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Sample records for bintan indonesia singapore

  1. PEMETAAN KELAYAKAN LAHAN BUDIDAYA RUMPUT LAUT (Kappaphycus alvareziiDI KABUPATEN BINTAN PROVINSI KEPULAUAN RIAU DENGAN PENDEKATAN SISTEM INFORMASI GEOGRAFIS DAN PENGINDERAAN JAUH

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    I Nyoman Radiarta

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Rumput laut merupakan komoditas unggulan ekspor perikanan budidaya di Indonesia. Untuk mempertahankan ataupun meningkatkan produksinya dapat dilakukan melalui perluasan areal budidaya. Pemilihan lokasi yang sesuai merupakan tahapan awal untuk mendukung keberhasilan usaha budidaya rumput laut. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melakukan analisis kelayakan lahan untuk budidaya rumput laut dengan metode apung di kawasan minapolitan Kabupaten Bintan. Data kualitas perairan telah dikumpulkan saat survai lapangan bulan Juli 2010. ALOS AVNIR-2 digunakan untuk mengekstrak data sosial infrastruktur. Data kualitas perairan dan sosial infrastruktur kemudian dianalisis secara spasial dengan sistem informasi geografis dan multi criteria analysis. Hasil analisis spasial menunjukkan bahwa dari total potensial pengembangan (904 km2, sekitar 13% tergolong sangat layak untuk pengembangan budidaya rumput laut. Lokasi dengan kategori sangat layak terkonsentrasi di Pulau Mantang, Telang Kecil, Gin Besar, Numbing, Gin Kecil, Buton, Poto, dan Kelong. Hasil penelitian ini sangat relevan dengan penetapan Kabupaten Bintan, meliputi: Kecamatan Bintan Timur, Mantang, dan Bintan Pesisir, sebagai kawasan sentra pengembangan minapolitan.

  2. Malay in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore: Three Faces of a National Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenberg, Peter

    Malay's long use as the dominant linga franca throughout modern Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore is partly responsible for its current status as the national language of all three countries. However, political and economic developments during and since the colonial era have created sociolinguistic contexts, motives, and results of the language's…

  3. The Effect of Group Differences among Church-Related Youth in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Paul

    1983-01-01

    Examines the influence of nationality, ethnicity, language, and beliefs on priority concerns among church related college students in Indonesia (N=122), Malaysia and Singapore (N=341). Results confirm the importance of traditional values with less agreement between groups about peers and adults. Implications for counselors are discussed. (JAC)

  4. Demand for Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand Tourist to Malaysia:Seasonal Unit Root and Multivariate Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Nanthakumar Loganathan; Ang Shy Han; Mori Kogid

    2013-01-01

    This is pioneer study conducted in Malaysia combining seasonal unit root and multivariate approach. Malaysia is a favorite destination for international tourist and the major tourism demand for Malaysia is from Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand. These three countries is neighboring country for Malaysia and tourists are more flexible to visit Malaysia using flights, rails and road transportations. This study attempts to investigate the seasonal and structural break analysis of tourist arrivals...

  5. U.S.-Singapore-Malaysia-Indonesia Multilateral Dialogue on Biosecurity: Year 2

    OpenAIRE

    Center on Contemporary Conflict; Cicero, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Performer: University of Pennsylvania Medical Center (UPMC) Center for Health Security Project Lead: Anita Cicero Project Cost: $223,784 FY16–17 This follow-on project will comprise two biosecurity dialogues among the United States, Singapore, Malaysia, and Indonesia to address regional risks related to deliberate or accidental misuse of biological materials, biosecurity and biosafety vulnerabilities at high-containment laboratories, security issues posed by dual-use ...

  6. Public concerns about transboundary haze: a comparison of Indonesia, Singapore, and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Forsyth, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Public concerns about environmental problems create narrative structures that influence policy by allocating roles of blame, responsibility, and appropriate behavior. This paper presents an analysis of public concerns about transboundary haze resulting from forest fires in Indonesia, Singapore, and Malaysia for crises experienced in 1997, 2005 and 2013. The source of the information is content analysis of 2231 articles from representative newspapers in each country. The study shows that newsp...

  7. Occupational safety and health management among five ASEAN countries: Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranatrevedh, Surasak

    2015-03-01

    Occupational safety and health is one of important issues for workforce movement among ASEAN countries. The objective was to study laws, main agencies, and law enforcement regarding occupational safety and health in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. This documentary research covered laws, main agencies' duties, and occupational safety and health law enforcement in Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, and Singapore. Thailand has its Occupational Safety, Health, and Work EnvironmentAct 2011. Its main agency was Department of Labor Protection and Welfare. Indonesia had WorkSafety Act (Law No. 1, 1970). Its main agency was Department of Manpower and Transmigration. Malaysia had Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) 1994. Its main agency is the Department of Occupational Safety and Health. The Philippines has its Occupational Safety and Health Standards. Its main agency was Department ofLabor and Employment. Singapore has its Workplace Safety and Health Act 2006. Its main agency is Occupational Safety and Health Division. Occupational safety and health law enforcement among each county covers work environment surveillance, workers' health surveillance, advice about prevention and control of occupational health hazards, training and education of employers and employees, data systems, and research. Further in-depth surveys of occupational safety and health among each ASEAN county are needed to develop frameworks for occupational safety and health management for all ASEAN countries.

  8. Response Asymmetry in Spillover Volatility: An Empirical Study in the Indonesia and Singapore Stock Market

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    Siti Saadah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Following the blueprint of the ASEAN integration 2015, the integration of the financial markets in this region will increase. This study investigates the existence of a volatility spillover from the Singaporean stock market into Indonesia, including its transmission pattern. Singapore, as an advanced country in the ASEAN region, has played an important role as the information leader in the market of this region, so that it is very possible that the shocks in the Singapore’s stock market will be transmitted to another stock market in this region. Using TGARCH (1,1 model specification regarding the data of the daily return of the Indonesia market index (IHSG for the period of January 2008 – August 2012, it is observed that the shock that took place in the Singapore stock market is immediately transmitted to the Indonesia stock market with two important asymmetric patterns. The transmission of the shock from the Singapore stock exchange becomes stronger when this market (1 experiences a negative return, and (2 is in the bearish phase.  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Crafting a Democratic Enclave on the Cyberspace: Case Studies of Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore

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    Yangyue Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As an antithesis of “authoritarian enclave” which has been well-established in the comparative politics literature, “democratic enclave” points to the institution of a state or the unambiguous regulatory space in society “where the authoritarian regime’s writ is substantively limited and is replaced by an adherence to recognizably democratic norms and procedures” (Gilley 2010. In this sense, the Internet space, embodied by information and communication technologies, has great potential to play such a role, since its “inherited” properties of decentralization and anonymity would inevitably breach the authoritarian rules. However, a closer look at three Southeast Asian states, Malaysia, Singapore and the “New Order” Indonesia whose regimes were characterized by authoritarianism when Internet was initially developed, reveals different trajectories. In the “New Order” Indonesia and Malaysia, the governments consciously left the Internet space uncontrolled; the online media developed independently, vibrantly, and professionally, especially in the Malaysian case; and there were strong connections between online and offline contentious politics. These elements made the Internet space in Indonesia and Malaysia a successful case of democratic enclave. Based on these criteria, however, the Internet space in Singapore has not achieved similar status. This paper analyses the different outcomes of enclave creation on the cyberspace among these countries. It argues that elite conflict and the strength of civil society are the two major factors that shape the differences. In this sense, the political contexts are of great importance for the understanding of Internet’s political impacts.

  9. Cholesterol-raising diterpenes in types of coffee commonly consumed in Singapore, Indonesia and India and associations with blood lipids: A survey and cross sectional study

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    Buchmann Sandra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To measure the content of cholesterol-raising diterpenes in coffee sold at the retailer level in Singapore, Indonesia and India and to determine the relationship of coffee consumption with lipid levels in a population-based study in Singapore. Methods Survey and cross-sectional study in local coffee shops in Singapore, Indonesia and India to measure the diterpene content in coffee, and a population-based study in Singapore to examine the relationship of coffee consumption and blood lipid levels. Interviews and coffee samples (n = 27 were collected from coffee shops in Singapore, Indonesia and India. In addition, 3000 men and women who were Chinese, Malay, and Indian residents of Singapore participated in a cross-sectional study. Results and Discussion The traditional 'sock' method of coffee preparation used in Singapore resulted in cafestol concentrations comparable to European paper drip filtered coffee (mean 0.09 ± SD 0.064 mg/cup. This amount would result in negligible predicted increases in serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Similarly low amounts of cafestol were found in Indian 'filter' coffee that used a metal mesh filter (0.05 ± 0.05 mg/cup. Coffee samples from Indonesia using the 'sock' method (0.85 ± 0.41 mg/cup or a metal mesh filter (0.98 mg/cup contained higher amounts of cafestol comparable to espresso coffee. Unfiltered coffee from Indonesia contained an amount of cafestol (4.43 mg/cup similar to Scandinavian boiled, Turkish and French press coffee with substantial predicted increases in serum cholesterol (0.33 mmol/l and triglycerides (0.20 mmol/l concentrations for consumption of 5 cups per day. In the Singaporean population, higher coffee consumption was not substantially associated with serum lipid concentrations after adjustment for potential confounders [LDL-cholesterol: 3.07 (95% confidence interval 2.97-3.18 for Conclusions Based on the low levels of diterpenes found in traditionally

  10. Are South East Asia Countries Capital Markets Characterized by Nonlinear Structures? An Investigation from Indonesia, Philippine and Singapore Capital Market Indices

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    Minarnita Yanti Verawati Bakara

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This research paper tries to detect the nonlinear structure in the South East Asia Countries Capital Markets. The capital markets of three South East Asia Countries are chosen: Indonesia, Philippine, and Singapore. Daily return data of Capital Markets composite indices are observed: Straits Times Index (STI of Singapore Exchange from January 04, 1985 to December 31, 2007, Pilipino Stock Exchange Index (PSEi of Philippines Stock Exchange from March 1, 1990 to December 31, 2007 and Jakarta Composite Index (JCI of Indonesia Stock Exchange from January 05, 1988 to December 31, 2007.Should nonlinearity be found, the outcomes of each observation are compared to analyze the implications of each country in global, regional and local position of their competition in the continuously changing world of interdependency environment. The implications of nonlinearity finding in the three ASEAN countries capital markets to the current issues of AFAS on Financial Services, Harmonization among ASEAN countries capital markets in the ASEAN region and ASEAN integration and liberalization on Financial Services are analyzed.BDS statistic and R/S Analysis as our tools for nonlinearity testing are applied. Nonlinearity evidences in Jakarta Composite Index, Pilipino Stock Exchange Index and Straits Times Index are found.

  11. The Use of the Death Penalty for Drug Trafficking in the United States, Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand: A Comparative Legal Analysis

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    Yingyos Leechaianan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article assesses the use of capital punishment for drug trafficking and related crimes from a comparative perspective. Domestic narcotics legislation, as well as important drug trafficking cases in four Southeast Asian nations (Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Thailand are examined in-depth and compared to the United States, which plays an important role in eradicating global drug-related problems. This article contends that the use of capital punishment is disproportionate to the gravity of drug-related offenses and that international drug control and enforcement treaties never suggested using such sanctions to deter crime. Fortunately, four Southeast Asian countries in this study, including Singapore, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand, currently realize this disproportionality and have become reluctant to carry out executions for drug trafficking; even though they continue to sentence a large number of drug-related offenders to death annually, they do not actually carry out these executions. Future research related to this topic is also recommended in this article.

  12. INDONESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MCVEY, RUTH T.

    THIS UNIVERSITY-LEVEL TEXT IS AN ATTEMPT TO BRIDGE THE GAP BETWEEN SUPERFICIAL IMPRESSION AND SPECIALIZED KNOWLEDGE CONCERNING INDONESIA. IT PROVIDES AN INTRODUCTION TO INDONESIA THROUGH CHAPTERS ON--(1) PHYSICAL AND HUMAN RESOURCE PATTERNS, BY K.J. PELZER, (2) INDONESIAN CULTURES AND COMMUNITIES, BY H. GEERTZ, (3) THE CHINESE MINORITY, BY G.W.…

  13. Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    Indonesia, an archipelago of 13,500 islands, ranks 5th as the most populous nation in the world. It has 175 million people, 105 million of which live on the island of Java alone. Indonesia has many distinct cultural and linguistic groups. Islam almost wholly replaced Hindu by the end of the 16th century, after arriving in the 12th century. Today 88% of the people are Muslim, while the rest includes Christians, Hindus, Buddhists, and others. The constitution guarantees religious freedom. Indonesia gained independence from the Netherlands in 1949. Indonesia's 1st president, Sukarno, led the rebellion leading to independence and remained in power from 1949-1967. After aligning with Asian communist countries and establishing an authoritarian regime in the early 1960s, the people rebelled, attempted a coup and, in 1967, the People's,s Consultative Assembly named Soeharto as president. He continues to be Indonesia's president and the dominant government and political figure. The constitution provides limited separation of executive, legislative, and judicial power. During the 1970s, the strong economy was based on high oil revenues and an industrial policy which protected domestic industries. Beginning in the 1980s, however, lower energy earnings assisted by low inflation, a downward float against the dollar, and the government eliminating regulatory obstacles turned the economic tide. Even though Indonesia has a larger unrescheduled external debt than any other developing nation, the government is dealing successfully with servicing this debt. Foreign interests participate in the oil and minerals sectors. Indonesia acts on its free and active foreign policy by playing a prominent role in Asian affairs, but avoiding involvement in conflicts among major powers. Indonesia is on friendly terms with its neighbors, and the military does not advocate developing the capability to project its power. The US and Indonesia carry on cordial diplomatic and trade relations

  14. Are The ASEAN-5 Foreign Exchange Market Efficient? Evidence From Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Philippines: Post-Global Economic Crisis 2008

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    Aditya Andika Putra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE This paper examines market efficiency of foreign exchange markets in South East Asia (Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Philippines after the global crisis period 2008. The time span covered by the samples are from 2009 to 2014, with the total number of observations for spot and forward exchange rate data amounting to 1565 data points. This study uses three different approaches to examine efficiency within countries and across countries. The result of this study shows that foreign exchange markets in the ASEAN-5 countries are efficient within countries, but have not been efficient across countries, especially when the country has a bivariate relationship with Thailand's foreign exchange market. The main implication of this study is that investors in the ASEAN-5 market cannot obtain abnormal returns using technical analysis on within countries foreign exchange market. In addition, there is no significant differences for participants in the foreign exchange market whether they are using hedging or not hedging. Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE

  15. Perception and understanding of health claims on milk powder for children: A focus group study among mothers in Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Karin Y M; van der Beek, Eline M; Kuznesof, Sharron A; Seal, Chris J

    2016-10-01

    Health claim regulations and guidelines on food products have been established in some Southeast Asia (SEA) countries. Health claims on food products aim to help consumers make informed food choices to achieve a healthy diet. This study aimed to investigate the perception and understanding of health claims and the associated regulatory frameworks of SEA mothers using semi-structured focus groups conducted in Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand. Milk powder for children for three years and above was used as product focus. The mothers recognised and recalled some specific nutrients and food constituents by name but lacked full understanding of their function. The findings indicated that the mothers in all three countries trusted health claims made on the products which was, in part, explained by their trust in their governments and the international brand manufacturers. Their understanding of health claims was influenced by several factors such as their familiarity of the nutrient, previous knowledge of the nutrients, the perceived relevance of the nutrient, the use of scientific terms, the choice of words, and also the phrasing and length of the claims. Consumer education efforts via Public, Private Partnerships could be an approach to educate SEA consumers and help them to better understand health claims. The findings of this study may be relevant to different stakeholders such as local regulatory bodies, policy makers, food industry, academia and non-profit organisations that aim to effectively communicate health claims.

  16. Singapore Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Singapore Math" is a collection of math curricula originally developed by Singapore's Ministry of Education and private textbook publishers for use in Singapore schools. "Singapore Math" curricula were developed under a national framework centered on problem solving that emphasizes computational skills as well as conceptual and strategic thinking…

  17. Recruitment constraints in Singapore's fluted giant clam (Tridacna squamosa population--a dispersal model approach.

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    Mei Lin Neo

    Full Text Available Recruitment constraints on Singapore's dwindling fluted giant clam, Tridacna squamosa, population were studied by modelling fertilisation, larval transport, and settlement using real-time hydrodynamic forcing combined with knowledge of spawning characteristics, larval development, behaviour, and settlement cues. Larval transport was simulated using a finite-volume advection-diffusion model coupled to a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. Three recruitment constraint hypotheses were tested: 1 there is limited connectivity between Singapore's reefs and other reefs in the region, 2 there is limited exchange within Singapore's Southern Islands, and 3 there exist low-density constraints to fertilisation efficacy (component Allee effects. Results showed that connectivity among giant clam populations was primarily determined by residual hydrodynamic flows and spawning time, with greatest chances of successful settlement occurring when spawning and subsequent larval dispersal coincided with the period of lowest residual flow. Simulations suggested poor larval transport from reefs located along the Peninsular Malaysia to Singapore, probably due to strong surface currents between the Andaman Sea and South China Sea combined with a major land barrier disrupting larval movement among reefs. The model, however, predicted offshore coral reefs to the southeast of Singapore (Bintan and Batam may represent a significant source of larvae. Larval exchange within Singapore's Southern Islands varied substantially depending on the locations of source and sink reefs as well as spawning time; but all simulations resulted in low settler densities (2.1-68.6 settled individuals per 10,000 m(2. Poor fertilisation rates predicted by the model indicate that the low density and scattered distribution of the remaining T. squamosa in Singapore are likely to significantly inhibit any natural recovery of local stocks.

  18. CHLOROQUINE SENSITIVITY OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM IN BERAKIT, BINTAN ISLAND, SUMATRA, AFTER MASS CHEMOPROPHYLAXIS THROUGH COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION, AND ITS SOCIOLOGICAL STUDIES

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    Wita Pribadi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Profilaksis minggguan dengan klorokuin yang dilakukan secara massal melalui peran serta masyarakat telah dilakukan pada penduduk RK I di desa Berakit, Bintan, Propinsi Riau, Sumatra selama dua tahun (¡983-1985. Delapan tahun kemudian (¡993, pemeriksaan sensitivitas Plasmodium falciparum terhadap klorokuin in vivo dan in vitro dilakukan di RK I untuk mengetahui apakah pemberian klorokuin setiap minggu pada penduduk secara massal selama 2 tahun mempunyai dampak terhadap timbulnya resistensi P. falciparum terhadap obat tersebut di RK I atau dapat menyebar­luaskan resistensi klorokuin. Penelitian sosial dilakukan untuk mendapatkan informasi melalui pemeriksaan pengetahuan, sikap dan perilaku (KAP tentang malaria pada penduduk RK II di desa Berakit. RK II letaknya bersebelahan dengan RK I yang penduduknya telah diwawancara dan diberi penyuluhan kesehatan dengan "learning module" tentang malaria, dan. apakah hal ini mempengaruhi situasi/keadaan malaria di RK II. Hasil penelitian malariometrik di RK I dan RK II menunjukkan angka limpa dan angka parasit menurun secara bermakna, bila dibandingkan dengan hasil pada tahun 1991 tetapi di RK I tidak berbeda bermakna dibandingkan dengan hasil tahun 1995. Dari pemeriksaan 644 sediaan darah dari RK I dan RK II untuk tes sensitivitas, prevalensi parasitnya adalah 8.2 % (53/644 dan 58.5 % kasus positif adalah P. falciparum dan infeksi campur, selebihnya adalah P. vivax (41.5 %. Sayang sekali, hanya satu infeksi P. falciparum yang memenuhi syarat untuk tes dengan hasil S/R I in vivo 7 hari yang disederhanakan. Tes mikro in vitro menunjukkan resistensi (R terhadap klorokuin dan masih sensitif (S terhadap obat malaria lain (kina, S-P, meftokuin.Hasil pemeriksaan sosiologis menunjukkan adanya pengaruh"learning module" mengenai penyakit malaria sebanyak 20 % responden di RK II yang mempunyai sikap dan perilaku yang positif, bila dibandingkan dengan penelitian di RK II tahun 1991 sebesar 27.9 % dan tahun 1995

  19. Online Learning in Singapore Primary Schools: An Interview with Seng Chee Tan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Elizabeth; Tan, Seng Chee

    2005-01-01

    The Southeast Asian country of Singapore comprises a main island and numerous islets between Malaysia and Indonesia. Inhabited by Chinese, Malays, Indians, Eurasians, and other ethnic populations, Singapore is a vibrant mix of different cultures and religions. It is also reputed to be the most wired island in the world. This characteristic--along…

  1. Counseling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Tan, Soo Yin; Neihart, Maureen F.

    2012-01-01

    Singapore, a tiny island nation, rose from 3rd- to 1st-world status in just 3 decades. Unlike in most developed countries, counseling in Singapore has a short history with faith-based beginnings and currently faces challenges to remain culturally relevant. The authors trace the development of Singapore's counseling services, provide an update…

  2. WFAS 2001 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON ACUPUNCTURE WAS HELD IN SINGAPORE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Junling

    2001-01-01

    @@ From 7th to 9th of December of 2001, WFAS 2001 International Symposium on Acupuncture was held in Singapore International Convention and Exhibition Center. The theme of the congress is entitled with "International Academic Research, Education and Clinical Therapy on Acupuncture in the New Century". This congress is sponsored by the World Federation of Acupuncture-Moxibustion Societies (WFAS), co-sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Singapore Ministry of Health, and organized by Singapore Chinese Physician's Association/Chinese Acupuncture Research Institution. About 600 officials, acupuncturists, scholars from WHO, Singapore, China, and other more than 20 countries and regions including Australia, France, Germany, Italy, Indonesia,Japan, Korea, Vietnam, Norway, Canada, Mexico, Portugal, Malaysia, etc. attended this conference.

  3. PERLINDUNGAN HUKUM TRANSAKSI JUAL BELI KOMPUTER RAKITAN MENURUT UNDANG-UNDANG TENTANG PERLINDUNGAN KONSUMEN (Studi Di Bintan Risky Computer Surabaya

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    Erie Hariyanto

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the computer trade is known two terms of the computer type namely Branded computer, which is usually sold in a well packet, assembled by the producer (company and the second one is assembly computer that nowadays dominates more than 60 % of computer market share in Indonesia in which the trade transaction makes many obstacles which need the solution and law protection for those involved in the trade transaction of assembly computer. By being prevailed the law of number 8, 1999 about consumer protection, it is wondered whether it has given the law protection for those who are involved especially the consumers. It can be devided into three stages, they are preliminary transaction or the bargain of assembly computer through advertisement, the transaction or agreement of the assembly computer trade and the last is the transaction of sale after service that also concerns with the guarantee. The form of lawsuit solution is commonly done by the familial relathionship between the consumer and the seller. It is the best and effective solution, although the law of the consumer protection also gives the place to complain their cases through the consumer lawsuit affairs.

  4. Cancer care in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Tey, J; Baggarley, S; Lee, KM

    2008-01-01

    Singapore is a small country, but it is ideally and centrally located to conveniently serve not only its population but also patients from the surrounding regions. It’s economy is sufficiently strong to maintain highly sophisticated and expensive equipment to manage a high level of healthcare, including oncology services. Cancer incidences in Singapore are on an upward trend based on the report of the Singapore Cancer Registry for the period of 2001-2005. Cancer is the number one cause of dea...

  5. Environmental concerns and diet in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Fleischer, Jennifer; Jeitner, Chris; Gochfeld, Michael

    2003-08-01

    Many factors affect how people perceive the world and their environment, and how such perceptions affect lifestyle decisions, yet the relationship between personal perceptions about environmental hazards and diet is rarely examined. In this study, environmental concerns on a local and global scale were examined, along with dietary patterns, to determine if there were associations and age-related differences. The hypothesis that concerns about water pollution might be reflected in choices about seafood consumption was examined. Many aspects of dietary choices varied significantly by age, including (1) younger people ate more "fast food" than others, (2) subjects aged 22-32 yr ate more meals in restaurants than older or younger people, (3) older individuals drank more tea than younger subjects, while younger people drank more soda than older people, and (4) there were few significant differences in total fish and shellfish meals, although young people ate more meals of other types of meat. Individuals who rated their health the best reported significantly fewer seafood meals than others. People who listed pollution as the major environmental problem did not consume seafood less often than others. While pollution was listed as the most important environmental problem globally, people distinguished between air and water pollution only for Singapore. Although Singapore, with its rapidly expanding economy, has reason to be concerned about both water and air pollution, only 14% of those listing pollution as the main Singapore environmental problem mentioned "water pollution." Singapore has been able to take measures to reduce water pollution from internal sources. Respondents considered air pollution a greater problem, perhaps reflecting recent haze disasters from deliberately set forest fires in Indonesia, which are beyond the direct control of Singapore or Singaporeans.

  6. Racialised Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The Singapore education system plays a central role in the mythology of the young country's nation building project. The education system is portrayed as the cradle of Singapore's multiracialism, fostering racial harmony and understanding. Yet this historical study of primary school English textbooks from the 1970s to the present reveals that…

  7. Japanese Outbound Market to Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Aw, Yeow Keng

    2007-01-01

    This research examines Japanese tourists' perceptions of Image of Singapore and attempts to apply motivational theories to attract Japanese tourists not only to come but stay longer in Singapore. For the analysis, data were collected via a questionnaires-based survey among the 650 Japanese tourists at Singapore Changi Airport, Departure Hall. The purpose of survey is to find out Japanese tourists' perceptions of Singapore as a travel destination, their satisfactions toward Singapore and like...

  8. Singapore - The Nursing Scene

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    M.A. Doyle

    1985-09-01

    Full Text Available In many ways Singapore still bears evidence of the period of British colonialism and the system of nursing service and nursing education is also still greatly influenced by the British system of nursing.

  9. The Singapore research story

    CERN Document Server

    Teck Seng, Low; Thampuran, Raj

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Singapore became independent in 1965, its leaders have invested tremendous efforts and resources to develop its economy in order to create jobs for its people and to support national development. This book describes the challenging journey of Singapore in developing a knowledge-based economy driven by research and innovation and the roles played by research institutes, universities, research manpower and appropriate collaboration between research institutes and industry. The book traces the foundations of Singapore's research story from the time of its independence in 1965 to the present day. Through interviews with the key players and research into the records, the establishment of the key institutes and the roles of a global cast of researchers, scientists and engineers in setting up the R&D infrastructure are outlined. The impact that the concerted efforts of the last 25 years to build up a credible and world-class research capability in Singapore is discussed, as are the tremendous challeng...

  10. Transnational Crime and Security Threats in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    coordinated patrols by Indonesia, Malaysia , and Singapore, along with increased security on vessels have sparked a dramatic downturn in piracy according to...for instance, has the second largest 11 rate of deforestation globally, comprising 14.53% of annual global deforestation . Myanmar is fourth...from an environmental sustainability perspective. A range wildlife are facing extinction, while logging leads to major issues of deforestation

  11. POLITICAL MERITOCRACY IN SINGAPORE

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    Artur ZHUK

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the political regime of meritocracy in Singapore which was formed by Lee Kuan Yew. It compares different approaches of the concept of East and West in the social sphere. It analyses the approach to the formation of the personnel policy of the government of Lee Kuan Yew in public administration. The article studies the mechanism of formation of modern selection and training of civil servants in Singapore. It describes the basic institutions of formation of officials, the development of these institutions and their functionality at different times. It touches on some aspects of the transfer of experience of Singapore in the personnel policy in the case of China and Russia. The article describes the efficiency of meritocracy in Singapore, in particular, referred to the level of salaries of officials and place of Singapore in the rankings of international financial institutions. The main conclusion of the article is to prove the effectiveness of this system, and the ability to implement it in practice in Russia. 

  12. Kembalinya Konservatisme Islam Indonesia

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    Din Wahid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Martin van Bruinessen, ed, Contemporary Development in Indonesian Islam, Explaining the “Conservative Turn”, Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2013, pp. 240 + xxxiv.Contemporary Developments in Indonesian Islam: Explaining the ‘Conservative Turn’ consists of four articles analyzing conservative currents among Muslims in Indonesia. The  book’s first two articles deal with established Muslim organizations, namely the Council of Indonesian ‘Ulama (MUI and Muhammadiyah, while the other two discuss radical Islamic movements in the regions of South Celebes and Solo, Central Java. Written by van Bruinessen, the book examines why the conservative trend has reemerged in Indonesian Islam. The author provides readers with two theories. Firstly, he argues that a decline in the influence of liberal thought has accompanied the democratization process. Secondly, he identifies an increase of Middle Eastern influence to Indonesia through alumni. This work shows that conservatism is not only apparent in radical Islamic movements that have emerged during the Reformation era but also present in well-established organizations such as MUI and Muhammadiyah. The significance of this work to the study of Indonesian Islam lies in its explanation of how conservatism enters those organizations.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v21i2.1043

  13. Spillover Volatilitas Pasar Saham Indonesia dan Singapura Periode 2001-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lestano Lestano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an Autoregressive model combined with a univariate Exponential GARCH model for constructing a volatility spillover model, we investigate asymmetric effect and volatility persistence effect in Indonesia and Singapore stock market, and the effect of volatility spillover from Singapore stock market considered as one of Asian financial activity center to Indonesia stock market during the post Asian financial crisis period. The study reveals that the degree of volatility persistence slightly increases as we include the spillover effect from Singapura as one extra variable in the variance equation. We also find that strong evidence of volatility spillover effect from Singapore to Indonesia stock market. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Autoregressive model yang dikombinasikan dengan univariate Exponential GARCH model digunakan untuk mengkonstruksi model spillover volatilitas, tulisan ini mengkaji asymmetric effect dan efek persistensi volatilitas pasar saham di Indonesia dan Singapura, dan efek spillover volatilitas dari pasar saham Singapura, yang dipertimbangkan sebagai salah satu pusat kegiatan keuangan Asia, ke pasar saham Indonesia selama periode setelah krisis keuangan Asia. Studi ini mengungkapkan bahwa tingkat persistensi volatilitas meningkat saat spillover effect dari Singapura dimasukan sebagai variabel tambahan ke dalam persamaan variance. Temuan empiris lain adalah terdapat fakta kuat keberadaan efek spillover volatilitas dari pasar saham Singapura ke Indonesia.   Kata kunci: Spillover volatilitas, asymmetric effect, leverage effect, exponential GARCH, pasar saham, Indonesia, Singapura

  14. DOMESTIC AND FORIGN FACTORS FOR STOCK PRICES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahajeng Cahyaning Putri Cipto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has been developing various sectors of its economy, and so it needs a huge amount of capital. Therefore, it has been putting a lot of efforts to develop its capital market. This paper analyzes the impacts of domestic and foreign factors on Indonesia stock price. Some considered domestic factors are interest rates, production index, and foreign exchange rates. Various considered foreign factors are Singapore and US stock prices. The paper uses Vector Error Correction Mechanism model to analyze the data. The estimation results suggest that all variables significantly influence Indonesia stock price, with Singapore stock price as the dominant factors.Keywords: Stock price, interest rates, exchange rates, production indexJEL classification numbers: G12, G15

  15. MEMS in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Francis E.

    2001-03-01

    Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) can be termed as a crossroad technology. Cross road in the sense that it is an amalgamation of various disciplines to produce a solution. Cross road also, in the sense that it is disruptive to the way that solutions used to be provided. At the crossroad, a decision needs to be made either to do things the old way or to embrace the new technology. In this paper, a review is made to the research and development of MEMS technology with potentially widespread applications in Singapore. In most cases, these are preparations to a possible acceleration of MEMS related industry in this part of the world. However, the author also noted that the transfer of MEMS technology from the laboratory to the industry is not a trivial matter. A major decision has to be made due to the high capital outlay and the high operational costs involved. Further, many production related issues such as yield and packaging have to be considered. A large number of MEMS commercial outfits such as Bosch are serving internal customers. As a small country with limited resources, Singapore places great emphasis on building up MEMS research and development activities to support future high value-added design and fabrication. In this paper, some of the MEMS activities in the national universities and institutes in Singapore are introduced, and some recent progress and development of MEMS technology in Singapore are presented.

  16. "Right" in Singapore English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Singapore English has been, and still is, an enigma for many scholars and researchers. In recent years, much attention has been given to the analysis of its particles. However, rather than focusing on the analysis of one particle or several particles and how they operate at the level of the sentence, this paper looks at a particular phenomenon in…

  17. Singapore Chooses Teachers Carefully

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Susan K.

    2015-01-01

    At the heart of the plans and programs that launched Singapore's rise to the top of international education comparisons are the tiny nation-state's commitments to its teaching force beginning with its highly competitive selection process and carrying through its teacher training, its career-long professional development, and even an enhanced…

  18. Higher Education and Entrepreneurial Citizenship in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on Singapore's "Global Schoolhouse" project, this article discusses how efforts to transform Singapore into a "world class" knowledge economy entail changes to the status of citizenship in Singapore. The project of wooing top foreign universities to Singapore is permeated with an entrepreneurial ideal of Singapore as…

  19. EMME (Indonesia)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — EMME is a program specific M&E tool for the Indonesia Mission that is managed by RTI and provides access to project statuses and success stories for the USAID...

  20. Singapore: An Aging Society

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Minsol; Lu, Phillip I Fan

    2015-01-01

    This project is a case study on Singapore and will investigate the issue of an aging population. This project draws upon the general theory of population aging and preference theory. The first part of our analysis is to investigate empirical data of Singapore’s population, fertility rates, mortality, and life expectancy. This is investigated through the use of the general theory of population aging. The second part of our project analyzes policymaking related to population and fertility in Si...

  1. Hoarding in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Kenneth Wei-Qiang; Lee, Wei Liang; How, Choon How; Ng, Beng Yeong

    2015-09-01

    Hoarding refers to an excessive acquisition of objects and inability to part with apparently valueless possessions. While it can lead to excessive clutter, distress and disability, it is important to note that not all cases of hoarding are pathological. This article aims to suggest how one can make recommendations to patients and families when they encounter someone exhibiting hoarding behaviour. It also introduces the Hoarding Task Force and relevant legislation in Singapore to address the issue of hoarding in the community.

  2. Analysis of Implementation The Policy on Malaria Elimination in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty Roosihermiatie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a tropic country Indonesia still faces malaria problems. In Asean, indonesia is one of three countries with the highest malaria morbidity. In 2007, 396 (80% of 495 districts/municipalities in indonesia are malaria. In 2009 the government issued a decree of the minister of health No 293 on malaria elimination. The study aimed to analyze the implementation decree of Ministry of Health No. 293/2009 on malaria elimination. Methods: It was a descriptive study. The study was conducted in 4 provinces, and 4 districts based on malaria elimination stages as in Bali province and Karangasem district, Riau islands province and Bintan district, West Nusa Tenggara province and west Lombok district, and Maluku province and South Halmahera district. The stakeholders were Heads and malaria programmers at province/district Health Offices and the related programs. Data were collected by focus group discussion and secondary data were taken. Data were collected by focus group discussion and secondary data. Analysis for Ministry of Health decree No.293 year 2009 on 1 Comphrehend, 2 Implementation, and, 3 Comittment, 4 Innovation intervension to support malaria elimination, 5 Sustainability of activity community empowerment, 6 Proportion of budget. Results: showed there was district that had not issued local policy on malaria elimination, the implementation with comittment especially that health centers in areas under study corfi rm diagnose by laboratory examination and malaria treatment by Artemisin Combined Therapy (ACT, although there were still treatment to clinical malaria, innovation activities were of bersifat local spesifi c, and reward for Juru Malaria Desa or malaria cadre to increase malaria suspect case detection, and with district budget for malaria program ranged 0,95-5,6% of the total budget. Recomendations: It suggested to advocate all malaria endemic areas to issue local policy on malaria elimination, decide intervension of the

  3. Higher Education and Entrepreneurial Citizenship in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Soren

    2012-01-01

    Focusing on Singapore's "Global Schoolhouse" project, this article discusses how efforts to transform Singapore into a "world class" knowledge economy entail changes to the status of citizenship in Singapore. The project of wooing top foreign universities to Singapore is permeated with an entrepreneurial ideal of Singapore…

  4. TAX REFORM IN SINGAPORE

    OpenAIRE

    Glenn Jenkins; Rup Khadka

    1998-01-01

    Globalization has forced many governments to change their economic policies, including tax policies, in the recent years. It has had an even greater impact on Singapore’s economy due to the high degree of its openness with respect to trade and investment. In this context, Singapore undertook a major restructuring of its tax system in the early 1990s. The introduction of a modern value added tax system (goods and services tax) was a part of the overall tax reform package. This paper examines h...

  5. Going Underground in Singapore

    CERN Multimedia

    John Osborne (GS/SEM)

    2010-01-01

    Singapore has plans to build a massive Underground Science City (USC) housing R&D laboratories and IT data centres. A delegation involved in the planning to build the subterranean complex visited CERN on 18 October 2010 to learn from civil engineers and safety experts about how CERN plans and constructs its underground facilities.   The delegation from Singapore. The various bodies and corporations working on the USC project are currently studying the feasibility of constructing up to 40 caverns (60 m below ground) similar in size to an LHC experiment hall, in a similar type of rock. Civil engineering and geotechnical experts are calculating the maximum size of the cavern complex that can be safely built. The complex could one day accommodate between 3000 and 5000 workers on a daily basis, so typical issues of size and number of access shafts need to be carefully studied. At first glance, you might not think the LHC has much in common with the USC project; as Rolf Heuer pointed out: &ldq...

  6. Mammoth order for Singapore project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Two new hospitals in Singapore that form a new integrated healthcare hub, that feature a range of innovations in patient treatment and care, and are reportedly the country's first such healthcare facilities built together as an integrated development to complement each other's capabilities and services, were officially opened by Singapore's Prime Minister, Lee Hsien Loong, last October. Operated by Jurong Health, a public healthcare 'cluster' formed to facilitate the integration of healthcare services in the west of Singapore, the Ng Teng Fong Hospital and Jurong Community Hospital feature an extensive array of Gerflor flooring, selected, as the company explains in this article, for a combination of outstanding aesthetics, durability, safety, and hard wear.

  7. Prefab Apartment Blocks in Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbye, Per Oluf H

    1997-01-01

    Skaarup & Jespersen, Architects and Planners, has designed and built 625 housing units for Housing Development Board in Singapore after an international competition.Experiences from the Danish precast systems have been used.......Skaarup & Jespersen, Architects and Planners, has designed and built 625 housing units for Housing Development Board in Singapore after an international competition.Experiences from the Danish precast systems have been used....

  8. Singapore’s Declining Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    a culture where singles view marriage as a top life goal,” designed to be a resource for social interaction skill improvement and social interaction...part of the Marriage and Parenthood Package, the government of Singapore will pay up to one-half of in-vitro fertilization costs, depending on the...index.html 11 Singapore Government Online website. Family & Community Development @ e-citizen: Marriage and Parenthood Package. http

  9. Health technology assessment in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pwee, Keng Ho

    2009-07-01

    The Republic of Singapore is an island city-state in Southeast Asia. Its population enjoys good health and the Singapore Ministry of Health's mission is to promote good health and reduce illness, ensure access to good and affordable health care, and pursue medical excellence. This is achieved through a healthcare system that includes both private and public sector elements. The financing philosophy of Singapore's healthcare delivery system is based on individual responsibility and community support. Health care in Singapore is financed by a combination of taxes, employee medical benefits, compulsory health savings, insurance, and out-of-pocket payment. The capability for health technology assessment in Singapore was developed concurrently with its medical device regulation system in the 1990s. The first formal unit with health technology assessment (HTA) functions was established in September 1995. Today, HTA features in decision making for the Standard Drug List, licensing of medical clinics, the Health Service Development Programme, healthcare subsidies, and policy development. The public sector healthcare delivery clusters have also recently started health services research units with HTA functions. Singapore is organizing the 6th Health Technology Assessment International (HTAi) Annual Meeting in June 2009. Bringing this prestigious international conference to Asia for the first time will help raise awareness of HTA in the region.

  10. Migrant female domestic workers: debating the economic, social and political impacts in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeoh, B S; Huang, S; Gonzalez, J

    1999-01-01

    This article analyzes the impact of migrant female domestic workers on the socioeconomic and political context in Singapore. Although Singapore state policy opposes long-term immigration, there is a labor shortage which permits a transient work force of low-skilled foreign workers. In the late 1990s, Singapore had over 100,000 foreign maids, of whom 75% were from the Philippines, 20% were from Indonesia, and the rest were from Sri Lanka. Legislation ensures their short-term migrant status, restricts their numbers, and governs their employment. Migrant workers are also regulated through a stringent allocation system based on household income of employers and the need for caregivers for children. Work permits are conditioned on non-marriage to citizens of Singapore or pregnancy. Terms and conditions of migrant employment are not specified, which permits long hours of work and potential for inhumane treatment. Migrant women fulfill jobs not desired by natives and accept these jobs at lower wages. There is disagreement about the motivation for the maid levy and its need, fairness, and effectiveness in reducing demand for foreign maids. Most public discussion focuses on social values and morality of foreign maids. Politically, tensions arise over the legality of migration, which results from tourist worker migration to Singapore and circumvents Filipino labor controls. Most of the adjustment cases that come to the attention of OWWA are tourist workers. Policies should be gender sensitive.

  11. A Critical Review on Singapore English

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谌婷

    2013-01-01

    A critical review is given on Singapore English. The historical introduction of the language provides readers a longitu-dinal insight into the development of this special variety. Then, the language features of Colloquial Singapore English and Stan-dard Singapore English are discussed, and a comparison of the use of Singapore and standard British English is made to show the differences in grammatical and lexical features of these two varieties of English.

  12. Singapore: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    in its success. Singapore achieved home rule in 1959 and joined with Malaya, Sabah, and Sarawak to form the Federation of Malaysia in 1963...Singapore from Malaysia . Amid serious doubts about its viability, Singapore became a separate independent nation on August 9, 1965. SINGAPORE...extensive land reclamation Ethnic Groups: 77% Chinese; 14% Malay; 8% Indian; 1% other Language: Chinese (official); Malay (official and national); Tamil

  13. Metal allergy in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goon, Anthony T J; Goh, C L

    2005-03-01

    This is a clinical epidemiologic study to determine the frequency of metal allergy among patch-tested patients in the years 2001-2003. The results are compared with those of previous studies. All patients diagnosed as having allergic contact dermatitis in the National Skin Centre, Singapore, from January 2001 to December 2003 were studied retrospectively. The frequency of positive patch tests to the following metals were nickel 19.9%, chromate 5.6%, cobalt 8.2% and gold 8.3%. The frequency of nickel allergy has been steadily rising over the last 20 years. The most common sources of nickel allergy are costume jewelry, belt buckles, wrist watches and spectacle frames. After declining from 1984 to 1990, chromate and cobalt allergies have also been steadily increasing subsequently. The most common sources of chromate allergy were cement, leather and metal objects. Most positive patch tests to cobalt are regarded as co-sensitization due to primary nickel or chromate allergies. There has been a steep increase in positive patch tests to gold from 2001 to 2003, which is difficult to explain because the relevance and sources of such positive patch tests can rarely be determined with certainty. There has been an overall rise in the frequency of metal allergy in the last 20 years.

  14. Evolution of Singapore's School Mathematics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Berinderjeet

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of Singapore's school mathematics curriculum is in tandem with developments in the education system of Singapore. In the last six decades, economic policies of the government that are necessary for the survival of Singapore in a fast changing world have shaped the aims of the school mathematics curriculum. The present day curriculum…

  15. Singapore Language Enhancer: Identity Included

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Desmond

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the rhetoric of the four official languages (English, Mandarin, Malay and Tamil) in Singapore and the domestic aversion towards Chinese "dialects" and colloquial "Singlish". The "Speak Mandarin Campaign" alongside the "Speak Good English Movement" represent a display of intercultural…

  16. Molecular characterization of two hantavirus strains from different rattus species in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kek Relus

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hantaviruses cause human disease in endemic regions around the world. Outbreaks of hantaviral diseases have been associated with changes in rodent population density and adaptation to human settlements leading to their proliferation in close proximity to human dwellings. In a parallel study initiated to determine the prevalence of pathogens in Singapore's wild rodent population, 1206 rodents were trapped and screened. The findings established a hantavirus seroprevalence of 34%. This paper describes the molecular characterization of hantaviruses from Rattus norvegicus and Rattus tanezumi, the predominant rodents caught in urban Singapore. Methodology Pan-hanta RT-PCR performed on samples of Rattus norvegicus and Rattus tanezumi indicated that 27 (2.24% of the animals were positive. sequence analysis of the S and M segments established that two different hantavirus strains circulate in the rodent population of Singapore. Notably, the hantavirus strains found in Rattus norvegicus clusters with other Asian Seoul virus sequences, while the virus strains found in Rattus tanezumi had the highest sequence similarity to the Serang virus from Rattus tanezumi in Indonesia, followed by Cambodian hantavirus isolates and the Thailand virus isolated from Bandicota indica. Conclusions Sequence analysis of the S and M segments of hantavirus strains found in Rattus norvegicus (Seoul virus strain Singapore and Rattus tanezumi (Serang virus strain Jurong TJK/06 revealed that two genetically different hantavirus strains were found in rodents of Singapore. Evidently, together with Serang, Cambodian and Thailand virus the Jurong virus forms a distinct phylogroup. Interestingly, these highly similar virus strains have been identified in different rodent hosts. Further studies are underway to analyze the public health significance of finding hantavirus strains in Singapore rodents.

