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Sample records for binding studies revealed

  1. Quantitative ligand and receptor binding studies reveal the mechanism of interleukin-36 (IL-36) pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Todorovic, Viktor; Kakavas, Steve; Sielaff, Bernhard; Medina, Limary; Wang, Leyu; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Stockmann, Henning; Richardson, Paul L; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Sun, Chaohong; Scott, Victoria

    2018-01-12

    IL-36 cytokines signal through the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) and a shared subunit, IL-1RAcP (IL-1 receptor accessory protein). The activation mechanism for the IL-36 pathway is proposed to be similar to that of IL-1 in that an IL-36R agonist (IL-36α, IL-36β, or IL-36γ) forms a binary complex with IL-36R, which then recruits IL-1RAcP. Recent studies have shown that IL-36R interacts with IL-1RAcP even in the absence of an agonist. To elucidate the IL-36 activation mechanism, we considered all possible binding events for IL-36 ligands/receptors and examined these events in direct binding assays. Our results indicated that the agonists bind the IL-36R extracellular domain with micromolar affinity but do not detectably bind IL-1RAcP. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we found that IL-1RAcP also does not bind IL-36R when no agonist is present. In the presence of IL-36α, however, IL-1RAcP bound IL-36R strongly. These results suggested that the main pathway to the IL-36R·IL-36α·IL-1RAcP ternary complex is through the IL-36R·IL-36α binary complex, which recruits IL-1RAcP. We could not measure the binding affinity of IL-36R to IL-1RAcP directly, so we engineered a fragment crystallizable-linked construct to induce IL-36R·IL-1RAcP heterodimerization and predicted the binding affinity during a complete thermodynamic cycle to be 74 μm The SPR analysis also indicated that the IL-36R antagonist IL-36Ra binds IL-36R with higher affinity and a much slower off rate than the IL-36R agonists, shedding light on IL-36 pathway inhibition. Our results reveal the landscape of IL-36 ligand and receptor interactions, improving our understanding of IL-36 pathway activation and inhibition. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Effective binding of perhalogenated closo-borates to serum albumins revealed by spectroscopic and ITC studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Marina V.; Losytskyy, Mykhaylo Yu.; Bykov, Alexander Yu.; Yarmoluk, Sergiy M.; Zhizhin, Konstantin Yu.; Kuznetsov, Nikolay T.; Varzatskii, Oleg A.; Gumienna-Kontecka, Elzbieta; Kovalska, Vladyslava B.

    2017-08-01

    The interactions of boron cluster compounds closo-borates with biomolecules are widely studied due to their efficiency as agents for boron neutron capture therapy of cancer. In present work the binding abilities of anionic halogen closo-borates [B10Hal10]2- (Hal = Cl, Br, I) and [B12Hal12]2- (Hal = Cl, I) towards bovine and human serum albumins were investigated by spectroscopic and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) methods. The protein fluorescence quenching method and ITC studies confirmed the complex formation. The degree of protein fluorescence quenching increased from chlorine to iodine boron derivatives that is attributed to external heavy atom effect. The ITC data point on the existence in the protein structure of two types of binding sites: with higher and lower affinity to closo-borates. Albumin-closo-borate complex binding ratio, n (4-5 anions per protein molecule) is higher than for the parent hydrogen closo-borates (2 anions per protein molecule). Binding constants estimated by fluorescent and ITC methods indicate higher affinity of halogen closo-borates to albumins (K in the range of 104-106 M-1) comparing to that of the hydrogen closo-borate (K about 103 M-1). Due to their high affinity and high binding ratio to albumins halogen closo-borates are proposed for further studies as agents for boron neutron capture therapy.

  3. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesoil, Charles [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Nonaka, Takahiro [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Miyata, Makoto [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi-ku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Afrin, Rehana [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Biofrontier Center, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Ikai, Atsushi, E-mail: ikai.a.aa@m.titech.ac.jp [Department of Life Science, Graduate School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsutacho 4259, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2010-01-15

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  4. Molecular shape and binding force of Mycoplasma mobile's leg protein Gli349 revealed by an AFM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesoil, Charles; Nonaka, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Osada, Toshiya; Miyata, Makoto; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies of the gliding bacteria Mycoplasma mobile have identified a family of proteins called the Gli family which was considered to be involved in this novel and yet fairly unknown motility system. The 349 kDa protein called Gli349 was successfully isolated and purified from the bacteria, and electron microscopy imaging and antibody experiments led to the hypothesis that it acts as the 'leg' of M. mobile, responsible for attachment to the substrate as well as for gliding motility. However, more precise evidence of the molecular shape and function of this protein was required to asses this theory any further. In this study, an atomic force microscope (AFM) was used both as an imaging and a force measurement device to provide new information about Gli349 and its role in gliding motility. AFM images of the protein were obtained revealing a complex structure with both rigid and flexible parts, consistent with previous electron micrographs of the protein. Single-molecular force spectroscopy experiments were also performed, revealing that Gli349 is able to specifically bind to sialyllactose molecules and withstand unbinding forces around 70 pN. These findings strongly support the idea that Gli349 is the 'leg' protein of M. mobile, responsible for binding and also most probably force generation during gliding motility.

  5. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    of the molecule. The addition of protein G, a bacterial protein that also binds to the Fc portion of mouse IgG, to the covalently modified 8A11 produced an antibody preparation that showed a lower affinity for U(VI)-DCP than that observed in the absence of protein G. This protein G-dependent decrease in the affinity of 8A11for U(VI)-DCP was dose-dependent. Similarly, U(VI)-DCP was observed to decrease the affinity between 8A11 and protein G, also in a dose-dependent manner. These reciprocal binding effects between protein G and U(VI)-DCP were taken as further evidence that binding to the Fc portion on the intact 8A11 antibody could influence the strength of the interaction at the antigen binding sites on the Fab portions of the protein, and vice versa. These practical, development-driven binding experiments have revealed a fundamental facet of antibody functional behavior that appears to have been largely unnoticed. The binding phenomena described for the first time in this report may have physiological relevance and can be purposefully exploited to improve the sensitivity and utility of selected immunoassays.

  6. Structural and functional studies of Escherichia coli aggregative adherence fimbriae (AAF/V) reveal a deficiency in extracellular matrix binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, Rie; Liu, Bing; Struve, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    A possesses an inserted helix at the beginning of the donor strand, which together with altered surface electrostatics, renders the protein unable to interact with fibronectin. Hence, here we characterize the first AAF variant with a binding mode that varies from previously described AAFs...

