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Sample records for binuclear metal center

  1. Structure and Bonding in Binuclear Metal Carbonyls. Classical Paradigms vs. Insights from Modern Theoretical Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 1053, SI (2015), s. 195-213 ISSN 2210-271X Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : binuclear metal carbonyls * DAFH analysis * 18-electron rule Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.403, year: 2015

  2. Synthesis, spectroscopic and biological activities studies of acyclic and macrocyclic mono and binuclear metal complexes containing a hard-soft Schiff base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Hussein, Azza A A; Linert, Wolfgang

    2012-09-01

    Mono- and bi-nuclear acyclic and macrocyclic complexes with hard-soft Schiff base, H(2)L, ligand derived from the reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and thiocabohydrazide, in the molar ratio 1:2 have been prepared. The H(2)L ligand reacts with Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), Mn(II) and UO(2)(VI) nitrates, VO(IV) sulfate and Ru(III) chloride to get acyclic binuclear complexes except for VO(IV) and Ru(III) which gave acyclic mono-nuclear complexes. Reaction of the acyclic mono-nuclear VO(IV) and Ru(III) complexes with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol afforded the corresponding macrocyclic mono-nuclear VO(IV) and Ru(IIII) complexes. Template reactions of the 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and thiocarbohydrazide with either VO(IV) or Ru(III) salts afforded the macrocyclic binuclear VO(IV) and Ru(III) complexes. The Schiff base, H(2)L, ligand acts as dibasic with two NSO-tridentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes after the deprotonation of the hydrogen atoms of the phenolic groups in all the complexes, except in the case of the acyclic mononuclear Ru(III) and VO(IV) complexes, where the Schiff base behaves as neutral tetradentate chelate with N(2)S(2) donor atoms. The ligands and the metal complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-vis (1)H-NMR, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and ESR, as well as the measurements of conductivity and magnetic moments at room temperature. Electronic spectra and magnetic moments of the complexes indicate the geometries of the metal centers are either tetrahedral, square planar or octahedral. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were calculated using Coats-Redfern equation, for the different thermal decomposition steps of the complexes. The ligands and the metal complexes were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus as Gram-positive bacteria, and Pseudomonas fluorescens as Gram-negative bacteria in addition to Fusarium oxysporum fungus. Most of the complexes exhibit

  3. Structural, spectral and biological studies of binuclear tetradentate metal complexes of N 3O Schiff base ligand synthesized from 4,6-diacetylresorcinol and diethylenetriamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emara, Adel A. A.

    2010-09-01

    The binuclear Schiff base, H 2L, ligand was synthesized by reaction of 4,6-diacetylresorcinol with diethylenetriamine in the molar ratio 1:2. The coordination behavior of the H 2L towards Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Zn(II), Fe(III), Cr(III), VO(IV) and UO 2(VI) ions has been investigated. The elemental analyses, magnetic moments, thermal studies and IR, electronic, 1H NMR, ESR and mass spectra were used to characterize the isolated ligand and its metal complexes. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N 3O-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The bonding sites are the nitrogen atoms of the azomethine and amine groups and the oxygen atoms of the phenolic groups. The metal complexes exhibit either square planar, tetrahedral, square pyramid or octahedral structures. The Schiff base ligand and its metal complexes were tested against four pathogenic bacteria ( Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) as Gram-positive bacteria, and ( Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas phaseolicola) as Gram-negative bacteria and two pathogenic fungi ( Fusarium oxysporum and Aspergillus fumigatus) to assess their antimicrobial properties. Most of the complexes exhibit mild antibacterial and antifungal activities against these organisms.

  4. Highly sensitive colour change system within slight differences in metal ion concentrations based on homo-binuclear complex formation equilibrium for visual threshold detection of trace metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, Hitoshi; Atsumi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Keigo; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Kudo, Yuki; Endo, Masatoshi; Yokota, Fumihiko; Shida, Junichi; Yotsuyanagi, Takao

    2004-01-01

    A new technique of expressing slight differences in metal ion concentrations by clear difference in colour was established for visual threshold detection of trace metal ions. The proposed method is based on rapid change of the mole fraction of the homo-binuclear complex (M 2 L) about a ligand in a narrow range of the total metal ion concentration (M T ) in a small excess, in case the second metal ion is bound to the reagent molecule which can bind two metal ions. Theoretical simulations showed that the highly sensitive colour change within slight differences in metal ion concentrations would be realized under the following conditions: (i) both of the stepwise formation constants of complex species are sufficiently large; (ii) the stepwise formation constant of the 1:1 complex (ML) is larger than that of M 2 L; and (iii) the absorption spectrum of M 2 L is far apart from the other species in the visible region. Furthermore, the boundary of the colour region in M T would be readily controlled by the total ligand concentration (L T ). Based on this theory, the proposed model was verified with the 3,3'-bis[bis(carboxymethyl)amino]methyl derivatives of sulphonephthalein dyes such as xylenol orange (XO), methylthymol blue (MTB), and methylxylenol blue (MXB), which can bind two metal ions at both ends of a π-electron conjugated system. The above-mentioned model was proved with the iron(III)-XO system at pH 2. In addition, MTB and MXB were suitable reagents for the visual threshold detection of trivalent metal ions such as iron(III), aluminium(III), gallium(III) and indium(III) ion in slightly acidic media. The proposed method has been applied successfully as a screening test for aluminium(III) ion in river water sampled at the downstream area of an old mine

  5. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 3,4-disubstituted phenol ... M. Avanta G.B.C., Australia atomic absorption spectrophotometer. .... hydroxide. ... in OH bridged complexes may give rise to poor ligand–metal orbital overlap. The.

  6. Tetradentate-arm Schiff base derived from the condensation reaction of 3,3′-dihydroxybenzidine, glyoxal/diacetyl and 2-aminophenol: Designing, structural elucidation and properties of their binuclear metal(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Akila

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The novel binuclear Schiff base complexes were prepared by the reaction of 3,3′-dihydroxybenzidine, glyoxal/diacetyl and 2-aminophenol in 1:2:2 M ratio. The binucleating Schiff base ligand and its complexes of Cu(II, Ni(II and VO(II ions were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, 1H NMR, infrared, electronic spectra, cyclic voltammetry, thermal, magnetic and EPR studies. The low molar conductance values of the complexes support the non-electrolytic in nature. In IR spectra, the comparison of shift in frequency of the complexes with the ligand reveals the coordination of donor atom to the metal atom. The binuclear nature of the complexes is assessed from their magnetic susceptibility values. The electronic and EPR spectra of the metal complexes provide information about the geometry of the complexes and are in good agreement with the proposed square planar geometry for Cu(II, Ni(II and square pyramidal for VO(II complexes. Molecular modeling has been used to suggest the structure of the complexes. The DNA cleavage ability of the complexes was monitored by gel electrophoresis using supercoiled pUC18 DNA. The metal complexes were screened for their antibacterial activities against pathogenic bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis. The activity data show that the metal complexes are more potent activity than the parent Schiff base ligand against microorganisms.

  7. XAFS Study of the Ferro- and Antiferromagnetic Binuclear Copper(II) Complexes of Azomethine Based Tridentate Ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasenko, Valery G.; Vasilchenko, Igor S.; Shestakova, Tatiana E.; Uraev, Ali I.; Burlov, Anatolii S.; Garnovskii, Alexander D.; Pirog, Irina V.

    2007-01-01

    Binuclear copper complexes are known to be models for metalloenzymes containing copper active sites, and some of them are of considerable interest due to their magnetic and charge transfer properties. The reactions of the complex formation of bibasic tridentate heterocyclic imines with copper acetate leads to two types of chelates with mono deprotonated ligands and with totally deprotonated ligands. Cu K-edge EXAFS has been applied to determine the local structure around the metal center in copper(II) azomethine complexes with five tridentate ligands: 1-(salycilideneimino)- or 1-(2-tosylaminobenzilideneimino)-2-amino(oxo, thio)benzimidazoles. It has been found that some of the chelates studied are bridged binuclear copper complexes, and others are mononuclear complexes. The copper-copper interatomic distances in the bridged binuclear copper complexes were found to be 2.85-3.01 A. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility data indicate the presence of both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic interactions within the dimer, the former is dominating at low temperatures and the latter at high temperatures

  8. Binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides supported by cyclooctatetraene ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Shi, Wei-Qun; Gibson, John K.

    2017-01-01

    Although the first organoactinide chloride Cp_3UCl (Cp = η"5-C_5H_5) was synthesized more than 50 years ago, binuclear uranium halides remain very rare in organoactinide chemistry. Herein, a series of binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides with cyclooctatetraene ligands, (COT)_2U_2X_n (COT = η"8-C_8H_8; X=F, Cl, CN; n=2, 4), have been systematically studied using scalar-relativistic density functional theory (DFT). The structures with bridging halide or cyanide ligands were predicted to be the most stable complexes of (COT)_2U_2X_n, and all the complexes show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the uranium centers. However, for each species, there is no significant uranium-uranium bonding interaction. The bonding between the metal and the ligands shows some degree of covalent character, especially between the metal and terminal halide or cyanide ligands. The U-5f and 6d orbitals are predominantly involved in the metal-ligand bonding. All the (COT)_2U_2X_n species were predicted to be more stable compared to the mononuclear half-sandwich complexes at room temperature in the gas phase such that (COT)_2U_2X_4 might be accessible through the known (COT)_2U complex. The tetravalent derivatives (COT)_2U_2X_4 are more energetically favorable than the trivalent (COT)_2U_2X_2 analogs, which may be attributed to the greater number of strong metal-ligand bonds in the former complexes.

  9. Binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides supported by cyclooctatetraene ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Cong-Zhi; Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Shi, Wei-Qun [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety; Chai, Zhi-Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety; Soochow Univ., Suzhou (China). School of Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X); Gibson, John K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division

    2017-03-01

    Although the first organoactinide chloride Cp{sub 3}UCl (Cp = η{sup 5}-C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) was synthesized more than 50 years ago, binuclear uranium halides remain very rare in organoactinide chemistry. Herein, a series of binuclear trivalent and tetravalent uranium halides and cyanides with cyclooctatetraene ligands, (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub n} (COT = η{sup 8}-C{sub 8}H{sub 8}; X=F, Cl, CN; n=2, 4), have been systematically studied using scalar-relativistic density functional theory (DFT). The structures with bridging halide or cyanide ligands were predicted to be the most stable complexes of (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub n}, and all the complexes show weak antiferromagnetic interactions between the uranium centers. However, for each species, there is no significant uranium-uranium bonding interaction. The bonding between the metal and the ligands shows some degree of covalent character, especially between the metal and terminal halide or cyanide ligands. The U-5f and 6d orbitals are predominantly involved in the metal-ligand bonding. All the (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub n} species were predicted to be more stable compared to the mononuclear half-sandwich complexes at room temperature in the gas phase such that (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub 4} might be accessible through the known (COT){sub 2}U complex. The tetravalent derivatives (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub 4} are more energetically favorable than the trivalent (COT){sub 2}U{sub 2}X{sub 2} analogs, which may be attributed to the greater number of strong metal-ligand bonds in the former complexes.

  10. Visible Light Absorption of Binuclear TiOCoII Charge-Transfer UnitAssembled in Mesoporous Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

    2007-01-30

    Grafting of CoII(NCCH3)2Cl2 onto mesoporous Ti-MCM-41 silicain acetonitrile solution affords binuclear Ti-O-CoII sites on the poresurface under complete replacement of the precursor ligands byinteractions with anchored Ti centers and the silica surface. The CoIIligand field spectrum signals that the Co centers are anchored on thepore surface in tetrahedral coordination. FT-infrared action spectroscopyusing ammonia gas adsorption reveals Co-O-Si bond modes at 831 and 762cm-1. No Co oxide clusters are observed in the as-synthesized material.The bimetallic moieties feature an absorption extending from the UV intothe visible to about 600 nm which is attributed to the TiIV-O-CoII?3TiIII-O-CoIII metal-to-metal charge-transfer (MMCT) transition. Thechromophore is absent in MCM-41 containing Ti and Co centers isolatedfrom each other; this material was synthesized by grafting CoII onto aTi-MCM-41 sample with the Ti centers protected by a cyclopentadienylligand. The result indicates that the appearance of the charge-transferabsorption requires that the metal centers are linked by an oxo bridge,which is additionally supported by XANES spectroscopy. The MMCTchromophore of Ti-O-CoII units has sufficient oxidation power to serve asvisible light electron pump for driving multi-electron transfer catalystsof demanding uphill reactions such as water oxidation.

  11. Unusual Metals in Galactic Center Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Kerry

    2018-03-01

    Far from the galactic suburbs where the Sun resides, a cluster of stars in the nucleus of the Milky Way orbits a supermassive black hole. Can chemical abundance measurements help us understand the formation history of the galactic center nuclear star cluster?Studying Stellar PopulationsMetallicity distributions for stars in the inner two degrees of the Milky Way (blue) and the central parsec (orange). [Do et al. 2018]While many galaxies host nuclear star clusters, most are too distant for us to study in detail; only in the Milky Way can we resolve individual stars within one parsec of a supermassive black hole. The nucleus of our galaxy is an exotic and dangerous place, and its not yet clear how these stars came to be where they are were they siphoned off from other parts of the galaxy, or did they form in place, in an environment rocked by tidal forces?Studying the chemical abundances of stars provides a way to separate distinct stellar populations and discern when and where these stars formed. Previous studies using medium-resolution spectroscopy have revealed that many stars within the central parsec of our galaxy have very high metallicities possibly higher than any other region of the Milky Way. Can high-resolution spectroscopy tell us more about this unusual population of stars?Spectral Lines on DisplayTuan Do (University of California, Los Angeles, Galactic Center Group) and collaborators performed high-resolution spectroscopic observations of two late-type giant starslocated half a parsec from the Milky Ways supermassive black hole.Comparison of the observed spectra of the two galactic center stars (black) with synthetic spectra with low (blue) and high (orange) [Sc/Fe] values. Click to enlarge. [Do et al. 2018]In order to constrain the metallicities of these stars, Do and collaborators compared the observed spectra to a grid of synthetic spectra and used a spectral synthesis technique to determine the abundances of individual elements. They found that

  12. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Binuclear and Pentanuclear Nickel(II Complexes Containing 4-(salicylaldiminatoantipyrine Schiff base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed N. EL-Kaheli

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The new title binuclear Ni (II compound  (1 and the novel pentanuclear Ni (II cluster {[   } (2 are formed from the reaction of an asymmetric Schiff base ligand L (L = 4-(salicylaldiminatoantipyrine with Ni .4  in the former or Ni(ClO42.6H2O in presence of malonate in the later.  Complex (1 consists of ( ]+ cation and one uncoordinated tetraphenylborate anion.  The cation adopts a distorted octahedral arrangement around each metal center.  In the binuclear unit both Ni(II ions are linked through two phenolate (µ2-O oxygen atoms of L, and two oxygen atoms of a  bridging carboxylate group. Each Ni (II coordinates to four oxygen atoms at the basal plane, two oxygen atoms from two bridging phenolate groups, one from pyrazolone ring and the last of an aqua molecule, and at the axial positions to a bridging carboxylate-O atom and an azomethine nitrogen atom.  In the pentanuclear cluster (2 consisting of [ ]+2 cation and two tetraphenylborate anions, the core of the cation is assembled by four [Ni( ] units, linked to the central Ni-ion by two bridging water molecules. The resulting coordination sphere for the external symmetry related nickel ions is a pseudo octahedron.  The central Ni-atom unusually adopts dodecahedron geometry through its coordination to eight bridging water molecules. In complex (1 each Ni-atom is coordinated to one tridentate L ligand and in complex (2 each [Ni ( ] unit is coordinated to two bidentate L ligands.  Inter-and intramolecular hydrogen bonds are present in both crystal structures.

  13. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear copper(II) complexes ... to the oxidation of 3,5-di--butylcatechol to the corresponding quinone. ... EPR spectral studies in methanol solvent show welldefined four hyperfine ...

  14. Caltech Center for Structural and Amorphous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-10

    Flores, D. Suh, R. Howell, P. Asoka -Kumar, P.A. Sterne, and R. H. Dauskardt, "Flow and Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys and Their Composites...Behavior of Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni-Be Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys," Materials Transactions, JIM, 42 [4], 638-641, 2001. K. M. Flores, D. Suh, P. Asoka -Kumar, P.A...Materials Research, 17[5], 1153-1161, 2002. D. Suh, P. Asoka -Kumar and R. H. Dauskardt, "The Effects of Hydrogen on Viscoelastic Relaxation in Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu

  15. Synthesis, characterization, X-ray crystal structure and conductometry studying of a number of new Schiff base complexes; a new example of binuclear square pyramidal geometry of Cu(II) complex bridged with an oxo group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golbedaghi, Reza; Alavipour, Ehsan

    2015-11-01

    Three new binuclear Cu(II), Mn(II), Co(II) complexes [Cu2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (1), [Mn2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (2), and [Co2(L) (ClO4)](ClO4)2 (3), {L = 1,3-bis(2-((Z)-(2-aminopropylimino)methyl)phenoxy)propan-2-ol} have been synthesized. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis of complex 1 showed that the complex is binuclear and all nitrogen and oxygen atoms of ligand (N4O3) are coordinated to two Cu(II) center ions. In addition, the crystal structure studying shows, a perchlorate ion has been bridged to the Cu(II) metal centers. However, two distorted square pyramidal Cu(II) ions are bridged asymmetrically by a perchlorate ion and oxygen of hydroxyl group of Schiff base ligand. In addition, the conductometry behaviors of all complexes were studied in acetonitrile solution.

  16. CD/MCD/VTVH-MCD Studies of Escherichia coli Bacterioferritin Support a Binuclear Iron Cofactor Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yeonju; Schwartz, Jennifer K; Huang, Victor W; Boice, Emily; Kurtz, Donald M; Solomon, Edward I

    2015-12-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins (Bfrs) utilize a binuclear non-heme iron binding site to catalyze oxidation of Fe(II), leading to formation of an iron mineral core within a protein shell. Unlike ferritins, in which the diiron site binds Fe(II) as a substrate, which then autoxidizes and migrates to the mineral core, the diiron site in Bfr has a 2-His/4-carboxylate ligand set that is commonly found in diiron cofactor enzymes. Bfrs could, therefore, utilize the diiron site as a cofactor rather than for substrate iron binding. In this study, we applied circular dichroism (CD), magnetic CD (MCD), and variable-temperature, variable-field MCD (VTVH-MCD) spectroscopies to define the geometric and electronic structures of the biferrous active site in Escherichia coli Bfr. For these studies, we used an engineered M52L variant, which is known to eliminate binding of a heme cofactor but to have very minor effects on either iron oxidation or mineral core formation. We also examined an H46A/D50A/M52L Bfr variant, which additionally disrupts a previously observed mononuclear non-heme iron binding site inside the protein shell. The spectral analyses define a binuclear and an additional mononuclear ferrous site. The biferrous site shows two different five-coordinate centers. After O2 oxidation and re-reduction, only the mononuclear ferrous signal is eliminated. The retention of the biferrous but not the mononuclear ferrous site upon O2 cycling supports a mechanism in which the binuclear site acts as a cofactor for the O2 reaction, while the mononuclear site binds the substrate Fe(II) that, after its oxidation to Fe(III), migrates to the mineral core.

  17. Oxo-group-14-element bond formation in binuclear uranium(V) pacman complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Guy M.; Arnold, Polly L.; Love, Jason B.

    2013-01-01

    Simple and versatile routes to the functionalization of uranyl-derived U"V-oxo groups are presented. The oxo-lithiated, binuclear uranium(V)-oxo complexes [{(py)_3LiOUO}_2(L)] and [{(py)_3LiOUO}(OUOSiMe_3)(L)] were prepared by the direct combination of the uranyl(VI) silylamide ''ate'' complex [Li(py)_2][(OUO)(N'')_3](N''=N(SiMe_3)_2) with the polypyrrolic macrocycle H_4L or the mononuclear uranyl (VI) Pacman complex [UO_2(py)(H_2L)], respectively. These oxo-metalated complexes display distinct U-O single and multiple bonding patterns and an axial/equatorial arrangement of oxo ligands. Their ready availability allows the direct functionalization of the uranyl oxo group leading to the binuclear uranium(V) oxo-stannylated complexes [{(R_3Sn)OUO}_2(L)] (R=nBu, Ph), which represent rare examples of mixed uranium/tin complexes. Also, uranium-oxo-group exchange occurred in reactions with [TiCl(OiPr)_3] to form U-O-C bonds [{(py)_3LiOUO}(OUOiPr)(L)] and [(iPrOUO)_2(L)]. Overall, these represent the first family of uranium(V) complexes that are oxo-functionalised by Group 14 elements. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Synergy and destructive interferences between local magnetic anisotropies in binuclear complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guihéry, Nathalie; Ruamps, Renaud [Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques, UMR5625, University of Toulouse 3, Paul Sabatier, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Maurice, Rémi [SUBATECH, IN2P3/EMN Nantes/University of Nantes, 4 rue Alfred Kastler, BP 20722 44307, Nantes, Cedex 3 (France); Graaf, Coen de [University Rovira i Virgili, Marcelli Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain)

    2015-12-31

    Magnetic anisotropy is responsible for the single molecule magnet behavior of transition metal complexes. This behavior is characterized by a slow relaxation of the magnetization for low enough temperatures, and thus for a possible blocking of the magnetization. This bistable behavior can lead to possible technological applications in the domain of data storage or quantum computing. Therefore, the understanding of the microscopic origin of magnetic anisotropy has received a considerable interest during the last two decades. The presentation focuses on the determination of the anisotropy parameters of both mono-nuclear and bi-nuclear types of complexes and on the control and optimization of the anisotropic properties. The validity of the model Hamiltonians commonly used to characterize such complexes has been questioned and it is shown that neither the standard multispin Hamiltonian nor the giant spin Hamiltonian are appropriate for weakly coupled ions. Alternative models have been proposed and used to properly extract the relevant parameters. Rationalizations of the magnitude and nature of both local anisotropies of single ions and the molecular anisotropy of polynuclear complexes are provided. The synergy and interference effects between local magnetic anisotropies are studied in a series of binuclear complexes.

  19. Synthesis, spectral characterization and structural studies of a novel O, N, O donor semicarbazone and its binuclear copper complex with hydrogen bond stabilized lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layana, S. R.; Saritha, S. R.; Anitha, L.; Sithambaresan, M.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Suma, S.

    2018-04-01

    A novel O,N,O donor salicylaldehyde-N4-phenylsemicarbazone, (H2L) has been synthesized and physicochemically characterized. Detailed structural studies of H2L using single crystal X-ray diffraction technique reveals the existence of intra and inter molecular hydrogen bonding interactions, which provide extra stability to the molecule. We have successfully synthesized a binuclear copper(II) complex, [Cu2(HL)2(NO3)(H2O)2]NO3 with phenoxy bridging between the two copper centers. The complex was characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility and conductivity measurements, FT-IR, UV-Visible, mass and EPR spectral methods. The grown crystals of the copper complex were employed for the single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The complex possesses geometrically different metal centers, in which the ligand coordinates through ketoamide oxygen, azomethine nitrogen and deprotonated phenoxy oxygen. The extensive intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions of the coordinated and the lattice nitrate groups interconnect the complex units to form a 2D supramolecular assembly. The ESI mass spectrum substantiates the existence of 1:1 complex. The g values obtained from the EPR spectrum in frozen DMF suggest dx2 -y2 ground state for the unpaired electron.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of a new complex binuclear of binuclear of Pd(II) containing the antibiotic oxy tetracycline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerra, Wendell; Fontes, Ana Paula Soares; Pereira-Maia, Elene Cristina

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the synthesis and characterization of a new binuclear complex of palladium (II) containing the antibiotic oxytetracycline. The complex was characterized by the usual techniques of analysis. With respect to sites of coordination, the IR spectral data suggests the involvement the oxygen of the amide group and the oxygen of the neighbor hydroxyl group at ring A and to the carbonyl oxygen at C11 and the hydroxyl group at C12. (author)

  1. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  2. Oxo-group-14-element bond formation in binuclear uranium(V) pacman complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Guy M.; Arnold, Polly L.; Love, Jason B. [EaStCHEM School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-29

    Simple and versatile routes to the functionalization of uranyl-derived U{sup V}-oxo groups are presented. The oxo-lithiated, binuclear uranium(V)-oxo complexes [{(py)_3LiOUO}{sub 2}(L)] and [{(py)_3LiOUO}(OUOSiMe{sub 3})(L)] were prepared by the direct combination of the uranyl(VI) silylamide ''ate'' complex [Li(py){sub 2}][(OUO)(N''){sub 3}](N''=N(SiMe{sub 3}){sub 2}) with the polypyrrolic macrocycle H{sub 4}L or the mononuclear uranyl (VI) Pacman complex [UO{sub 2}(py)(H{sub 2}L)], respectively. These oxo-metalated complexes display distinct U-O single and multiple bonding patterns and an axial/equatorial arrangement of oxo ligands. Their ready availability allows the direct functionalization of the uranyl oxo group leading to the binuclear uranium(V) oxo-stannylated complexes [{(R_3Sn)OUO}{sub 2}(L)] (R=nBu, Ph), which represent rare examples of mixed uranium/tin complexes. Also, uranium-oxo-group exchange occurred in reactions with [TiCl(OiPr){sub 3}] to form U-O-C bonds [{(py)_3LiOUO}(OUOiPr)(L)] and [(iPrOUO){sub 2}(L)]. Overall, these represent the first family of uranium(V) complexes that are oxo-functionalised by Group 14 elements. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence Metal Hydride Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-05-31

    The Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) was established in 2009 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance the development of materials-based hydrogen storage systems for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. The overall objective of the HSECoE is to develop complete, integrated system concepts that utilize reversible metal hydrides, adsorbents, and chemical hydrogen storage materials through the use of advanced engineering concepts and designs that can simultaneously meet or exceed all the DOE targets. This report describes the activities and accomplishments during Phase 1 of the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE, which lasted 30 months from February 2009 to August 2011. A complete list of all the HSECoE partners can be found later in this report but for the reversible metal hydride portion of the HSECoE work the major contributing organizations to this effort were the United Technology Research Center (UTRC), General Motors (GM), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Specific individuals from these and other institutions that supported this effort and the writing of this report are included in the list of contributors and in the acknowledgement sections of this report. The efforts of the HSECoE are organized into three phases each approximately 2 years in duration. In Phase I, comprehensive system engineering analyses and assessments were made of the three classes of storage media that included development of system level transport and thermal models of alternative conceptual storage configurations to permit detailed comparisons against the DOE performance targets for light-duty vehicles. Phase 1 tasks also included identification and technical justifications for candidate storage media and configurations that should be capable of reaching or exceeding the DOE targets. Phase 2 involved bench-level testing and

  4. Preparation and properties of mononuclear and binuclear uranyl(VI), thorium(IV) and transition d ions complexes with multidentate Schiff bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidali, M; Casellato, U; Vigato, P A; Doretti, L; Madalosso, F [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi

    1977-01-01

    The preparation, physical and chemical properties of a variety of mononuclear and binuclear complexes containing Schiff base ligands derived from 3-formylsalicylic acid and diamines are reported. The Schiff bases have six potential donor atoms and can function as tetrabasic ligands. In the mononuclear complexes the copper(II) and nickel(II) ions occupy the N/sub 2/O/sub 2/ donor set and the uranyl(VI) ion the O/sub 2/O/sub 2/ one. Both types of complexes can act as ligand toward transition metal ions to form complexes with a binuclear structure connected by two phenolic oxygens. The complexes have been characterized by magnetic measurements and by IR and visible spectral methods.

  5. MAGNETIC INVESTIGATION OF AN UNUSUAL DISSYMMETRIC BINUCLEAR MANGANESE CARBOXYLATE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghenadie Novitchi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic susceptibility (χT of an unusual dissymmetric binuclear manganese corboxylate complex has been measured from 2 to 300K. The magnetic data which have been fitted with help of the Heisenberg Dirac Van Vleck HDVV spin-exchange Hamiltonian H = − J S 1 S 2 , indicate that an antiferromagnetic interaction equal to J = -0.90(1 cm-1 is present. A correlation between J values and Mn-H2O-Mn angles has been tempted.

  6. Chemical rescue of the post-translationally carboxylated lysine mutant of allantoinase and dihydroorotase by metal ions and short-chain carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ya-Yeh; Huang, Yen-Hua; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2013-04-01

    Bacterial allantoinase (ALLase) and dihydroorotase (DHOase) are members of the cyclic amidohydrolase family. ALLase and DHOase possess similar binuclear metal centers in the active site in which two metals are bridged by a post-translationally carboxylated lysine. In this study, we determined the effects of carboxylated lysine and metal binding on the activities of ALLase and DHOase. Although DHOase is a metalloenzyme, purified DHOase showed high activity without additional metal supplementation in a reaction mixture or bacterial culture. However, unlike DHOase, ALLase had no activity unless some specific metal ions were added to the reaction mixture or culture. Substituting the metal binding sites H59, H61, K146, H186, H242, or D315 with alanine completely abolished the activity of ALLase. However, the K146C, K146D and K146E mutants of ALLase were still active with about 1-6% activity of the wild-type enzyme. These ALLase K146 mutants were found to have 1.4-1.7 mol metal per mole enzyme subunit, which may indicate that they still contained the binuclear metal center in the active site. The activity of the K146A mutant of the ALLase and the K103A mutant of DHOase can be chemically rescued by short-chain carboxylic acids, such as acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, but not by ethanol, propan-1-ol, and imidazole, in the presence of Co2+ or Mn2+ ions. However, the activity was still ~10-fold less than that of wild-type ALLase. Overall, these results indicated that the 20 natural basic amino acid residues were not sufficiently able to play the role of lysine. Accordingly, we proposed that during evolution, the post-translational modification of carboxylated lysine in the cyclic amidohydrolase family was selected for promoting binuclear metal center self-assembly and increasing the nucleophilicity of the hydroxide at the active site for enzyme catalysis. This kind of chemical rescue combined with site-directed mutagenesis may also be used to identify a binuclear metal

  7. Energy landscape of defects in body-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The structural materials in nuclear reactors are subjected to severe irradiation conditions, leading to changes in their mechanical properties. The aging of these materials raises important issues such as those related to the safety of existing plants and future reactors. In many cases, materials with body-centered cubic bcc crystal structure are used with iron, tungsten, vanadium and tantalum as base metal. Collisions between irradiating particles and atoms constituting materials generate point defects whose migration leads to the formation of clusters responsible for aging. In this thesis, we studied the energetic properties of point defects in the bcc metals mentioned above at the atomic scale. Modeling point defects at the atomic scale can be achieved with different methods that differ only in the quality of the description of the interaction between atoms. Studies using accurate atomic interactions such ab initio calculations are computationally costly making it impossible to directly study clusters of large sizes. The modeling of atomic interactions using semi-empirical potentials reduces the reliability of predictive calculations but allow calculations for large-sized clusters. In this thesis we have developed a unique energy model for dislocation loops as well as for three-dimensional interstitial cluster of type C15. The resulting model has no size limit and can be set entirely by ab initio calculations. To test its robustness for large sizes of clusters we also set this model with semi-empirical potentials calculations and compared the predictions of the model to atomic simulations. With our development we have determined: (i) The relative stability of interstitial dislocation loops according to their Burgers vectors. (ii) The stability of the clusters C15 compared to the type of cluster loop. We showed that the C15 type clusters are more stable when they involve less than 41 interstitials in iron. (iii) In Ta we were able to show the same stability till

  8. A study of binuclear zirconium hydride catalysts of the hydrogenolysis of alkanes by the density functional theory method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustynyuk, L. Yu.; Fast, A. S.; Ustynyuk, Yu. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2012-06-01

    Binuclear hydride centers containing two Zr(IV) atoms are suggested as promising catalysts for the hydrogenolysis of alkanes under mild conditions ( T model compounds L2(H)Zr(X)2Zr(H)L2 (X = H, L = OSi≡ ( 4a), X = L = OMe ( 4d)), L(H)Zr(O)2Zr(H)L (L = OSi≡ ( 4b), Cp( 4c)) and (≡SiO)2(H)Zr-O-Zr(H)(OSi≡)2 ( 4e and 4f) with the propane molecule were studied using the density functional theory method. The results show that centers of the 4a, 4e, and 4f types and especially 4b are promising catalysts of the hydrogenolysis of alkanes due to a high degree of unsaturation of two Zr atoms and their sequential participation in the splitting of the C-C bond and hydrogenation of ethylene formed as a result of splitting.

  9. A general reaction mechanism for carbapenem hydrolysis by mononuclear and binuclear metallo-β-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa, María-Natalia; Palacios, Antonela R; Aitha, Mahesh; González, Mariano M; Moreno, Diego M; Crowder, Michael W; Bonomo, Robert A; Spencer, James; Tierney, David L; Llarrull, Leticia I; Vila, Alejandro J

    2017-09-14

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae threaten human health, since carbapenems are last resort drugs for infections by such organisms. Metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs) are the main mechanism of resistance against carbapenems. Clinically approved inhibitors of MBLs are currently unavailable as design has been limited by the incomplete knowledge of their mechanism. Here, we report a biochemical and biophysical study of carbapenem hydrolysis by the B1 enzymes NDM-1 and BcII in the bi-Zn(II) form, the mono-Zn(II) B2 Sfh-I and the mono-Zn(II) B3 GOB-18. These MβLs hydrolyse carbapenems via a similar mechanism, with accumulation of the same anionic intermediates. We characterize the Michaelis complex formed by mono-Zn(II) enzymes, and we identify all intermediate species, enabling us to propose a chemical mechanism for mono and binuclear MβLs. This common mechanism open avenues for rationally designed inhibitors of all MβLs, notwithstanding the profound differences between these enzymes' active site structure, β-lactam specificity and metal content.Carbapenem-resistant bacteria pose a major health threat by expressing metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs), enzymes able to hydrolyse these life-saving drugs. Here the authors use biophysical and computational methods and show that different MβLs share the same reaction mechanism, suggesting new strategies for drug design.

  10. Calculation of the exchange coupling constants of copper binuclear systems based on spin-flip constricted variational density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhekova, Hristina R; Seth, Michael; Ziegler, Tom

    2011-11-14

    We have recently developed a methodology for the calculation of exchange coupling constants J in weakly interacting polynuclear metal clusters. The method is based on unrestricted and restricted second order spin-flip constricted variational density functional theory (SF-CV(2)-DFT) and is here applied to eight binuclear copper systems. Comparison of the SF-CV(2)-DFT results with experiment and with results obtained from other DFT and wave function based methods has been made. Restricted SF-CV(2)-DFT with the BH&HLYP functional yields consistently J values in excellent agreement with experiment. The results acquired from this scheme are comparable in quality to those obtained by accurate multi-reference wave function methodologies such as difference dedicated configuration interaction and the complete active space with second-order perturbation theory. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  11. A new crystal form of Aspergillus oryzae catechol oxidase and evaluation of copper site structures in coupled binuclear copper enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Leena; Rutanen, Chiara; Saloheimo, Markku; Kruus, Kristiina; Rouvinen, Juha; Hakulinen, Nina

    2018-01-01

    Coupled binuclear copper (CBC) enzymes have a conserved type 3 copper site that binds molecular oxygen to oxidize various mono- and diphenolic compounds. In this study, we found a new crystal form of catechol oxidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoCO4) and solved two new structures from two different crystals at 1.8-Å and at 2.5-Å resolutions. These structures showed different copper site forms (met/deoxy and deoxy) and also differed from the copper site observed in the previously solved structure of AoCO4. We also analysed the electron density maps of all of the 56 CBC enzyme structures available in the protein data bank (PDB) and found that many of the published structures have vague copper sites. Some of the copper sites were then re-refined to find a better fit to the observed electron density. General problems in the refinement of metalloproteins and metal centres are discussed.

  12. A new crystal form of Aspergillus oryzae catechol oxidase and evaluation of copper site structures in coupled binuclear copper enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Penttinen

    Full Text Available Coupled binuclear copper (CBC enzymes have a conserved type 3 copper site that binds molecular oxygen to oxidize various mono- and diphenolic compounds. In this study, we found a new crystal form of catechol oxidase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoCO4 and solved two new structures from two different crystals at 1.8-Å and at 2.5-Å resolutions. These structures showed different copper site forms (met/deoxy and deoxy and also differed from the copper site observed in the previously solved structure of AoCO4. We also analysed the electron density maps of all of the 56 CBC enzyme structures available in the protein data bank (PDB and found that many of the published structures have vague copper sites. Some of the copper sites were then re-refined to find a better fit to the observed electron density. General problems in the refinement of metalloproteins and metal centres are discussed.

  13. Chalcogenide metal centers for oxygen reduction reaction: Activity and tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yongjun; Gago, Aldo; Timperman, Laure; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This mini-review summarizes materials design methods, oxygen reduction kinetics, tolerance to small organic molecules and fuel cell performance of chalcogenide metal catalysts, particularly, ruthenium (Ru x Se y ) and non-precious transition metals (M x X y : M = Co, Fe and Ni; X = Se and S). These non-platinum catalysts are potential alternatives to Pt-based catalysts because of their comparable catalytic activity (Ru x Se y ), low cost, high abundance and, in particular, a high tolerance to small organic molecules. Developing trends of synthesis methods, mechanism of oxygen reduction reaction and applications in direct alcohol fuel cells as well as the substrate effect are highlighted.

  14. Economizer Based Data Center Liquid Cooling with Advanced Metal Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Chainer

    2012-11-30

    A new chiller-less data center liquid cooling system utilizing the outside air environment has been shown to achieve up to 90% reduction in cooling energy compared to traditional chiller based data center cooling systems. The system removes heat from Volume servers inside a Sealed Rack and transports the heat using a liquid loop to an Outdoor Heat Exchanger which rejects the heat to the outdoor ambient environment. The servers in the rack are cooled using a hybrid cooling system by removing the majority of the heat generated by the processors and memory by direct thermal conduction using coldplates and the heat generated by the remaining components using forced air convection to an air- to- liquid heat exchanger inside the Sealed Rack. The anticipated benefits of such energy-centric configurations are significant energy savings at the data center level. When compared to a traditional 10 MW data center, which typically uses 25% of its total data center energy consumption for cooling this technology could potentially enable a cost savings of up to $800,000-$2,200,000/year (assuming electricity costs of 4 to 11 cents per kilowatt-hour) through the reduction in electrical energy usage.

  15. Electronic structure of binuclear acetylacetonates of boron difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Sergey A.; Svistunova, Irina V.; Samoilov, Ilya S.; Osmushko, Ivan S.; Borisenko, Aleksandr V.; Vovna, Vitaliy I.

    2018-05-01

    The electronic structure of boron difluoride acetylacetonate and its three derivatives was studied using photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy, as well as the density functional theory. In a series of binuclear acetylacetonate complexes containing bridge-moieties of sulfur and selenium atoms, it was found an appreciable mixing of the π3-orbital of the chelate cycle with atomic orbitals S 3p and Se 4p resulting in destabilization of the HOMO levels by 0.4-0.6 eV, in comparison with the monomer. The positively charged fragment C(CH3)-CX-C(CH3) causes the field effect, which leads to stabilization of the LUMO levels by 0.3-0.4 eV and C 1s-levels by 0.5-1.2 eV. An analysis of the research results on the electronic structure made it possible to determine the effect of substituents in the γ position on the absorption spectra, which is mainly determined by the electron density transfer from the chalcogen atoms to the chelate cycles. It is shown that the calculated energy intervals between electron levels correlate well with the structure of the photoelectron spectra of valence and core electrons.

  16. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-l2 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer programs, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, provide pollution prevention information and documentation, and produce independent government estimates. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrapyard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums

  17. U.S. Department of Energy National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, V.; Bennett, M.; Bishop, L.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) National Center of Excellence for Metals Recycle has recently been established. The vision of this new program is to develop a DOE culture that promotes pollution prevention by considering the recycle and reuse of metal as the first and primary disposition option and burial as a last option. The Center of Excellence takes the approach that unrestricted release of metal is the first priority because it is the most cost-effective disposition pathway. Where this is not appropriate, restricted release, beneficial reuse, and stockpile of ingots are considered. The Center has gotten off to a fast start. Current recycling activities include the sale of 40,000 tons of scrap metal from the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly K-25 Plant) K-770 scrap yard, K-1064 surplus equipment and machinery, 7,000 PCB-contaminated drums, 12,000 tons of metal from the Y-12 scrap yard, and 1,000 metal pallets. In addition, the Center of Excellence is developing a toolbox for project teams that will contain a number of specific tools to facilitate metals recycle. This Internet-based toolbox will include primers, computer software, and case studies designed to help sites to perform life cycle analysis, perform ALARA (As Low As is Reasonably Achievable) analysis for radiation exposures, produce pollution prevention information and documentation, manage their materials inventory, produce independent government estimates, and implement sale/service contracts. The use of these tools is described for two current activities: disposition of scrap metal in the Y-12 scrap yard, and disposition of PCB-contaminated drums. Members of the Center look forward to working with all DOE sites, regulatory authorities, the private sector, and other stakeholders to achieve the metals recycle goals

  18. UTSA-74: A MOF-74 Isomer with Two Accessible Binding Sites per Metal Center for Highly Selective Gas Separation

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Feng

    2016-04-26

    A new metal-organic framework Zn2(H2O)-(dobdc)·0.5(H2O) (UTSA-74, H4dobdc = 2,5-dioxido-1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid), Zn-MOF-74/CPO-27-Zn isomer, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. It has a novel four coordinated fgl topology with one-dimensional channels of about 8.0 Å. Unlike metal sites in the wellestablished MOF-74 with a rod-packing structure in which each of them is in a five coordinate square pyramidal coordination geometry, there are two different Zn2+ sites within the binuclear secondary building units in UTSA-74 in which one of them (Zn1) is in a tetrahedral while another (Zn2) in an octahedral coordination geometry. After activation, the two axial water molecules on Zn2 sites can be removed, generating UTSA-74a with two accessible gas binding sites per Zn2 ion. Accordingly, UTSA-74a takes up a moderately high and comparable amount of acetylene (145 cm3/cm3) to Zn-MOF-74. Interestingly, the accessible Zn2+ sites in UTSA-74a are bridged by carbon dioxide molecules instead of being terminally bound in Zn-MOF-74, so UTSA-74a adsorbs a much smaller amount of carbon dioxide (90 cm3/cm3) than Zn-MOF-74 (146 cm3/cm3) at room temperature and 1 bar, leading to a superior MOF material for highly selective C2H2/CO2 separation. X-ray crystal structures, gas sorption isotherms, molecular modeling, and simulated and experimental breakthroughs comprehensively support this result. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  19. DFT calculations on N2O decomposition by binuclear Fe complexes in Fe/ZSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakovlev, A.L.; Zhidomirov, G.M.; Santen, van R.A.

    2001-01-01

    N2O decomposition catalyzed by oxidized Fe clusters localized in the micropores of Fe/ZSM-5 has been studied using the DFT approach and a binuclear cluster model of the active site. Three different reaction routes were found, depending on temperature and water pressure. The results show that below

  20. 75 FR 26791 - General Motors Company, Formerly Known as General Motors Corporation, Mansfield Metal Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...-Uniform Service, Cjbf, Llc, Ferrous Processing & Trading Co., Paragon Technologies and Severn Trent... leased from Aramark-Uniform Service, CJBF, LLC, Ferrous Processing & Trading Co., Paragon Technologies... Technologies and Severn Trent Services working on site at the Mansfield Metal Center, Mansfield, Ohio location...