  17. Station characteristics of the Singapore Infrasound Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perttu, Anna; Taisne, Benoit; Caudron, Corentin; Garces, Milton; Avila Encillo, Jeffrey; Ildefonso, Sorvigenaleon

    2016-04-01

    Singapore, located in Southeast Asia, presents an ideal location for an additional regional infrasound array, with diverse persistent natural and anthropogenic regional infrasound sources, including ~750 active or potentially active volcanoes within 4,000 kilometers. Previous studies have focused on theoretical and calculated regional signal detection capability improvement with the addition of a Singapore array. The Earth Observatory of Singapore installed a five element infrasound array in northcentral Singapore in late 2014, and this station began consistent real-time data transmission mid-2015. The Singapore array uses MB2005s microbarometers and Nanometrics Taurus digitizers. Automated array processing is carried out with the INFrasonic EneRgy Nth Octave (INFERNO) energy estimation suite, and PMCC (Progressive MultiChannel Correlation). The addition of the Singapore infrasound array to the existing International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound stations in the region has increased regional infrasound detection capability, which is illustrated with the preliminary work on three observed meteor events of various sizes in late 2015. A meteor observed in Bangkok, Thailand in early September, 2015 was picked up by the CTBTO, however, another meteor observed in Bangkok in November was only recorded on the Singapore array. Additionally, another meteor observed over Sumatra was only recorded by one IMS station and the Singapore array. This study uses array processing and Power Spectral Density results for both the Singapore and publicly available regional IMS stations to examine station characteristics and detection capability of the Singapore array in the context of the regional IMS network.

  18. Area Handbook Series: Singapore: A Country Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    strengthen the cultural ties of the Singapore Chinese to China by establishing a cultural club, a debating society, Singapore’s first Chinese-language...break up ethnic en- claves and resettle kampong dwellers in Housing and Development Board apartment complexes had a great effect on the Malays. Evi- dence...for Communications and Information 201 Singapore: A Country Study ineffective in the 1980s. The major issues were economic, involv- ing debate over the

  19. The Fresh-water Fishes of Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfred, E.R.

    1966-01-01

    CONTENTS Page Introduction 5 Materials................... 6 The environment................. 7 Ichthyological literature of Singapore........... 9 Aquarium fishes................. io Pond culture fishes................ n Introduced species................. 12 Acknowledgements................ 13 Syst

  20. Intrauterine devices in Singapore today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarthy, T G; Ratnam, S S

    1984-01-01

    The IUD has been selected by less than 1% of contraceptive users in Singapore in the past 15 years, largely because of concerns about uterine perforation and a lack of professional training in insertion techniques. However, increased public awareness of the possible complications of oral contraceptives has led to an interest in the IUD as a family planning method and the Singapore Family Planning and Population Board has introduced the Multiload Cu 250 device at its clinic. The IUD is now considered a feasible method of contraception for women in Singapore, many of whom achieve their ideal family size of 2 children between the ages of 20-25 years. Successful use of the IUD is dependent upon placement of the device at the top of the uterine cavity by an experienced physician. All devices should be changed after 4 years to reduce the risk of complications. The newer IUDs have many advantages over inert and early copper-bearing IUDs in terms of safety and efficacy.

  1. The Asian Values in Singapore`s Context of Use. The Curbsides of the Singapore`s Model of Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Berna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Out of a sense of nationhood or out of mere circumstantial and specific relatings to a national context, it is altogether visible that anti-universalist debate is making headway in international relations, in cultural studies and in the political science, if we are to classify a broader consultation of events.This article is aimed at presenting how the Western ideas can be seen, in examination, as artificial structures, in the national context of Asia. The Asian Values are a very interesting evaluative specimen of the anti-universalist orations. In the case of many Asian states, they created settled forms of government, having an especial adaptation with the originating incidents that were their birthplace. With the inward of these units of contextualization, we will turn to the conferral of the Singapore democracy model and to its germane bloc and bond with the Asian Values. We will interrelate a personal conspectus regarding the correctness of the seal of fastening between the Asian Values and Singapore`s democracy model.

  2. Two of Singapore`s refiners expand despite lack of land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhodes, A.K.

    1995-08-14

    With 1.1 million b/d of refining capacity, Singapore is the world`s third largest concentrated refining center, trailing only the US Gulf Coast and Rotterdam areas. But space on the island is limited and land is expensive. Despite these restrictions, two of Singapore`s major refiners have found ways to expand their operations. Singapore Refining Co. Pte. Ltd. (SRC) is completing a major expansion project, set to come on stream this fall. And Mobil Oil Singapore Pte. Ltd. brought on stream a new UOP continuous catalytic reformer (CCR) and aromatics complex in January 1994. Both projects are described.

  3. Quantitative analysis of Indonesia's reserves and energy security as an evaluation by the nation in facing global competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiratama, Hadi; Yerido, Hezron; Tetrisyanda, Rizki; Ginting, Rizqy R.; Wibawa, Gede

    2015-12-01

    Energy security has become a serious concern for all countries in the world and each country has its own definiton for measuring its energy security. The objective of this study was to measure energy security of Indonesia quantitatively by comparing it with other countries and provide some recommendations for enhancing the energy security. In this study, the database was developed from various sources and was cross-checked to confirm validity of the data. Then the parameters of energy security were defined, where all of data will be processed towards the selected parameters. These parameters (e.g. Primary Energy mix, TPES/capita, FEC/capita, Self Sufficiency, Refining capacity, Overseas Energy Resources, Resources diversification) are the standards used to produce an analysis or evaluation of national energy management. Energy balances for Indonesia and 10 selected countries (USA, Germany, Russia, England, Japan, China, South Korea, Singapore, Thailand and India) were presented from 2009 to 2013. With a base index of 1.0 for Indonesia, calculated energy security index capable of representing Indonesia energy security compared relatively to other countries were also presented and discussed in detail. In 2012, Indonesia security index is ranked 11 from 11 countries, while USA and South Korea are the highest with security index of 3.36 and 2.89, respectively. According to prediction for 2025, Indonesia energy security is ranked 10 from 11 countries with only Thailand has lower security index (0.98). This result shows that Indonesia energy security was vulnerable to crisis and must be improved. Therefore this study proposed some recommendations to improve Indonesia energy security. Indonesia need to increase oil production by constructing new refinery plants, developing infrastructure for energy distribution to reduce the potential of energy shortage and accelerating the utilization of renewable energy to reduce the excessive use of primary energy. From energy policy

  4. Tropospheric ozone variability over Singapore from August 1996 to December 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemura, S.; Tsuruta, H.; Maeda, T.; Kawashima, S.; Sudo, S.; Hayashi, M.

    Vertical ozone profiles over Singapore (lat 1°20'N, long 103°53'E) have been monitored by ozonesondes twice a month since August 1996. We report the vertical ozone profiles over Singapore from August 1996 to the end of 1999. During this time, large ozone enhancements occurred during three periods: March-June 1997, September-November 1997, and February-May 1998. These ozone enhancements were larger over Singapore than over Malaysia. Backward trajectory analyses revealed that the enhancements during September-November 1997, and February-May 1998 were associated with biomass burning in Indonesia and Southeast Asia. Outside the three periods, ozone concentrations over Singapore differed from those over Malaysia by not more than 2.5% at altitudes of between 2.6 and 7.6 km and by not more than 12% at altitudes of between 1 and 13.5 km. The minimum ozone concentrations in the middle and the upper troposphere were about 20 ppbv and were observed when the wind was easterly from the Pacific Ocean. Ozone concentrations at the bottom of the troposphere were near zero when the wind was southerly to westerly (from the larger, more urbanized and industrialized part of Singapore and the Strait of Malacca), implying that ozone-destroying reactions were occurring with high concentrations of urban pollutants. We conclude that the ozone enhancements observed in the free troposphere resulted from the effects of extensive biomass burning combined with the modified circulation (suppressed convection of maritime air masses) that occurs during El Niño events.

  5. Teacher Perceptions of Games in Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Elizabeth; Kin, Yeo Gee; Wadhwa, Bimlesh; Lim, John

    2012-01-01

    With the proliferation of entertainment games, supported by heavy investment in the underlying technologies, educators are now examining the educational values of gaming and attempting to incorporate games into their teaching. In Singapore, the game sector is worth many million Singapore dollars (SGDs), and gaming is an engaging activity of the…

  6. Mother Tongues, English, and Religion in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of the effect of religion on language use in Singapore. Data come from the Sociolinguistic Survey of Singapore, 2006, a large-scale language survey linked to follow-up studies. The conceptual framework was based upon Castells' idea of a new social order in the network society; the main research questions were…

  7. Integration of ICT into Education in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Horn Mun; Koh, Thiam Seng

    2001-01-01

    Discusses Singapore's use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance its economic competitiveness and quality of life in the knowledge-based economy, describing the IT Masterplan in education; Singapore's education system; integration of ICT in primary through university education; preparing teachers for the ICT environment;…

  8. Sorting Citizens: Differentiated Citizenship Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Li-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Using Singapore as a case study, this paper examines how the discourses of democratic elitism and meritocracy help allocate different citizen roles to students and define the nature of the social studies citizenship education programmes for different educational tracks. While the Singapore education system is not unique in its stratification of…

  9. Saving Chinese-Language Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cher Leng

    2012-01-01

    Three-quarters of Singapore's population consists of ethnic Chinese, and yet, learning Chinese (Mandarin) has been a headache for many Singapore students. Recently, many scholars have argued that the rhetoric of language planning for Mandarin Chinese should be shifted from emphasizing its cultural value to stressing its economic value since…

  10. Singapore-US Strategic Dialogue on Biosecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Liew CT. Economic reform needed to tackle exodus of Malaysians to Singapore. The Malaysian Insider. June 21, 2014. http://www.themalaysianinsider.com...sideviews/article/economic- reform-needed-to-tackle- exodus -of-malaysians-to-singapore-liew-chi. Accessed July 3, 2014. 4. Universal Detection to

  11. Diglossia and Register Variation in Singapore English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiming, Bao; Huaqing, Hong

    2006-01-01

    Colloquial Singapore English is an outer circle variety that exhibits contact induced linguistic change. It has been characterized as the L variant in diglossic opposition to standard English. In this paper, the authors address two related issues: (1) the extent to which the Singapore English diglossia is supported by corpus data, and (2) the…

  12. Singapore's Global Schoolhouse Strategy: Retreat or Recalibration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In 2002 a high-level economic review committee recommended that Singapore position itself as a "global schoolhouse". An ambitious target was set to attract 150,000 international students to Singapore by 2015 and to lift the education sector's contribution to GDP from 1.9% to 5% in the same timeframe. The global schoolhouse was viewed as…

  13. Children's Rights: Television Programmes Aired in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Sheela; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on aspects of children's rights as portrayed in television. The results of a six-month research study show analyses of television content of Channel 5, which is the only free-to-air, 24-hour, English-language entertainment channel in Singapore. The results identify the role of television in assisting Singapore to meet its…

  14. Japan og Singapore i Arktis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonami, Aki; Watters, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    are interested in the Arctic. Looking at the Arctic engagement of Japan and Singapore, this paper finds that their interest in the Polar Regions is not necessarily a new phenomenon and that Arctic policy, as with the development of other foreign policy objectives, is a complex mix of national, bureaucratic...... and group interests. For Greenlandic and Danish policymakers, it may be useful to understand the genesis of Japan and Singapore’s Arctic policies and that their interest is complex and multi-faceted....

  15. The Singapore general election 1997

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jinshan; Elklit, Jørgen

    1999-01-01

    The parliamentary eklection in singapore in January 1997 is examined, as is the particular electoral system ('the party block vote') which is found to be a central element in the electoral strategy of the ruling party, PAP. the functioning of this rare electoral system is, however, only one eleme...... in explaining how PAP has been able to win comfortable majorities in the House. The analysis contributes to the understandi9ng of how a semi-democratic regime can stay in power. The political and electoral process in relation to the 1997 election is also analysed...

  16. Children's television in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriyani, H.; Hollander, E.H.; d'Haenens, L.S.J.; Beentjes, J.W.J.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the structure, conduct, and performance of children's television in Indonesia during the last four decades, reflecting on its interaction with the government, the market, and civil society. A striking trend in Indonesia's children's television is undoubtedly its exponential gr

  17. SASTRA CYBER DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laily Fitriani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The digital era started when the internet technology spread to the developing countries including Indonesia. The flourish of cyber literature leads to the debate on the quality of the work of literature. Above all, the existence of literature sites (cyber literature becomes an important alternative for writers and literary activist in Indonesia.

  18. Comprehensive characterization of PM2.5 aerosols in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, R.; Qian, W.-B.; Decesari, S.; Facchini, M. C.; Fuzzi, S.

    2003-08-01

    A comprehensive characterization of PM2.5 aerosols collected in Singapore from January through December 2000 is presented. The annual average mass concentration of PM2.5 was 27.2 μg/m3. The atmospheric loading of PM2.5 was elevated sporadically from March through May, mainly due to advection of biomass burning (deliberate fires to clear plantation areas) impacted air masses from Sumatra, Indonesia. Satellite images of the area, trajectory calculations, and surface wind direction data are in support of the transport of pyrogenic products from Sumatra toward Singapore. Aerosol samples collected during the dry season were analyzed for water-soluble ions, water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC), elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon, and trace elements using a number of analytical techniques. The major components were sulfate, EC, water-soluble carbonaceous materials, and water-insoluble carbonaceous materials. Aerosol WSOC were characterized based on a combination of chromatographic separations by ion exchange chromatography, functional group investigation by proton nuclear magnetic resonance, and total organic carbon determination. The comprehensive chemical characterization of PM2.5 particles revealed that both non-sea-salt sufate (nss-SO42-) and carbonaceous aerosols mainly contributed to the increase in the mass concentration of aerosols during the smoke haze period. Using a mass closure test (a mass balance), we determined whether the physical measurement of gravimetric fine PM concentration of a sample is equal to the summed concentrations of the individually identified chemical constituents (measured or inferred) in the sample. The sum of the determined groups of aerosol components and the gravimetrically determined mass agreed reasonably well. Principal component analysis was performed from the combined data set, and five factors were observed: a soil dust component, a metallurgical industry factor, a factor representing emissions from biomass burning and

  19. Geologic map of Indonesia - Peta geologi Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigit, Soetarjo

    1965-01-01

    The geology, compiled by Th. H. F. Klompe in 1954 from published and unpublished maps of the Direktorat Geologi, has been brought up to date on the basis of investigations carried out to 1962 (Ref. Sigit, Soetarjo, "I. A brief outline of the geology of the Indonesian Archipelago, and II. Geological map of Indonesia;" Direktorat Geologi publication, 1962.)

  20. Energy in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symon, A.

    1997-07-01

    The report surveys Indonesia`s energy sector with the following interest groups in mind: operators and equipment suppliers, investors, purchasers of Indonesian oil, gas and coal, and those working in roles concerned with energy in Indonesia. It deals with each energy source in turn: electricity, including private power; oil; gas; coal; geothermal energy; hydropower; solar and other alternative energy systems; and nuclear power. For each industry it gives an overview, discusses resources, outlines government policy and regulatory framework, gives figures for production and discusses the industry outlook. 11 figs., 71 tabs., 7 apps.

  1. The Melithaeidae (Coelenterata: Octocorallia) of Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ofwegen, van L.P.; Goh, N.K.C.; Chou, L.M.

    2000-01-01

    Four species of Melithaeidae from Singapore waters are described and depicted: Melithaea ochracea (Linnaeus, 1758), Mopsella rubeola (Wright & Studer, 1889), M. retifera (Lamarck, 1816), and Acabaria robusta (Shann, 1912). Variation and synonymy are discussed.

  2. The evolution of sports medicine in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Benedict

    2013-10-01

    Sports medicine is a relatively new subspecialty in Singapore. This commentary chronicles its evolution in Singapore from 1969, through various milestones, to the present day. The first sports medicine clinic in Singapore was established in 1971 at Farrer Park. Notable institutions that followed include the Sports Medicine and Research Centre (1973), Soldier Performance Centre, Changi Sports Medicine Centre (2003), Singapore Sports Medicine Centre (2006), and other multidisciplinary centres of restructured hospitals. Formal groundwork to establish sports medicine as a subspecialty began in 2005, with its first trainee commencing traineeship at the Changi Sports Medicine Centre in 2007, and culminated in the subspecialty register at the beginning of 2011. Also captured in this discussion are the broader scopes of sports medicine, including military sports medicine, the sports sciences, exercise medicine, and event medical coverage.

  3. The Student's Perceptions of Learning Mathematics Using Flash Animation Secondary School in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Kalbin; Tiawa, Dayang Hjh

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the students perception on the use of animation courseware in math and to reveal how the sample courseware learning mathematical concepts to different change students' views. This research is a case study involving three mathematics students at SMAN 2 Bintan. Data were collected by means of…

  4. Udvikling. Singapores store væksteventyr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Henrik; Fleming, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The economic development of Singapore has been a success story. The analysis examines the main actors in this development and raises the question whether the country can take the next step to become a smart nation.......The economic development of Singapore has been a success story. The analysis examines the main actors in this development and raises the question whether the country can take the next step to become a smart nation....

  5. Indonesia in 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Ahead of upcoming elections, expectations ran high in 2013 across the archipelago for a highly pluralistic electorate. With China as a leading trading partner, the backdrop for Indonesia was steady economic growth, albeit checked by a sliding currency, a current account deficit, and a depressing culture of corruption. Mixing commerce and geopolitics, China, the U.S., and Japan all turned to Indonesia to expand their influence.

  6. Investigating the haze transport from 1997 biomass burning in Southeast Asia: its impact upon Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koe, Lawrence C. C.; Arellano, Avelino F.; McGregor, John L.

    The 1997 Indonesia forest fires was an environmental disaster of exceptional proportions. Such a disaster caused massive transboundary air pollution and indiscriminate destruction of biodiversity in the world. The immediate consequence of the fires was the production of large amounts of haze in the region, causing visibility and health problems within Southeast Asia. Furthermore, fires of these magnitudes are potential contributors to global warming and climate change due to the emission of large amounts of greenhouse gases and other pyrogenic products.The long-range transport of fire-related haze in the region is investigated using trajectories from the CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research Limited Area Model (DARLAM). Emission scenarios were constructed for hotspot areas in Sumatra and Kalimantan for the months of September and October 1997 to determine the period and fire locations most critical to Singapore. This study also examines some transport issues raised from field observations. Results show that fires in the coastal areas of southeast Sumatra and southwest Kalimantan can be potential contributors to transboundary air pollution in Singapore. Singapore was directly affected by haze from these areas whereas Kuala Lumpur was heavily affected by the haze coming from Sumatra. In most cases, Singapore was more affected by fires from Kalimantan than was Kuala Lumpur. This was mainly a result of the shifting of monsoons. The transition of monsoons resulted in weaker low-level winds and shifted convergence zones near to the southeast of Peninsular Malaysia. In addition to severe drought and massive fire activity in 1997, the timing of the monsoon transition has a strong influence on haze transport in the region.

  7. The Singapore Global Schoolhouse: An Analysis of the Development of the Tertiary Education Landscape in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee; Tan, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to analyse the Singapore government's recent attempt to make Singapore a "Global Schoolhouse" by transforming its tertiary education sector. It aims to examine the government's attempt to promote greater diversity and autonomy in the tertiary education landscape; it also aims to examine the government's systems…

  8. Determinan Ekspor CPO Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Rosita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil is one of the products that are important to the economy of Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the performance of Indonesia's CPO exports and to look for the influence of the independent variables such as production volume CPO, CPO consumption and the value of the rupiah against the U.S. dollar. The authors of this study tested using the Method of Error Correction Model. The time interval used is from 1998 to 2011 with the data quarter. The findings suggest that Indonesia's CPO production volume variables exert a positive and significant impact on the number of Indonesian CPO exports in both the short and long term, then the variable volume Indonesia CPO consumption in the short and long term is also a significant effect on the number of Indonesian CPO exports but negatively related, this is due to the domestic CPO consumption greater that the capacity to export will be reduced. Variables of the Rupiah against the U.S. dollar also affects Indonesia's CPO exports significantly and negatively related to both the short and long term and conditions of the depreciation of the rupiah exchange rate is not enough to effectively be driving exports. Estimates show that the close relationship between external demand caused exports to Indonesia's export performance vulnerable to external shocks. Side factors are also a determinant of export performance.

  9. Determinan Ekspor CPO Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratih Rosita

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Palm oil is one of the products that are important to the economy of Indonesia. This study aims to analyze the performance of Indonesia's CPO exports and to look for the influence of the independent variables such as production volume CPO, CPO consumption and the value of the rupiah against the U.S. dollar. The authors of this study tested using the Method of Error Correction Model. The time interval used is from 1998 to 2011 with the data quarter. The findings suggest that Indonesia's CPO production volume variables exert a positive and significant impact on the number of Indonesian CPO exports in both the short and long term, then the variable volume Indonesia CPO consumption in the short and long term is also a significant effect on the number of Indonesian CPO exports but negatively related, this is due to the domestic CPO consumption greater that the capacity to export will be reduced. Variables of the Rupiah against the U.S. dollar also affects Indonesia's CPO exports significantly and negatively related to both the short and long term and conditions of the depreciation of the rupiah exchange rate is not enough to effectively be driving exports. Estimates show that the close relationship between external demand caused exports to Indonesia's export performance vulnerable to external shocks. Side factors are also a determinant of export performance. Keywords: palm oil, CPO consumption, Error Correction Model

  10. PROSPECTIVE ISLAMIC LAW IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohdar Yanlua

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the Prospective Islamic law in Indonesia. The enforcement of Islamic law in Indonesia experienced the ups and downs, ranging from the colonial period with the Government of Indonesia to the Netherlands in order to reform it.In this study it was found that a prospective law of Islam in Indonesia the development of any regime of the Government of Indonesia is experiencing developments. By the Government of Indonesia does not accept or reject the extremes, but instead selectively receive (not the totality and gradual.Such a step is done for the sake of maintaining the stability and integrity of the country.

  11. Singapore Airlines and South African Airways Sign Codeshare Agreement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ From 15 September 2006, Singapore Airlines' customers will be able to travel to more destinations in South Africa thanks to a new codeshare agreement signed by Singapore Airlines and South African Airways (SAA).

  12. China-ASEAN Association Entrepreneur Council Member Delegation in Singapore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The China-ASEAN Association Entrepreneur Council Member Delegation, comprising ten people, visited Singapore from February 22 to March 1, 2009 at the invitation of the Singapore-China Friendship Association. During the visit, members of the

  13. Breast cancer in Singapore: some perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Lazaro, Ana Richelia; Thilagaratnam, Shyamala; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the commonest malignancy among Singapore women, accounting for 29.7% of all female cancers, with an age-standardized rate of 54.9 per 100,000 per year. It has been the most frequent cancer in Singapore women for the last 30 years, with the highest rates previously reported in those aged between 45 and 49 years, but with a more recent observation of a change in peak age group to women in their late 50s. About 1,100 new cases are diagnosed annually and approximately 270 women die in Singapore each year from breast cancer. In the multiethnic population of Singapore, it has been noted that rising breast cancer incidence is consistent across all three ethnic groups (Chinese, Malays, and Indians). Singapore has among the highest breast cancer incidence in Asia. Possible explanations include rapid urbanization, improvement in socio-economic status, and adoption of a western lifestyle. Our experience with the Singapore breast screening pilot project (1994-1997) and the national breast-screening program (BreastScreen Singapore) has led to increased understanding of this disease in the country. Data from the pilot project showed that breast screening is just as effective in a predominantly Asian population as in the west. Early breast cancer accounted for most breast cancers detected, with pre-invasive ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) comprising 26% of all screen-detected cancers in the pilot study. In the currently on-going BreastScreen Singapore, DCIS forms >30% of all breast cancers among pre-menopausal women, a relatively high proportion probably accounted for partially by the greater participation of women aged between 40 and 49 years. Despite the ready availability of subsidized mammographic screening, there are still women in Singapore who present with locally advanced breast cancer. Clinical management of an increasing number of women with breast cancer embraces a multidisciplinary team-based approach, with regular discussions of therapeutic

  14. Indonesia lowers infant mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, S

    1991-11-01

    Indonesia's success in reaching World Health Organization (WHO) universal immunization coverage standards is described as the result of a strong national program with timely, targeted donor support. USAID/Indonesia's Expanded Program for Immunization (EPI) and other USAID bilateral cooperation helped the government of Indonesia in its goal to immunize children against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, polio, tuberculosis, and measles by age 1. The initial project was to identify target areas and deliver vaccines against the diseases, strengthen the national immunization organization and infrastructure, and develop the Ministry of Health's capacity to conduct studies and development activities. This EPI project spanned the period 1979-90, and set the stage for continued expansion of Indonesia's immunization program to comply with the full international schedule and range of immunizations of 3 DPT, 3 polio, 1 BCG, and 1 measles inoculation. The number of immunization sites has increased from 55 to include over 5,000 health centers in all provinces, with additional services provided by visiting vaccinators and nurses in most of the 215,000 community-supported integrated health posts. While other contributory factors were at play, program success is at least partially responsible for the 1990 infant mortality rate of 58/1,000 live births compared to 72/1,000 in 1985. Strong national leadership, dedicated health workers and volunteers, and cooperation and funding from UNICEF, the World Bank, Rotary International, and WHO also played crucially positive roles in improving immunization practice in Indonesia.

  15. HISTORISITAS POLITIK PEREMPUAN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasisto Raharjo Jati

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze historicity of political participation and representation of women in the political landscape in Indonesia. This paper used the perspective of feminism theory as core analysis in reviewing its issue. Periodicity of Indonesian women's political participation is very volatile and depends on the political situation contemporary. Indonesian women's political participation in the era of colonialism experienced domestication, revivalism in the Sukarno era, stigmatization in the New Order era, and is now experiencing ambiguity in the Reformation era. Indonesian women's political participation need to find a strong platform to promote the aspirations of his peopleKeywords: partisipation, representation, domestification, stigmatization, and women politic.Artikel ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis histo-risitas partisipasi politik dan keterwakilan perempuan dalam lanskap politik di Indonesia. Tu-lisan ini menggunakan perspektif teori feminisme sebagai analisis inti dalam meninjau isu nya. Periodisitas partisipasi politik perempuan Indonesia sangat fluktuatif dan tergantung pada situasi politik kontemporer. Partisipasi politik perempuan Indonesia di era kolonialisme mengalami domestikasi, revivalisme di era Soekarno, stigmatisasi di era Orde Baru, dan sekarang mengalami ambiguitas dalam era Reformasi. Partisipasi politik perempuan Indonesia perlu menemukan platform yang kuat untuk memperjuangkan aspirasi rakyatnyaKata kunci: partisipasi, representasi, domestifikasi, stigmasi, politik perempuan  

  16. Mother Tongue Education in Singapore: Concerns, Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Leong Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In 1966, the Singapore Government implemented the English-knowing bilingual policy which made it mandatory for all Chinese students to study English as a "First Language" and the Chinese language (CL) as a "Mother Tongue Language" in Singapore schools. Using key literature relevant to Singapore's bilingual educational policy…

  17. Moving towards Quality Physical Education: Physical Education Provision in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Michael; Lim, Boon San Coral; Wang, Chee Keng John; Tan, Wee Keat Clara; MacPhail, Ann

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the provision of physical education (PE) in Singapore. Singapore is a small island city state of approximately 699 square kilometres with a population of about 4 million people. This article aims to highlight the current status of PE in Singapore schools and compare it against suggested international standards and…

  18. 76 FR 60100 - The Singapore Fund, Inc.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... COMMISSION The Singapore Fund, Inc.; Notice of Application September 22, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). Applicant: The Singapore Fund, Inc. (the ``Fund''). ACTION: Notice of... objective is to seek long-term capital appreciation through investment primarily in Singapore...

  19. Mother Tongue Education in Singapore: Concerns, Issues and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Leong Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In 1966, the Singapore Government implemented the English-knowing bilingual policy which made it mandatory for all Chinese students to study English as a "First Language" and the Chinese language (CL) as a "Mother Tongue Language" in Singapore schools. Using key literature relevant to Singapore's bilingual educational…

  20. National Cancer Center Singapore: the way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Melissa; Soo, Khee Chee

    2016-02-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death in Singapore, comprising almost 30% of annual deaths. The incidence and prevalence continue to rise, resulting in Singapore having the highest age-standardized rate of cancer in southeast Asia. A review of national health policies in 1992 resulted in the creation of a National Cancer Centre Singapore (NCCS) in 1999. The current NCCS, with its three pillars of clinical service, research and education, manages about 70% of all new cancer cases in the countries public healthcare system. As it outgrows its current outfit and looks to the new NCCS building in 2020, the goal must be for strategic planning to attract and retain the best minds and heart in the field of cancer if it were to continue to be successful in achieving its vision and mission. This article chronicles the NCCS's history and details the foundation of its strategic plans.

  1. Gynecological cancer in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, M Farid

    2009-03-01

    To overview the status of gynecologic cancer in Indonesia. Information regarding Indonesia obtained from World Bank Report and Statistical Yearbook of Indonesia 2007, epidemiological data obtained from Histopathological Data of Cancer in Indonesia 2002, Department of Health-Registry Body of Indonesian Specialist of Pathology Association-Indonesian Cancer Society; Various Hospitals in big Cities in Indonesia. Indonesia is an Archipelago with a total area of 1,922,570.00 km(2), the population is 222,192,000 (2006), the fourth world rank. Female is 49.86% with life expectancy 69 years. Gross National Product per Capita is 690.00 USD. Histopathological report in 2002 revealed that cervical cancer, ovarian cancer and uterine cancer were the most frequent cancer among female, which were the first (2,532 cases), the third (829 cases) and the eighth (316 cases) rank respectively. The peak age for cervical, uterine and ovarian cancer was 45-54 years. HPV 16, 18 were found in 82% of invasive cervical. Data from various academic hospitals in 2007 showed that cervical cancer is the most common malignancy followed by ovary, uterus, vulva and vagina. Five-year survival rate of stage I, II, III, IV cervical cancer were 50%, 40%, 20%, and 0% respectively. Overall five-year survival rate of carcinoma of the ovary was 54.8%. If sub-classified by stage, five-year survival rate are 94.3%, 75.0%, 31%, and 11.7% for stage I, II, III, and IV respectively. Five-year disease-free survival rate of endometrial cancer was 71.9%. Indonesia is the biggest Archipelago with a dense population but the income per capita still low (poor country). The most common gynecologic cancer is cervical cancer, followed by ovarian and uterine cancer. These cancers are included in top ten cancers in Indonesia. HPV 16, 18 were the most cause of cervical cancer. The five-year survival rates are comparable with world report.

  2. Snakebite in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Adiwinata

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia as one of the largest tropical and agricultural countries in the world shared the particularly high burden cases of snakebite. In the last decade, World Health Organization (WHO has listed snakebite as one of the neglected tropical disease. The clinical manifestations of snakebite could vary according to the type of venoms ranging from mild to life threatening condition. Appropriate first aid treatment and comprehensive management of snakebite cases are warranted to reduce mortality and morbidity rates. Key words: snakebite, neglected tropical disease, Indonesia, treatment, antivenom

  3. Turning point for Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, R.

    2006-07-21

    Indonesia's government has started to reform its subsidies policy, but structural reforms are needed to encourage more foreign investment. In 2005, Indonesia's coal production increased by 11% to 146.8 Mt, PT Bumi Resources being the largest producer. In March 2006 Bumi announced the sale of its coal interests to a consortium of foreign and Indonesian investors. Other major producers, PT Adaro, PT Berau Coal, PT Kideco and state-owned PT Bukat Asam all increased production in 2005. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. GOVERNANCE AND ECONOMIC CHANGE IN SINGAPORE

    OpenAIRE

    SOO ANN LEE

    2015-01-01

    The Singapore economy went through several changes due to changes in its mode of governance from being a trading outpost of the East India Company (EIC) to being part of the colony of the Straits Settlements, and more recently to being a British colony by itself, then to being part of Malaysia and now an independent republic. These modes of governance enabled the economy to grow until Singapore became more important and also more closely linked to the outside world. British rule, British capi...

  5. Difficulties in initial algebra learning in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-12-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian students' achievement in the algebra domain was significantly below the average student performance in other Southeast Asian countries such as Thailand, Malaysia, and Singapore. This fact gave rise to this study which aims to investigate Indonesian students' difficulties in algebra. In order to do so, a literature study was carried out on students' difficulties in initial algebra. Next, an individual written test on algebra tasks was administered, followed by interviews. A sample of 51 grade VII Indonesian students worked the written test, and 37 of them were interviewed afterwards. Data analysis revealed that mathematization, i.e., the ability to translate back and forth between the world of the problem situation and the world of mathematics and to reorganize the mathematical system itself, constituted the most frequently observed difficulty in both the written test and the interview data. Other observed difficulties concerned understanding algebraic expressions, applying arithmetic operations in numerical and algebraic expressions, understanding the different meanings of the equal sign, and understanding variables. The consequences of these findings on both task design and further research in algebra education are discussed.

  6. Bandung City, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tarigan, A.K.M.; Sagala, S.S.; Samsura, D.A.A.; Fiisabiilillah, D.F.; Simarmata, H.A.; Nababan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Bandung City has grown to become a very important centre in Indonesia, demonstrating a higher economic growth rate than the national average. It has experienced many challenges resulting from rapid urbanisation, including slums, basic infrastructures, and flooding. Despite such issues, a gradual imp

  7. My Classroom: Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, Erica

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the teaching experiences of Alief Noor Farida--a junior lecturer at Indonesia's "Universitas Negeri Semarang" (Semarang State University [UNNES]). Now teaching her fourth semester and an alumna of the English Education program at UNNES, Ms. Farida is an especially motivated and dedicated educator. She teaches 18…

  8. ANALISIS EKSPOR KOPI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SRI - WIDAYANTI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   This study aimed at analyzing, firstly, the factors influencing the coffee export of Indonesia; secondly, the factors influencing the domestic coffee supply; and thirdly, the factors influencing the domestic coffee demand. This research used secondary data, time series data of 1975–1997 which were collected from many resources, i.e. Statistical Center Bureau (BPS, Trade Department, Indonesian Coffee Exporter Association, Forestry and Commercial Agricultural Enterprise Department, and the Indonesian Bank. The factors influencing the coffee export of Indonesia as well as the domestic coffee demand and supply were analyzed by simultaneous equation model in the form of double logarithm using the two stage least square method (2SLS. The research results show that the factors influencing the export quantity of coffee were the coffee FOB price, the coffee price in domestic markets, the exchange rate and the coffee supply of the previous year. The coffee export price had negative correlation with the coffee export quantity of Indonesia with export supply elasticity toward the export price of 2.04. In other words, the increase of coffee export price was followed by the decrease of coffee export quantity. This condition was due to the low quality of the coffee export of Indonesia. The coffee price at domestic markets has positive correlation with the coffee export quantity of Indonesia. Export was still conducted when the coffee price at domestic markets increased because the demand for domestic coffee was still very low. Other factors positively influencing the coffee export quantity were the exchange rate of rupiah and the coffee supply of the previous year. The factors influencing the domestic coffee supply were the domestic coffee price, technology level and the coffee supply of the previous year. The domestic coffee price positively related to the coffee supply at domestic markets with a supply elasticity of 0.04. This means that the

  9. Distributed Leadership for ICT Reform in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, David; Ho, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This study examines distributed leadership in Information Communication Technology reform in a government school in Singapore. The study adopts a naturalistic inquiry approach, drawing upon a case study of the aforementioned school for much of its data. The study found that leadership for Information Communication Technology reform is distributed…

  10. Singapore Airlines A380 Takes Flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The first A380 aircraft that will be delivered to launch customer Singapore Airlines embarked on its maiden test flight on May 7, 2006. This aircraft will be the world's first A380 to enter commercial service at the end of the year.

  11. Multilingualism and Social Identity in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamwangamalu, Nkonko M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the results of a questionnaire designed to determine how multilingual speakers in the Singapore context express their social identities through language; how they relate to their languages; and how they perceive the various English accents to which they are exposed. (34 references) (VWL)

  12. Television Ads in Singapore: A Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Sharaf N.; Aw, Annette; Kennan, William

    1999-01-01

    Appraises the information content of Singapore television advertising, and makes a comparison with relevant United States findings. Research reported in this paper is a replication of two empirical studies of the informational content of television advertising in the United States from 1977. (Author/LRW)

  13. Education and Intergenerational Mobility in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Irene Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    International research on the effects of educational regimes on intergenerational mobility suggests that Singapore's education system possesses characteristics that tend to decrease intergenerational mobility. These characteristics include ability-based and school-based streaming, privatization of basic and tertiary education, expansion of…

  14. Stakeholders' Perceptions of School Counselling in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Poi Kee

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that set out to understand stakeholders' perception of the school counselling service in Singapore. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored the perceptions of three main stakeholder groups, namely teachers and counsellors working within the schools and those working in the communities.…

  15. Singapore Students' Misconceptions of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chew-Hung; Pascua, Liberty

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is an important theme in the investigation of human-environment interactions in geographic education. This study explored the nature of students' understanding of concepts and processes related to climate change. Through semi-structured interviews, data was collected from 27 Secondary 3 (Grade 9) students from Singapore. The data…

  16. Physical Education and Health in Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, Michael C.; Fry, Joan M.

    2010-01-01

    As a school subject, physical education (PE) in Singapore took on its own shape with the introduction of a conceptual games teaching approach in response to the national government's "Thinking Schools, Learning Nation" policy of the late 1990s. With the recent media attention on hosting two main international events (Asian Youth Games and the…

  17. Tropical urban lichens: observations from Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipman, H.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The known lichen diversity of Singapore, 296 species, is comparable with temperate lowland areas, but the taxa involved are different, even at high taxonomic levels: the commonest orders are Arthoniales and Graphidales instead of Lecanorales. Epiphytic species dominate, while saxicolous and terrestr

  18. Education and Intergenerational Mobility in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Irene Y. H.

    2014-01-01

    International research on the effects of educational regimes on intergenerational mobility suggests that Singapore's education system possesses characteristics that tend to decrease intergenerational mobility. These characteristics include ability-based and school-based streaming, privatization of basic and tertiary education, expansion of…

  19. Mending the imaginary wall between Indonesia and Malaysia The case of maritime delimitation in the waters off Tanjung Berakit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Made Andi Arsana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to its geographical location, Indonesia shares border areas with at least ten neighbouring countries with which maritime boundaries must be settled. As of March 2011, Indonesia is yet to finalize its maritime boundaries with various States including Malaysia with which four maritime boundaries need to be settled: the Malacca Strait, the South China Sea, the Sulawesi Sea, and the Singapore Strait (off Tanjung Berakit. It is evident that pending maritime boundaries can spark problems between Indonesia and Malaysia. The dispute over the Ambalat Block in 2005 and 2009 and an incident in the waters off Tanjung Berakit on 13 August 2010 are two significant examples. This paper discusses the incident in the waters off Tanjung Berakit, but will be preceded by a description of the principles of coastal States’ maritime entitlement pursuant to international law of the sea. Following the discussion, this paper provides suggestions for settling maritime boundaries in the area from technical/geospatial and legal perspectives.

  20. Analisis Faktor-Faktor yang Mempengaruhi Ekspor Crude Palm Oil (CPO) Indonesia ke Uni Eropa

    OpenAIRE

    Pinem, Nurul Fajriah

    2015-01-01

    Since 2004, Crude Palm Oil (CPO) is the largest contributor to the production of vegetable oil. Indonesia supplies 47 % of the world's palm oil, and Malaysia dominate 85% of palm oil market in the world. Most of them exported to European Union, India, China, and Singapore. World market price of CPO is still under controlled by European market particulary. Rotterdam as the standar. The purpose of this study was to analyze the factors influenced the Indonesian CPO exports to the EU. The data of...

  1. Ads in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulan Roro Retno

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmetics industry created the beauty myth for women through advertising. A cosmetic ad in Indonesia has spread a new concept of white skin: East Asia beauty myth. The white concept of Asia white skin basically derived from colonial legacy. The purpose of the research was analyzing the beauty myth in Indonesia ads using postcolonial perspective. The principal result brought the discourse analysis and postcolonial perspective a new insight in communication research. Particularly on media and cultural studies. Major conclusions showed that the beauty myth since the Dutch colonial period never been change. The main concept is always in colonialism’s idea: “white is better”. The West is better than the East.

  2. ANALISIS DAYA SAING DAN FAKTOR-FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI EKSPOR CPO INDONESIA KE CHINA, MALAYSIA, DAN SINGAPURA DALAM SKEMA ASEAN-CHINA FREE TRADE AGREEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyastutik Widyastutik

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The Objective of this research is to analyze the competitiveness and the factors that influence Indonesia CPO export to China, Malaysia, and Singapore in the ACFTA. Revealed Comparative Advantage was used to analyze competitiveness in China, Malaysia, and Singapore. Panel data regression method with fixed effect (cross section weight was used to analyze export supply model as an impact of ACFTA. The results shows that all dependent variables (domestic production of CPO, international price of CPO, price domestic of CPO, price of soybean oil, price of gasoline, exchange rate, lag of export, and dummy of ACFTA have the significant influence on CPO export to China, Malaysia, and Singapore.   Keywords: CPO, ASEAN-China, Revealed Comparative Advantage (RCA  

  3. Indonesia's migration transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, G

    1995-01-01

    This article describes population movements in Indonesia in the context of rapid and marked social and economic change. Foreign investment in Indonesia is increasing, and global mass media is available to many households. Agriculture is being commercialized, and structural shifts are occurring in the economy. Educational levels are increasing, and women's role and status are shifting. Population migration has increased over the decades, both short and long distance, permanent and temporary, legal and illegal, and migration to and between urban areas. This article focuses specifically on rural-to-urban migration and international migration. Population settlements are dense in the agriculturally rich inner areas of Java, Bali, and Madura. Although the rate of growth of the gross domestic product was 6.8% annually during 1969-94, the World Bank ranked Indonesia as a low-income economy in 1992 because of the large population size. Income per capita is US $670. Indonesia is becoming a large exporter of labor to the Middle East, particularly women. The predominance of women as overseas contract workers is changing women's role and status in the family and is controversial due to the cases of mistreatment. Malaysia's high economic growth rate of over 8% per year means an additional 1.3 million foreign workers and technicians are needed. During the 1980s urban growth increased at a very rapid rate. Urban growth tended to occur along corridors and major transportation routes around urban areas. It is posited that most of the urban growth is due to rural-to-urban migration. Data limitations prevent an exact determination of the extent of rural-to-urban migration. More women are estimated to be involved in movements to cities during the 1980s compared to the 1970s. Recruiters and middlemen have played an important role in rural-to-urban migration and international migration.

  4. HISTORISITAS POLITIK PEREMPUAN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Wasisto Raharjo Jati

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to analyze historicity of political participation and representation of women in the political landscape in Indonesia. This paper used the perspective of feminism theory as core analysis in reviewing its issue. Periodicity of Indonesian women's political participation is very volatile and depends on the political situation contemporary. Indonesian women's political participation in the era of colonialism experienced domestication, revivalism in the Sukarno era, stigmatizatio...

  5. Designing Futures in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Crosby

    2016-08-01

    This curated issue takes as its departure point Fry’s notion that design broadly shapes the world we occupy. To ask what happens when the world we occupy is not conceived simply in terms of local issues and solutions, but rather as a set of shared concerns that are localised and play out through global flows. To do so this issue presents ten contributions from Indonesia.

  6. KONFLIK AGRARIA DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zuber

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article describe agrarian conflict in Indonesia. Until this moment many agrarian conflict are happen in Papua, Java, Kalimantan and Sumatera. This conflict consist many interests and there isn’t equity policy to society are following this conflict. The implication the agrarian conflict become latent conflict. It usually make huge damage in society and nation.