  7. Kinetic study reveals weak Fe-binding ligand, which affects the solubility of Fe in the Scheldt estuary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L. J. A.; Rijkenberg, M. J. A.; Wolterbeek, H. Th.; Verburg, T. G.; Boye, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    The chemistry of dissolved Fe(III) was studied in the Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands). Two discrete size fractions of the dissolved bulk (<0.2 mu m and <1 kDa) were considered at three salinities (S = 26, 10 and 0.3). Within the upper estuary, where fresh river water meets seawater, the dissolved

  8. Kinetic and structural studies reveal a unique binding mode of sulfite to the nickel center in urease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Luca; Cianci, Michele; Benini, Stefano; Bertini, Leonardo; Musiani, Francesco; Ciurli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Urease is the most efficient enzyme known to date, and catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea using two Ni(II) ions in the active site. Urease is a virulence factor in several human pathogens, while causing severe environmental and agronomic problems. Sporosarcina pasteurii urease has been used extensively in the structural characterization of the enzyme. Sodium sulfite has been widely used as a preservative in urease solutions to prevent oxygen-induced oxidation, but its role as an inhibitor has also been suggested. In the present study, isothermal titration microcalorimetry was used to establish sulfite as a competitive inhibitor for S. pasteurii urease, with an inhibition constant of 0.19mM at pH7. The structure of the urease-sulfite complex, determined at 1.65Å resolution, shows the inhibitor bound to the dinuclear Ni(II) center of urease in a tridentate mode involving bonds between the two Ni(II) ions in the active site and all three oxygen atoms of the inhibitor, supporting the observed competitive inhibition kinetics. This coordination mode of sulfite has never been observed, either in proteins or in small molecule complexes, and could inspire synthetic coordination chemists as well as biochemists to develop urease inhibitors based on this chemical moiety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Artemin Crystal Structure Reveals Insights into Heparan Sulfate Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvian,L.; Jin, P.; Carmillo, P.; Boriack-Sjodin, P.; Pelletier, C.; Rushe, M.; Gong, B.; Sah, D.; Pepinsky, B.; Rossomando, A.

    2006-01-01

    Artemin (ART) promotes the growth of developing peripheral neurons by signaling through a multicomponent receptor complex comprised of a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor (cRET) and a specific glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked co-receptor (GFR{alpha}3). Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) signals through a similar ternary complex but requires heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for full activity. HSPG has not been demonstrated as a requirement for ART signaling. We crystallized ART in the presence of sulfate and solved its structure by isomorphous replacement. The structure reveals ordered sulfate anions bound to arginine residues in the pre-helix and amino-terminal regions that were organized in a triad arrangement characteristic of heparan sulfate. Three residues in the pre-helix were singly or triply substituted with glutamic acid, and the resulting proteins were shown to have reduced heparin-binding affinity that is partly reflected in their ability to activate cRET. This study suggests that ART binds HSPGs and identifies residues that may be involved in HSPG binding.

  10. CW EPR parameters reveal cytochrome P450 ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockart, Molly M; Rodriguez, Carlo A; Atkins, William M; Bowman, Michael K

    2018-06-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monoxygenses utilize heme cofactors to catalyze oxidation reactions. They play a critical role in metabolism of many classes of drugs, are an attractive target for drug development, and mediate several prominent drug interactions. Many substrates and inhibitors alter the spin state of the ferric heme by displacing the heme's axial water ligand in the resting enzyme to yield a five-coordinate iron complex, or they replace the axial water to yield a nitrogen-ligated six-coordinate iron complex, which are traditionally assigned by UV-vis spectroscopy. However, crystal structures and recent pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies find a few cases where molecules hydrogen bond to the axial water. The water-bridged drug-H 2 O-heme has UV-vis spectra similar to nitrogen-ligated, six-coordinate complexes, but are closer to "reverse type I" complexes described in older liteature. Here, pulsed and continuous wave (CW) EPR demonstrate that water-bridged complexes are remarkably common among a range of nitrogenous drugs or drug fragments that bind to CYP3A4 or CYP2C9. Principal component analysis reveals a distinct clustering of CW EPR spectral parameters for water-bridged complexes. CW EPR reveals heterogeneous mixtures of ligated states, including multiple directly-coordinated complexes and water-bridged complexes. These results suggest that water-bridged complexes are under-represented in CYP structural databases and can have energies similar to other ligation modes. The data indicates that water-bridged binding modes can be identified and distinguished from directly-coordinated binding by CW EPR. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Co-operative intra-protein structural response due to protein-protein complexation revealed through thermodynamic quantification: study of MDM2-p53 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-10-01

    The p53 protein activation protects the organism from propagation of cells with damaged DNA having oncogenic mutations. In normal cells, activity of p53 is controlled by interaction with MDM2. The well understood p53-MDM2 interaction facilitates design of ligands that could potentially disrupt or prevent the complexation owing to its emergence as an important objective for cancer therapy. However, thermodynamic quantification of the p53-peptide induced structural changes of the MDM2-protein remains an area to be explored. This study attempts to understand the conformational free energy and entropy costs due to this complex formation from the histograms of dihedral angles generated from molecular dynamics simulations. Residue-specific quantification illustrates that, hydrophobic residues of the protein contribute maximum to the conformational thermodynamic changes. Thermodynamic quantification of structural changes of the protein unfold the fact that, p53 binding provides a source of inter-element cooperativity among the protein secondary structural elements, where the highest affected structural elements (α2 and α4) found at the binding site of the protein affects faraway structural elements (β1 and Loop1) of the protein. The communication perhaps involves water mediated hydrogen bonded network formation. Further, we infer that in inhibitory F19A mutation of P53, though Phe19 is important in the recognition process, it has less prominent contribution in the stability of the complex. Collectively, this study provides vivid microscopic understanding of the interaction within the protein complex along with exploring mutation sites, which will contribute further to engineer the protein function and binding affinity.

  12. Co-operative intra-protein structural response due to protein-protein complexation revealed through thermodynamic quantification: study of MDM2-p53 binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sudipta; Mukherjee, Sanchita

    2017-10-01

    The p53 protein activation protects the organism from propagation of cells with damaged DNA having oncogenic mutations. In normal cells, activity of p53 is controlled by interaction with MDM2. The well understood p53-MDM2 interaction facilitates design of ligands that could potentially disrupt or prevent the complexation owing to its emergence as an important objective for cancer therapy. However, thermodynamic quantification of the p53-peptide induced structural changes of the MDM2-protein remains an area to be explored. This study attempts to understand the conformational free energy and entropy costs due to this complex formation from the histograms of dihedral angles generated from molecular dynamics simulations. Residue-specific quantification illustrates that, hydrophobic residues of the protein contribute maximum to the conformational thermodynamic changes. Thermodynamic quantification of structural changes of the protein unfold the fact that, p53 binding provides a source of inter-element cooperativity among the protein secondary structural elements, where the highest affected structural elements (α2 and α4) found at the binding site of the protein affects faraway structural elements (β1 and Loop1) of the protein. The communication perhaps involves water mediated hydrogen bonded network formation. Further, we infer that in inhibitory F19A mutation of P53, though Phe19 is important in the recognition process, it has less prominent contribution in the stability of the complex. Collectively, this study provides vivid microscopic understanding of the interaction within the protein complex along with exploring mutation sites, which will contribute further to engineer the protein function and binding affinity.