  1. Synthesis and spectral characterization of mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 2-benzoylpyridine-N4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: Crystal structure of a novel sulfur bridged copper(II) box-dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K.; Sithambaresan, M.; Aiswarya, N.; Kurup, M. R. Prathapachandra

    2015-03-01

    Mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-N4-methyl thiosemicarbazone (HL) were prepared and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Structural evidence for the novel sulfur bridged copper(II) iodo binuclear complex is obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex [Cu2L2I2], a non-centrosymmetric box dimer, crystallizes in monoclinic C2/c space group and it was found to have distorted square pyramidal geometry (Addison parameter, τ = 0.238) with the square basal plane occupied by the thiosemicarbazone moiety and iodine atom whereas the sulfur atom from the other coordinated thiosemicarbazone moiety occupies the apical position. This is the first crystallographically studied system having non-centrosymmetrical entities bridged via thiolate S atoms with Cu(II)sbnd I bond. The tridentate thiosemicarbazone coordinates in mono deprotonated thionic tautomeric form in all complexes except in sulfato complex, [Cu(HL)(SO4)]·H2O (1) where it binds to the metal centre in neutral form. The magnetic moment values and the EPR spectral studies reflect the binuclearity of some of the complexes. The spin Hamiltonian and bonding parameters are calculated based on EPR studies. In all the complexes g|| > g⊥ > 2.0023 and the g values in frozen DMF are consistent with the dx2-y2 ground state. The thermal stabilities of some of the complexes were also determined.

  2. Synthesis and spectral characterization of mono- and binuclear copper(II) complexes derived from 2-benzoylpyridine-N⁴-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone: crystal structure of a novel sulfur bridged copper(II) box-dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, K; Sithambaresan, M; Aiswarya, N; Kurup, M R Prathapachandra

    2015-03-15

    Mononuclear and binuclear copper(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-N(4)-methyl thiosemicarbazone (HL) were prepared and characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques. Structural evidence for the novel sulfur bridged copper(II) iodo binuclear complex is obtained by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The complex [Cu2L2I2], a non-centrosymmetric box dimer, crystallizes in monoclinic C2/c space group and it was found to have distorted square pyramidal geometry (Addison parameter, τ=0.238) with the square basal plane occupied by the thiosemicarbazone moiety and iodine atom whereas the sulfur atom from the other coordinated thiosemicarbazone moiety occupies the apical position. This is the first crystallographically studied system having non-centrosymmetrical entities bridged via thiolate S atoms with Cu(II)I bond. The tridentate thiosemicarbazone coordinates in mono deprotonated thionic tautomeric form in all complexes except in sulfato complex, [Cu(HL)(SO4)]·H2O (1) where it binds to the metal centre in neutral form. The magnetic moment values and the EPR spectral studies reflect the binuclearity of some of the complexes. The spin Hamiltonian and bonding parameters are calculated based on EPR studies. In all the complexes g||>g⊥>2.0023 and the g values in frozen DMF are consistent with the d(x2-y2) ground state. The thermal stabilities of some of the complexes were also determined. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Shear response of Σ3{112} twin boundaries in face-centered-cubic metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Misra, A.; Hirth, J. P.

    2011-02-01

    Molecular statics and dynamics simulations were used to study the mechanisms of sliding and migration of Σ3{112} incoherent twin boundaries (ITBs) under applied shear acting in the boundary in the face-centered-cubic (fcc) metals, Ag, Cu, Pd, and Al, of varying stacking fault energies. These studies revealed that (i) ITBs can dissociate into two phase boundaries (PBs), bounding the hexagonal 9R phase, that contain different arrays of partial dislocations; (ii) the separation distance between the two PBs scales inversely with increasing stacking fault energy; (iii) for fcc metals with low stacking fault energy, one of the two PBs migrates through the collective glide of partials, referred to as the phase-boundary-migration (PBM) mechanism; (iv) for metals with high stacking energy, ITBs experience a coupled motion (migration and sliding) through the glide of interface disconnections, referred to as the interface-disconnection-glide (IDG) mechanism.

  4. Reconstitution of active mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase complex in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hayashi, Mika; Kino, Kuniki

    2013-10-01

    Bacterial binuclear iron monooxygenases play numerous physiological roles in oxidative metabolism. Monooxygenases of this type found in actinomycetes also catalyze various useful reactions and have attracted much attention as oxidation biocatalysts. However, difficulties in expressing these multicomponent monooxygenases in heterologous hosts, particularly in Escherichia coli, have hampered the development of engineered oxidation biocatalysts. Here, we describe a strategy to functionally express the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase MimABCD in Escherichia coli. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic analysis of the mimABCD gene expression in E. coli revealed that the oxygenase components MimA and MimC were insoluble. Furthermore, although the reductase MimB was expressed at a low level in the soluble fraction of E. coli cells, a band corresponding to the coupling protein MimD was not evident. This situation rendered the transformed E. coli cells inactive. We found that the following factors are important for functional expression of MimABCD in E. coli: coexpression of the specific chaperonin MimG, which caused MimA and MimC to be soluble in E. coli cells, and the optimization of the mimD nucleotide sequence, which led to efficient expression of this gene product. These two remedies enabled this multicomponent monooxygenase to be actively expressed in E. coli. The strategy described here should be generally applicable to the E. coli expression of other actinomycetous binuclear iron monooxygenases and related enzymes and will accelerate the development of engineered oxidation biocatalysts for industrial processes.

  5. White OLED using {beta}-diketones rare earth binuclear complex as emitting layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quirino, W.G. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Legnani, C. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Cremona, M. [LOEM, Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, P.O.Box 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil)]. E-mail: cremona@fis.puc-rio.br; Lima, P.P. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil); Junior, S.A. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil); Malta, O.L. [Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, UFPE-CCEN, Recife, PE, 50670-901 (Brazil)

    2006-01-03

    In this work, the fabrication and the characterization of a white triple-layer OLED using a {beta}-diketones binuclear complex [Eu(btfa){sub 3}phenterpyTb(acac){sub 3}] as the emitting layer is reported. The devices were assembled using a heterojunction between three organic molecular materials: the N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine (NPB) as hole-transporting layer, the {beta}-diketones binuclear complex and the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) as the electron transporting layer. All the organic layers were sequentially deposited under high vacuum environment by thermal evaporation onto ITO substrates and without breaking vacuum. Continuous electroluminescence emission was obtained varying the applied bias voltage from 10 to 22 V showing a wide emission band from 400 to 700 nm with about 100 cd/m{sup 2} of luminance. The white emission results from a combined action between the binuclear complex, acting as hole blocking and emitting layer, blue from NPB and the typical Alq{sub 3} green emission. The intensity ratio of the peaks is determined by the layer thickness and by the bias voltage applied to the OLED, allowing us to obtain a color tunable light source.

  6. White OLED using β-diketones rare earth binuclear complex as emitting layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quirino, W.G.; Legnani, C.; Cremona, M.; Lima, P.P.; Junior, S.A.; Malta, O.L.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the fabrication and the characterization of a white triple-layer OLED using a β-diketones binuclear complex [Eu(btfa) 3 phenterpyTb(acac) 3 ] as the emitting layer is reported. The devices were assembled using a heterojunction between three organic molecular materials: the N,N'-bis(naphthalen-1-yl)-N,N'-bis(phenyl)benzidine (NPB) as hole-transporting layer, the β-diketones binuclear complex and the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq 3 ) as the electron transporting layer. All the organic layers were sequentially deposited under high vacuum environment by thermal evaporation onto ITO substrates and without breaking vacuum. Continuous electroluminescence emission was obtained varying the applied bias voltage from 10 to 22 V showing a wide emission band from 400 to 700 nm with about 100 cd/m 2 of luminance. The white emission results from a combined action between the binuclear complex, acting as hole blocking and emitting layer, blue from NPB and the typical Alq 3 green emission. The intensity ratio of the peaks is determined by the layer thickness and by the bias voltage applied to the OLED, allowing us to obtain a color tunable light source

  7. High dose effects in neutron irradiated face-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Toloczko, M.B.

    1993-06-01

    During neutron irradiation, most face-centered cubic metals and alloys develop saturation or quasi-steady state microstructures. This, in turn, leads to saturation levels in mechanical properties and quasi-steady state rates of swelling and creep deformation. Swelling initially plays only a small role in determining these saturation states, but as swelling rises to higher levels, it exerts strong feedback on the microstructure and its response to environmental variables. The influence of swelling, either directly or indirectly via second order mechanisms, such as elemental segregation to void surfaces, eventually causes major changes, not only in irradiation creep and mechanical properties, but also on swelling itself. The feedback effects of swelling on irradiation creep are particularly complex and lead to problems in applying creep data derived from highly pressurized creep tubes to low stress situations, such as fuel pins in liquid metal reactors

  8. Migration energy barriers of symmetric tilt grain boundaries in body-centered cubic metal Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Minghui; Gu, Jianfeng; Jin, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: DFT calculated migration energy barrier (left) for symmetric grain boundary in metals is an essential physical property to measure the trend of grain boundary migration, in particular, in terms of the classical homogeneous nucleation model of GB dislocation/disconnection loops (right). - Migration energy barriers of two symmetric tilt grain boundaries in body-centered cubic metal Fe are obtained via first-principles calculations in combination with the nudged elastic band methods. Although the two grain boundaries show similar grain boundary energies, the migration energy barriers are different. Based on a homogeneous nucleation theory of grain-boundary dislocation loops, the calculated energy barrier provides a measure of intrinsic grain-boundary mobility and helps to evaluate effects due to vacancy and interstitial atoms such as carbon

  9. Multiscale simulations in face-centered cubic metals: A method coupling quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Xiao-Xiang; Wang Chong-Yu

    2013-01-01

    An effective multiscale simulation which concurrently couples the quantum-mechanical and molecular-mechanical calculations based on the position continuity of atoms is presented. By an iterative procedure, the structure of the dislocation core in face-centered cubic metal is obtained by first-principles calculation and the long-range stress is released by molecular dynamics relaxation. Compared to earlier multiscale methods, the present work couples the long-range strain to the local displacements of the dislocation core in a simpler way with the same accuracy. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  10. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mala A. Sainna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu2(μ2-H (μ2-NHCH3(μ3-CPtCH3(P(CH332](COn+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH35, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes.

  11. Alkyl Chain Growth on a Transition Metal Center: How Does Iron Compare to Ruthenium and Osmium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainna, Mala A.; de Visser, Sam P.

    2015-01-01

    Industrial Fischer-Tropsch processes involve the synthesis of hydrocarbons usually on metal surface catalysts. On the other hand, very few homogeneous catalysts are known to perform a Fischer-Tropsch style of reaction. In recent work, we established the catalytic properties of a diruthenium-platinum carbene complex, [(CpRu)2(μ2-H)(μ2-NHCH3)(μ3-C)PtCH3(P(CH3)3)2](CO)n+ with n = 0, 2 and Cp = η5-C5(CH3)5, and showed it to react efficiently by initial hydrogen atom transfer followed by methyl transfer to form an alkyl chain on the Ru-center. In particular, the catalytic efficiency was shown to increase after the addition of two CO molecules. As such, this system could be viewed as a potential homogeneous Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. Herein, we have engineered the catalytic center of the catalyst and investigated the reactivity of trimetal carbene complexes of the same type using iron, ruthenium and osmium at the central metal scaffold. The work shows that the reactivity should increase from diosmium to diruthenium to diiron; however, a non-linear trend is observed due to multiple factors contributing to the individual barrier heights. We identified all individual components of these reaction steps in detail and established the difference in reactivity of the various complexes. PMID:26426009

  12. Theoretical and experimental spectroscopic studies of the first highly luminescent binuclear hydrocinnamate of Eu(III), Tb(III) and Gd(III) with bidentate 2,2'-bipyridine ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, Lippy F.; Correa, Charlane C.; Garcia, Humberto C. [Departamento de Química-ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora-MG 36036-330 (Brazil); Martins Francisco, Thiago [Departamento de Física-ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Pampulha, Belo Horizonte-MG 30123-970 (Brazil); Ribeiro, Sidney J.L. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho-UNESP, CP 355, Araraquara-SP 14801-970 (Brazil); Dutra, José Diogo L.; Freire, Ricardo O. [Pople Computational Chemistry Laboratory, Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, São Cristóvão-SE 49100-000 (Brazil); Machado, Flávia C., E-mail: flavia.machado@ufjf.edu.br [Departamento de Química-ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora-MG 36036-330 (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, the synthesis of three new binuclear lanthanide (III) complexes [Ln{sub 2}(cin){sub 6}(bpy){sub 2}] (Ln=Eu (1), Tb (2), Gd (3), cin=hydrocinnamate anion; bpy=2,2'-bipyridine), and their complete characterization, including single crystal X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectroscopy and thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) are reported. In especial, photophysical properties of Eu(III) complex have been studied in detail via both theoretical and experimental approaches. Crystal structures of 1–3 reveal that all compounds are isostructural and that each lanthanide ion is nine-coordinated by oxygen and nitrogen atoms in an overall distorted tricapped trigonal-prismatic geometry. Eu(III) complex structure was also calculated using the Sparkle model for lanthanide complexes and the intensity parameters (Ω{sub 2}, Ω{sub 4}, and Ω{sub 6}), calculated from the experimental data and from Sparkle/PM3 model. The theoretical emission quantum efficiencies obtained for Sparkle/PM3 structures are in excellent agreement with the experimental values, clearly attesting to the efficacy of the theoretical models. The theoretical procedure applied here shows that the europium binuclear compound displays a quantum yield about 65% suggesting that the system can be excellent for the development of efficient luminescent devices. Highlights: • First binuclear Ln{sup 3+}-hydrocinnamate have been synthesized and characterized. • Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+} complexes photoluminescence properties were investigated. • Theoretical approaches for Eu{sup 3+} complex luminescence has been performed. • An energy level diagram is used to establish the ligand-to-metal energy transfer. • 65% Quantum yield suggests an excellent system for luminescent devices.

  13. Photochemical activation and reactivity of polynuclear transition-metal-complex molecules. Progress report, June 1981-May 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endicott, J.F.; Lintvedt, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Significant results obtained during the year are summarized for the following programs: (1) reversible, two electron transfer at a single potential in binuclear complexes; (2) photophysics of polyketonate complexes; (3) synthetic strategies and characterization of heavy metal heterobinuclear complexes; (4) high yield synthesis of ligands capable of binding 3 and 4 metal ions per molecule. Electrochemical studies have uncovered a number of new binuclear metal complexes that undergo reversible two-electron reduction at single potential including Cu(II) complexes with two different coordination environments, mixed Ni(II), Cu(II) complexes and binuclear Ni(II) complexes. In each case the species that exhibit these electron transfer properties have been shown to be Na + ion-paired complexes. Several new trinuclear molecular complexes have been prepared and characterized that contain two UO 2 2+ ions and one transition metal ion. The electrochemistry, absorption spectra, and luminescence have been investigated

  14. Peroxide Activation for Electrophilic Reactivity by the Binuclear Non-heme Iron Enzyme AurF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kiyoung; Li, Ning; Kwak, Yeonju; Srnec, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Binuclear non-heme iron enzymes activate O 2 for diverse chemistries that include oxygenation of organic substrates and hydrogen atom abstraction. This process often involves the formation of peroxo-bridged biferric intermediates, only some of which can perform electrophilic reactions. To elucidate the geometric and electronic structural requirements to activate peroxo reactivity, the active peroxo intermediate in 4-aminobenzoate N-oxygenase (AurF) has been characterized spectroscopically and computationally. A magnetic circular dichroism study of reduced AurF shows that its electronic and geometric structures are poised to react rapidly with O 2 . Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopic definition of the peroxo intermediate formed in this reaction shows that the active intermediate has a protonated peroxo bridge. Density functional theory computations on the structure established here show that the protonation activates peroxide for electrophilic/single-electron-transfer reactivity. As a result, this activation of peroxide by protonation is likely also relevant to the reactive peroxo intermediates in other binuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

  15. Thioetherification of chloroheteroarenes: a binuclear catalyst promotes wide scope and high functional-group tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Mélanie; Wijaya, Novi; Rampazzi, Vincent; Cui, Luchao; Rousselin, Yoann; Saeys, Mark; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2014-09-22

    A constrained binuclear palladium catalyst system affords selective thioetherification of a wide range of functionalized arenethiols with chloroheteroaromatic partners with the highest turnover numbers (TONs) reported to date and tolerates a large variety of reactive functions. The scope of this system includes the coupling of thiophenols with six- and five-membered 2-chloroheteroarenes (i.e., functionalized pyridine, pyrazine, quinoline, pyrimidine, furane, and thiazole) and 3-bromoheteroarenes (i.e., pyridine and furane). Electron-rich congested thiophenols and fluorinated thiophenols are also suitable partners. The coupling of unprotected amino-2-chloropyridines with thiophenol and the successful employment of synthetically valuable chlorothiophenols are described with the same catalyst system. DFT studies attribute the high performance of this binuclear palladium catalyst to the decreased stability of thiolate-containing resting states. Palladium loading was as low as 0.2 mol %, which is important for industrial application and is a step forward in solving catalyst activation/deactivation problems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A tri-metal centered metal-organic framework for solid-phase microextraction of environmental contaminants with enhanced extraction efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shuqin; Xie, Lijun; Hu, Qingkun; Yang, Huangsheng; Pan, Guanrui; Zhu, Fang; Yang, Shenghong; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2017-01-01

    This study presents the preparation and the characterizations of six tri-metal centered metal-organic frameworks (tM-MOFs) as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) adsorbents. Possessing different proportions of Al, Ga and In atoms in their frameworks, the tM-MOF-based SPME coatings exhibited different extraction performance towards the organic pollutants. Extraction results showed that the M4 (Al 0.593 Ga 0.167 In 0.240 (O 2 C 2 H 4 )(h 2 fipbb)) coating exhibited the best enrichment ability among six tM-MOFs. In addition, it showed better extraction efficiency towards the analytes than three single-metal centered MOFs coatings and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) coating. The adsorption process of the M4 coating was physical adsorption and it was mainly affected by the diffusion process of the compound from the sample to the material, which is the same with the adsorption processes of the single-metal centered MOFs coatings. Under optimal conditions (extraction time, 3 min; NaCl concentration, 25% (w/v); desorption temperature, 270 °C; extraction temperature, 30 °C), the M4 coating achieved low detection limits (0.13–0.88 ng L −1 ) and good linearity (5–2000 and 5–5000 ng L −1 ) for benzene series compounds. The repeatabilities (n = 5) for single fiber were between 4.3 and 8.1%, while the reproducibilities (n = 3) of fiber-to-fiber were in the range of 7.9–12.7%. Finally, a M4 coated SPME fiber was successfully applied to the analysis of environmental water samples with satisfactory recoveries (80.8%–119.5%). - Highlights: • Six tri-metal centered metal-organic frameworks were synthesized and characterized. • Novel SPME fibers were fabricated with silicone sealant film and tri-metal centered metal-organic frameworks crystals. • The self-made fiber exhibited excellent extraction performance to organic pollutants. • The self-made fiber was used for analysis of benzene series compounds in environmental water samples.

  17. Teaching - methodical and research center of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in the former Soviet Union countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evdokimov, A.A; Sigov, A.S; Shinkarenko, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Teaching - Methodical and Research Center (TMRC) 'Sokolinaja Gora' is founded in order to provide methodical-information and scientific support of institutes of higher education in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in Russia and in the countries of the Former Soviet union. It is independent association of creative communities of scientist of higher educational specialists. The main directions of the Center activity are: 1. Teaching-methodological support and development of teaching in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metals in Russia in the countries of the Former Soviet Union. Themes of teaching includes the basic of safe using of hydrogen technologies and devices, ecological, economic and law aspects of new hydrogen power engineering, transition to which in 21 century is one of the central problems of mankind survival; 2. Organizing of joint researches by independent creative communities of scientists in the field of hydrogen power engineering and platinum group metal; 3. Independent scientific examination, which is made by Advisory Committee of High Technologies consisting of representatives of the countries of Former Soviet Union, which are standing participants of an Annual International Symposia 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals in the Former Soviet Union Countries'. Structure of the Center: 1. Center of strategic development in the field of high technologies; 2. Scientific Research Institute of Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals; 3. Teaching-Methodical Association in specialization 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and economics' and hydrogen wide spread training; 4. Media Center 'Hydrogen Power Engineering and Platinum Group Metals', 5. Organizational Center; 6. Administrative Center. The Center will be established step-by-step in 2005-2010 on the basis of the following programs: Teaching-methodological program. On the basis of this program it is planned to

  18. Long-range intramolecular electron transfer in aromatic radical anions and binuclear transition metal complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    1981-01-01

    Intramolecular electron transfer (ET) over distances up to about 10 Å between states in which the electron is localized on donor and acceptor groups by interaction with molecular or external solvent nuclear motion occurs, in particular, in two classes of systems. The excess electron in anionic ra...

  19. Control of in-plane texture of body centered cubic metal thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.M.; Rodbell, K.P.; Colgan, E.G.; Hammond, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    We show that dramatically different in-plane textures can be produced in body centered cubic (bcc) metal thin films deposited on amorphous substrates under different deposition conditions. The crystallographic orientation distribution of polycrystalline bcc metal thin films on amorphous substrates often has a strong left-angle 110 right-angle fiber texture, indicating that {110} planes are parallel to the substrate plane. When deposition takes place under bombardment by energetic ions or atoms at an off-normal angle of incidence, the left-angle 110 right-angle fiber texture develops an in-plane texture, indicating nonrandom azimuthal orientations of the crystallites. Three orientations in Nb films have been observed under different deposition geometries, in which the energetic particle flux coincides with channeling directions in the bcc crystal structure. In-plane orientations in Mo films have also been obtained in magnetron sputtering systems with various configurations. These are described, and an example is given in which the in-plane orientation of Mo films deposited in two different in-line magnetron sputtering systems differs by a 90 degree rotation. In these two cases, there is a strong left-angle 110 right-angle fiber texture, but the in-plane left-angle 100 right-angle direction is oriented parallel to the scan direction in one system, and perpendicular to the scan direction in the other system. The conditions which produce such different in-plane textures in two apparently similar sputtering systems are discussed. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  20. Binuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) clusters in coordination polymers derived from semirigid tetracarboxylate and N‑donor ligands: syntheses, new topology structures and magnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Ling [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); Liu, Guang-Zhen, E-mail: gzliuly@126.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); Xin, Ling-Yun [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); Wang, Li-Ya [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, and Henan Key Laboratory of Function-Oriented Porous Materials, Luoyang Normal University, Luoyang 471934 (China); College of Chemistry and Pharmacy Engineering, Nanyang Normal University, Nanyang, Henan 473061 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Two topologically new Mn(II) coordination polymers, namely ([Mn{sub 2}(H{sub 4}ipca)(4,4′-bpy){sub 1.5}(CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH){sub 0.5}(H{sub 2}O){sub 1.5}]·0.5CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH·2.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1) and (Mn{sub 4}(H{sub 4}ipca){sub 2}(bze)(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}){sub n} (2) were prepared by the solvothermal reactions of Mn(II) acetate with 5-(2’,3’-dicarboxylphenoxy)isophthalic acid (H{sub 4}ipca) in the presence of different N-donor coligands (4,4′-bpy=4,4′-bipyridyl and bze=1, 4-bis(1-imidazoly)benzene). The single crystal X-ray diffractions reveal that two complexes display 3D metal-organic frameworks with binuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) units, respectively. Complex 1 features a (3,4,6)-connected porous framework based on dinuclear Mn(II) unit with the (4.5{sup 2}){sub 2}(4{sup 2}.6{sup 8}.8{sup 3}.9{sup 2})(5{sup 2}.8.9{sup 2}.10) new topology, and complex 2 possesses a (3,8)-connected network based on tetranuclear Mn(II) unit with the (4{sup 2}.6){sub 2}(4{sup 4}.6{sup 14}.7{sup 7}.8{sup 2}.9) new topology. Magnetic analyses indicate that both two compounds show weak antiferromagnetic interactions within binuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) units. - Graphical abstract: Two topologically new Mn(II) metal-organic frameworks with dinuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) units respectively were assembled by using 5-(2′,3′-Dicarboxylphenoxy)isophthalic acid and N-donor ancillary coligands. Magnetic analysis revealed the existence of dominant antiferromagnetic interactions within the polynuclear Mn(II) units. - Highlights: • Mixed ligand strategy produces two topologically new MOFs with dinuclear and tetranuclear Mn(II) respectively. • Magnetic fitting gives weak antiferromagnetic interactions within the polynuclear Mn(II) units.

  1. Texture evolution maps for upset deformation of body-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myoung-Gyu; Wang, Jue; Anderson, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Texture evolution maps are used as a tool to visualize texture development during upset deformation in body-centered cubic metals. These maps reveal initial grain orientations that tend toward normal direction (ND)|| versus ND|| . To produce these maps, a finite element analysis (FEA) with a rate-dependent crystal plasticity constitutive relation for tantalum is used. A reference case having zero workpiece/die friction shows that ∼64% of randomly oriented grains rotate toward ND|| and ∼36% rotate toward ND|| . The maps show well-established trends that increasing strain rate sensitivity and decreasing latent-to-self hardening ratio reduce both and percentages, leading to more diffuse textures. Reducing operative slip systems from both {1 1 0}/ and {1 1 2}/ to just {1 1 0}/ has a mixed effect: it increases the percentage but decreases the percentage. Reducing the number of slip systems and increasing the number of FEA integration points per grain strengthen - texture bands that are observed experimentally

  2. Covalently attached multilayer assemblies of diazo-resins and binuclear cobalt phthalocyanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaofang; Zhao Shuang; Yang Min; Sun Changqing; Guo, Liping

    2005-01-01

    By using the ionic self-assembly technique, ordered multilayer thin films composed of diazo-resin (DAR) as polycation and water-soluble binuclear cobalt phthalocyaninehexasulfonate (Bi-CoPc) as polyanion were alternately fabricated on quartz, CaF 2 and glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs). Upon ultraviolet irradiation, the adjacent interface of the multilayer films reacted to form a covalently cross-linking structure. The obtained thin films were characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface photovoltage spectra (SPS), and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the uniform, highly stable and ordered multilayer thin films were formed. The linkage nature between the adjacent interface of the multilayer films converts from ionic to covalent, and, as a result, the stability of the multilayer thin films dramatically improved. The multilayer thin films on GCEs also exhibited excellent electrochemical behavior

  3. Covalently attached multilayer assemblies of diazo-resins and binuclear cobalt phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaofang [Key Lab of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Zhao Shuang [Key Lab of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Yang Min [Key Lab of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Sun Changqing [Key Lab of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)]. E-mail: sunchq@mail.jlu.edu.cn; Guo, Liping [Department of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

    2005-05-01

    By using the ionic self-assembly technique, ordered multilayer thin films composed of diazo-resin (DAR) as polycation and water-soluble binuclear cobalt phthalocyaninehexasulfonate (Bi-CoPc) as polyanion were alternately fabricated on quartz, CaF{sub 2} and glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs). Upon ultraviolet irradiation, the adjacent interface of the multilayer films reacted to form a covalently cross-linking structure. The obtained thin films were characterized by ultraviolet (UV)-vis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface photovoltage spectra (SPS), and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the uniform, highly stable and ordered multilayer thin films were formed. The linkage nature between the adjacent interface of the multilayer films converts from ionic to covalent, and, as a result, the stability of the multilayer thin films dramatically improved. The multilayer thin films on GCEs also exhibited excellent electrochemical behavior.

  4. A binuclear Fe(III)Dy(III) single molecule magnet. Quantum effects and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbinteanu, Marilena; Kajiwara, Takashi; Choi, Kwang-Yong; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Akio; Kojima, Norimichi; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Fujimura, Yuichi; Takaishi, Shinya; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2006-07-19

    The binuclear [FeIII(bpca)(mu-bpca)Dy(NO3)4], having Single Molecule Magnet (SMM) properties, belonging to a series of isostructural FeIIILnIII complexes (Ln = Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho) and closely related FeIILnIII chain structures, was characterized in concise experimental and theoretical respects. The low temperature magnetization data showed hysteresis and tunneling. The anomalous temperature dependence of Mössbauer spectra is related to the onset of magnetic order, consistent with the magnetization relaxation time scale resulting from AC susceptibility measurements. The advanced ab initio calculations (CASSCF and spin-orbit) revealed the interplay of ligand field, spin-orbit, and exchange effects and probed the effective Ising nature of the lowest states, involved in the SMM and tunneling effects.

  5. Electroreduction of CO2 Catalyzed by a Heterogenized Zn–Porphyrin Complex with a Redox-Innocent Metal Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Transition-metal-based molecular complexes are a class of catalyst materials for electrochemical CO2 reduction to CO that can be rationally designed to deliver high catalytic performance. One common mechanistic feature of these electrocatalysts developed thus far is an electrogenerated reduced metal center associated with catalytic CO2 reduction. Here we report a heterogenized zinc–porphyrin complex (zinc(II) 5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin) as an electrocatalyst that delivers a turnover frequency as high as 14.4 site–1 s–1 and a Faradaic efficiency as high as 95% for CO2 electroreduction to CO at −1.7 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode in an organic/water mixed electrolyte. While the Zn center is critical to the observed catalysis, in situ and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies reveal that it is redox-innocent throughout the potential range. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the porphyrin ligand may act as a redox mediator. Chemical reduction of the zinc–porphyrin complex further confirms that the reduction is ligand-based and the reduced species can react with CO2. This represents the first example of a transition-metal complex for CO2 electroreduction catalysis with its metal center being redox-innocent under working conditions. PMID:28852698

  6. Possible source and pattern distribution of heavy metals content in urban soil at Kuala Terengganu town center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foo, Toon Fong; Poh, Seng Chee; Asrul Azani Mahmood; Norhayati Mohd Tahir

    2008-01-01

    Total concentration of five trace metals (Cu, Mn, Cd, Pb and Zn) and two major elements (Al and Fe) as well as soil parameters (soil organic matter, pH and cation exchange capacity) were measured in soils of Kuala Terengganu town center. 40 surface soils (0-20 cm) were collected during the month of August, 2005. The soil samples (< 600 μm) were subjected to acid digestion and the concentration of total metal was measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Results show that the range of metals observed were 4.16-40.90 mg/ kg, 83.70 - 380.80 mg/ kg, 2940.00 - 28600.00 mg/ kg below detection limit (BDL) - 4.88 mg/ kg, 20.00 - 219.00 mg/ kg, 7.47 - 171.00 mg/ kg and 8840.00 - 62500.00 mg/ kg for Cu, Mn, Fe, Cd, Pb, Zn and Al, respectively. Factor and Pearsons correlation analyses suggest that the Fe, Mn and Al originates from the parent materials, whereas the possible sources of Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn are due to anthropogenic input such as vehicular traffic and metal corrosion since there are no major industrial activities in Kuala Terengganu. In addition, calculation of enrichment factors (Efs) for trace metals showed that Pb, Cd and Zn were significantly enriched, providing additional support to the contention that Pb, Cd and Zn level in Kuala Terengganu town center soils are due to human related activities. (author)

  7. Formation and properties of metallic nanoparticles in lithium and sodium fluorides with radiation-induced color centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukvina, L. I.; Martynovich, E. F.

    2012-12-01

    The specific features of light- and temperature-induced formation of metallic nanoparticles in γ-irradiated LiF and NaF crystals have been investigated. Atomic force microscope images of nanoparticles of different sizes and in different locations have been presented. The relation between the crystal processing regimes and properties of the nanoparticles formed has been revealed. The optical properties of the processed crystals have been analyzed. The thermo- and light-stimulated processes underlying the formation of metallic nanoparticles in aggregation of the color centers and their decay due to the recovery of the crystal lattice have been studied.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of a new complex binuclear of binuclear of Pd(II) containing the antibiotic oxy tetracycline; Sintese e caracterizacao de um novo complexo bimetalico de Pd(II) contendo o antibiotico oxitetraciclina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Wendell [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Fontes, Ana Paula Soares [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora (UFJF), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Pereira-Maia, Elene Cristina [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    This article reports the synthesis and characterization of a new binuclear complex of palladium (II) containing the antibiotic oxytetracycline. The complex was characterized by the usual techniques of analysis. With respect to sites of coordination, the IR spectral data suggests the involvement the oxygen of the amide group and the oxygen of the neighbor hydroxyl group at ring A and to the carbonyl oxygen at C11 and the hydroxyl group at C12. (author)

  9. Effectiveness of percutaneous metal stent placement in cholangiocarcinoma patients with midterm follow-up: Single center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kose, Fatih; Oguzkurt, Levent; Besen, Ayberk; Sumbul, Taner; Sezer, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Cemile; Disel, Umut; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Ozyilkan, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma present with high rate of local complications. The primary aim of this study is to report clinical course of advanced cholangiocarcinoma patients those who were presented with biliary obstruction and treated with percutaneous biliary stenting. Material and methods: Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic cholangiocarcinoma followed by our center for a period of 4 years were analyzed. For statistical analysis demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, primary biliary drainage method, metal stent occlusion rate, time to stent occlusion, and overall survival rates were recorded. Results: A total of 34 eligible patients were analyzed. 27 patients had metal stent placement. These 27 patients formed the basis of this study. Median overall survival (OS) was 6.0 months. After metal stent deployment bilurubin levels were normalized within a mean of 10 days. During the follow-up period, 13 patients were experienced metal stent occlusion. Median TtSO was 10 weeks. Cytotoxic chemotherapy was administered to 14 (52%) patients. Patients without stent dysfunction had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy exposure rate (p = 0.021). Statistical analysis, however, failed to exhibit significant effect of stent dysfunction on OS. Conclusion: In advanced cholangiocarcinoma, relief of bile duct obstruction is an important part of the initial patient management. This study therefore described the clinical value of percutaneous metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma patients and raises the question about patency of metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma whether we can expect success similar to the success achieved in pancreas carcinoma.

  10. Effectiveness of percutaneous metal stent placement in cholangiocarcinoma patients with midterm follow-up: Single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kose, Fatih, E-mail: fatihkose@gmail.com [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology, Adana (Turkey); Oguzkurt, Levent [Department of Interventional Radiology, Adana (Turkey); Besen, Ayberk; Sumbul, Taner; Sezer, Ahmet; Karadeniz, Cemile; Disel, Umut; Mertsoylu, Huseyin; Ozyilkan, Ozgur [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Oncology, Adana (Turkey)

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Patients with advanced cholangiocarcinoma present with high rate of local complications. The primary aim of this study is to report clinical course of advanced cholangiocarcinoma patients those who were presented with biliary obstruction and treated with percutaneous biliary stenting. Material and methods: Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic cholangiocarcinoma followed by our center for a period of 4 years were analyzed. For statistical analysis demographic and clinical characteristics of patients, primary biliary drainage method, metal stent occlusion rate, time to stent occlusion, and overall survival rates were recorded. Results: A total of 34 eligible patients were analyzed. 27 patients had metal stent placement. These 27 patients formed the basis of this study. Median overall survival (OS) was 6.0 months. After metal stent deployment bilurubin levels were normalized within a mean of 10 days. During the follow-up period, 13 patients were experienced metal stent occlusion. Median TtSO was 10 weeks. Cytotoxic chemotherapy was administered to 14 (52%) patients. Patients without stent dysfunction had significantly higher rate of chemotherapy exposure rate (p = 0.021). Statistical analysis, however, failed to exhibit significant effect of stent dysfunction on OS. Conclusion: In advanced cholangiocarcinoma, relief of bile duct obstruction is an important part of the initial patient management. This study therefore described the clinical value of percutaneous metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma patients and raises the question about patency of metal stent in cholangiocarcinoma whether we can expect success similar to the success achieved in pancreas carcinoma.

  11. Super-solar Metallicity Stars in the Galactic Center Nuclear Star Cluster: Unusual Sc, V, and Y Abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tuan; Kerzendorf, Wolfgang; Konopacky, Quinn; Marcinik, Joseph M.; Ghez, Andrea; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark R.

    2018-03-01

    We present adaptive-optics assisted near-infrared high-spectral-resolution observations of late-type giants in the nuclear star cluster of the Milky Way. The metallicity and elemental abundance measurements of these stars offer us an opportunity to understand the formation and evolution of the nuclear star cluster. In addition, their proximity to the supermassive black hole (∼0.5 pc) offers a unique probe of the star formation and chemical enrichment in this extreme environment. We observed two stars identified by medium spectral-resolution observations as potentially having very high metallicities. We use spectral-template fitting with the PHOENIX grid and Bayesian inference to simultaneously constrain the overall metallicity, [M/H], alpha-element abundance [α/Fe], effective temperature, and surface gravity of these stars. We find that one of the stars has very high metallicity ([M/H] > 0.6) and the other is slightly above solar metallicity. Both Galactic center stars have lines from scandium (Sc), vanadium (V), and yttrium (Y) that are much stronger than allowed by the PHOENIX grid. We find, using the spectral synthesis code Spectroscopy Made Easy, that [Sc/Fe] may be an order of magnitude above solar. For comparison, we also observed an empirical calibrator in NGC 6791, the highest metallicity cluster known ([M/H] ∼ 0.4). Most lines are well matched between the calibrator and the Galactic center stars, except for Sc, V, and Y, which confirms that their abundances must be anomalously high in these stars. These unusual abundances, which may be a unique signature of nuclear star clusters, offer an opportunity to test models of chemical enrichment in this region.

  12. Reactivity of Dinitrogen Bound to Mid- and Late-Transition-Metal Centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoenkhoen, N.; de Bruin, B.; Reek, J.N.H.; Dzik, W.I.

    2015-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive overview of the reactions of N-2 within the coordination sphere of transition metals of groups 6 to 9. Many of these metals mediate the reaction of N-2 with protons under reductive conditions, which can lead to the (catalytic) formation of ammonia or hydrazine,

  13. Rapid, sensitive, and selective fluorescent DNA detection using iron-based metal-organic framework nanorods: Synergies of the metal center and organic linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jingqi; Liu, Qian; Shi, Jinle; Hu, Jianming; Asiri, Abdullah M; Sun, Xuping; He, Yuquan

    2015-09-15

    Considerable recent attention has been paid to homogeneous fluorescent DNA detection with the use of nanostructures as a universal "quencher", but it still remains a great challenge to develop such nanosensor with the benefits of low cost, high speed, sensitivity, and selectivity. In this work, we report the use of iron-based metal-organic framework nanorods as a high-efficient sensing platform for fluorescent DNA detection. It only takes about 4 min to complete the whole "mix-and-detect" process with a low detection limit of 10 pM and a strong discrimination of single point mutation. Control experiments reveal the remarkable sensing behavior is a consequence of the synergies of the metal center and organic linker. This work elucidates how composition control of nanostructures can significantly impact their sensing properties, enabling new opportunities for the rational design of functional materials for analytical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of a binuclear complex and a coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Mohamadinasab

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Two new copper complexes [(bipy(pydcCu(μ-OCO-pydcCu(bipy(H2O].3.5H¬2O (1 and {[(μ2-C2O4(2,2'-bipyCu].2H2O}n (2 (pydcH2 = pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylilic acid, bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine have been hydrothermally synthesized. Both complexes were characterized by IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Complex 1 consists of two independent neutral molecules. In every moiety, metal ion center is in a distorted octahedral geometry. Coordination polymer (2 has been prepared from the reaction of bis-(cyclohexanone-oxal-dihydrazone,2,2'-bipyridine and Cu(NO32 in basic solution and under hydrothermal condition. The results showed that the bis-(cyclohexanone-oxal-dihydrazone was converted to oxalate ion under heating and basic pH. Each metal ion center in 2 is in a distorted octahedral geometry and is coordinated by four oxygen atoms of two bridged oxalate ions and two nitrogen atoms of 2,2'-bipyridine molecules. In the crystal structure of 2, some H-bonds and π-π interaction cause formation of a 3D network.

  15. Metal compounds in zeolites as active components of chemisorption and catalysis. Quantum chemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhidomirov, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    A short review of possible catalitic active sites associated with various types of metal species in zoolite is presented. The structural and electronic peculiarity of aluminum ions in zeolite lattice and their distribution in the lattice are discussed on the basis of quantum chemical calculations in connection with the formation of Broensted activity of zeolites. Various molecular models of Lewis Acid Sites associated the extra-lattice oxide-hydroxide aluminum species have been investigated by means of density functional model cluster calculations using CO molecule as a probe. Probable ways of formation of the selective oxidation center in FeZSM-5 by decomposition of dinitrogen monoxide have been studied by ab-initio quantum chemical calculations. The immediate oxidizing site is reasonably represented by the binuclear iron-hydroxide cluster with peroxo-like fragment located between iron atoms. Various probable intermediates of the selective oxidation center formation resulted from interaction of a hydroperoxide molecule with a lattice titanium ion in titanium silicalite have been investigated by quantum chemical calculations. It was concluded that this reaction requires essential structural reconstruction in the vicinity of the titanium ion. Probability of this structural reconstruction is discussed. Possible reasons of an electron-deficient and electron-enriched state of metal particles entrapped in zoolite cavities are discussed. Also, various probable molecular models of such modified metal particles in zeolite are considered

  16. Catalytic function of the mycobacterial binuclear iron monooxygenase in acetone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Nakao, Tomomi; Kino, Kuniki

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacteria such as Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc(2)155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 are able to grow on acetone and use it as a source of carbon and energy. We previously demonstrated by gene deletion analysis that the mimABCD gene cluster, which encodes a binuclear iron monooxygenase, plays an essential role in acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. In the present study, we determined the catalytic function of MimABCD in acetone metabolism. Whole-cell assays were performed using Escherichia coli cells expressing the MimABCD complex. When the recombinant E. coli cells were incubated with acetone, a product was detected by gas chromatography (GC) analysis. Based on the retention time and the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) spectrum, the reaction product was identified as acetol (hydroxyacetone). The recombinant E. coli cells produced 1.02 mM of acetol from acetone within 24 h. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MimABCD also was able to convert methylethylketone (2-butanone) to 1-hydroxy-2-butanone. Although it has long been known that microorganisms such as mycobacteria metabolize acetone via acetol, this study provides the first biochemical evidence for the existence of a microbial enzyme that catalyses the conversion of acetone to acetol. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Evolution of microstructure in face centered cubic metals during irradiation: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.