  7. Complex emergencies in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, D A; Drummond, C M; Richman, M

    2001-01-01

    Recently, Indonesia has experienced six major provincial, civil, armed conflicts. Underlying causes include the transmigration policy, sectarian disputes, the Asian economic crisis, fall of authoritarian rule, and a backlash against civil and military abuses. The public health impact involves the displacement nationwide of > 1.2 million persons. Violence in the Malukus, Timor, and Kalimantan has sparked the greatest population movements such that five provinces in Indonesia each now harbor > 100,000 internally displaced persons. With a background of government instability, hyperinflation, macroeconomic collapse, and elusive political solutions, these civil armed conflicts are ripe for persistence as complex emergencies. Indonesia has made substantial progress in domestic disaster management with the establishment of central administrative authority, strategic planning, and training programs. Nevertheless, the Indonesian experience reveals recurrent issues in international humanitarian health assistance. Clinical care remains complicated by absences of treatment protocols, inappropriate drug use, high procedural complication rates, and variable referral practices. Epidemiological surveillance remains complicated by unsettled clinical case definitions, non-standardized case management of diseases with epidemic potential, variable outbreak management protocols, and inadequate epidemiological analytic capacity. International donor support has been semi-selective, insufficient, and late. The militia murders of three UN staff in West Timor prompted the withdrawal of UN international staff from West Timor for nearly a year to date. Re-establishing rules of engagement for humanitarian health workers must address security, public health, and clinical threats.

  8. Singapore experience: Creation of a world level education system

    OpenAIRE

    Timirkhan Alishev; Albert Gilmutdinov

    2010-01-01

    The Singapore education system was created nearly from the scratch, and in the last 45 years it managed to reach a high level of efficiency and international recognition. Singapore school students routinely show the best results in international knowledge tests. Singapore has left behind developed countries in the quality of the education institution development, its educational infrastructure is compact and well integrated into the overall economic structure. The article summarizes the findi...

  9. China in International Institutions: Challenges and Opportunities for Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    could influence its diplomatic and economic objectives. Chapter 3 explains the two- stage methodology of analysis. Chapter 4 examines the primary...Singapore into a key node in the globalised economy; (2) to develop a creative and entrepreneurial culture for an innovation-driven economy in Singapore...that Singapore was now at an advanced stage of economic development and could not compete solely on the cost of production. As a vision for

  10. Dengue Prevention and 35 Years of Vector Control in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Ooi, Eng-Eong; Goh, Kee-Tai; Duane J Gubler

    2006-01-01

    After a 15-year period of low incidence, dengue has reemerged in Singapore in the past decade. We identify potential causes of this resurgence. A combination of lowered herd immunity, virus transmission outside the home, an increase in the age of infection, and the adoption of a case-reactive approach to vector control contribute to the increased dengue incidence. Singapore's experience with dengue indicates that prevention efforts may not be sustainable. For renewed success, Singapore needs ...

  11. Microplastics in Singapore's coastal mangrove ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Nur Hazimah Mohamed; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

    2014-02-15

    The prevalence of microplastics was studied in seven intertidal mangroves habitats of Singapore. Microplastics were extracted from mangrove sediments via a floatation method, and then counted and categorized according to particle shape and size. Representative microplastics from Berlayar Creek, Sungei Buloh, Pasir Ris and Lim Chu Kang were isolated for polymer identification using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Microplastics were identified in all seven habitats, with the highest concentration found in sediments at Lim Chu Kang in the northwest of Singapore. The majority of microplastics were fibrous and smaller than 20 μm. A total of four polymer types were identified, including polyethylene, polypropylene, nylon and polyvinyl chloride. The relationship between abundance of microplastics and sediment grain size was also investigated, but no relationship was apparent. The presence of microplastics is likely due to the degradation of marine plastic debris accumulating in the mangroves.

  12. Singapore Technologies Electronics——Committed to Growth in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ About STElectronics Headquartered in Singapore, ST Electronics has almost 40 years of experience providing electronics, communications and ICT (information communications technologies) solutions to governments and commercial enterprises worldwide.

  13. Reframing Singapore : Memory - Identity - Trans-Regionalism

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Table of contents: 1 Introduction / Syed Muhd Khairudin Aljunied and Derek Heng REFRAMING THE HISTORICAL NARRATIVE 2 From Political Rhetoric to National History: Bi-Culturalism and Hybridisation in the Construction of Singapore’s Historical Narrative / Derek Heng Thiam Soon 3 Gateway and Panopticon: Singapore and Surviving Regime Change in the Nineteenth-Century Malay World / Koh Keng We 4 Beyond the Rhetoric of Communalism: Violence and the Process of Reconciliation in 1950s S...

  14. Indonesia: Asia-Pacific energy series, country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prawiraatmadja, W.; Yamaguchi, N.; Breazeale, K.; Basari, S.R.

    1991-04-01

    As part of our continuing assessment of Asia-Pacific energy markets, the Energy Program has embarked on a series of country studies that discuss in detail the structure of the energy sector in each major country in the region. To date, our reports to the US Department of Energy have covered Australia, China, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. The country studies also provide the reader with an overview of the economic and political situation in the various countries. We have particularly highlighted petroleum and gas issues in the country studies and have attempted to show the foreign trade implications of oil and gas trade. Finally, to the greatest extent possible, we have provided the latest available statistics -- often from unpublished and disparate sources that are unavailable to most readers. Staff members have traveled extensively in -- and at times have lived in -- the countries under review and have held discussions with senior policymakers in government and industry. Thus, these reports provide not only information but also the latest thinking on energy issues in the various countries. This report covers Indonesia. 37 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

  15. Prevalence of Cataract Surgery and Visual Outcomes in Indian Immigrants in Singapore: The Singapore Indian Eye Study

    OpenAIRE

    Preeti Gupta; Yingfeng Zheng; Tay Wan Ting; Ecosse L Lamoureux; Ching-Yu Cheng; Tien-Yin Wong

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of cataract surgery and factors associated with post-surgical visual outcomes in migrant Indians living in Singapore. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a population-based study in 3,400 Indian immigrants residing in Singapore-the Singapore Indian Eye Study (SINDI). All participants underwent comprehensive medical eye examination and a standardized interview. Post-operative visual impairment (VI) was defined as best-corrected or presenting visual ...

  16. Exploring Indonesia: Past and Present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelander, Bjorn

    This book provides an overview of Indonesia's history and culture. The book begins with prehistoric times and continues through nationhood. Each chapter provides background information along with student activities and project suggestions. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction to the Lands and Peoples of Indonesia"; (2) "Early…

  17. ANALISIS DAYA SAING KEDELAI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwono Sarwono

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available RCA (Revealed Comparative Advantage index of soybean in Indonesia from 1983 up to 2013 is less than one, mostly. It means that the competitiveness of soybean in Indonesia is low. The purpose of this study is to analyze the factors influence the soybean competitiveness. OLS (Ordinary Least Square was used as the analysis method. Hypotheses test based on that analysis model is not bias, so that, classic divergence test is needed. It is for getting the Best Linier Unbiased Estimator (BLUE appraisal. T statistic and F statistic were also applied. The result of this research shows that production and export have positive and significant influence. In addition, exchange rate and government policy do not influence the Indonesia soybean competitiveness.Indeks RCA (Revealed Comparative Advantage kedelai Indonesia dari tahun 1983-2013 kecenderungan bernilai kurang dari satu yang berarti daya saing kedelai Indonesia rendah.Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis faktor-faktor yang mempengaruhi daya saing kedelai Indonesia.Metode analisis yang digunakan adalah Ordinary Least Square (OLS.Pengujian hipotesis berdasarkan model analisis tersebut tidak bias maka perlu dilakukan uji penyimpangan klasik yang tujuannya agar diperoleh penaksiran yang bersifat Best Linier Unbiased Estimator (BLUE.Pengujian statistik menggunakan uji t statistikdan uji f statistik.Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa produksi dan ekspor berpengaruh secara positif dan signifikan terhadap daya saing kedelai Indonesia. Nilai tukar rupiah dan kebijakan pemerintah tidak berpengaruh terhadap daya saing kedelai Indonesia.

  18. Singapore Haze in June 2013: Consequences of Land-Use Change, Fires, and Anomalous Meteorology for Air Quality in Equatorial Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplitz, S.; Mickley, L. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Kim, P. S.; DeFries, R. S.; Marlier, M. E.; Schwartz, J.; Buonocore, J.; Myers, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Much of Equatorial Asia is currently undergoing extensive burning from agricultural fires and rapid land-use conversion to oil palm plantations, with substantial consequences for air quality and health. In June 2013, Singapore experienced severe smoke levels, with surface particulate matter concentrations greater than ten times average. Unlike past haze events in Singapore (e.g. September 1997 and October 2006), the June 2013 pollution event occurred during El Nino-neutral conditions. Using a combination of observations and chemical transport modeling, we examine relationships between sea surface temperatures, wind fields, fire patterns, and aerosol optical depth during the June 2013 haze event. We find reasonable agreement between satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the MODIS and MISR instruments and in-situ measurements from the AERONET stations across Equatorial Asia for 2005-2010 (MODIS R2 = 0.39, bias = -1.6%; MISR R2 = 0.27, bias = -42%). However, AOD observations fail to capture the Singapore pollution event of June 2013. Simulations with the GEOS-Chem model suggest that anomalously high dust concentrations during June 2013 may have impaired the ability of MODIS to monitor the haze over Singapore. In contrast, we show that the OMI Aerosol Index can effectively capture these smoke events and may be used to monitor future haze episodes in Equatorial Asia. We find that the June 2013 haze in Singapore may be attributed to anomalously strong westerlies carrying smoke from Riau Province in Indonesia. These westerlies, 5 m s-1 faster than the 2005-2010 mean June winds, are consistent with the phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) crossing the Maritime Continent at that time. These westerlies may have been further enhanced by a negative phase of the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), an east-west gradient in sea surface temperature anomalies across the Indian Ocean, with cold sea surface temperature anomalies (-3 C°) off the Arabian coast and

  19. Thirty-two years of landscape architectural education in Indonesia: a retrospect and prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusna Amin

    1995-03-01

    Full Text Available Study programmes in landscape architecture have existed in Indonesia since the establishment of its first educational institution in 1963. This article presents a retrospective assessment which, hopefully, will encourage all those who arc concerned with landscape architecture in Indonesia to think about its future development. For the author, the article updates a previous paper about the status of the educational practice in Indonesia, delivered as a supporting document at the 4th IFLA Eastern Regional conference in Singapore in 1981, under the theme of 'Education'. The article begins with a systematic review of landscape architecture in Indonesia, and then presents results of six interviews with individuals chosen to represent a range of views from government, private practice, and educators. From both the review and interview results, questions are considered about people's perception and appreciation of landscape architecture in Indonesia as a branch of education and professional practice. Two specific priorities are highlighted. One is the recognised need for landscape architecture to make meaningful connections between people and the places they live in. The second focuses on the relationship between landscape education and the service and industrial sectors, with regard to the availability of job opportunities for its graduates. The article includes a profile of the profession in Indonesia and asks whether the profession is able to apply environmental approaches and techniques for community involvement in the planning and design process. Ideas arc discussed regarding the improvement of the quality of university graduates to produce educated human resources who will meet the current requirements of national development and the industrial sector.

  20. The fast-running flies (Diptera, Hybotidae, Tachydromiinae of Singapore and adjacent regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Grootaert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is the first comprehensive introduction to the flies of the subfamily Tachydromiinae (Hybotidae of Singapore. The monograph summarizes all publications on the Tachydromiinae of Singapore and includes new data resulting from mass-trapping surveys made in Singapore during the last six years. A few samples from Malaysia (Johor province, Pulau Tioman and Langkawi have been also included in this study. In Singapore the Tachydromiinae are the most diverse group of Empidoidea (except Dolichopodidae and currently comprise 85 species belonging to the following nine genera: Platypalpus (1, Tachydromia (1, Chersodromia (6, Pontodromia (1, Drapetis (5, Elaphropeza (60, Crossopalpus (1, Nanodromia (3 and Stilpon (7. All species are diagnosed and illustrated. The following 28 species are described as new for science: Chersodromia bulohensis sp. nov. (Singapore, C. glandula sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia, C. malaysiana sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia, C. pasir sp. nov. (Malaysia, C. sylvicola sp. nov. (Singapore, C. tiomanensis sp. nov. (Malaysia, Crossopalpus temasek sp. nov. (Singapore, Drapetis bakau sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia, D. hutan sp. nov. (Singapore, D. laut sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia, D. mandai sp. nov. (Singapore, D. pantai sp. nov. (Singapore, Malaysia, Elaphropeza chanae sp. nov. (Singapore, E. collini sp. nov. (Singapore, E. gohae sp. nov. (Singapore, E. kranjiensis sp. nov. (Singapore, E. lowi sp. nov. (Singapore, E. semakau sp. nov. (Singapore, E. shufenae sp. nov. (Singapore, Nanodromia hutan sp. nov. (Singapore, N. spinulosa sp. nov. (Singapore, Platypalpus singaporensis sp. nov. (Singapore, Pontodromia pantai sp. nov. (Singapore, Stilpon arcuatum sp. nov. (Singapore, S. neesoonensis sp. nov. (Singapore, S. nigripennis sp. nov. (Singapore, S. singaporensis sp. nov. (Singapore, S. weilingae sp. nov. (Singapore. A redescription is given for Crossopalpus exul (Osten-Sacken, 1882 (Taiwan. Males of Elaphropeza feminata Shamshev

  1. Deforestation and avian extinction on tropical landbridge islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodhi, Navjot S; Wilcove, David S; Lee, Tien Ming; Sekercioglu, Cagan H; Subaraj, R; Bernard, Henry; Yong, Ding Li; Lim, Susan L H; Prawiradilaga, Dewi M; Brook, Barry W

    2010-10-01

    There are few empirical data, particularly collected simultaneously from multiple sites, on extinctions resulting from human-driven land-use change. Southeast Asia has the highest deforestation rate in the world, but the resulting losses of biological diversity remain poorly documented. Between November 2006 and March 2008, we conducted bird surveys on six landbridge islands in Malaysia and Indonesia. These islands were surveyed previously for birds in the early 1900 s, when they were extensively forested. Our bird inventories of the islands were nearly complete, as indicated by sampling saturation curves and nonparametric true richness estimators. From zero (Pulau Malawali and Pulau Mantanani) to 15 (Pulau Bintan) diurnal resident landbird species were apparently extirpated since the early 1900 s. Adding comparable but published extinction data from Singapore to our regression analyses, we found there were proportionally fewer forest bird extinctions in areas with greater remaining forest cover. Nevertheless, the statistical evidence to support this relationship was weak, owing to our unavoidably small sample size. Bird species that are restricted to the Indomalayan region, lay few eggs, are heavier, and occupy a narrower habitat breadth, were most vulnerable to extinction on Pulau Bintan. This was the only island where sufficient data existed to analyze the correlates of extinction. Forest preservation and restoration are needed on these islands to conserve the remaining forest avifauna. Our study of landbridge islands indicates that deforestation may increasingly threaten Southeast Asian biodiversity.

  2. IT Integration and Online Learning in the Singapore Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David; Tan, Seng Chee; Chen, Der-Thanq

    2003-01-01

    Reviews technology integration efforts in Singapore. Discusses examples of online learning in schools under four broad categories: cyber conferencing, e-learning services providers, e-publication, and wireless technology. Describes ways information technology is being used at the National Institute of Education in Singapore, as a tool for…

  3. Mathematics Education in Singapore--An Insider's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Berinderjeet

    2014-01-01

    Singapore's Education System has evolved over time and so has Mathematics Education in Singapore. The present day School Mathematics Curricula can best be described as one that caters for the needs of every child in school. It is based on a framework that has mathematical problem solving as its primary focus. The developments from 1946 to 2012…

  4. Choosing Teaching as a Second Career in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Sylvia; Goh, Kim Chuan

    2007-01-01

    Background: As the sole teacher provider in Singapore, the National Institute of Education (NIE) prepares all new teachers for the Singapore's Education System. In the last decade, NIE's enrolments for initial teacher preparation programmes have grown significantly. There has been a parallel increase in the number of career changers entering the…

  5. Distributed Leadership to Support PLCs in Asian Pragmatic Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairon, Salleh; Goh, Jonathan Wee Pin; Lin, Tzu-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Nation states around the world, including Singapore, are endeavouring to reform their education systems in order to successfully compete in the global economy (Carnoy, 1999). With human capital as Singapore's primary resource, it is unsurprising that the state has placed great emphasis on strengthening the economic-education nexus. This tight…

  6. Attitudes towards Literary Tamil and Standard Spoken Tamil in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Vanithamani

    2007-01-01

    This is the first empirical study that focused on attitudes towards two varieties of Tamil, Literary Tamil (LT) and Standard Spoken Tamil (SST), with the multilingual state of Singapore as the backdrop. The attitudes of 46 Singapore Tamil teachers towards speakers of LT and SST were investigated using the matched-guise approach along with…

  7. Distributed Leadership to Support PLCs in Asian Pragmatic Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairon, Salleh; Goh, Jonathan Wee Pin; Lin, Tzu-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Nation states around the world, including Singapore, are endeavouring to reform their education systems in order to successfully compete in the global economy (Carnoy, 1999). With human capital as Singapore's primary resource, it is unsurprising that the state has placed great emphasis on strengthening the economic-education nexus. This tight…

  8. Singapore's Global Schoolhouse Strategy: Retreat or Recalibration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In 2002 a high-level economic review committee recommended that Singapore position itself as a "global schoolhouse". An ambitious target was set to attract 150,000 international students to Singapore by 2015 and to lift the education sector's contribution to GDP from 1.9% to 5% in the same timeframe. The global schoolhouse was…

  9. English in Singapore: Culture, Capital and Identity in Linguistic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsagoff, Lubna

    2010-01-01

    Singapore is placed in the Outer Circle of the Kachru's Three Circles Model, and has over the years developed an English which is uniquely Singaporean. This paper argues that in order to understand the ways in which Singapore English is developing its own standards and ways of speaking, a new model needs to be developed that takes culture, capital…

  10. Constructing the Cosmopolitan Subject: Teaching Secondary School Literature in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Angelia Mui Cheng

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the ambitious educational reforms of the Singapore government in response to the challenges of globalization vis-a-vis the specific issues arising from the case of teaching Literature in secondary schools. It shows how the Singapore state is invested in a particular view of globalization and argues how recent scholarly moves…

  11. Children's Rights: Television Programmes Aired in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Sheela; Ebbeck, Marjory

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on aspects of children's rights as portrayed in television. The results of a six-month research study show analyses of television content of Channel 5, which is the only free-to-air, 24-hour, English-language entertainment channel in Singapore. The results identify the role of television in assisting Singapore to meet its…

  12. Bridging East and West Educational Divides in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prem

    2013-01-01

    In Asia, we are witnessing an era where the pendulum of power is swaying towards the East with the rising economic strength of China and India. Singapore is at the "crossroads" between the East and West of these most populous nations on earth. Although Singapore may appear the most Westernised country in Asia, she is nevertheless a multicultural…

  13. University Restructuring in Singapore: Amazing or a Maze?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michael H.; Gopinathan, Saravanan

    2008-01-01

    The Singapore government has put forward a comprehensive restructuring program of university education since the 1990s. Public universities in Singapore are going to be developed as world-class universities through a series of university education policies and reforms. This article reviews major developments of university education policies and…

  14. Inventory of Forts in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinandi, N.; Suryaningsih, F.

    2015-08-01

    The great archipelago in Indonesia with its wealthy and various nature, the products and commodities of tropic agriculture and the rich soil, was through the centuries a region of interest for other countries all over the world. For several reasons some of these countries came to Indonesia to establish their existence and tried to monopolize the trading. These countries such as the Portuguese, the Spanish, the Dutch and the British built strengthened trade stations which later became forts all over Indonesia to defend their interest. The archipelago of Indonesia possesses a great number of fortification-works as legacies of native rulers and those which were built by European trading companies and later became colonial powers in the 16th to the 19th centuries. These legacies include those specific structures built as a defence system during pre and within the period of World War II. These fortresses are nowadaysvaluable subjects, because they might be considered as shared heritage among these countries and Indonesia. It's important to develop a vision to preserve these particular subjects of heritage, because they are an interesting part of the Indonesian history and its cultural treasures. The Government of the Republic of Indonesia has national program to compile a comprehensive documentation of the existing condition of these various types of forts as cultural heritage. The result of the 3 years project was a comprehensive 442 forts database in Indonesia, which will be very valuable to the implementation of legal protection, preservation matters and adaptive re-use in the future.

  15. Coal fires in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehouse, Alfred E.; Mulyana, Asep A.S. [Office of Surface Mining/Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources Coal Fire Project, Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Agency for Training and Education, Jl. Gatot Subroto, Kav. 49, Jakarta 12950 (Indonesia)

    2004-07-12

    Indonesia's fire and haze problem is increasingly being ascribed to large-scale forest conversion and land clearing activities making way for pulpwood, rubber and oil palm plantations. Fire is the cheapest tool available to small holders and plantation owners to reduce vegetation cover and prepare and fertilize extremely poor soils. Fires that escaped from agricultural burns have ravaged East Kalimantan forests on the island of Borneo during extreme drought periods in 1982-1983, 1987, 1991, 1994 and 1997-1998. Estimates based on satellite data and ground observations are that more than five million hectares were burned in East Kalimantan during the 1997/1998 dry season. Not only were the economic losses and ecological damage from these surface fires enormous, they ignited coal seams exposed at the ground surface along their outcrops.Coal fires now threaten Indonesia's shrinking ecological resources in Kutai National Park and Sungai Wain Nature Reserve. Sungai Wain has one of the last areas of unburned primary rainforest in the Balikpapan-Samarinda area with an extremely rich biodiversity. Although fires in 1997/1998 damaged nearly 50% of this Reserve and ignited 76 coal fires, it remains the most valuable water catchment area in the region and it has been used as a reintroduction site for the endangered orangutan. The Office of Surface Mining provided Indonesia with the capability to take quick action on coal fires that presented threats to public health and safety, infrastructure or the environment. The US Department of State's Southeast Asia Environmental Protection Initiative through the US Agency for International Development funded the project. Technical assistance and training transferred skills in coal fire management through the Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resource's Training Agency to the regional offices; giving the regions the long-term capability to manage coal fires. Funding was also included to extinguish coal fires as

  16. KAJIAN TVC WONDERFUL INDONESIA SEBAGAI CERMIN CITRA INDONESIA DI MATA DUNIA

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Oscario

    2013-01-01

    Tourism is one of the most important sectors supporting the economy of Indonesia. One way to develop the Indonesian tourism is strengthening the image of Indonesia in the world. To strengthen the image, Indonesia has replaced the old brand, Visit Indonesia, and launched a new brand, Wonderful Indonesia. Besides the logo, in order to campaign Wonderful Indonesia, some television commercials have been launched. An advertising, which creates a powerful image, not only has a great power to inf...

  17. EFISIENSI PERBANKAN SYARIAH DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afif Amirillah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to find out the factors that can cause the efficiency value difference of Islamic Banking in In-donesia. The data at this research is monetary data of Islamic Banking. It was obtained from Bank of Indonesia. Then, it was divided into input and output variables. The determination of input output variables at this research uses Value Added Approach. Its input output variables consist of Demand Deposits, Saving Deposits, Time Depo-sits, Paid -In Capital, Placement at Bank ofIndonesia, Inter Bank Assets, Mudharabah, Musyara kah, Murabahah, Istishna, Ijarahand Qardh. This research used Data Envelopment Analysis method. This method has a strength that is having the capability to measure inefficiency input output variables, so that, the variable can have the efficiency. This research has resulted Islamic Banking efficiency in Indonesia, but it does not include BPRS. The mean efficiency of Islamic banking in Indonesia is 99,94%. Penelitian ini bertujuan mencari faktor –faktor penyebab perbedaan nilai efisiensiperbankan syariah di Indo-nesia yang dibandingkan secara relatif untuk setiap periode. Data yang digunakan pada penelitian ini menggu-nakan data keuangan perbankan syariah yang diperoleh dari Bank Indonesia kemudian dibagi menjadi variabel input dan output. Penentuan variabel input dan output pada penelitian ini menggunakan pendekatan Value Added Approach. Variabel input outputnyaterdiri dari : Giro iB, Tabungan iB, Deposito iB, Modal disetor, Pen-empatan padaBank Indonesia, Penempatan pada bank lain, Mudharabah, Musyarakah, Murabahah,Istishna, Ijarah dan Qardh. Pada penelitian ini menggunakan metode Data Envelopment Analysis yang mempunyai kel-ebihan dalam menghitung efisiensi untuk setiap variabel input outputyang mengalami inefisiensi. Penelitian ini menghasilkan nilai efisiensi perbankan syariah di Indoenesia (tidak termasuk BPRS. Efisiensi perbankan syariah di Indonesia mengalami efisiensi rata-rata sebesar 99,94%.

  18. Fertilitas Remaja di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mugia Bayu Raharja

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fertilitas remaja merupakan isu penting dari segi kesehatan dan sosial karena berhubungan dengan tingkat morbiditas serta mortalitas ibu dan anak. Tujuan penelitian adalah mempelajari faktor-faktor yang memengaruhi fertilitas remaja di Indonesia. Data yang digunakan adalah hasil Survei Demografi dan Kesehatan Indonesia tahun 2012 dengan unit analisis wanita usia subur yang termasuk dalam kategori usia remaja (15 - 19 tahun. Jumlah sampel sebanyak 6.927 responden. Analisis dilakukan dengan metode deskriptif dan inferensial menggunakan model regresi logistik biner. Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa satu dari sepuluh remaja wanita tersebut pernah melahirkan dan atau sedang hamil saat survei dilakukan; sebesar 95,2% dari remaja yang sudah pernah melahirkan, memiliki satu anak sisanya sebesar 4,8% memiliki dua atau tiga anak; sebesar 11,1% dari remaja wanita yang pernah kawin, pertama kali kawin pada usia 10 - 14 tahun. Secara statistik, terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara kejadian fertilitas remaja dengan daerah tempat tinggal, pendidikan, status bekerja, serta tingkat kesejahteraan keluarga. Wanita berisiko tinggi mengalami fertilitas pada usia remaja adalah mereka yang tinggal di perdesaan, berpendidikan rendah, tidak bekerja dan berstatus ekonomi rendah. Rekomendasi berdasarkan hasil penelitian adalah akses ke tingkat pendidikan formal yang lebih tinggi bagi remaja wanita, penyediaan pelatihan usaha ekonomi kreatif terutama pada daerah perdesaan, peningkatan pengetahuan kesehatan reproduksi bagi remaja melalui pendidikan. Adolescent fertility is an important issue in terms of health and social care as it relates to the morbidity and mortality of mothers and children. This study aimed to know the factors that influence adolescent fertility in Indonesia. The data used was the result of Indonesian Demography and Health Survey in 2012 with units of analysis included women of childbearing age in the adolescent age group (15 - 19 years. Total

  19. After Indonesia’s Ratification: The ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution and Its Effectiveness As a Regional Environmental Governance Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Heilmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available On 20 January 2015 Indonesia deposited its instrument of ratification for the ASEAN Agreement on Transboundary Haze Pollution with the ASEAN Secretariat, becoming the last ASEAN member state to join the treaty. Haze pollution poses a serious health threat to the people of Indonesia, Singapore and Malaysia, and for decades haze pollution has been a highly contentious issue among ASEAN member states. This article argues that Indonesia’s ratification will not be an immediate game changer. The mechanisms of the agreement are too weak to contribute much to a reduction of haze pollution in the region. The agreement is designed according to the ASEAN way: a non-binding approach that is based on the principles of state sovereignty and non-intervention. This makes it unlikely that the agreement itself will bring about change, even now that all ASEAN member states have ratified it.

  20. Interregional migration flows in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wajdi, N.; van Wissen, L.J.G.; Mulder, C.H.

    2015-01-01

    Population Census and Intercensal Population Survey data permit description of the origin–destination patterns that characterize interregional migration flows in Indonesia. Application of the framework of population redistribution proposed by Long (1985) results in indications of over-urbanization,

  1. Archaeology and Islam in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wood

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Some Indonesian archaeologists, however, have focused on the nation's Islamic past. Uka Tjandrasasmita is one of Indonesia's leading archaeologists and is largely behind the writing of Volume III of the Sejarah Nasional Indonesia, the national history that was the "standard text" for the teaching of history in Indonesian schools during the New Order; the volume he worked on dealt with Indonesia's Islamic history. For many years he held the position of the head of the Islamic Antiquities section of the Indonesian Archaeological Service (Bidang Arkeologi Islam, Pusat Penelitian Kepurbakalaan dan Peninggalan Nasional and carried out survey and excavation work in West, Central and East java. He has published many reports on the Islamic archaeology of Indonesia.Copyright (c 2014 by SDI. All right reserved.DOI: 10.15408/sdi.v15i2.530

  2. Women at risk: Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, I

    1996-01-01

    In Indonesia, women, commercial sex workers, truck drivers, migrant workers, and people who live in port areas easily accessible to tourists and fishermen are particularly at risk of becoming infected with HIV. Recognizing the country's potential vulnerability to the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the government and the World Bank agreed to fund a $35.4 million, 3-year HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) prevention project to strengthen the capacity of government, nongovernmental organizations, and community-based organizations to carry out the basics of HIV/AIDS prevention, extend the sentinel surveillance system, ensure blood safety, launch public education campaigns, educate health workers on universal precautions and safe waste disposal, promote safer sex skills and behavioral change, and test the sensitivity of certain antibiotics to syphilis and gonorrhea. The program will also establish a STD control program and address the economic impact of the disease by improving the livelihood strategies of HIV/AIDS-affected communities.

  3. Migration and Deforestation in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Darmawan, Rivayani; Klasen, Stephan; Nuryartono, Nunung

    2015-01-01

    Indonesia now has the highest deforestation rate in the world, with an average increase of about 47,600 ha per year. As a result, the nation is one of the largest emitters of greenhouse gases in the world and putting its rich biodiversity at risk. Although the literature discussing the political economy of Indonesia commercial's logging is growing, only a small amount focuses on the relationship between migration and deforestation. Migration may contribute to the forest cover change, as migra...

  4. KONSUMSI GULA RUMAHTANGGA DI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Nahdodin, Nahdodin

    2016-01-01

    Sejak tahun 1984 Indonesia menghadapi usaha pelestarian swasembada gula. Dalam hal ini perlu diketahui perilaku konsumsi gula di Indonesia. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk melengkapi informasi perilaku konsumsi gula rumah tangga dengan menaksir elastisitas permintaan gula atas pendapatan dan atas harga dengan memperhatikan gejala "diseconomies of scale" dan "economies of scale", Hasil analisis menunjukkan bahwa elastisitas permintaan alas pendapatan sebesar 0,59, elastisitas permintaan atas ha...

  5. Family planning Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singarimbun, M

    1968-06-01

    The growth of family planning activities in Indonesia in the Postwar period is traced; and future prospects for family planning are assessed. Transmigration projects initiated by the Dutch and supported by President Sukarno after Indonesian independence as a means of decreasing population pressure on the island of Java, are identified as the only official response to the population problem until 1965. In the face of the government's opposition to the idea of birth control as a population control measure, the activities of the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) after its founding in 1957 were limited to advising mothers on spacing of their children for health reasons. Statements made in support of a national family planning program by government officials at a 1967 IPPA Congress and on other occasions are noted. The major components of an approved national family planning program to start in 1969 are described. However, the government's policy as of late 1967 and early 1968 is characterized as one of mainly benevolent encouragement and help to voluntary organizations. The chief impediment to family planning in Indonesia is said to be a lack of motivation and the force of traditional values that favor large families. On the positive side are: 1) Studies showing considerable interest in birth control by the rural population; 2) A long history of traditional birth control practices; 3) The absence of outright opposition by religious groups to the principle of family planning. However, financial costs, the need for the training of personnel, and a general unawareness of the magnitude of the task lying ahead constitute other formidable obstacles.

  6. Integrated care for diabetes - The Singapore Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Qian Yeo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is 12.7% in Singapore. Managing people with diabetes in the community may be needed to reduce unnecessary utilisation of expensive specialist resources and to reduce hospital waiting times for patients with complications. Care Practice The Singapore General Hospital (SGH Delivering on Target (DOT Programme was launched in 2005 to right-site clinically stable diabetic patients from the hospital to private DOT GPs. The Chronic Disease Management Office (CDMO was established and a fully customised DOT information technology (IT system was developed. Three initiatives were implemented: (i Subsidised Drug Delivery Programme, (ii Diagnostic Tests Incentive Programme, and (iii Allied Healthcare Incentive Programme. Discussion Right-siting was enabled through patient incentives that eased the burden of out-of-pocket expenditure. Right Siting Officers (RSOs maintained a general oversight of the patient pathway. The integrated system supported shared care follow-up by enabling DOT GPs to share updates on the patients' health status with the referring specialists. Conclusion A coherent process across all healthcare providers similar to the SGH DOT Programme may facilitate efforts to shift the care for people with diabetes to the community and to provide integrated care. Successful integration may require incentives for institutional partners and patients.

  7. MATHEMATICS EDUCATION IN SINGAPORE - AN INSIDER’S PERSPECTIVE

    OpenAIRE

    Berinderjeet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Singapore’s Education System has evolved over time and so has Mathematics Education in Singapore. The present day School Mathematics Curricula can best be described as one that caters for the needs of every child in school. It is based on a framework that has mathematical problem solving as its primary focus. The developments from 1946 to 2012 that have shaped the present School Mathematics Curricula in Singapore are direct consequences of developments in the Education System of Singapore dur...

  8. Composition of semi-volatile organic compounds in the urban atmosphere of Singapore: influence of biomass burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. He

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available An intensive field study was conducted in the urban atmosphere of Singapore to investigate the composition of organic compounds in both gaseous and particulate phases during the period of August to early November 2006. 17 atmospheric samples were collected. These samples were subjected to accelerated solvent extraction with a mixture of dichloromethane and acetone and separated into functional group fractions for analyses by GC/MS. Over 180 organic compounds belonging to three major fractions (n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, and polar organic compounds (POCs were identified and quantified. The characteristics and abundance of the n-alkanes, PAHs, mono and dicarboxylic acids, methoxylated phenols and other POCs were determined. The composition of these organic compounds fluctuated temporally with most of them being relatively higher in October than those in other months of the sampling period. 3-D backward air mass trajectory analyses together with the carbon preference index (CPI, molecular diagnostic ratios and molecular markers were used to investigate the origin of organic species measured in this study. Based on these diagnostic tools, the increased abundance of atmospheric organic species during October could be attributed to the occurrence of regional smoke haze episodes due to biomass burning in Indonesia. Among the POCs investigated, phthalic acid and cis-pinonic acid showed a strong linear relationship with maximum daily ozone concentration, indicating secondary organic aerosols (SOA to be an important contributor to ambient atmospheric organics over Singapore.

  9. Gastronomy Tourism in Several Neighbor Countries of Indonesia: a Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniasih Sukenti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastronomy tourism, also called culinary tourism or food tourism, is a kind of tourism that provide attractions based on the culinary aspect owned by a country, region, or area. It is not only offers food and beverages as the main objects in its attractions, but also everything related to food activities ranging from food ingredients, preparation, processing, serving, as well as the cultural and local values. A well-managed culinary tourism will be a supportive program in developing and enhancing the tourism sector in a country. The objective of this paper is to describe the profile of gastronomy tourism in several neighbor countries of Indonesia, i.e. Hongkong, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. This brief review is also discussed the potential of Indonesia gastronomy in supporting government’s tourism program. Basically, Indonesia has more enormous potential asset in managing its cultural heritages in term of culinary than its neighbor countries. A well-managed gastronomy tourism plays not only an important role in enhancing the economic sector, but also contribute in preserving the natural and cultural resources. Keywords: gastronomy tourism, culinary tourism, food tourism.

  10. Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) for Sentiment Analysis Toward Tourism Review in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, IR; Kusumaningrum, R.

    2017-01-01

    The tourism industry is one of foreign exchange sector, which has considerable potential development in Indonesia. Compared to other Southeast Asia countries such as Malaysia with 18 million tourists and Singapore 20 million tourists, Indonesia which is the largest Southeast Asia’s country have failed to attract higher tourist numbers compared to its regional peers. Indonesia only managed to attract 8,8 million foreign tourists in 2013, with the value of foreign tourists each year which is likely to decrease. Apart from the infrastructure problems, marketing and managing also form of obstacles for tourism growth. An evaluation and self-analysis should be done by the stakeholder to respond toward this problem and capture opportunities that related to tourism satisfaction from tourists review. Recently, one of technology to answer this problem only relying on the subjective of statistical data which collected by voting or grading from user randomly. So the result is still not to be accountable. Thus, we proposed sentiment analysis with probabilistic topic model using Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) method to be applied for reading general tendency from tourist review into certain topics that can be classified toward positive and negative sentiment.

  11. Singapore Technologies Electronics——Committed to Growth in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ About ST Electronics Headquartered in Singapore, ST Electronics has almost 40 years of experience providing electronics, communications and ICT (information communications technologies) solutions to governments and commercial enterprises worldwide.

  12. Singapore Technologies Electronics——Committed to Growth in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ About ST Electronics Headquartered in Singapore,ST Electronics has almost 40 years of experience providing electronics,communications,ICT(Information Communications Technologies)and IT(Information Technologies)solutions to governments and commercial enterorises worldwide.

  13. Singapore Technologies Electronics——Committed to Growth in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ About ST Electronics Headquartered in Singapore,ST Electronics has almost 40 years of experience providing electronics,communications and ICT(information communications technologies)solutions to governments and commercial enterprises worldwide.

  14. Singapore Technologies Electronics——Committed to Growth in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ About ST Electronics Headquartered in Singapore,ST Electronics has almost 40 years of experience providing electronics,communications and ICT (information communications technologies) solutions to governments and commercial enterprises worldwide.

  15. Jianghan PDC Bits Open Good Market in Singapore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tongliang

    1995-01-01

    @@ The PDC bits produced by PDC Division,Jianghan Drill Bit Plant won good reputation,because of its good quality and appearance in 94 South-east Asia Offshore Petroleum Engineering Product Exhibition held by Singapore International Exhibition Center.

  16. Photosymbiotic ascidians in Singapore: turbid waters may reduce living space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Wei Su

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The photosymbiotic ascidian fauna at Changi Beach, Pulau Semakau, Sentosa and St. John’s Island, Singapore were surveyed. A total of five species, Diplosoma simile, Lissoclinum bistratum, L. punctatum, L. timorense and Trididemnum cyclops, were recorded, with L. timorense and T. cyclops being newly recorded in Singapore. However, no photosymbiotic species were found at Changi Beach probably due to the polluted waters in the region. Coastal development has caused Singapore waters to become turbid, leading to decrease in suitable habitats for photosymbiotic ascidians. Clean waters in Pulau Semakau probably provide a better environment for the growth of photosymbiotic ascidians and this area has a greater variety of these ascidians than the other areas in Singapore. Each of the five species has also been recorded in the Ryukyu Archipelago (Japan and three species (Diplosoma simile, Lissoclinum bistratum and Trididemnum cyclops have also been recorded in Taiwan.

  17. MATHEMATICS EDUCATION IN SINGAPORE - AN INSIDER’S PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berinderjeet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Singapore’s Education System has evolved over time and so has Mathematics Education in Singapore. The present day School Mathematics Curricula can best be described as one that caters for the needs of every child in school. It is based on a framework that has mathematical problem solving as its primary focus. The developments from 1946 to 2012 that have shaped the present School Mathematics Curricula in Singapore are direct consequences of developments in the Education System of Singapore during the same period. The curriculum, teachers, leaners and the learning environment may be said to contribute towards Singapore’s performance in international benchmark studies such as TIMSS and PISA.Keywords: Mathematics Education, Singapore, Differentiated Curriculum, TIMSS, PISA DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.22342/jme.5.1.1444.1-16

  18. Bipalium engeli n. sp., a terrestrial triclad from Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, den C.

    1968-01-01

    A new species of the genus Bipalium, B. engeli, is described from secondary forest in Singapore. It is allied to B. rauchi von Graff, 1899, from the same area, but differs markedly in its colour pattern.

  19. Adolescent health in Asia: insights from Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jean-Yin; Rajasegaran, Kumudhini

    2016-08-01

    The introduction of adolescent medicine as a medical subspecialty in Singapore was a welcome in an evolving health care system that is unique in terms of both efficiency, in financing and the results achieved in community health outcomes. The Ministry of Health (MOH) already recognized the need to accommodate the health care concerns related to adolescent psychosocial health risk behaviors and an increased prevalence of young people living with chronic illness. The challenge for the pioneer team of physicians trained in adolescent medicine was to develop and sustain a model of care that integrated (i) core clinical services that include quality measures of care to adolescents; (ii) professional development and capacity building needing an expansive teaching agenda at every level of health education; (iii) strong inter-sectorial collaborations within hospital and community partners; and (iv) robust research and evaluation strategies that keep clinical practice relevant and evidence based.

  20. DESENTRALISASI PENGELUARAN DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Herni Rochana

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the implementation of Law 22/1999 and Law 25/1999 of 2001, has been an increase in the implementation of fiscal decentralization with a phenomenon called Big Bang. The study was conducted to determine the degree of decentralization of expenditure covering the period before and after the implementation of regional autonomy. The research data is a panel data drawn from 30 provinces between 1994 to 2007. The results showed that in Indonesia there has been a significant increase in expenditure decentralization since 2001. Significant increases occurred mainly on the expenditure side, especially the decentralization of authority be spending more than doubled from the previous. On a national scale, the degree of decentralization of authority expenditure increased from 10.48% in the year 2000 to 25.45% in 2001. And the average for each province, the degree of decentralization of spending authority increased from 0.40% in 2000 to 0, 85% in 2001DOI: 10.15408/sjie.v2i2.2423

  1. Educational leadership in Singapore: Tight coupling, sustainability, scalability, and succession

    OpenAIRE

    Dimmock, C; Tan, CY

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: While Singapore's outstanding educational achievements are well known worldwide, there is a disproportionate paucity of literature on school leadership practices that contribute to and support pedagogical initiatives that - along with socio-cultural factors - are normally considered responsible for its educational success. The aim of this paper is to explicate system-wide school leadership factors that contribute to Singapore's educational success. Design/methodology/approach: The pa...

  2. Mathematics Education in Singapore – An Insider’s Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Berinderjeet Kaur

    2014-01-01

    Singapore’s Education System has evolved over time and so has Mathematics Education in Singapore. The present day School Mathematics Curricula can best be described as one that caters for the needs of every child in school. It is based on a framework that has mathematical problem solving as its primary focus. The developments from 1946 to 2012 that have shaped the present School Mathematics Curricula in Singapore are direct consequences of developments in the Education System of Singapo...

  3. The Willingness to Spend on Healthcare: Evidence from Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Lydia L. Gan; Frederick, James R.

    2010-01-01

    For the past few decades, the household healthcare expenditures have experienced a phenomenal growth in Singapore. This paper seeks to identify the underlying socio-economic factors that contribute towards this phenomenon by employing time series data to examine the household willingness to spend on healthcare from 1970 to 2006. The results from our log-linear regression show that the willingness to spend on healthcare is positively related to the proportion of Singapore's population who are ...

  4. Reading, the Library, and the Elderly: A Singapore Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyt, Brendan; Ann, Ho Swee

    2011-01-01

    Singapore is now one of the fastest aging societies in the world. By 2030 those over 65 years old are expected to number 1.41m strong, 26.8 percent of the country's entire population. Given these numbers, it is not surprising that aging is a key concern in Singapore. This article reports on a qualitative study of 32 individuals over the age of 55…

  5. Chinese temples and transnational networks: Hokkien communities in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Hue, G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is intended as an overview of different categories of Chinese temples and other institutions in Singapore and their transnational networks, in particularly on Hokkien communiities in Singapore. It focusing on some preliminary research findings related to this Hokkien communities and their religious networks, examines the Minnan (South Fujian) Protector Gods (Regional or Village temple Main Gods) and the Minnan Taoist Altars, as well as their religious networks connecting Fujian, Ch...

  6. The Growth Potential of Debit Cards in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Heng, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    This paper starts by examining the evolution of the Singapore payments system from a historical perspective by reviewing the institutional evolution, as well as the development and adoption of some of the newest payment instruments. Two major trends in recent Singapore payment history are revealed, i.e. cash and check payments are being displaced by credit and debit card and other electronic mode of payments and usage of debit cards is seeing significant growth. From the literature revie...

  7. Singapore Airlines Unveils the World's Best Flying Experience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recently, Singapore Airlines launched its latest suite of cabin products designed to deliver the most luxurious and stylish travel experiences. The suite of products and services include new Singapore Airlines First, Business and Economy Class seats,the next generation Kris World inflight entertainment system and an enhanced service delivery. These next generation products will set new standards of excellence for premium air travel, and reinforce the Airline's product leadership in the airline industry.

  8. STRENGTHENING BIOTECHNOLOGY RESEARCH IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sastrapradja

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The wave of biotechnology promises has struck not only the developed countries but the developing countries as well. The scientific community in Indonesia is aware of the opportunities and is eager to take an active part in this particular endeavour. Meanwhile resources are required to welcoming the biotech­nology era. The need of trained manpower, appropriate infrastructure and equipment, operational and maintenance costs requires serious consideration if a unit or a laboratory is expected to be functional in biotechnology. There is a good opportunity of applying biotechnology in the field of agriculture and industry considering the availability of biological resources in Indonesia. This paper outlines what have been done so far, the difficulties encountered and the efforts made to strengthening biotechnology research in Indonesia.