  13. Structure of Drosophila Oskar reveals a novel RNA binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Na; Yu, Zhenyu; Hu, Menglong; Wang, Mingzhu; Lehmann, Ruth; Xu, Rui-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Oskar (Osk) protein plays critical roles during Drosophila germ cell development, yet its functions in germ-line formation and body patterning remain poorly understood. This situation contrasts sharply with the vast knowledge about the function and mechanism of osk mRNA localization. Osk is predicted to have an N-terminal LOTUS domain (Osk-N), which has been suggested to bind RNA, and a C-terminal hydrolase-like domain (Osk-C) of unknown function. Here, we report the crystal structures of Osk-N and Osk-C. Osk-N shows a homodimer of winged-helix–fold modules, but without detectable RNA-binding activity. Osk-C has a lipase-fold structure but lacks critical catalytic residues at the putative active site. Surprisingly, we found that Osk-C binds the 3′UTRs of osk and nanos mRNA in vitro. Mutational studies identified a region of Osk-C important for mRNA binding. These results suggest possible functions of Osk in the regulation of stability, regulation of translation, and localization of relevant mRNAs through direct interaction with their 3′UTRs, and provide structural insights into a novel protein–RNA interaction motif involving a hydrolase-related domain. PMID:26324911

  14. Comparison of S. cerevisiae F-BAR domain structures reveals a conserved inositol phosphate binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Alvarado, Diego; Schmitz, Karl R.; Kenniston, Jon A.; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Lemmon, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY F-BAR domains control membrane interactions in endocytosis, cytokinesis, and cell signaling. Although generally thought to bind curved membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, numerous functional studies argue that differences in lipid-binding selectivities of F-BAR domains are functionally important. Here, we compare membrane-binding properties of the S. cerevisiae F-BAR domains in vitro and in vivo. Whereas some F-BAR domains (such as Bzz1p and Hof1p F-BARs) bind equally well to all phospholipids, the F-BAR domain from the RhoGAP Rgd1p preferentially binds phosphoinositides. We determined X-ray crystal structures of F-BAR domains from Hof1p and Rgd1p, the latter bound to an inositol phosphate. The structures explain phospholipid-binding selectivity differences, and reveal an F-BAR phosphoinositide binding site that is fully conserved in a mammalian RhoGAP called Gmip, and is partly retained in certain other F-BAR domains. Our findings reveal previously unappreciated determinants of F-BAR domain lipid-binding specificity, and provide a basis for its prediction from sequence. PMID:25620000

  15. Image Restoration and Analysis of Influenza Virions Binding to Membrane Receptors Reveal Adhesion-Strengthening Kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald W Lee

    Full Text Available With the development of single-particle tracking (SPT microscopy and host membrane mimics called supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, stochastic virus-membrane binding interactions can be studied in depth while maintaining control over host receptor type and concentration. However, several experimental design challenges and quantitative image analysis limitations prevent the widespread use of this approach. One main challenge of SPT studies is the low signal-to-noise ratio of SPT videos, which is sometimes inevitable due to small particle sizes, low quantum yield of fluorescent dyes, and photobleaching. These situations could render current particle tracking software to yield biased binding kinetic data caused by intermittent tracking error. Hence, we developed an effective image restoration algorithm for SPT applications called STAWASP that reveals particles with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.2 while preserving particle features. We tested our improvements to the SPT binding assay experiment and imaging procedures by monitoring X31 influenza virus binding to α2,3 sialic acid glycolipids. Our interests lie in how slight changes to the peripheral oligosaccharide structures can affect the binding rate and residence times of viruses. We were able to detect viruses binding weakly to a glycolipid called GM3, which was undetected via assays such as surface plasmon resonance. The binding rate was around 28 folds higher when the virus bound to a different glycolipid called GD1a, which has a sialic acid group extending further away from the bilayer surface than GM3. The improved imaging allowed us to obtain binding residence time distributions that reflect an adhesion-strengthening mechanism via multivalent bonds. We empirically fitted these distributions using a time-dependent unbinding rate parameter, koff, which diverges from standard treatment of koff as a constant. We further explain how to convert these models to fit ensemble-averaged binding data

  16. NMR studies of the fifth transmembrane segment of Na+,K+-ATPase reveals a non-helical ion-binding region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underhaug, Jarl; Jakobsen, Louise Odgaard; Esmann, Mikael

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the fifth membrane-spanning segment (M5) in Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was determined using liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The spectra reveal that this peptide is substantially less...... transmembrane element of the Ca(2+)-ATPase. Furthermore, this region spans the residues implicated in Na(+) and K(+) transport, where they are likely to offer the flexibility needed to coordinate Na(+) as well as K(+) during active transport....... alpha-helical than the corresponding M5 peptide of Ca(2+)-ATPase. A well-defined alpha-helix is shown in the C-terminal half of the peptide. Apart from a short helical stretch at the N-terminus, the N-terminal half contains a non-helical region with two proline residues and sequence similarity to a non-structured...

  17. In vitro receptor autoradiography reveals angiotensin IL (ANG II) binding associated with sensory and motor components of the vagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diz, D.I.; Barnes, K.L.; Ferrario, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Specific, high affinity Ang II binding in the dog's dorsal medulla is concentrated in the area postrema, nucleus tractus solitarii (nTS) and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (dmnX). More recently Ang II binding sites were observed where bundles of vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla 6 mm rostral to obex and in the nodose ganglia and peripheral vagal nerves. Since Ang II binding in the nTS and dmnX overlies the distribution of vagal afferent fibers and efferent neurons, the effects of nodose ganglionectomy and cervical vagotomy on Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla were studied in rats and dogs using autoradiography after incubation of 14 μm coronal sections with 0.4 nM 125 I-Ang II. Nonspecific binding was determined in the presence of 1 μm unlabeled Ang II. Two weeks after unilateral nodose ganglionectomy Ang II binding sites were absent ipsilaterally in the region where vagal afferent fibers enter the dorsal medulla. In the nTS and dmnX, binding near obex was reduced, while more rostrally these nuclei were almost completely devoid of Ang II binding on the denervated side. After cervical vagotomy, the loss of binding was restricted to the ipsilateral dmnX. These data are the first to reveal that Ang II binding in the dorsal medulla requires an intact vagal system

  18. Structural characterisation of Tpx from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis reveals insights into the binding of salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds.

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    Mads Gabrielsen

    Full Text Available Thiol peroxidase, Tpx, has been shown to be a target protein of the salicylidene acylhydrazide class of antivirulence compounds. In this study we present the crystal structures of Tpx from Y. pseudotuberculosis (ypTpx in the oxidised and reduced states, together with the structure of the C61S mutant. The structures solved are consistent with previously solved atypical 2-Cys thiol peroxidases, including that for "forced" reduced states using the C61S mutant. In addition, by investigating the solution structure of ypTpx using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, we have confirmed that reduced state ypTpx in solution is a homodimer. The solution structure also reveals flexibility around the dimer interface. Notably, the conformational changes observed between the redox states at the catalytic triad and at the dimer interface have implications for substrate and inhibitor binding. The structural data were used to model the binding of two salicylidene acylhydrazide compounds to the oxidised structure of ypTpx. Overall, the study provides insights into the binding of the salicylidene acylhydrazides to ypTpx, aiding our long-term strategy to understand the mode of action of this class of compounds.