    1993-06-01

    When fcc metals and alloys are irradiated at elevated temperatures, they tend to evolve toward saturation microstructures that are independent of the starting state of the metal and the early details of irradiation history. This leads to property changes and rates of dimensional change that also eventually become independent of the starting state. The evolution of microstructure in complex alloys, especially during the transient regime, is usually determined by the complex interaction of many microstructural and microchemical processes. The more complex the alloy, the more difficult it is to-identify and define the separate influence of each participating mechanism. The use of irradiation studies conducted on simple metals or model alloys assists in understanding the behavior of alloys of engineering relevance. A review of such studies shows that a number of prevailing perceptions of radiation-induced microstructural evolution are not universally correct

  18. Ab initio modeling of interactions between screw dislocations and interstitial solutes in body-centered cubic transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthi, Berengere

    2017-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of alloy plasticity, it is important to describe at the atomic scale the dislocation-solute interactions and their effect on the dislocation mobility. This work focuses on the body-centered cubic (BCC) transition metals in presence of interstitial solute atoms, in particular the Fe-C system. Using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, the core structure of the screw dislocation of Burgers vector b=1/2<111> was investigated in iron in presence of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen solute atoms, and in BCC metals from group 5 (V, Nb, Ta) and 6 (Mo, W) in presence of carbon solutes. A core reconstruction is evidenced in iron and group 6 metals, along with a strong attractive dislocation-solute interaction energy: the dislocation goes from easy to hard configuration where the solute atoms are at the center of trigonal prisms along the dislocation line. A different behavior is observed in group 5 metals, for which the most stable configuration for the carbon atom is an octahedral site in the vicinity of the dislocation, without any core reconstruction. This group tendency is linked to the structure of mono-carbides. Consequences of the strongly attractive dislocation-solute interactions in Fe(C) were then investigated. First the equilibrium segregation close to the dislocation core was studied using a mean-field model and Monte Carlo simulations. Over a wide temperature range, from 200 to 700 K, a strong segregation is predicted with every other prismatic site occupied by a carbon atom. Then, the mobility of the dislocation in presence of carbon atoms was investigated by modeling the double-kink mechanism with DFT, in relation with experimental data obtained with transmission electron microscopy. The activation energy obtained for this atomic scale mechanism is in good agreement with experimental values for the dynamic strain aging. (author) [fr

  19. A new family of Ln₇ clusters with an ideal D(3h) metal-centered trigonal prismatic geometry, and SMM and photoluminescence behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarakioti, Eleni C; Poole, Katye M; Cunha-Silva, Luis; Christou, George; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2014-08-14

    The first use of the flexible Schiff base ligand N-salicylidene-2-aminocyclohexanol in metal cluster chemistry has afforded a new family of Ln7 clusters with ideal D(3h) point group symmetry and metal-centered trigonal prismatic topology; solid-state and solution studies revealed SMM and photoluminescence behaviors.

  20. Clean Grain Boundary Found in C14/Body-Center-Cubic Multi-Phase Metal Hydride Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Ting Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The grain boundaries of three Laves phase-related body-center-cubic (bcc solid-solution, metal hydride (MH alloys with different phase abundances were closely examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and more importantly, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD techniques. By using EBSD, we were able to identify the alignment of the crystallographic orientations of the three major phases in the alloys (C14, bcc, and B2 structures. This finding confirms the presence of crystallographically sharp interfaces between neighboring phases, which is a basic assumption for synergetic effects in a multi-phase MH system.

  1. Mesoscale plastic texture in body-centered cubic metals under uniaxial load

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gröger, Roman; Vitek, V.; Lookman, T.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 6 (2017), s. 063601 E-ISSN 2475-9953 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13797S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : dislocations * mesoscale * bcc metals Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.)

  2. Post-divorce custody arrangements and binuclear family structures of Flemish adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Katrien Sodermans

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Because of the tendency towards equal parental rights in post-divorce custody decisions, the number of children living partially in two households after divorce has increased. Because of this evolution, traditional family typologies have been challenged. OBJECTIVE In this study, we want to describe the post-divorce custody arrangements and family configurations of Flemish adolescents (between 12 and 18 years old. METHODS We use four waves of the Leuven Adolescents and Families Study, a yearly survey in which adolescents are questioned at school about their family life, family relationships and various dimensions of their wellbeing. Our research sample consists of 1525 adolescents who experienced a parental break-up. First, we present information on the proportion of adolescents in different custody arrangements, according to divorce cohort, age and sex. Next, we describe post-divorce family configurations, according to the custody arrangement and different criteria of co-residence between children and step-parents. RESULTS We observe a higher proportion of adolescents spending at least 33Š of time in both parental households (shared residence for more recent divorce cohorts. A large proportion of adolescents is living with a new partner of the mother or father, but there are important differences, according to the criteria used to define stepfamily configurations. CONCLUSIONS The relatively high incidence figures of children in shared residence challenge the current dichotomous post-divorce family concept in terms of single parent families and stepfamilies. Family typologies applying a binuclear perspective are therefore increasingly meaningful and necessary. In addition, shared residence increases the chance of co-residence with at least one step-parent, and increases the proportion of children with a part-time residential stepmother.

  3. A New Approach to Non-Coordinating Anions: Lewis Acid Enhancement of Porphyrin Metal Centers in a Zwitterionic Metal$-$Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jacob A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Petersen, Brenna M. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kormos, Attila [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Echeverría, Elena [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Chen, Yu-Sheng [Univ. of Chicago, Argonne, IL (United States). ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources; Zhang, Jian [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-02-28

    Here, we describe a new strategy to generate non-coordinating anions using zwitterionic metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). By assembly of anionic inorganic secondary building blocks (SBUs) ([In(CO2)4]$-$) with cationic metalloporphyrin-based organic linkers, we prepared zwitterionic MOFs in which the complete internal charge separation effectively prevents the potential binding of the counteranion to the cationic metal center. We demonstrate the enhanced Lewis acidity of MnIII- and FeIII-porphyrins in the zwitterionic MOFs in three representative electrocyclization reactions: [2 + 1] cycloisomerization of enynes, [3 + 2] cycloaddition of aziridines and alkenes, and [4 + 2] hetero-Diels–Alder cycloaddition of aldehydes with dienes. Lastly, this work paves a new way to design functional MOFs for tunable chemical catalysis.

  4. Benzene-centered tripodal diglycolamides : Synthesis, metal ion extraction, luminescence spectroscopy, and DFT studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leoncini, Andrea; Ansari, Seraj Ahmad; Mohapatra, Prasanta Kumar; Boda, Anil; Musharaf Ali, Sheikh; Sengupta, Arijit; Huskens, Jurriaan; Verboom, Willem

    2017-01-01

    Three benzene-centered tripodal diglycolamides (Bz-T-DGAs) were synthesized and evaluated for actinide, lanthanide, and fission product ion extraction. 1,3,5-Triethylbenzene-based tripodal DGA (LI) showed high distribution ratio (D) values for Am3+ and Eu3+ in a mixture of 95% n-dodecane and 5%

  5. Insights on activation enthalpy for non-Schmid slip in body-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, Lucas M.; Lim, Hojun; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Battaile, Corbett C.; Weinberger, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    We use insights gained from atomistic simulation to develop an activation enthalpy model for dislocation slip in body-centered cubic iron. Using a classical potential that predicts dislocation core stabilities consistent with ab initio predictions, we quantify the non-Schmid stress-dependent effects of slip. The kink-pair activation enthalpy is evaluated and a model is identified as a function of the general stress state. Our model enlarges the applicability of the classic Kocks activation enthalpy model to materials with non-Schmid behavior

  6. Oxidative addition of C--H bonds in organic molecules to transition metal centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.G.

    1989-04-01

    Alkanes are among the most chemically inert organic molecules. They are reactive toward a limited range of reagents, such as highly energetic free radicals and strongly electrophilic and oxidizing species. This low reactivity is a consequence of the C--H bond energies in most saturated hydrocarbons. These values range from 90 to 98 kcal/mole for primary and secondary C--H bonds; in methane, the main constituent of natural gas, the C--H bond energy is 104 kcal/mole. This makes methane one of the most common but least reactive organic molecules in nature. This report briefly discusses the search for metal complexes capable of undergoing the C--H oxidative addition process allowing alkane chemistry to be more selective than that available using free radical reagents. 14 refs

  7. Synthesis, characterisation and chemical reactivity of some new binuclear dioxouranium(VI) complexes derived from organic diazo compounds (Preprint No. CT-33)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujar, M.A.; Pirgonde, B.R.

    1988-02-01

    A new series of binuclear dioxouranium(VI) complexes of polydentatate diazo compounds have been synthesised and characterised adequately by analysis, physio-chemical techniques and reactivity of these complexes. The location of bonding site of ligands, stability of complexes and status of U-O bond and probable structures of these complexes have been discussed. (author). 10 refs

  8. Evaluation of Heavy Metals in Iranian and Non-Iranian Rice Supplied by Shopping Centers of Kashan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbani D.1 PhD,

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims Heavy metals in the environment are toxic to plants, animals and human. This study aimed to investigate concentration of Arsenic, Lead and Cadmium in Iranian and non- Iranian rice which have been sold in Kashan City, Iran shops. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, 126 samples from 42 trademarks (15 Iranian and 27 non-Iranian rice were collected from Kashan shopping centers. At first each sample was ashed, and then they have been dissolved with nitric acid. Heavy metal concentration was evaluated by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed by SPSS 16 software using One-sample and Independent T-tests. Findings Arsenic was not found in any of rice samples. There was a significant difference between Pb concentration in both Iranian and non-Iranian rice samples. There was not a significance difference between Cd concentration in Iranian (p=0.823 and non-Iranian (p=0.346 rice samples according to Iran national standards but there was a significant difference between Cd concentration in both Iranian (p=0.001 and non-Iranian (p=0.001 rice samples according to WHO and FAO standards. Conclusion Consumed rice pollution with Pb is considerable but with Cd is low. Arsenic concentration in Iranian and non-Iranian rice is less than Iran national and WHO/FAO standards.

  9. Emergence of Uranium as a Distinct Metal Center for Building Intrinsic X-ray Scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaxing; Yin, Xuemiao; Liu, Wei; Xie, Jian; Chen, Junfeng; Silver, Mark A; Sheng, Daopeng; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Liu, Ning; Chai, Zhifang; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E; Wang, Shuao

    2018-06-25

    The combination of high atomic number and high oxidation state in U VI materials gives rise to both high X-ray attenuation efficiency and intense green luminescence originating from ligand-to-metal charge transfer. These two features suggest that U VI materials might act as superior X-ray scintillators, but this postulate has remained substantially untested. Now the first observation of intense X-ray scintillation in a uranyl-organic framework (SCU-9) that is observable by the naked eye is reported. Combining the advantage in minimizing the non-radiative relaxation during the X-ray excitation process over those of inorganic salts of uranium, SCU-9 exhibits a very efficient X-ray to green light luminescence conversion. The luminescence intensity shows an essentially linear correlation with the received X-ray intensity, and is comparable with that of commercially available CsI:Tl. SCU-9 possesses an improved X-ray attenuation efficiency (E>20 keV) as well as enhanced radiation resistance and decreased hygroscopy compared to CsI:Tl. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. A constitutive description of the thermo-viscoplastic behavior of body-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, C.Y.; Lu, W.R.; Zhang, L.C.; Yan, H.X.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Established a new physics-based constitutive model for the plasticity of BCC crystals. ► The new model is better than the R–K, Abed, Z–A and J–C models. ► The new model is simpler and easier to use than the original MTS model. ► The material parameters are determined by a global optimization algorithm. ► Provided a precise description of the flow stress of HSLA-65 steel as well as Tantalum. -- Abstract: The Johnson–Cook (J–C) equation, which is obtained from the phenomenological observations of experimental data at relatively low strain rates, cannot well describe the dynamic thermo-mechanical response of many materials at high strain rates, especially under the situations of high or low temperatures. This paper develops a new physics-based model for the constitutive description of BCC metals through a thermal activation analysis of the dislocation motion in the plastic deformation of crystalline materials with the use of the mechanical threshold stress (MTS) as an internal state variable. It was found that the new model can effectively reflect the plastic deformation mechanism of BCC crystals because it directly relates the macroscopic state variables in the constitutive model with the micromechanical characteristics of materials. The material parameters of the model are efficiently determined by an optimization method to guarantee that the material parameters are globally optimal in their theoretically allowed ranges. The application of the model to HSLA-65 steel and Tantalum shows that it is much easier to apply than the MTS model, that its flow stress predictions are better than the Rusinek and Klepaczko (R–K), Abed, Zerilli and Armstrong (Z–A) and J–C models, and that the present model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data in a broad range of strain rate, temperature and strain.

  11. Electrochemistry suggests proton access from the exit site to the binuclear center in Paracoccus denitrificans cytochrome c oxidase pathway variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas; Melin, Frédéric; Richter, Oliver-M H; Ludwig, Bernd; Kannt, Aimo; Müller, Hanne; Michel, Hartmut; Hellwig, Petra

    2015-02-27

    Two different pathways through which protons access cytochrome c oxidase operate during oxygen reduction from the mitochondrial matrix, or the bacterial cytoplasm. Here, we use electrocatalytic current measurements to follow oxygen reduction coupled to proton uptake in cytochrome c oxidase isolated from Paracoccus denitrificans. Wild type enzyme and site-specific variants with defects in both proton uptake pathways (K354M, D124N and K354M/D124N) were immobilized on gold nanoparticles, and oxygen reduction was probed electrochemically in the presence of varying concentrations of Zn(2+) ions, which are known to inhibit both the entry and the exit proton pathways in the enzyme. Our data suggest that under these conditions substrate protons gain access to the oxygen reduction site via the exit pathway. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Water Oxidation by Ru-Polyoxometalate Catalysts: Overpotential Dependency on the Number and Charge of the Metal Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Piccinin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Water oxidation is efficiently catalyzed by several Ru-based polyoxometalate (POM molecular catalysts differing in the number, local atomistic environment and oxidation state of the Ru sites. We employ density functional theory calculations to rationalize the dependency of the reaction overpotential on the main structural and electronic molecular properties. In particular, we compare the thermodynamics of the water oxidation cycle for single-site Ru-POM and multiple-site Ru4-POM complexes. For the Ru-POM case, we also investigate the reaction free energy as a function of the Ru oxidation state. We find that the overpotential of these molecular catalysts is primarily determined by the oxidation state of the metal center and is minimum for Ru(IV. In solution, the number of active sites is shown to play a minor role on the reaction energetics. The results are rationalized and discussed in terms of the local structure around the active sites and of the electrostatic screening due to the molecular structure or the solvent.

  13. Can Electron-Rich Oxygen (O2-) Withdraw Electrons from Metal Centers? A DFT Study on Oxoanion-Caged Polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takazaki, Aki; Eda, Kazuo; Osakai, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Takahito

    2017-10-12

    The answer to the question "Can electron-rich oxygen (O 2- ) withdraw electrons from metal centers?" is seemingly simple, but how the electron population on the M atom behaves when the O-M distance changes is a matter of controversy. A case study has been conducted for Keggin-type polyoxometalate (POM) complexes, and the first-principles electronic structure calculations were carried out not only for real POM species but also for "hypothetical" ones whose heteroatom was replaced with a point charge. From the results of natural population analysis, it was proven that even an electron-rich O 2- , owing to its larger electronegativity as a neutral atom, withdraws electrons when electron redistribution occurs by the change of the bond length. In the case where O 2- coexists with a cation having a large positive charge (e.g., P 5+ (O 2- ) 4 = [PO 4 ] 3- ), the gross electron population (GEP) on the M atom seemingly increases as the O atom comes closer, but this increment in GEP is not due to the role of the O atom but due to a Coulombic effect of the positive charge located on the cation. Furthermore, it was suggested that not GEP but net electron population (NEP) should be responsible for the redox properties.

  14. Outcomes and complications of self-expanding metal stent placement for malignant colonic obstruction in a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankiewicz, Rafał; Kozieł, Sławomir; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Zieniewicz, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    Approximately 20% of cases of colorectal cancer are accompanied by acute colonic obstruction. While emergency colonic surgery is associated with high mortality and morbidity rates, placement of a self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) has been suggested as an alternative method. The SEMS placement can serve as either a definitive treatment in palliative cases or a bridge to surgery. To summarize the experience of our center in the treatment of malignant colonic obstruction using SEMS placement. A retrospective review was conducted of all patients who underwent a SEMS placement for colorectal stricture in the study period. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic guidance with colonoscopic assistance, and uncovered stents were used in all patients. The study population consisted of 28 patients treated with SEMS placement due to malignant colonic obstruction. The majority of procedures were performed with palliative intent. The overall technical success rate was 96.5%, and clinical success was achieved in all of the successfully placed SEMSs. One fatal complication due to colonic perforation occurred. In the bridge-to-surgery group, all patients experienced tumor resection with no stoma creation. The SEMS placement is an optimal treatment in the vast majority of acute colonic obstruction cases. Due to the possibility of potentially fatal complications, SEMS procedures should be performed by proficient endoscopists.

  15. Sonochemical synthesis and characterization of a novel hetro-binuclear metal organic nano polymer based on picolinic acid ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Payam; Souri, Bagher; Rezvani, Ali Reza; Morsali, Ali; Gutierrez, Angel

    2017-12-01

    Nanoparticles of one new lead and K coordination polymer (CP), {[Pb6(pyc)6(N3)7K].½H2O}n (1) Hpyc = picolinic acid ligand, has been synthesized by use of a sonochemical process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy and elemental analyses. The single crystal X-ray data of compound 1 imply that the Pb ion is seven coordinated. The thermal stability of compound 1 has been studied by thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The role of temperature, reaction time and ultrasound irradiation power on the size and morphfology of the nano-structured compound obtained from 1, have been investigated. Results indicate that an increase of temperature and sonication power and a decrease in time reaction led to a decrease of particle size.

  16. Electroreduction of CO 2 Catalyzed by a Heterogenized Zn–Porphyrin Complex with a Redox-Innocent Metal Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yueshen [Department; Energy; Jiang, Jianbing [Department; Energy; Weng, Zhe [Department; Energy; Wang, Maoyu [School; Broere, Daniël L. J. [Department; Zhong, Yiren [Department; Energy; Brudvig, Gary W. [Department; Energy; Feng, Zhenxing [School; Wang, Hailiang [Department; Energy

    2017-07-26

    Transition-metal-based molecular complexes are a class of catalyst materials for electrochemical CO2 reduction to CO that can be rationally designed to deliver high catalytic performance. One common mechanistic feature of these electrocatalysts developed thus far is an electrogenerated reduced metal center associated with catalytic CO2 reduction. Here we report a heterogenized zinc–porphyrin complex (zinc(II) 5,10,15,20-tetramesitylporphyrin) as an electrocatalyst that delivers a turnover frequency as high as 14.4 site–1 s–1 and a Faradaic efficiency as high as 95% for CO2 electroreduction to CO at -1.7 V vs the standard hydrogen electrode in an organic/water mixed electrolyte. While the Zn center is critical to the observed catalysis, in situ and operando X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies reveal that it is redox-innocent throughout the potential range. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that the porphyrin ligand may act as a redox mediator. Chemical reduction of the zinc–porphyrin complex further confirms that the reduction is ligand-based and the reduced species can react with CO2. This represents the first example of a transition-metal complex for CO2 electroreduction catalysis with its metal center being redox-innocent under working conditions.

  17. Formation of reactive oxygen by N2O decomposition over binuclear cationic sites of Fe-ferrierite zeolite: Periodic DFT + U study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdeev, Vasilii I.; Bedilo, Alexander F.

    2018-03-01

    The electronic nature of sites over Fe-ferrierite zeolite stabilizing active α-oxygen is analyzed by the periodic DFT + U approach. It is shown that two antiferromagnetically coupled Fe2+ cations with bridging OH-bonds form a stable bi-nuclear site of the [Fe2+Fe2+] doped FER complex. Frontier orbitals of this complex populated by two electrons with minority spins are localized in the bandgap. As a result, [Fe2+Fe2+] unit acquires the properties of a binuclear Lewis acid dipolarophile for 1,3-dipole N2O. First reaction step of N2O decomposition follows the Huisgen‧s concept of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition concept followed by the formation of reactive oxygen species Fesbnd O.

  18. EPR studies on binuclear copper(II) complexes with N,N',N'',N'''-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraaza-cyclotetradecane in solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jezierska, J.; Ozarowski, A.; Vuckovic, G.

    1997-01-01

    Binuclear copper(II) complexes of macrocyclic ligand TMPC (tetraazamacrocycle with four pendant 2-pirydylmethyl groups attached to the ring nitrogen atoms) with various anions forming bridge between copper ions, or coordinating to copper(II) ions at the apex, were prepared and their frozen solutions in DMF and NMF were investigated by EPR. The spectroscopic results have been interpreted in terms of molecular structure of investigated complexes

  19. Nano optical sensor binuclear Pt-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid -bipyridine for enhancement of the efficiency of 3-nitrotyrosine biomarker for early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis with minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, M S; Al-Radadi, Najlaa S

    2016-12-15

    A new, precise, and very selective method for increasing the impact and assessment of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-Nty) as a biomarker for early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) disease was developed. The method depends on the formation of the ion pair associate between 3-nitrotyrosine and the optical sensor binuclear Pt-2-pyrazinecarboxylic acid (pca)-Bipyridine (bpy) complex doped in sol-gel matrix in buffer solution of pH 7.3. The binuclear Pt (pca)(bpy) has +II net charge which is very selective and sensitive for [3-Nty](-2) at pH 7.3 in serum sample of liver cirrhosis with MHE diseases. 3-nitrotyrosine (3-Nty) quenches the luminescence intensity of the nano optical sensor binuclear Pt(pca) (bpy) at 528nm after excitation at 370nm, pH 7.3. The remarkable quenching of the luminescence intensity at 528nm of nano binuclear Pt(pca) (bpy) doped in sol-gel matrix by various concentrations of the 3-Nty was successfully used as an optical sensor for the assessment of 3-Nty in different serum samples of (MHE) in patients with liver cirrhosis. The calibration plot was achieved over the concentration range 1.85×10(-5) - 7.95×10(-10)molL(-1) 3-Nty with a correlation coefficient of (0.999) and a detection limit of (4.7×10(-10)molL(-1)). The method increases the sensitivity (93.75%) and specificity (96.45%) of 3-Nty as a biomarker for early diagnosis of liver cirrhosis with MHE in patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Synthesis, electrochemical properties, and charge-transfer band of binuclear 1,10-phenanthroline/bis(2,2'-bipyridine) complexes of ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tinnemans, A.H.A.; Timmer, K.; Reinten, M.; Kraaijkamp, J.G.; Alberts, A.H.; van der Linden, J.G.M.; Schmitz, J.E.J.; Saaman, A.A.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation of the mononuclear [Ru(bpy) 2 L] 2+ (L = bpy, phenOCH 3 , phenC(==O)NH-n-C 3 H 7 ), the binuclear [(bpy) 2 RuLRu(bpy) 2 ] 4+ (L = phenO(CH 2 CH 2 O)/sub n/phen (n = 2-4), phenC(==O)NHCH 2 CH 2 O)/sub n/(CH 2 CH 2 NH(O==)Cphen (n = 1,2), phenC(==O)NH(CH 2 )/sub n/NH(O==)Cphen (n = 3,6)), and the trinuclear [N[CH 2 CH 2 OphenRu(bpy) 2 ] 3 ] 6+ is described. Both the mononuclear and the binuclear complexes exhibit at a platinum electrode one oxidation wave and three reduction waves at potentials close to those observed for Ru(bpy) 3 2+ . The oxidation and the reductions of the binuclear complexes are two-electron-transfer reactions. From the reduction of the peak width of the differential pulse polarograms it is concluded that K/sub con/less than or equal to 1 for the conproportionation equilibrium [2,2] + [3,3] in equilibrium 2[2,3]. The mixed-valence 5+ ion has an intervalence-transfer band in the solid state (KBr) in the near-infrared spectral region. Given the saturated character of the bridge, this represents a clear example of an intramolecular outer-sphere electron-transfer transition

  1. Structural and magnetic characterization of a tetranuclear copper(II) cubane stabilized by intramolecular metal cation-π interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Rivière, Eric; Giorgi, Michel; Jamet, Hélène; Rousselot-Pailley, Pierre; Réglier, Marius; Simaan, A Jalila; Tron, Thierry

    2013-05-20

    A novel tetranuclear copper(II) complex (1) was synthesized from the self-assembly of copper(II) perchlorate and the ligand N-benzyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(1)). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that complex 1 consists of a Cu4(OH)4 cubane core, where the four copper(II) centers are linked by μ3-hydroxo bridges. Each copper(II) ion is in a distorted square-pyramidal geometry. X-ray analysis also evidenced an unusual metal cation-π interaction between the copper ions and phenyl substituents of the ligand. Calculations based on the density functional theory method were used to quantify the strength of this metal-π interaction, which appears as an important stabilizing parameter of the cubane core, possibly acting as a driving parameter in the self-aggregation process. In contrast, using the ligand N-phenethyl-1-(2-pyridyl)methaneimine (L(2)), which only differs from L(1) by one methylene group, the same synthetic procedure led to a binuclear bis(μ-hydroxo)copper(II) complex (2) displaying intermolecular π-π interactions or, by a slight variation of the experimental conditions, to a mononuclear complex (3). These complexes were studied by X-ray diffraction techniques. The magnetic properties of complexes 1 and 2 are reported and discussed.

  2. Intra-/Intermolecular Bifurcated Chalcogen Bonding in Crystal Structure of Thiazole/Thiadiazole Derived Binuclear (DiaminocarbenePdII Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Mikherdov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of cis-[PdCl2(CNXyl2] (Xyl = 2,6-Me2C6H3 with 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine in molar ratio 2:3 at RT in CH2Cl2 leads to binuclear (diaminocarbenePdII complex 3c. The complex was characterized by HRESI+-MS, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and its structure was elucidated by single-crystal XRD. Inspection of the XRD data for 3c and for three relevant earlier obtained thiazole/thiadiazole derived binuclear diaminocarbene complexes (3a EYOVIZ; 3b: EYOWAS; 3d: EYOVOF suggests that the structures of all these species exhibit intra-/intermolecular bifurcated chalcogen bonding (BCB. The obtained data indicate the presence of intramolecular S•••Cl chalcogen bonds in all of the structures, whereas varying of substituent in the 4th and 5th positions of the thiazaheterocyclic fragment leads to changes of the intermolecular chalcogen bonding type, viz. S•••π in 3a,b, S•••S in 3c, and S•••O in 3d. At the same time, the change of heterocyclic system (from 1,3-thiazole to 1,3,4-thiadiazole does not affect the pattern of non-covalent interactions. Presence of such intermolecular chalcogen bonding leads to the formation of one-dimensional (1D polymeric chains (for 3a,b, dimeric associates (for 3c, or the fixation of an acetone molecule in the hollow between two diaminocarbene complexes (for 3d in the solid state. The Hirshfeld surface analysis for the studied X-ray structures estimated the contributions of intermolecular chalcogen bonds in crystal packing of 3a–d: S•••π (3a: 2.4%; 3b: 2.4%, S•••S (3c: less 1%, S•••O (3d: less 1%. The additionally performed DFT calculations, followed by the topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader’s theory (AIM method, confirm the presence of intra-/intermolecular BCB S•••Cl/S•••S in dimer of 3c taken as a model system (solid state geometry. The AIM analysis demonstrates the presence of appropriate bond critical points for these

  3. Optimizing the Relaxivity of MRI Probes at High Magnetic Field Strengths With Binuclear GdIII Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Leone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The key criteria to optimize the relaxivity of a Gd(III contrast agent at high fields (defined as the region ≥ 1.5 T can be summarized as follows: (i the occurrence of a rotational correlation time τR in the range of ca. 0.2–0.5 ns; (ii the rate of water exchange is not critical, but a τM < 100 ns is preferred; (iii a relevant contribution from water molecules in the second sphere of hydration. In addition, the use of macrocycle-based systems ensures the formation of thermodynamically and kinetically stable Gd(III complexes. Binuclear Gd(III complexes could potentially meet these requirements. Their efficiency depends primarily on the degree of flexibility of the linker connecting the two monomeric units, the absence of local motions and the presence of contribution from the second sphere water molecules. With the aim to maximize relaxivity (per Gd over a wide range of magnetic field strengths, two binuclear Gd(III chelates derived from the well-known macrocyclic systems DOTA-monopropionamide and HPDO3A (Gd2L1 and Gd2L2, respectively were synthesized through a multistep synthesis. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST experiments carried out on Eu2L2 at different pH showed the occurrence of a CEST effect at acidic pH that disappears at neutral pH, associated with the deprotonation of the hydroxyl groups. Then, a complete 1H and 17O NMR relaxometric study was carried out in order to evaluate the parameters that govern the relaxivity associated with these complexes. The relaxivities of Gd2L1 and Gd2L2 (20 MHz, 298 K are 8.7 and 9.5 mM−1 s−1, respectively, +77% and +106% higher than the relaxivity values of the corresponding mononuclear GdDOTAMAP-En and GdHPDO3A complexes. A significant contribution of second sphere water molecules was accounted for the strong relaxivity enhancement of Gd2L2. MR phantom images of the dinuclear complexes compared to GdHPDO3A, recorded at 7 T, confirmed the superiority of Gd2L2. Finally, ab initio

  4. Hydrolytic activity of μ-alkoxide/acetato-bridged binuclear Cu(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    philic attack of the metal-bound hydroxide on the carboxyl of PNPP in the ... oping artificial enzymes with high efficiency under near neutral conditions is a big .... CH–OH); IR(KBr, film)νmax: 3394, 3055, 2896, 1633,. 1579, 1496, 1459, 1277, ...

  5. Comparison of two binuclear vanadium-catecholate complexes: Synthesis, X-ray structure and effects in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zixiang; Zhu, Linli; Lu, Xiaoming

    2011-08-01

    Two binuclear vanadium-catecholate complexes [Et 3NH] 2[V VO 2(μ-cat)] 2( 1) and [Et 3NH] 2[V VO 2(μ-N-2,3-D)] 2( 2) (cat = catechol, N-2,3-D = naphthalene-2,3-diol) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, IR, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry (CV). X-ray analysis reveals that the structures of complexes 1 and 2 are both in the anion form of V. Et 3N works as counter-ions and connects the main frame by hydrogen bonding. The electrochemical behavior of the two complexes is studied in comparison to that of the free ligands and the two complexes display different redox potentials. Pharmaceutical screenings of complexes 1 and 2 have been made against two representative cancer cell-lines A-549 (lung cancer) and Bel-7402 (liver cancer) by MTT assay. The inhibition of cell proliferation was determined 72 h after cells were exposed to the tested compounds at a concentration of 5 μg/mL. Complex 1 exhibits well inhibition ratio against both two cell-lines (76.28% and 75.94%), while 2 displays positive and negative effect (65.36% and -68.82%) respectively. In association with X-ray and electrochemistry, a preliminary analysis about the possible inhibitory mechanism is provided.

  6. Ratiometric colorimetric determination of coenzyme A using gold nanoparticles and a binuclear uranyl complex as optical probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Rurong; Liao, Lifu; Li, Shijun; Yang, Yanyan; Xiao, Xilin; Nie, Changming

    2016-01-01

    We describe a ratiometric colorimetric method for the determination of coenzyme A (CoA) by using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and bis-uranyl-bis-sulfosalophen (BUBSS) as optical probes. BUBSS is a binuclear uranyl complex and formed through the chelating reaction of two uranyl ions with bis-sulfosalophen. CoA is captured by the AuNPs via the thiol group and this leads to the formation of CoA-AuNPs. In a second step, BUBSS binds two CoA-AuNPs through a coordination reaction between the uranyl ions in BUBSS and the phosphate groups in CoA-AuNPs. This causes the CoA-AuNPs to aggregate and results in a color change from wine red to blue. A ratiometric colorimetric assay was established for CoA based on the ratiometric measurement of absorbance changes at 650 and 525 nm. Their ratio is linearly related to the concentration of CoA in the 0 to 1.2 μmol⋅L -1 range, with a 6 nmol⋅ L- 1 detection limit under optimal conditions. The method was successfully applied to the determination of CoA in spiked liver samples with recoveries between 99.4 and 102.6 %. (author)

  7. Quantum chemical calculations and experimental investigations on 2-aminobenzoic acid-cyclodiphosph(V)azane derivative and its homo-binuclear Cu(II) complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gogary, Tarek M.; Alaghaz, Abdel-Nasser M. A.; Ammar, Reda A. A.

    2012-03-01

    A novel 2-aminobenzoic acid-cyclodiphosph(V)azane ligand H4L and its homo-binuclear Cu(II) complex of the type [Cu2L(H2O)2].2.5 H2O in which L is 1,3-di(-o-pyridyl)-2,4-(dioxo)-2',4'-bis-(2-iminobenzoic acid) cyclodiphosph(V)azane, were synthesized and characterized by different physical techniques. Infrared spectra of the complex indicate deprotonation and coordination of the imine NH and carboxyl COOH groups. It also confirms that nitrogen atom of the pyridine ring contribute to the complexation. Electronic spectra and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal square-planar geometry for the Cu(II) complex. The elemental analyses and thermogravimetric results have justified the [Cu2L(H2O)2]·2.5H2O composition of the complex. Quantum chemical calculations were utilized to explore the electronic structure and stability of the H4L as well as the binuclear Cu(II) complex. Computational studies have been carried out at the DFT-B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory on the structural and spectroscopic properties of H4L and its binuclear Cu(II) complex. Different tautomers and geometrical isomers of the ligand were optimized at the ab initio DFT level. Simulated IR frequencies were scaled and compared with that experimentally measured. TD-DFT method was used to compute the UV-VIS spectra which show good agreement with measured electronic spectra.

  8. Determination of the nitrogen vacancy as a shallow compensating center in GaN doped with divalent metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, J; Catlow, C R A; Scanlon, D O; Keal, T W; Sherwood, P; Miskufova, M; Walsh, A; Woodley, S M; Sokol, A A

    2015-01-09

    We report accurate energetics of defects introduced in GaN on doping with divalent metals, focusing on the technologically important case of Mg doping, using a model that takes into consideration both the effect of hole localization and dipolar polarization of the host material, and includes a well-defined reference level. Defect formation and ionization energies show that divalent dopants are counterbalanced in GaN by nitrogen vacancies and not by holes, which explains both the difficulty in achieving p-type conductivity in GaN and the associated major spectroscopic features, including the ubiquitous 3.46 eV photoluminescence line, a characteristic of all lightly divalent-metal-doped GaN materials that has also been shown to occur in pure GaN samples. Our results give a comprehensive explanation for the observed behavior of GaN doped with low concentrations of divalent metals in good agreement with relevant experiment.

  9. Determination of the Nitrogen Vacancy as a Shallow Compensating Center in GaN Doped with Divalent Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, J.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Scanlon, D. O.; Keal, T. W.; Sherwood, P.; Miskufova, M.; Walsh, A.; Woodley, S. M.; Sokol, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    We report accurate energetics of defects introduced in GaN on doping with divalent metals, focusing on the technologically important case of Mg doping, using a model that takes into consideration both the effect of hole localization and dipolar polarization of the host material, and includes a well-defined reference level. Defect formation and ionization energies show that divalent dopants are counterbalanced in GaN by nitrogen vacancies and not by holes, which explains both the difficulty in achieving p -type conductivity in GaN and the associated major spectroscopic features, including the ubiquitous 3.46 eV photoluminescence line, a characteristic of all lightly divalent-metal-doped GaN materials that has also been shown to occur in pure GaN samples. Our results give a comprehensive explanation for the observed behavior of GaN doped with low concentrations of divalent metals in good agreement with relevant experiment.

  10. The large second-harmonic generation of LiCs{sub 2}PO{sub 4} is caused by the metal-cation-centered groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiyue; Guo, Guo-Cong; Hong, Maochun; Deng, Shuiquan [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter (FJIRSM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Fuzhou (China); Whangbo, Myung-Hwan [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter (FJIRSM), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Fuzhou (China); Department of Chemistry, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2018-04-03

    We evaluated the individual atom contributions to the second harmonic generation (SHG) coefficients of LiCs{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (LCPO) by introducing the partial response functionals on the basis of first principles calculations. The SHG response of LCPO is dominated by the metal-cation-centered groups CsO{sub 6} and LiO{sub 4}, not by the nonmetal-cation-centered groups PO{sub 4} expected from the existing models and theories. The SHG coefficients of LCPO are determined mainly by the occupied orbitals O 2p and Cs 5p as well as by the unoccupied orbitals Cs 5d and Li 2p. For the SHG response of a material, the polarizable atomic orbitals of the occupied and the unoccupied states are both important. (copyright 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Study of helium diffusion, implanted at a cyclotron, in face-centered cubic metals: Au, Ag and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciani, V.

    1985-01-01

    Helium in metals is produced by nuclear reactions of energetic particles. In nuclear technology the interest on helium in metals is import, due to its production by (n, α) reaction. Because helium has extremely low solubility in metals, the precipitation in the form of filled bubbles at elevated temperatures occurs, which have detrimental effects on mechanical properties and may limit the lifetime of structural components. One typical example is the high temperature embrittlement. The nucleation and growth of the bubbles strongly depends on the mobility of the helium. This work presents the study of helium diffusion in Au, Ag and Al at temperatures above room temperature. The helium created by (n, α) reactions has been simulated by homogeneous alpha particles implantation in cyclotron, at room temperature, in specimens of thicknesses between 5 and 50 μm and helium concentration between 10 -3 to 10 ppm. After implantation, the specimens were dropped in a furnace in a UHV-chamber and the diffusion was measured by observing the He-release during linear and isothermal annealings. The occurence of free diffusion was comparing the dependence of release kinetics on helium concentration, sample thickness, time and heating rate to diffusion theory and is clearly separeted from agglomeration process. The diffusion constants of helium in Au, Ag and Al follow an Arrhenius behavior, with: Au:D o =10 -1.0 cm 2 /s ΔH=1.70eV Ag:D 0 =10 -1.2 cm 2 /s ΔH=1.51eV Al:D o =10 +0.5 cm 2 /s ΔH=1.40eV. The results are compared to self-diffusion and to the diffusion of other gases in these metals. Comparison with theoretical estimates favours the vacancy mechanism for helium diffusion in Au, Ag and Al. (author) [pt

  12. Photoisomerization Mechanism of Ruthenium Sulfoxide Complexes: Role of the Metal-Centered Excited State in the Bond Rupture and Bond Construction Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Zhang, Lisheng; Zheng, Lvyin; Li, Xun; Fan, Xiaolin; Zhao, Yi

    2016-09-26

    Phototriggered intramolecular isomerization in a series of ruthenium sulfoxide complexes, [Ru(L)(tpy)(DMSO)](n+) (where tpy=2,2':6',2''-terpyridine; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide; L=2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), n=2; N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine (tmen) n=2; picolinate (pic), n=1; acetylacetonate (acac), n=1; oxalate (ox), n=0; malonate (mal), n=0), was investigated theoretically. It is observed that the metal-centered ligand field ((3) MC) state plays an important role in the excited state S→O isomerization of the coordinated DMSO ligand. If the population of (3) MCS state is thermally accessible and no (3) MCO can be populated from this state, photoisomerization will be turned off because the (3) MCS excited state is expected to lead to fast radiationless decay back to the original (1) GSS ground state or photodecomposition along the Ru(2+) -S stretching coordinate. On the contrary, if the population of (3) MCS (or (3) MCO ) state is inaccessible, photoinduced S→O isomerization can proceed adiabatically on the potential energy surface of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer excited states ((3) MLCTS →(3) MLCTO ). It is hoped that these results can provide valuable information for the excited state isomerization in photochromic d(6) transition-metal complexes, which is both experimentally and intellectually challenging as a field of study. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Human colon cancer targeted pro-apoptotic, anti-metastatic and cytostatic effects of binuclear Silver(I)-N-Heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Hussein, Mouayed A; Oon, Chern Ein; Haque, Rosenani A; Khadeer Ahamed, Mohamed B; Abdul Majid, Aman Shah; Abdul Majid, Amin Malik Shah

    2016-01-27

    The current mechanistic study was conducted to explore the effects of increased lipophilicity of binuclear silver(I)-NHC complexes on cytotoxicity. Two new silver(I)-N-Heterocyclic Carbene (NHC) complexes (3 and 4), having lypophilic terminal alkyl chains (Octyl and Decyl), were derived from meta-xylyl linked bis-benzimidazolium salts (1 and 2). Each of the synthesized compounds was characterized by microanalysis and spectroscopic techniques. The complexes were tested for their cytotoxicity against a panel of human cancer c as well normal cell lines using MTT assay. Based on MTT assay results, complex 4 was found to be selectively toxic towards human colorectal carcinoma cell line (HCT 116). Complex 4 was further studied in detail to explore the mechanism of cell death and findings of the study revealed that complex 4 has promising pro-apoptotic and anti-metastatic activities against HCT 116 cells. Furthermore, it showed pronounced cytostatic effects in HCT 116 multicellular spheroid model. Hence, binuclear silver(I)-NHC complexes with longer terminal aliphatic chains have worth to be further studied against human colon cancer for the purpose of drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Removal and recovery of radionuclides and toxic metals from wastes, soils and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.

    1993-07-01

    A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the removal of metals and radionuclides from contaminated materials, soils, and waste sites (Figure 1). In this process, citric acid, a naturally occurring organic complexing agent, is used to extract metals such as Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, and radionuclides Co, Sr, Th, and U from solid wastes by formation of water soluble, metal-citrate complexes. Citric acid forms different types of complexes with the transition metals and actinides, and may involve formation of a bidentate, tridentate, binuclear, or polynuclear complex species. The extract containing radionuclide/metal complex is then subjected to microbiological degradation followed by photochemical degradation under aerobic conditions. Several metal citrate complexes are biodegraded and the metals are recovered in a concentrated form with the bacterial biomass. Uranium forms binuclear complex with citric acid and is not biodegraded. The supernatant containing uranium citrate complex is separated and upon exposure to light, undergoes rapid degradation resulting in the formation of an insoluble, stable polymeric form of uranium. Uranium is recovered as a precipitate (uranium trioxide) in a concentrated form for recycling or for appropriate disposal. This treatment process, unlike others which use caustic reagents, does not create additional hazardous wastes for disposal and causes little damage to soil which can then be returned to normal use

  15. Ultrafast excited-state relaxation of a binuclear Ag(i) phosphine complex in gas phase and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, S V; Bäppler, F; Klopper, W; Walg, S P; Thiel, W R; Diller, R; Riehn, C

    2017-08-30

    The binuclear complex [Ag 2 (dcpm) 2 ](PF 6 ) 2 (dcpm = bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)methane) exhibits a structure with a close silver-silver contact mediated by the bridging ligand and thus a weak argentophilic interaction. Upon electronic excitation this cooperative effect is strongly increased and determines the optical and luminescence properties of the compound. We have studied here the ultrafast electronic dynamics in parallel in gas phase by transient photodissociation and in solution by transient absorption. In particular, we report the diverse photofragmentation pathways of isolated [Ag 2 (dcpm) 2 ] 2+ in an ion trap and its gas phase UV photodissociation spectrum. By pump-probe fragmentation action spectroscopy (λ ex = 260 nm) in the gas phase, we have obtained fragment-specific transients which exhibit a common ultrafast multiexponential decay. This is fitted to four time constants (0.6/5.8/100/>1000 ps), highlighting complex intrinsic photophysical processes. Remarkably, multiexponential dynamics (0.9/8.5/73/604 ps) are as well found for the relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile solution. Ab initio calculations at the level of approximate coupled-cluster singles-doubles (CC2) theory of ground and electronically excited states of the reduced model system [Ag 2 (dmpm) 2 ] 2+ (dmpm = bis(dimethylphosphino)methane) indicate a shortening of the Ag-Ag distance upon excitation by 0.3-0.4 Å. In C 2 geometry two close-lying singlet states S 1 ( 1 MC(dσ*-pπ), 1 B, 4.13 eV) and S 2 ( 1 MC(dσ*-pσ), 1 A, 4.45 eV) are found. The nearly dark S 1 state has not been reported so far. The excitation of the S 2 state carries a large oscillator strength for the calculated vertical transition (266 nm). Two related triplets are calculated at T 1 (3.87 eV) and T 2 (3.90 eV). From these findings we suggest possible relaxation pathways with the two short time constants ascribed to ISC/IVR and propose from the obtained similar values in gas phase that the fast solution dynamics

  16. Semiconductor color-center structure and excitation spectra: Equation-of-motion coupled-cluster description of vacancy and transition-metal defect photoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jesse J.; Duan, Xiaofeng F.; Burggraf, Larry W.