  9. DETERMINAN TABUNGAN MUDHARABAH DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roikhan Moch Aziz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research to determine how the influence of macro variables were Profit Sharing Ratio (equivalent rate, Inflation, GDP, and SWBI against Mudharabah Savings at Islamic Banking in Indonesia. The data used in this research were data time series by using multiple regressions and analysis by Ordinary Least Squares. The results showed that simultaneously independent variables (Profit Sharing ratio, Inflation, GDP, and SWBI have significant influence the dependent variable (MudharabaH Savings with probability 0.000000. End that partially independent variables (Inflation with probability 0.0013, GDP with probability 0.0000, and SWBI with probability 0.0000 have positively influence and significantly to dependent variable (Mudharabah Savings in the Islamic Banking of Indonesia. While between the variable independent (Profit Sharing ratio to dependent variable (Mudharabah Savings have not significantly with probability 0.2040, in the Islamic Banking of IndonesiaDOI: 10.15408/sjie.v2i2.2425

  10. Perancangan Aplikasi Web Dinamis Pada Bank Indonesia Kantpr Cabang Medan

    OpenAIRE

    Saragih, Yeni F.

    2011-01-01

    Bank Indonesia merupakan satu-satunya bank sentral di Indonesia yang menangani berbagai kegiatan keuangan dan perbankan. Selain itu Bank Indonesia juga mendukung dan memberikan andil dalam menjalankan roda perekonomian di Indonesia. Karena pengaruhnya yang besar dalam roda perekonomian Indonesia maka lembaga ini telah meluncurkan sebuah web dinamis yang telah dipublikasikan oleh pimpinan Bank Indonesia di pusat (Jakarta). Website tersebut menyajikan berbagai informasi Bank Indonesia secara um...

  11. Probabilitas Teroris Perempuan di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Endy Saputro

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian police through Densus 88 have analyzed and predicted the strategy of terrorism in Indonesia, which was important to note that those Indonesian terrorist are males. In short, the Indonesian terrorists need to set up their strategy of attack. Will the Indonesian terrorists build a new strategy with taking involve woman within the strategy? This paper aims to understand the involvement of women terrorist in some suicide actions in global context. To sum up, this paper argues that the emergence of women terrorist in Indonesia are possible, yet it requires the precedence conditions of world women terrorists in global contexts.

  12. Indonesia country report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murni Soedyartomo Soentono, Tri [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia - Batan, Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals Development Centre, Pasar Jum' at, Cinere Raya, 12570 Jakarta (Indonesia)

    2008-07-01

    Several nuclear research are currently operation in Serpong, Jakarta, Bandung and Yogyakarta; these facilities has been in operation step wisely and having strong link with various universities and laboratories within the country (30 MW in Serpong, 2 MW in Bandung, Cyclotron CS-30 Serpong, Accelerator Yogyakarta, Irradiator Co-60). Public Acceptance: Further more the routine activities of the public information by WiN regarding the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, especially to the immediate environment of the NPP candidate site are indeed of important steps. Future of nuclear power: Since 1990's, Indonesia planned to build NPP station in Jepara to anticipate future energy crisis. Indonesia National Energy Policy has four main objectives: - Securing the continuity of energy supply for domestic use at price affordable to the public, - Enhancing the life quality of the people, - Stimulating economic growth, and, - Reserving an adequate supply of oil and gas for expert to provide source of foreign exchange to fund the national development program. Nuclear Waste Management Policy: Law no 10/1997 on nuclear power became the basic policy in management of radioactive waste The only national agency dealing with radioactive substances, BATAN possesses all data and information concerning the use of nuclear power. Radioactive waste management is particularly earmarked for maximum protection of living creatures, the environment and its ecosystems. In order to guarantee maximum safety and protection, all parties involved in the acquisition of radioactive materials should abide by the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle. In order to achieve radioactive waste management that complies with the principle of sustainable development, technological applications should be technically and economically viable for maximum protection of the environment and safety from any potential nuclear hazards, now and in future. The application must also be accepted by the community

  13. Soil organic carbon distribution in roadside soils of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhadip; Scharenbroch, Bryant C; Ow, Lai Fern

    2016-12-01

    Soil is the largest pool of organic carbon in terrestrial systems and plays a key role in carbon cycle. Global population living in urban areas are increasing substantially; however, the effects of urbanization on soil carbon storage and distribution are largely unknown. Here, we characterized the soil organic carbon (SOC) in roadside soils across the city-state of Singapore. We tested three hypotheses that SOC contents (concentration and density) in Singapore would be positively related to aboveground tree biomass, soil microbial biomass and land-use patterns. Overall mean SOC concentrations and densities (0-100 cm) of Singapore's roadside soils were 29 g kg(-1) (4-106 g kg(-1)) and 11 kg m(-2) (1.1-42.5 kg m(-2)) with median values of 26 g kg(-1) and 10 kg m(-2), respectively. There was significantly higher concentration of organic carbon (10.3 g kg(-1)) in the top 0-30 cm soil depth compared to the deeper (30-50 cm, and 50-100 cm) soil depths. Singapore's roadside soils represent 4% of Singapore's land, but store 2.9 million Mg C (estimated range of 0.3-11 million Mg C). This amount of SOC is equivalent to 25% of annual anthropogenic C emissions in Singapore. Soil organic C contents in Singapore's soils were not related to aboveground vegetation or soil microbial biomass, whereas land-use patterns to best explain variance in SOC in Singapore's roadside soils. We found SOC in Singapore's roadside soils to be inversely related to urbanization. We conclude that high SOC in Singapore roadside soils are probably due to management, such as specifications of high quality top-soil, high use of irrigation and fertilization and also due to an optimal climate promoting rapid growth and biological activity.

  14. Phylogeography of the sponge Suberites diversicolor in Indonesia: insights into the evolution of marine lake populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leontine E Becking

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple independently derived populations in landlocked marine lakes provides an opportunity for fundamental research into the role of isolation in population divergence and speciation in marine taxa. Marine lakes are landlocked water bodies that maintain a marine character through narrow submarine connections to the sea and could be regarded as the marine equivalents of terrestrial islands. The sponge Suberites diversicolor (Porifera: Demospongiae: Suberitidae is typical of marine lake habitats in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Four molecular markers (two mitochondrial and two nuclear were employed to study genetic structure of populations within and between marine lakes in Indonesia and three coastal locations in Indonesia, Singapore and Australia. Within populations of S. diversicolor two strongly divergent lineages (A & B (COI: p = 0.4% and ITS: p = 7.3% were found, that may constitute cryptic species. Lineage A only occurred in Kakaban lake (East Kalimantan, while lineage B was present in all sampled populations. Within lineage B, we found low levels of genetic diversity in lakes, though there was spatial genetic population structuring. The Australian population is genetically differentiated from the Indonesian populations. Within Indonesia we did not record an East-West barrier, which has frequently been reported for other marine invertebrates. Kakaban lake is the largest and most isolated marine lake in Indonesia and contains the highest genetic diversity with genetic variants not observed elsewhere. Kakaban lake may be an area where multiple putative refugia populations have come into secondary contact, resulting in high levels of genetic diversity and a high number of endemic species.

  15. The future of urbanisation in developing countries. The case of Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgee, T

    1994-02-01

    Indonesia was used as an example of a country that, in the 1960s, was beset with persistent poverty, a large informal sector, and agricultural involution. Indonesia's population increased to more than 180 million by 1990; the population was unevenly distributed and was concentrated on the island of Java. A proposed scenario for Indonesia in 2020 would result in the development of one of the largest and most prosperous newly industrialized countries in Asia. Gross domestic product (GDP) would grow at about 6% annually with the advent of a free trading block with a population of about 650 million. Growth would be mainly in the business services sector in urban areas concurrent with growth in lower order services such as food processing and vending, sports, and entertainment. Indonesian industrial markets would be regional and would include exports of oil, gas, timber, and mineral resources. Rice would still be government subsidized, as in Japan. Farmers would cultivate rice part-time and earned most of their income from other sources. Agriculture would continue to decline as a percentage of GDP and would engage only 20% of the labor force. The informal sector would decrease in size, while household income and personal consumption would increase. Housing would be of three types: low-income, low-rise, walk-up apartments; middle-income houses in the suburbs; and high-income, single-family houses in large developments at the edge of cities or high rises in the city core. Following this scenario, Indonesia would have developed a very efficient transportation system with a container port and ferries connecting it with Thailand, Singapore, and even China. Information would flow readily over interactive television and telecommunications. Air transport would be upgraded. Local governments would be involved with their own development of financing and national transfers. The one child family size would be introduced, and family size would decline to 3.5. The American lifestyle

  16. Smoke over Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    At least once a year for a period lasting from a week to several months, northern Sumatra is obscured by smoke and haze produced by agricultural burning and forest fires. These data products from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer document the presence of airborne particulates on March 13, 2002, during Terra orbit 11880. On the left is an image acquired by MISR's 70-degree backward-viewing camera. On the right is a map of aerosol optical depth, a measure of the abundance of atmospheric particulates. This product utilized a test version of the MISR retrieval that incorporates an experimental set of aerosol mixtures. The haze has completely obscured northeastern Sumatra and part of the Strait of Malacca, which separates Sumatra and the Malaysian Peninsula. A northward gradient is apparent as the haze dissipates in the direction of the Malaysian landmass. Each panel covers an area of about 760 kilometers x 400 kilometers.Haze conditions had posed a health concern during late February (when schools in some parts of North Sumatra were closed), and worsened considerably in the first two weeks of March. By mid-March, local meteorology officials asked residents of North Sumatra's provincial capital, Medan, to minimize their outdoor activities and wear protective masks. Poor visibility at Medan airport forced a passenger plane to divert to Malaysia on March 14, and visibility reportedly ranged between 100 and 600 meters in some coastal towns southeast of Medan.The number and severity of this year's fires was exacerbated by dry weather conditions associated with the onset of a weak to moderate El Nino. The governments of Indonesia, Malaysia, and Brunei have agreed to ban open burning in plantation and forest areas. The enforcement of such fire bans, however, has proven to be an extremely challenging task.MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by

  17. The tick Ixodes granulatus infests Rattus rattus populating a small island offshore of Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Paperna I.

    2006-01-01

    The ixodid tick Ixodes granulosus Supino 1897 was found infesting Rattus rattus in Semakau island, one of the small offshore islands fringing Singapore to the south. None of the examined R. rattus from the other islands fringing Singapore, or from Singapore island were found infested. Ixodes granulatus occurs, however, on Singapore island on Rattus annandalei, resident of undisturbed forested habitats. We speculate that invading black rats in Semakau replaced autochthonous sylvatic rodent pop...

  18. The fast-running flies (Diptera, Hybotidae, Tachydromiinae) of Singapore and adjacent regions

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Grootaert; Shamshev, Igor V.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive introduction to the flies of the subfamily Tachydromiinae (Hybotidae) of Singapore. The monograph summarizes all publications on the Tachydromiinae of Singapore and includes new data resulting from mass-trapping surveys made in Singapore during the last six years. A few samples from Malaysia (Johor province, Pulau Tioman and Langkawi) have been also included in this study. In Singapore the Tachydromiinae are the most diverse group of Empidoidea (except Dolichop...

  19. Energy policy review of Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-11-21

    The Republic of Indonesia is the world's fourth most populous nation and a developing economy in transition. It is now consolidating its democratic government and implementing governance and financial reforms. After the Asian financial crisis of 1997-99, Indonesia's economy has returned to a strong and stable 5-6% annual growth. Over recent decades, its resource wealth, openness to trade and investment, and a strategically favourable location in East Asia have made Indonesia a key global exporter of oil, gas, and coal. However, Indonesia now faces the serious challenge of fast-rising domestic energy demand with declining oil and gas production. The country's energy policy makers are looking closely at domestic energy requirements and best policies to meet these needs. This includes moving prices towards international parity, improving the energy sector investment climate, and developing electricity generation capacity. While some very difficult decisions have been made over recent years, many challenges remain. This study assesses the country's major energy issues. The study was conducted by a team of IEA member country specialists - an approach which has also been used for national and sectoral reviews of other non-IEA countries, including Angola, China, India, Russia, and Ukraine, as well as the Western Balkan region. The Review offers an analysis of Indonesia's energy sector, with findings and recommendations that draw on experience in IEA member countries. Six areas are suggested for priority attention, including progressive reduction in fuel and electricity subsidies, better implementation of policy, improving clarity of the investment framework, helping the energy regulators do their job more effectively, and harnessing a sustainable development agenda particularly renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  20. Disincentives to fertility: the Singapore program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, P

    1974-01-01

    Singapore's first 5-year national family planning program saw a dramatic drop in all fertility rates including a drop in the crude birthrate from 28.6 per thousand in 1966 to 22.1 in 1970. However, the 1970 figure represents a slight increase over the preceding year, and the government, in its new plan begun in 1972, has undertaken several measures to significantly reduce fertility among younger families and "hard-core" risisters. The aim is a crude birthrate of 18/1000 by 1975. In addition to widespread publicity and motivational campaigns, tough new measures were introduced to discourage couples from having more than 2 children. These include: 1) reduction of future income tax relief from 5 to the first 3 children: 2) reduction in paid maternity leave from 3 to 2 confinements; 3) lower priority of allocation of government apartments to families of 3 or more children; and 4) increase in accouchement fees in government hospitals. The measures are largely regressive in nature, affecting lower income families who would feel the economic pinch the most. Some politicians have considered the measures too drastic.

  1. Trends in Income Disparity and Equality Enhancing (?) Education Policies in the Development Stages of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhaya, P.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the trends in income diversity in Singapore at the total and disaggregated level using Labour Force Survey data. The income inequality in Singapore is found to be significantly high. One reason is the selective migration policy of the government of Singapore. The government has made conscious efforts to bring equality in…

  2. 77 FR 39320 - Suggestions for Environmental Cooperation Pursuant to the United States-Singapore Memorandum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... Suggestions for Environmental Cooperation Pursuant to the United States-Singapore Memorandum of Intent on... regarding the 2013-2014 United States--Singapore Plan of Action for Environmental Cooperation. SUMMARY: The... of Action for implementing the U.S.-Singapore Memorandum of Intent on Cooperation in...

  3. 75 FR 28059 - Actual Effects of the Free Trade Agreements With Chile, Australia, and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... COMMISSION Actual Effects of the Free Trade Agreements With Chile, Australia, and Singapore AGENCY: United... Singapore. DATES: July 15, 2010: Deadline for filing written submissions. December 13, 2010: Transmittal of...) concluded with Chile, Singapore, and Australia. In its report the Commission will-- (1) With respect to...

  4. 19 CFR 10.570 - Goods re-entered after repair or alteration in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Singapore. 10.570 Section 10.570 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Goods Returned After Repair Or Alteration § 10.570 Goods re-entered after repair or alteration in Singapore. (a) General. This section sets forth the rules which apply...

  5. Towards Evidence-Based Initial Teacher Education in Singapore: A Review of Current Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Ee-Ling; Hui, Chenri; Taylor, Peter G.; Ng, Pak Tee

    2012-01-01

    Initial teacher education (ITE) in Singapore is shifting towards evidence-based practice. Despite a clear policy orientation, ITE in Singapore has not yet produced the evidence base that it is anticipating. This paper presents an analytical review of previous research into ITE in Singapore and makes comparisons to the larger international context.…

  6. Singapore Math®. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report. Updated December 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report on "Singapore Math®" updates the 2009 WWC review of the curriculum to include seven new studies. Despite the additional research, no studies meet WWC design standards and therefore, no conclusions can be made about the effectiveness of "Singapore Math®." [For the 2009 report, "Singapore Math," see…

  7. Mathematics Education in Singapore – An Insider’s Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berinderjeet Kaur

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Singapore’s Education System has evolved over time and so has Mathematics Education in Singapore. The present day School Mathematics Curricula can best be described as one that caters for the needs of every child in school. It is based on a framework that has mathematical problem solving as its primary focus. The developments from 1946 to 2012 that have shaped the present School Mathematics Curricula in Singapore are direct consequences of developments in the Education System of Singapore during the same period. The curriculum, teachers, leaners and the learning environment may be said to contribute towards Singapore’s performance in international benchmark studies such as TIMSS and PISA.

  8. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW IN INDONESIA AFTER 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Selvie Sinaga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the major changes of intellectual property condition in Indonesia after 2001. In that year, Indonesia, which has become a member of the Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS since 1994, was ready to meet its commitment under TRIPS. To do so, Indonesiahas made changes in the areas of legislation, administration, court proceedings, and law enforcement. The paper also discusses problematic issues surrounded the implementation of such changes in Indonesia. Tulisan ini melihat kembali perubahan-perubahan besar dalam bidang hak kekayaan intelektual di Indonesia setelah tahun 2001. Pada tahun tersebut, Indonesia, yang telah menjadi anggota Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS sejak 1994, siap untuk memenuhi komitmennya dalam TRIPS. Untuk memenuhi komitmen tersebut, Indonesia telah membuat perubahan-perubahan dalam bidang legislatif, administratif, tata cara pengadilan dan penegakan hukum. Tulisan ini juga membahas permasalahan di seputar pelaksanaan perubahan-perubahan tersebut.

  9. M-Commerce In Indonesia: Problems & Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suyoto Indonesia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a preliminary observation of the latest m-Commerce problems and prospects in Indonesia. Every year the Indonesian mobile market has grown, from 175.1 million subscribers in 2009 to 222.7 million in 2010 and then to more than 240 million subscribers by 2011. However, the fact is that the m-Commerce adoption in Indonesia has still been low and slow. Mobile commerce or commonly abbreviated as m-Commerce is still considered as something new in Indonesia. The purposes of this paper are to describe the m-Commerce development trends in Indonesia, to identify problems faced by Indonesia, to identify its prospects in Indonesia, and to propose alternative solutions to the problems that have been identified. This paper attempts to help business managers to understand the problems of m-Commerce and to be capitalize on the advantages of m-Commerce.

  10. Area Handbook Series: Indonesia: A Country Study,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    1719-26) as king, and further concessions were made to the VOC. 19 SI- n ll l l llfl Indonesia : A Country Study The Third Javanese War of Succession...economic prosperity (anti-Chinese sentiment was a major appeal), the organization also drew on traditional Javanese 35 Indonesia : A Country Study...popu- lation spoke the language at home. In Javanese areas, only 1 to 5 percent of the people spoke Bahasa Indonesia in the home. Na- tionwide

  11. Crisis prevention and management during SARS outbreak, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Stella R; Hin-Peng, Lee

    2004-02-01

    We discuss crisis prevention and management during the first 3 months of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Singapore. Four public health issues were considered: prevention measures, self-health evaluation, SARS knowledge, and appraisal of crisis management. We conducted telephone interviews with a representative sample of 1,201 adults, > or = 21 years of age. We found that sex, age, and attitude (anxiety and perception of open communication with authorities) were associated with practicing preventive measures. Analysis of Singapore's outbreak improves our understanding of the social dimensions of infectious disease outbreaks.

  12. Madrasah in Singapore: Tradition and modernity in religious education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Steiner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The educational policies of the Singapore government are driven by the needs of a modern knowledge-based society and economic development, with the state advocating modernity while the Muslim minority, arguably, appeared to be caught in tradition and holding on to “old fashioned” education. However, whether the new attempts at modernizing madrasah education driven by the state will succeed remains to be seen, as earlier  attempts of reformation driven by the Muslim community, or parts thereof, have been rather unsuccessful. This paper analyses the discourse between tradition and modernity of Islamic religious education in Singapore.

  13. Gravitraps for management of dengue clusters in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Caleb; Vythilingam, Indra; Chong, Chee-Seng; Abdul Razak, Muhammad Aliff; Tan, Cheong-Huat; Liew, Christina; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2013-05-01

    Although Singapore has an intensive dengue control program, dengue remains endemic with regular outbreaks. We report development and use of a novel adult oviposition trap, the Gravitrap, in managing dengue cluster areas. The Gravitrap is a simple, hay infusion-filled cylindrical trap with a sticky inner surface to serve as an oviposition site for gravid female Aedes mosquitoes. Wire gauze fitted above the water level minimizes the risk of it being an unwanted breeding habitat. The Gravitrap was deployed in 11 dengue cluster areas throughout Singapore. Aedes aegypti was the predominant mosquito caught in the trap and some (5.73%) were found to be positive for dengue virus.

  14. The epidemiology of lung cancer in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H P

    1985-07-01

    Lung cancer has reached epidemic proportions in all developed countries and many of the urban centres of the developing world. It is the most frequent cancer site in Singapore, accounting for 23.4% (623 cases) of all cancer deaths and nearly 5% of all causes in 1982. Based on incidence data for 1968-1977, among males, there was an average of about 330 cases diagnosed each year, giving an annual incidence rate of 30.7 per 100,000 and a proportion of 21% against all sites. Among females, there was an average of about 115 cases, with the incidence rate at 11.2 and the proportion 10.3% (ranking third behind breast and cervix). The risks among the Chinese were more than double those of the other ethnic groups. The Hokkien (73.2 per 100,000) and Teochew (67.0) males had one of the highest age-standardized incidence rates in the world. Most of the cases were of the epidermoid carcinoma type. Among the females, the Cantonese (28.5) had about double the risks compared to the other dialect groups, and the rate was among the highest in the world. Adenocarcinomas accounted for almost 50% of the cases. The relevant host and environmental factors associated with lung cancer are discussed. Without doubt, cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor. The ultimate solution to this problem must lie in an effective smoking control programme, besides much-needed improvements in early diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

  15. Deep neck abscesses: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yan Qing; Kanagalingam, Jeevendra

    2011-04-01

    This study aims to review our experience with deep neck abscesses, identify key trends, and improve the management of this condition. This is a retrospective chart review of patients diagnosed with deep neck abscesses in the Department of ENT (Otorhinolaryngology) at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore between 2004 and 2009. Patient demographics, etiology, bacteriology, systemic disease, radiology, treatment, complications, duration of hospitalization, and outcomes were reviewed. 131 patients were included (64.9% male, 35.1% female) with a median age of 51.0 years. 54 (41.2%) patients had diabetes mellitus. The parapharyngeal space (23.7%) was the most commonly involved space. Odontogenic and upper airway infections were the leading causes of deep neck abscesses (28.0% each). Klebsiella pneumoniae (27.1%) was the most commonly cultured organism in this study and among the diabetic patients (50.0%). 108 (82.4%) patients underwent surgical drainage. 42 patients suffered complications. All 19 patients, who had upper airway obstruction, had either a tracheostomy or intubation. Patients with multi-space abscesses, diabetes mellitus, and complications had prolonged hospitalizations. Old age and diabetes are risk factors for developing deep neck abscesses and their sequelae. The empiric choice of antibiotics should recognize that a dental source is likely, and that Klebsiella is most common in diabetics. Surgical drainage and adequate antibiotic coverage remains the cornerstone of treatment of deep neck abscesses. Therapeutic needle aspiration may successfully replace surgical drainage, if the abscesses are small and no complications are imminent. Airway obstruction should be anticipated in multi-space and floor of mouth abscesses.

  16. Perlakuan Akuntansi Karbon di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Meliana Taurisianti

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to understand the implementation of accounting for carbon, about how it can be measured, recognized, recorded, presentedand disclosed based on Pernyataan Standar Akuntansi (PSAK 19, 23, 32 and 57, also the impact toward the financial ratios. The object of this study is the financial statements of an integrated timber company in Indonesia. This study has analyzed the enables account to be used to record accounting for carbon, also analyzed the impact of implementation of accounting for carbon toward the financial ratios. The results of this study are support the previous study, which intangible asset can be recognized based on PSAK 19, whereas asset and contingent liabilities can be recognized based on PSAK 57. This study also fit out the previous study, which a company can recognize its expense and other income based on PSAK 19, 23 and 32 as a basis for forestry accounting in Indonesia.

  17. Karakteristik morfologi teritip spons Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulistiono

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian teritip spons Indonesia jarang dilakukan sejak kelompok ini pertama kali dideskripsikan hingga saat ini. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengkaji karakter morfologi teritip spons Indonesia dan untuk mengkaji hubungan spesies spesifik teritip terhadap spons. Pengambilan sampel pada penelitian ini dilaksanakan sejak Oktober sampai Desember 2012 di tiga lokasi yaitu Pulau Weh, Kepulauan Seribu, dan Kepulauan Karimunjawa. Metode penelitian menggunakan metode survei dan titik pengambilan sampel dipilih berdasarkan keberadaan spons. Sampel diamati menggunakan mikroskop stereo dan mikroskop elektron kemudian diidentifikasi berdasarkan deskripsi Darwin (1854, Pilsbry (1916, Martin dan Davis (2001, dan Kolbasov (1993. Hasil penelitian didapatkan empat spesies teritip spons yaitu Acasta cyathus, A. fenestrata, Euacasta dofleini, dan Membranobalanus longirostrum. Terdapat hubungan spesies spesifik antara teritip dan spons inang yaitu antara teritip E. dofleini dan spons Haliclona sp. dan antara teritip M. longirostrum dan spons Suberites sp.

  18. KERAGAAN KOPI PASAR DOMESTIK INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufani Sagita

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Coffee has been becoming one of priority commodity of Indonesia since this country also as one of main producer in the world. However, Indonesia got hardly in maintaining world position due to increasing of production and capacity of other country such as in Vietnam and Brazil. Therefore, it is necessary to recognize situation of demand and supply for coffee commodity in domestic scope to understand further the bargaining position level. Various variable such as production, productivity,demand, supply, domestic price, export and import of coffe are considered to be performance variables for domestic market. This research used SAS (Statistical Analysis System tool by using times series data. The result of the analysis shown that the performance of Indonesian coffee trading is affected by the supply, demand and price of Indonesian coffee.

  19. CESTODES IN MAN IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri S. Margono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cestodes are found endemic in certain areas of Indonesia. The most common cestodes found are Taenia saginata and Taenia solium. Eggs of Taenia are found in stool samples during surveys in Irian Jaya (2-9 %, Nusa Tenggara Timur (7 %, Bali and resettlement areas of people from Bali (0,4 - 3,3%. Interviews, with questions concerning expelled segments, recovered a prevalence of 9,5 % in inhabitants of the island of Samosir (North Sumatra and 2 % in the people of 6 villages in Abiansemal (Bali. Cases are also reported from Jakarta. Hymenolepis nana (0,2 -1% and Hymenolepis diminuta (0,4 % are rarely found in surveys. A case of hyperinfection with H. nana has been reported in Jakarta in 1968. Occasionally there are reports of infections with Dipylidium caninum, Raillietina madagascariensis, Bertiella studeri and sparganum. Report on treatment of taeniasis in Indonesia mentioned the use of atabrine, mebendazole, bithionol and praziquantel with different results.

  20. INDONESIA: FROM PLURALISM TO MULTICULTURALISM

    OpenAIRE

    Wasino Wasino

    2013-01-01

    Indonesia was not a new entity when started to become national country. It was called a continuation of the history of the Dutch East Indies. The people lived under western colonial was a pluralistic society, people separated by social class, ethnicity, religion, race and inter-group. Between the authorities and the people separated along racial lines. In addition there was the separation of ethnic groups associated with the economic, educational and social relations. After Indonesian indepen...

  1. Transmigration and accumulation in Indonesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez Sáinz, Juan Pablo

    1980-01-01

    ILO pub-wep pub. Working paper tracing the evolution of migration policy involving state intervention to reduce problems of overpopulation and employment in Indonesia - describes historical internal migration from java and bali to the outer islands during colonialism and after to up 1979, and argues that migration policy based on exploitation of surplus labour supply for reasons of capitalism has ended in failure. References and statistical tables.

  2. Rethinking Language Education in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maslihatul Umami Umami

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Language education in Indonesia may be discussed by over viewing the nature of the three language categories in the country: Indonesian language, indigenous languages, and foreign languages. From the picture of how the three groups of languages work and function, the problem raised in this paper is based on two fundamental assumptions. Language education in this multilingual and multicultural country is not done on the context of literacy, on the one hand, and it is not yet considered important in comparison with that of the subjects related to basic science and technology, on the other. After reviewing a number of models of bilingual education and comparing them with what has been done in Indonesia, a preferred model will be offered. Finally, it will also be suggested that language education in Indonesia should be associated with literacy development in a wider sense. Furthermore, meanwhile language education should be given an adequate room; language teaching should be based on the functional use of the existing languages in the country and should be done in tandem with the teaching of content since content is delivered through the medium of language.

  3. INDONESIA: FROM PLURALISM TO MULTICULTURALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasino Wasino

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia was not a new entity when started to become national country. It was called a continuation of the history of the Dutch East Indies. The people lived under western colonial was a pluralistic society, people separated by social class, ethnicity, religion, race and inter-group. Between the authorities and the people separated along racial lines. In addition there was the separation of ethnic groups associated with the economic, educational and social relations. After Indonesian independence the pluralistic society situation continues. The end of the New Order has opened a Pandora's Box of poor relations between ethnic and inter-religious. As a result many conflicts occurred based on religious and ethnic differences. The conflict heated up as the influx of political interests. The process of political reform gave birth to a new awareness of the relationship between ethnicity and religion. The starting point of this change was when the President Abdurrahman Wahid unlocked barriers on multicultural relationship that respects the differences of cultural orientation among the existing ethnic. From that moment the concept of multiculturalism experienced socialization process within Indonesian society. Key words: pluralism, multiculturalism, colonial, new order, socialization Ketika Indonesia lahir sebagai negara nasional, Indonesia bukanlah  entitas yang baru. Ia merupakan kelanjutan  sejarah dari masyarakat yang disebut Hindia Belanda. Masyarakat di bawah penjajah Barat ini merupakan masyarakat majemuk, masyarakat yang terpisah-pisah berdasarkan kelas sosial, suku, agama, ras, dan antar golongan. Antara penguasa dan rakyat terpisah secara garis rasial. Selain itu ada pe-misahan suku bangsa terkait dengan ekonomi, pendidikan, dan hubungan-hubungan sosial. Setelah Indonesia merdeka situasi masyarakat majemuk terus berlangsung. Berakhirnya Orde Baru telah membuka kotak pandora  buruknya hubungan antar etnik dan antar agama. Akibatnya

  4. KAJIAN TVC WONDERFUL INDONESIA SEBAGAI CERMIN CITRA INDONESIA DI MATA DUNIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Oscario

    2013-09-01

    a double-edged sword. Advertising can become a mirror of reality, but it can also become a distorted mirror of reality. A similar case happens with Wonderful Indonesia television commercial, which was released early in 2012 by the Ministry of Tourism and Creative Economy. The television commercial is considered to have distorted the image of Indonesia in the world by displaying only the culture, society, and nature of Java and Bali. Meanwhile, the other Wonderful Indonesia television commercial, Feeling is Believing, which was launched by Indonesia Tourism Board in 2012 considered to have become quite successful framing the beauty, and diversity of the cultures, communities, regions, and natures of Indonesia. Learning from the mistakes, and considering the importance of an image, the future Wonderful Indonesia television commercial should be dealt more carefully. The image that is proper to represent Indonesia, the visual signifier should reflect the intended signified precisely.

  5. Singapore’s Defense Policy: Essential or Excessive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    in Bangkok , Thailand. At the time, interstate relations in the region were tense. As the post-colonial era gradually took form, Southeast Asian...had a small population, no geographical hinterland, and a shortage of natural resources, including fresh water. Since the nineteenth century, Singapore...and engineering services across the land , maritime 85Teo, Speech, Committee of Supply Debate

  6. Fourth Way in Action? The Evolution of Singapore's Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, Saravanan

    2012-01-01

    Hargreaves and Shirley's "The Fourth Way" offers a valuable framework for considering the challenges and dilemmas that confront education change practitioners. In this article, I consider how well their framework fits the evolution and more recent changes in Singapore education. History, context culture and aspirations are seen as…

  7. Sex (Education) in the City: Singapore's Sexuality Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Warren Mark

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the Singapore Ministry of Education's sexuality education curriculum in relation to two leading approaches to sex education, namely, abstinence-only-until-marriage education (AOUME) and comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). Based on competing cultural, political, and religious beliefs, the arguments between the advocates of…

  8. Familial correlation of retinal vascular caliber in Singapore Chinese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.-J. Li (Ling-Jun); J. Liao (Jie); Q. Fan (Qiao); C.Y.-L. Cheung (Carol Yim-Lui); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); T.Y. Wong (Tien)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. Our study aimed to explore the heritability of retinal vascular caliber among Singapore Chinese families. Methods. In the Strabismus, Amblyopia, and Refractive Error Study in Singaporean Chinese Preschoolers (STARS) family study conducted from 2008 to 2010, a total of 727 partic

  9. Contesting Reform: Bernstein's Pedagogic Device and Madrasah Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the active role played by various pedagogic agents in contesting the state educational reforms for madrasahs in Singapore. Drawing upon Basil Bernstein's pedagogic device, the paper identifies tensions and challenges that arise from the attempts by the state to implement curriculum reforms. The paper contends that the stakes…

  10. A hypothesis for the 2007 dengue outbreak in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massad, E; Coutinho, F A B; Ma, S; Burattini, M N

    2010-07-01

    A previous mathematical model explaining dengue in Singapore predicted a reasonable outbreak of about 6500 cases for 2006 and a very mild outbreak with about 2000 cases for 2007. However, only 3051 cases were reported in 2006 while more than 7800 were reported in the first 44 weeks of 2007. We hypothesized that the combination of haze with other local sources of particulate matter had a significant impact on mosquito life expectancy, significantly increasing their mortality rate. To test the hypothesis a mathematical model based on the reproduction number of dengue fever and aimed at comparing the impact of several possible alternative control strategies was proposed. This model also aimed at contributing to the understanding of the causes of dengue resurgence in Singapore in the last decade. The model's simulation demonstrated that an increase in mosquito mortality in 2006 and either a reduction in mortality or an increase in the carrying capacity of mosquitoes in 2007 explained the patterned observed in Singapore. Based on the model's simulation we concluded that the fewer than expected number of dengue cases in Singapore in 2006 was caused by an increase in mosquito mortality due to the disproportionate haze affecting the country that year and that particularly favourable environmental conditions in 2007 propitiated mosquitoes with a lower mortality rate, which explains the greater than expected number of dengue cases in 2007. Whether our hypothesis is plausible or not should be debated further.

  11. Vocational Education in Singapore: Meritocracy and Hidden Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Terence

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a broad overview of vocational education in Singapore. Looking at vocational education from Independence, it argues that the development of a skilled labour force was not only crucial in the age of globalisation and the dominance of multinational companies, but also an empirical litmus test of the newly elected post-colonial…

  12. Computer Habits and Behaviours among Young Children in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppiah, Nirmala

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory research project was aimed at developing baseline data on computer habits and behaviours among preschool children in Singapore. Three sets of data were collected from teachers, parents and children which are (1) why and how young children use computers; (2) what are the key physical, social and health habits and behaviours of…

  13. Students' Perception of Change in the Singapore Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research that examines students' perception of the change in the Singapore Education System and how that impacts on their satisfaction and outlook. Analysis of the data obtained through a questionnaire and face-to-face interviews shows that the more favourable the perception of change amongst students, the…

  14. Special Education Teacher Preparation in Singapore's Dual Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Global comparisons of teacher education programs should start with an understanding of the school systems that teachers are being prepared for in their local contexts. The purpose of this article is to describe Singapore's dual education system as well as teacher preparation in a country that educates many students with disabilities in a separate…

  15. Organisational Legitimacy of the Singapore Ministry of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cheng Yong

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the perceived organisational legitimacy of the Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE) in preparing the population for work in the knowledge-based economy (KBE). It is argued that challenges to MOE's legitimacy are emerging with ramifications that are difficult to ignore. These challenges relate to equipping the population with…

  16. University 2.0: A View from Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Daniel; Lee, Chye Seng; Chan, Lay Kock; Lu, Adrian Din How

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the processes and best practices adopted by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore in implementing their mission-critical e-learning services for a population of 28,000 students and 1,100 faculty members. The various phases of this rapid growth in e-learning from the initial genesis in achieving mass buy-in by…

  17. Language Shift in the Tamil Communities of Malaysia and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Harold F.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the position of Tamil as the language of an ethnic minority in Malaysia and Singapore, placing the issue of Tamil and language maintenance within the larger sociolinguistic milieu in the two countries and drawing conclusions about the role of language policy and planning in the determination of linguistic outcomes. (SM)

  18. Tongue-Tied in Singapore: A Language Policy for Tamil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Harold F.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the Tamil language situation in Singapore, which lends itself ideally to the study of minority-language maintenance. Examines attempts to maintain Tamil, a highly diglossic language in emigration and concludes that the well-meaning bilingual education system actually produces a situation of subtractive bilingualism. (Author/VWL)

  19. STR data for the 13 CODIS loci in Singapore Malays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, H C; Sornarajah, R; Lim, S E S; Syn, C K C; Tan-Siew, W F; Chow, S T; Budowle, Bruce

    2005-03-10

    Allele frequencies for the 13 CODIS (Combined DNA Index System, USA) STR loci included in the AmpFISTR Profiler Plus and AmpFISTR Cofiler kits (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, USA) were determined in a sample of 197 unrelated Malays in Singapore.

  20. "Our Shared Values" in Singapore: A Confucian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Charlene

    2012-01-01

    In this essay Charlene Tan offers a philosophical analysis of the Singapore state's vision of shared citizenship by examining it from a Confucian perspective. The state's vision, known formally as "Our Shared Values," consists of communitarian values that reflect the official ideology of multiculturalism. This initiative included a White…

  1. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Singapore,Laos and Vietnam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Singapore-China Friendship Association (SCFA), the Lao-Chinese Friendship Association (LCFA) and the Vietnam-China Friendship Association, a CPAFFC Delegation led by its vice president Feng Zuoku paid goodwill visits to the three countries from January 12 to 25.

  2. Bilingualism without Diglossia: The Indian Community in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaish, Viniti

    2007-01-01

    This paper tells a tentative story from the preliminary findings of The Sociolinguistic Survey of Singapore, 2006 (SSS 2006). Though the main study reports on language use amongst Chinese, Malay and Indian communities, my focus is only on Indian homes. The paper reports results from five domains: school, family and friends, media, public space and…

  3. The Effect of Accent on Listening Comprehension: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, George K.

    1978-01-01

    A study was conducted at Nanyang University in Singapore with Chinese-educated students who supposedly received 12 years of instruction in English but who were still deficient in the language. Comprehension of four different English accents were tested, and two tests of measuring aural comprehension were compared. (SW)

  4. English, Language Shift and Values Shift in Japan and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This is a comparative study of English language education in Japan and Singapore and the role English plays in both countries. English language education in Japan has not been very effective. Although the communicative approach to teaching English was introduced in the 1980s, schools still use the grammar-translation method and most Japanese do…

  5. Sea level trend and variability in the Singapore Strait

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tkalich, P.; Vethamony, P.; Luu, Q.-H.; Babu, M.T.

    Sea level in the Singapore Strait (SS) exhibits response to various scale phenomena, from local to global. Longest tide gauge records in SS are analysed to derive local sea level trend and annual, inter-annual and multi-decadal sea level variability...

  6. Educational Leadership in Singapore: Tight Coupling, Sustainability, Scalability, and Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive; Tan, Cheng Yong

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: While Singapore's outstanding educational achievements are well known worldwide, there is a disproportionate paucity of literature on school leadership practices that contribute to and support pedagogical initiatives that--along with socio-cultural factors--are normally considered responsible for its educational success. The aim of this…

  7. Instituting Change in Early Childhood Education: Recent Developments in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Chan, Yvonne Yoke Yin

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to improve preschool education, the Singapore government has embraced the need for change by identifying needed policies related to preschool education. These changes require teachers to rethink their approach to learning and teaching. A proposed tool suggested in this paper that may help facilitate curriculum change is the use of…

  8. The Talent Development of a Musically Gifted Adolescent in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Pauline S. K.; Chong, Sylvia N. Y.

    2010-01-01

    Using Gagne's Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent (DMGT) as a conceptual model, this study investigated the factors that influenced the talent development process of a musically gifted adolescent in Singapore. Five macro themes emerged as key catalysts that impacted the adolescent's talent growth: (1) natural abilities; (2) early musical…

  9. Nurturing Bilingual Learners: Challenges and Concerns in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao Lan; Sun, Baoqi

    2016-01-01

    Singapore's bilingual policy legitimises English not only as the language of governmental administration and interethnic communication, but also as the medium of instruction in all schools on all levels and across all subjects except mother tongues (MTs). As a result of these politics of language recognition, a visible shift has occurred in all…

  10. How to Assemble a Knowledge Economy: Singapore's Transnational Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Ravinder

    2006-01-01

    This article takes Singapore, an emerging education hub, as a focal point from which to investigate its attempts to become a global city and knowledge-based economy. It outlines how discourses of the knowledge economy are used to rationalise particular policy interventions and the transnational education forms arising from them. It speculates on…

  11. The Alignment of Small States: Singapore and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    signed agreements on educational cooperation, science and technology, cultural cooperation and the establishment of a Confucius Institute in Singapore...on a broad mix of international relations theory ranging from structural realism to neoliberal institutionalism to the second order effects of... neoliberal institutionalism and domestic political influence. After those examinations, the following section will use the theories presented to develop a

  12. High rates of inapparent dengue in older adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Grace; Li, Chenny; Mutalib, Adeliza; Lai, Yee-Ling; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2013-06-01

    Although the dengue iceberg phenomenon is well known, there is a paucity of data on inapparent dengue. Results from a seroepidemiological study conducted during a dengue epidemic in 2007 in Singapore showed a seroprevalence of 65.9% and an inapparent dengue rate of 78%. Older adults (> 45 years old) had significantly higher rates of inapparent dengue infections (P < 0.05).

  13. High Rates of Inapparent Dengue in Older Adults in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Yap, Grace; Li, Chenny; Mutalib, Adeliza; Lai, Yee-Ling; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Although the dengue iceberg phenomenon is well known, there is a paucity of data on inapparent dengue. Results from a seroepidemiological study conducted during a dengue epidemic in 2007 in Singapore showed a seroprevalence of 65.9% and an inapparent dengue rate of 78%. Older adults (> 45 years old) had significantly higher rates of inapparent dengue infections (P < 0.05).

  14. Developing New Reading Assessments to Promote Beginning Reading in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kim H.; Paris, Scott G.

    2011-01-01

    Effective reading instruction and intervention are rooted in effective assessments of children's developing skills in reading. The article aims to describe the development of new reading assessments to help promote beginning reading in Singapore primary schools. We begin with an introduction to the educational landscape and policies before…

  15. Reinventing Ourselves: Collaborative Research Initiatives between Singapore & US Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, M.; Rogers, P.S.; H. Wong, I.F.

    2005-01-01

    To show how coordinated activities involving shared assessment instruments and results between two business schools, one in Singapore, the other in the US/Midwest, have helped faculty shift their research and teaching from a focus on language to an emphasis on communicative competence in English for the global workplace.

  16. Language Planning in Singapore: On Pragmatism, Communitarianism and Personal Names

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhorst-Heng, Wendy D.; Wee, Lionel

    2007-01-01

    Singapore's annual Speak Mandarin Campaign has been largely successful in shifting the language patterns of its Chinese citizens from Chinese dialects to Mandarin in all sectors. However, there has been a notable exception: the effort to have Chinese Singaporeans give their children Mandarin names, rather than dialect ones. In this paper, we…

  17. Elite Schools, Postcolonial Chineseness and Hegemonic Masculinities in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Daniel P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The educational reproduction of elite masculinity in postcolonial societies has not been properly studied. This is partly because the postcolonial masculinities of non-western elites are accomplished through the cultivation of naturalized practices signifying the body politic of the nation-state. In Singapore, same-sex elite schools of colonial…

  18. Wireless Laptops in English Classrooms: A SWOT Analysis from Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towndrow, Phillip A.; Vaish, Viniti

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents illustrative findings from a one-year pilot study undertaken in the English department of a high school in Singapore that was in the first year of implementing a one-to-one wireless laptop programme. The findings show that learning was often constrained by lecture-style presentations and overt test preparation. Despite…

  19. Use of Facebook: A Case Study of Singapore Students' Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Khe Foon; Cheung, Wing Sum

    2012-01-01

    Facebook has become one of the most popular social network sites among many students. However, current research on Facebook use has focused mainly on Anglo-American students. Relatively little is known about Facebook use in Singapore. Data were collected from 83 students (ages ranged from 15 to 23). This study uses a naturalistic case study…

  20. "Inculcating" Creativity: Culture as Public Pedagogy in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The Singapore government has long relied on the inherent public pedagogical qualities of culture in the forms of official cultural and media policies and in the unscripted signifiers of cultural conduct, such as in the public's attitude towards the arts. The prime objective is to instrumentalise citizens on how they should become both…

  1. The energy cost of water independence: the case of Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Lenouvel; Michel, Lafforgue; Catherine, Chevauché; Pauline, Rhétoré

    2014-01-01

    Finding alternative resources to secure or increase water availability is a key issue in most urban areas. This makes the research of alternative and local water resources of increasing importance. In the context of political tension with its main water provider (Malaysia), Singapore has been implementing a comprehensive water policy for some decades, which relies on water demand management and local water resource mobilisation in order to reach water self-sufficiency by 2060. The production of water from alternative resources through seawater desalination or water reclamation implies energy consumptive technologies such as reverse osmosis. In the context of increasing energy costs and high primary energy dependency, this water self-sufficiency objective is likely to be an important challenge for Singapore. The aim of this paper is to quantify the long-term impact of Singapore's water policy on the national electricity bill and to investigate the impact of Singapore's projects to reduce its water energy footprint. We estimate that 2.0% of the Singaporean electricity demand is already dedicated to water and wastewater treatment processes. If its water-energy footprint dramatically increases in the coming decades, ambitious research projects may buffer the energy cost of water self-sufficiency.