  19. Structures of BmrR-Drug Complexes Reveal a Rigid Multidrug Binding Pocket And Transcription Activation Through Tyrosine Expulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newberry, K.J.; Huffman, J.L.; Miller, M.C.; Vazquez-Laslop, N.; Neyfakh, A.A.; Brennan, R.G.

    2009-05-22

    BmrR is a member of the MerR family and a multidrug binding transcription factor that up-regulates the expression of the bmr multidrug efflux transporter gene in response to myriad lipophilic cationic compounds. The structural mechanism by which BmrR binds these chemically and structurally different drugs and subsequently activates transcription is poorly understood. Here, we describe the crystal structures of BmrR bound to rhodamine 6G (R6G) or berberine (Ber) and cognate DNA. These structures reveal each drug stacks against multiple aromatic residues with their positive charges most proximal to the carboxylate group of Glu-253 and that, unlike other multidrug binding pockets, that of BmrR is rigid. Substitution of Glu-253 with either alanine (E253A) or glutamine (E253Q) results in unpredictable binding affinities for R6G, Ber, and tetraphenylphosphonium. Moreover, these drug binding studies reveal that the negative charge of Glu-253 is not important for high affinity binding to Ber and tetraphenylphosphonium but plays a more significant, but unpredictable, role in R6G binding. In vitro transcription data show that E253A and E253Q are constitutively active, and structures of the drug-free E253A-DNA and E253Q-DNA complexes support a transcription activation mechanism requiring the expulsion of Tyr-152 from the multidrug binding pocket. In sum, these data delineate the mechanism by which BmrR binds lipophilic, monovalent cationic compounds and suggest the importance of the redundant negative electrostatic nature of this rigid drug binding pocket that can be used to discriminate against molecules that are not substrates of the Bmr multidrug efflux pump.

  20. Cation Binding to Xanthorhodopsin: Electron Paramagnetic Resonance and Magnetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky Koganov, Elena; Leitus, Gregory; Rozin, Rinat; Weiner, Lev; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2017-05-04

    Xanthorhodopsin (xR) is a member of the retinal protein family and acts as a proton pump in the cell membranes of the extremely halophilic eubacterium Salinibacter ruber. In addition to the retinal chromophore, xR contains a carotenoid, which acts as a light-harvesting antenna as it transfers 40% of the quanta it absorbs to the retinal. Our previous studies have shown that the CD and absorption spectra of xR are dramatically affected due to the protonation of two different residues. It is still unclear whether xR can bind cations. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy used in the present study revealed that xR can bind divalent cations, such as Mn 2+ and Ca 2+ , to deionized xR (DI-xR). We also demonstrate that xR can bind 1 equiv of Mn 2+ to a high-affinity binding site followed by binding of ∼40 equiv in cooperative manner and ∼100 equiv of Mn 2+ that are weakly bound. SQUID magnetic studies suggest that the high cooperative binding of Mn 2+ cations to xR is due to the formation of Mn 2+ clusters. Our data demonstrate that Ca 2+ cations bind to DI-xR with a lower affinity than Mn 2+ , supporting the assumption that binding of Mn 2+ occurs through cluster formation, because Ca 2+ cations cannot form clusters in contrast to Mn 2+ .

  1. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

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    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  2. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  3. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular simulations and Markov state modeling reveal the structural diversity and dynamics of a theophylline-binding RNA aptamer in its unbound state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Becka M Warfield

    Full Text Available RNA aptamers are oligonucleotides that bind with high specificity and affinity to target ligands. In the absence of bound ligand, secondary structures of RNA aptamers are generally stable, but single-stranded and loop regions, including ligand binding sites, lack defined structures and exist as ensembles of conformations. For example, the well-characterized theophylline-binding aptamer forms a highly stable binding site when bound to theophylline, but the binding site is unstable and disordered when theophylline is absent. Experimental methods have not revealed at atomic resolution the conformations that the theophylline aptamer explores in its unbound state. Consequently, in the present study we applied 21 microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations to structurally characterize the ensemble of conformations that the aptamer adopts in the absence of theophylline. Moreover, we apply Markov state modeling to predict the kinetics of transitions between unbound conformational states. Our simulation results agree with experimental observations that the theophylline binding site is found in many distinct binding-incompetent states and show that these states lack a binding pocket that can accommodate theophylline. The binding-incompetent states interconvert with binding-competent states through structural rearrangement of the binding site on the nanosecond to microsecond timescale. Moreover, we have simulated the complete theophylline binding pathway. Our binding simulations supplement prior experimental observations of slow theophylline binding kinetics by showing that the binding site must undergo a large conformational rearrangement after the aptamer and theophylline form an initial complex, most notably, a major rearrangement of the C27 base from a buried to solvent-exposed orientation. Theophylline appears to bind by a combination of conformational selection and induced fit mechanisms. Finally, our modeling indicates that when Mg2+ ions are

  5. Longitudinal investigation of source memory reveals different developmental trajectories for item memory and binding

    OpenAIRE

    Riggins, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    The present study used a cohort-sequential design to examine developmental changes in children's ability to bind items in memory during early and middle childhood. Three cohorts of children (aged 4, 6, or 8 years) were followed longitudinally for three years. Each year, children completed a source memory paradigm assessing memory for items and binding. Results suggest linear increases in memory for individual items (facts or sources) between 4 and 10 years of age, but that memory for correct ...

  6. Combined computational and biochemical study reveals the importance of electrostatic interactions between the "pH sensor" and the cation binding site of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaA of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhova, Elena; Kozachkov, Lena; Padan, Etana; Michel, Hartmut

    2009-08-15

    Sodium proton antiporters are essential enzymes that catalyze the exchange of sodium ions for protons across biological membranes. The crystal structure of NhaA has provided a basis to explore the mechanism of ion exchange and its unique regulation by pH. Here, the mechanism of the pH activation of the antiporter is investigated through functional and computational studies of several variants with mutations in the ion-binding site (D163, D164). The most significant difference found computationally between the wild type antiporter and the active site variants, D163E and D164N, are low pK(a) values of Glu78 making them insensitive to pH. Although in the variant D163N the pK(a) of Glu78 is comparable to the physiological one, this variant cannot demonstrate the long-range electrostatic effect of Glu78 on the pH-dependent structural reorganization of trans-membrane helix X and, hence, is proposed to be inactive. In marked contrast, variant D164E remains sensitive to pH and can be activated by alkaline pH shift. Remarkably, as expected computationally and discovered here biochemically, D164E is viable and active in Na(+)/H(+) exchange albeit with increased apparent K(M). Our results unravel the unique electrostatic network of NhaA that connect the coupled clusters of the "pH sensor" with the binding site, which is crucial for pH activation of NhaA. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Mistletoe lectin I in complex with galactose and lactose reveals distinct sugar-binding properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikeska, Ruth; Wacker, Roland; Arni, Raghuvir; Singh, Tej P.; Mikhailov, Albert; Gabdoulkhakov, Azat; Voelter, Wolfgang; Betzel, Christian