    2018-03-01

    Valence excitation spectra are computed for deep-center silicon-vacancy defects in 3C, 4H, and 6H silicon carbide (SiC), and comparisons are made with literature photoluminescence measurements. Optimizations of nuclear geometries surrounding the defect centers are performed within a Gaussian basis-set framework using many-body perturbation theory or density functional theory (DFT) methods, with computational expenses minimized by a QM/MM technique called SIMOMM. Vertical excitation energies are subsequently obtained by applying excitation-energy, electron-attached, and ionized equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOMCC) methods, where appropriate, as well as time-dependent (TD) DFT, to small models including only a few atoms adjacent to the defect center. We consider the relative quality of various EOMCC and TD-DFT methods for (i) energy-ordering potential ground states differing incrementally in charge and multiplicity, (ii) accurately reproducing experimentally measured photoluminescence peaks, and (iii) energy-ordering defects of different types occurring within a given polytype. The extensibility of this approach to transition-metal defects is also tested by applying it to silicon-substituted chromium defects in SiC and comparing with measurements. It is demonstrated that, when used in conjunction with SIMOMM-optimized geometries, EOMCC-based methods can provide a reliable prediction of the ground-state charge and multiplicity, while also giving a quantitative description of the photoluminescence spectra, accurate to within 0.1 eV of measurement for all cases considered.

  17. Simulation of changes in heavy metal contamination in farmland soils of a typical manufacturing center through logistic-based cellular automata modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Menglong; Wang, Qi; Li, Fangbai; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A customized logistic-based cellular automata (CA) model was developed to simulate changes in heavy metal contamination (HMC) in farmland soils of Dongguan, a manufacturing center in Southern China, and to discover the relationship between HMC and related explanatory variables (continuous and categorical). The model was calibrated through the simulation and validation of HMC in 2012. Thereafter, the model was implemented for the scenario simulation of development alternatives for HMC in 2022. The HMC in 2002 and 2012 was determined through soil tests and cokriging. Continuous variables were divided into two groups by odds ratios. Positive variables (odds ratios >1) included the Nemerow synthetic pollution index in 2002, linear drainage density, distance from the city center, distance from the railway, slope, and secondary industrial output per unit of land. Negative variables (odds ratios <1) included elevation, distance from the road, distance from the key polluting enterprises, distance from the town center, soil pH, and distance from bodies of water. Categorical variables, including soil type, parent material type, organic content grade, and land use type, also significantly influenced HMC according to Wald statistics. The relative operating characteristic and kappa coefficients were 0.91 and 0.64, respectively, which proved the validity and accuracy of the model. The scenario simulation shows that the government should not only implement stricter environmental regulation but also strengthen the remediation of the current polluted area to effectively mitigate HMC.

  18. Spectral sensitization of SrTiO3 photoanodes with binuclear 1,10-phenanthroline bis(2,2'-bipyridine) complexes of ruthenium(II) and tris(2,2'-bipyridine) ruthenium(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinnemans, A.H.A.; Mackor, A.

    1981-01-01

    A single crystal of strontium titanate, used as a photoanode for the photoelectrolysis of water, has been sensitized by mono‐ and binuclear ruthenium(II) complexes in acidic solution for visible light. The dependence of the photocurrent density on light intensity, dye concentration, wavelength and

  19. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  20. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Roguin, Ariel; Schroeder, Erwin; Philipp, Sebastian; Heitzer, Thomas; Schwacke, Harald; Ayzenberg, Oded; Serra, Antonio; Delarche, Nicolas; Luchner, Andreas; Slagboom, Ton

    2014-01-01

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  1. Evaluation of sediment trace metal records as paleoproductivity and paleoxygenation proxies in the upwelling center off Concepción, Chile (36°S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Praxedes; Dezileau, Laurent; Lange, Carina; Cardenas, Lissette; Sellanes, Javier; Salamanca, Marco A.; Maldonado, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the records of several trace metals sensitive to redox conditions in continental shelf sediments off Concepción, Chile (36°S). The continental margin off Concepción (36°S; 73°W) lies beneath an important upwelling center characterized by high primary production rates and, consequently, high fluxes of organic matter. In spring and summer, this material settles to the seafloor where it decays, producing periods of very low oxygen content in bottom waters (oxygen minimum zone develops at ∼100-400 m water depth, where dissolved oxygen levels are oxygen at the bottom increases drastically (>1 mL L -1). The goals of this study were to determine the input of trace metals to the sediment and to decipher how this information can be used to reveal variations in primary productivity or bottom oxygenation. Gravity cores collected at two stations - VG06-2 over the mid-shelf station (88 m water depth, upper boundary of the oxygen minimum zone) and VG06-3 over the outer shelf (120 m water depth, within the oxygen minimum zone) - were sampled for high resolution profiles (1 cm) of trace metals, biogenic opal, stable isotopes, and total organic carbon. The results suggest that the variability in the trace metal distribution on the continental shelf off Concepción is determined by redox conditions and the organic carbon flux to the bottom. Some sections of the sediment cores from the outer shelf showed appreciable authigenic enrichment of U, Cd, and Mo (EF: 5-10, 2-5, and 10-16 respectively) along with heavier values of δ 15N, suggesting periods of suboxic conditions. During these periods, fluxes of organic material to the bottom were higher, as indicated by elevated TOC and opal contents. Alternating periods of higher and lower trace metal contents were not observed mid-shelf as they were on the outer shelf. Rather, the mid-shelf samples showed authigenic enrichment of U, Cd, and Mo (EF: 1-6, 4-5, and 10-20, respectively) throughout the core except in a

  2. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbel, Raimund, E-mail: erbel@uk-essen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eggebrecht, Holger [Cardioangiological Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Roguin, Ariel [Department of Cardiology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Schroeder, Erwin [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Philipp, Sebastian [Department Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Elbe Klinikum Stade, Stade (Germany); Heitzer, Thomas [Department of Cardiology, Heart Center Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Schwacke, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonissen-Stiftungs- Krankenhaus Speyer (Germany); Ayzenberg, Oded [The Heart Institute, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Serra, Antonio [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España (Spain); Delarche, Nicolas [Cardiology unit, Pau General Hospital, Pau (France); Luchner, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Slagboom, Ton [Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  3. Origins and implications of temperature-dependent activation energy barriers for dislocation nucleation in face-centered cubic metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, D.H.; Curtin, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    The linking of atomistic simulations of stress-driven processes to experimentally observed mechanical behavior via the computation of activation energy barriers is a topic of intense current research. Using dislocation nucleation from a crack tip as the reaction process, long-time multiscale molecular dynamics simulations show that the activation barrier can exhibit significant temperature dependence. Using an analytic model for the nucleation process and computing the relevant material properties (elastic constants and stacking fault energies), the temperature dependence is shown to arise primarily from the temperature dependence of the material parameters for both Al and Ni. After thermally activated emission of the first partial dislocation, there is then a competition between two other thermally activated processes: twinning and full dislocation emission. Because the activation barriers depend on temperature, this transition is more complex than usually envisioned. Simulations in Al reveal that a transition from twinning to full dislocation emission back to twinning occurs with increasing temperature, which is counter to traditional metallurgical wisdom. Temperature-dependent activation energies are thus essential to accurate understanding and prediction of those phenomena that control fracture and deformation in metals at realistic loading rates.

  4. Removal of Retrievable Self-Expandable Metallic Tracheobronchial Stents: An 18-Year Experience in a Single Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Shin, Ji Hoon; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Song, Ho-Young

    2016-01-01

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the technical outcomes of removal of retrievable self-expandable metallic stents (REMSs) and identify predictors of technical failure in 81 patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures.Materials and MethodsA total of 98 REMSs were removed under fluoroscopic guidance in 81 patients with benign (n = 48) or malignant (n = 33) tracheobronchial strictures. Primary and secondary technical success rates and complication rate were evaluated. Technical outcomes with regard to underlying diseases were also evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictors of primary technical success.ResultsPrimary and secondary technical success rates were 86.7 and 94.9 %, respectively. Stent removal-related complication rate was 7.1 % (7/98) and all were bleeding after stent removal. All bleeding complications were minor and managed conservatively. Primary technical success rate for benign strictures was significantly lower compared with that for malignant strictures (80.9 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.029), but secondary technical success rate (93.7 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.652) did not differ between the two groups. Granulation tissue formation was identified as an independent predictor of primary technical success (odds ratio 0.249, 95 % CI 0.071–0.874, P = 0.030).ConclusionRemoval of REMSs in patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures is safe and technically feasible. Bronchoscopic guidance may be required when the removal using a hook wire fails. The presence of granulation tissue was the negative predictor of primary technical success.

  5. Removal of Retrievable Self-Expandable Metallic Tracheobronchial Stents: An 18-Year Experience in a Single Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Shin, Ji Hoon, E-mail: jhshin@amc.seoul.kr; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Song, Ho-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the technical outcomes of removal of retrievable self-expandable metallic stents (REMSs) and identify predictors of technical failure in 81 patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures.Materials and MethodsA total of 98 REMSs were removed under fluoroscopic guidance in 81 patients with benign (n = 48) or malignant (n = 33) tracheobronchial strictures. Primary and secondary technical success rates and complication rate were evaluated. Technical outcomes with regard to underlying diseases were also evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictors of primary technical success.ResultsPrimary and secondary technical success rates were 86.7 and 94.9 %, respectively. Stent removal-related complication rate was 7.1 % (7/98) and all were bleeding after stent removal. All bleeding complications were minor and managed conservatively. Primary technical success rate for benign strictures was significantly lower compared with that for malignant strictures (80.9 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.029), but secondary technical success rate (93.7 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.652) did not differ between the two groups. Granulation tissue formation was identified as an independent predictor of primary technical success (odds ratio 0.249, 95 % CI 0.071–0.874, P = 0.030).ConclusionRemoval of REMSs in patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures is safe and technically feasible. Bronchoscopic guidance may be required when the removal using a hook wire fails. The presence of granulation tissue was the negative predictor of primary technical success.

  6. Removal of Retrievable Self-Expandable Metallic Tracheobronchial Stents: An 18-Year Experience in a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Shin, Ji Hoon; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Kim, Min Tae; Cho, Young Chul; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Song, Ho-Young

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to retrospectively evaluate the technical outcomes of removal of retrievable self-expandable metallic stents (REMSs) and identify predictors of technical failure in 81 patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures. A total of 98 REMSs were removed under fluoroscopic guidance in 81 patients with benign (n = 48) or malignant (n = 33) tracheobronchial strictures. Primary and secondary technical success rates and complication rate were evaluated. Technical outcomes with regard to underlying diseases were also evaluated. Logistic regression models were constructed to identify predictors of primary technical success. Primary and secondary technical success rates were 86.7 and 94.9 %, respectively. Stent removal-related complication rate was 7.1 % (7/98) and all were bleeding after stent removal. All bleeding complications were minor and managed conservatively. Primary technical success rate for benign strictures was significantly lower compared with that for malignant strictures (80.9 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.029), but secondary technical success rate (93.7 vs. 97.1 %, P = 0.652) did not differ between the two groups. Granulation tissue formation was identified as an independent predictor of primary technical success (odds ratio 0.249, 95 % CI 0.071-0.874, P = 0.030). Removal of REMSs in patients with benign and malignant tracheobronchial strictures is safe and technically feasible. Bronchoscopic guidance may be required when the removal using a hook wire fails. The presence of granulation tissue was the negative predictor of primary technical success.

  7. Superhalogen properties of hetero-binuclear anions MM‧F4- and MM″F5- (M = Li, Na, M‧ = Be, Mg, Ca; M″ = B, Al, Ga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Li, Ying; He, Hui-Min; Tong, Jing; Wu, Di; Li, Zhi-Ru

    2017-09-01

    Hetero-binuclear superhalogen anions, namely MM‧F4- and MM″F5- (M = Li, Na; M‧ = Be, Mg, Ca; M″ = B, Al, Ga), have been theoretically characterized at the MP2(FULL)/6-311+G(3df) level. It is found that two central atoms can be linked by at most three fluorine ligands. The large vertical electron detachment energies (VDEs, 7.449-8.978 eV) verify the superhalogen identity of these anions. The VDEs of both MM‧F4- and MM″F5- decrease when the atomic size of M increases whereas increase with the size of M‧ and M″. Besides, the extra electron distribution also has effect on the VDEs of such superhalogen anions.

  8. Electron transfer. 93. Further reactions of transition-metal-center oxidants with vitamin B12s (Cob(I)alamin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, G.C.; Ghosh, S.K.; Gould, E.S.

    1988-01-01

    Vitamin B 12s (cob(I)alamin) reduces europium(III), titanium(IV) (TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- ), and uranium(VI) in aqueous solution. These oxidants undergo one-electron changes, leading in each case to the cobalt product cob(II)alamin (B 12r ). The reduction of Eu 3+ , which is inhibited by TES buffer, but not by glycine, is outer sphere. Its limiting specific rate (1 x 10 2 M -1 s -1 ), incorporated in the Marcus treatment, yields a B 12s ,B 12r self-exchange rate of 10 4.8±0.5 M -1 s -1 . Reductions of TiO(C 2 O 4 ) 2 2- are accelerated by H + and by acetic acid. Kinetic patterns suggest three competing reaction paths involving varying degrees of protonation of the Ti(IV) center or its association with acetic acid. The very rapid reduction of U(VI) (k = 4 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 ) yields U(V) in several buffering media, even when B 12s is taken in excess. The much slower conversion of U(V) to U(IV), although thermodynamically favored, appears to be retarded by the extensive reorganization of the coordination sphere of oxo-bound U(V) that must accompany its acceptance of an additional electron. The observed specific rate for the B 12s -U(VI) reaction is in reasonable agreement, in the framework of the Marcus formalism, with reported values of the formal potential and the self-exchange rate for U(V,VI). 37 references, 4 tables

  9. Coordination of different ligands to copper(II) and cobalt(III) metal centers enhances Zika virus and dengue virus loads in both arthropod cells and human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Shovan; Celestine, Michael J; Khanal, Supreet; Huddleston, Alexis; Simms, Colin; Arca, Jessa Faye; Mitra, Amlan; Heller, Loree; Kraj, Piotr J; Ledizet, Michel; Anderson, John F; Neelakanta, Girish; Holder, Alvin A; Sultana, Hameeda

    2018-01-01

    Trace elements such as copper and cobalt have been associated with virus-host interactions. However, studies to show the effect of conjugation of copper(II) or cobalt(III) metal centers to thiosemicarbazone ligand(s) derived from either food additives or mosquito repellent such as 2-acetylethiazole or citral, respectively, on Zika virus (ZIKV) or dengue virus (serotype 2; DENV2) infections have not been explored. In this study, we show that four compounds comprising of thiosemicarbazone ligand derived from 2-acetylethiazole viz., (E)-N-ethyl-2-[1-(thiazol-2-yl)ethylidene]hydrazinecarbothioamide (acetylethTSC) (compound 1), a copper(II) complex with acetylethTSC as a ligand (compound 2), a thiosemicarbazone ligand-derived from citral (compound 3) and a cobalt(III) complex with a citral-thiosemicarbazone ligand (compound 4) increased DENV2 and ZIKV replication in both mosquito C6/36 cells and human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells). Treatment of both cell lines with compounds 2 or 4 showed increased dengue viral titers at all three tested doses. Enhanced dengue viral plaque formation was also noted at the tested dose of 100μM, suggesting higher production of infectious viral particles. Treatment with the compounds 2 or 4 enhanced ZIKV and DENV2 RNA levels in HeLa cell line and primary cultures of mouse bone marrow derived dendritic cells. Also, pre- or post treatments with conjugated compounds 2 or 4 showed higher loads of ZIKV or DENV2 envelope (E) protein in HaCaT cells. No changes in loads of E-protein were found in ZIKV-infected C6/36 cells, when compounds were treated after infection. In addition, we tested bis(1,10-phenanthroline)copper(II) chloride ([Cu(phen) 2 ]Cl 2 , (compound 5) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline)cobalt(III) chloride ([Co(phen) 3 ]Cl 3 , (compound 6) that also showed enhanced DENV2 loads. Also, we found that copper(II) chloride dehydrate (CuCl 2 ·2H 2 O) or cobalt(II) chloride hexahydrate (CoCl 2 ·6H 2 O) alone had no effects as "free" cations

  10. Novel condensation of Au-centered trigonal prisms in rare-earth-metal-rich tellurides: Er7Au2Te2 and Lu7Au2Te2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shalabh; Corbett, John D

    2010-07-14

    A new monoclinic structure occurs for Er(7)Au(2)Te(2) according to X-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals grown at 1200 degrees C: C2/m, Z = 4, a = 17.8310(9) A, b = 3.9819(5) A, c = 16.9089(9) A, beta = 104.361(4) degrees. The isostructural Lu(7)Au(2)Te(2) also exists according to X-ray powder pattern means, a = 17.536(4) A, b = 3.9719(4) A, c = 16.695(2) A, beta = 104.33(1) degrees. The structure contains zigzag chains of condensed, Au-centered tricapped trigonal prisms (TCTP) of Er along c that also share basal faces along b to generate puckered sheets. Further bi-face-capping Er atoms between these generate the three dimensional network along a, with tellurium in cavities outlined by augmented trigonal prismatic Er polyhedra. Bonding analysis via LMTO-DFT methods reveal very significant Er-Au bonding interactions, as quantified by their energy-weighted Hamilton overlap populations (-ICOHP), approximately 49% of the total for all interactions. These and similar Er-Te contributions sharply contrast with the small Er-Er population, only approximately 14% of the total in spite of the high proportion of Er-Er contacts. The strong polar bonding of Er to the electronegative Au and Te leaves Er relatively oxidized, with many of its 5d states falling above the Fermi level and empty. The contradiction with customary representations of structures that highlight rare-earth metal clusters is manifest. The large Er-Au Hamilton overlap population is in accord with the strong bonding between early and late transition metals first noted by Brewer in 1973. The relationship of this structure to the more distorted orthorhombic (Imm2) structure type of neighboring Dy(7)Ir(2)Te(2) is considered.

  11. On the Dehydrocoupling of Alkenylacetylenes Mediated by Various Samarocene Complexes: A Charming Story of Metal Cooperativity Revealing a Novel Dual Metal σ-Bond Metathesis Type of Mechanism (DM|σ-BM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos E. Kefalidis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevailing reductive chemistry of Sm(II has been accessed and explored mostly by the use of samarocene precursors. The highly reducing character of these congeners, along with their Lewis acidity and predominantly ionic bonding, allows for the relatively facile activation of C–H bonds, as well as peculiar transformations of unsaturated substrates (e.g., C–C couplings. Among other important C–C coupling reactions, the reaction of phenylacetylene with different mono- or bimetallic samarocene complexes affords trienediyl complexes of the type {[(C5Me52Sm]2(µ-η2:η2-PhC4Ph}. In contrast, when t-butylacetylene is used, uncoupled monomers of the type (C5Me52Sm(C≡C–tBu were obtained. Although this type of reactivity may appear to be simple, the mechanism underlying these transformations is complex. This conclusion is drawn from the density functional theory (DFT mechanistic studies presented herein. The operating mechanistic paths consist of: (i the oxidation of each samarium center and the concomitant double reduction of the alkyne to afford a binuclear intermediate; (ii the C–H scission of the acetylinic bond that lies in between the two metals; (iii a dual metal σ-bond metathesis (DM|σ-SBM process that releases H2; and eventually (iv the C–C coupling of the two bridged μ-alkynides to give the final bimetallic trienediyl complexes. For the latter mechanistic route, the experimentally used phenylacetylene was considered first as well as the aliphatic hex-1-yne. More interestingly, we shed light into the formation of the mono(alkynide complex, being the final experimental product of the reaction with t-butylacetylene.

  12. Influence of stacking fault energies on the size distribution and character of defect clusters formed by collision cascades in face-centered cubic metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to evaluate the influence of the stacking fault energy (SFE as a single variable parameter on defect formation by collision cascades in face-centered cubic metals. The simulations are performed for energies of a primary knock-on atom (EPKA up to 50keV at 100K by using six sets of the recently developed embedded atom method–type potentials. Neither the number of residual defects nor their clustering behavior is found to be affected by the SFE, except for the mean size of the vacancy clusters at EPKA=50keV. The mean size increases as the SFE decreases because of the enhanced formation of large vacancy clusters, which prefer to have stacking faults inside them. On the other hand, the ratio of glissile self-interstitial atom (SIA clusters decreases as the SFE increases. At higher SFEs, both the number of Frank loops and number of perfect loops tend to decrease; instead, three-dimensional irregular clusters with higher densities appear, most of which are sessile. The effect of SFE on the number of Frank loops becomes apparent only at a high EPKA of 50keV, where comparably large SIA clusters can be formed with a higher density.

  13. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  14. DNA-binding, catalytic oxidation, C—C coupling reactions and antibacterial activities of binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Manimaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available New hexa-coordinated binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type {[(B(EPh3(COClRu]2L} (where, E = P or As; B = PPh3 or AsPh3 or pyridine; L = mononucleating NS donor of N-substituted thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–vis and 31P{1H} NMR cyclic voltammetric studies. The DNA-binding studies of Ru(II complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were investigated by UV–vis, viscosity measurements, gel-electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new complexes have been used as catalysts in C—C coupling reaction and in the oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding carbonyl compounds by using NMO as co-oxidant and molecular oxygen (O2 atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new binucleating thiosemicarbazone ligands and their Ru(II complexes were also screened for their antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. From this study, it was found out that the activity of the complexes almost reaches the effectiveness of the conventional bacteriocide.

  15. Robust binding between carbon nitride nanosheets and a binuclear ruthenium(II) complex enabling durable, selective CO{sub 2} reduction under visible light in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriki, Ryo; Ishitani, Osamu; Maeda, Kazuhiko [Department of Chemistry, School of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan); Yamamoto, Muneaki; Yoshida, Tomoko [Advanced Research Institute for Natural Science and Technology, Osaka City University (Japan); Higuchi, Kimitaka; Yamamoto, Yuta; Akatsuka, Masato; Yagi, Shinya [Institute of Materials and Systems for Sustainability, Nagoya University (Japan); Lu, Daling [Suzukakedai Materials Analysis Division, Technical Department, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2017-04-18

    Carbon nitride nanosheets (NS-C{sub 3}N{sub 4}) were found to undergo robust binding with a binuclear ruthenium(II) complex (RuRu') even in basic aqueous solution. A hybrid material consisting of NS-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} (further modified with nanoparticulate Ag) and RuRu' promoted the photocatalytic reduction of CO{sub 2} to formate in aqueous media, in conjunction with high selectivity (approximately 98 %) and a good turnover number (>2000 with respect to the loaded Ru complex). These represent the highest values yet reported for a powder-based photocatalytic system during CO{sub 2} reduction under visible light in an aqueous environment. We also assessed the desorption of RuRu' from the Ag/C{sub 3}N{sub 4} surface, a factor that can contribute to a loss of activity. It was determined that desorption is not induced by salt additives, pH changes, or photoirradiation, which partly explains the high photocatalytic performance of this material. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Temperature-dependent transitions between normal and inverse isotope effects pertaining to the interaction of H-H and C-H bonds with transition metal centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Gerard

    2009-02-17

    Deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) serve as versatile tools to infer details about reaction mechanisms and the nature of transition states, while equilibrium isotope effects (EIEs) associated with the site preferences of hydrogen and deuterium enable researchers to study aspects of molecular structure. Researchers typically interpret primary deuterium isotope effects based on two simple guidelines: (i) the KIE for an elementary reaction is normal (k(H)/k(D) > 1) and (ii) the EIE is dictated by deuterium preferring to be located in the site corresponding to the highest frequency oscillator. In this Account, we evaluate the applicability of these rules to the interactions of H-H and C-H bonds with a transition metal center. Significantly, experimental and computational studies question the predictability of primary EIEs in these systems based on the notion that deuterium prefers to occupy the highest frequency oscillator. In particular, the EIEs for (i) formation of sigma-complexes by coordination of H-H and C-H bonds and (ii) oxidative addition of dihydrogen exhibit unusual temperature dependencies, such that the same system may demonstrate both normal (i.e., K(H)/K(D) > 1) and inverse (i.e., K(H)/K(D) ZPE (where SYM is the symmetry factor, MMI is the mass-moment of inertia term, EXC is the excitation term, and ZPE is the zero-point energy term), and the distinctive temperature profile results from the inverse ZPE (enthalpy) and normal [SYM x MMI x EXC] (entropy) components opposing each other and having different temperature dependencies. At low temperatures, the ZPE component dominates and the EIE is inverse, while at high temperatures, the [SYM x MMI x EXC] component dominates and the EIE is normal. The inverse nature of the ZPE term is a consequence of the rotational and translational degrees of freedom of RH (R = H, CH(3)) becoming low-energy isotopically sensitive vibrations in the product, while the normal nature of the [SYM x MMI x EXC] component

  17. Identification of the Regulator Gene Responsible for the Acetone-Responsive Expression of the Binuclear Iron Monooxygenase Gene Cluster in Mycobacteria ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hirose, Satomi; Semba, Hisashi; Kino, Kuniki

    2011-01-01

    The mimABCD gene cluster encodes the binuclear iron monooxygenase that oxidizes propane and phenol in Mycobacterium smegmatis strain MC2 155 and Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523. Interestingly, expression of the mimABCD gene cluster is induced by acetone. In this study, we investigated the regulator gene responsible for this acetone-responsive expression. In the genome sequence of M. smegmatis strain MC2 155, the mimABCD gene cluster is preceded by a gene designated mimR, which is divergently transcribed. Sequence analysis revealed that MimR exhibits amino acid similarity with the NtrC family of transcriptional activators, including AcxR and AcoR, which are involved in acetone and acetoin metabolism, respectively. Unexpectedly, many homologs of the mimR gene were also found in the sequenced genomes of actinomycetes. A plasmid carrying a transcriptional fusion of the intergenic region between the mimR and mimA genes with a promoterless green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was constructed and introduced into M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. Using a GFP reporter system, we confirmed by deletion and complementation analyses that the mimR gene product is the positive regulator of the mimABCD gene cluster expression that is responsive to acetone. M. goodii strain 12523 also utilized the same regulatory system as M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. Although transcriptional activators of the NtrC family generally control transcription using the σ54 factor, a gene encoding the σ54 factor was absent from the genome sequence of M. smegmatis strain MC2 155. These results suggest the presence of a novel regulatory system in actinomycetes, including mycobacteria. PMID:21856847

  18. Metal-organic frameworks with dynamic interlocked components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukotic, V. Nicholas; Harris, Kristopher J.; Zhu, Kelong; Schurko, Robert W.; Loeb, Stephen J.

    2012-06-01

    The dynamics of mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes have been studied in solution as examples of rudimentary molecular switches and machines, but in this medium, the molecules are randomly dispersed and their motion incoherent. As a strategy for achieving a higher level of molecular organization, we have constructed a metal-organic framework material using a [2]rotaxane as the organic linker and binuclear Cu(II) units as the nodes. Activation of the as-synthesized material creates a void space inside the rigid framework that allows the soft macrocyclic ring of the [2]rotaxane to rotate rapidly, unimpeded by neighbouring molecular components. Variable-temperature 13C and 2H solid-state NMR experiments are used to characterize the nature and rate of the dynamic processes occurring inside this unique material. These results provide a blueprint for the future creation of solid-state molecular switches and molecular machines based on mechanically interlocked molecules.

  19. Evaluation of Orthopedic Metal Artifact Reduction Application in Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction of Spinal Instrumentation: A Single Saudi Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Amir Monir

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the commercially available orthopedic metal artifact reduction (OMAR) technique in postoperative three-dimensional computed tomography (3DCT) reconstruction studies after spinal instrumentation and to investigate its clinical application. One hundred and twenty (120) patients with spinal metallic implants were included in the study. All had 3DCT reconstruction examinations using the OMAR software after obtaining the informed consents and approval of the Institution Ethical Committee. The degree of the artifacts, the related muscular density, the clearness of intermuscular fat planes, and definition of the adjacent vertebrae were qualitatively evaluated. The diagnostic satisfaction and quality of the 3D reconstruction images were thoroughly assessed. The majority (96.7%) of 3DCT reconstruction images performed were considered satisfactory to excellent for diagnosis. Only 3.3% of the reconstructed images had rendered unacceptable diagnostic quality. OMAR can effectively reduce metallic artifacts in patients with spinal instrumentation with highly diagnostic 3DCT reconstruction images.

  20. Composite photocatalyst containing Eosin Y and multiwalled carbon nanotubes loaded with CuO/NiO: Mixed metal oxide as an active center of H2 evolution from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Shizhao; Chen Lili; Li Xiangqing; Mu Jin

    2012-01-01

    A composite photocatalyst containing Eosin Y as a sensitizer, multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a supporter material or electron transfer channel, and CuO/NiO as an active center of H 2 evolution from water was fabricated and characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope. Meanwhile, photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water over this catalyst was explored using triethanolamine as a sacrificial reagent under visible irradiation. A rate of H 2 evolution of approximately 1.0 mmol g -1 h -1 was achieved under optimal conditions. Furthermore, for practical purposes, the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution was studied as a function of content of CuO/NiO, mass ratio of CuO to NiO, pH of solution, concentration of triethanolamine and dosage of Eosin Y, respectively. The results show that mixed metal oxides are a kind of promising active centers of H 2 evolution from water in the photocatalytic system studied.

  1. Composite photocatalyst containing Eosin Y and multiwalled carbon nanotubes loaded with CuO/NiO: Mixed metal oxide as an active center of H2 evolution from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Shi-Zhao; Chen, Lili; Li, Xiangqing; Mu, Jin

    2012-06-01

    A composite photocatalyst containing Eosin Y as a sensitizer, multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a supporter material or electron transfer channel, and CuO/NiO as an active center of H2 evolution from water was fabricated and characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope. Meanwhile, photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water over this catalyst was explored using triethanolamine as a sacrificial reagent under visible irradiation. A rate of H2 evolution of approximately 1.0 mmol g-1 h-1 was achieved under optimal conditions. Furthermore, for practical purposes, the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution was studied as a function of content of CuO/NiO, mass ratio of CuO to NiO, pH of solution, concentration of triethanolamine and dosage of Eosin Y, respectively. The results show that mixed metal oxides are a kind of promising active centers of H2 evolution from water in the photocatalytic system studied.

  2. A study of fundamental reaction pathways for transition metal alkyl complexes. I. The reaction of a nickel methyl complex with alkynes. Ii. The mechanism of aldehyde formation in the reaction of a molybdenum hydride with molybdenum alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, John Mitchell [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1980-06-12

    it was possible to show that the mixed dimers MeCpMo(CO)3-(CO)3MoCp (3b) and MeCpMo(CO)2≡(CO)2 MoCp (4b) are the predominant kinetic products of the reaction. Additionally labeling the carbonyl ligands of 1a with 13CO led to the conclusion that all three of the carbonyl ligands in 1a end up in the tetracarbonyl dimers 4a if the reaction is carried out under a continuous purge of argon Trapping studies failed to find any evidence for the intermediacy of either [CpMo(CO)3] - or [CpMo(CO)3] + in this reaction. A mechanism is proposed that involves the initial migration of the alkyl ligand in 2 to CO forming an unsaturated acyl complex which reacts with 1a to give a binuclear complex containing a three center-two electron Mo-H-Mo bond. This complex then selectively looses a carbonyl from the acyl molybdenum, migrates the hydride to that same metal, and forms a metal-metal bond. This binuclear complex with the hydride and acyl ligands on one metal reductively eliminates aldehyde, and migrates a carbonyl ligand, to give 4a directly. The other product 3a is formed by addition of two molecules of free CO to 4a.

  3. METALS (Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences) and the Value of Collaborative Field-centered Experiences in the Geosciences (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, L. D.

    2013-12-01

    METALS (Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences) is a field-based, geoscience diversity program developed by a collaborative venture among San Francisco State University, the University of Texas at El Paso, the University of New Orleans, and Purdue University. Since 2010, this program has created meaningful geoscience experiences for underrepresented minorities by engaging 30 high school students in experiential learning opportunities each year. During METALS field trips, the primarily urban students observe natural landforms, measure water quality, conduct beach profiles, and interpret stratigraphic and structural features in locations that have included southern Utah, southern Louisiana, central Wyoming, and northern California. In these geological settings participants are also able to focus on societally relevant, community-related issues. Results from program evaluation suggest that student participants view METALS as: (1) opening up new opportunities for field-based science not normally available to them, (2) engaging in a valuable science-based field experience, (3) an inspirational, but often physically challenging, undertaking that combines high-interest geology content with an exciting outdoor adventure, and (4) a unique social experience that brings together people from various parts of the United States. Further evaluation findings from the four summer trips completed thus far demonstrate that active learning opportunities through direct interaction with the environment is an effective way to engage students in geoscience-related learning. Students also seem to benefit from teaching strategies that include thoughtful reflection, journaling, and teamwork, and mentors are positive about engaging with these approaches. Participants appear motivated to explore geoscience topics further and often discuss having new insights and new perspectives leading to career choices in geosciences. Additionally, students who had a prior and

  4. Y-shaped bilateral self-expandable metallic stent placement for malignant hilar biliary obstruction: data from a referral center for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mitri, R; Mocciaro, F

    2014-01-01

    Malignant hilar strictures are a clinical challenge because of the current therapeutic approach and the poor prognosis. In recent years, self-expandable metallic stents have proven more effective than plastic stents for palliation of malignant hilar strictures, with the bilateral stent-in-stent technique registering a high success rate. We report our experience with Y-shaped endoscopic self-expandable metallic stents placement for treatment of advanced malignant hilar strictures. From April 2009 to August 2012, we prospectively collected data on patients treated with Y-shaped SEMS placement for advanced malignant hilar carcinoma. Data on technical success, clinical success, and complications were collected. Twenty patients (9 males) were treated (mean age 64.2 ± 15.3 years). The grade of malignant hilar strictures according to the Bismuth classification was II in 5 patients (25%), IIIa in 1 (5%), and IV in 14 (70%). The mean bilirubin level was 14.7 ± 4.9 mg/dL. Technical success was achieved in all patients, with a significant reduction in bilirubin levels (2.9 ± 1.7 mg/dL). One patient experienced cholangitis as early complication, while in 2 patients stent ingrowth was observed. No stents migration was recorded. There was no procedure-related mortality. At the end of the follow-up (7.1 ± 3.1 months), 13 of the 20 patients (65%) had died. Our experience confirms endoscopic bilateral self-expandable metallic stents placement with stent-in-stent technique (Y-shaped configuration) as a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar strictures.

  5. Y-Shaped Bilateral Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Malignant Hilar Biliary Obstruction: Data from a Referral Center for Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Di Mitri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim. Malignant hilar strictures are a clinical challenge because of the current therapeutic approach and the poor prognosis. In recent years, self-expandable metallic stents have proven more effective than plastic stents for palliation of malignant hilar strictures, with the bilateral stent-in-stent technique registering a high success rate. We report our experience with Y-shaped endoscopic self-expandable metallic stents placement for treatment of advanced malignant hilar strictures. Methods. From April 2009 to August 2012, we prospectively collected data on patients treated with Y-shaped SEMS placement for advanced malignant hilar carcinoma. Data on technical success, clinical success, and complications were collected. Results. Twenty patients (9 males were treated (mean age 64.2 ± 15.3 years. The grade of malignant hilar strictures according to the Bismuth classification was II in 5 patients (25%, IIIa in 1 (5%, and IV in 14 (70%. The mean bilirubin level was 14.7 ± 4.9 mg/dL. Technical success was achieved in all patients, with a significant reduction in bilirubin levels (2.9 ± 1.7 mg/dL. One patient experienced cholangitis as early complication, while in 2 patients stent ingrowth was observed. No stents migration was recorded. There was no procedure-related mortality. At the end of the follow-up (7.1 ± 3.1 months, 13 of the 20 patients (65% had died. Conclusions. Our experience confirms endoscopic bilateral self-expandable metallic stents placement with stent-in-stent technique (Y-shaped configuration as a feasible, effective, and safe procedure for palliation of unresectable malignant hilar strictures.

  6. [The application of Y-shaped self-expandable covered metal stents in the thoracostomach-airway fistula: a single center, 11 years experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Li, Tengfei; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Gang; Ren, Jianzhuang; Ren, Kewei; Lu, Huibin; Zhang, Quanhui; Li, Zongming

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the clinical feasibility and efficacy of Y-shaped self-expandable covered metal stents (Y-stents) in the management of thoracostomach-airway fistula. Retrospective analysis was performed for 108 patients treated for thoracostomach-airway fistula with Y-shaped self-expandable coated metal stents between April 2003 and October 2014. Y-stents were designed based on the dimensions of trachea and bronchus and sites of the fistula and then were inserted under DSA monitoring. There were 65 cases with single big Y-stent placement, 26 cases with single small Y-stent placement, 23 cases with double Y-stents placement, and 1 case with 3 Y-stents placement. Stent implantation was successfully accomplished with single manipulation in all patients. Complete occlusion of the fistula was obtained in 104 patients after the primary manipulation, and 4 patients required a secondary manipulation where a double Y-stents was inserted because of failure of primary manipulate. Ninety-two patients completed the follow-up , while 16 were lost. Fifty-nine patients died while 33 were alive with marked improvement in their quality of life. The placement of Y-stents can effectively occlude the thoracostomach-airway fistula in patients who had had the esophageal tumors resected. The technique is not only feasible but reliable to improve the quality of life of the patients.

  7. Explosion metal welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popoff, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    Process parameters pertaining to welding similar and dissimilar metals using explosives are reviewed. The discussion centers on the interrelationship of physical parameters which play a part in achieving desirable metallurgical results. Present activities in explosion metal welding at LASL are presented and shown how they related to the interests of the ERDA community

  8. On the measurement of the stacking-fault energies of face centered cubic metal and austenitic stainless steels by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.F.A.

    1985-01-01

    An X-rays diffraction method was applied to measure the Stacking-Fault Energies (SFE) of the AISI 304, AISI 316, AISI 347 and DIN-WERKSTOFF 1.4970 Austenitic Stainless Steels. The SFE determination plays an important role in the research of the mechanical behaviour of the Metal and Alloys, their deformation mechanisms, stability of microstructure amd electronic configuration. The method is based on the relationship between the SFE and the ratio of the Mean Square Strain to the Stacking-Fault probability. The Mean Square Strain was evaluated by Fourier Analysis of X-rays Diffraction profiles, corrected to reduce instrumental effects, followed by the application of the Warren-Averbach method to the Fourier Coefficients. The Stacking-Fault probabilities were derived from the changes of peak separations between cold-worked and annealed specimens. (author) [pt

  9. Introduction of Artificial Pinning Center into PLD-YBCO Coated Conductor on IBAD and Self-Epitaxial CeO2 Buffered Metal Substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, H.; Yamada, Y.; Ishida, S.; Takahashi, K.; Konishi, M.; Ibi, A.; Miyata, S.; Kato, T.; Hirayama, T.; Shiohara, Y.

    2006-01-01

    In order to fabricate YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) coated conductors with high critical current density Jc in magnetic fields, we fabricated YBCO coated conductors with artificial pinning centers by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method on a self epitaxial PLD-CeO2 layer and ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD)-Gd2Zr2O7 (GZO) buffered Hastelloy tape. Artificial pinning centers were introduced by the PLD deposition using the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) oxide target (nano-dot method) and YBCO target including YSZ particles (mixed target method). In the experiments using YSZ oxide target, YSZ nano-dots were observed. They were approximately 15 nm in height and 10 nm to 70 nm in diameter. We found that the density of nano-dots was controlled by the number of laser pulses. These samples exhibited higher Jc than YBCO films in magnetic fields. Furthermore, a similar improvement of Jc was observed in the experiments using YBCO target including YSZ particles. TEM observation revealed that columnar nano-structure made of BaZrO3 was formed during YBCO deposition and it was effective for pinning. We call this new epitaxial nano-structure 'bamboo structure' from its anisotropic growth and morphology

  10. Materials Characterization Center state-of-the-art report on corrosion data pertaining to metallic barriers for nuclear-waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merz, M.D.

    1982-10-01

    A compilation of published corrosion data on metals that have been suggested as canisters and overpack materials is presented. The data were categorized according to the solutions used in testing and divided into two parts: high-ionic strength solutions (such as seawater and brine) and low-ionic-strength waters (such as basalt and tuff waters). This distinction was made primarily because of the general difference in aggressiveness of these solutions with respect to general corrosion. A considerable amount of data indicated that titanium alloys have acceptably low uniform corrosion rates in anticipated repository sites; the other possible corrosion failure modes for titanium alloys, such as stress corrosion cracking and delayed failure due to hydrogen, have not been sufficiently studied to make any similar conclusions about lifetime with respect to these particular degradation processes. Other data suggested that iron-base alloys are sufficiently resistant to corrosion in basalt and tuff waters, although the effects of radiation and radiation combined with elevated temperature have not been reported in enough detail to conclusively qualify iron-base alloys for any particular barrier thickness in regard to uniform corrosion rate. The effect of overpack size on corrosion rate has been given little attention. A review of long-term underground data indicated that temperature and accessibility to oxygen were too different for deep geologic repositories to make the underground corrosion data directly applicable. However, the characteristics of corrosion attack, statistical treatment of data, and kinetics of corrosion showed that corrosion proceeds in a systematic and predictable way

  11. Macroscopic and bulk-controlled elastic modes in an interaction of interstitial alcali metal cations within a face-centered cubic crystalline fullerine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsysman, C.L.; Oltarzhevskaya, Y.T. [Institute for Metal Physics, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1994-12-31

    The calculations in a majority of previous works for the fulleride (AqC{sub 60}) crystals were performed within the framework of the rigid-lattice model, neglecting the distoration relaxation of the host fullerene (C{sub 60}) crystal caused by the interstitial alkali-metal (A) cations. However, an each cation is a source of a static distoration field, and the resulting field is a superposition of such fields generated by all cations. This is a reason why the host-crystal distortions depend on the A-cations configurations, i.e. on a type of a spatial bulk distribution of interstitial cations. This paper seeks to find a functional relation between the amplitudes of the doping-induced structure-distortion waves and of statistic concentration ones. A semiphenomenological model is constructed here within the scope of statistical-thermodynamic treatment and using the lattice-statistics simulation method. In this model the effects due to the presence of q solute A cations over available interstices (per unit cell) on the statistic inherent reorientation and/or displacements of the solvent molecules from the average-lattice sites as well as on the lattice parameter a of the elastically-anysotropic cubic C{sub 60} crystal are taken into account.