  2. Supporting Inclusive Education: Negotiating Home-School Partnership in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Meng Ee; Ng, Zi Jia; Poon, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    While there has been growing theoretical and policy interest in the areas of homeschool partnership and inclusive education, relatively little work has linked the two fields. Where there have been studies, these have focused primarily on parent or school perspective. With inclusive education in its nascent stage in Singapore, this study examines…

  3. Lifelong Learning, Income Inequality and Social Mobility in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Millie; Morris, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Singapore has been assigned the role of a "model" nation state primarily for two reasons: its rapid rate of economic growth and its outstanding performance on cross-national tests of educational achievement, such as PISA. This has resulted in advocates of reform citing it as illustrating "best practices", especially in the…

  4. Suicide Methods in Singapore (2000-2004): Types and Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Boon-Hock; Franzco, Audrey Chia; Ng, Wai-Yee; Tai, Bee-Choo

    2011-01-01

    The choice of suicide methods varies between countries. Common methods used in Singapore between 2000 and 2004 were jumping (72.4%), hanging (16.6%), and poisoning (5.9%). Those who jumped were more likely to be young, single, female, and to have had a major mental illness. By comparison, those who hung themselves were more likely to be older (OR…

  5. Indonesia`s turmoil and its coal industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, G. [Swabara Mining and Energy Group (Indonesia)

    1998-12-31

    Indonesia is facing extremely difficult economic conditions for the foreseeable future with the current monetary crisis stripping the preceding fifteen years of solid growth. It has fallen from recession into depression with very few positive signs of recovery before 2003. In this environment, however, the Indonesian coal industry remains with positive growth potential, both for domestic supply and export. Additional coal will be required by the Indonesian electricity industry in 1999 and 2000 - PLN, operational IPPs and captive power. The gradual withdrawal of subsidies will increase the cost of oil-fired generation and increase the attractiveness of off-taking coal-fired capacity. The domestic coal market historically has represented only 20.00% of Indonesian coal production and this will continue. The concerns of overseas consumers that exports of Indonesian coal could be limited by huge growth in domestic demand should be allayed with strong tonnage growth potential of competitive export coal becoming available from Indonesia. This will continue to service industries in Asian nations less affected by the regional economic downturn as it is considered that demand for thermal coal will continue to increase albeit at a slower rate than previously envisaged. Competition for supply will increase and prices will remain at low levels over the next year. It is appropriate to reiterate the critical importance of productivity improvements, cost control and operational efficiencies to Indonesia. The coal industry is in the fortunate position of being in a viable growth industry during a period where the country`s economy is suffering and the poverty of the people is increasing. The nation must maintain a profitable world-class coal industry to participate positively towards social and economic recovery. 4 tabs.

  6. Telecommunications and National Goals in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flournoy, Don M.

    This discussion of the cultural aspects of mass media in Indonesia covers the following topics: (1) PALAPA, the Indonesian communications satellite; (2) cultural, demographic, and economic characteristics of Indonesia; (3) television policies and programming; (4) the number of government- and privately-owned radio stations; (5) a longitudinal…

  7. Culture Project: Imaginary Travel to Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, Harold, Jr.

    When U.S. citizens travel to Indonesia, it is hard for the majority of them to understand the country's culture and people. This project outlines some of the major fallacies individuals have when in Indonesia, and how they can avoid them by studying ahead of time. The project begins by requiring the individuals to plan their trip properly, know…

  8. Special Education in Indonesia (Scope and Development).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semiawan, Conny

    The paper covers characteristics of Indonesia's special education program. Considered are the scope of special education, some viewpoints on the impact of culture on the perspective of special education in Indonesia (including programs, services, teacher training, and financial resources). The scope of special education is considered; and some…

  9. Report on Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Charles Elroy

    This resource packet was compiled by a participant in the Fulbright Summer Seminar on Indonesia. The materials provide information for teaching about the diaspora of Hinduism and Islamic beliefs throughout the southeast Asia archipelagoes and their influence on art and culture. The handouts supplement information on Indonesia as part of an Asian…

  10. I LOVE CHINA,I LOVE INDONESIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ In July 1940,JACKSON Sze Mau Leung(here-in-after called Jackson Leung)was born in an oversea Chinese family in WestJava,Indonesia.During 18 to 24 April 1955,the world famous Asian-African Conference was held in Bandung,Indonesia.

  11. Shia: Its History and Development in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh Hasyim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Shiah becomes a new problem in Indonesia after hundreds years of living together. Currently, treatment to Shiah tends to violate the principles of religious freedom. Therefore, it is necessary to know, how the history of the emergence of Shiah and its development in Indonesia? This is a library research using a critical analysis approach. This study found that the Syiah is a religious ideology which refers to the views of Saidina Ali (the fourth khalifat and his descendants. This teaching emerged since the beginning of the khulafaurasidin. Shiah has developed dozens of religiousstreams due to disagreement and differences on the idea of Imamah. There are four stages of Shiah development in Indonesia, namely: Firstly, along with the arrival of Islam in Indonesia; Secondly, after the Islamic revolution in Iran; Thirdly, through Indonesian Muslim Intellectuals who studied in Iran, and Finally,  during the open era there was an establishment of as association Jamaah Ahlul Bai’t Indonesia.

  12. DINAMIKA PERKEMBANGAN PERBANKAN SYARIAH DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syukron

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Perkembangan perbankan syariah di Indonesia merupakan suatu perwujudan dari permintaan masyarakat yang membutuhkan suatu sistem perbankan alternatif yang selain menyediakan jasa perbankan/keuangan yang sehat, juga memenuhi prinsip-prinsip syariah. Tulisan ini mencoba mereview bagaimana perjalanan dan perkembangan bank syariah di Indonesia serta dibandingkan dengan beberapa Negara muslim lainnya. Secara umum, kebijakan pengembangan perbankan syariah di Indonesia belum mencapai target yang ideal yang direncanakan. Berdasarkan Global Islamic Financial Report (GIFR tahun 2014, Indonesia menduduki urutan ketujuh turun tiga peringkat yang sempat menempati urutan keempat pada tahun 2011. Sebagai negara yang memiliki potensi dan kondusif dalam pengembangan industri keuangan syariah setelah Iran, Malaysia dan Saudi Arabia. Dengan melihat beberapa aspek dalam penghitungan indeks, seperti jumlah bank syariah, jumlah lembaga keuangan non-bank syariah, maupun ukuran aset keuangan syariah yang memiliki bobot terbesar, dapat dikatakan perkembangan perbankan syariah di Indonesia berjalan di tempat, bahkan belum menunjukkan perkembangan yang signifikan dari tahun-tahun sebelumnya.

  13. DNA-Based Analyses of Molds in Singapore Public Buildings Results in a Proposed Singapore Environmental Relative Moldiness Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dust samples (n=75) were collected from shopping malls, hotels and libraries in Singapore and then analyzed using Mold Specific Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction(MSQPCR) for the 36 molds that make up the Environmental Relative Moldiness Index (ERMI). Most of these molds (23/...

  14. INDUSTRI KREATIF INDONESIA: PENDEKATAN ANALISIS KINERJA INDUSTRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Kamil

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the Department of Commerce of the Republic of Indonesia has launched a creative economic development documents interpreted the 2025 Indonesia became the starting point and guide the development of the creative economy in Indonesia. With the existence of this document, the industry and its stakeholders or other stakeholders can readily develop the creative economy in Indonesia. Economic development in the direction of the creative industries is one manifestation of optimism aspiration to support the Master Plan for the Acceleration and Expansion of Indonesia's Economic Development in realizing the vision of Indonesia are being developed nation. The main objective of this study is the first to analyze the role of the creative industries in Indonesia for labor, value added and productivity, secondly, to analyze the performance trend of the creative industries sector, and third, to analyze the factors affecting the performance of the creative industries sector in Indonesia. Under Indonesia Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC and codes 151-372 (manufacturing industries category identified 18 industry groups belonging to the creative industries, showed that the performance of the national creative industries has been relatively high (in terms of trend analysis of the performance of the industrial creative. Furthermore, regression analysis of panel data (econometrics indicates that company size (SIZE, wages for workers (WAGE and the content of local inputs (LOCAL has a significant impact on the performance of Indonesia's creative industry. Meanwhile, the concentration ratio (CR4 no consequences but have koresi significantly positive effect on the performance of Indonesia’s creative industry.

  15. Children’s use of Bahasa Indonesia in Jakarta kindergartens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaert, M.B.H.; Van de Velde, H.; Kushartanti, B.

    2015-01-01

    At a very young age children living in Jakarta use both Colloquial Jakarta Indonesia and Bahasa Indonesia. The children’s first and most used language is Colloquial Jakarta Indonesia. In the formal school setting Bahasa Indonesia is frequently used and stimulated on a daily basis, and the learning p

  16. Investing in Our Future: The Early Years. First Singapore Conference on Preschool Education: Promoting Quality Care and Education for Preschoolers (Singapore, December 2-3, 1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan-Niam, Carolyn, Ed.; Ling, Quah May, Ed.

    Informed by current thinking and supported by data gathered in Singapore, this volume compiles a selection of papers presented at the First Singapore Conference on Preschool Education: Promoting Quality Care and Education for Preschoolers. The papers are: (1) "Introduction: Issues in Quality Provision for Preschool Care and Education" (Carolyn…

  17. Menggagas Pendidikan Multikultur di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anin Nurhayati

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia with diversity of ethnic, culture, tradition, social group, religion, and so on, on the one hand, has aroused the dynamics of cultural diversity and positive civilization; on the other hand, it will even become the cause of conflict and disintegration, if it is not managed wisely and comprehensively. Multicultural education in Indonesia, however, should not only become an academic discourse, but it needs to be implemented in the concrete sphere, among them is in the education realm. Here, we need a conceptual frame in its implementation, so that the problem that emerges as the effect of the diversity and religiousness bias does not become a heavy burden of this nation. Multicultural education is a reform as well as the process of education which inculcate to the students the values and beliefs the importance of uniqueness recognition at every ethnic, culture, and other social groups. There are at least five scopes in multicultural education, they are (1 promotion to strengthen cultural diversity; (2 promotion to respect human right and other different people; (3 promotion to act based on his own way of life for every human being; and (5 promotion to the importance of equality and distribution of authority among different social groups.

  18. Animasi Indonesia (Tinjauan Singkat Perkembangan Animasi Indonesia dalam Konteks Animasi Dunia)

    OpenAIRE

    Arik Kurnianto

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the development of animated films in Indonesia based on historical studies to determine simultaneously mapping the history Indonesia in the context of world/global animation history. This study also examines the relationship between the histories of Indonesiananimated films with history first entry of the film in Indonesia which began the Dutch colonial era. According to Stephen Cavalier, the world history of animation was divided into five large round ...

  19. The U.S.-Singapore Free Trade Agreement: Effects After Five Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    U.S. service providers in Singapore under the FTA, Citibank has been able to expand its operations there (it has 50% of the credit card market...ATM network by 2008.6 Citibank , in particular, has been expanding its presence in Singapore. From four branches in 2004, it now has eleven full...locate ATMs and branches in and around subway stations.8 Citibank has a 50% share of the Singapore credit card market.9 As of mid-2006, Citibank

  20. Malaysia and Singapore's terrorist rehabilitation programs : learning and adapting to terrorist threats

    OpenAIRE

    Khor, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The central question of this thesis examines how Malaya/Malaysia and Singapore learned and adapted successful terrorist disengagement programs and policies; through their unique and non-military rehabilitation programs. The methodology is a comparative case study analysis of Malaysia and Singapore. In order to understand how the countries of Malaya/Malaysia and Singapore adapted a colonial-era counter-insurgency program to disengage Communist Terrorists into a program that now rehabilitates r...

  1. Singapore Airlines to Fly A380 to Beijing Due to Olympics Demand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Customers will enjoy exhilarating sporting action,exciting moments when they fly with Singapore Airlincs during the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing.To satisfy higher demand on its flights during the of the Olympic Games,Singapore Airlines will fly the Airbus A380 super-jumbo,the world's largest passenger plane,on one of its three daily flights between Singapore and Beijing for one week in early August.

  2. Augmented Reality Edugame Senjata Tradisional Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Sudarmilah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Senjata tradisional merupakan sebuah produk yang berkaitan erat dengan budaya suatu masyarakat. Selain berfungsi sebagai senjata, senjata tradisional telah menjadi identitas suatu bangsa yang membantu memperkaya khasanah budaya nusantara. Pendidikan di Indonesia berpedoman pada kurikulum baru yang disebut kurikulum 2013. Salah satu materi kurikulum mengarahkan siswa untuk belajar tentang senjata tradisional bentuk senjata tradisional. Berdasarkan pada masalah yang timbul dari kurikulum 2013, peneliti menyiapkan metode pembelajaran dengan menggabungkan Augmented Reality (AR dengan permainan edukasi berbasis adventure game dalam menyajikan materi keanekaragaman budaya Indonesia, terutama untuk senjata tradisional sehingga siswa memiliki semangat dalam belajar tentang keanekaragaman budaya Indonesia khusunya senjata.

  3. Optical packaging activities at Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Keng-Hwa; Sudharsanam, Krishnamachari; Pamidighantam, Ramana V.; Yeo, Yongkee; Iyer, Mahadevan K.

    2002-08-01

    The development of optoelectronic components for gigabit Ethernet communications is converging towards access networks where the cost of device makes a significant impact on the market acceptance. Device fabrication and packaging cost have to be brought down with novel assembly and packaging methods. Singapore has established a reputation in semiconductor device development and fabrication with excellent process and packaging facilities. Institute of Microelectronics (IME) was founded in 1991 to add value to the Singapore electronics industry. IME is involved in the development of active and passive photonics components using Silicon and polymer materials. We present a brief report on the development activities taking place in the field of optical component packaging at IME in recent years. We present a review of our competence and some of the optical device packaging activities that are being undertaken.

  4. Prevention and control of avian influenza in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Hon Keong; Goh, Cheryl S; Chew, Siang Thai; Lim, Chee Wee; Lin, Yueh Nuo; Chang, Siow Foong; Yap, Him Hoo; Chua, Sin Bin

    2008-06-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus was first detected in 1996 in Guangdong, China. Since 2003, H5N1 outbreaks have been reported in parts of Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. It is currently entrenched among poultry in parts of Asia and poses a major challenge to animal and human health. Singapore is free from HPAI. Given Singapore's need to import food, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) has adopted a pro-active risk management system to prevent the introduction of HPAI. AVA's approach maybe described as a multi-layered control strategy for the prevention and control of HPAI. The strategy includes control measures at source, border control measures, local control measures and emergency preparedness.

  5. Organochlorine compounds in the marine atmosphere of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurl, Oliver; Obbard, Jeffrey Philip

    Organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were quantified in high-volume air samples collected on polyurethane foam (PUF) over the sea surface of Singapore during the summer monsoon period of 2004. A novel and quality assured microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) procedure for PUF was developed as an alternative to conventional Soxhlet extraction for the analysis of organochlorine compounds (OCs). Average concentrations of ΣPCBs, ΣHCHs and ΣDDTs in air samples were 32, 311 and 8 pg m -3, respectively. Overall, a decline in the ocean atmospheric concentration of DDTs was noted relative to data obtained from the early 1990s, but current data are in a similar range for HCH and PCBs. Levels of OCs in the equatorial atmosphere were compared to equivalent data from temperate regions available in the literature. On a global scale, the levels of DDTs and PCBs in the atmosphere of Singapore are low, but moderate for HCHs.

  6. National Information Infrastructure and the realization of Singapore IT2000 initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl Marie Cordeiro

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Being a small island and without any natural resource, Singapore has much to depend on its human potential and investment in National Information Infrastructure (NII in order to find its place in the ever competitive global world economies. From Singapore's first experience with the setting up and accessing of the Internet in 1991, the Singapore Government has expended so much creative and financial energy into using information technology to spearhead Singapore's success in terms of enticing and encouraging economic growth and achieving national competitiveness on a global scale. In 1991, the Singapore government, together with the National Computer Board (NCB currently known as the Infocomm Development Authority (IDA, launched the IT 2000, with the objective of converting Singapore into an intelligent island. With many NII projects in place and the various government initiative, this study focus on the role of Singapore Government in the development of the national information infrastructure and the realisation of IT2000 vision. This investigative study delves into the role of the Singapore government in helping Singapore forge its path into the new millennium of the information world.

  7. Integrating research, clinical practice and translation: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Beng-Hai; Gao, Xinting; Yin, Fengshou; Zhang, Jielin; Htoo, Min Thet

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the experiences of the Singapore ocular imaging team, iMED, in integrating image processing and computer-aided diagnosis research with clinical practice and knowledge, towards the development of ocular image processing technologies for clinical usage with potential impact. In this paper, we outline key areas of research with their corresponding image modalities, as well as providing a systematic introduction of the datasets used for validation.

  8. ART STAGE SINGAPORE THE NEW DESTINATION FOR THE ART WORLD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    ASlA’S NEW INTERNATIONAL TOP CONTEMPORARY ART FAIR Art Stage Singapore supports and protects the interests of Asian galleries by elevating them to a level of international importance in order to help propel them as strong and competitive players in the global market. Therefore,the heart of the fair is made up of the best and most exciting of Asia’s artistic creativity,showcasing Asia’s most important

  9. Gravitraps for Management of Dengue Clusters in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Caleb; Vythilingam, Indra; Chong, Chee-Seng; Razak, Muhammad Aliff Abdul; Tan, Cheong-Huat; Liew, Christina; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Although Singapore has an intensive dengue control program, dengue remains endemic with regular outbreaks. We report development and use of a novel adult oviposition trap, the Gravitrap, in managing dengue cluster areas. The Gravitrap is a simple, hay infusion-filled cylindrical trap with a sticky inner surface to serve as an oviposition site for gravid female Aedes mosquitoes. Wire gauze fitted above the water level minimizes the risk of it being an unwanted breeding habitat. The Gravitrap w...

  10. Real interest rates equalization: The case of Malaysia and Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This study provides some evidences showing high degree of financial integration from both evidences of common shocks and real interest parity in the context of two small and open economies, that is, Malaysia and Singapore. Few key policy implications may be suggested from the findings in this study. First, foreign investors who invest in these two countries may need to look for sources of diversification to protect their wealth against the occurrence of contagion effect due to the strong tr...

  11. Why Conscription Singapore? The Social and Geostrategic Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Defence, 2000), 6–13, http://www.mindef.gov.sg/dam/publications/ eBooks /More_eBooks/ds21.pdf. 103 Lee, From Third World to First, 22–23. 104 Ibid...Singapore Ministry of Defence, 2000. http://www.mindef.gov.sg/dam/publications/ eBooks /More_eBooks /ds21.pdf. Desch, Michael C. Civilian Control of

  12. Footwear characteristics in people with inflammatory arthritis in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, K.; Lahiri, M.; Cheung, P. P.; Santosa, A.; Rome, K

    2016-01-01

    Background Foot problems are common in people with inflammatory arthritis. Despite suitable footwear having the potential to alleviate pain, improve mobility and maintain independence, previous studies have found many people with inflammatory arthritis wearing poorly fitting and inappropriate footwear. Footwear styles and characteristics have not been reported in a Singapore inflammatory arthritis population. The objective of this study was to identify current footwear styles and characterist...

  13. The Singapore Mental Health Study: an overview of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Mythily; Vaingankar, Janhavi; Heng, Derrick; Kwok, Kian Woon; Lim, Yee Wei; Yap, Mabel; Chong, Siow Ann

    2012-06-01

    The Singapore Mental Health Study (SMHS) is a population-based, cross-sectional, epidemiological study on the Singapore multi-ethnic adult population. This article provides an overview of the research design and methods used which took into consideration the unique characteristics of the country and its multi-ethnic population. A face-to-face household survey of Singapore residents aged 18 years and above was undertaken from 2009 to 2010. The nationally representative probability sample was derived using a disproportionate stratified sampling method. In order to increase precision for subgroup estimations the design was stratified with over-sampling of Malays, Indians and those aged 65 years and above. Respondents were assessed using the English, Chinese (computerized) and Malay (paper and pencil based) version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) 3.0 to establish lifetime and 12-month prevalence of mental disorders, the current use of mental health services (both Western and traditional services), the treatment gaps and loss of role functioning.

  14. Individualized and Depoliticized: A Study of Chinese Blogosphere in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Soon

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on new media such as blogs examines users’ motivations and gratifications, and how individuals and organizations use them for political participation. In Singapore, political blogs have attracted much public scrutiny due to the bloggers’ online and offline challenges of official discourse. While previous research has established the political significance of these blogs, extant scholarship is limited to blogs written in the English language. Little is known about blogs maintained by the Chinese community, the largest ethnic group in multi-racial Singapore. This study is a first to examine this community and the space they inhabit online. Through web crawling, we identified 201 Chinese-language blogs and through content analysis, we analyzed if Chinese bloggers contributed to public debates and used their blogs for civic engagement. Their content, motivations for blogging in the language, hyperlinking practices and use of badges indicated that Chinese bloggers in Singapore do not use blogs for political participation and mobilization, but are individualized and a-politicized. We discuss possible reasons and implications in this paper.

  15. Hydrodynamic modeling of Singapore's coastal waters: Nesting and model accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, G. M. Jahid; van Maren, Dirk Sebastiaan; Ooi, Seng Keat

    2016-01-01

    The tidal variation in Singapore's coastal waters is influenced by large-scale, complex tidal dynamics (by interaction of the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea) as well as monsoon-driven low frequency variations, requiring a model with large spatial coverage. Close to the shores, the complex topography, influenced by headlands and small islands, requires a high resolution model to simulate tidal dynamics. This can be achieved through direct nesting or multi-scale nesting, involving multiple model grids. In this paper, we investigate the effect of grid resolution and multi-scale nesting on the tidal dynamics in Singapore's coastal waters, by comparing model results with observations using different statistical techniques. The results reveal that the intermediate-scale model is generally sufficiently accurate (equal to or better than the most refined model), but also that the most refined model is only more accurate when nested in the intermediate scale model (requiring multi-scale nesting). This latter is the result of the complex tidal dynamics around Singapore, where the dominantly diurnal tidal currents are decoupled from the semi-diurnal water level variations. Furthermore, different techniques to quantify model accuracy (harmonic analysis, basic statistics and more complex statistics) are inconsistent in determining which model is more accurate.

  16. Prevalence and correlates of heart disease among adults in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picco, Louisa; Subramaniam, Mythily; Abdin, Edimansyah; Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit; Chong, Siow Ann

    2016-02-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide and it has been well established that it is associated with both mental and physical conditions. This paper describes the prevalence of heart disease with mental disorders and other chronic physical conditions among the Singapore resident population. Data were from the Singapore Mental Health Study which was a representative, cross-sectional epidemiological survey undertaken with 6616 Singapore residents, between December 2009 and December 2010. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 was used to establish the diagnosis of mental disorders, while a chronic medical conditions checklist was used to gather information on 15 physical conditions, including various forms of heart disease. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Euro-Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). The lifetime prevalence of heart disease was 2.8%. Socio-demographic correlates of heart disease included older age, Indian ethnicity, secondary education (vs. tertiary) and being economically inactive. After adjusting for socio-demographic variables and other comorbid physical and mental disorders, the prevalence of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder were significantly higher among those with heart disease, as were diabetes, arthritis, kidney failure and lung disease. These findings highlight important associations between heart disease and various socio-demographic correlates, mental disorders and physical conditions. Given the high prevalence of mood disorders among heart disease patients, timely and appropriate screening and treatment of mental disorders among this group is essential.

  17. 78 FR 74115 - Monosodium Glutamate From the People's Republic of China and the Republic of Indonesia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Indonesia: Postponement of Preliminary Determination in the Countervailing Duty Investigations AGENCY... (PRC)); Nicholas Czajkowski at (202) 482- 1395 (the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia)), AD/CVD... investigations of monosodium glutamate from Indonesia and the PRC.\\1\\ Currently, the preliminary...

  18. Pembuatan Wiki Legenda Indonesia dengan Menggunakan CMS Mediawiki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adityo Roosdiono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia adalah negara yang terdiri dari berbagai suku bangsa dan budaya. Salah satu bentuk kekayaan suku bangsa di Indonesia dapat dilihat dari banyaknya legenda yang tersebar di Indonesia. Hampir setiap daerah di Indonesia memiliki cerita rakyat yang kental dengan suasana mistik, budaya dan tradisi di daerah masing-masing.Sayangnya cerita rakyat ini jarang sekali diekspos sehingga tidak jarang warga negara Indonesia tidak tahu cerita sejarah yang ada di Indonesia.  Berdasarkan pemikiran itulah, perlu diadakannya sebuah Wiki legenda Indonesia terkait mitos dan sejarah di Indonesia.Wiki legenda Indonesia menggunakan teknologi CMS MediaWiki, yang telah digunakan oleh Wikipedia sendiri. MediaWiki ini akan dipakai sebagai model awal pembuatan Wiki legenda Indonesia sehingga dapat digunakan sebagai media penyimpanan cerita rakyat. Selain sebagai media penyimpanan, Wiki legenda Indonesia juga berfungsi sebagai media diskusi para peminat cerita rakyat yang ada di Indonesia. Sehingga kedepannya, cerita legenda di Indonesia mampu diketahui oleh seluruh masyarakat Indonesia pada khususnya, dan dunia pada umumnya.

  19. Analisis Keunggulan Bersaing Nissan di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    lim Sanny

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Automotive sales in Indonesia picked up sharply in 2010, and increase of prices does not lower the demand for automotive products. The large population of Indonesia and the low level of car ownership in the country suggest there is a lot of potential for expansion in the automotive industry. The aim of this research is to observe Nissan’s strategy in Indonesia to gain a spot in the top 10 of the best automotive seller in Indonesia. This research uses primary data with forecasting with monthly index to forecast the demand and to detect the selling target plans in 2010. Then, with combined porter five forces to determine the competitive strategy in the last 5 years. 

  20. Performance and political change in Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    Review of: Michael H. Bodden, Resistance on the national stage: Theater and politics in late New Order Indonesia. Barbara Hatley, Javanese performances on an Indonesian stage: Contesting culture, embracing change.

  1. Effectiveness of monetary policy transmission in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Khoirul Fuddin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the channel of monetary policy transmission mechanism of money, credit, interest rate and exchange rate in Indonesia. The effectiveness of the transmission mechanism of monetary policy in Indonesia can be described and explained by the ultimate target object in Indonesia, specifically economic growth and inflation. The analytical tool used in this study is Vector Error Correction Model (VECM which uses impulse response and variance decomposition in determining the effectiveness of monetary policy transmission mechanism. The results explain that the credit channel is considered effective in explaining economic growth and the interest rate channel is effective in explaining inflation found in Indonesia.

  2. 1992 Flores Region, Maumere, Indonesia Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — On December 12, 1992, a magnitude 7.5 Ms (USGS) earthquake at 05:29 UT occurred in the Flores, Indonesia, region producing a tsunami that reached shore in five...

  3. IMPORTANT PROTOZOAN PARASITES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisasi Gandahusada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most important protozoan parasites in Indonesia are the malaria parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Entamoeba histolytica. After the second world war the residual insecticides and effective antimalarial drugs were used in the control of malaria. After development of resistance among mosquitoes to insecticides, the Malaria Control Programme was switched over to the Malaria Eradication Programme. Malaria incidence dropped heavily. However, due to the quick development of vector resistance and financial limitations, malaria came back and so did the Malaria Control Programme. P. falciparum and P.vivax are the most common species in Indonesia. Important vectors are An. sundaicus, An. aconitus, An. maculatus, An. hyrcanus group, An. balabacensis, An. farauti etc. An. sundaicus and An. aconitus have developed resistance to DDT and Dieldrin in Java. In 1959 the Malaria Eradication Programme was started in Java, Bali and Lampung. In 1965 the API dropped to 0,15 per thousand. From 1966 onwards malaria transmission was on the increase, because spraying activities were slowed down, but dropped again from 1974 onwards by occasional residual house spraying with DDT or Fenitrothion, malaria surveillance and treatment of malaria cases, resulting in an API of 0.18 per thousand in 1987. At present malaria is not transmitted in Jakarta and in capitals of the provinces and kabupatens, except in Irian Jaya, Nusa Tenggara Timur and one or two other provinces, but it still exists in rural areas. The distribution of chloroquine resistant P.falciparum is patchy. Resistance is at the RI, RII and RUT levels. The main problems of malaria control are : the increasing development of resistance of the vector to insecticides, the change of An.aconitus from zoophili to anthropophili and from indoor to outdoor biting, the increasing resistance of P.falciparum to chloroquine, the shortage of skilled manpower and limitation of budget. In Indonesia many newborns with congenital

  4. Perilaku Impor Susu di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastuti Pratiwi

    2016-06-01

    This paper analyzes the behaviour of milk import in Indonesia during 1985-2010. Using an Error Correction Model (ECM, it finds that in the long run, factors influencing the milk import are percapita income, domestic milk real price, and imported milk price. In the short run, the import is influenced by population size of more than 5-year old residents, real domestic price milk, real price of imported milk, and exchange rates. Variables that do not influence milk imports, both in the short run and in the long run, are national milk production, milk exports, population size of less than 5-year old residents, and the gonvernment policy on the deletion of milk imports.

  5. Indonesia Shows:To shine in April

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zihan

    2015-01-01

    INATEX, INDO INTER TEX and TECHNITEX 2015, scheduled to take place from 23 – 25 April 2015 at Jakarta International Expo (JIEXPO) Jakarta – Indonesia, are to meet with mills and manufacturers from Indonesia and around the world showcasing their collections. These three binding exhibitions, with theme,“The Only Trade Platform to Meet ASEAN Garment Industry”, will set as an exclusive business platform for domestic and international quality supplier of Textile and Garment Industries.

  6. Chinese Foreign Direct Investment in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peter; Tarmidi, Lepi T.

    2013-01-01

    In Indonesia, no systematic study of Chinese FDI has been undertaken to date. This paper contributes to filling this research gap and analyses the current composition as well as the historical evolution of Chinese FDI in Indonesia, relying on a survey conducted in 2008 among Chinese invested ente...... investments, at this early period of their internationalisation, are likely to give rise to a more modest extent of positive spillovers than investors from more economically advanced countries....

  7. Hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Lusida, Maria Inge; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 240 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), 75% of whom reside in Asia. Approximately 600000 of infected patients die each year due to HBV-related diseases or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The endemicity of hepatitis surface antigen in Indonesia is intermediate to high with a geographical difference. The risk of HBV infection is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, men having sex with men, and health care workers. Occult HBV infection has been detected in various groups such as blood donors, HD patients, and HIV-infected individuals and children. The most common HBV subgenotype in Indonesia is B3 followed by C1. Various novel subgenotypes of HBV have been identified throughout Indonesia, with the novel HBV subgenotypes C6-C16 and D6 being successfully isolated. Although a number of HBV subgenotypes have been discovered in Indonesia, genotype-related pathogenicity has not yet been elucidated in detail. Therefore, genotype-related differences in the prognosis of liver disease and their effects on treatments need to be determined. A previous study conducted in Indonesia revealed that hepatic steatosis was associated with disease progression. Pre-S2 mutations and mutations at C1638T and T1753V in HBV/B3 have been associated with advanced liver diseases including HCC. However, drug resistance to lamivudine, which is prominent in Indonesia, remains obscure. Although the number of studies on HBV in Indonesia has been increasing, adequate databases on HBV infection are limited. We herein provided an overview of the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of HBV infection in Indonesia. PMID:26478663

  8. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    A. C. Spessa; Field, R. D.; F. Pappenberger; Langner, A.; S. Englhart; Weber, U.; T. Stockdale; F. Siegert; Kaiser, J. W.; Moore, J.

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean–atmosphere model. Ba...

  9. CHILD ABUSE, FENOMENA DAN KEBIJAKAN DI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Suci Wulansari

    2012-01-01

    Research about child abuse in Indonesia done by United Nations Children's Funds (UNICEF) results a concerned condition. The same opinion is also declared by Indonesian Commission on Children Protection. The increasing number of child abuse in Indonesia is highlighted in international society. Child abuse causes many negative effects for physical, mental, and or sexual of children, that effect for the growth and development of child thus leads to rise the lost generation. Medical officers hope...

  10. Plagiarism In English Language Theses In Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Like Raskova Octaberlina

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This article argues that plagiarism in Indonesia exists due to some reasons. The reasons range from the requirements on the part of the students to adhere to uniformity in terms of thesis format to failure on the part of the government to effectively enforce a regulation dealing with plagiarism. Anecdotal observations as a student in one Indonesian university will give color to the discussion throughout this article. A recommendation to subdue plagiarism in Indonesia will conclude the article.

  11. PERKEMBANGAN ISLAM DI INDONESIA PASCA KEMERDEKAAN

    OpenAIRE

    Beti Yanuri Posha

    2015-01-01

    Islam is a religion that put the principles of truth and justice for all its adherents. Factors that encourage Muslims to achieve independence are factors Ideology, political, economic, social and cultural. In Indonesia, Islam has an important role in education. Islamic education in Indonesia is given in three sectors, namely formal, informal and non-formal. After Indonesian independence, the issue of religious education received serious attention from the government, both in public and priva...

  12. ANALISIS EKSPOR IKAN TUNA INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indriana - Yudiarosa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Facing the  free trade era, Indonesia needs to reorganize its export strategies with not mainly depending on oil and gas sector only. In relation to this, tuna as Indonesia’s export commodity has plate an important role but presently Indonesia can only contribute 7% of the world tuna supply. Being one of the country which have unused tunas potensial  up to 53,7%, Indonesia’s opportunity to supply world market is the large. This studied was aimed at analyzing; factors influencing Indonesia’s tunas export; factors  influencing domestic supply of tunas; predicting tunas export in the next 5 years (2000 –2005 and study marketing strategies that effect Indonesia’s export of tuna. To analyze factors that influenced tunas export and domestic supply of tunas, simultan equation in the form of double logarithma with two stage least square (2SLS methods were used. Meanwhile, export development were analyzed with trend analysis and tunas export strategies with SWOT analysis. Result of this study showed that, tunas export price,  tunas export  tax, exchange rate and tunas export the previous year effected tunas export.Factors that influenced domestic tuna supplies were domestic prices of tunas and domestic supplies of tunas the previous year.       Tunas export prediction from 2000 – 2005 drawn from the trend analysis; shows an increase in export by average of 1.06%. Hopefully this will be followed by increase in tunas production by an average of 1.27%. Increase in tunas export must be supported by marketing strategies.Marketing strategies that can be carried out based on the SWOT analysis are improving infrastucture, transfer of technology for fleet and catch material, improvement in the quality and quantity of the product , marketing research and upgrading cooperation with importing countries.   Keywords: tuna fish, export

  13. The use of law to encourage smaller families in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T W

    1980-01-01

    To pursue its goal of rapid economic development, Singapore provides family planning services and has vigorously encouraged its citizens to limit family size. The government has legislated disincentives for families to have more than 2 children. This discussion reviews the history of these legal measures and their usefulness as a tool to promote social change and development. Singapore has used the law as a means to encourage family planning in order to supplement the overall thrust for economic development in the late 1960s. Freed from obligations to the Malaysian Federation and lacking the support of the British military as of 1969, Lee Kuan Yew led his people's economic development along a Western model. Reduction of population growth is an essential component of that model. Lee stressed family planning by providing clinics, by advertising, by promoting housing and lifestyles conducive to nuclear families, and by gradually adopting a set of laws favoring small families. These laws were introduced in different sectors of the economy at different times and were revised as social conditions changed. Typically, they set a minor monetary or priority penalty for parents of 3 or more children. The laws discourage additional births rather than prohibit them, guiding rather than forcing family planning decisions. To what extent the laws were the cause of decreasing family size in Singapore is uncertain, but they contributed to some extent to the country's phenomenal progress in income and lifestyle. The Abortion Act of 1969 legalized abortion on nonmedical grounds with the Singapore Family Planning and Population Board (SFPPB) approval. The Act was amended twice in 1974 to make abortions available "on demand." The charging of progressive delivery (accouchement) fees in government hospitals for mothers with 2 or more children might be considered as the focal point of the total disincentives system. The fees placed financial pressure directly on those who violated the

  14. 75 FR 25032 - Biennial Review of the Progress of Cooperation Under the United States-Singapore Memorandum of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... Biennial Review of the Progress of Cooperation Under the United States-Singapore Memorandum of Intent on Cooperation in Environmental Matters and Suggestions for 2011-2012 U.S.-Singapore Plan of Action for... under the U.S.-Singapore Memorandum of Intent on Cooperation on Environmental Matters and...

  15. Complexity of Language Ideologies in Transnational Movement: Korean "Jogi Yuhak" Families' Ambivalent Attitudes towards Local Varieties of English in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, So Hee

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the complex and competing language ideologies that Korean educational migrant families in Singapore hold about the normativity and legitimacy of English language varieties. During their educational migration in Singapore, Korean families show ambivalent attitudes toward the local variety of English in Singapore, Singlish.…

  16. Education and State Formation Reappraised--Chinese School Identity in Postwar Singapore and Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ting-Hong

    2007-01-01

    After World War II the Singapore government, wishing to blend the island's several ethnic communities into a national whole, endeavored to replace Chinese schools, which imparted students with cultural-linguistic traits sharply different from those promoted in other schools. This policy, nevertheless, elicited tough resistance from Singapore's…

  17. Rates of Return to Investments in Formal and Technical/Vocational Education in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Chris

    2003-01-01

    Explores relationship between education and earnings in Singapore. Uses Labor Force data to obtain estimates of private returns to investment in formal and technical/vocational education. Some results confirm earlier patterns from other countries, whole others make Singapore a world outlier, with very high private returns to schooling in relation…

  18. A Standalone but Not Lonely Language: Chinese Linguistic Environment and Education in Singapore Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Huang; Kangdi, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Bilingual education policy in Singapore permits the students learn both English as working language and mother tongues, such as Chinese, as L2 anchoring to culture heritage. Starting from historical and sociolinguistic reasons, this paper is intended to provide a panoramic view of Chinese education in Singapore, clarify and compare Chinese…

  19. Is Singapore's School Geography Becoming Too Responsive to the Changing Needs of Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chew-Hung

    2014-01-01

    In understanding the divergences and commonalities in the representations of geography across different national settings, the case of Singapore is examined through the notion of politicisation of school curricula to meet the needs of "significant power groups". In particular, the development of school geography in Singapore and its…

  20. Reconciling Discourse about Geography and Teaching Geography: The Case of Singapore Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    This study draws upon a Foucauldian notion of discourse to explore how four pre-service geography teachers in Singapore made decisions about what geography is and how to enact their understandings of geography in their classrooms. This analysis of discursive power is particularly relevant to Singapore because of the high level of state control…

  1. The Quest for Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Singapore: Strategies and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2012-01-01

    Innovation and entrepreneurship are two very important ingredients in the continuous economic growth of Singapore. This article describes and analyses how Singapore attempts to develop innovation and entrepreneurship through initiatives at the national level and at the universities and schools level. In particular, the article examines the recent…

  2. -New Destinations, Greater Convenience-ANA and Singapore Airlines Expand Strategic Code-Sharing Agreement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ ANA and Singapore Airlines have filed for permission to increase their present code-sharing relationship to cover destinations in Asia,North America and Japan beyond the hub mrports of Singapore Changi Airport and Tokyo Narita Airport,from September 1 this year.

  3. Comparative Study of Teaching Content in Teacher Education Programmes in Canada, Denmark, Finland and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jens; Bayer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparative study of the content in selected teacher education programmes for primary and lower secondary teachers in Canada, Denmark, Finland and Singapore. First and foremost, the study is a comparison between teacher education programmes in, on the one hand, Canada, Finland and Singapore, all of which…

  4. Why Schools in America Should Not Be Like Schools in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Barbara S. S.

    2014-01-01

    America is not Singapore and Singapore cannot be America. So why are we often comparing ourselves to high-performing countries based on international exams? Despite the educational crisis many U.S. schools are facing, Americans should be cautious not to mimic another country's model within our diverse classrooms. We are largely grounded on the…

  5. Quality Assurance in the Singapore Education System in an Era of Diversity and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes how Singapore attempts to balance the need for quality assurance and the need for educational diversity and innovation. The Singapore experience shows that this is a delicate balance. On the one hand, to promote diversity and innovation, the government attempts to decentralise its power to the schools. On the other hand, for…

  6. Challenging and Co-Opting Globalisation: Singapore's Strategies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinathan, S.; Lee, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Since its independence in 1965, Singapore has adopted a developmental state orientation and has placed a strong emphasis on education to meet its socio-economic development needs. In line with its aspirations to be a regional education hub, the Singapore higher education system hosts a number of prestigious institutions and international…

  7. Assessment and the Logic of Instructional Practice in Secondary 3 English and Mathematics Classrooms in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, David; Chan, Melvin; Rahim, Ridzuan; Kwek, Dennis; Aye, Khin Maung; Loo, Siok Chen; Sheng, Yee Zher; Luo, Wenshu

    2013-01-01

    By any measure, Singapore's educational system has generated an extraordinary record of achievement over the past two or three decades. In this article, we report on one key component of a broader three year investigation into why Singapore has done so well, and explore the logic, strength, resilience and limits of the underlying pedagogical model…

  8. Curriculum as Praxis: Ensuring Quality Technical Education in Singapore for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yek, Tiew Ming; Penney, Dawn

    2006-01-01

    Singapore, a small island city-state, has achieved notable economic advancement within 40 years since independence. It is fast becoming a global city and a knowledge society. In education and training, the Singapore system has evolved from its British roots. Macro performance indicators of participation rate, literacy rate and mean years of…

  9. Adult Learners Understanding in Learning Islam Using the Andragogy Approach in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Mohd Amin Bin

    2016-01-01

    This study describes adult learners understanding in learning Islam using the andragogy approach in Singapore comprising multicultural and multi-religious society. Singapore is a secular state where freedom of religion is encrypted in the constitution and Malay/Muslim comprises 13.3% of the population. Adults learn Islam to deepen their…

  10. Relationships between indices of obesity and its co-morbidities in multi-ethnic Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurenberg-Yap, M.; Chew, S.K.; Lin, V.F.; Tan, B.Y.; Staveren, van W.A.; Deurenberg, P.

    2001-01-01

    Paper Relationships between indices of obesity and its co-morbidities in multi-ethnic Singapore M Deurenberg-Yap1, S K Chew2, V F P Lin1, B Y Tan2, W A van Staveren3 and P Deurenberg3,4 1Research and Information Management, Health Promotion Board, Singapore 2Department of Epidemiology and Disease Co

  11. Gender differences in the trend of colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore, 1968–2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M.C.M. de Kok (Inge); C.S. Wong (Chia Siong); K.S. Chia (Kee Seng); X. Sim (Xueling); C.S. Tan (Chuen Seng); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); H.M. Verkooijen (Helena)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and aims Over the past decades, incidence trends of colorectal cancer are sharply increased in Singapore. In this population-based study we describe changes in colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore and explore the reasons behind these changes through age-period cohort (APC

  12. Gender differences in the trend of colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore, 1968-2002.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, IM de; Wong, C.S.; Chia, K.S.; Sim, X.; Tan, C.S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Verkooijen, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Over the past decades, incidence trends of colorectal cancer are sharply increased in Singapore. In this population-based study we describe changes in colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore and explore the reasons behind these changes through age-period cohort (APC) modeling.

  13. Status of Tamil Language in Singapore: An Analysis of Family Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakara, Shanmugam

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the phenomenon of Language Maintenance and Language Shift through a qualitative study of Tamil language in the family domain in Singapore. The influence of Singapore's bilingual policy and the institutional support offered for maintenance of Tamil language provide the context in which the central research problem of the status…

  14. An Assessment of the Use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) in Teaching Geography in Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Lee Yong; Tan, Geok Chin Ivy; Zhu, Xuan; Wettasinghe, Marissa C.