    2004-01-01

    The structures of mistletoe lectin I in complex with lactose and galactose reveal differences in binding by the two known sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 and suggest the presence of a third low-affinity site in subdomain β1. The structures of mistletoe lectin I (ML-I) from Viscum album complexed with lactose and galactose have been determined at 2.3 Å resolution and refined to R factors of 20.9% (R free = 23.6%) and 20.9 (R free = 24.6%), respectively. ML-I is a heterodimer and belongs to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins of type II, which consist of two chains. The A-chain has rRNA N-glycosidase activity and irreversibly inhibits eukaryotic ribosomes. The B-chain is a lectin and preferentially binds to galactose-terminated glycolipids and glycoproteins on cell membranes. Saccharide binding is performed by two binding sites in subdomains α1 and γ2 of the ML-I B-chain separated by ∼62 Å from each other. The favoured binding of galactose in subdomain α1 is achieved via hydrogen bonds connecting the 4-hydroxyl and 3-hydroxyl groups of the sugar moiety with the side chains of Asp23B, Gln36B and Lys41B and the main chain of 26B. The aromatic ring of Trp38B on top of the preferred binding pocket supports van der Waals packing of the apolar face of galactose and stabilizes the sugar–lectin complex. In the galactose-binding site II of subdomain γ2, Tyr249B provides the hydrophobic stacking and the side chains of Asp235B, Gln238B and Asn256B are hydrogen-bonding partners for galactose. In the case of the galactose-binding site I, the 2-hydroxyl group also stabilizes the sugar–protein complex, an interaction thus far rarely detected in galactose-specific lectins. Finally, a potential third low-affinity galactose-binding site in subunit β1 was identified in the present ML-I structures, in which a glycerol molecule from the cryoprotectant buffer has bound, mimicking the sugar compound

  8. Surface plasmon resonance imaging reveals multiple binding modes of Agrobacterium transformation mediator VirE2 to ssDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyun; Zbaida, David; Elbaum, Michael; Leh, Hervé; Nogues, Claude; Buckle, Malcolm

    2015-07-27

    VirE2 is the major secreted protein of Agrobacterium tumefaciens in its genetic transformation of plant hosts. It is co-expressed with a small acidic chaperone VirE1, which prevents VirE2 oligomerization. After secretion into the host cell, VirE2 serves functions similar to a viral capsid in protecting the single-stranded transferred DNA en route to the nucleus. Binding of VirE2 to ssDNA is strongly cooperative and depends moreover on protein-protein interactions. In order to isolate the protein-DNA interactions, imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPRi) studies were conducted using surface-immobilized DNA substrates of length comparable to the protein-binding footprint. Binding curves revealed an important influence of substrate rigidity with a notable preference for poly-T sequences and absence of binding to both poly-A and double-stranded DNA fragments. Dissociation at high salt concentration confirmed the electrostatic nature of the interaction. VirE1-VirE2 heterodimers also bound to ssDNA, though by a different mechanism that was insensitive to high salt. Neither VirE2 nor VirE1-VirE2 followed the Langmuir isotherm expected for reversible monomeric binding. The differences reflect the cooperative self-interactions of VirE2 that are suppressed by VirE1. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  10. Unfolding mechanism of thrombin-binding aptamer revealed by molecular dynamics simulation and Markov State Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaojun; Zhang, Liyun; Xiao, Xiuchan; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Yu, Xinyan; Pu, Xuemei; Li, Menglong

    2016-04-05

    Thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) with the sequence 5'GGTTGGTGTGGTTGG3' could fold into G-quadruplex, which correlates with functionally important genomic regionsis. However, unfolding mechanism involved in the structural stability of G-quadruplex has not been satisfactorily elucidated on experiments so far. Herein, we studied the unfolding pathway of TBA by a combination of molecular dynamics simulation (MD) and Markov State Model (MSM). Our results revealed that the unfolding of TBA is not a simple two-state process but proceeds along multiple pathways with multistate intermediates. One high flux confirms some observations from NMR experiment. Another high flux exhibits a different and simpler unfolding pathway with less intermediates. Two important intermediate states were identified. One is similar to the G-triplex reported in the folding of G-quadruplex, but lack of H-bonding between guanines in the upper plane. More importantly, another intermediate state acting as a connector to link the folding region and the unfolding one, was the first time identified, which exhibits higher population and stability than the G-triplex-like intermediate. These results will provide valuable information for extending our understanding the folding landscape of G-quadruplex formation.

  11. Exhaustive sampling of docking poses reveals binding hypotheses for propafenone type inhibitors of P-glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freya Klepsch

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of the xenotoxin transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp represents one major reason for the development of multidrug resistance (MDR, leading to the failure of antibiotic and cancer therapies. Inhibitors of P-gp have thus been advocated as promising candidates for overcoming the problem of MDR. However, due to lack of a high-resolution structure the concrete mode of interaction of both substrates and inhibitors is still not known. Therefore, structure-based design studies have to rely on protein homology models. In order to identify binding hypotheses for propafenone-type P-gp inhibitors, five different propafenone derivatives with known structure-activity relationship (SAR pattern were docked into homology models of the apo and the nucleotide-bound conformation of the transporter. To circumvent the uncertainty of scoring functions, we exhaustively sampled the pose space and analyzed the poses by combining information retrieved from SAR studies with common scaffold clustering. The results suggest propafenone binding at the transmembrane helices 5, 6, 7 and 8 in both models, with the amino acid residue Y307 playing a crucial role. The identified binding site in the non-energized state is overlapping with, but not identical to, known binding areas of cyclic P-gp inhibitors and verapamil. These findings support the idea of several small binding sites forming one large binding cavity. Furthermore, the binding hypotheses for both catalytic states were analyzed and showed only small differences in their protein-ligand interaction fingerprints, which indicates only small movements of the ligand during the catalytic cycle.

  12. Spectroscopic studies on Titanium ion binding to the apo lactoferrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshtaghie, A.A.; Ani, M.; Arabi, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    Titanium is a relatively abundant element that has found growing applications in medical science and recently some of Titanium compounds are introduced as anticancer drugs. In spite of very limited data which exist on the Titanium metabolism, some proteins might be involved in the mechanism of action of Titanium up to our knowledge, there is not any report in the literature concerning binding of Titanium to apo lactoferrin. Binding of apo lactoferrin with Ti(IV)-citrate was studied by spectroflourimeterey and spectrophotometery techniques under physiological conditions. The spectroflourimeteric studies revealed a significant fluorescence quenching, that indicated binding of apo lactoferrin with Ti(IV). The same reaction was monitored through spectrophotometry technique; this represents a characteristic UV difference band at 267 nm, which is different from lac-Fe (III). Titration studies how that lactoferrin specifically binds two moles Ti(IV) as complex with citrate per mol protein. Spectroflourimeterey and spectrophotometery techniques indicated that Ti(IV) ions cause a reduction (13%-14%) in binding of Fe(III) to lactoferrin. In overall, we may come to this conclusion that this element might be involved in the iron metabolism