  12. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealson, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  13. Final Scientific Report: Bacterial Nanowires and Extracellular Electron Transfer to Heavy Metals and Radionuclides by Bacterial Isolates from DOE Field Research Centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealson, Kenneth [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This proposal involved the study of bacteria capable of transferring electrons from the bacterial cells to electron acceptors located outside the cell. These could be either insoluble minerals that were transformed into soluble products upon the addition of electrons, or they could be soluble salts like uranium or chromium, that become insoluble upon the addition of electrons. This process is called extracellular electron transport or EET, and can be done directly by cellular contact, or via conductive appendages called bacterial nanowires. In this work we examined a number of different bacteria for their ability to perform EET, and also looked at their ability to produce conductive nanowires that can be used for EET at a distance away from the EET-capable cells. In the work, new bacteria were isolated, new abilities of EET were examined, and many new methods were developed, and carefully described in the literature. These studies set the stage for future work dealing with the bioremediation of toxic metals like uranium and chromium. They also point out that EET (and conductive nanowires) are far more common that had been appreciated, and may be involved with energy transfer not only in sediments, but in symbioses between different bacteria, and in symbiosis/pathogenesis between bacteria and higher organisms.

  14. Composite photocatalyst containing Eosin Y and multiwalled carbon nanotubes loaded with CuO/NiO: Mixed metal oxide as an active center of H{sub 2} evolution from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang Shizhao [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Chen Lili [Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Li Xiangqing [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China); Mu Jin, E-mail: mujin@sit.edu.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Institute of Technology, 100 Haiquan Road, Shanghai 201418 (China)

    2012-06-01

    A composite photocatalyst containing Eosin Y as a sensitizer, multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a supporter material or electron transfer channel, and CuO/NiO as an active center of H{sub 2} evolution from water was fabricated and characterized with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope. Meanwhile, photocatalytic hydrogen evolution from water over this catalyst was explored using triethanolamine as a sacrificial reagent under visible irradiation. A rate of H{sub 2} evolution of approximately 1.0 mmol g{sup -1} h{sup -1} was achieved under optimal conditions. Furthermore, for practical purposes, the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution was studied as a function of content of CuO/NiO, mass ratio of CuO to NiO, pH of solution, concentration of triethanolamine and dosage of Eosin Y, respectively. The results show that mixed metal oxides are a kind of promising active centers of H{sub 2} evolution from water in the photocatalytic system studied.

  15. Lanthanide(III) complexes with tridentate Schiff base ligand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The X-ray study reveals isotopic Nd/Sm binuclear structures were each metal ion is nine-coordinated in the same fashion. Both metal centers have distorted tricapped trigonal prism geometry, with the Schiff base acting as tridentate ligand. The DPPH· radical scavenging effects of the Schiff base ligand and its Ln(III) ...

  16. Long-term safety and outcome of a temporary self-expanding metallic stent for achalasia: a prospective study with a 13-year single-center experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Jun-Gong; Li, Yong-Dong; Li, Ming-Hua; Shang, Ke-Zhong; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Chen, Ni-Wei; Chen, Wei-Xiong

    2009-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate the long-term clinical safety and efficacy of a newly designed self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) in the treatment of patients with achalasia. Seventy-five patients with achalasia were treated with a temporary SEMS with a 30-mm diameter. The SEMSs were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and removed by gastroscopy 4-5 days after stent placement. Follow-up data focused on dysphagia score, technique and clinical success, clinical remissions and failures, and complications and was performed at 6 months, 1 year, and within 3 to 5 years, 5 to 8 years, 8 to 10 years, and >10 years postoperatively. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients. Complications included stent migration (n=4, 5.33%), chest pain (n=28, 38.7%), reflux (n=15, 20%), and bleeding (n=9, 12%). No perforation or 30-day mortality occurred. Clinical success was achieved in all patients 1 month after stent removal. The overall remission rates at 6 months, 1, 1-3, 3-5, 5-8, 8-10, and >10 year follow-up periods were 100%, 96%, 93.9%, 90.9%, 100%, 100%, and 83.3%, respectively. Stent treatment failed in six patients, and the overall remission rate in our series was 92%. The median and mean primary patencies were 2.8 ± 0.28 years (95% CI: 2.25-3.35) and 4.28 ± 0.40 years (95% CI: 3.51-5.05), respectively. The use of temporary SEMSs with 30-mm diameter proved to be a safe and effective approach for managing achalasia with a long-term satisfactory clinical remission rate. (orig.)

  17. Long-term safety and outcome of a temporary self-expanding metallic stent for achalasia: a prospective study with a 13-year single-center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun-Gong; Li, Yong-Dong; Li, Ming-Hua; Shang, Ke-Zhong [Shanghai Tong Ji University, Department of Radiology, Tenth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Cheng, Ying-Sheng [Shanghai Tong Ji University, Department of Radiology, Tenth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Sixth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China); Chen, Ni-Wei; Chen, Wei-Xiong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Gastroenterology, Sixth Affiliated People' s Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2009-08-15

    To prospectively evaluate the long-term clinical safety and efficacy of a newly designed self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) in the treatment of patients with achalasia. Seventy-five patients with achalasia were treated with a temporary SEMS with a 30-mm diameter. The SEMSs were placed under fluoroscopic guidance and removed by gastroscopy 4-5 days after stent placement. Follow-up data focused on dysphagia score, technique and clinical success, clinical remissions and failures, and complications and was performed at 6 months, 1 year, and within 3 to 5 years, 5 to 8 years, 8 to 10 years, and >10 years postoperatively. Stent placement was technically successful in all patients. Complications included stent migration (n=4, 5.33%), chest pain (n=28, 38.7%), reflux (n=15, 20%), and bleeding (n=9, 12%). No perforation or 30-day mortality occurred. Clinical success was achieved in all patients 1 month after stent removal. The overall remission rates at 6 months, 1, 1-3, 3-5, 5-8, 8-10, and >10 year follow-up periods were 100%, 96%, 93.9%, 90.9%, 100%, 100%, and 83.3%, respectively. Stent treatment failed in six patients, and the overall remission rate in our series was 92%. The median and mean primary patencies were 2.8 {+-} 0.28 years (95% CI: 2.25-3.35) and 4.28 {+-} 0.40 years (95% CI: 3.51-5.05), respectively. The use of temporary SEMSs with 30-mm diameter proved to be a safe and effective approach for managing achalasia with a long-term satisfactory clinical remission rate. (orig.)

  18. Structure of a conserved hypothetical protein SA1388 from S. aureus reveals a capped hexameric toroid with two PII domain lids and a dinuclear metal center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leybourne Matthew

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein encoded by the SA1388 gene from Staphylococcus aureus was chosen for structure determination to elucidate its domain organization and confirm our earlier remote homology based prediction that it housed a nitrogen regulatory PII protein-like domain. SA1388 was predicted to contain a central PII-like domain and two flanking regions, which together belong to the NIF3-like protein family. Proteins like SA1388 remain a poorly studied group and their structural characterization could guide future investigations aimed at understanding their function. Results The structure of SA1388 has been solved to 2.0Å resolution by single wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method using selenium anomalous signals. It reveals a canonical NIF3-like fold containing two domains with a PII-like domain inserted in the middle of the polypeptide. The N and C terminal halves of the NIF3-like domains are involved in dimerization, while the PII domain forms trimeric contacts with symmetry related monomers. Overall, the NIF3-like domains of SA1388 are organized as a hexameric toroid similar to its homologs, E. coli ybgI and the hypothetical protein SP1609 from Streptococcus pneumoniae. The openings on either side of the toroid are partially covered by trimeric "lids" formed by the PII domains. The junction of the two NIF3 domains has two zinc ions bound at what appears to be a histidine rich active site. A well-defined electron density corresponding to an endogenously bound ligand of unknown identity is observed in close proximity to the metal site. Conclusion SA1388 is the third member of the NIF3-like family of proteins to be structurally characterized, the other two also being hypothetical proteins of unknown function. The structure of SA1388 confirms our earlier prediction that the inserted domain that separates the two NIF3 domains adopts a PII-like fold and reveals an overall capped toroidal arrangement for the protein hexamer. The

  19. Electron-mediating Cu(A) centers in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epel, Boris; Slutter, Claire S; Neese, Frank

    2002-01-01

    High field (W-band, 95 GHz) pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements were carried out on a number of proteins that contain the mixed-valence, binuclear electron-mediating Cu(A) center. These include nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), the recombinant water-soluble fragment...... of subunit II of Thermus thermophilus cytochrome c oxidase (COX) ba(3) (M160T9), its M160QT0 mutant, where the weak axial methionine ligand has been replaced by a glutamine, and the engineered "purple" azurin (purpAz). The three-dimensional (3-D) structures of these proteins, apart from the mutant, are known...... indicates differences in the positions of the imidazole rings relative to the Cu(2)S(2) core. Comparison of the spectral features of the weakly coupled protons of M160QT0 with those of the other investigated proteins shows that they are very similar to those of purpAz, where the Cu(A) center is the most...

  20. Metal-metal-hofteproteser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Michael; Overgaard, Søren; Penny, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    In Denmark 4,456 metal-on-metal (MoM) hip prostheses have been implanted. Evidence demonstrates that some patients develope adverse biological reactions causing failures of MoM hip arthroplasty. Some reactions might be systemic. Failure rates are associated with the type and the design of the Mo...

  1. Metallated metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bury, Wojciech; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-08-22

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metallated porous MOFs are provided. Also provided are methods of metallating porous MOFs using atomic layer deposition and methods of using the metallated MOFs as catalysts and in remediation applications.

  2. Biotransformation of uranium and transition metal citrate complexes by clostridia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francis, A.J.; Joshi-Tope, G.A.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Clostridium sphenoides, which uses citric acid as its sole carbon source, metabolized equimolar Fe(III)-citrate with the degradation of citric acid and the reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), but not the U(VI)-citrate complex. However, in the presence of excess citric acid or added glucose it was reduced to U(IV)-citrate. In contrast, Clostridium sp., which ferments glucose but not citrate, reduced Fe(III)-citrate to Fe(II)-citrate and U(VI)-citrate to U(IV)-citrate only when supplied with glucose. These results show that complexed uranium is readily accessible as an electron acceptor despite the bacterium's inability to metabolize the organic ligand complexed to the actinide. These results also show that the metabolism of the metal-citrate complex depends upon the type of complex formed between the metal and citric acid. Fe(III) forms a bidentate complex with citric acid and was metabolized, whereas U forms a binuclear complex with citric acid and was recalcitrant. (author)

  3. Usage Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinaltenkamp, Michael; Plewa, Carolin; Gudergan, Siegfried

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to advance extant theorizing around resourceintegration by conceptualizing and delineating the notion of a usage center. Ausage center consists of a combination of interdependent actors that draw onresources across their individual usage processes to create v...

  4. Transition metal-centered trigonal prisms as building units in RE{sub 14}T{sub 3}In{sub 3} (RE = Y, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu; T = Pd, Ir, Pt) and Y{sub 4}IrIn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaremba, R.; Rodewald, U.C.; Poettgen, R. [Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    The indides RE{sub 14}T{sub 3}In{sub 3} (RE = Y, Ho, Er, Tm, Lu; T = Pd, Ir, Pt) and Y{sub 4}IrIn were synthesized from the elements by are-melting and subsequent annealing for crystal growth. Their structures were characterized on the basis of X-ray powder and single crystal data: Lu{sub 14}Co{sub 3}In{sub 3}-type, space group P4{sub 2}/nmc, a = 970.2(1), c = 2340.7(5) pm for Y{sub 13.95}Pd{sub 3}In{sub 3.05}, a = 959.7(1), c = 2309.0(5) pm for Ho{sub 14}Pd{sub 2.95}In{sub 3}, a = 955.5(1), c = 2305.1(5) pm for Er{sub 14}Pd{sub 3}In{sub 3}, a = 950.9(1), c = 2291.6(5) pm for Tm{sub 13.90}Pd{sub 3}In{sub 3.10}, a = 944.4(1), c = 2275.5(5) pm for Lu{sub 13.93}Pd{sub 3}In{sub 3.07}, a = 962.9(1), c = 2343.0(5) pm for Y{sub 13.86}Ir{sub 2.97}In{sub 3.02}, a = 967.6(1), c = 2347.8(5) pm for Y{sub 13.92}Pt{sub 3.05}In{sub 2.91}, and Gd{sub 4}RhIn-type, space group F anti 43m, a = 1368.6(2) pm for Y{sub 4}IrIn. The main structural motifs are transition metal-centered trigonal prisms of the rare Earth elements which are condensed to two-dimensional networks in the RE{sub 14}T{sub 3}In{sub 3} indides and to a three-dimensional one in Y{sub 4}IrIn. The indium atoms in both structure types show segregation in the metal-rich matrix, i.e. In{sub 2} dumbbells in the RE{sub 14}T{sub 3}In{sub 3} indides (309 pm In2-In2 in Y{sub 13.86}Ir{sub 2.97}In{sub 3.02}) and In{sub 4} tetrahedra (322 pm In-In) in Y{sub 4}IrIn. The crystal chemical peculiarities of both structure types are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Heavy metals

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano, Domy; VANGRONSVELD, Jaco; Bolan, N.S.; Wenzel, W.W.

    2005-01-01

    - Sources of Metals in the Environment - Environmental Contamination - Retention and Dynamics of Metals in Soils - Adsorption - Complexation - Precipitation - Bioavailability–Natural Attenuation Interactions - Biological Response to Metals - Soil Remediation

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Friction Resistance of Titanium, Stainless Steel, Ceramic and Ceramic with Metal Insert Brackets with Varying Dimensions of Stainless Steel Wire: An In vitro Multi-center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B Sunil; Miryala, Suresh; Kumar, K Kiran; Shameem, K; Regalla, Ravindra Reddy

    2014-09-01

    The orthodontist seeks an archwire-bracket combination that has both good biocompatibility and low friction. Hence, the aim of this multicenter in vitro study was to evaluate and compare the frictional resistance generated between titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SS), ceramic and ceramic with metal insert (CMI) brackets with SS wires of varying dimensions in a specially designed apparatus. The material used in this study were Ti, SS, Ceramic and CMI with 0.018″ slot manufactured with zero degree tip and -7° torque premolar brackets (3M, Unitek) and SS wires of varying dimensions (0.016″ round, 0.016 × 0.016″ square, 0.016 × 0.022″ rectangular and 0.017 × 0.025″ rectangular) used. The frictional resistance was measured using Instron Universal testing machine (Model no. 4301). The specimen population in each center composed each of 160 brackets and wires. Differences among the all bracket/wire combinations were tested using (one-way) ANOVA, followed by the student Newman Keuls multiple comparisons of means ranking (at P bracket in combination with 0.017 × 0.025″ SS rectangular wire produced significant force levels for an optimum orthodontic movement with least frictional resistance. Ti brackets have least resistance and rectangular wires produced significant force. These can be used to avoid hazards of Nickel. SS brackets revealed higher static frictional force values as the wire dimension increased and showed lower static friction than Ti brackets for all wires except the thicker wire. Our study recommends the preclusion of brackets with rough surface texture (Ti brackets) with SS ligature wire for ligating bracket and archwire are better to reduce friction.

  7. Photochemical activation and reactivity of polynuclear transition metal complex molecules. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endicott, J.F.; Lintvedt, R.L.

    1982-06-01

    Several bi- and trinuclear metal complexes containing ligands from β-polyketonates have been synthesized and characterized including homo- and hetero-polynuclear complexes. New synthetic approaches to the preparation of heterobi- and trinuclear complexes have been developed that allow the preparation of a large number of molecules containing heavy-metal ions such as Pd 2+ or UO 2 2+ and a first-row transition-metal ion. The electrochemical properties of these complexes have been investigated and many exhibit the ability to transfer two electrons at very nearly the same potential. Photochemical studies on binuclear Cu(II) and Ni(II) showed that these compounds yielded reduced metal species and decomposition upon irradiation. Luminescence of hetero-complexes of uranyl polyketonates is observed at 77 0 K with the UO 2 2+ moiety functioning as an isolated chromophore in which emission is observed only on direct excitation of UO 2 2+ and energy transfer to lower states in the molecule is not observed

  8. Binuclear Pt-Tl bonded complex with square pyramidal coordination around Pt: a combined multinuclear NMR, EXAFS, UV-Vis, and DFT/TDDFT study in dimethylsulfoxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgel, Mihály; Maliarik, Mikhail; Glaser, Julius; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Persson, Ingmar; Tóth, Imre

    2011-07-04

    The structure and bonding of a new Pt-Tl bonded complex formed in dimethylsulfoxide (dmso), (CN)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+), have been studied by multinuclear NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, and EXAFS measurements in combination with density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. This complex is formed following the equilibrium reaction Pt(CN)(4)(2-) + Tl(dmso)(6)(3+) ⇆ (CN)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+) + dmso. The stability constant of the Pt-Tl bonded species, as determined using (13)C NMR spectroscopy, amounts to log K = 2.9 ± 0.2. The (NC)(4)Pt-Tl(dmso)(5)(+) species constitutes the first example of a Pt-Tl bonded cyanide complex in which the sixth coordination position around Pt (in trans with respect to the Tl atom) is not occupied. The spectral parameters confirm the formation of the metal-metal bond, but differ substantially from those measured earlier in aqueous solution for complexes (CN)(5)Pt-Tl(CN)(n)(H(2)O)(x)(n-) (n = 0-3). The (205) Tl NMR chemical shift, δ = 75 ppm, is at extraordinary high field, while spin-spin coupling constant, (1)J(Pt-Tl) = 93 kHz, is the largest measured to date for a Pt-Tl bond in the absence of supporting bridging ligands. The absorption spectrum is dominated by two strong absorption bands in the UV region that are assigned to MMCT (Pt → Tl) and LMCT (dmso → Tl) bands, respectively, on the basis of MO and TDDFT calculations. The solution of the complex has a bright yellow color as a result of a shoulder present on the low energy side of the band at 355 nm. The geometry of the (CN)(4)Pt-Tl core can be elucidated from NMR data, but the particular stoichiometry and structure involving the dmso ligands are established by using Tl and Pt L(III)-edge EXAFS measurements. The Pt-Tl bond distance is 2.67(1) Å, the Tl-O bond distance is 2.282(6) Å, and the Pt-C-N entity is linear with Pt-C and Pt···N distances amounting to 1.969(6) and 3.096(6) Å, respectively. Geometry optimizations on

  9. High Re-Operation Rates Using Conserve Metal-On-Metal Total Hip Articulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, S L; Jakobsen, Thomas; Christoffersen, Hardy

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Metal-on-metal hip articulations have been intensely debated after reports of adverse reactions and high failure rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the implant of a metal-on.metal total hip articulation (MOM THA) from a single manufacture in a two-center st......INTRODUCTION: Metal-on-metal hip articulations have been intensely debated after reports of adverse reactions and high failure rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the implant of a metal-on.metal total hip articulation (MOM THA) from a single manufacture in a two...

  10. New metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergqvist, U.

    1983-12-01

    The aim of this report is to estimate the exposure to various metals and metal compounds and discuss the available information of the possible toxic effects of these metals and compounds. In the first section, some metals are defined as those with either a large or a fast increasing exposure to living organisms. The available information on toxicity is discussed in the second section. In the third section interesting metals are defined as compounds having a large exposure and an apparent insufficient knowledge of their possible toxic effects. Comments on each of these metals are also to be found in the third section. (G.B.)

  11. Characterization of metal-bound water in bioactive Fe(III)-cyclophane complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Medina, A. J.; Gámez-Corrales, R.; Ramírez, J. Z.; González-Aguilar, G. A.; Velázquez-Contreras, E. F.

    2018-02-01

    Binuclear Fe(III) complexes, Fe2PO and Fe2PC, have functions of antioxidants as well as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase mimickers. The role of water molecules in the non-cytotoxic properties of these complexes have been studied by thermogravimetric and IR/Raman-spectroscopic methods. The thermogravimetric analysis of Fe2PO shows the presence of nine water molecules (Fe2PO·9H2O), three of which are directly coordinated to the metallic ion; the remaining six molecules occupy the secondary coordination sphere. For Fe2PC, eight water molecules were detected (Fe2PC·8H2O), and only one of them directly coordinates to the metallic ion. IR/Raman spectrum analyses corroborate the presence of water molecules in both metallic complexes and the mode of coordination to the ligand, on the basis of bands characteristic of hydration water at ∼3300 cm-1 and bands of adsorbed water between 430 and 490 cm-1. A pentacoordinate geometry is proposed for Fe2PO and a hexacoordinated geometry for Fe2PC. Those results are consistent with theoretical calculations performed through a semiempirical PM7 method. The presence of coordinated water molecules is closely related to the reactivity of Fe2PO and Fe2PC in solution.

  12. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  13. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in / Jacobs Retina Center Department of Psychology University of California, San Francisco Department of University School of Optometry Maui Community College Maui Community College Space Grant Program Montana

  14. Silicone metalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghribi, Mariam N. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Hamilton, Julie (Tracy, CA)

    2008-12-09

    A system for providing metal features on silicone comprising providing a silicone layer on a matrix and providing a metal layer on the silicone layer. An electronic apparatus can be produced by the system. The electronic apparatus comprises a silicone body and metal features on the silicone body that provide an electronic device.

  15. Casimir Repulsion between Metallic Objects in Vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Michael; McCauley, Alexander P.; Rodriguez, Alejandro W.; Reid, M. T. Homer; Johnson, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    We give an example of a geometry in which two metallic objects in vacuum experience a repulsive Casimir force. The geometry consists of an elongated metal particle centered above a metal plate with a hole. We prove that this geometry has a repulsive regime using a symmetry argument and confirm it with numerical calculations for both perfect and realistic metals. The system does not support stable levitation, as the particle is unstable to displacements away from the symmetry axis.

  16. Facile construction of terpridine-based metallo-polymers in hydrogels, crystals and solutions directed by metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajuan; Guo, Jiangbo; Dai, Bo; Geng, Lijun; Shen, Fengjuan; Zhang, Yajun; Yu, Xudong

    2018-07-01

    Driven by tunable metal-ligand interactions, a polydentate ligand TC containing terpyridine and carboxylic acid units was developed to construct metallo-polymers that showed multiple aggregation modes with controlled macroscopic properties. In the presence of different kind of Zn 2+ ions or NaOH, TC could form metallo-polymers via π-π stacking and metal-ligand interaction that further trapped water molecules, resulting in hydrogels and crystals. Moreover, these TC/Zn 2+ hydrogels could transform to soluble and fluorescent aggregates in the presence of NaOH due to the formation of binuclear metallo-polymers with enhanced ICT emission. The metal-ligand interactions tuned by different metal salts in gels, crystals, and sols were also studied and illustrated in detail, it was also proved that water was an essential linker for constructing Na + -based metallo-polymers from the TC/NaOH crystal data. This work demonstrated the engineered coordination pathways in generating controllable hydrogels and metallo-polymers for the first time, which led to novel approach for facilely constructing a number of hydrogels with tailorable macroscopic properties. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Metallic nanomesh

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhifeng; Sun, Tianyi; Guo, Chuanfei

    2018-02-20

    A transparent flexible nanomesh having at least one conductive element and sheet resistance less than 300.OMEGA./.quadrature. when stretched to a strain of 200% in at least one direction. The nanomesh is formed by depositing a sacrificial film, depositing, etching, and oxidizing a first metal layer on the film, etching the sacrificial film, depositing a second metal layer, and removing the first metal layer to form a nanomesh on the substrate.

  18. Plasma metallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowther, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Many methods are currently used for the production of thin metal films. However, all of these have drawbacks associated with them, for example the need for UHV conditions, high temperatures, exotic metal precursors, or the inability to coat complex shaped objects. Reduction of supported metal salts by non-isothermal plasma treatment does not suffer from these drawbacks. In order to produce and analyse metal films before they become contaminated, a plasma chamber which could be attached directly to a UHV chamber with XPS capability was designed and built. This allowed plasma treatment of supported metal salts and surface analysis by XPS to be performed without exposure of the metal film to the atmosphere. Non-equilibrium plasma treatment of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride using hydrogen as the feed gas resulted in a 95% pure gold film, the remaining 5% of the film being carbon. If argon or helium were used as the feed gases during plasma treatment the resultant gold films were 100% pure. Some degree of surface contamination of the films due to plasma treatment was observed but was easily removed by argon ion cleaning. Hydrogen plasma reduction of glass supported silver(l) nitrate and palladium(ll) acetate films reveals that this metallization technique is applicable to a wide variety of metal salts and supports, and has also shown the ability of plasma reduction to retain the complex 'fern-like' structures seen for spin coated silver(l) nitrate layers. Some metal salts are susceptible to decomposition by X-rays. The reduction of Nylon 66 supported gold(lll) chloride films by soft X-rays to produce nanoscopic gold particles has been studied. The spontaneous reduction of these X-ray irradiated support gold(lll) chloride films on exposure to the atmosphere to produce gold rich metallic films has also been reported. (author)

  19. Metals: In Sickness and in Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They make vital functions like respiration, circulation and reproduction possible. Metals like iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and ... zinc helps regulate communication between two types of brain cells in the hippocampus, the brain's center of ...

  20. Rare oxidation states of group V metal compounds generated by radiolysis in non aqueous solvents: experimental and theoretical study. Attempts for synthesis of heterometallic complexes containing niobium and uranium or thorium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Motais, B.

    1986-02-01

    Mononuclear and binuclear complexes of group V trivalent metals (V, Nb, Ta), coordinated with γ-picolin molecules and chlorine atoms, have been oxidized or reduced, respectively by the radical-ions CH 2 Cl 2 + or CH 3 CN - radiolytically generated in free-oxygen dichloromethane or acetonitrile. The mechanism of these reactions have been established from kinetic, spectroscopic data and in some cases, from EPR measurements and theoretical SWXα calculations. Some preliminary results about the reaction occurring between Cp 2 Nb-(CO)H and Cp 2 'M(CH 3 ) 2 (M=U or Th) (Cp = eta 5 - C 5 H 5 ; Cp = eta 5 - (C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) are also reported [fr

  1. Binuclear model of an Sb-galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nezhinskij, E.M.

    1980-01-01

    To explain the causes of origin of the observed peculiarities of SB-galaxies a self-consistent stable model of an Sb-galaxy is constructed. The evolutionary scheme of origin of this model is described. The model consists of an extensive spherical corona, of two point nuclei and of a cloud of particles of infinitely small mass, the latter being bar-shaped and situated in the neighbourhood of the nuclei. The model has the following properties: the nuclei move along the circular orbit, whose centre coincides with that of the corona; the motion of the particles of the bar-shaped cloud is stable in the sense of Hill [ru

  2. Actividad química de los ligandos puente difósforo y difosfenilo en los complejos binucleares (Mo2Cp2(n-PCy2) (n-K2:K2-P2)(CO)2)-y (Mo2Cp2(n-PCy2)(n-K2:K2-P2Me)(CO)2)

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano Rivera, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    El trabajo de investigación que se recoge en la presente Memoria comprende un amplio estudio de la reactividad de complejos metálicos binucleares con ligandos puente difósforo y metildifosfenilo procedentes de la activación directa del fósforo blanco. Por un lado, se ha llevado a cabo un amplio análisis del comportamiento químico de la especie aniónica [Mo2Cp2(¿-PCy2)(¿-¿2:¿2-P2)(CO)2]- frente a electrófilos de distinta naturaleza, tales como clorofosfinas y complejos metálicos generadores...

  3. Synthesis of binuclear rhodacarboranes from dianions 1,4- and 1,3-C6H4(CH2-9-C2H2B9H9-7,8-nido)22- and (Ph3P)3RhCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharkin, L.I.; Zhigareva, G.G.

    1996-01-01

    Dianions 1,4 and 1,3-C 6 H 4 (CH 2 -9-C 2 H 2 B 9 H 9 -7,8-nido) 2 2- obtained from nido 7,8-dicarbollide-ion and 1,4-bis(bromomethyl) and 1,3-bis(bromomethyl)benzenes react with (Ph 3 P) 3 RhCl to give binuclear rhodacarboranes, 1,4- and 1,3-[3,3-(Ph 3 P) 2 -3-H-3,1,2-RhC 2 B 9 H 10 -4-CH 2 ] 2 C 6 H 6 with chemical reaction yield 85% and 87% respectively. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. Transition metal mediated transformations of small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayusman [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-03-08

    Catalysis at metal centers is of great scientific, as well as practical, importance because of the high efficiency, high specificity, and low energy demands often associated with such systems. The two major themes of our research are (a) the design of metal-based systems for the synthesis of novel classes of polymers and (b) the identification of new metal-catalyzed systems for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals, and related “green” chemical processes.

  5. Volatilization behavior of transactinides from metal surfaces and melts (thermochemical calculation); Verfluechtigungsverhalten der Transaktinoide von Metalloberflaechen und aus Schmelzen (Thermochemische Kalkulation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichler, B

    2003-01-01

    Volatilization properties of elements with the atomic numbers Z=104 to 116 are determined on the basis of empirical relations. These empirical correlations are deduced from the analysis of thermochemical data of metallic elements in the periodic table and their relations to the material constant: Structure specific connections are shown to exist between the electron densities at the 'Wigner-Seitz' cell borders of metals and the specific surface energies of solid metals with hexagonal, cubic face-centred, cubic body-centred and rhombohedral lattices. Analogously, structure specific relations can be found between the standard enthalpies of the gaseous monoatomic metals and their surface energies. Linear correlations with exceptionally high correlation coefficients are observed between the standard sublimation enthalpies of isotypic metals in the dimeric state and the surface energies. Volatilization properties are deduced for the transactinides on the basis of these established relations, applying a predicted structure and further empirical correlations. These volatilization properties are in detail: the standard enthalpies of the gaseous monomers; the standard sublimation enthalpies of the dimers; the standard dissociation enthalpies of the dimers; the standard enthalpies of adsorption on metal surfaces; the volatilization enthalpies from molten metals, and the standard formation enthalpies of hetero binuclear intermetallic molecules. Thermochemical constants required for the calculation of the intermetallic interactions are determined using the Miedema model. The closed systematic approach facilitate: the assessment of the calculated data considering the agreement with known rules of metal chemistry, trends in the 7{sup t}h row and along the groups of the periodic table, the coherence of the data, and the action of closed shell effects in the electron configurations. From the obtained data conclusions are possible regarding the design of volatilization

  6. Stereodivergent-at-metal synthesis of [60]fullerene hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco-Martinez, Juan; Vidal, Sara; Fernandez, Israel; Filippone, Salvatore [Departamento de Quimica Organica I, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); Martin, Nazario [Departamento de Quimica Organica I, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain); IMDEA-Nanociencia, C/Faraday, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2017-02-13

    Chiral fullerene-metal hybrids with complete control over the four stereogenic centers, including the absolute configuration of the metal atom, have been synthesized for the first time. The stereochemistry of the four chiral centers formed during [60]fullerene functionalization is the result of both the chiral catalysts employed and the diastereoselective addition of the metal complexes used (iridium, rhodium, or ruthenium). DFT calculations underpin the observed configurational stability at the metal center, which does not undergo an epimerization process. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Iowa Water Center | Iowa Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home Iowa State University Extension Iowa Water Center Submitted by mollyd on April 24, 2012 - 09 :42 Advancing the state of water knowledge and management The Iowa Water Center is a part of a nationwide network of university-based water centers created to encourage interdisciplinary water research

  8. Insights into Substrate Specificity and Metal Activation of Mammalian Tetrahedral Aspartyl Aminopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Farquhar, Erik R.; Chance, Mark R.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Kiser, Philip D. (Case Western)

    2012-07-11

    Aminopeptidases are key enzymes involved in the regulation of signaling peptide activity. Here, we present a detailed biochemical and structural analysis of an evolutionary highly conserved aspartyl aminopeptidase called DNPEP. We show that this peptidase can cleave multiple physiologically relevant substrates, including angiotensins, and thus may play a key role in regulating neuron function. Using a combination of x-ray crystallography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and single particle electron microscopy analysis, we provide the first detailed structural analysis of DNPEP. We show that this enzyme possesses a binuclear zinc-active site in which one of the zinc ions is readily exchangeable with other divalent cations such as manganese, which strongly stimulates the enzymatic activity of the protein. The plasticity of this metal-binding site suggests a mechanism for regulation of DNPEP activity. We also demonstrate that DNPEP assembles into a functionally relevant tetrahedral complex that restricts access of peptide substrates to the active site. These structural data allow rationalization of the enzyme's preference for short peptide substrates with N-terminal acidic residues. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the physiology and bioinorganic chemistry of DNPEP and other M18 family aminopeptidases.

  9. Metal cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    From the biewpoint of general crystal T chemistry principles and on the basis of modern data the structural chemistry of metal cyanites is presented. The features of the structure of the following compounds are considered: simple ionic alkali cyanides (Li-Cs) containing CN - ions; molybdenum (4,5), tungsten (4,5), rhenium (5,6) complexes etc, where-CN group is only connected with one metal atom; covalent cyanides of cadmium and other elements in which the CN-group serves as a bridge

  10. Stephenson Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson Cancer Center at the University of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City is an NCI-designated cancer center at the forefront of NCI-supported cancer research. Learn more about the Stephenson Cancer Center's mission.

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  13. A new indium metal-organic 3D framework with 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate, MIL-96 (In), containing μ 3-oxo-centered trinuclear units and a hexagonal 18-ring network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkringer, Christophe; Loiseau, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    A new indium trimesate In 12 O(OH) 12 ({OH} 4 ,{H 2 O} 5 )[btc] 6 .∼31H 2 O, called MIL-96 (btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate or trimesate species) was hydrothermally synthesized under mild condition (210 deg. C, 5 h) in the presence of trimethyl 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate in water and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The MIL-96 (In) structure exhibits a three-dimensional metal-organic framework containing isolated trinuclear μ 3 -oxo-bridged indium clusters and infinite chains of InO 4 (OH) 2 and InO 2 (OH) 3 (H 2 O) octahedra generating a hexagonal network based on 18-membered ring. The two types of indium entities are connected to each other through the trimesate species which induce corrugated chains of indium octahedra, linked via μ 2 -hydroxo bonds with the specific -cis-cis-trans- sequence. The 3D framework of MIL-96 reveals three kind of cavities (two of them have estimated ∼ 400 A 3 volumes), in which are encapsulated free water molecules. The latter species are removed upon heating at 150 deg. C

  14. Womens Business Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Women's Business Centers (WBCs) represent a national network of nearly 100 educational centers throughout the United States and its territories, which are designed...

  15. heavy metals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    aDepartment of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, South Africa. bSchool of Health Systems and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, ... ing the levels of toxic metals in food.15,19 Compared to ET-AAS or .... mum pressure 350 psi and maximum temperature 210 °C. The.

  16. Ultradense Nuclear Fusion in Metallic Lithium Liquid. A report on research performed at the R and D Center, Sakaguchi E.H VOC Co. under the auspices of the Swedish Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikegami, Hidetsugu; Pettersson, Roland

    2006-10-01

    This report is concerned with research and development on a new fusion scheme, 'chemonuclear fusion'. In this scheme, lithium or deuterium ions are implanted in liquid lithium whereby huge reaction rate enhancements, as much as up to 10 15 compared to what is expected for a free two-body deuterium-lithium interaction, are obtained. The enhancement is suggested to be a result of nuclear, atomic and chemical reactions taking place cooperatively. Experimental studies on the Li - D chemonuclear fusion is supported financially by the Swedish Energy Agency and were initiated at the Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Uppsala University. The studies were continued in a collaboration with the R and D Centre, Sakaguchi E.H VOC Co. in Tokyo where a new and modified setup was constructed. Here, besides the Li - D chemonuclear fusion, the Li - Li fusion and the D 2 - 2Li molecular chemonuclear fusion were developed. In 2005 at the R and D Centre, molecular ions D 2 + of energies 30keV were implanted on a surface of metallic Li liquid. Product alpha particles were identified and measured by a single solid state detector. The energies were around 7.6MeV corresponding to what would be expected for the reaction 7 Li + D → 2x 4 He + n. Under some conditions of the Li liquid, the reaction rate was intermittently so high that the particle detector was saturated and stopped counting simultaneously with an appreciable temperature rise in the Li liquid. The results were discussed in March at the University of Tokyo and in October at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, The Royal Swedish Engineering Academy of Sciences and at Uppsala University. This report presents a full description of the results. It also contains more recent results where an additional detector setup, a ΔE-E detector was used for validation of the results in particular the identity of the alpha particles

  17. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, W.D. II.

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN + CpV(CO) 3 H - (Cp=eta 5 -C 5 H 5 and PPN = (Ph 3 P) 2 ) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN + CpV(CO) 3 H - reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN + [CpV(C) 3 X] - and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN + [CpV(CO) 3 ] 2 H - . The borohydride salt PPN + [CpV(CO) 3 BH 4 ] - has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO) 3 H - and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO) 3 H - . Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO) 2 or a mixture of CpRh(CO) 2 and CpCo(CO) 2 affords two new anions, PPN + [Cp 2 Rh 3 (CO) 4 ] - and PPN + [Cp 2 RhCo(CO) 2 ] - . CpMo(CO) 3 H reacts with CpMo(CO) 3 R (R=CH 3 ,C 2 H 5 , CH 2 C 6 H 5 ) at 25 to 50 0 C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO) 3 ] 2 and [CpMo(CO) 2 ] 2 . In general, CpV(CO) 3 H - appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO) 3 H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO) 3 H - generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO) 3 H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species

  18. Reactivity patterns of transition metal hydrides and alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, W.D. II

    1979-05-01

    The complex PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ (Cp=eta/sup 5/-C/sub 5/H/sub 5/ and PPN = (Ph/sub 3/P)/sub 2/) was prepared in 70% yield and its physical properties and chemical reactions investigated. PPN/sup +/ CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ reacts with a wide range of organic halides. The organometallic products of these reactions are the vanadium halides PPN/sup +/(CpV(C)/sub 3/X)/sup -/ and in some cases the binuclear bridging hydride PPN/sup +/ (CpV(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/H/sup -/. The borohydride salt PPN/sup +/(CpV(CO)/sub 3/BH/sub 4/)/sup -/ has also been prepared. The reaction between CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ and organic halides was investigated and compared with halide reductions carried out using tri-n-butyltin hydride. Results demonstrate that in almost all cases, the reduction reaction proceeds via free radical intermediates which are generated in a chain process, and are trapped by hydrogen transfer from CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/. Sodium amalgam reduction of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ or a mixture of CpRh(CO)/sub 2/ and CpCo(CO)/sub 2/ affords two new anions, PPN/sup +/ (Cp/sub 2/Rh/sub 3/(CO)/sub 4/)/sup -/ and PPN/sup +/(Cp/sub 2/RhCo(CO)/sub 2/)/sup -/. CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with CpMo(CO)/sub 3/R (R=CH/sub 3/,C/sub 2/H/sub 5/, CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/) at 25 to 50/sup 0/C to produce aldehyde RCHO and the dimers (CpMo(CO)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ and (CpMo(CO)/sub 2/)/sub 2/. In general, CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ appears to transfer a hydrogen atom to the metal radical anion formed in an electron transfer process, whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H transfers hydride in a 2-electron process to a vacant coordination site. The chemical consequences are that CpV(CO)/sub 3/H/sup -/ generally reacts with metal alkyls to give alkanes via intermediate alkyl hydride species whereas CpMo(CO)/sub 3/H reacts with metal alkyls to produce aldehyde, via an intermediate acyl hydride species.

  19. Metallicity in the GC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najarro, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    We review quantitative spectroscopic studies of massive stars in the three Galactic Center clusters: Quintuplet, Arches and Central cluster. Thanks to the impressive evolution of IR detectors and the new generation of line blanketed models for the extended atmospheres of hot stars we are able to accurately derive the physical properties and metallicity estimates of the massive stars in these clusters. For the Quintuplet cluster our analysis of the LBVs provides a direct estimate of a-elements and Fe chemical abundances in these objects. For the Arches cluster, we introduce a method based on the N abundance of WNL stars and the theory of evolution of massive stars. For the Central cluster, new observations reveal IRS 8 as an outsider with respect to the rest of massive stars in the cluster both in terms of age and location. Using the derived properties of IR.S 8, a new method is presented to derive metallicity from the OIII feature at 2.115 μm. Our results indicate solar metallicity in the three clusters

  20. Metal-silica sol-gel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiegman, Albert E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a single phase metal-silica sol-gel glass formed by the co-condensation of a transition metal with silicon atoms where the metal atoms are uniformly distributed within the sol-gel glass as individual metal centers. Any transition metal may be used in the sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to sensor materials where the sensor material is formed using the single phase metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The sensor materials may be in the form of a thin film or may be attached to an optical fiber. The present invention also relates to a method of sensing chemicals using the chemical sensors by monitoring the chromatic change of the metal-silica sol-gel glass when the chemical binds to the sensor. The present invention also relates to oxidation catalysts where a metal-silica sol-gel glass catalyzes the reaction. The present invention also relates to a method of performing oxidation reactions using the metal-silica sol-gel glasses. The present invention also relates to organopolymer metal-silica sol-gel composites where the pores of the metal-silica sol-gel glasses are filled with an organic polymer polymerized by the sol-gel glass.

  1. Corrosion of valve metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draley, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized

  2. Heavy Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Susan

    2001-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that more than 1 million children ages 5 and under are afflicted with unsafe amounts of lead. Schools can be a source of lead poisoning. Other sources include playgrounds near freeways, playground equipment, contaminated soil, and technology rooms with lead-bearing supplies. Sidebars…

  3. Binuclear new complexes of dioxouranium (VI) and thorium (IV) with some Schiff bases derived from 4,4'-diamino stilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid-vanillin and O-vanillin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujar, M.A.; Siddappa, K.

    1992-01-01

    Dioxouranium (VI) and thorium (IV) form 1:1 (metal:ligand) complexes with some Schiff bases. The complexes have been characterized through elemental analyses, conductance, UV-Visible, IR, NMR, TG data and magnetic susceptibility measurements. They are found to be dimeric with hexa or octa-coordinated arrangement around metal ion moiety. The Fsub(U-O) (mdyn A o ) and the length R UO (A o ) of U-O bond are calculated from the IR data. (author). 8 refs., 1 tab

  4. Glassy metals

    CERN Document Server

    Russew, Krassimir

    2016-01-01

    The topics discussed in this book focus on fundamental problems concerning the structural relaxation of amorphous metallic alloys, above all the possibility of studying it on the basis of viscous flow behavior and its relation to rheological anomalies, such as bend stress relaxation, thermal expansion, specific heat, density changes, and crystallization. Most relaxation studies deal with the relaxation changes of a single definite material property, and not with a wider spectrum of physical properties integrated into a common framework. This book shows that it is possible to describe these property changes on the basis of a more comprehensive theoretical understanding of their mechanism.

  5. Living Colloidal Metal Particles from Solvated Metal Atoms. Clustering of Metal Atoms in Organic Media 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-23

    attributed to these solutions, especially toward heart disease. And in 1618 Antoni published Panacea Aurea : Auro Potabile 4 which centered on the...probably a slow process (discussed next under the electrophoresis section ). Electrophoresis: Electrophoresis, the movement of charged particles in...electrical properties. Experimental Section Preparation of a Typical Au-Acetone Colloid The metal atom reactor has been described previo sly. 3 9 ’ 5 9 ’ 6 0

  6. Materials Preparation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — MPC is recognized throughout the worldwide research community for its unique capabilities in purification, preparation, and characterization of: rare earth metals,...