    2008-01-01

    In 1998, geographical information systems (GIS) were introduced to secondary schools in Singapore as a tool for teaching geography at the secondary and junior college levels. However, general observations and feedback from school teachers suggested that only a small number of secondary schools and junior colleges in Singapore were actually using…

  15. Toward an Ecosystem for Innovation in a Newly Industrialized Economy: Singapore and the Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Poh-Kam

    2006-01-01

    In the late 1990s the Singapore government embarked on a set of far-reaching strategies intended to develop the city-state into one of the major life science R&D and industrial clusters in Asia. Besides efforts to attract leading overseas life science companies to establish operations in Singapore, the government has developed new life science…

  16. Singapore's Response to the Global War for Talent: Politics and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses how Singapore engages in the global war for talent. The paper discusses how Singapore demonstrates a Foucauldian perspective of "governmentality" in trying to mould citizens into a way of thinking that is geared suitably to an engagement in a global talent war. It first examines the social, political and economic…

  17. Is Singapore's School Geography Becoming Too Responsive to the Changing Needs of Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chew-Hung

    2014-01-01

    In understanding the divergences and commonalities in the representations of geography across different national settings, the case of Singapore is examined through the notion of politicisation of school curricula to meet the needs of "significant power groups". In particular, the development of school geography in Singapore and its…

  18. Doing Class Analysis in Singapore's Elite Education: Unravelling the Smokescreen of "Meritocratic Talk"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the specificity of the education-class nexus in an elite independent school in Singapore. It seeks to unravel the puzzle that meritocracy is dogmatically believed in Singapore in spite of evidences that point to the contrary. The paper draws on discursive (analysis of media materials) and institutional (analysis of interview…

  19. The Purposes Outdoor Education Does, Could and Should Serve in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the purposes that outdoor education does, could and should serve in Singapore. Gert Biesta's conceptualisation of three functions of education is adapted to frame deliberations on the purposes of outdoor education in Singapore's socio-political and educational milieu. The author suggests that outdoor education in…

  20. A Tale of Two Countries: Comparing Civic Education in the Philippines and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baildon, Mark; Sim, Jasmine B.-Y.; Paculdar, Agnes

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a comparative analysis of citizenship education in the Philippines and Singapore. Through an analysis of historical contexts, citizenship education policy and curriculum, it examines "Makabayan" in the Philippines and "National Education" in Singapore. It identifies particular policy and curriculum…

  1. How Singapore Junior College Science Teachers Address Curriculum Reforms: A Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Patrick; Pyvis, David

    2012-01-01

    Using grounded theory research methodology, a theory was developed to explain how Singapore junior college science teachers implement educational reforms underpinning the key initiatives of the "Thinking Schools, Learning Nation" policy. The theory suggests Singapore junior college science teachers "deal with" implementing curriculum reforms by…

  2. Singapore's Response to the Global War for Talent: Politics and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses how Singapore engages in the global war for talent. The paper discusses how Singapore demonstrates a Foucauldian perspective of "governmentality" in trying to mould citizens into a way of thinking that is geared suitably to an engagement in a global talent war. It first examines the social, political and…

  3. "Hottest Brand, Coolest Pedagogy": Approaches to Corporate Branding in Singapore's Higher Education Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Carl Jon Way

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the corporate branding efforts of Singapore's publicly funded higher education institutions within a context of neoliberal marketization. Adopting a discourse-analytic perspective, it examines the kind of branding approaches employed by Singapore's universities and polytechnics, and how these approaches are realized…

  4. Doing Business in the Global Village: Japanese Professionals on EL Needs in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Mitaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of English language (EL) education from the perspectives of Japanese and non-Japanese professionals in Singapore, based on their experiences of "doing business" in Singapore. As established career business people, the perspectives of Japanese participants offer a retrospective evaluation of their…

  5. 78 FR 38690 - Aerospace Executive Service Trade Mission at the Singapore Airshow 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    ... International Trade Administration Aerospace Executive Service Trade Mission at the Singapore Airshow 2014... Commercial Service is organizing an Aerospace Executive Service Trade Mission (AESTM) to Singapore in... representatives from a variety of U.S. aerospace-industry manufacturers and service providers. The...

  6. Why Schools in America Should Not Be Like Schools in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Barbara S. S.

    2014-01-01

    America is not Singapore and Singapore cannot be America. So why are we often comparing ourselves to high-performing countries based on international exams? Despite the educational crisis many U.S. schools are facing, Americans should be cautious not to mimic another country's model within our diverse classrooms. We are largely grounded on…

  7. Service Learning Using English Language Teaching in Pre-Service Teacher Education in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Rozario, Vilma; Low, Ee Ling; Avila, Ava Patricia; Cheung, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    In line with the Ministry of Education's vision of the delivery of twenty-first century competencies amongst all students in Singapore, the National Institute of Education in Singapore employs service learning as a pedagogical tool to develop community outreach and engagement. This paper begins with a review of related literature on service…

  8. The MBA in Singapore: A Microcosm of Communication Training for Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Priscilla S.; Wong, Irene F. H.

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses communication training provided in MBA and executive MBA programs in Singapore. The authors found that Singapore is a microcosm in terms of (a) requirements for English competency, (b) the variety of communication offerings, and (c) the lack of uniformity in the delivery of communication training. Whereas Singaporean MBA/EMBA…

  9. MARICULTURE DEVELOPMENT IN INDONESIA: Prospects and Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Rimmer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Mariculture is an important component of Indonesian fisheries and aquaculture production, directly contributing an estimated US$ 320 million in 2008. Because most mariculture production is focussed on producing for export markets, mariculture production is an important source of foreign earnings for the Indonesian economy. This paper reviews the current status and prospects for continuing development of mariculture in Indonesia. Currently the major mariculture commodity in Indonesia is seaweed for carrageenan production. Seaweed production accounts for 98% of total Indonesian mariculture production and 84% of value. The other major commodity groups are marine finfish and pearl oysters. Commodities being developed for mariculture in Indonesia include abalone and spiny lobsters. Prospects for continued development of mariculture in Indonesia appear positive. Indonesia has several advantages for mariculture development, including many potential mariculture sites, a stable tropical climate, and does not suffer from cyclonic storms. The Government of Indonesia is planning to increase aquaculture production substantially over the next four years, including mariculture production. Globally, demand for seafood products is expanding due to increasing population and increased per capita consumption of fish products. Constraints to the continued development of mariculture in Indonesia include: limited seed supply, particularly of species which cannot be economically produced in hatcheries, such as spiny lobsters; need to develop more efficient production systems for some marine finfish; the need to improve environmental sustainability by improving feeds and reducing environmental impacts; and market issues relating to environmental sustainability.

  10. Demokrasi, Korupsi dan Makhluk Halus Dalam Politik Kontemporer Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bubandt, Nils Ole

    Indonesian translation of "Democracy, Corruption and the Politics of Spirits in Contemporary Indonesia" (Routledge, 2014)......Indonesian translation of "Democracy, Corruption and the Politics of Spirits in Contemporary Indonesia" (Routledge, 2014)...

  11. Theft of electricity in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priatna, Dedy Supriadi

    In 1996, among 196 million Indonesian people, only 47.6% had access to electricity; 45.4% in rural areas and 51.5% in urban. 64% of population lived in 61,975 villages, and electric power was supplied to 69% of villages. The government has set a goal to achieve nearly universal services by the year 2014. The government can use existing installed capacity of PLN's system more efficiently. Theft of electricity, which currently constitutes a large share of PLN's losses, should be reduced. The potential of the private sector including captive power and local communities, to participate in electric power generation can also be utilized. The large interest that has been shown by the private sector might be followed by making electric power provision profitable and therefore attractive for the private sector. PLN profits, that in 1996 were only 5.22% instead of the 8% recommended by the World Bank as the best practice for Indonesia, have to be increased by improving their performance levels. The government should also seek solutions for the extremely poor households who will never be able to afford both connection charges and a monthly bill. In 1996 the extremely poor households included 5,251,788 households, constituting 12.1% of the total Indonesian households. Only 1.2% of these households had access to electricity. The objective of this study is to seek the policies that can be implemented in Indonesia that will make it possible to generate and deliver electricity profitably, and reduce theft while providing nearly universal services. For this purpose, the options that are proposed in this study are reducing theft of electricity; something like the CAMPFIRE that has successfully reduced poaching of elephants in Africa: that is, consumer-owned systems, both partially (distribution facilities) and completely (generation and distribution facilities); performance-based regulation (PBR); and solutions for supplying the extremely poor based on the minimum subsidies from the

  12. IMPORTANT NEMATODE INFECTIONS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Oemijati

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At least 13 species of intestinal nematodes and 4 species of blood and tissue nematodes have been reported infecting man in Indonesia. Five species of intestinal nematodes are very common and highly prevalent, especially in the rural areas and slums of the big cities. Those species are Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, Trichuris trichiura and Oxyuris vermicularis, while Strongyloides stercoralis is disappearing. The prevalence of the soil transmitted helminths differs from place to place, depending on many factors such as the type of soil, human behaviour etc. Three species of lymph dwelling filarial worms are known to be endemic, the urban Wuchereria bancrofti is low endemic in Jakarta and a few other cities along the north coast of Java, with Culex incriminated as vector, high endemicity is found in Irian Jaya, where Anopheline mosquitoes act as vectors. Brugia malayi is widely distributed and is still highly endemic in many areas. The zoonotic type is mainly endemic in swampy areas, and has many species of Mansonia mosquitoes as vectors. B.timori so far has been found only in the south eastern part of the archipelago and has Anopheles barbirostris as vector. Human infections with animal parasites have been diagnosed properly only when adult stages were found either in autopsies or removed tissues. Cases of infections with A. caninum, A.braziliense, A.ceylanicum, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, T.axei and Oesophagostomum apiostomum have been desribed from autopsies, while infections with Gnathostoma spiningerum have been reported from removed tissues. Infections with the larval stages such as VLM, eosinophylic meningitis, occult filanasis and other could only be suspected, since the diagnosis was extremely difficult and based on the finding and identification of the parasite. Many cases of creeping eruption which might be caused by the larval stages of A.caninum and A.braziliense and Strongyloides stercoralis

  13. Epidemiology of burn injuries in Singapore from 1997 to 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Colin; Chua, Alvin

    2005-01-01

    The Singapore General Hospital (SGH) Burn Centre receives more than 93% of burn cases occurring in Singapore. The Centre also received patients from the Southeast Asian region. The collection and analysis of burn epidemiology data in recent years from Singapore would provide insights into new prevention/management strategies in terms of population profile and economic activities. Data pertaining to burn patients admitted to SGH Burn Centre between January 1997 and December 2003 were studied retrospectively in terms of admissions' demographics, extent of burn (TBSA), causes of burns, length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality. A total of 2019 burn patients were admitted with an annual admission of 288. This presented an incidence rate for burn injury (with admission) of 0.07 per 1000 general population. The male to female ratio is 2.2:1 and the mean age of admission is 32.5years. The mean extent of burn was 11.5% and patients with burn size 10% TBSA and less made up the majority of admissions at 70.7% while patients with burn size 30% TBSA and more made up 8.2%. The most common cause of burn injury is scald at 45.6% followed by flame at 35.2%. The overall mean LOS and mortality are 10.8days and 4.61%, respectively. An annual trend of falling mortality rate for admissions with burn size >30% TBSA was observed-60% in year 2000 to 30% in 2003. This is a result of massive early excision and grafting of severe burn patients. 17.6% of patients were children of 12years and below, showing a 11.9% reduction from previous study in the 80s. This is consistent with the city's demographics of falling fertility rate and improved living and social conditions. Occupational burn admissions account for 33.4% of total admissions, a reduction of 11.6% from a study in the early 90s. Occurrence of occupational flame burns decreased by 9.5% due to an improvement in fire prevention and management of the industrial sectors. However, chemical burns increased by 12.6% as the chemical sector

  14. Wajah Nasionalisme pada Pengajaran Bahasa Indonesia di Perguruan Tinggi Prancis

    OpenAIRE

    Armin, Mardi Adi

    2014-01-01

    Hubungan bahasa dan kebudayaan Indonesia-Prancis dan sebaliknya sudah berlangsung cukup lama. Beberapa pengarang dan pelukis terkenal Indonesia seperti Raden Saleh, Salim, NH Dini, Farida Soemargono telah lama tinggal dan berkarya di Prancis. Mereka memliki keluarga sebagai hasil perkawinan dengan orang-orang Prancis, namun mereka tetap memillih kewarganegaraan Indonesia dan berkarya lewat pengajaran dan penerjemahan buku-buku berbahasa Indonesia. Pembelajaran bahasa dan kebudayaan I...

  15. Teacher Professional Development in Singapore: Depicting the Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teacher Professional Development in Singapore: Depicting the Landscape

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article depicts the landscape of teacher professional development (PD in Singapore, one of the world’s top-performing countries in education. We provide an overview of the resources available to the approximately 30,000 teachers within the 350 primary and secondary schools run by the Ministry of Education (MOE. We focus on the three main PD providers: the National Institute of Education, the Academy of Singapore Teachers and six Centers of Excellence, and schools themselves. Guided by the “Teacher Growth Model,” these providers aim at making PD coherent with teachers’ interests, the needs of schools, and the national curriculum. Teachers in Singapore are given the exceptionally high allotment of 100 voluntary hours of PD per year. There are multiple types of activities teachers can engage in, ranging from formal/structured courses and programs to more informal/reform-based initiatives (action research, lesson study. Teachers with different levels of expertise and career paths have access to different PD opportunities. Most PD is subject-specific and provides teachers with opportunities for networked learning, collegial sharing, and collaboration. In fact, all MOE schools have been recently mandated to become Professional Learning Communities (PLC. We conclude that this comprehensive set of PD resources, considered as a whole, presents the features of “high-quality” PD described in the international literature. However, we suggest that more research is needed to examine the extent to which such an ambitious PD model is enhancing teachers’ knowledge and pedagogies, and ultimately students’ learning.

  16. The influence of climate variables on dengue in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Edna; Coelho, Micheline; Oliver, Leuda; Massad, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    In this work we correlated dengue cases with climatic variables for the city of Singapore. This was done through a Poisson Regression Model (PRM) that considers dengue cases as the dependent variable and the climatic variables (rainfall, maximum and minimum temperature and relative humidity) as independent variables. We also used Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to choose the variables that influence in the increase of the number of dengue cases in Singapore, where PC₁ (Principal component 1) is represented by temperature and rainfall and PC₂ (Principal component 2) is represented by relative humidity. We calculated the probability of occurrence of new cases of dengue and the relative risk of occurrence of dengue cases influenced by climatic variable. The months from July to September showed the highest probabilities of the occurrence of new cases of the disease throughout the year. This was based on an analysis of time series of maximum and minimum temperature. An interesting result was that for every 2-10°C of variation of the maximum temperature, there was an average increase of 22.2-184.6% in the number of dengue cases. For the minimum temperature, we observed that for the same variation, there was an average increase of 26.1-230.3% in the number of the dengue cases from April to August. The precipitation and the relative humidity, after analysis of correlation, were discarded in the use of Poisson Regression Model because they did not present good correlation with the dengue cases. Additionally, the relative risk of the occurrence of the cases of the disease under the influence of the variation of temperature was from 1.2-2.8 for maximum temperature and increased from 1.3-3.3 for minimum temperature. Therefore, the variable temperature (maximum and minimum) was the best predictor for the increased number of dengue cases in Singapore.

  17. Spatial Econometric Model for Economics Development in Archipelago of Riau, as a Defense System Development in Republic of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanti Linuwih

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Province of Archipelago of Riau is a region in Indonesia which is adjacent to Singapore and Malaysia. This province has a great potential conditions diversity and natural resources. Planning on public prosperity improvement is necessary in order to increase loyalty and nationalism to Republic of Indonesia. The aim of this research is to build a spatial econometric model of economic growth in Province of Archipelago of Riau. One of the results shows that in recent 4 years Batam always gives the largest contribution to GRDP in Province of Archipelago of Riau. This can be understood that the contribution is more than 72.0% not only based on GRDP at current prices, but also based on GRDP at constant prices. Economic growth rate in regions in Province of Archipelago of Riau is higher than national economic growth rate. The model fits well because the coefficient of determination R2 is more than 85%. There are only 3 worse models, i.e. based on building construction in Batam (with R2= 59.6%, in Tanjungpinang (with R2=74.0%, and based on transportation and communication in Tanjungpinang (with R2=37.1%.

  18. Role of the state in population planning: Singapore and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, R

    1984-01-01

    in 1965. Singapore's leadership has supported family planning actively and consistently since 1966, and the country's socioeconomic development has contributed to its remarkable fertility decline. A 1975 survey of 864 persons in Singapore and a 1981 survey of 584 persons in Pakistan included questions on opinions of the appropriate role of the state in population planning. In Singapore and Pakistan respectively, 31 and 17% felt that the government should have a strict role in controlling family size, 32 and 10% felt that the government should primarily provide advice and pass laws, 18 and 18% felt the government should provide advice only, 17 and 37% felt it should be left to the married couple, and 2 and 18% didn't know. The empirical evidence suggests that the political legitimacy of the state and public policies to promote distributive justice, are both more developed in Singapore than Pakistan, have significant influence on the degree of public acceptance of state intervention in family planning.

  19. Seasonal sea level variability and anomalies in the Singapore Strait

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tkalich, P.; Vethamony, P.; Babu, M.T.; Pokratath, P.

    in the South China Sea from merged altimetry data, Global and Planetary Change, 57 (2007) 371–382. Church, J.A., Gregory, J.M., Huybrechts, P., Kuhn, M., Lambeck, K., Nhuan, M.T.,Qin,D.,Woodworth, P.L., 2001. Changes in Sea Level, in Intergovernmental Panel.... MPA (2008). Singapore tide table for the year 2008. 239 pages. White, N.J., Church, J.A., Gregory, J.M., 2005. Coastal and global averaged sea level rise for 1950 to 2000. Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L01601. doi:10.1029/2004GL021391. Wong, P.P. 1992...

  20. Identifying information technology competencies needed in Singapore nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Chia Choon

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify Singapore's healthcare industry's minimum information technology (IT) performance standard expectations for nurses' competencies. A needs assessment was conducted with a panel representing nursing education, nursing management and nursing practice. The findings in this study would provide suggestions to improve the current diploma and advanced diploma nursing programs curricula to meet the present workforce demands. The experts agreed that information technology is necessary and there were two main categories of IT skills identified, basic IT skills and work-related IT skills.

  1. Pre- and postnatal drivers of childhood intelligence: evidence from Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail; Hedges, Mary; Schilling, Chris; Morton, Susan

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to investigate what influences intelligence in early childhood. The Singapore Cohort Study of the Risk Factors of Myopia (SCORM) is used to assess determinants of childhood IQ and changes in IQ. This longitudinal data set, collected in 1999, includes a wealth of demographic, socioeconomic and prenatal characteristics. The richness of the data allows various econometric approaches to be employed, including the use of ordered and multinomial logit analysis. Mother's education is found to be a consistent and key determinant of childhood IQ. Father's education and school quality are found to be key drivers for increasing IQ levels above the average sample movement.

  2. Observing the Vertical Dimensions of Singapore's Urban Heat Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, W. T. L.; Ho, D. X. Q.

    2015-12-01

    In numerous cities, measurements of urban warmth in most urban heat island (UHI) studies are generally constrained towards surface or near-surface (Singapore, which is a rapidly urbanizing major tropical metropolis. These profiles were measured from the surface to ~100 m above ground level, a height which includes all of the urban canopy and parts of the urban boundary layer. Initial results indicate significant variations in stability measured over different land uses (e.g. urban park, high-rise residential, commercial); these profiles are also temporally dynamic, depending on the time of day and larger-scale weather conditions.

  3. Singapore's economic internationalization and its effects on work and family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, A

    2000-04-01

    There are tensions between Singapore's economic strategy of internationalization and the emphasis on family life. Frequent travelers, unaccompanied expatriates, and their families experience these tensions. The frequent or extended absences of frequent travelers and expatriates make it difficult for them to fulfill their family roles and obligations, and may lead to estrangement from their families. Families who are left behind may face role conflict and role strain, but actually draw closer in their efforts to cope with the absence of their absent members. Researchers, policy-makers, and employers can contribute towards reducing the tensions between internationalization and family togetherness.

  4. Antinomy in Legislation in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Arifin Mochtar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of reality for laws as a production of Parliament and President was canceled by the Constitutional Court, occur as a result of the legislation matter that plural reflects the injustice and legal uncertainty. The high number of judicial review becomes signal less accommodation of citizen interests and rights in a legislation product. The absence of arrangement harmony made by Parliament gives impact on plural legislation sued. This paper attempts to describe some debate antinomy that characterizes the existence of legislation in Indonesia. The analysis showed, antinomy-conflict-norm in the legislation is one thing that is difficult to avoid, especially given the poor-legislative process in the parliament today. In each establishment of legislation, synchronization and norms harmonization is not a major pressing point, but defeated by transnational politics inter-faction in the parliament that actually looked more dominant. But when these norms conflict constituted a rule of law which are simultaneous, dynamic, and meet legal ideals, would not be a problem. As long as not to cause harm to the fulfillment of constitutional rights of citizens.

  5. Tsunami risk assessment in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Strunz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS the assessment of tsunami risk is an essential part of the overall activities. The scientific and technical approach for the tsunami risk assessment has been developed and the results are implemented in the national Indonesian Tsunami Warning Centre and are provided to the national and regional disaster management and spatial planning institutions in Indonesia.

    The paper explains the underlying concepts and applied methods and shows some of the results achieved in the GITEWS project (Rudloff et al., 2009. The tsunami risk assessment has been performed at an overview scale at sub-national level covering the coastal areas of southern Sumatra, Java and Bali and also on a detailed scale in three pilot areas. The results are provided as thematic maps and GIS information layers for the national and regional planning institutions. From the analyses key parameters of tsunami risk are derived, which are integrated and stored in the decision support system of the national Indonesian Early Warning Centre. Moreover, technical descriptions and guidelines were elaborated to explain the developed approach, to allow future updates of the results and the further development of the methodologies, and to enable the local authorities to conduct tsunami risk assessment by using their own resources.

  6. Agarwood-planted tree inventory in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjaman, Maman; Hidayat, Asep

    2017-01-01

    Indonesia has as a country that has a high diversity of agarwood-producing trees (APT) species compared to other countries in Asia. Unfortunately, the populations of APT species have declined significantly. The purpose of this study was to record and maps the agarwood-planted trees in Indonesia as a baseline for future management of this species. The questioners were distributed to 31 of provinces in Indonesia. The feedback came from 21 prefectures (67.7%), consisting from 121 regencies (36.6%) those in detail came from 579 district, 1,257 villages and 4,757 farmers group. The major of APT species planted by farmer groups are Aquilaria malaccensis, A. microcarpa, and Gyrinops versteegii. The potency of APT in Indonesia is 3.4 million trees, consisting from 0.2 million tree with DBH > 20 cm and 3.2 million tree with DBH Indonesia is located in Central Kalimantan (24.7%) followed by North Sumatera (17.9%). The prediction of agarwood products and its derivate will be obtained in 2020 with economic value might be reached 1.6 trillion rupiahs if the inoculation technique used the standard procedure recommended by FORDA. These results showed how huge the potential of APT will be developed in the future.

  7. Socio-Economic Factors on Indonesia Education Disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzizah, Yuni

    2015-01-01

    Since 1998, regional governments in Indonesia have had greater autonomy due to the commencement of a reformation movement across Indonesia. Large portions of education management were delegated to the regional governments. Because of this, the education level varies strongly across Indonesia' provinces. Referring to the data provided by the…

  8. Strategic Planning Implementation in Indonesia’s Transmigration Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-01

    replaced the Hinduism of the :ndonesians. (Now 90 7,ercent of Indonesia are moslem) excekt for the Balinese, some Javanese , and some Chinese. Currently...block number) I Transmigration, Indonesia , Strategic Planning,"Indon ia s e- velopment Plan, Presidential Decree, t N ASe- Migration, Strategy, Racial...84 5 LIST OF TABLES I. Pcpulation Density of Indonesia in 1978 and 1980 .. ....... ....... ...... *,2 II. Distribution

  9. EMPLOYER BRANDING PT. CITIBANK INDONESIA PADA KALANGAN WORKFORCE DI MAKASSAR

    OpenAIRE

    -, RUZKYHAQ

    2016-01-01

    2016 Employer Branding PT. Citibank Indonesia pada Kalangan Workforce di Makassar Ruzkyhaq Nurdjanah Hamid Shinta Dewi S. Tikson Jurusan Manajemen, Fakultas Ekonomi dan Bisnis, Universitas Hasanuddin JL. Perintis Kemerdekaan Km.10 Makassar, 90245 Sulawesi Selatan, Indonesia Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui dan menganalisis pengaruh Employer Branding PT. Citibank Indonesia yang menghasilkan dua Atribut Daya Tarik yang terdiri dari Atribut Instrument...

  10. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... COMMISSION Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading... United States at less than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Governments of China and Indonesia....

  11. KONDISI KESEHATAN LINGKUNGAN DI INDONESIA DAN ANGKA KEMATIAN BAYI, ANGKA KEMATIAN ANAK BALITA SERTA ANGKA KEMATIAN BALITA MENURUT DATA SUSENAS 1998, 2001 DAN 2003 (Environmental Health and Child Mortality in Indonesia Based on Susenas Data of 1998, 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supraptini Supraptini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental Health and Child Mortality in Indonesia Based on Susenas Data of 1998, 2001 and 2003.Environmental health related disease are still problem in Indonesia and these factors are importence in the public daily life. Childhood mortality rate which include Infant Mortality Rate (IMR, Child Mortality Rate (CMR and Under five Mortality Rate have been used as social welfare and public health indicators. Registration system for death in lndonesia not good enough, so we count number of death using indirect methode so we used data survey. National Social and Economics Survey (NSES/Susenas as one of data survey which every year collected can used to analysis and count the environmental health related with number of death include childhood mortality rate. Data used for this analysis is NSES Modul 1998, 2001 and 2003 and the analysis unit is house hold. The scoring of healthy housing based upon the total scoring of 8 parameters and divided into 3 categories e.g good, moderate, and bad. The result showed that the factor of environment health 'bad' categories produced IMR, CMR, and Under live Mortality rate was higest. Environmental health 'good' categories in Indonesia contributed for decreasing CMR (age 1-4 years, in Java Bali especially to decreasing for Under five Mortality Rate (age 1-59 months. But in East Indonesian Area for five years (1998-2003 or 'good' categories there are increasing tor IMR, CMR, and Under five Mortality Rate. In urban or rural area there are not different environmental health 'good' categories will be contributed for decreasing death, exepted for CMR (age 1-4 years in urban area there are the same for 'good' categories or 'moderate' categories. The trend of IMR,CMR and Under five Mortality Rate increasing in 2001 but decreasing in 2003. Indonesian IMR in 2001 at seven grade in ASEAN after Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei Darussalam, Thailand, The Philippines, and Vietnam.Keywords: Enviromental health, Infant Mortality Rate

  12. Melacak Akar Radikalisme Islam di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rizky Mardhatillah Umar

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Radicalism nowadays becomes a popular discourse in Indonesia. The fall of Soeharto in 1998 was also followed by the rise of some groups which enroots their ideology and value with the ideology of Islamic political movement in Middle East. Many authors even connect this phenomenon to terrorism. By those points of view, they try to encounter terrorism by de-radicalizing people and promoting the empowerment of moderate society. But this point of view is argued by some authors who think that terrorism differs from radicalism. It is structural problem –poverty, oppression, political authoritarianism— which implies violence and terror. It leads us to a question: What cause radicalism? This article attempts to analyze the historical and political-economic root of Radical Islam group in Indonesia. By analyzing those problems, we will elaborate the problem of Islamic radicalism in structural perspective of post-New Order Indonesia.

  13. Analisis Industri Pengolahan Susu di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    lim Sanny

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Milk is the main food for all ages. In addition, many products can be made from milk such as food, beverages, cheese, butter, yogurt, etc.. Opportunities milk processing industry in Indonesia is very good, considering that Indonesia with a population based on census 2010 reached 237.6 million people. If viewed from the supply side, current milk production in Indonesia is still very low, the number of dairy farmers around 118.75 thousand breeders. National dairy cow productivity stagnated, the average milk production ranges between 8-12 liters per day, with a scale of 2-3 maintenance per family breeder breeding. In addition, 90% of milk production resulting from farm people, so the quality and productivity cannot fulfill the demand of milk in the country, so most still have to import. 

  14. Fluctuations in Direct Investment in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Taufik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze the effect of interest rate, Gross Domestid Product (GDP per capita, exchange rate Rupiah to U.S.$, net export, tax rate, tax incentives (tax allowances, and ease of service and licensing to FDI in Indonesia during the period 1985-2011. The analysis model used in this study is a multiple regression model of time series data so will know the factors affecting FDI in Indonesia during the period 1985-2011. The result shows that variable interest rate, GDP per capita, exchange rate Rupiah to U.S.$, tax rate, tax incentives (tax allowances, and ease of service and licensing have a significant effect on the entry of FDI in Indonesia, but the net export variable have not a significant effect on the entry FDI.

  15. Reaktualisasi Pengamalan Nilai Pancasila untuk Demokrasi Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiani Mutiani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancasila as an integral (comprehensively is a solid supporting to the state established in Indonesia. Pancasila is maintained and developed with the aim to protect and develop the dignity and rights of all citizens of the nation to democracy in Indonesia. Posts in this article aims to explain how the urgency of re-actualization of Pancasila. As a method of this paper is literature study. The writer was conducting Pancasila in the context of political education in Indonesia emphasis on understanding the unity and integrity of the nation and the values listed in UUD 1945 with its main foundation of Pancasila. As the result, therefor, Pancasila is expected to realize the Good and Smart Citizenship, which, law-abiding citizens, to the literacy of citizens to political issues. Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15408/sd.v2i2.2822

  16. KAJIAN BISNIS FRANCHISE MAKANAN DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Astuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Food franchising business in Indonesia is growing up very fast. Factors that urge the growth are the specific characteristics of franchise inself, the rise of market demand, the availability of skilled labor, the high of return on investment and the internal factors such as the motivation, personality and the changing life style. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Bisnis franchise makanan di Indonesia berkembang dengan cepat. Beberapa faktor yang mendorong pertumbuhannya adalah ciri-ciri dari franchise itu sendiri , meningkatnya daya beli, tersedianya sumber daya dengan keahlian yang dibutuhkan, return on investment yang tinggi serta faktor internal seperti motivasi, kepribadian yang terbuka serta perubahan gaya hidup Kata kunci: franchise, studi pemasaran, studi keuangan.

  17. PENDIDIKAN MULTIKULTURAL BAGI MASYARAKAT INDONESIA YANG MAJEMUK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhiddinur Kamal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of Indonesia is a national asset which has long been considered by the founders of this nation.  It is thought that being diversity is not a barrier to realize the unity of the Republic of Indonesia.  However, the current state of our nation building indicates that such a spirit has declined as conflicts among the tribes lead to unlawful acts which raise the issues of tribes, tradition or race, and religion.  Education as a tool to resolve problems either as a state or a nation.  As a multicultural country, Indonesia is striving to horizontal conflict which may break the unity.  Multicultural education is, therefore, expected to be able to resolve the national conflicts.Copyright © 2013 by Al-Ta'lim All right reservedDOI: 10.15548/jt.v20i3.42

  18. Penggugusan Provinsi di Indonesia Berdasarkan Kondisi Kesehatan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarinah Prasetyo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Untuk melaksanakan penelitian di Indonesia yang dapat mewakili 33 provinsi, sampling bertahap banyak dilakukan, dan tahap awalnya adalah memilih provinsi. Pada penelitian bidang kesehatan, agar provinsi terpilih mewakili kondisi kesehatan penduduk Indonesia, seyogyanya provinsi dikelompokkan berdasarkan variabel terkait kesehatan. Untuk itu, secara statistik dapat dilakukan analisis gugus (cluster analysis memakai data dari berbagai sumber, dengan 27 variabel mencakup prevalensi beberapa penyakit infeksi dan status gizi, akses ke pelayanan kesehatan, status demografi, indeks pembangunan manusia, dan aspek keuangan. Hasil akhir menunjukkan bahwa ada 4 gugus provinsi di Indonesia, pada masing-masing gugus terdapat sebanyak 4, 8, 7, dan 14 provinsi. Proses penggugusan dengan analisis gugus semacam ini dapat diterapkan dengan memakai data yang diperbaharui dan hasilnya dapat dimanfaatkan sebagai salah satu pertimbangan untuk sampling provinsi di Indonesia. Amultistage sampling procedure is often used in conducting a research that represents all 33 provinces in Indonesia, and the first step for the procedure is the sample selection of provinces. In the area of health research, it is recommended that the province selection is based on the stratification of provinces using health related variables. Cluster analysis is a statistical technique possibly employed utilizing data from many sources. In this particular application, it involves 27 important health variables which reflect important communicable diseases and nutritional status, access to health services, demographic situation, human development index, and financial factor. This cluster analysis produces four clusters of province, with each of them comprising of 4, 8, 7, and 14 provinces. This statistical clustering technique of provinces can be implemented and considered in the sampling process of provinces in Indonesia using the updated data.

  19. State carnivals and the subvention of multiculturalism in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Daniel P S

    2011-03-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the specificities of Asian multiculturalism in relation to ethnic pluralism, citizenship and developmental state formation. This article examines these relationships by analysing three carnival events in colonial and postcolonial Singapore that were organized by the state to promote its official multiculturalism. Through its cultural logics of horizontal racial segmentation, cascading symbolic authority from the state to co-opted communal representatives and multi-modal ritual iteration, the 1937 King George VI coronation celebrations proffered an imperial multiculturalism based on mediating plural groups and procedural norms. Adopting the same cultural logics in the 1970s, the newly-independent nation-state revived and transformed Chingay, a creole Chinese religious procession, into an annual parade celebrating the nation as comprising racially plural groups bound together by the modern ethos of progress the developmental state exemplified. In the 2000s, Chingay has been turned into an international spectacle celebrating Singapore as a cosmopolitan global city of hybridizing multiculturalism. But indicative of new racial-class segmentation, the old nation-building pluralism is promoted by Racial Harmony Day carnivals held in suburban public housing neighborhoods. This bifurcated multiculturalism reflects the developmental state's attempts to deal with new citizenship trends as they grind against the old ethnic pluralism. While faced with the same issues globalization brings, this postcolonial multiculturalism is distinctively different from liberal multiculturalism, not least because the subvention of multiculturalism is achieved through the state appropriation of vernacular cultural practices through its carnivals.

  20. Four Corners Television History: Gallipoli and the Fall of Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Blackburn

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses how the Australian current affairs programme, Four Corners, which follows a style modelled on the BBC programme Panorama, has represented Australian military history in two of its programmes, Gallipoli: The Fatal Shore and No Prisoners on Australian deserters at the fall of Singapore. Chris Masters was the reporter on both programmes. These historical documentaries claim to investigate Australian Anzac mythology. Four Corners is noted for its rigorous pursuit of issues in current affairs. Programmes construct argument that the journalists steadfastly pursue in order to ‘expose the truth’. Rather than neutrally representing both sides of a debate, the programmes tend to take the side that the journalists perceive to be in the public interest. Examining how Four Corners has applied its own style of investigative journalism to the Anzac mythology is explored by outlining whether the programmes follow Ken Burn’s ideas of documentary-makers as ‘tribal story-teller’ crafting stories that uphold national identity or Bill Nichols’ view that documentary is an argument that is representative of reality rather than reflects reality. Examining the history of Gallipoli and the fall of Singapore in the Four Corners programmes tends suggest that the journalists working on the programmes preferred to reaffirm the assumptions of the Anzac legend, but attack or ignore historians and evidence that questions it. The programmes appear to be a mixture of Burns’s and Nichols’ ideas of documentary making.

  1. Influenza excess mortality from 1950-2000 in tropical Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Tropical regions have been shown to exhibit different influenza seasonal patterns compared to their temperate counterparts. However, there is little information about the burden of annual tropical influenza epidemics across time, and the relationship between tropical influenza epidemics compared with other regions. METHODS: Data on monthly national mortality and population was obtained from 1947 to 2003 in Singapore. To determine excess mortality for each month, we used a moving average analysis for each month from 1950 to 2000. From 1972, influenza viral surveillance data was available. Before 1972, information was obtained from serial annual government reports, peer-reviewed journal articles and press articles. RESULTS: The influenza pandemics of 1957 and 1968 resulted in substantial mortality. In addition, there were 20 other time points with significant excess mortality. Of the 12 periods with significant excess mortality post-1972, only one point (1988 did not correspond to a recorded influenza activity. For the 8 periods with significant excess mortality periods before 1972 excluding the pandemic years, 2 years (1951 and 1953 had newspaper reports of increased pneumonia deaths. Excess mortality could be observed in almost all periods with recorded influenza outbreaks but did not always exceed the 95% confidence limits of the baseline mortality rate. CONCLUSION: Influenza epidemics were the likely cause of most excess mortality periods in post-war tropical Singapore, although not every epidemic resulted in high mortality. It is therefore important to have good influenza surveillance systems in place to detect influenza activity.

  2. Curriculum as praxis: Ensuring quality technical education in Singapore for the 21st century.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiew Ming Yek

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Singapore, a small island city-state, has achieved notable economic advancement within 40 years since independence. It is fast becoming a global city and a knowledge society. In education and training, the Singapore system has evolved from its British roots. Macro performance indicators of participation rate, literacy rate and mean years of schooling, show that the current education system can be regarded as highly successful. The contributions of general education as well as technical education and training to the overall success of the nation are often cited. Technical education and training, which is globally perceived as having a lower status than "academic" curricula, has largely overcome its "image" problem in Singapore. Singaporeans have seemingly embraced technical education and training as an accessible, attractive mode of education, which therefore enjoys a high participation rate. The success and quality of technical education and training were affirmed when its main provider, the Institute of Technical Education, became the first educational institution in Singapore to win the Singapore Quality Award in October 2005. This paper provides a review of the contemporary education system and curriculum in Singapore with a focus on technical education and training vis-à-vis a vision of education and training in and for postmodern knowledge societies. Suggestions are made on how the technical education and training sector in Singapore can further develop and thrive in the 21st century, while continuing to be accessible and of high quality.

  3. Developing Singapore Driving Cycle for passenger cars to estimate fuel consumption and vehicular emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Sze-Hwee; Wong, Yiik-Diew; Chang, Victor Wei-Chung

    2014-11-01

    Singapore has pledged to attain 7-11% Business-As-Usual carbon emissions reduction by 2020. Road transport sector is a significant source of carbon emissions, estimated to be the third largest sector in Singapore. A current gap in environmental evaluation for road transport activities in Singapore is the lack of a representative driving cycle for passenger cars (64% of the total population of 974,170 vehicles). This Singapore Driving Cycle (SDC) is hence developed for Singapore roads and traffic conditions. A chase-car (instrumented vehicle) was used to collect on-road data along 12 designed routes, and circulation driving on highly utilized arterial roads (including those in Central Business District (CBD) and both inner and outer ring roads fringing the CBD area). The SDC was thus hence constructed, with consideration of road type proportions, time periods and desired distance, duration and peak-lull proportion. In essence, the SDC is a 2400-s speed-time profile to represent the driving pattern for passenger car in Singapore. Microscopic estimation model (CMEM) shows that, as compared to SDC, the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) underestimates most of the vehicular emissions (fuel, CO2, HC and NOx by 5%, 5%, 22% and 47%, respectively) and overestimates CO by 8%. The SDC is thus more suitable than the NEDC that is currently in use in Singapore; the SDC can be used to generate more accurate fuel consumption and emissions ratings for various uses (for example, inventory of vehicular emissions and fuel economy labelling).

  4. Enhancing the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, J.; Chong, E.

    2011-12-01

    Singapore has a long tradition of geography education at the secondary and Junior College levels (ages 12-18). Although most geography teachers teach both human and physical geography, many of them have received more extensive university training in human geography. The Earth Obervatory of Singapore (EOS), a newly established research institute at Nanyang Technological University (NTU), is building an education and outreach program to integrate its research across formal and informal education. We are collaborating with the Singapore Ministry of Education to enhance the earth-science content and inquiry basis of physical geography education in Singapore classrooms. EOS is providing input to national curriculum, textbook materials, and teaching resources, as well as providing inquiry-based field seminars and workshops for inservice teachers. An upcoming 5-year "Our Dynamic Earth" exhibit at the Science Centre Singapore will be a centerpoint of outreach to younger students, their teachers and parents, and to the community at large. On a longer time scale, the upcoming undergraduate program in earth science at NTU, the first of its kind in Singapore, will provide a stream of earth scientists into the geography teaching workforce. Developing ties between EOS and the National Institute of Education will further enhance teacher training. With a highly centralized curriculum, small land area, high-performing student population, and key stakeholders eager to collaborate with EOS, Singapore presents an unusual opportunity to impact classrooms on a national scale.

  5. Indonesia; World Bank assists Second Population Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Indonesia's First Population Project, funded jointly by the International Development Association and UNFPA, was started in 1972 and provided for construction of service and training facilities, equipment, research and evaluation studies, education, and communication activities. The national family planning program has made progress in the last 20 years. Acceptor and family planning personnel statistics are given. The World Bank has recently awarded Indonesia a loan to fund its Second Population Project, to aid in reaching the goal of a 50% reduction in fertility by 2000.

  6. Policy Implementation Decentralization Government in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kardin M. Simanjuntak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Decentralization in Indonesia is that reforms not completed and until the current implementation is not maximized or have not been successful. The essence of decentralization is internalising cost and benefit' for the people and how the government closer to the people. That's the most important essence of essence 'decentralization’. However, the implementation of decentralization in Indonesia is still far from the expectations. It is shown that only benefits of decentralization elite and local authorities, decentralization is a neo-liberal octopus, decentralization of public services are lacking in character, decentralization without institutional efficiency, decentralization fosters corruption in the area, and quasi-fiscal decentralization.

  7. Internationalization of Psychology Education in Indonesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarlito W. Sarwono

    2014-01-01

    Psychology in Indonesia was born from a medical faculty in 1953, a few years after the independence of Indonesia. It was founded primarily to get the right man in the right place that is very urgent at that time after the Dutch colonial government left many vital public and private positions empty. From the time it was born, the Indonesian psychology has moved vice-versa from indigenous psychology to universalism, from East to West, and from qualitative to quantitative methodology. The internationalization process of Indonesian psychology is discussed from the author's personal view.

  8. Population and food problems in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusli, S

    1979-06-01

    This discussion examines the relationship between population growth and food problems in Indonesia and their connection with the total food production requirement particularly of staples or basic foods in the country. In 1976 Indonesia's population numbered about 130 million. The uneven distribution of population by regions is 1 of the outstanding features of Indonesia's demographic situation. The estimates of mortality levels for the period 1961-1971 mostly refer to life expectancies at birth over 40 years. Using 1971 census data Nicoli and Mamas estimated that life expectancy at birth in Indonesia during 1960-1970 was around 45-46 years. Heligman, considering the situation of economics, food, health facilities, and so forth questioned that there was a considerable improvement in mortality levels during the 1960s compared with that in the 1950s. In the 1960-1970 period the infant mortality rate was estimated at about 143/1000 births. The crude birthrate was around 43-44/1000 for the whole of Indonesia over the 1970-1971 period. Currently, Indonesia is implementing a family planning program which the government adopted in 1968. The recent estimate of crude birthrate is about 38/1000. Indonesia's projected population in 1990-1991 ranges from 180-202 million; its range will be from 209-272 million around the year 2000. A wide range of foods is produced in Indonesia, but some are more prominent than others. These are the basic foods such as rice, corn (maize), cassava. The availability of food production per head per year in Indonesia is at this time relatively similar to what it was in the pre World War 2 period, although rice production per head per year has increased in recent years due to wet land extensification and the involvement of Indonesia in the green revolution. Non-rice basic food available per head continues to seem far below that in the pre World War 2 period. Population increase is in part responsible for the deteriorating non-rice basic food available

  9. Popular Music in Singapore: Cultural Interactions and the “Inauthenticity” of Singaporean Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Lequn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The popular music industry in Singapore advocates for Western music as being superior to local Singaporean music. Singaporeans are usually skeptical about the quality of Singaporean musicians, because of the “inauthentic” stereotype of Singaporean music. So this paper analyses the culture interaction and Singapore music from some current phenomenon that J-pop, K-pop and other music types become an integral part of music culture in Singapore. At the same time, this paper elaborates Authenticity and its importance in Singaporean music and media industry and its influences.

  10. A new owl species of the genus Otus (aves: strigidae) from Lombok, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, George; King, Ben F; Verbelen, Philippe; Trainor, Colin R

    2013-01-01

    The avifauna of Indonesia is one of the richest in the world but the taxonomic status of many species remains poorly documented. The sole species of scops owl known from Lombok has long been assigned to the widespread Moluccan Scops Owl Otus magicus on the basis of superficial similarities in morphology. Field work in 2003 has shown that the territorial song of the scops owls inhabiting the foothills of Gunung Rinjani differs dramatically from that of O. magicus and is more similar to those of Rufescent Scops Owl O. rufescens and Singapore Scops Owl O. cnephaeus. Detailed comparisons of sound recordings and museum specimens with those of other scops owls in Wallacea and the Indo-Malayan region have confirmed the distinctiveness of the Lombok population. We describe Otus jolandae as a new species, the Rinjani Scops Owl. It is locally common at elevations from 25-1350 m. and occurs within Gunung Rinjani National Park. The new species is known from seven specimens collected by Alfred Everett in 1896. Otus jolandae represents the first endemic bird species from Lombok.