  13. YY1 binding association with sex-biased transcription revealed through X-linked transcript levels and allelic binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Shi, Wenqiang; Balaton, Bradley P; Matthews, Allison M; Li, Yifeng; Arenillas, David J; Mathelier, Anthony; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R; Brown, Carolyn J; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2016-11-18

    Sex differences in susceptibility and progression have been reported in numerous diseases. Female cells have two copies of the X chromosome with X-chromosome inactivation imparting mono-allelic gene silencing for dosage compensation. However, a subset of genes, named escapees, escape silencing and are transcribed bi-allelically resulting in sexual dimorphism. Here we conducted in silico analyses of the sexes using human datasets to gain perspectives into such regulation. We identified transcription start sites of escapees (escTSSs) based on higher transcription levels in female cells using FANTOM5 CAGE data. Significant over-representations of YY1 transcription factor binding motif and ChIP-seq peaks around escTSSs highlighted its positive association with escapees. Furthermore, YY1 occupancy is significantly biased towards the inactive X (Xi) at long non-coding RNA loci that are frequent contacts of Xi-specific superloops. Our study suggests a role for YY1 in transcriptional activity on Xi in general through sequence-specific binding, and its involvement at superloop anchors.

  14. Honey bee odorant-binding protein 14: effects on thermal stability upon odorant binding revealed by FT-IR spectroscopy and CD measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Kotlowski, Caroline; Araman, Can; Chu, Nam; Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; Becker, Christian; Pelosi, Paolo; Knoll, Wolfgang; Larisika, Melanie; Nowak, Christoph

    2014-03-01

    In the present work, we study the effect of odorant binding on the thermal stability of honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) odorant-binding protein 14. Thermal denaturation of the protein in the absence and presence of different odorant molecules was monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD). FT-IR spectra show characteristic bands for intermolecular aggregation through the formation of intermolecular β-sheets during the heating process. Transition temperatures in the FT-IR spectra were evaluated using moving-window 2D correlation maps and confirmed by CD measurements. The obtained results reveal an increase of the denaturation temperature of the protein when bound to an odorant molecule. We could also discriminate between high- and low-affinity odorants by determining transition temperatures, as demonstrated independently by the two applied methodologies. The increased thermal stability in the presence of ligands is attributed to a stabilizing effect of non-covalent interactions between odorant-binding protein 14 and the odorant molecule.

  15. Longitudinal Investigation of Source Memory Reveals Different Developmental Trajectories for Item Memory and Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    The present study used a cohort-sequential design to examine developmental changes in children's ability to bind items in memory during early and middle childhood. Three cohorts of children (aged 4, 6, or 8 years) were followed longitudinally for 3 years. Each year, children completed a source memory paradigm assessing memory for items and…

  16. Mapping of the Lassa virus LAMP1 binding site reveals unique determinants not shared by other old world arenaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadar Israeli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell entry of many enveloped viruses occurs by engagement with cellular receptors, followed by internalization into endocytic compartments and pH-induced membrane fusion. A previously unnoticed step of receptor switching was found to be critical during cell entry of two devastating human pathogens: Ebola and Lassa viruses. Our recent studies revealed the functional role of receptor switching to LAMP1 for triggering membrane fusion by Lassa virus and showed the involvement of conserved histidines in this switching, suggesting that other viruses from this family may also switch to LAMP1. However, when we investigated viruses that are genetically close to Lassa virus, we discovered that they cannot bind LAMP1. A crystal structure of the receptor-binding module from Morogoro virus revealed structural differences that allowed mapping of the LAMP1 binding site to a unique set of Lassa residues not shared by other viruses in its family, illustrating a key difference in the cell-entry mechanism of Lassa virus that may contribute to its pathogenicity.

  17. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions between Metal-binding Domains Modulate Intracellular Targeting of Cu(I)-ATPase ATP7B, as Revealed by Nanobody Binding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yiping; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Yu, Corey H.; Yang, Haojun; Barry, Amanda N.; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L.; Muyldermans, Serge; Dmitriev, Oleg Y.; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The biologically and clinically important membrane transporters are challenging proteins to study because of their low level of expression, multidomain structure, and complex molecular dynamics that underlies their activity. ATP7B is a copper transporter that traffics between the intracellular compartments in response to copper elevation. The N-terminal domain of ATP7B (N-ATP7B) is involved in binding copper, but the role of this domain in trafficking is controversial. To clarify the role of N-ATP7B, we generated nanobodies that interact with ATP7B in vitro and in cells. In solution NMR studies, nanobodies revealed the spatial organization of N-ATP7B by detecting transient functionally relevant interactions between metal-binding domains 1–3. Modulation of these interactions by nanobodies in cells enhanced relocalization of the endogenous ATP7B toward the plasma membrane linking molecular and cellular dynamics of the transporter. Stimulation of ATP7B trafficking by nanobodies in the absence of elevated copper provides direct evidence for the important role of N-ATP7B structural dynamics in regulation of ATP7B localization in a cell. PMID:25253690

  19. Revealing the mechanisms of protein disorder and N-glycosylation in CD44-hyaluronan binding using molecular simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgun eGuvench

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular N-terminal hyaluronan binding domain (HABD of CD44 is a small globular domain that confers hyaluronan (HA binding functionality to this large transmembrane glycoprotein. When recombinantly expressed by itself, HABD exists as a globular water-soluble protein that retains the capacity to bind HA. This has enabled atomic-resolution structural biology experiments that have revealed the structure of HABD and its binding mode with oligomeric HA. Such experiments have also pointed to an order-to-disorder transition in HABD that is associated with HA binding. However, it had remained unclear how this structural transition was involved in binding since it occurs in a region of HABD distant from the HA-binding site. Furthermore, HABD is known to be N-glycosylated, and such glycosylation can diminish HA binding when the associated N-glycans are capped with sialic acid residues. The intrinsic flexibility of disordered proteins and of N-glycans makes it difficult to apply experimental structural biology approaches to probe the molecular mechanisms of how the order-to-disorder transition and N-glycosylation can modulate HA binding by HABD. We review recent results from molecular dynamics simulations that provide atomic-resolution mechanistic understanding of such modulation to help bridge gaps between existing experimental binding and structural biology data. Findings from these simulations include: Tyr42 may function as a molecular switch that converts the HA binding site from a low affinity to a high affinity state; in the partially-disordered form of HABD, basic amino acids in the C-terminal region can gain sufficient mobility to form direct contacts with bound HA to further stabilize binding; and terminal sialic acids on covalently-attached N-glycans can form charge-paired hydrogen bonding interactions with basic amino acids that could otherwise bind to HA, thereby blocking HA binding to glycosylated CD44 HABD.