  7. Tornadoes: A Center Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christman-Rothlein, Liz; Meinbach, Anita M.

    1981-01-01

    Information is given on how to put together a learning center. Discusses information and activity packets for a complete learning center on tornadoes including objectives, directions, materials, photographs of physical arrangements, and posttest. (DC)

  8. Tehran Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1977-01-01

    The Tehran Nuclear Research Center was formerly managed by the University of Tehran. This Center, after its transformation to the AEOI, has now become a focal point for basic research in the area of Nuclear Energy in Iran

  9. Day Care Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This database contains locations of day care centers for 50 states and Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. The dataset only includes center based day care locations...

  10. Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) explores the unique properties of materials and processes at the nanoscale. The CFN is a user-oriented research center...

  11. Hydrologic Engineering Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), an organization within the Institute for Water Resources, is the designated Center of Expertise for the U.S. Army Corps of...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... OnSafety Blog Safety Education Centers Neighborhood Safety Network Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster ... Sitemap RSS E-mail Inside CPSC Accessibility Privacy Policy Budget, Performances & Finance Open Government Freedom of Information ( ...

  13. MARYLAND ROBOTICS CENTER

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Maryland Robotics Center is an interdisciplinary research center housed in the Institute for Systems Research (link is external)within the A. James Clark School...

  14. Find a Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — HRSA Health Centers care for you, even if you have no health insurance – you pay what you can afford based on your income. Health centers provide services that...

  15. NIH Clinical Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The NIH Clinical Center consists of two main facilities: The Mark O. Hatfield Clinical Research Center, which opened in 2005, houses inpatient units, day hospitals,...

  16. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Science Learning Center Making science and health easy for everyone to understand Home News Our Team What We Do ... Collaboration Conferences Current Projects Publications Contact The Genetic Science Learning Center at The University of Utah is a ...

  17. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  18. Hybrid compounds of Keggin polyoxotungstate with transition metal ion as the central atom. Synthesis, structure and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Min; Chen, Ya-Guang; Shi, Tian

    2016-02-01

    The compounds (Hbipy)2[Co(bipy)2(H2O)4]2(CoW12O40)·2bipy·7H2O (1) and [Ni2(Hbipy)2(bipy)(H2O)4(H2W12O40)]·5H2O (2) (bipy = 4,4-bipyridine) were synthesized hydrothermally and characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, TG analyses, solid ultraviolet diffuse spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray diffraction method. In 1 the complex ions, [Co(bipy)2(H2O)4]2+, construct a supramolecular layer through π-π stacking interaction. The heteropolyanions with central Co atom and supramolecular layers are linked by hydrogen bonds. In 2 a 2D structure is formed from metatungstate anions and binuclear Ni-bipy complexes through the coordination of metatungstate anions and bipy to Ni ions. Between the layers and bipyridine molecules are the hydrogen bond interactions. The formation of 1 and 2 shows that the solution acidity and metal ions influence greatly the structure of the compounds. Solid ultraviolet diffusion results indicate that the compounds 1 and 2 are potential semiconductor materials. In 1 and 2 there exists a weak antiferromagnetic interaction.

  19. Novel synergism by complex ligands in solvent extraction of rare earth metals(III) with β-diketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imura, H.; Ebisawa, M.; Kato, M.; Ohashi, K.

    2006-01-01

    The extraction of rare earth metals(III) (RE) with hexafluoroacetylacetone (Hhfa) and 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (Htta) was studied in the presence of some cobalt(III) chelates such as tris(acetylacetonato)cobalt(III), tris(4-isopropyltropolonato)cobalt(III), tris(8-quinolinolato)cobalt(III), tris(8-quinolinethiolato)cobalt(III), and tris(diethyldithiocarbamato)cobalt(III) in benzene or toluene. The synergistic enhancement of the extraction of RE, especially of lanthanum(III) was found in all the systems. Therefore, those cobalt(III) chelates act as synergists or complex ligands. The equilibrium analysis and IR spectroscopic study were performed to evaluate the present synergistic mechanism. It was found that the RE-β-diketone chelates form 1:1 adducts, i.e., binuclear complexes, with the cobalt(III) chelates in the organic phase. The formation constants (β s,1 ) were determined and compared with those reported previously. The spectroscopic studies demonstrated that adducts have two different structures with inner- and outer-sphere coordination. In the former the cobalt(III) chelate directly coordinated to the RE ion and displaced the coordinated water molecules. In the latter the hydrogen-bonding was formed between the coordinating oxygen or sulfur atoms of cobalt(III) chelate and hydrogen atoms of the coordinated water molecules in the RE-β-diketone chelate. The types of the adducts are mainly due to the steric factors of the RE-β-diketone chelates and the cobalt(III) chelates

  20. Vacancies in transition metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, G.; Lannoo, M.

    1976-01-01

    A calculation of the formation energy and volume for a vacancy in transition metals is described. A tight-binding scheme is used for the d band and a Born-Mayer type potential to account for the repulsive part of the energy at small distances. The results show that the relaxation energy is small in all cases, less than 0.1 eV. This seems to be coherent with the good agreement obtained for the theoretical and experimental values of the formation energy Esub(F)sup(V) of the vacancy, without including relaxation. The center of the transitional series is found to give a contraction (Formation volume of order -0.4 at.vol.) whereas the edges are found to produce dilations. (author)

  1. Data Center Tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temares, M. Lewis; Lutheran, Joseph A.

    Operations tasking for data center management is discussed. The original and revised organizational structures of the data center at the University of Miami are also described. The organizational strategy addresses the functions that should be performed by the data center, anticipates the specialized skills required, and addresses personnel…

  2. Center of buoyancy definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandberg, V.

    1988-12-01

    The center of buoyancy of an arbitrary shaped body is defined in analogy to the center of gravity. The definitions of the buoyant force and center of buoyancy in terms of integrals over the area of the body are converted to volume integrals and shown to have simple intuitive interpretations

  3. Wound care centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure ulcer - wound care center; Decubitus ulcer - wound care center; Diabetic ulcer - wound care center; Surgical wound - wound ... Common types of non-healing wounds include: Pressure sores Surgical ... flow, or swollen legs Certain wounds may not heal well due to: ...

  4. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab

  5. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of β-diketones, halogenated β-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs

  6. FLIT: Flowing LIquid metal Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolemen, Egemen; Majeski, Richard; Maingi, Rajesh; Hvasta, Michael

    2017-10-01

    The design and construction of FLIT, Flowing LIquid Torus, at PPPL is presented. FLIT focuses on a liquid metal divertor system suitable for implementation and testing in present-day fusion systems, such as NSTX-U. It is designed as a proof-of-concept fast-flowing liquid metal divertor that can handle heat flux of 10 MW/m2 without an additional cooling system. The 72 cm wide by 107 cm tall torus system consisting of 12 rectangular coils that give 1 Tesla magnetic field in the center and it can operate for greater than 10 seconds at this field. Initially, 30 gallons Galinstan (Ga-In-Sn) will be recirculated using 6 jxB pumps and flow velocities of up to 10 m/s will be achieved on the fully annular divertor plate. FLIT is designed as a flexible machine that will allow experimental testing of various liquid metal injection techniques, study of flow instabilities, and their control in order to prove the feasibility of liquid metal divertor concept for fusion reactors. FLIT: Flowing LIquid metal Torus. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Metals production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Theodore S.

    1992-01-01

    Existing procedures for design of electrochemical plants can be used for design of lunar processes taking into consideration the differences in environmental conditions. These differences include: 1/6 Earth gravity, high vacuum, solar electrical and heat source, space radiation heat sink, long days and nights, and different availability and economics of materials, energy, and labor. Techniques have already been developed for operation of relatively small scale hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems used in the U.S. lunar landing program. Design and operation of lunar aqueous electrolytic process plants appears to be within the state-of-the-art. Finding or developing compatible materials for construction and designing of fused-magma metal winning cells will present a real engineering challenge.

  8. Metallic substrates for high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchan, Thomas G.; Miller, Dean J.; Goretta, Kenneth C.; Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Foley, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A biaxially textured face-centered cubic metal article having grain boundaries with misorientation angles greater than about 8.degree. limited to less than about 1%. A laminate article is also disclosed having a metal substrate first rolled to at least about 95% thickness reduction followed by a first annealing at a temperature less than about 375.degree. C. Then a second rolling operation of not greater than about 6% thickness reduction is provided, followed by a second annealing at a temperature greater than about 400.degree. C. A method of forming the metal and laminate articles is also disclosed.

  9. The Sounds of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Cynthia M.

    2015-01-01

    Two, I propose that this framework allows for at least a theoretical distinction between the way in which extreme metal – e.g. black metal, doom metal, funeral doom metal, death metal – relates to its sound as music and the way in which much other music may be conceived of as being constituted...

  10. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Ganesh, E-mail: ghegde@purdue.edu; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard, E-mail: gekco@purdue.edu [Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN), Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Boykin, Timothy [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

    2014-03-28

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales.

  11. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Klimeck, Gerhard; Boykin, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales

  12. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. I. Model and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Ganesh; Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Boykin, Timothy; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2014-03-01

    Semi-empirical Tight Binding (TB) is known to be a scalable and accurate atomistic representation for electron transport for realistically extended nano-scaled semiconductor devices that might contain millions of atoms. In this paper, an environment-aware and transferable TB model suitable for electronic structure and transport simulations in technologically relevant metals, metallic alloys, metal nanostructures, and metallic interface systems are described. Part I of this paper describes the development and validation of the new TB model. The new model incorporates intra-atomic diagonal and off-diagonal elements for implicit self-consistency and greater transferability across bonding environments. The dependence of the on-site energies on strain has been obtained by appealing to the Moments Theorem that links closed electron paths in the system to energy moments of angular momentum resolved local density of states obtained ab initio. The model matches self-consistent density functional theory electronic structure results for bulk face centered cubic metals with and without strain, metallic alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures with high accuracy and can be used in predictive electronic structure and transport problems in metallic systems at realistically extended length scales.

  13. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-10-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d-p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology.

  14. Half-metallicity in 2D organometallic honeycomb frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Hao; Li, Bin; Zhao, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Half-metallic materials with a high Curie temperature (T C ) have many potential applications in spintronics. Magnetic metal free two-dimensional (2D) half-metallic materials with a honeycomb structure contain graphene-like Dirac bands with π orbitals and show excellent aspects in transport properties. In this article, by investigating a series of 2D organometallic frameworks with a honeycomb structure using first principles calculations, we study the origin of forming half-metallicity in this kind of 2D organometallic framework. Our analysis shows that charge transfer and covalent bonding are two crucial factors in the formation of half-metallicity in organometallic frameworks. (i) Sufficient charge transfer from metal atoms to the molecules is essential to form the magnetic centers. (ii) These magnetic centers need to be connected through covalent bonding, which guarantee the strong ferromagnetic (FM) coupling. As examples, the organometallic frameworks composed by (1,3,5)-benzenetricarbonitrile (TCB) molecules with noble metals (Au, Ag, Cu) show half-metallic properties with T C as high as 325 K. In these organometallic frameworks, the strong electronegative cyano-groups (CN groups) drive the charge transfer from metal atoms to the TCB molecules, forming the local magnetic centers. These magnetic centers experience strong FM coupling through the d – p covalent bonding. We propose that most of the 2D organometallic frameworks composed by molecule—CN—noble metal honeycomb structures contain similar half metallicity. This is verified by replacing TCB molecules with other organic molecules. Although the TCB-noble metal organometallic framework has not yet been synthesized, we believe the development of synthesizing techniques and facility will enable the realization of them. Our study provides new insight into the 2D half-metallic material design for the potential applications in nanotechnology. (paper)

  15. Helium release from metals with face-centered cubic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciani, V.; Lucki, G.; Jung, P.

    1984-01-01

    The helium release from gold sheets of 5 and 54 μm of thickness and helium concentrations from 10 -9 to 10 -5 ap of He during the isothermal and linear annealing is studied. The helium was put in the sample through the implantation of alpha particles, with variable energy,in the cyclotron. The free diffusion of the atoms of the helium, where the diffusion coefficient follows an Arrhenius law is studied. (E.G.) [pt

  16. Handbook on data centers

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Samee Ullah

    2015-01-01

    This handbook offers a comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art research achievements in the field of data centers. Contributions from international, leading researchers and scholars offer topics in cloud computing, virtualization in data centers, energy efficient data centers, and next generation data center architecture.  It also comprises current research trends in emerging areas, such as data security, data protection management, and network resource management in data centers. Specific attention is devoted to industry needs associated with the challenges faced by data centers, such as various power, cooling, floor space, and associated environmental health and safety issues, while still working to support growth without disrupting quality of service. The contributions cut across various IT data technology domains as a single source to discuss the interdependencies that need to be supported to enable a virtualized, next-generation, energy efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly data cente...

  17. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    in order to relate the results to the service levels used in call centers. Furthermore, the generic nature of the approximation is demonstrated by applying it to a system incorporating a dynamic priority scheme. In the last paper Optimization of overflow policies in call centers, overflows between agent......The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructure...... in modern call centers allows for a high level of customization, but also induces complicated operational processes. The size of the industry together with the complex and labor intensive nature of large call centers motivates the research carried out to understand the underlying processes. The customizable...

  18. The guiding center Lagrangian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recursion relations determining the guiding center Langrangian Λ and the associated guiding center variables to all orders are derived. We consider some particularly simple forms of Λ obtainable by specific choices of certain arbitrary functions appearing as free parameters in the theory. It is, for example, possible to locally define the guiding center variables so that the expression for the corresponding Langrangian is unchanged by all higher order terms. (orig.)

  19. Binuclear complexes of technetium. Evidence for bis(terdentate)bidentate coordination by the bridging ligand 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine to technetium(V)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Preez, J.G.H.; Gerber, T.I.A.; Gibson, M.L.; Geyser, R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have used the potentially bis(terdentate) nitrogen aromatic heterocyclic ligand 2,3,5,6-tetrakis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine (tppz) to prepare mono- and bimetallic technetium(V) complexes bound to tppz. The stimulus for the development of the coordination chemistry of the man-made element technetium is provided by the use of complexes of this element as anatomical imaging agents in nuclear medicine. Although the chemistry of technetium(V) with nitrogen donor ligands is well understood, no complexes have been prepared using potentially terdentate neutral nitrogen donor ligands of this metal in the +5 oxidation state

  20. Metallic Winds in Dwarf Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles-Valdez, F.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; Esquivel, A.

    2017-01-01

    We present results from models of galactic winds driven by energy injected from nuclear (at the galactic center) and non-nuclear starbursts. The total energy of the starburst is provided by very massive young stellar clusters, which can push the galactic interstellar medium and produce an important outflow. Such outflow can be a well or partially mixed wind, or a highly metallic wind. We have performed adiabatic 3D N -Body/Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics simulations of galactic winds using the gadget-2 code. The numerical models cover a wide range of parameters, varying the galaxy concentration index, gas fraction of the galactic disk, and radial distance of the starburst. We show that an off-center starburst in dwarf galaxies is the most effective mechanism to produce a significant loss of metals (material from the starburst itself). At the same time, a non-nuclear starburst produces a high efficiency of metal loss, in spite of having a moderate to low mass loss rate.

  1. Environmental Modeling Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Modeling Center provides the computational tools to perform geostatistical analysis, to model ground water and atmospheric releases for comparison...

  2. Chemical Security Analysis Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In 2006, by Presidential Directive, DHS established the Chemical Security Analysis Center (CSAC) to identify and assess chemical threats and vulnerabilities in the...

  3. Center for Women Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Business with VA Acquisition, Logistics, & Construction Small & Veteran Business Programs VetBiz.gov Financial & Asset Enterprise Management Security Investigation Center/Background Clearances Freedom of Information ...

  4. Small Business Development Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Small Business Administration — Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs throughout the United States and its territories. SBDCs...

  5. Center for Deployment Psychology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Deployment Psychology was developed to promote the education of psychologists and other behavioral health specialists about issues pertaining to the...

  6. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  7. Electron Microscopy Center (EMC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Electron Microscopy Center (EMC) at Argonne National Laboratory develops and maintains unique capabilities for electron beam characterization and applies those...

  8. Audio Visual Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Audiovisual Services Center provides still photographic documentation with laboratory support, video documentation, video editing, video duplication, photo/video...

  9. Test Control Center (TCC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Test Control Center (TCC) provides a consolidated facility for planning, coordinating, controlling, monitoring, and analyzing distributed test events. ,The TCC...

  10. Great Lakes Science Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Since 1927, Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC) research has provided critical information for the sound management of Great Lakes fish populations and other important...

  11. Method of regulating magnetic field of magnetic pole center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Masao; Yamada, Teruo; Kato, Norihiko; Toda, Yojiro; Kaneda, Yasumasa.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide the subject method comprising using a plurality of magnetic metal pieces having different thicknesses, regulating very easily symmetry of the field of the magnetic pole center depending upon the combination of said metal pieces, thereby obtaining a magnetic field of high precision. Method: The regulation of magnetic field at the central part of the magnetic field is not depending only upon processing of the center plug, axial movement of trim coil and ion source but by providing a magnetic metal piece such as an iron ring, primary higher harmonics of the field at the center of the magnetic field can be regulated simply while the position of the ion source slit is on the equipotential surface in the field. (Yoshihara, H.)

  12. Entrapment of metal clusters in metal-organic framework channels by extended hooks anchored at open metal sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shou-Tian; Zhao, Xiang; Lau, Samuel; Fuhr, Addis; Feng, Pingyun; Bu, Xianhui

    2013-07-17

    Reported here are the new concept of utilizing open metal sites (OMSs) for architectural pore design and its practical implementation. Specifically, it is shown here that OMSs can be used to run extended hooks (isonicotinates in this work) from the framework walls to the channel centers to effect the capture of single metal ions or clusters, with the concurrent partitioning of the large channel spaces into multiple domains, alteration of the host-guest charge relationship and associated guest-exchange properties, and transfer of OMSs from the walls to the channel centers. The concept of the extended hook, demonstrated here in the multicomponent dual-metal and dual-ligand system, should be generally applicable to a range of framework types.

  13. Bovine Serum Albumin Metal Complexes for Mimic of SOD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Key Lab. Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials of Ministry of Education, Key Lab. ... scaffold and the metal complex functioned as the catalytic active center. ... small molecule.22 It is found that the antioxidative ... and absence, respectively, of the measured compound. ... monitor the interaction of metal ions with BSA.

  14. Neutron powder diffraction of metal-organic frameworks for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review recent structural studies that we have undertaken aimed at elucidating the fundamental properties of metal-organic framework materials and their interactions with hydrogen. We have shown that exposing coordinatively unsaturated metal centers can greatly enhance the hydrogen binding energy and that they ...

  15. Ceramic/metal seals. [refractory materials for hermetic seals for lighium-metal sulfide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredbenner, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    Design criteria are discussed for a hermetic seal capable of withstanding the 450 C operating temperature of a lithium-metal sulfide battery system. A mechanical seal consisting of two high strength alloy metal sleeves welded or brazed to a conductor assembly and pressed onto a ceramic is described. The conductor center passes through the ceramic but is not sealed to it. The seal is effected on the outside of the taper where the tubular part is pressed down over and makes contact.

  16. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  17. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  18. From Periphery To Center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carré, David

    2014-01-01

    the notions of Center/Periphery. As Hermans (2001) proposed, center and periphery are not fixed ‘I-positions’ of the self; in this vein, these notions are explored as relevant theoretical tools for addressing the developmental trajectories involved in the construction of scientific identities. In sum...

  19. ENERGY RESOURCES CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-11-01

    First I will give a short history of this Center which has had three names and three moves (and one more in the offing) in three years. Then I will tell you about the accomplishments made in the past year. And last, I will discuss what has been learned and what is planned for the future. The Energy and Environment Information Center (EEIC), as it was first known, was organized in August 1975 in San Francisco as a cooperative venture by the Federal Energy Administration (FEA), Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These three agencies planned this effort to assist the public in obtaining information about energy and the environmental aspects of energy. The Public Affairs Offices of FEA, ERDA and EPA initiated the idea of the Center. One member from each agency worked at the Center, with assistance from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Information Research Group (LBL IRG) and with on-site help from the EPA Library. The Center was set up in a corner of the EPA Library. FEA and ERDA each contributed one staff member on a rotating basis to cover the daily operation of the Center and money for books and periodicals. EPA contributed space, staff time for ordering, processing and indexing publications, and additional money for acquisitions. The LBL Information Research Group received funds from ERDA on a 189 FY 1976 research project to assist in the development of the Center as a model for future energy centers.

  20. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Danbury, CT 06810 203-748-6000 Accredited Since March 1998 Corvallis Birth & Women's Health Center Accredited 2314 NW Kings Blvd, Suite ... Washington, DC 20002 202-398-5520 Accredited Since March 2001 Flagstaff Birth and Women's Center Accredited 401 West Aspen Avenue Flagstaff, AZ ...

  1. Technology Information Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerson, E.L.; Shepherd, E.W.; Minor, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A Transportation Technology Center (TTC) has been established at Sandia to address the transportation of nuclear waste and spent fuel. The Technology Information Center (TIC) acts as TTC's clearing house for nuclear material transportation information. TIC's activities are divided into three activities: public information, policy information, and technical information. Some of the uses of TIC's activities are briefly outlined

  2. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  3. Relative Lyapunov Center Bifurcations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Claudia; Schilder, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Relative equilibria (REs) and relative periodic orbits (RPOs) are ubiquitous in symmetric Hamiltonian systems and occur, for example, in celestial mechanics, molecular dynamics, and rigid body motion. REs are equilibria, and RPOs are periodic orbits of the symmetry reduced system. Relative Lyapunov...... center bifurcations are bifurcations of RPOs from REs corresponding to Lyapunov center bifurcations of the symmetry reduced dynamics. In this paper we first prove a relative Lyapunov center theorem by combining recent results on the persistence of RPOs in Hamiltonian systems with a symmetric Lyapunov...... center theorem of Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart. We then develop numerical methods for the detection of relative Lyapunov center bifurcations along branches of RPOs and for their computation. We apply our methods to Lagrangian REs of the N-body problem....

  4. Heavy metal jako subkultura

    OpenAIRE

    KOUTNÁ, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with heavy metal subculture. Its aim is to introduce the most important branches and to show broadness of heavy metal. This bachelor thesis describes development and history, briefly shows Czech heavy metal history alongside with the biggest and most popular Czech heavy metal festivals. It shows the most dressing concerns of society against this style.

  5. METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magel, T.T.

    1958-03-01

    This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

  6. Energy efficient data centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed

  7. Lattice Location of Transition Metals in Semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS366 %title\\\\ \\\\Transition metals (TMs) in semiconductors have been the subject of considerable research for nearly 40 years. This is due both to their role as important model impurities for deep centers in semiconductors, and to their technological impact as widespread contaminants in Si processing, where the miniaturization of devices requires to keep their sheet concentration below 10$^{10}$ cm$^{-2}$. As a consequence of the low TM solubility, conventional ion beam methods for direct lattice location have failed completely in identifying the lattice sites of isolated transition metals. Although electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has yielded valuable information on a variety of TM centers, it has been unable to detect certain defects considered by theory, e.g., isolated interstitial or substitutional Cu in Si. The proposed identity of other EPR centers such as substitutional Fe in Si, still needs confirmation by additional experimental methods. As a consequence, the knowledge on the structural propert...

  8. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  9. Information sharing guidebook for transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    This guidebook provides an overview of the mission and functions of transportation management centers, emergency operations centers, and fusion centers. The guidebook focuses on the types of information these centers produce and manage and how the sh...

  10. Mononuclear Amido and Binuclear Imido Zirconium Complexes Supported by Dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene Ligands. X-ray Structure of [(Me(4)taa)Zr(&mgr;-NR)(2)Zr(NHR)(2)] (R = Bu(t) or 2,6-C(6)H(3)Me(2)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonov, Georgii I.; Blake, Alexander J.; Mountford, Philip

    1997-03-12

    Reaction of 2 equiv of Li[NH-2,6-C(6)H(3)R(2)] with [(Me(4)taa)ZrCl(2)] (Me(4)taaH(2) = tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene) gives the bis(amido) derivatives [(Me(4)taa)Zr(NH-2,6-C(6)H(3)R(2))(2)] [R = Pr(i) (1) and Me (2)]. Addition of Me(4)taaH(2) to [Zr(N-2,6-C(6)H(3)Pr(i)(2))(NH-2,6-C(6)H(3)Pr(i)(2))(2)(py)(2)] also affords 1. The reaction of 2 equiv of aryl or alkyl amines H(2)NR with the bis(alkyl) complex [(Me(4)taa)Zr(CH(2)SiMe(3))(2)] is the most versatile method for preparing [(Me(4)taa)Zr(NHR)(2)] (R = 2,6-C(6)H(3)Pr(i)(2), 2,6-C(6)H(3)Me(2), Ph, or Bu(t)). Reaction of 1 equiv of Me(4)taaH(2) with the binuclear complexes [(Bu(t)NH)(2)Zr(&mgr;-NBu(t))(2)Zr(NHBu(t))(2)] or [(py)(HN-2,6-C(6)H(3)Me(2))(2)Zr(&mgr;-N-2,6-C(6)H(3)Me(2))(2)Zr(NH-2,6-C(6)H(3)Me(2))(2)(py)] gives the asymmetrically substituted derivatives [(Me(4)taa)Zr(&mgr;-NR)(2)Zr(NHR)(2)] [R = Bu(t) (6) or 2,6-C(6)H(3)Me(2) (8)], which have been crystallographically characterized.

  11. Amorphous metal composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrne, M.A.; Lupinski, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    This patent discloses an improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite

  12. User-centered design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Joo Hyun; Kim, Hyeong Heon

    2008-01-01

    The simplification philosophy, as an example, that both of EPRI-URD and EUR emphasize is treated mostly for the cost reduction of the nuclear power plants, but not for the simplification of the structure of user's tasks, which is one of the principles of user-centered design. A user-centered design is a philosophy based on the needs and interests of the user, with an emphasis on making products usable and understandable. However, the nuclear power plants offered these days by which the predominant reactor vendors are hardly user-centered but still designer-centered or technology-centered in viewpoint of fulfilling user requirements. The main goal of user-centered design is that user requirements are elicited correctly, reflected properly into the system requirements, and verified thoroughly by the tests. Starting from the user requirements throughout to the final test, each requirement should be traceable. That's why requirement traceability is a key to the user-centered design, and main theme of a requirement management program, which is suggested to be added into EPRI-URD and EUR in the section of Design Process. (author)

  13. In-Situ Electrokinetic Remediation for Metal Contaminated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    phytoremediation , and electrokinetic extraction. The US Army Environmental Center (USAEC) and Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC...California (CA) List Metals: Antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury , molybdenum, nickel, selenium...Comparison Technologies with which electrokinetic remediation must compete are "Dig and Haul", Soil Washing, and Phytoremediation . "Dig and haul

  14. Core Operations of the Metals and Ceramics Information Center (A DoD information Analysis Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-30

    1214 Hy-Tuf Steel 12 Sep 4208 Wassaloy? 36 Dec 1215 Nitralloy 135 Mod 8 Dec 4310 Haynes Alloy 188 40 1987 Mar 1203 4140 Sterl 34 Mar 1601 A-286 Steel 37...BE /Ej*Az5 pofj.’t FRACT UjPE CATA FOR AISI 521 ,O ALLCY STEEL r-L’I1 AFS. 6 L Pesconm C OPY OF SELECTED DATA FAxED ,-T LCCP"EED 1MILES A AE OPol.es

  15. Self-assembly of metal-organic supramolecules: from a metallamacrocycle and a metal-organic coordination cage to 1D or 2D coordination polymers based on flexible dicarboxylate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fangna; Dou, Jianmin; He, Haiyan; Zhao, Xiaoliang; Sun, Daofeng

    2010-05-03

    To assemble metal-organic supramolecules such as a metallamacrocycle and metal-organic coordination cage (MOCC), a series of flexible dicarboxylate ligands with the appropriate angle, 2,2'-(2,3,5,6-tetramethyl-1,4-phenylene)bis(methylene)bis(sulfanediyl)dibenzoic acid (H(2)L(1)), 2,2'-(2,5-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene)bis(methylene)bis(sulfanediyl)dibenzoic acid (H(2)L(2)), 2,2'-(2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(methylene)bis(sulfanediyl)dinicotinic acid (H(2)L(3)), and 2,2'-(2,4,6-trimethyl-1,3-phenylene)bis(methylene)bis(sulfanediyl)dibenzoic acid (H(2)L(4)), have been designed and synthesized. Using these flexible ligands to assemble with metal ions, six metal-organic supramolecules, Cd(2)(L(1))(2)(dmf)(4)(H(2)O)(2).H(2)O (1), Mn(3)((1)L(2))(2)((2)L(2))(dmf)(2)(H(2)O)(2).5dmf (2), Cu(4)(L(3))(4)(H(2)O)(4).3dmf (3), Cu(4)(L(4))(4)(dmf)(2)(EtOH)(2).8dmf.6H(2)O (4), Mn(4)(L(4))(4)(dmf)(4)(H(2)O)(4).6dmf.H(2)O (5), and Mn(3)(L(4))(3)(dmf)(4).2dmf.3H(2)O (6), possessing a rectangular macrocycle, MOCCs or their extensions, and 1D or 2D coordination polymers, have been isolated. All complexes have been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis. Complex 1 is a discrete rectangular macrocycle, while complex 2 is a 2D macrocycle-based coordination polymer in which the L(2) ligand adopts both syn and anti conformations. Complexes 3-5 are discrete MOCCs in which two binuclear metal clusters are engaged by four organic ligands. The different geometries of the secondary building units (SBUs) and the axial coordinated solvates on the SBUs result in their different symmetries. Complex 6 is a 1D coordination polymer, extended from a MOCC made up of two metal ions and three L(4) ligands. All of the flexible dicarboxylate ligands adopt a syn conformation except that in complex 2, indicating that the syn conformational ligand is helpful for the formation of a metallamacrocycle and a MOCC. The magnetic properties of complexes 5

  16. Alkali metals and group IIA metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the coordination complexes of the alkali metals of group IIA starts with a historical perspective of their chemistry, from simple monodentate ligands, metal-β-diketonates to the macrocyclic polyethers which act as ligands to the alkali and akaline earth metals. Other macrocyclic ligands include quarterenes, calixarenes, porphyrins, phthalocyanines and chlorophylls. A section on the naturally occurring ionophores and carboxylic ionophores is included. (UK)

  17. Advanced Cancer Detection Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruckdeschel, John

    1999-01-01

    ... through screening, and the testing of methods to prevent cancer. In addition, the Center created and supports education programs to provide increased cancer awareness and established working collaborations with the James...

  18. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  19. FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This is a search site for FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRC). A DRC is a readily accessible facility or mobile office set up by FEMA where applicants may go for...

  20. World Trade Center

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Esilinastus katastroofifilm "World Trade Center" : stsenarist Andrea Berloff : režissöör Oliver Stone : kunstnik Jan Roelfs : osades Nicholas Cage, Michael Pena, Stephen Dorff jpt : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2006. Ka filmi prototüüpidest

  1. USU Patient Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — he National Capital Area (NCA) Medical Simulation Center is a state-of-the-art training facility located near the main USU campus. It uses simulated patients (i.e.,...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  3. Center for Contaminated Sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Center for Contaminated Sediments serves as a clearinghouse for technology and expertise concerned with contaminated sediments. The...

  4. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  5. Mental Health Screening Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Releases & Announcements Public Service Announcements Partnering with DBSA Mental Health Screening Center These online screening tools are not ... you have any concerns, see your doctor or mental health professional. Depression Screening for Adult Depression Screening for ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data Consumer Opinion Surveys About CPSC About CPSC Chairman Commissioners Contact / FAQ ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  7. Climate Prediction Center - Outlooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Web resources and services. HOME > Outreach > Publications > Climate Diagnostics Bulletin Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Tropics Climate Diagnostics Bulletin - Forecast Climate Diagnostics

  8. Heart Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rounds Seminar Series & Daily Conferences Fellowships and Residencies School of Perfusion Technology Education Resources Library & Learning Resource Center CME Resources THI Journal THI Cardiac Society Register for the Cardiac Society ...

  9. Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Cooperative Tagging Center (CTC) began as the Cooperative Game Fish Tagging Program (GTP) at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI) in 1954. The GTP was...

  10. National Automotive Center - NAC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Encouraged by the advantages of collaboration, the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC) worked with the Secretary of the...

  11. Mobility Data Analytics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Mobility Data Analytics Center aims at building a centralized data engine to efficiently manipulate : large-scale data for smart decision making. Integrating and learning the massive data are the key to : the data engine. The ultimate goal of underst...

  12. HUD Homeownership Centers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD Homeownership Centers (HOCs) insure single family Federal Housing Administration (FHA) mortgages and oversee the selling of HUD homes. FHA has four Homeownership...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  14. - Oklahoma Water Resources Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development Ag Business Community & Rural Development Crops Family & Consumer Sciences Gardening Family & Consumer Sciences Food & Ag Products Center Horticulture & Landscape Architecture & Landscape Architecture Natural Resource Ecology & Management Plant & Soil Sciences

  15. Predicting dietborne metal toxicity from metal influxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.

    2009-01-01

    Dietborne metal uptake prevails for many species in nature. However, the links between dietary metal exposure and toxicity are not well understood. Sources of uncertainty include the lack of suitable tracers to quantify exposure for metals such as copper, the difficulty to assess dietary processes such as food ingestion rate, and the complexity to link metal bioaccumulation and effects. We characterized dietborne copper, nickel, and cadmium influxes in a freshwater gastropod exposed to diatoms labeled with enriched stable metal isotopes. Metal influxes in Lymnaea stagnalis correlated linearly with dietborne metal concentrations over a range encompassing most environmental exposures. Dietary Cd and Ni uptake rate constants (kuf) were, respectively, 3.3 and 2.3 times higher than that for Cu. Detoxification rate constants (k detox) were similar among metals and appeared 100 times higher than efflux rate constants (ke). Extremely high Cu concentrations reduced feeding rates, causing the relationship between exposure and influx to deviate from linearity; i.e., Cu uptake rates leveled off between 1500 and 1800 nmol g-1 day-1. L. stagnalis rapidly takes up Cu, Cd, and Ni from food but detoxifies the accumulated metals, instead of reducing uptake or intensifying excretion. Above a threshold uptake rate, however, the detoxification capabilities of L. stagnalis are overwhelmed.

  16. World data centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapley, Alan H.; Hart, Pembroke J.

    One of the lasting heritages of the International Geophysical Year (1957-58) is the system of world data centers (WDC) through which there has been international exchange of a wide variety of geophysical data on a continuing basis. This voluntary exchange mechanism has been remarkably successful. The basic operating costs of the centers are provided by the host country. The international exchanges are mainly by barter. The data providers number in the thousands and the users in the tens of thousands.

  17. Recycling of Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Anders; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Metals like iron and aluminium are produced from mineral ore and used for a range of products, some of which have very short lifetimes and thus constitute a major fraction of municipal waste. Packaging in terms of cans, foils and containers are products with a short lifetime. Other products like...... appliances, vehicles and buildings, containing iron and aluminium metals, have long lifetimes before they end up in the waste stream. The recycling of production waste and postconsumer metals has a long history in the metal industry. Some metal smelters are today entirely based on scarp metals. This chapter...... describes briefly how iron and aluminium are produced and how scrap metal is recycled in the industry. Quality requirements and use of recycled products are discussed, as are the resource and environmental issues of metal recycling. Copper and other metals are also found in waste but in much smaller...

  18. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  19. Orientation dependence of the dislocation microstructure in compressed body-centered cubic molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Wang, M.P.; Chen, C.; Xiao, Z.; Jia, Y.L.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z.X.

    2014-01-01

    The orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure has been investigated in commercial pure molybdenum. After deformation, the dislocation boundaries of compressed molybdenum can be classified, similar to that in face-centered cubic metals, into three types: dislocation cells (Type 2), and extended planar boundaries parallel to (Type 1) or not parallel to (Type 3) a (110) trace. However, it shows a reciprocal relationship between face-centered cubic metals and body-centered cubic metals on the orientation dependence of the deformation microstructure. The higher the strain, the finer the microstructure is and the smaller the inclination angle between extended planar boundaries and the compression axis is. - Highlights: • A reciprocal relationship between FCC metals and BCC metals is confirmed. • The dislocation boundaries can be classified into three types in compressed Mo. • The dislocation characteristic of different dislocation boundaries is different

  20. Synthesis, spectroscopic properties, molecular docking, anti-colon cancer and anti-microbial studies of some novel metal complexes for 2-amino-4-phenylthiazole derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harbi, Sami A.; Bashandy, Mahmoud S.; Al-Saidi, Hammed M.; Emara, Adel A. A.; Mousa, Tarek A. A.

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the synthesis of novel bidentate Schiff base (H2L) from condensation of 2-amino-4-phenylthiazole (APT) with 4,6-diacetylresorcinol (DAR) in the molar ratio 2:1. We studied interaction of ligand (H2L) with transition metal ions such as Cr(III), Fe(III), Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II). The ligand (H2L) has two bidentate sets of (N-O) units which can coordinate with two metal ions to afford novel binuclear metal complexes. The directions of coordinate bonds are from nitrogen atoms of azomethine groups and oxygen atoms of the phenolic groups. Structures of the newly synthesized complexes were confirmed by elemental analysis, IR, UV, 1H NMR, ESR, TGA and mass spectral data. All of the newly synthesized complexes were evaluated for their antibacterial and anti-fungal activities. They were also evaluated for their in vitro anticancer activity against human colon carcinoma cells (HCT-116) and mammalian cells of African green monkey kidney (VERO). The Cu(II) complex with selectivity index (S.I.) = 21.26 exhibited better activity than methotrexate (MTX) as a reference drug with S.I. value = 13.30, while Zn(II) complex with S.I. value = 10.24 was found to be nearly as active as MTX. Molecular docking studies further helped in understanding the mode of action of the compounds through their various interactions with active sites of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme. The observed activity of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes gave rise to the conclusion that they might exert their action through inhibition of the DHFR enzyme.

  1. PACS for imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, T J

    2003-01-01

    PACS can be a difficult and confusing decision for any radiology provider, but it can be an even more dynamic question for an outpatient imaging center. Every center represents a unique situation and requires a specialized solution. Typically, most of what is said and discussed about PACS concentrates on solutions and requirements for hospital radiology facilities. Administrators of imaging centers have different problems from hospital administrators, and they need different answers. For imaging centers, the financial justification for PACS may be less immediate than for hospitals. The first thing that must be understood is that no PAC system can make a typical imaging center completely filmless, at least not for quite a while. A hospital has the ability to dictate to its internal referring physicians how a radiological study is delivered, whereas in an imaging center environment, the roles are very much reversed. Once the justification are made for the financial viability of PACS in an imaging center, the next question is how to finance the acquisition of PACS. The decision will depend on how you cost justify your PACS, as well as the shape of your business model, and it will come to a decision between capital purchase or contracting with an application service provider, or ASP. Historically, in the hospital-dominated marketplace, PAC systems have been treated as capital acquisitions. However, for most imaging center, owning the system is more of a problem than a benefit. ASPs increasingly represent a successful alternative for imaging centers. One of the biggest things to consider with PACS is how to store all of those images. There are typically two options, on-site and off-site, with a new "hybrid" option surfacing more recently. Each option has benefits for the user, but the benefits of off-site storage are increasing as the technology advances. Some of the benefits are data security and access. Other issues to address are HIPAA compliance, standardized

  2. Weight Estimate and Centers of Gravity for JT-11 Nuclear Conversion Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manning, R. W.

    1958-01-01

    Weight estimates and centers of gravity for the JT-11 nuclear conversion study are tabulated. Included in the radiator section are: diffuser, shrouds, supports, radiator, liquid metal, shafting and casing.

  3. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  4. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  5. Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Engineer Research and Development Center's Materials Testing Center (MTC) is committed to quality testing and inspection services that are delivered on time and...

  6. Metal-on-metal hip joint tribology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowson, D; Jin, Z M

    2006-02-01

    The basic tribological features of metal-on-metal total hip replacements have been reviewed to facilitate an understanding of the engineering science underpinning the renaissance of these hard-on-hard joints. Metal-on-polymer hip replacements operate in the boundary lubrication regime, thus leading to the design guidance to reduce the femoral head diameter as much as is feasible to minimize frictional torque and volumetric wear. This explains why the gold-standard implant of this form from the past half-century had a diameter of only 22.225 mm (7/8 in). Metal-on-metal implants can operate in the mild mixed lubrication regime in which much of the applied load is supported by elastohydrodynamic films. Correct tribological design leads to remarkably low steady state wear rates. Promotion of the most effective elastohydrodynamic films calls for the largest possible head diameters and the smallest clearances that can reasonably be adopted, consistent with fine surface finishes, good sphericity and minimal structural elastic deformation of the cup on its foundations. This guidance, which is opposite in form to that developed for metal-on-polymer joints, is equally valid for solid (monolithic) metallic heads on metallic femoral stems and surface replacement femoral shells. Laboratory measurements of friction and wear in metal-on-metal joints have confirmed their potential to achieve a very mild form of mixed lubrication. The key lies in the generation of effective elastohydrodynamic lubricating films of adequate thickness compared with the composite roughness of the head and cup. The calculation of the film thickness is by no means easy, but the full procedure is outlined and the use of an empirical formula that displays good agreement with calculations based upon the full numerical solutions is explained. The representation of the lambda ratio, lambda, embracing both film thickness and composite roughness, is described.

  7. ORO scrap metal decontamination program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jugan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80,000 tons of contaminated scrap metal at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon, Ohio; and the Feed Materials Production Center in Fernald, Ohio. After unsuccessful in-house attempts to eliminate/recycle the contaminated metal, DOE is allowing private enterprise the opportunity to participate in this program. DOE is making this opportunity available under a two-phase approach, which is being supported by two separate and corresponding Request for Proposals. Phase I, which is nearing completion, is a demonstration phase to establish a group of companies that the DOE will consider qualified to eliminate the scrap at one or more sites. In Phase I, the companies decontaminated 25-50 tons of scrap to demonstrate capabilities to DOE and to gain the knowledge required to plan/bid on elimination of the scrap at one or more sites. Phase II will request proposals for elimination of the total scrap at one or more of the above noted sites. Multiple awards for Phase II are also anticipated. Companies participating in Phase II will be required to take title to the contaminated scrap and decontaminate/process the scrap for beneficial reuse. Radioactive wastes and metal that cannot be successfully decontaminated/processed will be returned to DOE

  8. The USC Epigenome Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    The University of Southern California (USC, CA, USA) has a long tradition of excellence in epigenetics. With the recent explosive growth and technological maturation of the field of epigenetics, it became clear that a dedicated high-throughput epigenomic data production facility would be needed to remain at the forefront of epigenetic research. To address this need, USC launched the USC Epigenome Center as the first large-scale center in academics dedicated to epigenomic research. The Center is providing high-throughput data production for large-scale genomic and epigenomic studies, and developing novel analysis tools for epigenomic research. This unique facility promises to be a valuable resource for multidisciplinary research, education and training in genomics, epigenomics, bioinformatics, and translational medicine.

  9. International Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  10. Nanochemistry of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, Gleb B

    2001-01-01

    The results of studies on the nanochemistry of metals published in recent years are generalised. Primary attention is centred on the methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles and their chemical reactions. The means of stabilisation of nanoparticles which involve individual metals and incorporate atoms of several metals are considered as well as their physicochemical properties. Self-assembling processes of nanoparticles are described. The prospects of using metal nanoparticles in semiconductor devices, catalysis, biology and medicine are discussed. The bibliography includes 165 references.