  11. Singapore’s willingness to pay for mitigation of transboundary forest-fire haze from Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Wijedasa, Lahiru S.; Chisholm, Ryan A.

    2017-02-01

    Haze pollution over the past four decades in Southeast Asia is mainly a result of forest and peatland fires in Indonesia. The economic impacts of haze include adverse health effects and disruption to transport and tourism. Previous studies have used a variety of approaches to assess the economic impacts of haze and the forest fires more generally. But no study has used contingent valuation to assess non-market impacts of haze on individuals. Here we apply contingent valuation to estimate impacts of haze on Singapore, one of most severely affected countries. We used a double-bounded dichotomous-choice survey design and the Kaplan-Meier-Turnbull method to infer the distribution of Singaporeans’ willingness to pay (WTP) for haze mitigation. Our estimate of mean individual WTP was 0.97% of annual income (n = 390). To calculate total national WTP, we stratified by income, the demographic variable most strongly related to individual WTP. The total WTP estimate was 643.5 million per year (95% CI [527.7 million, 765.0 million]). This estimate is comparable in magnitude to previously estimated impacts of Indonesia’s fires and also to the estimated costs of peatland protection and restoration. We recommend that our results be incorporated into future cost–benefit analyses of the fires and mitigation strategies.

  12. Kewenangan Bank Indonesia Dalam Likuiditas Bank Umum

    OpenAIRE

    Silvana R

    2008-01-01

    Perbankan merupakan pokok dari sistem keuangan setiap negara, karena perbankan merupakan salah satu motor penggerak pembangunan seluruh bangsa. Krisis perbankan berdampak pada turunnya kepercayaan masyarakat terhadap industri perbankan. Berbagai masalah di sektor perbankan yang tidak terdeteksi secara dini akan mengakibatkan runtuhnya kepercayaan masyarakat terhadap industri perbankan, Skripsi mi mengemukakan bagaimana penilaian kesehatan bank umum yang dilakukan oleh Bank Indonesia, bagai...

  13. Doing Business 2014 Economy Profile : Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank; International Finance Corporation

    2013-01-01

    This economy profile presents the Doing Business indicators for Indonesia. In a series of annual reports, Doing Business assesses regulations affecting domestic firms in 189 economies and ranks the economies in 10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders. This year's report data cover regulations measured from June 2012 thro...

  14. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessa, A. C.; Field, R. D.; Pappenberger, F.; Langner, A.; Englhart, S.; Weber, U.; Stockdale, T.; Siegert, F.; Kaiser, J. W.; Moore, J.

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Based on analyses of long, up-to-date series observations on burnt area, rainfall, and tree cover, we demonstrate that fire activity is negatively correlated with rainfall and is positively associated with deforestation in Indonesia. There is a contrast between the southern region of Kalimantan (high fire activity, high tree cover loss, and strong non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire) and the central region of Kalimantan (low fire activity, low tree cover loss, and weak, non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire). The ECMWF seasonal forecast provides skilled forecasts of burnt and fire-affected area with several months lead time explaining at least 70% of the variance between rainfall and burnt and fire-affected area. Results are strongly influenced by El Niño years which show a consistent positive bias. Overall, our findings point to a high potential for using a more physical-based method for predicting fires with several months lead time in the tropics rather than one based on indexes only. We argue that seasonal precipitation forecasts should be central to Indonesia's evolving fire management policy.

  15. Leptocorisa Latreille in Indonesia (Heteroptera, Coreidae, Alydinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siwi, Sri S.; Doesburg, van P.H.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of the taxonomy and distribution of the Leptocorisa species in the Indonesian archipelago, primarily based on the material present in the Dutch museums, and on data from the literature. Thirteen species are found to be present in Indonesia: L. acuta (Thunberg), L. ayamaruensis Does

  16. Checklist of woody plants of Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keßler, P.J.A.; Bos, M.M.; Sierra Daza, S.E.C.; Kop, A.; Willemse, L.P.M.; Pitopang, R.; Gradstein, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Sulawesi comprises of about 182,870 km² of land and fewer botanical specimens (about 23 specimens per 100 km², Whitten et al., 1987) have been collected here than in any other major island in Indonesia. This island is up to date botanically poorly explored and according to Van Steenis (1950) about 3

  17. PERANAN NERACA PEMBAYARAN INTERNASIONAL DALAM PEREKONOMIAN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismadiyanti P Astuti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The balance of payments is an indicator of economic fundamentals. Balance of payment describes the ability of a country to gain foreign exchange and foreign payments. This study aimed to analyze the determinants of the balance of payments on the Indonesian economy . It used  Thirlwall and Hussain models and also Duasa empirical model. This study used secondary data years 1987-2014, namely foreign exchange reserves, exports, foreign investment, the exchange rate and the real gross national income. The results showed that the performance of the balance of payments in Indonesia can be explained by the models shown in accordance with the hypothesis, but on several variables did not show a significant correlation. Neraca pembayaran internasional memiliku peranan penting sebagai indikator fundamental perekonomian suatu negara. Hal ini karena neraca pembayaran berkaitan dengan kemampuan suatu negara dalam menyerap devisa dan pembayaran luar negeri. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis peranan neraca pembayaran terhadap perekonomian Indonesia yang didekati dengan model Thirlwall dan Hussain dan menganalisis determinan neraca pembayaran Indonesia yang didekati dengan model empiris Duasa. Penelitian ini menggunakan data sekunder tahun 1987-2014 yaitu cadangan devisa, ekspor, penanaman modal asing, nilai tukar dan Pendapatan nasional bruto rill. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa neraca perilaku neraca pembayaran di Indonesia dapat dijelaskan dengan kedua model tersebut yang ditunjukkan dengan kesesuaian dengan hipotesis, namun pada beberapa variabel tidak menunjukkan hubungan yang signifikan.

  18. Difficulties in initial algebra learning in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paulus; van den Heuvel - Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian student

  19. Language in education: The case of Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nababan, P. W. J.

    1991-03-01

    Although over 400 languages are spoken in Indonesia, by 1986 60% of the population had some competence in the Indonesian national language, a substantial increase over 1971. Bahasa Indonesia was declared the state language in the 1945 constitution, and reformed spelling was agreed in 1972. It is the sole medium of instruction, except in the first three grades of elementary school in nine regions, where vernaculars may be used transitionally. Thereafter vernaculars are taught as school subjects. Bilingualism, and even multilingualism in Indonesian and one or more vernaculars and/or foreign languages is increasing, and despite the use of Indonesian for official documentary purposes at all levels it does not appear that vernaculars are dying out, although their spheres of use are restricted. Bahasa Indonesia fulfils the four functions: cognitive, instrumental, integrative and cultural, while vernaculars are only integrative and cultural. The curriculum of Indonesian, established centrally, is pragmatic or communicative. It is expressed in a standard syllabus for course books. This approach equally applies to foreign languages, which are introduced at secondary level, although here receptive reading is given more weight than productive skills. A full description of the syllabus organization of the various languages is given. Nonformal language learning also takes place, in the national basic education and literacy programme, which teaches Bahasa Indonesia, and in vocational courses in foreign languages for commerce.

  20. Factors Affecting Internationalization of Indonesia Franchise Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Halim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Franchise is one of successful business strategies in business expansion. Franchise format has been already adopted in all countries. The success is proven in the world and also in Indonesia. Franchise system can be implemented not only in franchisor country but also in other countries. The spirit of internalization is not only because of market saturated, but also to increase reputation of franchise companies and to follow competitors or customers. Important thing discussed in this research is the franchise life-cycle, franchise growth model, and franchise companies’ profile.  It is found that the Indonesia franchise companies are in the introduction stage. The stage in life-cycle shows its reputation. This study used literature review as methodology, and the purpose of this study is to give a big picture for Indonesia franchise companies to make internationalization. There are some Indonesia franchise business profiles in the discussion part. The factors affecting franchise internationalization were analyzed by PESTEL analysis. Some strategies should be prepared in making decision to go international.  At the end, there are some recommendations and future research relating to internationalize franchise business.

  1. Seismic risk assessment for road in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyfur, Mona Foralisa; Pribadi, Krishna S.

    2016-05-01

    Road networks in Indonesia consist of 446,000 km of national, provincial and local roads as well as toll highways. Indonesia is one of countries that exposed to various natural hazards, such as earthquakes, floods, landslides, etc. Within the Indonesian archipelago, several global tectonic plates interact, such as the Indo-Australian, Pacific, Eurasian, resulting in a complex geological setting, characterized by the existence of seismically active faults and subduction zones and a chain of more than one hundred active volcanoes. Roads in Indonesia are vital infrastructure needed for people and goods movement, thus supporting community life and economic activities, including promoting regional economic development. Road damages and losses due to earthquakes have not been studied widely, whereas road disruption caused enormous economic damage. The aim of this research is to develop a method to analyse risk caused by seismic hazard to roads. The seismic risk level of road segment is defined using an earthquake risk index, adopting the method of Earthquake Disaster Risk Index model developed by Davidson (1997). Using this method, road segments' risk level can be defined and compared, and road risk map can be developed as a tool for prioritizing risk mitigation programs for road networks in Indonesia.

  2. Astro Talk in Social Media - Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamani, A.; Soegijoko, W.

    2015-03-01

    Social media is a new trend in communicating and connecting to people. It is also a good choice to build awareness of astronomy as issues spread easily and quickly, creating hot topics. This paper will analyze the trend of astro talk in Indonesia and hope to inspire astronomers to use social media in raising awareness.

  3. Difficulties in Initial Algebra Learning in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian students' achievement in the algebra domain was…

  4. Kontestasi Kekuasaan dan Keteladanan Semu di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael HB Raditya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Kepemimpinan di Indonesia merupakan persoalan yang menarik untuk ditelaah. Jika bertolak dari tataran diakronis, secara kronologis Indonesia telah mengalami pelbagai macam fase kepemimpinan dan rezim. Ihwal ini dapat menjadi stimulan positif jika masyarakat dapat mengartikulasikan pengalaman bernegaranya dengan tepat. Kontestasi kekuasaan pun tidak dapat terhindarkan, terlebih setiap pemimpin melakukan persaingan dalam memperebutkan kekuasaan. Kontestasi ini tidak hanya merujuk pada tingkat lokal, namun hingga tingkat nasional. Berbagai aspek pun turut menjadi faktor utama dari kontestasi tersebut, seperti tipe kepemimpinan aristokrasi dan demokrasi, hingga perbedaan gender pemimpinnya. Ihwal tersebut turut mengejewantah kan bahwa keteladanan yang didasarkan atas beberapa kontekstual, bersifat pseudo, atau semu. Dalam mengupas ihwal tersebut, telaah yang digunakan merujuk pada pemahaman Barkerakan agen, dan Gramsci akan hegemoni. Tidak hanya itu, Kouzes dan Posner digunakan untuk menilik parameter keteladanan. Asumsi penulis, keteladanan merupakan unsur yang tercipta untuk menghegomoni agen di dalamnya. Bertolak dari mempertanyakan keteladanan, maka pembahasan akan lebih mempertimbangkan aspek agen, hegemoni dan kuasa. Penulis menyadari bahwa tidak mungkin meneliti semua pola kepemimpinan yang ada di Indonesia, maka rujukan contoh kepemimpinan didasarkan pada beberapa contoh di era kolonial, orde lama, orde baru,dan pemerintahan kini. Penelitian ini mencoba untuk mengupas persoalan keteladanan dalam kepemimpinan yang kerap diunggulkan kepemimpinan yang ada di Indonesia.

  5. Cultural Beliefs about Autism in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riany, Yulina Eva; Cuskelly, Monica; Meredith, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Cultural beliefs about parenting have an important influence on parenting behaviours, including considerations about appropriate ways to parent children with autism. Although Indonesia has one of the largest and most ethnically diverse populations in the world, little is known about cultural beliefs regarding children with autism within Indonesian…

  6. Child Labor and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kis-Katos; R.A. Sparrow (Robert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examine the effects of trade liberalization on child work in Indonesia. Our estimation strategy identifies geographical differences in the effects of trade policy through district level exposure to reduction in import tariff barriers. We use a balanced panel of 261 districts, based o

  7. Child Labor and Trade Liberalization in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis-Katos, Krisztina; Sparrow, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We examine the effects of trade liberalization on child work in Indonesia, identifying geographical differences in the effects of trade policy through district level exposure to reduction in import tariff barriers, from 1993 to 2002. The results suggest that increased exposure to trade liberalization is associated with a decrease in child work…

  8. Indonesia wrestles with its chronic electricity crisis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, N.

    2010-10-15

    Indonesia's attempts to end its many years of power shortages must overcome tough challenges to remedy years of indecision and ensure capacity keeps pace with economic growth. Ten large coal powered stations are being constructed in Java. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. ANALISIS KONTRASTIS BAHASA JAWA DENGAN BAHASA INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riris Tiani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Dari pemaparan dalam bagian pembahasan di atas, dapat disimpulkan bahwa bahasa Jawa dan bahasa Indonesia dapat diketahui struktur fonologi, morfologi, dan sintaksis. Dari pemaparan itu pula, dapat diketahuai adanya perbedaan yang mencolok dalam struktur fonologi, morfologi, dan sintaksis. Dalam ranah fonologi terdapat perbedaan tentang keberadaan fonem segmental dan fonem suprasegmental dalam bahasa Jawa, jumlah bunyi vokal bahasa Jawa lebih banyak.

  10. Difficulties in Initial Algebra Learning in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupri, Al; Drijvers, Paul; van den Heuvel-Panhuizen, Marja

    2014-01-01

    Within mathematics curricula, algebra has been widely recognized as one of the most difficult topics, which leads to learning difficulties worldwide. In Indonesia, algebra performance is an important issue. In the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007, Indonesian students' achievement in the algebra domain was…

  11. Seasonal forecasting of fire over Kalimantan, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Spessa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale fires occur frequently across Indonesia, particularly in the southern region of Kalimantan and eastern Sumatra. They have considerable impacts on carbon emissions, haze production, biodiversity, health, and economic activities. In this study, we demonstrate that severe fire and haze events in Indonesia can generally be predicted months in advance using predictions of seasonal rainfall from the ECMWF System 4 coupled ocean–atmosphere model. Based on analyses of up-to-date and long series observations on burnt area and rainfall, and tree cover, we demonstrate that fire activity is negatively correlated with rainfall, and is positively associated with deforestation in Indonesia. There is a contrast between the southern region of Kalimantan (high fire activity, high tree cover loss and strong non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire and the central region of Kalimantan (low fire activity, low tree cover loss and weak non-linear correlation between observed rainfall and fire. The ECMWF seasonal forecast provides skilled forecasts of burnt area with several months lead time explaining at least 70% of the variance between rainfall and with burnt area. Results are strongly influenced by El Niño years which show a consistent positive bias. Overall, our findings point to a high potential for using a more physical-based method for predicting fires with several months lead time in the tropics, rather than one based on indexes only. We argue that seasonal precipitation forecasts should be central to Indonesia's evolving fire management policy.

  12. Step-Wise Migration : Evidence from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardede, Elda; McCann, Philip; Venhorst, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study multiple internal migration trajectories in Indonesia, with special attention to step-wise migration. Step-wise migration involves moves with smaller steps from village to nearby small town, to larger town, and then to big cities rather than a direct move from

  13. Developing ‘green’ labour in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunawan, Janti; Fraser, Kym

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a descriptive account of the current state of play in regards to the creation of green jobs in Indonesia. Most countries struggle with the environmental effects of economic and social development, and these effects are of an even greater magnitude in developing countries. Indo...

  14. Public Health and Midwifery in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    JPRS: ^472 21 March 1961 PUBLIC HEALTH AND MIDWIFERY IN INDONESIA 3y M. Joedono DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A Approved for Public Release...established to service the translation and research needs of the various government departments. ,-^’ JPRS: J^72 CSO: 1335-S/d PUBLIC HEALTH AND MIDWIFERY

  15. Labour law and development in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjandra, Surya

    2016-01-01

    This book is about the creation and enforcement of labour law in Indonesia, a topic that reflects the broader processes of social and political change in the country. Its starting point is the notion of the trade union as a crucial institution in any modern industrial capitalist society, with the po

  16. Divergence of the dengue virus type 2 Cosmopolitan genotype associated with two predominant serotype shifts between 1 and 2 in Surabaya, Indonesia, 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Tomohiro; Yamanaka, Atsushi; Mulyatno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Sucipto, Teguh Hari; Labiqah, Amaliah; Ahwanah, Nur Laila Fitriati; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Kameoka, Masanori; Konishi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Indonesia is one of the biggest dengue endemic countries, and, thus, is an important place to investigate the evolution of dengue virus (DENV). We have continuously isolated DENV in Surabaya, the second biggest city in Indonesia, since 2008. We previously reported sequential changes in the predominant serotype from DENV type 2 (DENV-2) to DENV type 1 (DENV-1) in November 2008 and from DENV-1 to DENV-2 in July 2013. The predominance of DENV-2 continued in 2014, but not in 2015. We herein phylogenetically investigated DENV-2 transitions in Surabaya between 2008 and 2014 to analyze the divergence and evolution of DENV-2 concomitant with serotype shifts. All DENV-2 isolated in Surabaya were classified into the Cosmopolitan genotype, and further divided into 6 clusters. Clusters 1-3, dominated by Surabaya strains, were defined as the "Surabaya lineage". Clusters 4-6, dominated by strains from Singapore, Malaysia, and many parts of Indonesia, were the "South East Asian lineage". The most recent common ancestor of these strains existed in 1988, coinciding with the time that an Indonesian dengue outbreak took place. Cluster 1 appeared to be unique because no other DENV-2 isolate was included in this cluster. The predominance of DENV-2 in 2008 and 2013-14 were caused by cluster 1, whereas clusters 2 and 3 sporadically emerged in 2011 and 2012. The characteristic amino acids of cluster 1, E-170V and E-282Y, may be responsible for its prevalence in Surabaya. No amino acid difference was observed in the envelope region between strains in 2008 and 2013-14, suggesting that the re-emergence of DENV-2 in Surabaya was due to the loss or decrease of herd immunity in the 5-year period when DENV-2 subsided. The South East Asian lineage primarily emerged in Surabaya in 2014, probably imported from other parts of Indonesia or foreign countries.

  17. Singapore-India Relations: A Return to History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Hwa Ting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael Leifer observes Singapore-India relations to be ‘diplomatically distant’. This observation was correct during the Cold War when differing political ideologies made it difficult for these two countries to develop close relations. With the end of the Cold War, bilateral relations improved rapidly, especially on the economic front. Consequently, most literature focuses on the economic interaction between them, at the expense of other significant developments on the political, military as well as social and cultural fronts. In order to better understand Singapore-India relations in the present, a well-rounded approach is necessary. Hence, this article addresses this lacuna in the present scholarship by providing a comprehensive overview that takes into account developments in both the areas of high and low politics. In so doing, this article argues that Singapore-India relations are now no longer ‘diplomatically distant’, but instead mirror the close relations they had during the colonial period, and so represent a ‘return to history’ instead. --- Michael Leifer beschreibt die Beziehungen zwischen Singapur und Indien als "diplomatisch distanziert". Diese Beobachtung war während des Kalten Krieges korrekt, als unterschiedliche politische Ideologien eine enge Zusammenarbeit dieser beiden Länder erschwerten. Mit dem Ende des Kalten Krieges verbesserten sich bilaterale Beziehungen – vor allem im wirtschaftlichen Bereich – rapide. Aus diesem Grund konzentrieren sich die meisten Publikationen auf die wirtschaftliche Interaktion der beiden Länder und vernachlässigen gleichzeitig weitere wichtige Entwicklungen in der politischen, militärischen, sozialen und kulturellen Sphäre. Um die Beziehungen zwischen Singapur und Indien besser zu verstehen, ist ein vielseitigerer Ansatz notwendig. Der vorliegende Artikel versucht diese Lücke gegenwärtiger Forschung zu schließen und einen umfassenden Überblick der Entwicklungen

  18. Migration and Singapore: implications for the Asia Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, L

    1994-01-01

    Regarding immigration and emigration issues, there is a need for greater and more detailed data collection, an emphasis on data on illegal as well as legal migration, an examination of the impact of direct foreign investment on job creation and new labor market entrants, and a strengthening of international conventions for protection of foreign workers. The Pacific Economic Cooperation Council (PECC), Human Resource Development Task Force, is the source for projections of labor demand and supply for 18 PECC countries in 1993 and 1994. These projections indicate labor shortages in 1993 in Canada, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand. The greatest labor supplier will be China. Japan and Korea are expected to have economic downturns, which will increase excess labor. The extent of excess labor is estimated to be 8.01 million in 1993 and 12.43 in 1994. The nature of the calculations could potentially exaggerate existing demand. A variety of theories are used to determine the direction and flow of migration, capital, goods and services, and technology. Estimates of migration flows indicate an increase to 100 million migrants in 1992, or 1.8% of world population (35 million in Sub-Saharan Africa, 15 million in Asia and the Middle East, and almost 13 million in Western Europe and North America). The value of remittances is estimated at $66 million (US dollars), which is slightly less than the value of oil trade and exceeds the $46 million in foreign aid. It is hypothesized that wider spatial and income inequalities with expanding globalization will increase migration flows. The case of Singapore illustrates how manipulation of the labor market reduces potential problems. Immigration policy historically encouraged migration of skilled and professional workers. In 1990 foreign workers in Singapore constituted 12% of the labor force. Since 1982 a monthly foreign worker levy has been imposed. The levy is increased when needed in order to slow demand. In 1992

  19. Composition of semi-volatile organic compounds in the urban atmosphere of Singapore: influence of biomass burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, J.; Zielinska, B.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2010-12-01

    An intensive field study was conducted in the urban atmosphere of Singapore to investigate the composition of organic compounds in both gaseous and particulate phases during the period of August to early November 2006. 17 atmospheric samples were collected. These samples were subjected to accelerated solvent extraction with a mixture of dichloromethane and acetone and separated into functional group fractions for analyses by GC/MS. Over 180 organic compounds belonging to three major fractions (n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - PAHs, and polar organic compounds - POCs) were identified and quantified. The characteristics and abundance of the n-alkanes, PAHs, mono and dicarboxylic acids, methoxylated phenols and other POCs were determined. The composition of these organic compounds fluctuated temporally with most of them being relatively higher in October than those in other months of the sampling period. 3-D backward air mass trajectory analyses together with the carbon preference index (CPI), molecular diagnostic ratios and molecular markers were used to investigate the origin of organic species measured in this study. Based on these diagnostic tools, the increased abundance of atmospheric organic species during October could be attributed to the occurrence of regional smoke haze episodes due to biomass burning in Indonesia. Among the POCs investigated, phthalic acid and cis-pinonic acid were abundant during October 2006. These two acids showed strong linear relationships with maximum daily ozone concentrations throughout the entire sampling period. This correlation with ozone suggested that the secondary aerosol constituents such as phthalic and cis-pinonic acids were probably formed through O3-induced photochemical transformation.

  20. The progress on governing REDD+ in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mas Achmad Santosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is one of the ten most forest-rich countries in the world. Almost 70 per cent of Indonesia’s mainland is covered with forest. However, Indonesia faces one of the highest rates of forest loss in the world. Deforestation and forest degradation accounts for more than 60 per cent of carbon emissions in Indonesia. Being aware of that fact and the danger of climate change, in October 2009, Indonesia voluntarily committed to reduce emissions by 26 per cent from business as usual by 2020 through national efforts, and by 41 per cent with international support. Indonesia’s commitment has gained international support; chiefly from Norway, which signed a Letter of Intent on 26 May 2010. To formalise the commitment, Presidential Decree No 19/2010 on Task Force for the preparation of REDD+ Agency and Presidential Instruction No 10/2011 on moratorium on new licenses and improvement of natural primary forest and peat land governance have been issued. The Presidential Decree ended on 30 June 2011 and was continued by Presidential Decree No 25/2011, which was later amended by Presidential Decree No 05/2013. The third Presidential Decree will conclude in the middle of 2013. The expected outputs are: establishment of a New REDD+ agency; measurement, reporting and verification instrument; funding instrument; improvement on forest governance, including legislative reform, law enforcement and administrative procedures; and gazetting forest areas and consolidating licenses through legal audit and legal compliance or legal due diligence in the pilot province. The new REDD+ Agency is expected to be established in 2013. The Agency will be an independent central agency, directly responsible to the President of the Republic of Indonesia, and will be responsible for leading and coordinating the national effort to reduce the country’s carbon emission.

  1. Perdagangan Luar Negeri Indonesia-Amerika Serikat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darman Darman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify and analyze: how international trade relations are between Indonesia and the United States, especially in the export-import of goods, particularly non-oil exports; how the value is obtained from the export-import of goods between Indonesia-United States, whether Indonesian exports to the United States greater than Indonesian import from the United States; who gets the surplus of trade between the two countries; and how big the export-import growth rate is, whether Indonesia tends to become exporter or importer. Data used in this study were a time series of the year 2008-2012. The analytical method used was the growth formula and Trade Specialization Index. Based on the trade balance, the value of Indonesian exports, both oil and non-oil, the United States has a surplus and vice versa. In other words, the United States includes a country of Indonesia's main export, in addition to Japan and China. Value of Trade Specialization Index for both oil and non-oil exports is positive above 0 to 1, then the oil and non-oil commodities have strong competitiveness. Indonesia is likely as a means exporter of the commodity. However, based on 10 major Indonesian export commodities to the United States, as the largest foreign exchange earner for textile examples and textile products, footwear industries, electronic products, furniture, as well as horticultural commodities, is threatened lethargic, because shutdown policy decisions on the government services were feared to reduce consumption of the American people’s imported products.

  2. Ecological Planning for Sino-Singapore Ecological Science and Technology Town of Suzhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1. Background The construction of Sino-Singapore Ecological Science and Technology Town (SSESTT), which is a part of Suzhou Industrial Park, was initiated in 2005 under the circumstance of rapid development

  3. Photosymbiotic ascidians in Singapore: turbid waters may reduce living space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Hirose, Euichi; Chen, Serina Lee Siew; Mok, Michael Hin-Kiu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The photosymbiotic ascidian fauna at Changi Beach, Pulau Semakau, Sentosa and St. John’s Island, Singapore were surveyed. A total of five species, Diplosoma simile, Lissoclinum bistratum, Lissoclinum punctatum, Lissoclinum timorense and Trididemnum cyclops, were recorded, with Lissoclinum timorense and Trididemnum cyclops being newly recorded in Singapore. However, no photosymbiotic species were found at Changi Beach probably due to the polluted waters in the region. Coastal development has caused Singapore waters to become turbid, leading to decrease in suitable habitats for photosymbiotic ascidians. Clean waters in Pulau Semakau probably provide a better environment for the growth of photosymbiotic ascidians and this area has a greater variety of these ascidians than the other areas in Singapore. Each of the five species has also been recorded in the Ryukyu Archipelago (Japan) and three species (Diplosoma simile, Lissoclinum bistratum and Trididemnum cyclops) have also been recorded in Taiwan. PMID:23794913

  4. The work-family interface in the United States and Singapore: conflict across cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galovan, Adam M; Fackrell, Tamara; Buswell, Lydia; Jones, Blake L; Hill, E Jeffrey; Carroll, Sarah June

    2010-10-01

    This article examines the work-family interface in a cross-cultural comparison between two nationally representative samples from the United States (n = 1,860) and Singapore (n = 1,035) with emphasis on work-family conflict. Family-to-work conflict was negatively related to marital satisfaction in both Singapore and the United States, although the effect was stronger in the United States. Similarly, family-to-work conflict was positively related to job satisfaction in the United States but was negatively related in Singapore. As expected, schedule flexibility was negatively related to depression in the United States, but in Singapore the relationship was positive. These findings suggest that theoretical relationships in the work-family interface developed in the more culturally individualistic West may need to be adapted when studying populations in the more collectivist East.

  5. Comparision of Istanbul with Hong Kong and Singapore for Regional Treasury Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Selçuk DİZKIRICI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is examining Istanbul to find out whether or not it has the ability to become an appropriate location to host regional treasury centers. Hence; Simkova’s 11 location criteria are compared across Istanbul additionally Hong Kong and Singapore, being already attractive locations in South East Asia for multinational corporations to set up their regional finance offices, to specify Istanbul’s weaker facilities even if it is not regarded as a rival for Hong Kong and Singapore. The study contributes to the understanding of Simkova’s location criteria assessment before establishing a regional treasury center in any location, as it is applied to some European countries and three Asian countries: Brunei, Hong Kong and Singapore, previously. Lastly, it is concluded that Istanbul is not as superior as Hong Kong and Singapore but it has reasonable conditions to become an attractive location for regional treasury centers.

  6. Presence of the Japanese Freshwater Prawn Macrobrachium Nipponense (De Haan, 1849) (Decapoda: Caridea: Palaemonidae) in Singapore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chong, S.S.C.; Khoo, H.W.; Ng, P.K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Characters of adults and larvae are given to differentiate between Macrobrachium nipponense and M. sintangense. The presence of the former in Singapore is stated and explained as an introduction from Japan or China, possibly with ornamental fishes.

  7. Subjugated in the Creative Industries The Fine Arts in Singapore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    2011-01-01

    The arts and culture are considered core in a creative industries strategy. But the promotion of the creative industries brings about revised notions of creativity. These revised notions are being applied to the arts. Creativity is now seen to be largely manageable. All individuals are made...... and enthuse many people into the creative industries. Such notions of creativity contrast against the fine arts. Regardless, as this paper examines the situation in Singapore, shows that fine artists in the city-state are finding themselves internalizing a market logic and have tied their art practices...... to economic value. Fine arts practices will not be as lucrative or popular as their counterparts in the other creative businesses; they will remain poor cousins in the creative industries. Essentially, the fine arts are being subjugated in the creative industries and the Singaporean art world is being changed....

  8. Training incidents in armored vehicles in the Singapore Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Kok-Yong; Ng, Yih-Yng; Ying, Meng-Fai

    2003-02-01

    Training in armored vehicles presents occupational hazards. Since the inception of armored units in the Singapore Armed Forces in 1969, there has been no scientific study of the demographics of the trauma patterns. A review of existing literature also indicated a paucity of data on this subject. This article qualified and quantified the proportion of trauma during peacetime armored vehicle training during a 5-year period. Most of the 100 documented incidences of injuries occurred on the head and body limbs. Many injuries were caused by minor lacerations, abrasions, and crush injuries. Although fractures accounted for 24%, 65% of the total injury count could be classified as "minor." A diurnal pattern of injuries was noted in the study. The injury patterns could be used to analyze morbidity and mortality trends and facilitate subsequent evaluation of efficacy of affirmative action. New challenges facing further research in training injuries were also discussed.

  9. GOVERNING HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN SINGAPORE: AN AGENCY FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choon-Yin Sam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is widely known that governments are changing their relationships with public sector organizations with the aim of improving public sector efficiency and effectiveness. The conceptual understanding of government control and governance approaches in state-owned higher education institutions (HEIs is, however, less well understood. Undoubtedly, question of the extent of autonomy and control of higher education institutions is of significant interest to administrators and policy-makers. This paper reviews the reforms undertaken by the Singapore government in HEIs especially the university sector. The agency framework is applied to assess the internal and external monitoring mechanisms aimed to protect the interest of the public. The paper finds that there is still much state presence and intervention in HEIs’ activities despite the government’s attempt to develop autonomous universities. Strengthening the corporate governance standard of the HEIs will offer a useful means to increase the willingness of the government to give more control to the HEI administrators.

  10. Contribution of forest fires to concentrations of particulate matter in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, D. V.; Reddington, C.; Yoshioka, M.; Arnold, S.; Balasubramanian, R.

    2013-12-01

    Singapore is regularly exposed to substantial levels of transboundary air pollution arising from uncontrolled forest and peat fires from specific regions within Southeast Asia. This air pollution has detrimental impacts on the lives of Singapore residents and on sensitive ecosystems. In June 2013, forest fires resulted in concentrations of particulate matter greatly exceeding levels recommended for human health, causing substantial public concern. We apply two different methods to quantify the impact of forest fires on the concentrations of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometres (PM2.5) in Singapore. Firstly, we use a global aerosol model (GLOMAP) in combination with fire emissions from GFED3 to simulate PM2.5 concentrations over the period 1998-2009. We evaluate simulated PM2.5 concentrations against long-term observations from Singapore. To identify the contributions of fires from different source regions to PM2.5 concentrations we run multiple simulations with and without fire emissions from specific regions across Southeast Asia. Secondly, we apply an atmospheric back trajectory model in combination with the GFED3 fire emissions to calculate exposure of air masses arriving in Singapore to fire emissions. Both methods use meteorology from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts and are consistent with the large-scale atmospheric flow from the assimilated observations. We find that both methods give consistent results, with forest fires increasing PM2.5 concentrations in Singapore predominately during April to October. Forest and peat fires in Sumatra and Kalimantan cause the greatest degradation of air quality in Singapore. The contribution of fires to PM2.5 concentrations in Singapore exhibits strong interannual variability. During years with a strong contribution from fires, our simulations show that the prevention of fires in southern Sumatra would reduce regional PM2.5 concentrations around Singapore by more than a factor

  11. INFLASI DI INDONESIA : SUMBER-SUMBER PENYEBAB DAN PENGENDALIANNYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adwin Surja Atmadja

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The monetary crisis that happens among the ASEAN countries including Indonesia has cause the broken of the national economical aspects. The monetary crisis causes the imported inflation, which is the result of the sharp depreciation of rupiah exchange rate toward the foreign exchange rate. This condition can cause the heavy inflation pressure for Indonesia. The inflation phenomenon in Indonesia actually is not the short-term phenomena. That is only happens incidentally. In fact, the same general problem also happens in others developing countries. The inflation problem in Indonesia is the kind of long-term inflation that caused by the structural of economic obstacles that still occur in Indonesia. As the result, the reconstruction of inflation problem in Indonesia is not enough to be accomplished only with monetary instruments, which usually tend to be in short-term. Therefore, the reconstruction in the real sector with the main target to eliminate the nation structural economic obstacles also needed in order to improve the national economy of Indonesia. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Krisis moneter yang melanda negara-negara ASEAN, termasuk Indonesia, telah menyebabkan rusaknya sendi-sendi perekonomian nasional. Krisis moneter menyebabkan terjadinya imported inflation sebagai akibat dari terdepresiasinya secara tajam nilai tukar rupiah terhadap mata uang asing, yang selanjutnya mengakibatkan tekanan inflasi yang berat bagi Indonesia. Fenomena inflasi di Indonesia sebenarnya semata-mata bukan merupakan suatu fenomena jangka pendek saja dan yang terjadi secara situasional, tetapi seperti halnya yang umum terjadi pada negara-negara yang sedang berkembang lainnya, masalah inflasi di Indonesia lebih pada masalah inflasi jangka panjang karena masih terdapatnya hambatan-hambatan struktural dalam perekonomian negara. Dengan demikian, maka pembenahan masalah inflasi di Indonesia tidak cukup dilakukan dengan menggunakan instrumen-instrumen moneter saja

  12. Economic Analysis of Pandemic Influenza Vaccination Strategies in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vernon J.; Tok, Mei Yin; Chow, Vincent T.; Phua, Kai Hong; Ooi, Eng Eong; Tambyah, Paul A.; Chen, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    Background All influenza pandemic plans advocate pandemic vaccination. However, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies. This paper compares the economic outcomes of vaccination compared with treatment with antiviral agents alone, in Singapore. Methodology We analyzed the economic outcomes of pandemic vaccination (immediate vaccination and vaccine stockpiling) compared with treatment-only in Singapore using a decision-based model to perform cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. We also explored the annual insurance premium (willingness to pay) depending on the perceived risk of the next pandemic occurring. Principal Findings The treatment-only strategy resulted in 690 deaths, 13,950 hospitalization days, and economic cost of USD$497 million. For immediate vaccination, at vaccine effectiveness of >55%, vaccination was cost-beneficial over treatment-only. Vaccine stockpiling is not cost-effective in most scenarios even with 100% vaccine effectiveness. The annual insurance premium was highest with immediate vaccination, and was lower with increased duration to the next pandemic. The premium was also higher with higher vaccine effectiveness, attack rates, and case-fatality rates. Stockpiling with case-fatality rates of 0.4–0.6% would be cost-beneficial if vaccine effectiveness was >80%; while at case-fatality of >5% stockpiling would be cost-beneficial even if vaccine effectiveness was 20%. High-risk sub-groups warrant higher premiums than low-risk sub-groups. Conclusions The actual pandemic vaccine effectiveness and lead time is unknown. Vaccine strategy should be based on perception of severity. Immediate vaccination is most cost-effective, but requires vaccines to be available when required. Vaccine stockpiling as insurance against worst-case scenarios is also cost-effective. Research and development is therefore critical to develop and stockpile cheap, readily available effective vaccines. PMID:19771173

  13. Sea level trend and variability in the Singapore Strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tkalich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Sea level in the Singapore Strait (SS exhibits response to various scale phenomena, from local to global. Longest tide gauge records in SS are analysed to derive local sea level trend and annual, inter-annual and multi-decadal sea level variability, which then are attributed to regional and global phenomena. Annual data gaps are reconstructed using functions correlating sea level variability with ENSO. At annual scale, sea level anomalies in SS are (quasi-periodic monsoon-driven, of the order of ±20 cm, the highest during northeast monsoon and the lowest during southwest monsoon. Interannual regional sea level drops are associated with El Niño events, while the rises are correlated with La Niña episodes; both variations are in the range of ±5 cm. At multi-decadal scale, annual measured sea levels in SS are varying with global mean sea level, rising at the rate 1.2–1.7 mm yr−1 for 1975–2009, 1.8–2.3 mm yr−1 for 1984–2009 and 1.9–4.6 mm yr−1 for 1993–2009. When SS rates are compared with the global trends (2.0, 2.4 and 2.8 mm yr−1, respectively derived from tide gauge measurements for the same periods, they are smaller in the earlier era and considerably larger in the recent one. Taking into account the first estimate of land subsidence rate, 1–1.5 mm yr−1 in Singapore, the recent trend of absolute sea level rise in SS follows regional tendency.

  14. Economic analysis of pandemic influenza vaccination strategies in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All influenza pandemic plans advocate pandemic vaccination. However, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies. This paper compares the economic outcomes of vaccination compared with treatment with antiviral agents alone, in Singapore. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed the economic outcomes of pandemic vaccination (immediate vaccination and vaccine stockpiling compared with treatment-only in Singapore using a decision-based model to perform cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. We also explored the annual insurance premium (willingness to pay depending on the perceived risk of the next pandemic occurring. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The treatment-only strategy resulted in 690 deaths, 13,950 hospitalization days, and economic cost of USD$497 million. For immediate vaccination, at vaccine effectiveness of >55%, vaccination was cost-beneficial over treatment-only. Vaccine stockpiling is not cost-effective in most scenarios even with 100% vaccine effectiveness. The annual insurance premium was highest with immediate vaccination, and was lower with increased duration to the next pandemic. The premium was also higher with higher vaccine effectiveness, attack rates, and case-fatality rates. Stockpiling with case-fatality rates of 0.4-0.6% would be cost-beneficial if vaccine effectiveness was >80%; while at case-fatality of >5% stockpiling would be cost-beneficial even if vaccine effectiveness was 20%. High-risk sub-groups warrant higher premiums than low-risk sub-groups. CONCLUSIONS: The actual pandemic vaccine effectiveness and lead time is unknown. Vaccine strategy should be based on perception of severity. Immediate vaccination is most cost-effective, but requires vaccines to be available when required. Vaccine stockpiling as insurance against worst-case scenarios is also cost-effective. Research and development is therefore critical to develop and stockpile cheap, readily available effective vaccines.

  15. Curriculum as praxis: Ensuring quality technical education in Singapore for the 21st century.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiew Ming Yek; Dawn Penney

    2006-01-01

    Singapore, a small island city-state, has achieved notable economic advancement within 40 years since independence. It is fast becoming a global city and a knowledge society. In education and training, the Singapore system has evolved from its British roots. Macro performance indicators of participation rate, literacy rate and mean years of schooling, show that the current education system can be regarded as highly successful. The contributions of general education as well as technical educat...

  16. IMPACTS OF AGEING POPULATION ON MONETARY AND EXCHANGE RATE MANAGEMENT IN SINGAPORE

    OpenAIRE

    PAUL S. L. YIP; Tan, K C

    2008-01-01

    This policy note finds that the ageing of the population in Singapore will cause a reversal of the current net Central Provident Fund (CPF) contribution into a substantial net CPF withdrawal from 2025, with a peak occurring at 2035. The result is qualitatively robust to changes in the underlying assumptions of the projection. The paper then highlights the implications of this change on the exchange rate and monetary management in Singapore. Finally, the paper proposes policy measures that can...

  17. The queer time of creative urbanism: family, futurity, and global city Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Natalie Oswin

    2012-01-01

    Singapore's rise as a 'global city' has attracted much scholarly attention, especially as its government has recently turned to 'creative city' strategies. In line with critiques made of other global and creative cities around the world, important critiques have been leveled that the city-state’s developmental efforts are bureaucratic, hierarchical, narrowly economistic, and, most importantly, socially polarizing. This paper demonstrates that Singapore’s global/creative city project is al...

  18. Market Entry strategy of Interbev UK Ltd. Into the markets of Singapore and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    With a constant GDP rise in both Singapore and Malaysia the markets in these countries provide immense potential for foreign businesses. The idea of this report is to formulate an internationalization strategy for Interbev UK Ltd, a international beverage trading company in to the markets of Malaysia and Singapore. Interbev wants to enter the market via export and start dealing with the local distributors as an initial step towards being established in the region. The report ex...

  19. 2013 dengue outbreaks in Singapore and Malaysia caused by different viral strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lee-Ching; Chem, Yu-Kie; Koo, Carmen; Mudin, Rose Nani Binti; Amin, Faridah Mohd; Lee, Kim-Sung; Kheong, Chong Chee

    2015-06-01

    Characterization of 14,079 circulating dengue viruses in a cross-border surveillance program, UNITEDengue, revealed that the 2013 outbreaks in Singapore and Malaysia were associated with replacement of predominant serotype. While the predominant virus in Singapore switched from DENV2 to DENV1, DENV2 became predominant in neighboring Malaysia. Dominance of DENV2 was most evident on the southern states where higher fatality rates were observed.

  20. Dengue virus surveillance in Singapore reveals high viral diversity through multiple introductions and in situ evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kim-Sung; Lo, Sharon; Tan, Sharon Siok-Yin; Chua, Rachel; Tan, Li-Kiang; Xu, Helen; Ng, Lee-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever, a vector-borne disease, has caused tremendous burden to countries in the tropics and sub tropics. Over the past 20 years, dengue epidemics have become more widespread, severe and frequent. This study aims to understand the dynamics of dengue viruses in cosmopolitan Singapore. Envelope protein gene sequences of all four dengue serotypes (DENV-1-DENV-4) obtained from human sera in Singapore (2008-2010) revealed that constant viral introductions and in situ evolution contribute to viral diversity in Singapore and play important roles in shaping the epidemiology of dengue in the island state. The diversity of dengue viruses reported here could be a reflection of the on-going dengue situation in the region given Singapore's location in a dengue hyperendemic region and its role as the regional hub for travels and trade. Though cosmopolitan genotype of DENV-2 has remained as the predominant strain circulating in Singapore, we uncovered evidence of in situ evolution which could possibly result in viruses with improved fitness. While we have previously shown that a switch in the predominant dengue serotype could serve as a warning for an impending outbreak, our current data shows that a replacement of a predominant viral clade, even in the absence of a switch in predominant serotype, could signal a possible increase in dengue transmission. The circulating dengue viruses in Singapore are highly diverse, a situation which could offer ample opportunities for selection of strains of higher fitness, thus increasing the risk of outbreaks despite a low Aedes population.

  1. 78 FR 13325 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ...-815] Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia... frozen warmwater shrimp from the People's Republic of China, Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia... of China,Ecuador, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and the Socialist Republic of...