  20. Structures of Orf Virus Chemokine Binding Protein in Complex with Host Chemokines Reveal Clues to Broad Binding Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couñago, Rafael M; Knapp, Karen M; Nakatani, Yoshio; Fleming, Stephen B; Corbett, Michael; Wise, Lyn M; Mercer, Andrew A; Krause, Kurt L

    2015-07-07

    The chemokine binding protein (CKBP) from orf virus (ORFV) binds with high affinity to chemokines from three classes, C, CC, and CXC, making it unique among poxvirus CKBPs described to date. We present its crystal structure alone and in complex with three CC chemokines, CCL2, CCL3, and CCL7. ORFV CKBP possesses a β-sandwich fold that is electrostatically and sterically complementary to its binding partners. Chemokines bind primarily through interactions involving the N-terminal loop and a hydrophobic recess on the ORFV CKBP β-sheet II surface, and largely polar interactions between the chemokine 20s loop and a negatively charged surface groove located at one end of the CKBP β-sheet II surface. ORFV CKBP interacts with leukocyte receptor and glycosaminoglycan binding sites found on the surface of bound chemokines. SEC-MALLS and chromatographic evidence is presented supporting that ORFV CKBP is a dimer in solution over a broad range of protein concentrations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Burn injury reveals altered phenotype in mannan-binding lectin-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Kristensen, Mette; Hamblin, Michael R; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Burn injury destroys skin, the second largest innate immune organ in the body, and triggers chaotic immune and inflammatory responses. The pattern recognition molecule, mannan-binding lectin (MBL), plays an important role in the first-line host defense against infectious agents. MBL initiates...... the lectin complement pathway and acts as an opsonin. Recent studies suggest that MBL also modulates inflammatory responses. We report that local responses after burn in MBL null mice differ from those found in wild-type (WT) mice in the following important biological markers: spontaneous eschar separation......, thinned epidermis and dermis, upregulation of soluble factors including cytokines, chemokines, cell adhesion molecules, a growth factor-binding protein, and matrix metalloproteinases. Mice lacking C1q, C4, or C3 did not show the lack of eschar separation seen in MBL null-burn phenotype. These findings...

  2. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  3. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.

  4. The Panitumumab EGFR Complex Reveals a Binding Mechanism That Overcomes Cetuximab Induced Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Allen Sickmier

    Full Text Available Panitumumab and cetuximab target the epidermal growth factor receptor for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. These therapies provide a significant survival benefit to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with wild-type RAS. A single point mutation in the ectodomain of EGFR (S468R confers acquired or secondary resistance in cetuximab treated patients, which is not observed in panitumumab-treated patients. Structural and biophysical studies presented here show this mutation directly blocks cetuximab binding to EGFR domain III and describes a unique mechanism by which panitumumab uses a central cavity to accommodate this mutation.

  5. Diverse binding site structures revealed in homology models of polyreactive immunoglobulins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsland, Paul A.; Guddat, Luke W.; Edmundson, Allen B.; Raison, Robert L.

    1997-09-01

    We describe here computer-assisted homology models of the combiningsite structure of three polyreactive immunoglobulins. Template-based modelsof Fv (VL-VH) fragments were derived forthe surface IgM expressed by the malignant CD5 positive B cells from threepatients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). The conserved frameworkregions were constructed using crystal coordinates taken from highlyhomologous human variable domain structures (Pot and Hil). Complementaritydetermining regions (CDRs) were predicted by grafting loops, taken fromknown immunoglobulin structures, onto the Fv framework models. The CDRtemplates were chosen, where possible, to be of the same length and of highresidue identity or similarity. LCDR1, 2 and 3 as well as HCDR1 and 2 forthe Fv were constructed using this strategy. For HCDR3 prediction, adatabase containing the Cartesian coordinates of 30 of these loops wascompiled from unliganded antibody X-ray crystallographic structures and anHCDR3 of the same length as that of the B CLL Fv was selected as a template.In one case (Yar), the resulting HCDR3 model gave unfavourable interactionswhen incorporated into the Fv model. This HCDR3 was therefore modelled usingan alternative strategy of construction of the loop stems, using apreviously described HCDR3 conformation (Pot), followed by chain closurewith a β-turn. The template models were subjected to positionalrefinement using energy minimisation and molecular dynamics simulations(X-PLOR). An electrostatic surface description (GRASP) did not reveal acommon structural feature within the binding sites of the three polyreactiveFv. Thus, polyreactive immunoglobulins may recognise similar and multipleantigens through a diverse array of binding site structures.

  6. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  7. Machine Learning Reveals a Non-Canonical Mode of Peptide Binding to MHC class II Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Kaever, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    binding motif with a non-canonical binding core of length different from nine. This previously undescribed mode of peptide binding to MHCII molecules gives a more complete picture of peptide presentation by MHCII and allows us to model more accurately this event. This article is protected by copyright...

  8. Nanodisc-Targeted STD NMR Spectroscopy Reveals Atomic Details of Ligand Binding to Lipid Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Juan C; Inacio Dos Reis, Rosana; Taylor, Richard J; Henry, Alistair J; Watts, Anthony

    2018-05-18

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy is one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. This is due to its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need for NMR information on the macromolecular target. This technique is most commonly applied to systems involving different types of ligands (e.g., small organic molecules, carbohydrates or lipids) and a protein as the target, in which the latter is selectively saturated. However, only a few examples have been reported where membrane mimetics are the macromolecular binding partners. Here, we have employed STD NMR spectroscopy to investigate the interactions of the neurotransmitter dopamine with mimetics of lipid bilayers, such as nanodiscs, by saturation of the latter. In particular, the interactions between dopamine and model lipid nanodiscs formed either from charged or zwitterionic lipids have been resolved at the atomic level. The results, in agreement with previous isothermal titration calorimetry studies, show that dopamine preferentially binds to negatively charged model membranes, but also provide detailed atomic insights into the mode of interaction of dopamine with membrane mimetics. Our findings provide relevant structural information for the design of lipid-based drug carriers of dopamine and its structural analogues and are of general applicability to other systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Calcium Binding Properties and Allosteric Regulation of Downstream Regulatory Element Antagonist Modulator (DREAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jing; Craig, Theodore A; Kumar, Rajiv; Gross, Michael L

    2017-07-18

    Downstream regulatory element antagonist modulator (DREAM) is an EF-hand Ca 2+ -binding protein that also binds to a specific DNA sequence, downstream regulatory elements (DRE), and thereby regulates transcription in a calcium-dependent fashion. DREAM binds to DRE in the absence of Ca 2+ but detaches from DRE under Ca 2+ stimulation, allowing gene expression. The Ca 2+ binding properties of DREAM and the consequences of the binding on protein structure are key to understanding the function of DREAM. Here we describe the application of hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and site-directed mutagenesis to investigate the Ca 2+ binding properties and the subsequent conformational changes of full-length DREAM. We demonstrate that all EF-hands undergo large conformation changes upon calcium binding even though the EF-1 hand is not capable of binding to Ca 2+ . Moreover, EF-2 is a lower-affinity site compared to EF-3 and -4 hands. Comparison of HDX profiles between wild-type DREAM and two EF-1 mutated constructs illustrates that the conformational changes in the EF-1 hand are induced by long-range structural interactions. HDX analyses also reveal a conformational change in an N-terminal leucine-charged residue-rich domain (LCD) remote from Ca 2+ -binding EF-hands. This LCD domain is responsible for the direct interaction between DREAM and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and regulates the recruitment of the co-activator, CREB-binding protein. These long-range interactions strongly suggest how conformational changes transmit the Ca 2+ signal to CREB-mediated gene transcription.