  11. Marks of Metal Copenhell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet.......Planchebaseret udendørs udstilling på musikfestivalen Copenhell 18-20/6 2015. En mindre udgave af udstillingen Marks of Metal - Logodesign og visualitet i heavy metal. Udarbejdet i samarbejde med Mediemuseet....

  12. Cryochemistry of Metal Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeev, Gleb B.

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of metal atoms, clusters and nanoparticles with different organic and inorganic substances were studied at low temperature (10-40K). Combination of matrix isolation technique and preparative cryochemistry was applied for the investigation of activity and selectivity of metal particles of different size. Encapsulation of metal nanoparticles in polymers was studied. The metal-polymer films thus obtained exhibited satisfactory sensitivity to ammonia

  13. Cryochemistry of Metal Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeev, Gleb B. [Moscow State University, Laboratory of Low Temperature Chemistry, Chemistry Department (Russian Federation)], E-mail: gbs@kinet.chem.msu.ru

    2003-12-15

    The interaction of metal atoms, clusters and nanoparticles with different organic and inorganic substances were studied at low temperature (10-40K). Combination of matrix isolation technique and preparative cryochemistry was applied for the investigation of activity and selectivity of metal particles of different size. Encapsulation of metal nanoparticles in polymers was studied. The metal-polymer films thus obtained exhibited satisfactory sensitivity to ammonia.

  14. Cryochemistry of Metal Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, Gleb B.

    2003-12-01

    The interaction of metal atoms, clusters and nanoparticles with different organic and inorganic substances were studied at low temperature (10-40K). Combination of matrix isolation technique and preparative cryochemistry was applied for the investigation of activity and selectivity of metal particles of different size. Encapsulation of metal nanoparticles in polymers was studied. The metal-polymer films thus obtained exhibited satisfactory sensitivity to ammonia.

  15. Fungitoxicity of metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, E

    1961-01-01

    The in vitro fungistatic activity of some twenty-four metal cations has been determine against Alternaria tenuis and Botrytis fabae. The metal salts, mainly nitrates, were tested in aqueous solution without added spore germination stimulant. The logarithm of the metal ion concentration at the ED 50 value has been found to conform to the exponenttial relationship with electronegativity proposed by Danielli and Davies (1951). These results are discussed in relation to the site of action of metal cations on the fungal cell.

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from Veterans Crisis Line Search Enter ... Experience (TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers ... Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research Research ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  20. QUAD FAMILY CENTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PINAYEV, I.

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that beam position monitors (BPM) utilizing signals from pickup electrodes (PUE) provide good resolution and relative accuracy. The absolute accuracy (i.e. position of the orbit in the vacuum chamber) is not very good due to the various reasons. To overcome the limitation it was suggested to use magnetic centers of quadrupoles for the calibration of the BPM [1]. The proposed method provides accuracy better then 200 microns for centering of the beam position monitors using modulation of the whole quadrupole family

  1. Lied Transplant Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Department of Energy has prepared an Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1143) evaluating the construction, equipping and operation of the proposed Lied Transplant Center at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha, Nebraska. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Statement in not required.

  2. Starting an aphasia center?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Roberta J

    2011-08-01

    Starting an aphasia center can be an enormous challenge. This article provides initial issues to review and consider when deciding whether starting a new organization is right for you. Determining the need for the program in your community, the best size and possible affiliation for the organization, and available resources, as well as developing a business plan, marketing the program, and building awareness in the community, are some of the factors that are discussed. Specific examples related to starting the Aphasia Center of California are provided. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. Metallic DFB lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marell, M.J.H.; Nötzel, R.; Smit, M.K.; Hill, M.T.; Pozo, J.; Mortensen, M.; Urbach, P.; Leijtens, X.; Yousefi, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present our latest results on the design, fabrication and characterization of metal coated DFB lasers. These devices are based on a specialform of the metal-insulator-metal waveguides, which support plasmon gap modes. The distributed feedback provides control over the laser ~

  4. The metal borohydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2004-01-01

    Publications on borohydrides of metals are systematized in the monograph. Special attention is paid to investigation in the field of synthesis and properties of borohydrides of rare-earth metals, which were carried out under author's supervision. The monograph reviews the basic types of chemical reactions, which are inherent to borohydrides of metals, and structural principles account for their molecular and crystal structures

  5. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fichte, B.; Assmann, H.; Ritzau, F.

    1984-01-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report of a patient, who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism. (orig.) [de

  6. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichte, B.; Ritzau, F.; Assmann, H.

    1984-02-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report is given of a patient who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism.

  7. Intoxication with metallic mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichte, B.; Assmann, H.; Ritzau, F.

    1984-02-01

    Intoxications by metallic mercury are extremely rare. Report is given of a patient, who tried to commit suicide by subcutaneous injection of 500 g of metallic mercury. He died 16 months later in the course of the intoxication. A short review is given of effects and reactions of metallic mercury in the human organism.

  8. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center ...

  10. Optical properties of T-centers under gamma irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Polosan, S; Dragusin, M; Topa, V

    2003-01-01

    Electrolytic coloring of KCl:Pb crystals, leads to formation of negative metal ions with intense emission in the infrared region. These new color centers were named T centers; their most probable configuration could be Pb sub 2 sup 2 sup - , due to the lack of EPR or DCM signals. In order to destroy these structures, the crystals were irradiated with gamma-rays at high doses. The results were the detachment of the electrons from T centers and the appearance of Pb sup 2 sup + - ions. The possibility cannot be excluded of the existence of Pb sup + and Pb sup 0 centers in the samples, because these centers do not exhibit any optical properties on this spectral region. (authors)

  11. Conducting metal oxide and metal nitride nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J.; Subban, Chinmayee V.

    2017-12-26

    Conducting metal oxide and nitride nanoparticles that can be used in fuel cell applications. The metal oxide nanoparticles are comprised of for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten and combinations thereof. The metal nitride nanoparticles are comprised of, for example, titanium, niobium, tantalum, tungsten, zirconium, and combinations thereof. The nanoparticles can be sintered to provide conducting porous agglomerates of the nanoparticles which can be used as a catalyst support in fuel cell applications. Further, platinum nanoparticles, for example, can be deposited on the agglomerates to provide a material that can be used as both an anode and a cathode catalyst support in a fuel cell.

  12. Crib Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Department of Health (HRSA) NICHD text4baby ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase Font Contact CPSC Consumers: Businesses: Report an Unsafe Product ... Guide View All CO Safety Guides ")); jQuery(".node-type-safety-education-center .region-sidebar-second").css('display', " ...

  15. Distribution center consolidation games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, F.; Slikker, M.

    2005-01-01

    We study a location-inventory model to analyze the impact of consolidation of distribution centers on facility and inventory costs. We introduce a cooperative game and show that when demand processes are i.i.d. the core is non-empty, i.e., consolidation allows for a stable division of the minimal

  16. Carolinas Energy Career Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classens, Anver; Hooper, Dick; Johnson, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    Central Piedmont Community College (CPCC), located in Charlotte, North Carolina, established the Carolinas Energy Career Center (Center) - a comprehensive training entity to meet the dynamic needs of the Charlotte region's energy workforce. The Center provides training for high-demand careers in both conventional energy (fossil) and renewable energy (nuclear and solar technologies/energy efficiency). CPCC completed four tasks that will position the Center as a leading resource for energy career training in the Southeast: • Development and Pilot of a New Advanced Welding Curriculum, • Program Enhancement of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) Technology, • Student Support through implementation of a model targeted toward Energy and STEM Careers to support student learning, • Project Management and Reporting. As a result of DOE funding support, CPCC achieved the following outcomes: • Increased capacity to serve and train students in emerging energy industry careers; • Developed new courses and curricula to support emerging energy industry careers; • Established new training/laboratory resources; • Generated a pool of highly qualified, technically skilled workers to support the growing energy industry sector.

  17. School Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  18. The Women's Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Catharine R.; And Others

    Barnard College has created a Women's Center that devotes itself to the task of reaffirming the dignity, autonomy, and equality of women. For too long society has held that women are less rational than men, less capable than men, and thus that educating women is less useful than educating men. Replacing myth with fact is the responsibility of…

  19. Climate Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weather Service NWS logo - Click to go to the NWS home page Climate Prediction Center Home Site Map News Organization Enter Search Term(s): Search Search the CPC Go NCEP Quarterly Newsletter Climate Highlights U.S Climate-Weather El Niño/La Niña MJO Blocking AAO, AO, NAO, PNA Climatology Global Monsoons Expert

  20. Ocean Prediction Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Media Facebook Twitter YouTube Search Search For Go NWS All NOAA Weather Analysis & Forecasts of Commerce Ocean Prediction Center National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Analysis & Unified Surface Analysis Ocean Ocean Products Ice & Icebergs NIC Ice Products NAIS Iceberg Analysis

  1. National Pesticide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I protect my pets when using pesticides around them? More FAQs FAQ Comics Video FAQs From NPIC: Fact Sheets Videos Web Apps Podcasts Outreach Materials NPIC Professional Resources Social Media: National Pesticide Information Center Tweets by NPICatOSU Please read our ...

  2. Queering the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Harry

    2010-01-01

    Composition classrooms and writing centers are spaces where negotiation of academic, social, cultural, and political identities are ubiquitous, yet research has not produced adequate theory and practice to help tutors and writers navigate identity production and its politics. This article seeks to begin conversations that might lead to better…

  3. Precision Joining Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. W.; Westphal, D. A.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop to obtain input from industry on the establishment of the Precision Joining Center (PJC) was held on July 10-12, 1991. The PJC is a center for training Joining Technologists in advanced joining techniques and concepts in order to promote the competitiveness of U.S. industry. The center will be established as part of the DOE Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Initiative, and operated by EG&G Rocky Flats in cooperation with the American Welding Society and the Colorado School of Mines Center for Welding and Joining Research. The overall objectives of the workshop were to validate the need for a Joining Technologists to fill the gap between the welding operator and the welding engineer, and to assure that the PJC will train individuals to satisfy that need. The consensus of the workshop participants was that the Joining Technologist is a necessary position in industry, and is currently used, with some variation, by many companies. It was agreed that the PJC core curriculum, as presented, would produce a Joining Technologist of value to industries that use precision joining techniques. The advantage of the PJC would be to train the Joining Technologist much more quickly and more completely. The proposed emphasis of the PJC curriculum on equipment intensive and hands-on training was judged to be essential.

  4. Centering of quadrupole family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinayev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    A procedure for finding the individual centers for a family of quadrupoles fed with a single power supply is described. The method is generalized for using the correctors adjacent to the quadrupoles. Theoretical background is presented as well as experimental data for the NSLS rings. The method accuracy is also discussed

  5. Guiding center drift equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.

    1979-03-01

    The quations for particle guiding center drift orbits are given in a new magnetic coordinate system. This form of the equations not only separates the fast motion along the lines from the slow motion across, but also requires less information about the magnetic field than many other formulations of the problem

  6. vCenter troubleshooting

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Chuck

    2015-01-01

    The book is designed for the competent vCenter administrator or anyone who is responsible for the vSphere environment. It can be used as a guide by vSphere architects and VMware consultants for a successful vSphere solution. You should have good knowledge and an understanding of core elements and applications of the vSphere environment.

  7. Water Resources Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untitled Document  Search Welcome to the University of Hawai'i at Manoa Water Resources Research Center At WRRC we concentrate on addressing the unique water and wastewater management problems and issues elsewhere by researching water-related issues distinctive to these areas. We are Hawaii's link in a network

  8. Starting a sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Valentine, Paul S

    2010-05-01

    The demand for sleep medicine services has grown tremendously during the last decade and will likely continue. To date, growth in demand has been met by growth in the number of new sleep centers. The need for more new centers will be dependent on market drivers that include increasing regulatory requirements, personnel shortages, integration of home sleep testing, changes in reimbursement, a shift in emphasis from diagnostics to treatment, and an increased consumer focus on sleep. The decision to open a new center should be based on understanding the market dynamics, completing a market analysis, and developing a business plan. The business plan should include an overview of the facility, a personnel and organizational structure, an evaluation of the business environment, a financial plan, a description of services provided, and a strategy for obtaining, managing, and extending a referral base. Implementation of the business plan and successful operation require ongoing planning and monitoring of operational parameters. The need for new sleep centers will likely continue, but the shifting market dynamics indicate a greater need for understanding the marketplace and careful planning.

  9. The Precarious Question of Black Cultural Centers Versus Multicultural Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princes, Carolyn D. W.

    This paper discusses the role of black cultural centers on university campuses, focusing on whether black cultural centers or multicultural centers best meet the needs of an increasingly diverse student body and society. It examines the historical role of black cultural centers as vehicles to promote educational opportunity, student retention, and…

  10. User-Centered Design through Learner-Centered Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Burçak

    2014-01-01

    This article initially demonstrates the parallels between the learner-centered approach in education and the user-centered approach in design disciplines. Afterward, a course on human factors that applies learner-centered methods to teach user-centered design is introduced. The focus is on three tasks to identify the application of theoretical and…

  11. Stern-Center Potsdam; Stern-Center Potsdam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1999-07-01

    The ''Stern-Center Potsdam'' is a star-shaped shopping mall in the city center. [German] Das Stern-Center in Potsdam bietet als Einkaufszentrum vor den Toren Berlins Platz fuer eine Vielzahl von Geschaeften. Die sternfoermige Gebaeudestruktur des Centers bildet den Mittelpunkt des Stadtviertels 'Am Stern'. (orig.)

  12. Metal Nitrides for Plasmonic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naik, Gururaj V.; Schroeder, Jeremy; Guler, Urcan

    2012-01-01

    Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications.......Metal nitrides as alternatives to metals such as gold could offer many advantages when used as plasmonic material. We show that transition metal nitrides can replace metals providing equally good optical performance for many plasmonic applications....

  13. Semi-metallic polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubnova, Olga; Khan, Zia Ullah; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Polymers are lightweight, flexible, solution-processable materials that are promising for low-cost printed electronics as well as for mass-produced and large-area applications. Previous studies demonstrated that they can possess insulating, semiconducting or metallic properties; here we report...... that polymers can also be semi-metallic. Semi-metals, exemplified by bismuth, graphite and telluride alloys, have no energy bandgap and a very low density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, they typically have a higher Seebeck coefficient and lower thermal conductivities compared with metals, thus being...... a Fermi glass to a semi-metal. The high Seebeck value, the metallic conductivity at room temperature and the absence of unpaired electron spins makes polymer semi-metals attractive for thermoelectrics and spintronics....

  14. Kineococcus radiotolerans Dps forms a heteronuclear Mn-Fe ferroxidase center that may explain the Mn-dependent protection against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardini, Matteo; Fiorillo, Annarita; Fittipaldi, Maria; Stefanini, Simonetta; Gatteschi, Dante; Ilari, Andrea; Chiancone, Emilia

    2013-06-01

    The ferroxidase center of DNA-binding protein from starved cells (Dps) is a major player in the iron oxidation/detoxification process that leads to a decreased reactive oxygen species production. The possible Mn(II) participation in this process has been studied in Dps from Kineococcus radiotolerans, a radiation-resistant bacterium with a high cytosolic Mn/Fe ratio and a high capacity to survive ionizing and stress conditions. The X-ray structure of recombinant K. radiotolerans Dps loaded with Mn(II) has been solved at 2.0Å resolution. Mn(II) binding to K. radiotolerans Dps and its effect on Fe(II) oxidation have been characterized in spectroscopic measurements. In K. radiotolerans Dps, the Fe-Fe ferroxidase center can have a Mn-Fe composition. Mn(II) binds only at the high affinity, so-called A site, whereas Fe(II) binds also at the low affinity, so-called B site. The Mn-Fe and Fe-Fe centers behave distinctly upon iron oxidation by O2. A site-bound Mn(II) or Fe(II) plays a catalytic role, while B site-bound Fe(II) behaves like a substrate and can be replaced by another Fe(II) after oxidation. When H2O2 is the Fe(II) oxidant, single electrons are transferred to aromatic residues near the ferroxidase center and give rise to intra-protein radicals thereby limiting OH release in solution. The presence of the Mn-Fe center results in significant differences in the development of such intra-protein radicals. Mn(II) bound at the Dps ferroxidase center A site undergoes redox cycling provided the B site contains Fe. The results provide a likely molecular mechanism for the protective role of Mn(II) under oxidative stress conditions as it participates in redox cycling in the hetero-binuclear ferroxidase center. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  16. Metal Matrix Composite Solar Cell Metallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilt David M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced solar cells are moving to ever thinner formats in order to save mass and in some cases improve performance. As cells are thinned, the possibility that they may fracture or cleave due to mechanical stresses is increased. Fractures of the cell can degrade the overall device performance if the fracture propagates through the contact metallization, which frequently occurs. To address this problem, a novel semiconductor metallization system based on multi-walled carbon nanotube (CNT reinforcement, termed metal matrix composite (MMC metallization is under investigation. Electro-mechanical characterization of MMC films demonstrate their ability to provide electrical conductivity over >40 micron wide cracks in the underlying semiconductor, with the carbon nanotubes bridging the gap. In addition, these materials show a “self-healing” behaviour, electrically reconnecting at ~30 microns when strained past failure. Triple junction (TJ space cells with MMC metallization demonstrated no loss in Jsc after intentional fracture, whereas TJ cells with conventional metallization suffer up to 50% Jsc loss.

  17. NREL's Education Center Programs | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    NREL's Education Center Programs NREL's Education Center Programs There are a variety of educational programs offered through NREL's education center to inspire our community to explore the science neighbors, campus and trail maps, and more. A photo of the NREL Education Center exterior. Programs for

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center : Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel on

  19. Additive Manufacturing: Reproducibility of Metallic Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the properties of five different metals/alloys (Al-12Si, Cu-10Sn and 316L—face centered cubic structure, CoCrMo and commercially pure Ti (CP-Ti—hexagonal closed packed structure fabricated by selective laser melting. The room temperature tensile properties of Al-12Si samples show good consistency in results within the experimental errors. Similar reproducible results were observed for sliding wear and corrosion experiments. The other metal/alloy systems also show repeatable tensile properties, with the tensile curves overlapping until the yield point. The curves may then follow the same path or show a marginal deviation (~10 MPa until they reach the ultimate tensile strength and a negligible difference in ductility levels (of ~0.3% is observed between the samples. The results show that selective laser melting is a reliable fabrication method to produce metallic materials with consistent and reproducible properties.

  20. Revisiting the student centered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise

    2018-01-01

    Has the orthodoxy of progressive pedagogy, or what praise as the student centered, become means of an overall managerial turn that erodes students’ freedom do learn? This is the main question in Bruce Macfarlane’s book Freedom to learn - The Threat to Student Academic Freedom and Why it Needs...... to be Reclaimed (2017). In eighth well-written chapters, Macfarlane explores an often-overlooked paradox in higher education teaching and learning: The idea of the student centered learning, deriving from humanist psychology and progressive pedagogy, has been hijacked by increased and continuous demands of bodily......, cognitive and emotional performance that restricts students’ freedom to develop as autonomous adults. Macfarlane’s catch 22 is, however, that his heritage from humanist psychology, i.e. the idea that we as humans are born with an inner potential that we should be free to realise though education...

  1. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  2. The Center is Everywhere

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberg, David H.

    2012-01-01

    "The Center is Everywhere" is a sculpture by Josiah McElheny, currently (through October 14, 2012) on exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. The sculpture is based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using hundreds of glass crystals and lamps suspended from brass rods to represent the three-dimensional structure mapped by the SDSS through one of its 2000+ spectroscopic plugplates. This article describes the scientific ideas behind this sculpture, emphasizing the p...

  3. Positional isomerism-driven two 3D pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks: Syntheses, topological structures and photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yayong; Zhao, Siwei; Ma, Haoran; Han, Yi; Liu, Kang; Wang, Lei, E-mail: inorchemwl@126.com

    2016-06-15

    Two novel three-dimensional (3D) pillar-layered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), namely [Zn{sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-OH)(boaba)(1,4-bmimb)]{sub n} (1) and {[Zn_5K_2(μ_2-H_2O)_2(boaba)_4(1,2-bmimb)_2(H_2O)_2]·H_2O}{sub n} (2), were prepared by hydrothermal reactions (H{sub 3}boaba=3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid; 1,4-bmimb=1,4-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene; 1,2-bmimb =1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene). Notably, 1 exhibits a (3,5)-connected binodal (6{sup 3})(6{sup 9}·8)-gra net with binuclear [Zn{sub 2}(μ{sub 2}-OH)(COO)]{sup 2+} clusters, while 2 shows a novel (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal net constructed from the unique Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. The results indicate that the disposition of the 2-methylimidazolyl groups of bis(imidazole) ligands have a significant effect on structural diversity. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties of 1 and 2 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 3D pillar-layered metal-organic coordination networks with aromatic multicarboxylate anion and bis(imidazole) ligands have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Display Omitted - Highlights: • It is rarely reported that metal-organic frameworks prepared with 3,5-bis-oxyacetate-benzoic acid. • Two metal-organic frameworks based on positional isomeric ligands were synthesized and structurally characterized. • Compond 1 displays unique (3,5)-connected binodal gra topology. • Compound 2 exhibits (4,4,5,9)-connected 4-nodal topology based on the Zn(II)-K(I) heterometal rod-like substructures. • The photoluminescence properties of compound 1 and 2 have been investigated.

  4. Metal Borohydrides synthesized from metal borides and metal hydrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Sanna

    2014-01-01

    Aarhus C, Denmark email: gallafogh@hotmail.com / sanna-sommer@hotmail.com Magnesium boride, MgB2, ball milled with MH (M = Li, Na, Ca) followed by hydrogenation under high hydrogen pressure, readily forms the corresponding metal borohydrides, M(BH4)x (M = Li, Na, Ca) and MgH2 according to reaction scheme...

  5. Light metal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qinbai

    2016-04-19

    An electrochemical process for the production of light metals, particularly aluminum. Such a process involves contacting a light metal source material with an inorganic acid to form a solution containing the light metal ions in high concentration. The solution is fed to an electrochemical reactor assembly having an anode side containing an anode and a cathode side containing a cathode, with anode side and the cathode side separated by a bipolar membrane, with the solution being fed to the anode side. Light metal ions are electrochemically transferred through the bipolar membrane to the cathode side. The process further involves reducing the light metal ions to light metal powder. An associated processing system is also provided.

  6. Liquid metal steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolowodiuk, W.

    1975-01-01

    A liquid metal heated steam generator is described which in the event of a tube failure quickly exhausts out of the steam generator the products of the reaction between the water and the liquid metal. The steam is generated in a plurality of bayonet tubes which are heated by liquid metal flowing over them between an inner cylinder and an outer cylinder. The inner cylinder extends above the level of liquid metal but below the main tube sheet. A central pipe extends down into the inner cylinder with a centrifugal separator between it and the inner cylinder at its lower end and an involute deflector plate above the separator so that the products of a reaction between the liquid metal and the water will be deflected downwardly by the deflector plate and through the separator so that the liquid metal will flow outwardly and away from the central pipe through which the steam and gaseous reaction products are exhausted. (U.S.)

  7. Mesostructured metal germanium sulfides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLachlan, M.J.; Coombs, N.; Bedard, R.L.; White, S.; Thompson, L.K.; Ozin, G.A.

    1999-12-29

    A new class of mesostructured metal germanium sulfide materials has been prepared and characterized. The synthesis, via supramolecular assembly of well-defined germanium sulfide anionic cluster precursors and transition-metal cations in formamide, represents a new strategy for the formation of this class of solids. A variety of techniques were employed to examine the structure and composition of the materials. Structurally, the material is best described as a periodic mesostructured metal sulfide-based coordination framework akin to periodic hexagonal mesoporous silica, MCM-41. At the molecular scale, the materials strongly resemble microstructured metal germanium sulfides, in which the structure of the [Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10}]{sup 4{minus}} cluster building-blocks are intact and linked via {mu}-S-M-S bonds. Evidence for a metal-metal bond in mesostructured Cu/Ge{sub 4}S{sub 10} is also provided.

  8. Soil heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherameti, Irena [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Botanik und Pflanzenphysiologie; Varma, Ajit (eds.) [Amity Univ., Uttar Pradesh (India). Amity Inst. of Microbial Technology; Amity Science, Technology and Innovation Foundation, Noida, UP (India)

    2010-07-01

    Human activities have dramatically changed the composition and organisation of soils. Industrial and urban wastes, agricultural application and also mining activities resulted in an increased concentration of heavy metals in soils. How plants and soil microorganisms cope with this situation and the sophisticated techniques developed for survival in contaminated soils is discussed in this volume. The topics presented include: the general role of heavy metals in biological soil systems; the relation of inorganic and organic pollutions; heavy metal, salt tolerance and combined effects with salinity; effects on abuscular mycorrhizal and on saprophytic soil fungi; heavy metal resistance by streptomycetes; trace element determination of environmental samples; the use of microbiological communities as indicators; phytostabilization of lead polluted sites by native plants; effects of soil earthworms on removal of heavy metals and the remediation of heavy metal contaminated tropical land. (orig.)

  9. Coordination polymers with the chiral ligand N-p-tolylsulfonyl-L-glutamic acid: Influence of metal ions and different bipyridine ligands on structural chirality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Rong; Song Huihua; Wei Zhen; Zhang Jianjun; Gao Yuanzhe

    2010-01-01

    Four new polymers, namely [Ni(-tsgluO)(2,4'-bipy) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] n .5nH 2 O (1), [Co(-tsgluO)(2,4'-bipy) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] n .5nH 2 O (2), [Ni(-tsgluO)(4,4'-bipy)] n .0.5nH 2 O (3), and [Co(-tsgluO)(4,4'-bipy)] n .0.5nH 2 O (4), where tsgluO 2- =(+)-N-p-tolylsulfonyl-L-glutamate dianion, 2,4'-bipy=2,4'-bipyridine, and 4,4'-bipy=4,4'-bipyridine, have been prepared and structurally characterized. Compounds 1 and 2 are isostructural and mononuclear, and crystallize in the acentric monoclinic space group Cc, forming 1D chain structures. Compound 3 is also mononuclear, but crystallizes in the chiral space group P2 1 , forming a homochiral 2D architecture. In contrast to the other complexes, compound 4 crystallizes in the space group P-1 and is composed of binuclear [Co 2 O 6 N 2 ] n 4- units, which give rise to a 2D bilayer framework. Moreover, compounds 1, 2, and 4 self-assemble to form 3D supramolecular structures through π-π stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions, while compound 3 is further hydrogen-bonded to form 3D frameworks. We have demonstrated the influence of the central metal and bipyridine ligands on the framework chirality of the coordination complexes. - Graphical abstract: Four novel polymers based on a chiral ligand were prepared and structurally characterized; it represents the first series of investigations about the effect of central metals and bipyridine ligands on framework chirality.

  10. Alkylamine functionalized metal-organic frameworks for composite gas separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; McDonald, Thomas M.; D'Alessandro, Deanna M.

    2018-01-09

    Functionalized metal-organic framework adsorbents with ligands containing basic nitrogen groups such as alkylamines and alkyldiamines appended to the metal centers and method of isolating carbon dioxide from a stream of combined gases and carbon dioxide partial pressures below approximately 1 and 1000 mbar. The adsorption material has an isosteric heat of carbon dioxide adsorption of greater than -60 kJ/mol at zero coverage using a dual-site Langmuir model.

  11. Metal atom oxidation laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-01-01

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides

  12. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  13. Tritium in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schober, T.

    1990-01-01

    In this Chapter a review is given of some of the important features of metal tritides as opposed to hydrides and deuterides. After an introduction to the topics of tritium and tritium in metals information will be presented on a variety of metal-tritium systems. Of main interest here are the differences from the classic hydrogen behavior; the so called isotope effect. A second important topic is that of aging effects produced by the accumulation of 3 He in the samples. (orig.)

  14. Ion implantation in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vook, F.L.

    1977-02-01

    The application of ion beams to metals is rapidly emerging as a promising area of research and technology. This report briefly describes some of the recent advances in the modification and study of the basic properties of metals by ion implantation techniques. Most of the research discussed illustrates some of the new and exciting applications of ion beams to metals which are under active investigation at Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque

  15. Liquid Metal Transformers

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Lei; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The room temperature liquid metal is quickly emerging as an important functional material in a variety of areas like chip cooling, 3D printing or printed electronics etc. With diverse capabilities in electrical, thermal and flowing behaviors, such fluid owns many intriguing properties that had never been anticipated before. Here, we show a group of unconventional phenomena occurring on the liquid metal objects. Through applying electrical field on the liquid metals immersed in water, a series...

  16. Economics of Metal Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Tilton, J.E.

    1984-01-01

    Simple economic principles can provide useful insights into the behavior of metal markets. In applying these principles, however, the analyst must take into account technology, market structure, government policies, and other institutional factors influencing the nature of metal supply and demand. Knowledge of both economics and the metal markets is essential. One without the other is likely to lead to sterile or even misleading results. In support of the above conclusion, this study exa...

  17. Hydrogen-metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenzl, H.; Springer, T.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on the alloys of metal crystals with hydrogen. The system niobium-hydrogen and its properties are especially dealt with: diffusion and heat of solution of hydrogen in the host crystal, phase diagram, coherent and incoherent phase separation, application of metal-hydrogen systems in technology. Furthermore, examples from research work in IFF (Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung) of the Nuclear Research Plant, Juelich, in the field of metal-H systems are given in summary form. (GSC) [de

  18. Honeycomb metal panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Product constituted by a honeycomb metal panel that can be employed to advantage for manufacturing lagging by sandwiching it between two plane sheets, utilized in particular in the nuclear industry where lagging has to have a very long life strength. The honeycomb metal panel is made of an expanded metal extrusion previously cut so as to form, after additional drawing, a honeycomb structure with square or rectangular cells with a plane surface [fr

  19. Evaluate Data Center Network Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilimon, Artur

    through a data center network, which is usually built with layer 2 switches and layer 3 routers. The topology of the data center network is crucial for latency in the data communication to and from the data center and between servers in the data center. Tests can be conducted to measure latency and other...... Engineering, scientists evaluate data center network topologies with an SDN-based (Software-Defined Networking) control framework measuring network performance – primarily latency. This can be used to plan data center scaling by testing how a new topology will function before changes are made. Data center...... performance parameters for different data center network topologies. It is however important that tests can be repeated and reproduced to have comparable information from the tests. There are, of course, many topologies that can be used for data center networks. At DTU Fotonik, Department of Photonics...

  20. Metal interactions with boron clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: the structural and bonding features of metallaboranes and metallacarboranes; transition-metal derivatives of nido-boranes and some related species; interactions of metal groups with the octahydrotriborate (1-) anion, B 3 H 8 ; metallaboron cage compounds of the main group metals; closo-carborane-metal complexes containing metal-carbon and metal-boron omega-bonds; electrochemistry of metallaboron cage compounds; and boron clusters with transition metal-hydrogen bonds

  1. Method of producing homogeneous mixed metal oxides and metal--metal oxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    Metal powders, metal oxide powders, and mixtures thereof of controlled particle size are provided by reacting an aqueous solution containing dissolved metal values with excess urea. Upon heating, urea reacts with water from the solution to leave a molten urea solution containing the metal values. The molten urea solution is heated to above about 180 0 C, whereupon metal values precipitate homogeneously as a powder. The powder is reduced to metal or calcined to form oxide particles. One or more metal oxides in a mixture can be selectively reduced to produce metal particles or a mixture of metal and metal oxide particles

  2. Application of liquid metals for the extraction of solid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.U.

    1996-01-01

    Liquid metals dissolve several solid metals in considerable amounts at moderate temperatures. The dissolution processes may be based upon simple physical solubility, formation of intermetallic phases. Even chemical reactions are often observed in which non-metallic elements might be involved. Thus, the capacity to dissolve metals and chemical properties of the liquid metals play a role in these processes. Besides the solubility also chemical properties and thermochemical data are of importance. The dissolution of metals in liquid metals can be applied to separate the solutes from other metals or non-metallic phases. Relatively noble metals can be chemically reduced by the liquid phases. Such solution processes can be applied in the extractive metallurgy, for instance to extract metals from metallic waste. The recycling of metals is of high economical and ecological importance. Examples of possible processes are discussed. (author)

  3. Conducting metal dithiolate complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhill, A. E.; Ahmad, M. M.; Turner, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound......Further work on the chemical composition of the one-dimensional metallic metal dithiolene complex Li-Pt(mnt) is reported. The electrical conduction and thermopower properties of the nickel and palladium complexes are reported and compared with those of the platinum compound...

  4. Physics of amorphous metals

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalenko, Nikolai P; Krey, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of bulk metallic glasses has led to a large increase in the industrial importance of amorphous metals, and this is expected to continue. This book is the first to describe the theoretical physics of amorphous metals, including the important theoretical development of the last 20 years.The renowned authors stress the universal aspects in their description of the phonon or magnon low-energy excitations in the amorphous metals, e.g. concerning the remarkable consequences of the properties of these excitations for the thermodynamics at low and intermediate temperatures. Tunneling

  5. Purification of uranium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kenji; Shikama, Tatsuo; Ochiai, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    We developed the system for purifying uranium metal and its metallic compounds and for growing highly pure uranium compounds to study their intrinsic physical properties. Uranium metal was zone refined under low contamination conditions as far as possible. The degree of the purity of uranium metal was examined by the conventional electrical resistivity measurement and by the chemical analysis using the inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP). The results show that some metallic impurities evaporated by the r.f. heating and other usual metallic impurities moved to the end of a rod with a molten zone. Therefore, we conclude that the zone refining technique is much effective to the removal of metallic impurities and we obtained high purified uranium metal of 99.99% up with regarding to metallic impurities. The maximum residual resistivity ratio, the r.r.r., so far obtained was about 17-20. Using the purified uranium, we are attempting to grow a highly pure uranium-titanium single crystals. (author)

  6. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  7. The waste minimization program at the Feed Materials Production Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasdel, J.E.; Crotzer, M.E.; Gardner, R.L.; Kato, T.R.; Spradlin, C.N.

    1987-01-01

    A waste minimization program is being implemented at the Feed Materials Production Center to reduce the generation of uranium-contaminated wastes and to comply with existing and forthcoming regulations. Procedures and plans are described which deal with process and non-process trash, contaminated wood and metals, used metal drums, and major process wastes such as contaminated magnesium fluoride and neutralized raffinate. Waste minimization techniques used include segregation, source reduction, volume reduction, material substitution and waste/product recycle. The importance of training, communication, and incentives is also covered. 5 refs., 11 figs

  8. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  9. FFTF Work Control Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talbot, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    A centralized Work Control Center (WCC) is responsible for assuring that maintenance and modification of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is performed in accordance with written procedures that ensure design integrity, personnel and public safety, and equipment and system availability for the computerized Master Information Data Acquisition System (MIDAS). Each maintenance task is logged into MIDAS from a Work Request from that has been reviewed and prioritized by the WCC. Thereafter, MIDAS is used to track schedule, manpower and material requirements; authorize field work; and close out the maintenance activity

  10. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  11. Radiation silver paramagnetic centers in a beta-alumina crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badalyan, A.G.; Zhitnikov, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Silver paramagnetic centers in a β-alumina crystal, formed after X-ray radiation at 77 K, are investigated by the EPR method. Silver enters the β-alumina crystal, substituting sodium and potassium ions in a mirror plane. Crystals with substitution from 0.1 to 100% of alkali metal ions by Ag + ions are investigated. Silver atomic centers (Ag 0 -centers), formed by electron capture with the Ag + ion, are firstly detected and investigated in the β-alumina. Hole Ag 2+ -centers are investigated and detected in crystals with high concentration of Ag + . By studying the orientation dependence of a g-factor it is established that hole capture by the Ag + ion is accompanied by Ag 2+ ion displacement from the position, Ag + being primarity taken up (Beavers-Roth or anti- Beavers-Roth) to the position between two oxygen ions in the mirror plane

  12. Anomalous conductivity of calcium- and cadmium molybdates with colour centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reut, E.G.

    1983-01-01

    Electrical properties of cadmium- and calcium molybdates with colour centers are considered. Electric conductivity and capacitance in the 50 to 100 kHz frequency range at temperature change from 4 to 300 K, are investigated. Temperature- and frequency dependences are described by Debye formulas. The potential distribution over the sample is investigated and a conclusion is drawn that electric characteristics are dependent on the barrier impedance which arises at the crystal-electrode metal interface. Bulk conductivity is determined using a probe technique. The CdMoO 4 electric conductivity is anomalously high and cannot be explained by ion transport CdMoO 4 with colour centers is concluded to be an impurity semiconductor. It has been foUnd that in both crystals bulk conductivity and charge layer relaxation on the contacts depend on the same centers. Center parameters are determined

  13. Illinois Accelerator Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroc, Thomas K.; Cooper, Charlie A.

    The Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) hosts a new accelerator development program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. IARC provides access to Fermi's state-of-the-art facilities and technologies for research, development and industrialization of particle accelerator technology. In addition to facilitating access to available existing Fermi infrastructure, the IARC Campus has a dedicated 36,000 ft2 Heavy Assembly Building (HAB) with all the infrastructure needed to develop, commission and operate new accelerators. Connected to the HAB is a 47,000 ft2 Office, Technology and Engineering (OTE) building, paid for by the state, that has office, meeting, and light technical space. The OTE building, which contains the Accelerator Physics Center, and nearby Accelerator and Technical divisions provide IARC collaborators with unique access to world class expertise in a wide array of accelerator technologies. At IARC scientists and engineers from Fermilab and academia work side by side with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in accelerator science and translate them into applications for the nation's health, wealth and security.

  14. Phenomenological three center model

    CERN Document Server

    Poenaru, D N; Gherghescu, R A; Nagame, Y; Hamilton, J H; Ramayya, A V

    2001-01-01

    Experimental results on ternary fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf suggest the existence of a short-lived quasi-molecular state. We present a three-center phenomenological model able to explain such a state by producing a new minimum in the deformation energy at a separation distance very close to the touching point. The shape parametrization chosen by us allows to describe the essential geometry of the systems in terms of one independent coordinate, namely, the distance between the heavy fragment centers. The shell correction (also treated phenomenologically) only produces quantitative effects; qualitatively it is not essential for the new minimum. Half-lives of some quasi-molecular states which could be formed in sup 1 sup 0 B accompanied fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 6 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 6 Cm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf, sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 sup , sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 Fm, sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 sup , sup 2 sup 6 sup 0 No, and sup 2 sup 6 sup 2 Rf are roughly estimated. (authors)

  15. Sustainable Biofuels Development Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reardon, Kenneth F. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The mission of the Sustainable Bioenergy Development Center (SBDC) is to enhance the capability of America’s bioenergy industry to produce transportation fuels and chemical feedstocks on a large scale, with significant energy yields, at competitive cost, through sustainable production techniques. Research within the SBDC is organized in five areas: (1) Development of Sustainable Crops and Agricultural Strategies, (2) Improvement of Biomass Processing Technologies, (3) Biofuel Characterization and Engine Adaptation, (4) Production of Byproducts for Sustainable Biorefining, and (5) Sustainability Assessment, including evaluation of the ecosystem/climate change implication of center research and evaluation of the policy implications of widespread production and utilization of bioenergy. The overall goal of this project is to develop new sustainable bioenergy-related technologies. To achieve that goal, three specific activities were supported with DOE funds: bioenergy-related research initiation projects, bioenergy research and education via support of undergraduate and graduate students, and Research Support Activities (equipment purchases, travel to attend bioenergy conferences, and seminars). Numerous research findings in diverse fields related to bioenergy were produced from these activities and are summarized in this report.

  16. Rapid guiding center calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, R.B.

    1995-04-01

    Premature loss of high energy particles, and in particular fusion alpha particles, is very deleterious in a fusion reactor. Because of this it is necessary to make long-time simulations, on the order of the alpha particle slowing down time, with a number of test particles sufficient to give predictions with reasonable statistical accuracy. Furthermore it is desirable to do this for a large number of equilibria with different characteristic magnetic field ripple, to best optimize engineering designs. In addition, modification of the particle distribution due to magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes such as the saw tooth mode present in the plasma can be important, and this effect requires additional simulation. Thus the large number of necessary simulations means any increase of computing speed in guiding center codes is an important improvement in predictive capability. Previous guiding center codes using numerical equilibria such as ORBIT evaluated the local field strength and ripple magnitude using Lagrangian interpolation on a grid. Evaluation of these quantities four times per time step (using a fourth order Runge-Kutta routine) constitutes the major computational effort of the code. In the present work the authors represent the field quantities through an expansion in terms of pseudo-cartesian coordinates formed from the magnetic coordinates. The simplicity of the representation gives four important advantages over previous methods

  17. Recombination luminescence from H centers and conversion of H centers into I centers in alkali iodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berzina, B.J.

    1981-01-01

    The study is aimed at the search for H-plus-electron centers of luminescence and the investigation of the conversion of H- into I centers by the luminescence of H-plus-electron centers in alkali iodide crystals. KI, RbI and NaI crystals were studied at 12 K. H and F centers were created by irradiation with ultraviolet light corresponding to the absorption band of anion excitons. Then the excitation of electron centers by red light irradiation was followed. The spectra of stimulated recombination luminescence were studied. The luminescence of H-plus- electron centers had been observed and the conclusion was made that this center was formed on immobile H centers. In case of stable H centers the optically stimulated conversion of H centers into I centers occurs. The assumption is advanced on the spontaneous annihilation of near placed unstable F, H centers which leads to the creation of H-plus-electron luminescence centers and to the spontaneous H-I-centers conversion [ru

  18. METALLICITY GRADIENTS OF THICK DISK DWARF STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrell, Kenneth; Chen Yuqin; Zhao Gang, E-mail: carrell@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2012-12-01

    We examine the metallicity distribution of the Galactic thick disk using F, G, and K dwarf stars selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Data Release 8. Using the large sample of dwarf stars with proper motions and spectroscopically determined stellar parameters, metallicity gradients in the radial direction for various heights above the Galactic plane and in the vertical direction for various radial distances from the Galaxy center have been found. In particular, we find a vertical metallicity gradient of -0.113 {+-} 0.010 (-0.125 {+-} 0.008) dex kpc{sup -1} using an isochrone (photometric) distance determination in the range 1 kpc <|Z| < 3 kpc, which is the vertical height range most consistent with the thick disk of our Galaxy. In the radial direction, we find metallicity gradients between +0.02 and +0.03 dex kpc{sup -1} for bins in the vertical direction between 1 kpc <|Z| < 3 kpc. Both of these results agree with similar values determined from other populations of stars, but this is the first time a radial metallicity gradient for the thick disk has been found at these vertical heights. We are also able to separate thin and thick disk stars based on kinematic and spatial probabilities in the vertical height range where there is significant overlap of these two populations. This should aid further studies of the metallicity gradients of the disk for vertical heights lower than those studied here but above the solar neighborhood. Metallicity gradients in the thin and thick disks are important probes into possible formation scenarios for our Galaxy and a consistent picture is beginning to emerge from results using large spectroscopic surveys, such as the ones presented here.

  19. Dialysis centers - what to expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kidneys - dialysis centers; Dialysis - what to expect; Renal replacement therapy - dialysis centers; End-stage renal disease - dialysis ... to a tube that connects to the dialysis machine. Your blood will flow through the tube, into ...