  2. Seasonal distribution of anti-malarial drug resistance alleles on the island of Sumba, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asih, P.B.; Rogers, W.O.; Susanti, A.I.; Rahmat, A.; Rozi, I.E.; Kusumaningtyas, M.A.; Dewi, R.M.; Coutrier, F.N.; Sutamihardja, A.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Syafruddin, D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug resistant malaria poses an increasing public health problem in Indonesia, especially eastern Indonesia, where malaria is highly endemic. Widespread chloroquine (CQ) resistance and increasing sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance prompted Indonesia to adopt artemisinin-based com

  3. Faktor Risiko Dominan Penderita Stroke di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lannywati Ghani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Stroke tends to increase and becomes the first leading cause of death as well as disability in Indonesia that impact in socioeconomy. Stroke is preventable through early detection and control of risk factors. This study aimed to assess the dominant risk factors of stroke in Indonesia. Analysis was done using secondary data of a cross sectional study called Indonesian Basic Health Research (Riskesdas 2013. Data were analyzed using SPSS 17 software by complex samples. A total of 722,329 subjects aged 15 years and over were included. Stroke prevalence was 1.21%, no difference by sex but increased along with the age. People aged 55 years and over were at higher risk of stroke with adjusted OR of 5.8 (5.32; 6.32, p 0.0001 compared to aged 15-44 years old. The other risk factors were coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, heart failure. Those were 3.13, 2.96, 2.87, and 2.74 times respectively compared to people without related conditions. Stroke occurred since younger age. The dominant risk factors of stroke in Indonesia were older age, coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart failure. Healthy behavior and early detection of risk factors should be encouraged to prevent stroke.Keywords : stroke, risk factor, Basic Health Research (RiskesdasAbstrakStroke semakin meningkat dan merupakan penyebab kematian serta kecacatan tertinggi di Indonesia yang berdampak secara sosioekonomi. Penyakit stroke dapat dicegah dengan deteksi dini dan pengendalian faktor risiko. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk memperoleh faktor risiko dominan penderita stroke di Indonesia. Penelitian ini menggunakan data sekunder dari Survei Riset Kesehatan Dasar Indonesia tahun 2013. Analisis data menggunakan SPSS 17 dengan complex sample. Dari 722,329 responden usia ≥ 15 tahun, didapat prevalensi penderita stroke sebesar 1,21%, proporsi tidak berbeda antara laki-laki dan perempuan. Risiko stroke meningkat seiring meningkatnya usia. Responden

  4. PERBANDINGAN PENGHASILAN TABUNGAN MUDHARABAH NASABAH BANK SYARIAH (Studi Kasus pada Bank Syariah Mandiri, Bank Negara Indonesia Syariah, dan Bank Muamalat Indonesia di Makassar)

    OpenAIRE

    ALIMULA, YULIANA

    2014-01-01

    2014 Perbandingan Penghasilan Tabungan Mudharabah Nasabah Bank Syariah (Studi Kasus pada Bank Syariah Mandiri, Bank Negara Indonesia Syariah, dan Bank Muamalat Indonesia di Makassar) Profit Sharing Comparison of Mudharabah Saving of Islamic Banking (A Case Study at Bank Syariah Mandiri, Bank Negara Indonesia Syariah, and Bank Muamalat Indonesia in Makassar) Yuliana Alimula Alimuddin Muhammad Ashari Penelitian ini bertujuan un...

  5. The Perennial Problem: The Chinese Minority in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-06-28

    one another at least as much as Italian from Spanish and Spanish from Portuguese.(13) Hokkiens were the first Chinese to settle in Indonesia in large...Today, the Hokkiens and their descendants are the dominant Chinese group in East Indonesia , Central and East Java, and on the We1t coast of Sumatra. A... Hokkien ) term meaning ’master.’ But in Indonesia , it is used to denote a "skillful Chinese businessman who closely cooperates as a middleman with those

  6. KONTINUITAS DAN PERUBAHAN MAKNA LAGU KEBANGSAAN INDONESIA RAYA

    OpenAIRE

    Wisnu Mintargo

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to analyze function of “heroic” Indonesia songs related to the struggle for Indonesian independence ( from 1945 to 1949) from a historical perspective. Through this analysis it is hoped that the process of the past, particularly the history of music development in Indonesia and the background of the use of the “heroic”Indonesia songs, can be reconstructed. Important aspects of Indonesian songs, as this paper shows, include a constructive function for ceremo...

  7. Geographical Assessment of Rickettsioses in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, Susana; Williams, Maya; Winoto, Imelda; Farzeli, Arik; Stoops, Craig A; Barbara, Kathryn A; Richards, Allen L; Blair, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    To expand the documentation of rickettsioses in Indonesia, we conducted an ectoparasite and small mammal investigation involving four major islands: Java, Sumatra, Sulawesi, and Kalimantan. Coastal and highland regions on each island surveyed were chosen to represent different ecologies in Indonesia. Indication of the presence of Rickettsia spp. was evident in all areas sampled. Typhus group rickettsiae-specific antibodies had significantly higher prevalence among small mammals captured in Java compared to the other islands surveyed (78% in coastal and 50% in highland regions) and the prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae-specific antibodies was significantly higher in Kalimantan than the other islands investigated. Hosts and vectors were restricted by Rickettsia spp. but not by coastal or highland regions. Our findings expand the range in which rickettsial pathogens have been documented within the Indonesian archipelago and point to a significant risk to human health.

  8. Indonesia: Nation-building and democratic governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Montobbio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The constitution of a state in democracy and development in what is Indonesia today is just one of the possible stories of History. To explain what has made it possible and what will determine Indonesia’s future and transformations, this paper offers an approach to the structuring axis of Indonesia’s national construction; it also analyses the process that led to the replacing of the political regime established by Sukarno after independence by Suharto’s “New Order”, and its consolidation and crisis, which subsequently led to political transition, then to the present democratic regime in consolidation and to the overcoming of Indonesia’s historical challenges. The paper concludes with an analysis of the current situation and the challenges Indonesia faces in the future.

  9. Perilaku Inflasi 33 Propinsi di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitta Dian Saraswati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify the effect of food prices and the factors of demand side on the inflation rate in the 33 provinces in Indonesia. Using fixed effect panel data regression model, our result show that inflation in 33 provinces in Indonesia are caused by demand-side factors ( gross regional domestik product and government expenditure as well as supply-side factors, namely food prices in this case the price of rice. The policy implication of this study is that monetary policy by controlling the money supply is still effective for achieving the goal of price stability. However, monetary policy alone will not be effective to achieve the inflation target. Required policy coordination among agencies or departments in order to ensure the availability of basic necessities such as rice commodities.

  10. Mutation breeding in sorghum in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeranto, H.; Razzak, M.T. [Center for Research and Development of Isotope and Radiation Technology, Batan (Indonesia); Nakanishi, Tomoko M.

    2001-05-01

    Sorghum has a big potential to be grown and developed in Indonesia. The objective of this research is to produce new sorghum variety to improve sorghum production for supporting the development of sorghum agroindustry in Indonesia. The lethal dose 50% (LD-50) value for sorghum was found to be 0.73 kGy. The dose of 0.4 kGy gave the highest variance for plant height and harvest index. Selection in the generating M2, M3 and M4 populations resulted to some promising lines, especially ET20-B, with desirable agronomic characteristics, big and condense head, high yielding, white and clean color of seeds, and good nutrition values. (author)

  11. Chinese Foreign Direct Investment in Indonesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, Peter; Tarmidi, Lepi T.

    China‟s increasing integration with the world economy is met with much anticipation and much anxiety in the Southeast Asian region. In Indonesia, there is intense interest in Chinese foreign direct investment (FDI), not only among academics but also among policy makers, industrialists...... conducted in 2008 among Chinese invested enterprises supplemented with available official statistics and secondary data, the study finds that Chinese FDI in Indonesia is performed by mixed entities: some are owned by central government, some by regional government and some are private firms. In the case...... of joint ventures, their local partners are mostly local Chinese, except in the infrastructure, mining and energy sector where their local partners are Indonesian state-owned enterprises. Where the local developmental effects are concerned, a picture emerges where Chinese investments, at this early period...

  12. TELAAH GAYA ARSITEKTUR MEDITERANIA DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freddy H. Istanto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade of 1990' s, the style of architecture takes after the architectural style of Mediterranean. This style has invited a strong polemic against the name it bears. Is Mediterranean spanning the three continents appropriate of representing the name of Mediterranean-style ? This paper will discuss about the historical development of this Architectural style and its physical elements. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Gaya arsitektur yang marak di Indonesia pada dasawarsa akhir tahun 1990-an adalah gaya arsitektur Mediterania. Gaya arsitektur ini mengundang polemik tentang nama yang disandangnya, apakah kawasan Mediterania yang meliputi tiga benua itu layak mewakili nama gaya arsitektur Mediterania ?. Makalah ini membahas perjalanan Gaya Arsitektur ini dan elemen-elemen fisikalnya. Kata kunci : gaya arsitektur Mediterania, elemen-elemen fisikal.

  13. Indonesia and the touch of refinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, J.; Hoften, S. van; Nickell, R.E.; Horne, D.A. (Anatech Applications, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    SGI's Liquids from Coal (LFC) process converts low-rank coals into coal derived liquid (CDL) process derived fuel (PDF). A demonstration plant owned and operated by Encoal Corp. in Gillette, Wyoming has been testing low-rank coal from the US and around the world in an effort to identify opportunities for upgrading subbituminous and lignite coals. East Asia and the Pacific Rim present the most attractive opportunities. Indonesia, in particular has an abundance of low grade coal and a growing demand for electricity. The article reports on results of testing some thirteen different Indonesian coals from South Sumatra and Kalimantan to determine the technical feasibility of LFC processing these coals and presents hypothetical example of an LFC Clean Coal Refinery complex in Indonesia producing both PDF and LFC co-products for export. The article contains some detail of LFC coal evaluation procedures used by SGI. 6 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. REVIEW: The Diversity of Indigenous Honey Bee Species of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOESILAWATI HADISOESILO

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been known that Indonesia has the most diverse honey bee species in the world. At least five out of nine species of honey bees are native to Indonesia namely Apis andreniformis, A. dorsata, A. cerana, A. koschevnikovi, and A. nigrocincta. One species, A. florea, although it was claimed to be a species native to Indonesia, it is still debatable whether it is really found in Indonesia or not. The new species, A. nuluensis, which is found in Sabah, Borneo is likely to be found in Kalimantan but it has not confirmed yet. This paper discusses briefly the differences among those native honey bees.

  15. PENCAPAIAN TUJUAN MDGs BIDANG KESEHATAN DI INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syafrawati Syafrawati

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Millenium Development Goals (MDGsyang kalau di Bahasa Indonesiakan menjadi Tujuan Pembangunan Milenium (TPM, adalah suatu rancangan pembangunan millenium yang disepakati oleh Konferensi Tingkat Tinggi (KTT Milenium Perserikatan Bangsa-bangsa (PBB bulan September 2000. Konferensi ini dihadiri oleh 189 negara anggota termasuk Indonesia.MDGs mempunyai 8 tujuan yang memiliki satu atau beberapa target yang harus tercapai pada tahun 2015 dengan dasar situasi dunia pada tahun 1990.

  16. Accreditation System in Indonesia(JSME NEWS)

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Comparison between accreditation systems of university study programs in Japan and Indonesia is very briefly described in this article. BAN-PT and JABEE have been establishing their accreditation systems, which contain ABET criteria, namely criteria of learning process and student outcomes as their basic components as well as the other criteria for their own missions. Therefore, both the accreditation systems are not substantially different from each other. However, apparent disparity of both...

  17. PERBANDINGAN PENDIDIKAN ISLAM DI INDONESIA DAN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Haryanto, Budi

    2016-01-01

    Islamic education as a subsystem which cannot be separated from national education, because it not only serves as a complement but also as the foundation stone for the formulation of national education goals. This is true in Indonesia and Malaysia. Islamic education in both countries, also affected the national struggle journey, to the efforts to maintain and develop its existence after the independence so as to have a clear role in mental strengthen human resources in their respective countr...

  18. Restructuring the Schoolbook Provision System in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Supriadi

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Schoolbooks account for between 65% and 75% of all publishing activity in Indonesia. The amount of money allocated is continually increasing. Priority is given to the primary and junior secondary school levels (6+3 years, which are compulsory. Between 1969 and 1988, the Government of Indonesia (GOI has produced some 550 million primary textbooks and library books. Up to the year 2000, the GOI has decided to allocate the total of US$ 355.2 million to produce 250 million copies of primary and junior secondary school textbooks to reach the ratio of one book for each student. In addition, around Rp 20-50 billion (US$ 10-20 million annually is spent to purchase 8-17 million copies of reading books which are aimed at stimulating the reading interest of primary school children. These books are distributed free to some 168,000 primary and 26,969 junior secondary schools throughout Indonesia. Following the massive efforts to increase book availability at schools, some innovative policies are being taken. Book evaluation standards have been improved to ensure that only high quality books are used at schools. The distribution system has been restructured to guarantee that books reach targeted schools. Consequently, the book monitoring system has had to be strengthened to examine whether or not the books really reach the schools and are used properly by students and teachers in the classrooms. In the last three years, there has also been a growing concern with multicultural issues in schoolbook provision programs. In such a culturally diverse nation as Indonesia, schoolbooks should also be culturally sensitive and be recognize the varied sociocultural backgrounds which affect students' learning.

  19. Environmental Effects Of Ecotourism In Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Regina Butarbutar; Soemarno Soemarno

    2013-01-01

    The ecotourism is global issues who most talked lately in Indonesia, it is one of the activities special tourist interest which low impacts on natural tourism.The presence of ecotourism in the era of sustainable and tourism development mission should be minimum negative impacts, both on the environment resources and on socio-cultural local values.  Ecotourism activities were more oriented on the utilization of natural resources, the natural ecosystems and have not been polluted yet.  However,...

  20. The Democratic Constitutional State of Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Mohamad Faiz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The political reform in Indonesia started in 1998 when President Soeharto was forced to resign from his presidential office after 32 years in power. This momentum has transformed Indonesian political culture from an authoritarian state to the third largest democracy in the world after India and United States. It also led to Indonesian constitutional reform which was marked by the amendments of 1945 Constitution for the first time in 1999.

  1. EFL: REVISITING ELT PRACTICES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandita Gusweni Jayanti

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, we have witnessed a revolutionary spread of English worldwide. This global spread of English can be attributed to the combination of various historical, political, economic, cultural, and technological factors. This led to the emergence of new varieties of English, multiple linguistic and cultural identities. However, for decades, the Western paradigm of English language teaching has occupied a prestigious position in Asia, including Indonesia. This paradigm neglects the emerging varieties of English. Furthermore, it is important to recognize that language teaching and learning is affected by a host of factors ranging from the macro political and cultural environments of a country or region to the micro perceptions and practices of individual teachers or learners, which calls for different methodologies for different learners or learning situations. This article attempts to discuss briefly the current issues in English language teaching (ELT in Indonesia from English as lingua franca (ELF perspectives, particularly by taking a close look at all the local features and limitations in the established theories and practices in ELT in Indonesia. Keywords: English language teaching, contextual, methodology, EFL

  2. CO₂ efflux from shrimp ponds in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidik, Frida; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored 'blue' carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO₂) efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO₂ efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO₂ efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the walls and 1.60 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO₂ emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y⁻¹. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO₂ emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO₂ released to atmosphere.

  3. CO₂ efflux from shrimp ponds in Indonesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Sidik

    Full Text Available The conversion of mangrove forest to aquaculture ponds has been increasing in recent decades. One of major concerns of this habitat loss is the release of stored 'blue' carbon from mangrove soils to the atmosphere. In this study, we assessed carbon dioxide (CO₂ efflux from soil in intensive shrimp ponds in Bali, Indonesia. We measured CO₂ efflux from the floors and walls of shrimp ponds. Rates of CO₂ efflux within shrimp ponds were 4.37 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the walls and 1.60 kg CO₂ m⁻² y⁻¹ from the floors. Combining our findings with published data of aquaculture land use in Indonesia, we estimated that shrimp ponds in this region result in CO₂ emissions to the atmosphere between 5.76 and 13.95 Tg y⁻¹. The results indicate that conversion of mangrove forests to aquaculture ponds contributes to greenhouse gas emissions that are comparable to peat forest conversion to other land uses in Indonesia. Higher magnitudes of CO₂ emission may be released to atmosphere where ponds are constructed in newly cleared mangrove forests. This study indicates the need for incentives that can meet the target of aquaculture industry without expanding the converted mangrove areas, which will lead to increased CO₂ released to atmosphere.

  4. Pengembangan Model e-Business di Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mohammad Subekti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Problems in building e-business is the number of influential factors that really should be considered in the design, especially from the aspect of a relatively bad infrastructure in Indonesia. By doing appropriate design, it can at least reduce the impact due to various shortcomings that exist, it is intended that the users are able to surf comfortably and safely in a business website in cyberspace. In managing e-Business, there are business models that can be done by the businessman in the virtual world, but the e-Business models vary according to the character and culture of each region. What e-Business models are suitable to be applied in Indonesia, according to the character and culture of Indonesia, as well as the ability of the existing infrastructure will be described in this article. One solution is the utilization of social networking that is widely used, even though there are positive and negative sides of it. Then, what kinds of advantages are gained, in both for managing the site and as well as benefits for the customers.

  5. Present status of Indonesia HTR team activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lasman, As Natio; Arbie, Bakri [National Atomic Energy Agency BATAN, Jakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-09-01

    The Indonesian HTR Team was established in August 1993 to conduct studies on HTR technology and its application. The team is divided into 2 groups, i.e. reactor technology and safety group, which includes activities in the field of neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel elements, information and communication, environmental, HTR material, techno-economical aspect, and application group. Especially in the field of application, the study is connected with CO2 conversion from the enriched CO2 of the Natuna gas field by using HTR. This activity is now influenced by another program for the Natuna gas field and the Memberamo river in Irian Jaya. Another activity concerns coal liquefaction because of the relative big abundance of coal resources in Indonesia. Coal are mostly utilized for electric power generation and for cement industries. Regarding the prediction that Indonesia is becoming one of the nett oil importing countries, the coal liquefaction is needed and will be realized if and only if the fluid fuel from coal is competitive. The study activity in desalination is still done by using an HTR or floating nuclear power plant, it is especially addressed for the eastern part of Indonesia. Particle coatings activity is still done in Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Center since 3 years ago, and it will be supported in the near future in the Center for Nuclear Fuel Element at Serpong. 3 refs.

  6. Animasi Indonesia (Tinjauan Singkat Perkembangan Animasi Indonesia dalam Konteks Animasi Dunia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arik Kurnianto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the development of animated films in Indonesia based on historical studies to determine simultaneously mapping the history Indonesia in the context of world/global animation history. This study also examines the relationship between the histories of Indonesiananimated films with history first entry of the film in Indonesia which began the Dutch colonial era. According to Stephen Cavalier, the world history of animation was divided into five large round starts from the era before 1900 (The Origin of Animation to the digital era (1986-2010. Based results of the study, Indonesian animation in the context of five major round of world animation, though have long been in contact with foreign-made films and animation (Disney Studio has into Indonesia from the early 20th century (the early 1900s, the animation is produced Indonesia has only emerged in the '50s through the vision of a Soekarno, the first President. 1950 in the world of animation history entered the era of transition from gold age of traditional animation/cartoon (golden age of cartoons are dominated by studio Disney to the era of television (television era. In a review of the history of animation, the era of the '50s travel half a century is the era of the modern world of animation history. Based on the facts the Indonesian animation has actually grown quite long, but the development of animation in Indonesia was very slow when seen in the context of the world animation history.

  7. The Roles of the Supreme Court of the Republic Indonesia in Enforcement of International Arbitral Awards in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutiara Hikmah

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has been being a member of the 1958 New York Convention since 1981, namely upon issuance of the Presidential Decree No. 34 of 1981. Prior to taking into force of the Regulation of the Supreme Court of the Republic of Indonesia No. 1 of 1990 on Procedures for Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral awards, there were still constraints for the foreign business players in term of enforcement of arbitral awards in Indonesia. The Supreme Court as the highest judicial institution in Indonesia holds that international arbitral awards can not be enforced in Indonesia. After the Indonesian Supreme Court has issued such a regulation, enforcement of international arbitral awards in Indonesia began to be enforceable, because the procedural law that governs the procedures for execution of arbitral awards has been clear. In order to regulate better the international arbitral award problems in the hierarchy of legislation, on October 12, 1999, the Law on Arbitration and Alternative Dispute Resolution was promulgated. In that Law, there is a special part discussing the International Arbitration. This study examines the development of international arbitral award enforcement in Indonesia before Indonesia becoming member of the 1958 New York Convention, until nowadays, by analyzing the international arbitral awards that were decided by the Supreme Court of the Republic of Indonesia after the coming into effect of the Arbitration Law.

  8. Lirik Musikal pada Lagu Anak Berbahasa Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortunata Tyasrinestu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini mengkaji bahasa lagu anak berbahasa Indonesia. Lagu anak berbahasa Indonesia adalah lagu yang diperuntukkan dan dinyanyikan oleh anak-anak sesuai dengan perkembangan anak. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mendeskripsikan karakteristik lagu anak (LA secara musikal dengan memperhatikan kata-kata atau lirik yang ada dalam lagu anak berbahasa Indonesia. Karakteristik lirik dan karakteristik musikal yang saling menyatu merupakan harmoni yang indah dalam lagu anak. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode deskriptif. Analisis yang diterapkan adalah metode holistik yang dipergunakan untuk melihat LA dari beberapa perspektif melalui wawancara dan angket yang diperoleh dari praktisi musik dan praktisi pendidikan, guru, orangtua, siswa dan awam. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa lagu anak berbahasa Indonesia mempunyai beberapa karakteristik secara lirik dan musikal yaitu 1 pola ritme yang diulang secara musikal, 2 melodi yang diulang secara musikal, 3 motif yang diulang secara musikal, dan 4 kata-kata yang diulang secara musikal. Fungsi lagu anak berbahasa Indonesia selain untuk belajar bahasa juga mengandung nilai pendidikan dan karakter positif untuk anak dengan kata-kata bermakna positif pada lirik-liriknya. The Characteristics of Musical Lyrics on Indonesian Children Songs.The study tries to examine the discourse of Indonesian children songs. Indonesian children songs are songs that are composed for and sung by children in accordance with the child development stages. The purpose of this study is to describe the discourse of Indonesian children songs which describe their musical characteristics by giving more attention on words or lyrics of the songs. The characteristics of lyrics and musical characteristics that belong to each other are mainly a beautiful harmony in children songs. This study uses a descriptive method. The holistic method is employed to analyze children songs from some perspectives by doing the interview and distributing

  9. An optimal renewable energy mix for Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Patrizio, Piera; Yowargana, Ping; Kraxner, Florian

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia has experienced a constant increase of the use of petroleum and coal in the power sector, while the share of renewable sources has remained stable at 6% of the total energy production during the last decade. As its domestic energy demand undeniably continues to grow, Indonesia is committed to increase the production of renewable energy. Mainly to decrease its dependency on fossil fuel-based resources, and to decrease the anthropogenic emissions, the government of Indonesia has established a 23 percent target for renewable energy by 2025, along with a 100 percent electrification target by 2020 (the current rate is 80.4 percent). In that respect, Indonesia has abundant resources to meet these targets, but there is - inter alia - a lack of proper integrated planning, regulatory support, investment, distribution in remote areas of the Archipelago, and missing data to back the planning. To support the government of Indonesia in its sustainable energy system planning, a geographic explicit energy modeling approach is applied. This approach is based on the energy systems optimization model BeWhere, which identifies the optimal location of energy conversion sites based on the minimization of the costs of the supply chain. The model will incorporate the existing fossil fuel-based infrastructures, and evaluate the optimal costs, potentials and locations for the development of renewable energy technologies (i.e., wind, solar, hydro, biomass and geothermal based technologies), as well as the development of biomass co-firing in existing coal plants. With the help of the model, an optimally adapted renewable energy mix - vis-à-vis the competing fossil fuel based resources and applicable policies in order to promote the development of those renewable energy technologies - will be identified. The development of the optimal renewable energy technologies is carried out with special focus on nature protection and cultural heritage areas, where feedstock (e.g., biomass

  10. Three-dimensional Simulations of the Mean Air Transport During the 1997 Forest Fires in Kalimantan, Indonesia Using a Mesoscale Numerical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roswintiarti, O.; Raman, S.

    - This paper describes the meteorological processes responsible for the mean transport of air pollutants during the ENSO-related forest fires in Kalimantan, Indonesia from 00 UTC 21 September to 00 UTC 25 September, 1997. The Fifth Generation of the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) is used to simulate three-dimensional winds at 6-hourly intervals. A nonhydrostatic version of the model is run using two nested grids with horizontal resolutions of 45 km and 15 km. From the simulated wind fields, the backward and forward trajectories of the air parcel are investigated using the Vis5D model.The results indicate that the large-scale subsidence over Indonesia, the southwest monsoon low-level flows (2-8 m s-1), and the shallow planetary boundary layer height (400-800 m) play a key role in the transport of air pollutants from Kalimantan to Malaysia, Singapore and Brunei.

  11. Urban Water and Riverine Quality: Participatory Science in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgitt, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Singapore is a highly urbanised environment experiencing tropical monsoon hydrological regimes. A heavily engineered fluvial system has been developed over time to provide efficient drainage and reduce the area subject to flood risk. However, recent interest in ecosystem-based approaches to river management and the enhancement of the aesthetic and ecological 'quality' of riverine landscape, coupled with concerns about climate change, has challenged the prevailing engineering view. This is reflected in the Public Utility Board (PUB) ABC Waters Programme, which also seeks to develop community interest in riverine environments and engagement with water-related concerns. As part of a programme developing participatory GIS (PGIS) with school and university students, we have undertaken applications involving participant observation, reporting and analysis of water quality data and habitat quality based on a simplified version of the UK Environment Agency's River Habitat Survey. From an educational perspective, there is evidence that these PGIS initiatives raise environmental awareness and enhance geospatial thinking, particularly in relation to catchment management concepts. The extent to which participant-derived data can contribute to a citizen science of urban water quality and hence deliver some aspects of the community engagement sought after by the authorities, is a topic of debate.

  12. Aetiological factors in oesophageal cancer in Singapore Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, U W; Breslow, N; Hong, J G; Sridharan, M; Shanmugaratnam, K

    1974-03-15

    Analysis of a hospital-based case-control study of esophageal cancer among Singapore Chinese (composed of Cantonese, Hokkien, Teochew, and other dialect groups) revealed the following statistically significant risk factors for both sexes: 1) belonging to either Hokkien or Teochew dialect group; 2) consuming beverages at temperatures stated subjectively to be burning hot before illness; and 3) smoking Chinese cigarettes. Additional risk factors for males were birth in China and consumption of Samsu (Chinese wine). Bread, potato, and banana consumption was reported at significantly lower levels in male esophagus cancer patients than controls. Esophageal cancer was less common in males who attended school for more than 8 years. Multivariate analysis (joint influence of selected variables) confirmed the strong effects of dialect group and beverage temperature for both sexes. For females, Chinese cigarette smoking remained a risk factor; for males, Samsu consumption. Smoking western cigarettes and drinking strong liquors were not significantly related for either sex. These findings suggest that esophageal cancer is more likely to occur among traditional Chinese who maintain dietary patterns which include Samsu and scalding beverages but avoid bland foodstuffs not native to the culture. The greater risk in Teochew and Hokkien may be due in part to beverage temperature, since "burning hot" was cited more frequently in these dialect groups. However, these differences are based on subjective impressions and require further verification.

  13. Revisiting Mobility Limitations of Seniors in Singapore, 1995 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Hock Kang Phd

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Singapore’s life expectancy at birth and at age 65 continues to improve. Although this is a positive development, it is necessary to understand how much of this increased life expectancy is spent with and without mobility limitations. This research uses the latest round of the National Survey of Senior Citizens to examine the situation in 2011 and the possible changes that may have occurred since the last survey in 2005. It seeks to add to earlier research in this area in Singapore and uses the prevalence-based Sullivan method to calculate lifetime free of mobility limitations for this population. Pertinent conclusions drawn from this research include evidence pointing to changing prevalence rates among the older adult population and observations that suggest the possibility of a compression of morbidity for this population in 2011 compared with an expansion of morbidity observed in the previous survey conducted in 2005. The research also shows that women continue to be disadvantaged as they age compared with men.

  14. Prevention of intellectual and other disabilities: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyen, K R

    1989-01-01

    In Singapore, first level prevention, aimed at reducing the occurrence of disabilities, has included neonatal screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, a programme of universal vaccination, screening for congenital hypothyroidism, and improvements in obstetric and neonatal care. Non-specific measures, such as improved housing, better nutrition and higher standards of education, have also contributed to the reduction in serious illnesses that can potentially cause disabilities. Second level prevention, designed to limit or reverse a disability, has included a developmental screening programme carried out in the primary health care sector. Centralised multi-disciplinary developmental assessment clinics have been established to define better the disabilities and to advise on rehabilitation. An early intervention programme has been started, and special schools are being upgraded. Third level prevention, aimed at preventing a disability from becoming a handicap, has included the setting up of comprehensive rehabilitation programmes, provision of aids and appliances, vocational training, and job opportunities. The integration of the handicapped back into society is currently being promoted.

  15. THE EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS OF SINGAPORE REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT TRUSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Chen Chiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the REIT industry is relatively new in Singapore, the objective of this research is to examine the operation efficiency among firms in the industry through the method of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. In addition, the method of Tobit regression is applied to investigate the impact factors on efficiency. The results are as follows. First, none of 14 firms analyzed performs relatively efficiently based on the average efficiency scores over the sample periods of 2007 to first quarter of 2015. Nevertheless, it is found that First REIT and Suntec REIT are the most efficient and least efficient REITs respectively. Second, ROA is positively correlated to efficiency scores while the negative relationship is found with the debt ratio. Third, regarding property-type, retail REITSs perform better than commercial ones on average. However, the most efficient group is “others” which consists of one hospitality/residential REITs, one healthcare REITs, and three industrial REITs. Fourth, geographical diversification may not affect REIT’s efficiency. Meanwhile, REITs holding more properties overseas perform better than their counterparts on average. Last, in regards to size, small-size REITs significantly perform better in efficiency than those in other categories. Especially, medium-size and largesize REITs do not have significant differences on average in efficiency.

  16. Water systems and urban sanitation: a historical comparison of Tokyo and Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Yurina; Otaki, Masahiro; Sakura, Osamu

    2007-06-01

    The importance of a water supply and sewage treatment for urban sanitation is recognized in the modern world. Their contributions to public health have not, however, been well demonstrated by historical data, especially in Asian cities. In this research, we focused on the Asian cities of Tokyo and Singapore, which both developed significantly in the 20th century. We analysed their development processes statistically to determine what the key elements for the protection of urban sanitation have been. Although both cities constructed modern water supply systems at almost same time (Tokyo in 1898 and Singapore in 1878), and similarly modern wastewater treatment systems (Tokyo in 1922 and Singapore in 1913), the prevalence of water-borne diseases in Tokyo was more serious than it was in Singapore, in spite of Singapore's high infant mortality rate. The main reason for this was the differences in the systems of night-soil transport. We found that the water supply system in itself was not enough to resolve all urban sanitation problems, and appropriate night-soil removal was also crucial. In addition, historical trends and water consumption vary by city, so the appropriate technology and system are also different according to the unique characteristics and needs of each.

  17. A Multimethod Approach towards Assessing Urban Flood Patterns and Its Associated Vulnerabilities in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winston T. L. Chow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated flooding patterns in the urbanised city-state of Singapore through a multimethod approach combining station precipitation data with archival newspaper and governmental records; changes in flash floods frequencies or reported impacts of floods towards Singapore society were documented. We subsequently discussed potential flooding impacts in the context of urban vulnerability, based on future urbanisation and forecasted precipitation projections for Singapore. We find that, despite effective flood management, (i significant increases in reported flash flood frequency occurred in contemporary (post-2000 relative to preceding (1984–1999 periods, (ii these flash floods coincide with more localised, “patchy” storm events, (iii storms in recent years are also more intense and frequent, and (iv floods result in low human casualties but have high economic costs via insurance damage claims. We assess that Singapore presently has low vulnerability to floods vis-à-vis other regional cities largely due to holistic flood management via consistent and successful infrastructural development, widespread flood monitoring, and effective advisory platforms. We conclude, however, that future vulnerabilities may increase from stresses arising from physical exposure to climate change and from demographic sensitivity via rapid population growth. Anticipating these changes is potentially useful in maintaining the high resilience of Singapore towards this hydrometeorological hazard.

  18. Development of a Coupled Ocean-Hydrologic Model to Simulate Pollutant Transport in Singapore Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, V. P.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive agricultural, economic and industrial activities in Singapore and Malaysia have made our coastal areas under high risk of water pollution. A coupled ocean-hydrologic model is employed to perform three-dimensional simulations of flow and pollutant transport in Singapore coastal waters. The hydrologic SWAT model is coupled with the coastal ocean SUNTANS model by outputting streamflow and pollutant concentrations from the SWAT model and using them as inputs for the SUNTANS model at common boundary points. The coupled model is calibrated with observed sea surface elevations and velocities, and high correlation coefficients that exceed 0.97 and 0.91 are found for sea surface elevations and velocities, respectively. The pollutants are modeled as Gaussian passive tracers, and are released at five upstream locations in Singapore coastal waters. During the Northeast monsoon, pollutants released in Source 1 (Johor River), Source 2 (Tiram River), Source 3 (Layang River) and Source 4 (Layau River) enter the Singapore Strait after 4 days of release and reach Sentosa Island within 9 days. Meanwhile, pollutants released in Source 5 (Kallang River) reach Sentosa Island after 4 days. During the Southwest monsoon, the dispersion time is roughly doubled, with pollutants from Sources 1 - 4 entering the Singapore Strait only after 12 days of release due to weak currents.

  19. Inclusion in High - Achieving Singapore: Challenges of Building an Inclusive Society in Policy and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Walker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Building an inclusive society in which all people can participate effectively and live together requires understanding inclusive education and its impact on the social order. As countries of different regions face the vast array of challenges unique to their educational systems, it becomes apparent that inclusive societies are intricately tied to social inclusion policy initiatives and developments in education. Governments are becoming increasingly aware of the need to review their educational systems as they attempt to define what an inclusive society is and how to make inclusion truly effective. Singapore is a unique example of a country that has the resources and the vision, but currently lacks an educational system designed to fully include individuals with special needs. Although Singaporean students consistently score near the top in science, math, and reading achievement on international assessments, many students with special needs still receive their education in schools separated from their mainstream peers. In 2004, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong discussed a new vision of Singapore becoming an inclusive society that embraces all individuals with special learning needs. In this manuscript, the authors provide a brief history of Singapore and its education system and explore how PM Lee’s vision of an inclusive society has shaped practice and policy in Singapore schools in the last decade. Specific ideas and next steps for creating an inclusive Singapore for individuals with disabilities are discussed.

  20. Characterization of extreme flood and drought events in Singapore and investigation of their relationships with ENSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Babovic, Vladan

    2016-04-01

    Flood and drought are hydrologic extreme events that have significant impact on human and natural systems. Characterization of flood and drought in terms of their start, duration and strength, and investigation of the impact of natural climate variability (i.e., ENSO) and anthropogenic climate change on them can help decision makers to facilitate adaptions to mitigate potential enormous economic costs. To date, numerous studies in this area have been conducted, however, they are primarily focused on extra-tropical regions. Therefore, this study presented a detailed framework to characterize flood and drought events in a tropical urban city-state (i.e., Singapore), based on daily data from 26 precipitation stations. Flood and drought events are extracted from standardized precipitation anomalies from monthly to seasonal time scales. Frequency, duration and magnitude of flood and drought at all the stations are analyzed based on crossing theory. In addition, spatial variation of flood and drought characteristics in Singapore is investigated using ordinary kriging method. Lastly, the impact of ENSO condition on flood and drought characteristics is analyzed using regional regression method. The results show that Singapore can be prone to extreme flood and drought events at both monthly and seasonal time scales. ENSO has significant influence on flood and drought characteristics in Singapore, but mainly during the South West Monsoon season. During the El Niño phase, drought can become more extreme. The results have implications for water management practices in Singapore.

  1. Cross-Cultural Studies of Implicit Theories of Creativity: A Comparative Analysis between the United States and the Main Ethnic Groups in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Suzanna J.; Puccio, Gerard J.

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the extent of influence of culture on implicit theories of creativity among laypeople from the United States and Singapore, as well as the ethnic groups in Singapore. Adaptive and innovative styles of creativity were examined, as well as their own conceptions of creativity. Laypersons from the United States and Singapore were…

  2. Constitutionalism and conflict in Ternate, North Maluku, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermkens, A.K.

    2010-01-01

    Allegedly the oldest in Indonesia, and to some even beyond, the constitution treasured in the Kedaton (traditional palace) of the Sultan of Ternate (North Maluku, Indonesia) constitutes a dividing line between North and South Ternate in terms of government, ethnicity, and, spirituality. Moreover, it

  3. Recent developments in forestry and land use in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, W.

    1974-01-01

    Dr. W. Meijer, who is Dutch-born, worked in Indonesia from 1951 to 1958, first at Bogor, then at Pajakumbuh, Sumatra, and was Forest Botanist in Sabah for several years, revisited Indonesia with a National Science Foundation travel grant under an NSF-AID (Agency for International Development) progra

  4. The Development of Educational Evaluation Models in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasoetion, N.; And Others

    The primary purpose of this project was to develop model evaluation procedures that could be applied to large educational undertakings in Indonesia. Three programs underway in Indonesia were selected for the development of evaluation models: the Textbook-Teacher Upgrading Project, the Development School Project, and the Examinations (Item Bank)…

  5. Bentuang Karimun National Park: integrated conservation and development in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soedjito, H.

    1997-01-01

    The International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) has funded a project for the Bentuang Karimun National Park (BKNP) of the Department of Forestry of Indonesia [Project Bentuang Karimun PD 26/ 93 Rev. 1 (F)]. It started on November 1995 and is implemented by WWF Indonesia. The main objective is

  6. Indonesia: Internal Conditions, the Global Economy, and Regional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Helga; Sheppard, Eric S.

    1987-01-01

    Describes recent trends in the economic and regional development of Indonesia and examines the internal and external forces influencing the process. Shows how these forces account for the rise of a strong centralized state. Discusses Indonesia's current problems. Includes tables, maps, and graphs of economic investment figures, world trade, and…

  7. Teaching Non-Standard Varieties of Bahasa Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukmana, Iwa

    1997-01-01

    Considers the question of which variety of Indonesian to teach in Australia. Issues related to standardization, formality, and diglossia in Bahasa, Indonesia, the use of its many varieties across Indonesia, differences between the Jakarta dialect and the standard form, and pedagogical considerations in teaching non-standard varieties are…

  8. NAHDHATUL ULAMA DAN PERUBAHAN BUDAYA POLITIK DI INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    The aim of article to descriptive relationship between Nahdhatul Ulama institution and change of political culture in Indonesia. The first, explore many terminology of political culture, type of political culture and political behavior. Secondly, this article to analysis ideology of Nahdhatul Ulama and democracy. The last, this article recommended the new role of Nahdhatul Ulama to contribution in change of political culture in Indonesia.

  9. Sculpture of Indonesia. [Teacher's Packet for a Teacher Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, CA.

    This teacher's packet accompanies a slide presentation on the sculpture found in Indonesia. The packet contains: (1) a slide list with descriptions listing time period and dimensions of each piece; (2) an introductory essay describing the setting of Indonesia, the Central Javanese Period and the Eastern Javanese Period; (3) descriptions of how to…

  10. Etiology and clinical management of adult meningitis in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizal Ganiem, A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis consists of 8 chapters and addresses the etiology, diagnosis, outcome and treatment of adult meningitis in Indonesia. The studies were conducted in Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, the referral hospital for West Java province, Indonesia between December 2006 and August 2012. In a cohor

  11. Cost-effectiveness of hepatitis a vaccination in indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suwantika, A.A.; Beutels, P.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to assess the cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination in Indonesia, including an explicit comparison between one-dose and twodose vaccines. Methods: An age-structured cohort model based on a decision tree was developed for the 2012 Indonesia birth cohort. Using the

  12. Prototype Tsunami Evacuation Park in Padang, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, B. E.; Cedillos, V.; Deierlein, G.; Di Mauro, M.; Kornberg, K.

    2012-12-01

    Padang, Indonesia, a city of some 900,000 people, half of whom live close to the coast and within a five-meter elevation above sea level, has one of the highest tsunami risks in the world due to its close offshore thrust-fault seismic hazard, flat terrain and dense population. There is a high probability that a tsunami will strike the shores of Padang, flooding half of the area of the city, within the next 30 years. If that tsunami occurred today, it is estimated that several hundred thousand people would die, as they could not reach safe ground in the ~30 minute interval between the earthquake's occurrence and the tsunami's arrival. Padang's needs have been amply demonstrated: after earthquakes in 2007, 2009, 2011 and 2012, citizens, thinking that those earthquakes might cause a tsunami, tried to evacuate in cars and motorbikes, which created traffic jams, and most could not reach safe ground in 30 minutes. Since 2008, GeoHazards International (GHI) and Stanford University have studied a range of options for improving this situation, including ways to accelerate evacuation to high ground with pedestrian bridges and widened roads, and means of "vertical" evacuation in multi-story buildings, mosques, pedestrian overpasses, and Tsunami Evacuation Parks (TEPs), which are man-made hills with recreation facilities on top. TEPs proved most practical and cost-effective for Padang, given the available budget, technology and time. The Earth Observatory Singapore (EOS) developed an agent-based model that simulates pedestrian and vehicular evacuation to assess tsunami risk and risk reduction interventions in Southeast Asia. EOS applied this model to analyze the effectiveness in Padang of TEPs over other tsunami risk management approaches in terms of evacuation times and the number of people saved. The model shows that only ~24,000 people (20% of the total population) in the northern part of Padang can reach safe ground within 30 minutes, if people evacuate using cars and

  13. Student Teachers' Intentions and Actions on Integrating Technology into Their Classrooms during Student Teaching: A Singapore Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Doris; Wong, Angela F. L.; Gao, Ping

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to explore student teachers' intentions and actions in technology integration in their classrooms. A postgraduate teacher education cohort of 118 Singapore student teachers participated in the study. The results suggested that student teachers in Singapore showed positive intentions to integrate technology to facilitate…

  14. Interventions with Young Female Offenders and Teenage Girls at Risk: Alternative Educational Services in a Singapore Girls' Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaili Chen; Choo, Andrew; Lim, Liping

    2009-01-01

    This article presents factors that place girls at risk of delinquency and offending as well as the patterns in juvenile delinquency trends for females in Singapore. The authors also describe Singapore's overall structure of services for young offenders and the current status of alternative education programmes for young women engaged in delinquent…

  15. Reflections on 12 Years of Research into ICT-in-Education and the Learning Sciences in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, David; Huang, Jun Song

    2016-01-01

    This article reflects on the landscape of ICT-mediated learning research in Singapore schools over the past 12 years. This ICT (information and communications technology) journey is situated in the context of the Singapore education Masterplans and the inception of substantive research funding in this area of work since 2003. The article questions…

  16. Transformative Pedagogy, Leadership and School Organisation for the Twenty-First-Century Knowledge-Based Economy: The Case of Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimmock, Clive; Goh, Jonathan W. P.

    2011-01-01

    Singapore has a high performing school system; its students top international tests in maths and science. Yet while the Singapore government cherishes its world class "brand", it realises that in a globally competitive world, its schools need to prepare students for the twenty-first-century knowledge-based economy (KBE). Accordingly, over the past…

  17. A Professional Learning Community for the New Teacher Professionalism: The Case of a State-Led Initiative in Singapore Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daphnee; Lee, Wing On

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to explore the empirical fit of two PLC models, using Singapore as a case. Insights emerged from documentary analyses and interviews with state-affiliated agents from the Academy of Singapore Teachers. The proposed DuFour--Fullan model, despite policy aspirations, remains largely DuFour-predominant in practice. Aspirations for a…

  18. The Relationship between Civic Attitudes and Voting Intention: An Analysis of Vocational Upper Secondary Schools in England and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Christine; Hoskins, Bryony; Sim, Jasmine Boon-Yee

    2014-01-01

    From 2009 to 2011, a team from the Centre for Learning and Life Chances in Knowledge Economies and Societies carried out a mixed-methods study of young people in England and Singapore. With regard to civic attitudes, the study showed that there was a greater sense of political self-efficacy and collective (school) efficacy in Singapore than in…

  19. The Tongue in Between: Some Thoughts on the Teaching of Chinese as a Second Language in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chee Lay

    2014-01-01

    In Singapore's unique and complex linguistic environment, it is common to have Chinese-language learners from many different backgrounds in the same school classroom, which is why Singapore is nicknamed as a "language laboratory." In this paper, I hope to examine our linguistic environment and response strategies from different angles,…

  20. The Technology of Technology Transfer. The Case of the Japan-Singapore Technical Institute. Discussion Paper No. 93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo e Oliveira, Joao Batista; Pillay, Gerald F.

    The new economic and industrial policies of the 1980s called for a major restructuring of the industrial profile of Singapore. The government decided to set up three new technical institutes to prepare and supply skilled workers to new investors: French-, German-, and Japan-Singapore Technical Institutes with the collaboration of the government…