  20. VT Designated Growth Center Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Growth centers aim to align public infrastructure and private building investments with a local framework of policies and regulations to ensure that 20 years of...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Help with VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... ADMINISTRATION Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration ...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center ... Advanced Search Where to Get Help PTSD Coach Online Tools to help you manage stress. Search Pilots ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enter to expand a main menu option (Health, Benefits, etc). 3. To enter and activate the submenu ... Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's ... Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff ...

  5. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities.

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from ... Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside ...

  7. National Center for Biotechnology Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to NCBI Sign Out NCBI National Center for Biotechnology Information Search database All Databases Assembly Biocollections BioProject ... Search Welcome to NCBI The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances science and health by providing access ...

  8. Center for Beam Physics, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report contains the following information on the center for beam physics: Facilities; Organizational Chart; Roster; Profiles of Staff; Affiliates; Center Publications (1991--1993); and 1992 Summary of Activities

  9. Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Daugherty Memorial Assessment Center (DMAC) is a 39,000-square-foot facility that doubles the warfare center's high-secured performance assessment capabilities. DMAC...

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional ... TEE) Tournament Wheelchair Games Winter Sports Clinic Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan ...

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    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web ...

  12. Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — As seen on the center's logo, the mission statement for FDA's Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) reads: "Protecting Human and Animal Health." To achieve this broad...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... crisis or having thoughts of suicide, visit VeteransCrisisLine.net for more resources. Close this modal

  14. VT Designated Village Centers Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This community revitalization program helps maintain or evolve small to medium-sized historic centers with existing civic and commercial buildings. The designation...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Search Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers Locator Hospitals and Clinics Vet Centers Regional ... Locations Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers VA » Health Care » PTSD: National Center for ...

  16. Italy INAF Data Center Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negusini, M.; Sarti, P.

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Italian INAF VLBI Data Center. Our Data Center is located in Bologna, Italy and belongs to the Institute of Radioastronomy, which is part of the National Institute of Astrophysics.

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning Service Members Rural Veterans ...

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and Staff Disaster Responders Medical Doctors Community Providers and Clergy ... Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention ... and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s ...

  1. Center for Prostate Disease Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Prostate Disease Research is the only free-standing prostate cancer research center in the U.S. This 20,000 square foot state-of-the-art basic science...

  2. School-Based Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care group, such as a community health center, hospital, or health department. A few are run by the school district itself. Centers often get money from charities and the government so they can give care ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... and Clinics Vet Centers Regional Benefits Offices Regional Loan Centers Cemetery Locations Get help from Veterans Crisis ... Rehabilitation & Employment Dependents' Educational Assistance Survivor Benefits Home Loans Life Insurance Appeals Modernization Burials & Memorials Cemetery Services ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ... Search Tips Modify Your Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search ...

  6. Metal borohydrides and derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paskevicius, Mark; Haarh Jepsen, Lars; Schouwink, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    major classes of metal borohydride derivatives have also been discovered: anion-substituted compounds where the complex borohydride anion, BH4 -, is replaced by another anion, i.e. a halide or amide ion; and metal borohydrides modified with neutral molecules, such as NH3, NH3BH3, N2H4, etc. Here, we...

  7. Ion implantation of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dearnaley, G.

    1976-01-01

    In this part of the paper descriptions are given of the effects of ion implantation on (a) friction and wear in metals; and (b) corrosion of metals. In the study of corrosion, ion implantation can be used either to introduce a constituent that is known to convey corrosion resistance, or more generally to examine the parameters which control corrosion. (U.K.)

  8. Marks of Metal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Udstilling på Mediemuseet med fokus på den visuelle side af heavy metal: Logoer, pladecovers og lignende.......Udstilling på Mediemuseet med fokus på den visuelle side af heavy metal: Logoer, pladecovers og lignende....

  9. Liquid metals pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Frere, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Pumps used to pump liquid metals depend on the liquid metal and on the type of application concerned. One deals more particularly with electromagnetic pumps, the main pumps used with mechanical pumps. To pump sodium in the nuclear field, these two types of pumps are used; the pumps of different circuits of Super Phenix are presented and described [fr

  10. PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, W.L.; Moore, R.H.

    1961-01-17

    A process is given for producing plutonium metal by the reduction of plutonium chloride, dissolved in alkali metal chloride plus or minus aluminum chloride, with magnesium or a magnesium-aluminum alloy at between 700 and 800 deg C and separating the plutonium or plutonium-aluminum alloy formed from the salt.

  11. Liquid metal monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.; Roach, P.F.

    1982-01-01

    A liquid metal monitor of the by-pass plugging meter kind described in British Patent 1,308,466, is further provided with a pump arranged to oppose flow through a by-pass thereby to provide a constant pressure difference across an orifice and improve the sensitivity of the instrument. The monitor estimates the impurity content in a liquid metal stream. (author)

  12. Extraction of metal values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, R F

    1988-10-19

    Metal values (especially uranium values) are extracted from aqueous solutions of metal oxyions in the absence of halogen ion using an imidazole of defined formula. Especially preferred extractants are 1-alkyl imidazoles and benzimidazoles having from 7 to 25 carbon atoms in the alkyl group.

  13. Liquid metal purification device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takao; Shimoyashiki, Shigehiro.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention concerns a liquid metal purification device for removing and purifying impuries in liquid metal sodium used as coolants of an FBR type reactor. A vessel having a group of pipes made of hydrogen permeable metal at the inside thereof is disposed to the inlet pipeline of a cold trap. The group of hydrogen permeable metal pipes is connected to an exhaust pipe and a vacuum pump, so that the inside of the pipes is exhausted. Liquid metal sodium branched from the main pipeline of a coolant system passes through the outer side of the group of the hydrogen permeable metal pipes. In this cae, hydrogen contained as impurities in the liquid metal sodium diffuses and permeates the hydrogen permeation metal pipes and enters into the pipe group and is discharged out of the system by the vacuum pump. This can mitigate the hydrogen removing burden of the cold trap, to extend the device life time. (I.N.)

  14. Superconductivity in bad metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emery, V.J.; Kivelson, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that many synthetic metals, including high temperature superconductors are ''bad metals'' with such a poor conductivity that the usual mean-field theory of superconductivity breaks down because of anomalously large classical and quantum fluctuations of the phase of the superconducting order parameter. Some consequences for high temperature superconductors are described

  15. Metals and Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pan; Miah, Mahfuzur Rahman; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Metals play important roles in the human body, maintaining cell structure and regulating gene expression, neurotransmission, and antioxidant response, to name a few. However, excessive metal accumulation in the nervous system may be toxic, inducing oxidative stress, disrupting mitochondrial function, and impairing the activity of numerous enzymes. Damage caused by metal accumulation may result in permanent injuries, including severe neurological disorders. Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown a strong correlation between aberrant metal exposure and a number of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Guillain–Barré disease, Gulf War syndrome, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and Wilson’s disease. Here, we briefly survey the literature relating to the role of metals in neurodegeneration. PMID:27006759

  16. Production of magnesium metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blencoe, James G [Harriman, TN; Anovitz, Lawrence M [Knoxville, TN; Palmer, Donald A [Oliver Springs, TN; Beard, James S [Martinsville, VA

    2010-02-23

    A process of producing magnesium metal includes providing magnesium carbonate, and reacting the magnesium carbonate to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The carbon dioxide is used as a reactant in a second process. In another embodiment of the process, a magnesium silicate is reacted with a caustic material to produce magnesium hydroxide. The magnesium hydroxide is reacted with a source of carbon dioxide to produce magnesium carbonate. The magnesium carbonate is reacted to produce a magnesium-containing compound and carbon dioxide. The magnesium-containing compound is reacted to produce magnesium metal. The invention further relates to a process for production of magnesium metal or a magnesium compound where an external source of carbon dioxide is not used in any of the reactions of the process. The invention also relates to the magnesium metal produced by the processes described herein.

  17. Chelation in Metal Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaran J.S. Flora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy is the preferred medical treatment for reducing the toxic effects of metals. Chelating agents are capable of binding to toxic metal ions to form complex structures which are easily excreted from the body removing them from intracellular or extracellular spaces. 2,3-Dimercaprol has long been the mainstay of chelation therapy for lead or arsenic poisoning, however its serious side effects have led researchers to develop less toxic analogues. Hydrophilic chelators like meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid effectively promote renal metal excretion, but their ability to access intracellular metals is weak. Newer strategies to address these drawbacks like combination therapy (use of structurally different chelating agents or co-administration of antioxidants have been reported recently. In this review we provide an update of the existing chelating agents and the various strategies available for the treatment of heavy metals and metalloid intoxications.

  18. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-01-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  19. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to

  20. Method of producing homogeneous mixed metal oxides and metal-metal oxide mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinby, T.C.

    1980-01-01

    A method for preparing particulate metal or metal oxide of controlled partile size comprises contacting an an aqueous solution containing dissolved metal values with excess urea at a temperature sufficient to cause urea to react with water to provide a molten urea solution containing the metal values; heating the molten urea solution to cause the metal values to precipitate, forming a mixture containing precipitated metal values; heating the mixture containing precipitated metal values to evaporate volatile material leaving a dry powder containing said metal values. The dry powder can be calcined to provide particulate metal oxide or reduced to provide particulate metal. Oxide mixtures are provided when the aqueous solution contains values of more than one metal. Homogeneousmetal-metal oxide mistures for preparing cermets can be prepared by selectively reducing at least one of the metal oxides. (auth)

  1. NASA Space Engineering Research Center for VLSI systems design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This annual review reports the center's activities and findings on very large scale integration (VLSI) systems design for 1990, including project status, financial support, publications, the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) Symposium on VLSI Design, research results, and outreach programs. Processor chips completed or under development are listed. Research results summarized include a design technique to harden complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS) memory circuits against single event upset (SEU); improved circuit design procedures; and advances in computer aided design (CAD), communications, computer architectures, and reliability design. Also described is a high school teacher program that exposes teachers to the fundamentals of digital logic design.

  2. Effects of the exotic zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) on metal cycling in Lake Erie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klerks, P.L. [Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Dept. of Biology, Lafayette, Louisiana (United States)]. E-mail: klerks@usl.edu; Fraleigh, P.C.; Lawniczak, J.E. [Univ. of Toledo, Dept. of Biology, Toledo, Ohio (United States)

    1997-07-15

    This research demonstrated the impact of high densities of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) on the cycling of copper, nickel, and zinc in a lake environment. Experiments with mussels on sedimentation traps in western Lake Erie and with mussels in flow-through tanks receiving Lake Erie water showed that zebra mussels remove metals from the water column, incorporate metals in their tissues, and deposit metals on the lake bottom. Removal of metals from the water column was estimated at 10-17%{center_dot}day{sup -1} of the amounts present. This material was largely deposited on the lake bottom; zebra mussels more than doubled the rate at which metals were being added to the lake bottom. Metal biodeposition rates were extremely high (e.g., 50 mg Zn{center_dot}m{sup -2}{center_dot}day{sup -1}) in high-turbidity areas with elevated metal levels. Two factors contributed to metal biodeposition by zebra mussels. First, their production of feces and pseudofeces increased the rate at which suspended matter was being added to the sediment (accounting for 92% of the increased metal biodeposition). Second, the material coming out of suspension had higher metal concentrations when zebra mussels were present (constituting 8% of the increased biodeposition). (author)

  3. Feasibility Study on 3-D Printing of Metallic Structural Materials with Robotized Laser-Based Metal Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaoyu; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2016-07-01

    Metallic structural materials continue to open new avenues in achieving exotic mechanical properties that are naturally unavailable. They hold great potential in developing novel products in diverse industries such as the automotive, aerospace, biomedical, oil and gas, and defense. Currently, the use of metallic structural materials in industry is still limited because of difficulties in their manufacturing. This article studied the feasibility of printing metallic structural materials with robotized laser-based metal additive manufacturing (RLMAM). In this study, two metallic structural materials characterized by an enlarged positive Poisson's ratio and a negative Poisson's ratio were designed and simulated, respectively. An RLMAM system developed at the Research Center for Advanced Manufacturing of Southern Methodist University was used to print them. The results of the tensile tests indicated that the printed samples successfully achieved the corresponding mechanical properties.

  4. Virtual Meteorological Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Brinzila

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A virtual meteorological center, computer based with Internet possibility transmission of the information is presented. Circumstance data is collected with logging field meteorological station. The station collects and automatically save data about the temperature in the air, relative humidity, pressure, wind speed and wind direction, rain gauge, solar radiation and air quality. Also can perform sensors test, analyze historical data and evaluate statistical information. The novelty of the system is that it can publish data over the Internet using LabVIEW Web Server capabilities and deliver a video signal to the School TV network. Also the system performs redundant measurement of temperature and humidity and was improved using new sensors and an original signal conditioning module.

  5. Microtubule-Organizing Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingchao; Akhmanova, Anna

    2017-10-06

    The organization of microtubule networks is crucial for controlling chromosome segregation during cell division, for positioning and transport of different organelles, and for cell polarity and morphogenesis. The geometry of microtubule arrays strongly depends on the localization and activity of the sites where microtubules are nucleated and where their minus ends are anchored. Such sites are often clustered into structures known as microtubule-organizing centers, which include the centrosomes in animals and spindle pole bodies in fungi. In addition, other microtubules, as well as membrane compartments such as the cell nucleus, the Golgi apparatus, and the cell cortex, can nucleate, stabilize, and tether microtubule minus ends. These activities depend on microtubule-nucleating factors, such as γ-tubulin-containing complexes and their activators and receptors, and microtubule minus end-stabilizing proteins with their binding partners. Here, we provide an overview of the current knowledge on how such factors work together to control microtubule organization in different systems.

  6. Interactive design center.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomplun, Alan R. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-07-01

    Sandia's advanced computing resources provide researchers, engineers and analysts with the ability to develop and render highly detailed large-scale models and simulations. To take full advantage of these multi-million data point visualizations, display systems with comparable pixel counts are needed. The Interactive Design Center (IDC) is a second generation visualization theater designed to meet this need. The main display integrates twenty-seven projectors in a 9-wide by 3-high array with a total display resolution of more than 35 million pixels. Six individual SmartBoard displays offer interactive capabilities that include on-screen annotation and touch panel control of the facility's display systems. This report details the design, implementation and operation of this innovative facility.

  7. Center for dielectric studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, L. E.; Newnham, R. E.; Biggers, J. V.

    1984-05-01

    This report focuses upon the parts of the Center program which have drawn most extensively upon Navy funds. In the basic study of polarization processes in high K dielectrics, major progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms in relaxor ferroelectric in the perovskite structure families. A new effort is also being mounted to obtain more precise evaluation of the internal stress effects in fine grained barium titanate. Related to reliability, studies of the effects of induced macro-defects are described, and preparation for the evaluation of space charge by internal potential distribution measurements discussed. To develop new processing methods for very thin dielectric layers, a new type of single barrier layer multilayer is discussed, and work on the thermal evaporation of oriented crystalline antimony sulphur iodide describe.

  8. The satellite situation center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teague, M.J.; Sawyer, D.M.; Vette, J.I.

    1982-01-01

    Considerations related to the early planning for the International Magnetospheric Study (IMS) took into account the desirability of an establishment of specific entities for generating and disseminating coordination information for both retrospective and predictive periods. The organizations established include the IMS/Satellite Situation Center (IMS/SSC) operated by NASA. The activities of the SSC are related to the preparation of reports on predicted and actually achieved satellite positions, the response to inquiries, the compilation of information on satellite experiments, and the issue of periodic status summaries. Attention is given to high-altitude satellite services, other correlative satellite services, non-IMS activities of the SSC, a summary of the SSC request activity, and post-IMS and future activities

  9. Citizen centered design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Mulder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Today architecture has to design for rapidly changing futures, in a citizen-centered way. That is, architecture needs to embrace meaningful design. Societal challenges ask for a new paradigm in city-making, which combines top-down public management with bottom-up social innovation to reach meaningful design. The biggest challenge is indeed to embrace a new collaborative attitude, a participatory approach, and to have the proper infrastructure that supports this social fabric. Participatory design and transition management are future-oriented, address people and institutions. Only through understanding people in context and the corresponding dynamics, one is able to design for liveable and sustainable urban environments, embracing the human scale.

  10. Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, Christopher M.; Ross, Larry; Kaldenbach, Karen Yvonne; Estigneev, Yuri; Murievav, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. government has been assisting the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) for many years with nuclear weapons transportation security (NWTS) through the provision of specialized guard escort railcars and cargo railcars with integrated physical security and communication systems, armored transport vehicles, and armored escort vehicles. As a natural continuation of the NWTS program, a partnership has been formed to construct a training center that will provide counterterrorism training to personnel in all branches of the RF MOD. The Abramovo Counterterrorism Training Center (ACTC) is a multinational, multiagency project with funding from Canada, RF and the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy. ACTC will be a facility where MOD personnel can conduct basic through advanced training in various security measures to protect Category IA material against the threat of terrorist attack. The training will enhance defense-in-depth principles by integrating MOD guard force personnel into the overall physical protection systems and improving their overall response time and neutralization capabilities. The ACTC project includes infrastructure improvements, renovation of existing buildings, construction of new buildings, construction of new training facilities, and provision of training and other equipment. Classroom training will be conducted in a renovated training building. Basic and intermediate training will be conducted on three different security training areas where various obstacles and static training devices will be constructed. The central element of ACTC, where advanced training will be held, is the 'autodrome,' a 3 km road along which various terrorist events can be staged to challenge MOD personnel in realistic and dynamic nuclear weapons transportation scenarios. This paper will address the ACTC project elements and the vision for training development and integrating this training into actual nuclear weapons transportation operations.

  11. Mixed-ligand binuclear copper(II) complex of 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The title compound was obtained as dark green ... tals were sorted using polarizing microscope (Leica. DMLSP). Crystals ... minimum peak heights of 0.405 and –0.285 e Å. −3. , respectively. .... placed in a centre of inversion. Each unit of the ...

  12. Mono- and binuclear complexes of low-valent zirconium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielstra, IJtsen

    1990-01-01

    This thesis is a study on the synthesis and reactivity of low-valent zirconium. The investigation can be divided in two parts: the first describes the chemistry of mono-cyclopentadienyl Zr (II) complexes (Chapter II, III and IV), and the second describes some synthetic pathways successfully used for

  13. Synthesis and physiochemical studies on binuclear Cu(II ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    samples were dissolved in methanol and introduced into the ESI source ... electrochemical measurements was obtained from Fluka and recrystallised from .... All the complexes undergo two one-electron reduction and oxidation at two different.

  14. Webinar Presentation: Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Vitamins, Minerals and Metals: Do Healthy Diets Counteract Health Effects of Toxicants?, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Food and Children's Health held on Dec. 9, 2015.

  15. On tension-compression asymmetry in ultrafine-grained and nanocrystalline metals

    KAUST Repository

    Gurses, Ercan; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2010-01-01

    We present a physically motivated computational study explaining the tension/compression (T/C) asymmetry phenomenon in nanocrystalline (nc) and ultrafine-grained (ufg) face centered cubic (fcc) metals utilizing a variational constitutive model where

  16. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  17. Nanoporous metal-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Satcher, Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei; Charnvanichborikarn, Supakit; Colvin, Jeffrey; Felter, Thomas; Kim, Sangil; Merrill, Matthew; Orme, Christine

    2017-12-19

    Described here is a metal-carbon composite, comprising (a) a porous three-dimensional scaffold comprising one or more of carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide, and (b) metal nanoparticles disposed on said porous scaffold, wherein the metal-carbon composite has a density of 1 g/cm.sup.3 or less, and wherein the metal nanoparticles account for 1 wt. % or more of the metal-carbon composite. Also described are methods for making the metal-carbon composite.

  18. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  19. Method for producing metallic microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-06-29

    Method for producing metallic particles. The method converts metallic nanoparticles into larger, spherical metallic particles. An aerosol of solid metallic nanoparticles and a non-oxidizing plasma having a portion sufficiently hot to melt the nanoparticles are generated. The aerosol is directed into the plasma where the metallic nanoparticles melt, collide, join, and spheroidize. The molten spherical metallic particles are directed away from the plasma and enter the afterglow where they cool and solidify.

  20. A double metal process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, F.; Vasche, G.; Caywood, J.M.; Houck, B.; Boyce, J.; Tso, L.

    1988-01-01

    A dual layer metallization process is studied using a Tungsten 10% Titanium/Molybdenum sandwich (TiW/Mo) first metal with an Al/.5% Cu for the second metal. This metallization process has: 1) very reliable shallow junction contacts without junction spiking, 2) very high electromigration resistance and (3) A very smooth defect free surface throughout the process. Contact resistance of 50 and 30 ohm-um2 for P and N type silicon respectively is achieved. The TiW/Mo film stress is studied and an optimum condition for low compressive stress is defined. The TiW/Mo is etched using a corrosion free etch process. Electromigration data is presented showing TiW/Mo to be at least an order of magnitude better than Al/Si. The intermetal oxide layer is a planarized sandwich of LTO/SOG/LTO providing a smooth positive slope surface for the Metal 2. Metal l/Metal 2 via resistances are studied with 1.25 ohm-um2 values obtained

  1. Launch Vehicle Control Center Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Epps, Amy; Woodruff, Van; Vachon, Michael Jacob; Monreal, Julio; Williams, Randall; McLaughlin, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This analysis is a survey of control center architectures of the NASA Space Launch System (SLS), United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V and Delta IV, and the European Space Agency (ESA) Ariane 5. Each of these control center architectures have similarities in basic structure, and differences in functional distribution of responsibilities for the phases of operations: (a) Launch vehicles in the international community vary greatly in configuration and process; (b) Each launch site has a unique processing flow based on the specific configurations; (c) Launch and flight operations are managed through a set of control centers associated with each launch site, however the flight operations may be a different control center than the launch center; and (d) The engineering support centers are primarily located at the design center with a small engineering support team at the launch site.

  2. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. This paper discusses a detailed Study Plan which was prepared describing planned geochronology and field studies to assess the chronology of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center and other Quaternary volcanic centers in the region. A paper was published discussing the geomorphic and soil evidence for a late Pleistocene or Holoceno age for the main cone of the center. The purpose of this paper was to expose the ideas concerning the age of the Lathrop Wells center to scientific scrutiny. Additionally, field evidence was described suggesting the Lathrop Wells center may have formed from multiple eruptive events with significant intervals of no activity between events. This interpretation breaks with established convention in the volcanological literature that small volume basalt centers are monogenetic

  3. The ATOMKI Accelerator Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biri, S.; Kormany, Z.; Berzi, I.; Hunyadi, M.

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 a new division was established in our institute: the ATOMKI Accelerator Center (AAC). Before this time the facilities and staff of AAC belonged to other departments of the institute. The re-organization however, was necessary. It was understood that the translocation of all the accelerators into a centralized unit is advantageous in numerous fields. Here we just mention some of them. The submission of any instrumentation type proposal (EU or domestic) will be easier and has a higher chance to be supported. The organization and distribution of the beamtimes will be more equal and optimal. The usage of the maintenance and spare tools can became better and cheaper. The operating staff (cca. 20 person) can serve at more than one accelerator and the teams can help each other. The accelerator center actually became a fourth new basic unit of the institute besides the three traditional scientific divisions (see the Atomki homepage for the organization chart). The following six main facilities belong to the accelerator center: Cyclotron; VdG-5 accelerator; VdG-1 accelerator; ECR ion source; Isotope separator; Tandetron (under installation). In figure 1 the placements of these machines are shown in an artistic 3D map of the Atomki. The table 1 summarizes the main parameters of the accelerators. More detailed technical specification of the machines can be found in the new homepage of the center. In 2009 all the accelerators operated as scheduled, safely and without major breakdowns. After the experiences in the first months it can be concluded that the new center works well both for technical and human point of views. In the next sub-chapters the 2009 operation and development details of the individual accelerators are summarized. Cyclotron operation. The operation of the cyclotron in 2009 was concentrated to the usual 9 months; January, July and August were reserved for maintenance and holidays. The overall working time of the accelerator was 2009 hours; the time

  4. Actinide metal processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, N.N.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide metal such as thorium, uranium, or plutonium to an actinide oxide material by admixing the actinide metal in an aqueous medium with a hypochlorite as an oxidizing agent for sufficient time to form the actinide oxide material and recovering the actinide oxide material is described together with a low temperature process for preparing an actinide oxide nitrate such as uranyl nitrate. Additionally, a composition of matter comprising the reaction product of uranium metal and sodium hypochlorite is provided, the reaction product being an essentially insoluble uranium oxide material suitable for disposal or long term storage

  5. Metal recovery via geobiotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedrich, Sabrina; Schippers, Axel

    2017-01-01

    Specialized acidophilic bacteria and archaea are able to extract valuable metals such as copper, gold, cobalt, nickel, zinc, and uranium from sulfide ores. This process is known as bioleaching and its application in the mining industry as biomining. Laboratory studies also demonstrated bioleaching of oxide ores such as laterites and of mining residues such as mine tailings as well as metal recycling from waste (secondary mining). Metals being leached have to be recovered from acidic polymetallic solutions (mine and process waters) which is possible via biosorption or biomineralisation.

  6. Metal Detecting in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobat, A.S.

    2016-01-01

    questions: 1) Why does the liberal model work in Denmark, 2) which downsides of the liberal model of metal detector archaeology in Denmark can be identified, 30 years after its inception the beginning, and 3) what are possible solutions to these problems. It will be argued that a user-driven national...... all of the spectacular and ground-breaking discoveries of the past decades are owed to metal detectors in the hands of amateur archaeologists. In order to serve as a contribution to the discussion on the upsides and downsides of liberal metal detector archaeology, this article addresses mainly three...

  7. Tuning aromaticity in trigonal alkaline earth metal clusters and their alkali metal salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Halla, J Oscar C; Matito, Eduard; Blancafort, Lluís; Robles, Juvencio; Solà, Miquel

    2009-12-01

    In this work, we analyze the geometry and electronic structure of the [X(n)M(3)](n-2) species (M = Be, Mg, and Ca; X = Li, Na, and K; n = 0, 1, and 2), with special emphasis on the electron delocalization properties and aromaticity of the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) unit. The cyclo-[M(3)](2-) ring is held together through a three-center two-electron bond of sigma-character. Interestingly, the interaction of these small clusters with alkali metals stabilizes the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) ring and leads to a change from sigma-aromaticity in the bound state of the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) to pi-aromaticity in the XM(3) (-) and X(2)M(3) metallic clusters. Our results also show that the aromaticity of the cyclo-[M(3)](2-) unit in the X(2)M(3) metallic clusters depends on the nature of X and M. Moreover, we explored the possibility for tuning the aromaticity by simply moving X perpendicularly to the center of the M(3) ring. The Na(2)Mg(3), Li(2)Mg(3), and X(2)Ca(3) clusters undergo drastic aromaticity alterations when changing the distance from X to the center of the M(3) ring, whereas X(2)Be(3) and K(2)Mg(3) keep its aromaticity relatively constant along this process. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Investigation of irradiation strengthening of bcc metals and their alloys. Progress report, January 1977--October 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of (a) the effect of neutron damage on the dislocation kinetics in bcc metals and their alloys, and (b) the effect of 3 He on the deformation characteristics of body centered cubic metals and their alloys. Results obtained from these projects are discussed

  9. 'Motor control center obsolescence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A significant and growing problem within the global nuclear industry is the aging of motor control center (MCC) components. MCC's have a very important role in the safety and critical to generation requirements of a nuclear power plant. Although many OEM's MCC's such as ITE/Telemechanique, GE, Westinghouse, Cutler Hammer, Klockner Moeller, etc. have been used throughout the global nuclear industry, they all have one common aspect obsolescence. Obsolescence of various components within the MCC's such as molded case circuit breakers, starters, relays, heaters, contactors, etc. are impacting the reliability of the MCC to serve its intended function. The paper will discuss the options which the nuclear industry is faced with to increase the reliability of the MCC's while maintaining design control, qualification and meeting budget constraints. The options as listed below shall be discussed in detail with examples to enhance the readers understanding of the situation: 1) Component by component replacement: The hurdles associated with trying to find equivalent components to replace the obsolete components while still worki (mechanically and electrically) in the original cubicle will be presented. 2) Complete MCC cubicle with new internal components replacement: The process of supplying a replacement cubicle, with all new internal components and new door to replace the original cubicle will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of the advantages and dis-advantages of the two methods to bring the MCC to an as new condition with the overall goal of increasing reliability. (author)

  10. The DESY Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waloschek, P.

    1988-01-01

    On November 12, 1964, the 6 GeV electrons synchrotron and the associated utility facilities were dedicated for regular operation. Since that date, the DESY Research Center, the German Electron Synchrotron in Hamburg, has offered to scientists from all over the world unique facilities in which to study the smallest constituents of matter. At present, some 580 physicists participate in DESY's research work on particle physics and high energy physics. Most of them are university teachers, a great many come from abroad. Their home institutions make considerable contributions to setting up the measuring equipment. Another 500 physicists annually make use of the extensive synchrotron radiation facilities available at DESY. DESY is one of the thirteen national research laboratories in the Federal Republic of Germany; its annual government grants for operation and personnel (1300 staff members in 1988) amount to some DM 150 million. In addition, some DM 950 million will be invested into the construction of the new HERA facility between 1984 and 1990, of which 15% will be contributed by foreign institutions. The ordinary budget of DESY is paid 90% by the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) and 10% by the city of Hamburg. (orig.)

  11. Space Operations Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Ben; Milner, Barbara; Binebrink, Dan; Kuok, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The Space Operations Learning Center (SOLC) is a tool that provides an online learning environment where students can learn science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) through a series of training modules. SOLC is also an effective media for NASA to showcase its contributions to the general public. SOLC is a Web-based environment with a learning platform for students to understand STEM through interactive modules in various engineering topics. SOLC is unique in its approach to develop learning materials to teach schoolaged students the basic concepts of space operations. SOLC utilizes the latest Web and software technologies to present this educational content in a fun and engaging way for all grade levels. SOLC uses animations, streaming video, cartoon characters, audio narration, interactive games and more to deliver educational concepts. The Web portal organizes all of these training modules in an easily accessible way for visitors worldwide. SOLC provides multiple training modules on various topics. At the time of this reporting, seven modules have been developed: Space Communication, Flight Dynamics, Information Processing, Mission Operations, Kids Zone 1, Kids Zone 2, and Save The Forest. For the first four modules, each contains three components: Flight Training, Flight License, and Fly It! Kids Zone 1 and 2 include a number of educational videos and games designed specifically for grades K-6. Save The Forest is a space operations mission with four simulations and activities to complete, optimized for new touch screen technology. The Kids Zone 1 module has recently been ported to Facebook to attract wider audience.

  12. Energy Efficiency Center - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obryk, E.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The Energy Efficiency Center (EEC) activities have been concentrated on Energy Efficiency Network (SEGE), education and training of energy auditors. EEC has started studies related to renewable fuels (bio fuel, wastes) and other topics related to environment protection. EEC has continued close collaboration with Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway. It has been organized and conducted Seminar and Workshop on ''How to Reduce Energy and Water Cost in Higher Education Buildings'' for general and technical managers of the higher education institutions. This Seminar was proceeded by the working meeting on energy efficiency strategy in higher education at the Ministry of National Education. EEC has worked out proposal for activities of Cracow Regional Agency for Energy Efficiency and Environment and has made offer to provide services for this Agency in the field of training, education and consulting. The vast knowledge and experiences in the field of energy audits have been used by the members of EEC in lecturing at energy auditors courses authorized by the National Energy Efficiency Agency (KAPE). Altogether 20 lectures have been delivered. (author)

  13. Feed Materials Production Center Waste Management Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.E.; Allen, T.; Castle, S.A.; Hopper, J.P.; Oelrich, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    In the process of producing uranium metal products used in Department of Energy (DOE) defense programs at other DOE facilities, various types of wastes are generated at the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC). Process wastes, both generated and stored, are discussed in the Waste Management Plan and include low-level radioactive waste (LLW), mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and sanitary/industrial waste. Scrap metal waste and wastes requiring special remediation are also addressed in the Plan. The Waste Management Plan identifies the comprehensive programs developed to address safe storage and disposition of all wastes from past, present, and future operations at the FMPC. Waste streams discussed in this Plan are representative of the waste generated and waste types that concern worker and public health and safety. Budgets and schedules for implementation of waste disposition are also addressed. The waste streams receiving the largest amount of funding include LLW approved for shipment by DOE/ORO to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (MgF 2 , slag leach filter cake, and neutralized raffinate); remedial action wastes (waste pits, K-65 silo waste); thorium; scrap metal (contaminated and noncontaminated ferrous and copper scrap); construction rubble and soil generated from decontamination and decommissioning of outdated facilities; and low-level wastes that will be handled through the Low-Level Waste Processing and Shipping System (LLWPSS). Waste Management milestones are also provided. The Waste Management Plan is divided into eight major sections: Introduction; Site Waste and Waste Generating Process; Strategy; Projects and Operations; Waste Stream Budgets; Milestones; Quality Assurance for Waste Management; and Environmental Monitoring Program

  14. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  15. Heavy Metal Pollution Around International Hatay Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özkan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it was aimed to determine the heavy metal pollution in the agricultural lands around Hatay airport and travel possible alteration in the amount of heavy metal on the land in accordance with the distance to the airport. For this purpose, the airport was chosen as the center and 27 soil samples were obtained around the airport at 2 km intervals in depth ranging from 0 to 30 cm. Lead (Pb, cadmium (Cd, nickel (Ni, chrome (Cr, cobalt (Co, aluminium (Al, iron (Fe, copper (Cu, manganese (Mn and zinc (Zn elements in soil samples were analysed using MP-AES instrument by DTPA method. (3 repetition for each sample. As a result of the analysis, heavy metal concentrations were found as Pb 0-1.45 mg/kg, Cd 0-0.220 mg/kg, Ni 0-3.95 mg/kg, Cr 0-0.780 mg/kg, Co 0-0.270 mg/kg, Al 0-0.700 mg/kg, Fe 1.47- 16.2 mg/kg, Cu 0.400-5.35 mg/kg, Mn 0-19 mg/kg and Zn 0.050-3.14 mg/kg. When comparing the obtained data through this study with allowable concentrations of heavy metals in soil of Environment and Forest Directorates Guidance, it was determined that the heavy metal concentration of the soil does not pose any problems in terms of heavy metal pollution. Besides, iron concentration was decreased when the distance to the airport is increased.

  16. Metalcasting: Filtering Molten Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauren Poole; Lee Recca

    1999-01-01

    A more efficient method has been created to filter cast molten metal for impurities. Read about the resulting energy and money savings that can accrue to many different industries from the use of this exciting new technology

  17. Micro metal forming

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Micro Metal Forming, i. e. forming of parts and features with dimensions below 1 mm, is a young area of research in the wide field of metal forming technologies, expanding the limits for applying metal forming towards micro technology. The essential challenges arise from the reduced geometrical size and the increased lot size. In order to enable potential users to apply micro metal forming in production, information about the following topics are given: tribological behavior: friction between tool and work piece as well as tool wear mechanical behavior: strength and formability of the work piece material, durability of the work pieces size effects: basic description of effects occurring due to the fact, that the quantitative relation between different features changes with decreasing size process windows and limits for forming processes tool making methods numerical modeling of processes and process chains quality assurance and metrology All topics are discussed with respect to the questions relevant to micro...

  18. Ferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes ferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  19. Nonferrous Metal Processing Plants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes nonferrous metal processing plants in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team (MIT) of the...

  20. Coating of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, F.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for coating the surface of an article of Ti, Zr or Ta, or an alloy thereof, with a tinning metal or alloy, the article having a shape other than that of a sheet. The method comprises contacting the surface of the article at an elevated temperature with the molten tinning metal and moving an ultrasonically excited probe over the surface to be coated, the probe being in contact with the surface of the article and with the tinning metal. The tinning metal may be Sn or Zn or a binary alloy of Sn with Zn, Cd or Bi at a temperature of 300 0 to 450 0 C. The head of the probe may be shaped to conform with the surface of the article. The method may be used to form composite articles, and may be applied to a pre-tinned steel article. (U.K.)

  1. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  2. Crystalline structure of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holas, A.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to find the crystalline structure of metals on the basis of the existing theory of metals. The considerations are limited to the case of free crystals, that is, not subjected to any stresses and with T=0. The energy of the crystal lattice has been defined and the dependence of each term on structures and other properties of metals has been described. The energy has been used to find the values of crystalline structure parameters as the values at which the energy has an absolute minimum. The stability of the structure has been considered in cases of volume changes and shearing deformations. A semiqualitative description has been obtained which explains characteristic properties of one-electron metals. (S.B.)

  3. Plutonium metal burning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hausburg, D.E.; Leebl, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    A glove-box facility was designed to convert plutonium skull metal or unburned oxide to an oxide acceptable for plutonium recovery and purification. A discussion of the operation, safety aspects, and electrical schematics are included

  4. Genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hong; Mason, Michael M; Wise, John Pierce

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is currently used in industry, medicine, and military applications, as well as in more than 300 commercial products. Yet, the same properties that make these particles exciting for technology also make them daunting public health concerns because their toxicity is unknown and relatively unexplored. Increased attention is being placed on the study of metal particle genotoxicity; however, a lot of unknowns remain about their effects and the mechanisms. In this article, we highlight some metal and metal oxide nanoparticles of interest and discuss the current in vivo and in vitro studies of genotoxic effects. Many metal nanoparticles were found to cause chromosomal aberrations, DNA strand breaks, oxidative DNA damage, and mutations. Inconsistencies are found in the literature, however, thus drawing conclusions is difficult due to a variety of factors. Therefore, the areas requiring further attention are highlighted and recommendations to improve our understanding of the genotoxic potential are addressed.

  5. Novel Metals and Metal Complexes as Platforms for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Frezza, Michael; Hindo, Sarmad; Chen, Di; Davenport, Andrew; Schmitt, Sara; Tomco, Dajena; Dou, Q. Ping

    2010-01-01

    Metals are essential cellular components selected by nature to function in several indispensable biochemical processes for living organisms. Metals are endowed with unique characteristics that include redox activity, variable coordination modes, and reactivity towards organic substrates. Due to their reactivity, metals are tightly regulated under normal conditions and aberrant metal ion concentrations are associated with various pathological disorders, including cancer. For these reasons, coo...

  6. Metallic composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frommeyer, G.

    1987-01-01

    The structure and properties of metallic composite materials and composite materials with metallic matrix are considered. In agreement with the morphology of constituent phases the following types of composite materials are described: dispersion-strengthened composite materials; particle-reinforced composite materials; fibrous composite materials; laminar composite materials. Data on strength and electric properties of the above-mentioned materials, as well as effect of the amount, location and geometric shape of the second phase on them, are presented

  7. PRODUCTION OF HAFNIUM METAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, G.W.; Boubel, R.W.

    1963-01-01

    This patent deals with a process of producing pure Hf metal from oxygen- contaminated gaseous Hf chloride. The oxygen compounds in the chioride gas are halogenated by contacting the gas at elevated temperature with Cl/sub 2/ in the presence of C. The Hf chloride, still in gaseous form, is contacted with molten Mg whereby Hf metal is formed and condensed on the Mg. (AEC)

  8. Radiation effects in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leteurtre Jean.

    1978-01-01

    The current understanding of radiation damage in metals is reviewed, simplifying the actual complexity of the effects by considering some aspects separately. The production of point defects in metals, the primary damage state are first studied. The second part of the lecture is devoted to the evolution of this primary damage state as a function of temperature and dose: the steady state concentration of point defects, the nucleation of secondary defects and their growth are successively considered

  9. Satellite medical centers project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Arvind

    2002-08-01

    World class health care for common man at low affordable cost: anywhere, anytime The project envisages to set up a national network of satellite Medical centers. Each SMC would be manned by doctors, nurses and technicians, six doctors, six nurses, six technicians would be required to provide 24 hour cover, each SMC would operate 24 hours x 7 days. It would be equipped with the Digital telemedicine devices for capturing clinical patient information and investigations in the form of voice, images and data and create an audiovisual text file - a virtual Digital patient. Through the broad band connectivity the virtual patient can be sent to the central hub, manned by specialists, specialists from several specialists sitting together can view the virtual patient and provide a specialized opinion, they can see the virtual patient, see the examination on line through video conference or even PCs, talk to the patient and the doctor at the SMC and controlle capturing of information during examination and investigations of the patient at the SMC - thus creating a virtual Digital consultant at the SMC. Central hub shall be connected to the doctors and consultants in remote locations or tertiary care hospitals any where in the world, thus creating a virtual hub the hierarchical system shall provide upgradation of knowledge to thedoctors in central hub and smc and thus continued medical education and benefit the patient thru the world class treatment in the smc located at his door step. SMC shall be set up by franchisee who shall get safe business opportunity with high returns, patients shall get Low cost user friendly worldclass health care anywhere anytime, Doctors can get better meaningful selfemplyment with better earnings, flexibility of working time and place. SMC shall provide a wide variety of services from primary care to world class Global consultation for difficult patients.

  10. Magnetic susceptibility of 244Cm metal and 249Cf metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, D.K.; Parsons, T.C.; Edelstein, N.; Noe, M.; Peterson, J.R.

    1975-07-01

    The first magnetic susceptibility measurements made on the expanded fcc phase of 249 Cf metal are reported. Further measurements are needed on other Cf metal phases. Another measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of 244 Cm metal in a limited temperature range has been reported. The result does not agree with previously reported values. Further work is continuing on the synthesis of 244 Cm metal and 248 Cm metal and magnetic measurements on these samples. (auth)

  11. Production and Distribution Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Steel, Coca Cola , Standard Oil of Ohio, and Martin Marietta have been involved in joint research with members of the Center. The number of Faculty...permitted the establishment of the Center and supports its continuing development. The Center has also received research sponsorship from the Joint...published relating to results developed within the PDRC under Offce of Naval Research sponsorship . These reports are listed in Appendix A. Many of these

  12. Metal Dusting: Catastrophic Corrosion by Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David J.; Zhang, Jianqiang

    2012-12-01

    Reducing gases rich in carbon-bearing species such as CO can be supersaturated with respect to graphite at intermediate temperatures of about 400-700°C. Engineering alloys such as low-alloy and stainless steels, and heat-resisting iron-, nickel-, and cobalt-base alloys catalyze gas processes that release the carbon. An understanding of how the resulting carbon deposition can destroy alloys at a catastrophically rapid rate has been the objective of a great deal of research. The current review of recent work on metal dusting covers the mass transfer—principally carbon diffusion—and graphite nucleation processes involved. A clear distinction emerges between ferritic alloys, which form cementite and precipitate graphite within that carbide, and austenitics that nucleate graphite directly within the metal. The latter process is facilitated by the strong orientation relationship between the graphite and face-centered cubic (fcc) lattices. Strategies for the control of dusting are briefly outlined.

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Immunizations Flu Vaccination Prevention / Wellness Public Health Weight Management (MOVE!) Locations Hospitals & Clinics Vet Centers Veterans Canteen Service (VCS) Research ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Performance VA Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act ... Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Office of Accountability & Whistleblower ...

  16. Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research (CRSR) was established as a research organization to promote successful return to duty and community reintegration of...

  17. Center for Environmental Health Sciences

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The primary research objective of the Center for Environmental Health Sciences (CEHS) at the University of Montana is to advance knowledge of environmental impacts...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Plans, Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget ... Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival Golden Age Games Summer ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Media Research Topics For Veterans For Researchers Research Oversight Special Groups Caregivers Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web Links Advanced Search About Us National Center ...