  10. Studies on binding of radiolabeled thyrotropin to cultured human thyroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Rapoport, B.

    1978-01-01

    A line of cultured human thyroid adenoma cells was used in a study designed to compare the stimulatory effect of TSH on cellular cAMP generation with the binding of radiolabeled TSH to the cells. At 37 C, specific binding of [ 125 I]TSH to suspensions of thyroid cells was maximal at 20 min and was reversed by the addition of excess TSH. Unlike the generation of cellular cAMP in response to TSH stimulation, which was maximal at pH 7.5, the binding of [ 125 ]TSH to the cells was maximal at pH 5.5 and progressively declined up to pH 8.5. Increasing NaCl concentrations progressively inhibited cellular binding of TSH; at physiological salt concentrations, almost no TSH binding was detectable. Competitive inhibition studies of [ 125 I]TSH binding to cells revealed a binding site with a dissociation constant of 5.5 x 10 -8 M at pH 7.4. GH, PRL, hCG, FSH, insulin, and glucagon did not compete with [ 125 I)TSH binding. ACTH, however, was a potent inhibitor of [ 125 I]TSH binding. Despite this inhibitory effect on TSH binding, ACTH had little or no effect on cellular cAMP generation. High concentrations of ACTH did not inhibit the biological effect of TSH on cAMP generation. Specific binding of [ 125 I]TSH to empty plastic culture dishes was time dependent, reversible, and displayed a hormonal specificity identical to binding to thyroid cells. The effects of pH and NaCl concentrations on TSH binding to dishes were similarbut not identical to those on cellular binding. This study raises serious questions as to the biological significance of [ 125 I]TSH binding to cultured human thyroid cells

  11. The host-binding domain of the P2 phage tail spike reveals a trimeric iron-binding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Eiki; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Takahashi, Junichi; Tsunoda, Kin-ichi; Yamada, Seiko; Takeda, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of a bacteriophage P2 tail-spike protein, gpV, was crystallized and its structure was solved at 1.27 Å resolution. The refined model showed a triple β-helix structure and the presence of iron, calcium and chloride ions. The adsorption and infection of bacteriophage P2 is mediated by tail fibres and tail spikes. The tail spikes on the tail baseplate are used to irreversibly adsorb to the host cells. Recently, a P2 phage tail-spike protein, gpV, was purified and it was shown that a C-terminal domain, Ser87–Leu211, is sufficient for the binding of gpV to host Escherichia coli membranes [Kageyama et al. (2009 ▶), Biochemistry, 48, 10129–10135]. In this paper, the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of P2 gpV is reported. The structure is a triangular pyramid and looks like a spearhead composed of an intertwined β-sheet, a triple β-helix and a metal-binding region containing iron, calcium and chloride ions

  12. Protein binding of glufosinate and factors affecting it revealed by an equilibrium dialysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Y; Koyama, K; Fujisawa, M; Nakajima, M; Shimada, K; Hirose, Y; Kohda, Y; Akuzawa, H

    2001-09-01

    We investigated the protein binding of glufosinate ammonium (GLF) and several factors affecting this binding using human serum albumin (HSA) and human volunteer serum under various conditions. The mean ratios of the free GLF (RFr-GLF) to 4% HSA were examined in the sera of patients described elsewhere at GLF levels from 1 microg/mL to 500 microg/mL; the range was found to be only from 0.80 to 0.88. Neither the incubation temperature nor buffers containing different chloride ion concentrations had any effect on the RFr-GLF to HSA. Moreover, the addition of heparin, glycoprotein-alpha1-acid (AAG), and sodium azide had no effect on the RFr-GLF. However, pH of the isotonic phosphate buffer and the addition of palmitic or oleic acid were seen to have an effect. In this study, the mean RFr-GLF to healthy human serum was 0.99. This high value was evidenced that GLF was rapidly excreted through the renal route.

  13. Presence of a highly efficient binding to bacterial contamination can distort data from binding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcar, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    3 HGABA at low concentrations (5-10 nM) was bound by what appeared to be a GABA receptor binding site in bacterial contamination originating from a batch of distilled water. Under experimental conditions similar to those usually employed in 3 HGABA binding studies, the apparent binding displayed a very high specific component and a high efficiency in terms of 3 HGABA bound per mg of protein. The binding was blocked by muscimol but not by isoguvacine, SR95531 and nipecotic acid. These characteristics suggest that the presence of such spurious binding in the experiments using 3H-labeled ligands in brain homogenates may not always be very obvious and, moreover, it can result in subtle, but serious, distortions of data from such studies, which may not be immediately recognized

  14. Binding of indomethacin methyl ester to cyclooxygenase-2. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárosi, Menyhárt-Botond

    2018-06-05

    Inhibitors selective towards the second isoform of prostaglandin synthase (cyclooxygenase, COX-2) are promising nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antitumor medications. Methylation of the carboxylate group in the relatively nonselective COX inhibitor indomethacin confers significant COX-2 selectivity. Several other modifications converting indomethacin into a COX-2 selective inhibitor have been reported. Earlier experimental and computational studies on neutral indomethacin derivatives suggest that the methyl ester derivative likely binds to COX-2 with a similar binding mode as that observed for the parent indomethacin. However, docking studies followed by molecular dynamics simulations revealed two possible binding modes in COX-2 for indomethacin methyl ester, which differs from the experimental binding mode found for indomethacin. Both alternative binding modes might explain the observed COX-2 selectivity of indomethacin methyl ester. Graphical abstract Binding of indomethacin methyl ester to cyclooxygenase-2.

  15. Pulse radiolysis studies on DNA-Binding radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Hoechst 33342 and newly-synthesised analogues exhibit radioprotective activity in cultured cells and in vivo, as described in accompanying abstracts. These minor groove binding ligands bind at discreet sites in DNA, characterised by 3 to 4 consecutive AT base pairs, and DNA sequencing studies have shown focussed radioprotection at these binding sites. There is evidence that the bound ligands also confer more 'global' protection including the intervening DNA between the binding sites. The observed focussed radioprotection could be explained by H-atom donation from the ligand to radiation-induced carbon-centred deoxyribosyl radicals, but this mechanism is unlikely to account for the global radioprotection. We now report pulse radiolysis studies on another possible mechanism, namely reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidising species on DNA by the ligand, which is consistent with the report of reduction of G + by TMPD. Oxidation of deoxyguanosine (dG) by Br 2 - , produced by radiolysis of Br- in N 2 0-saturated solutions, in the presence of Hoechst 33342 results in the appearance of a transient ligand species which is kinetically resolvable from that obtained from direct oxidation of Hoechst 33342 by Br 2 - . A plot of reaction rate versus ligand concentration indicates that the rate constant for reduction of G + is approximately 3 x 10 8 dm 3 M -1 sec -1 . Similar experiments with DNA, rather than dG, also revealed a transient species corresponding to oxidation of the ligand, but the absolute rate of oxidation was considerably slower for the DNA-bound ligand compared to that for oxidation of the free ligand by G+. These results are clearly consistent with the proposed mechanism of radioprotection by Hoechst 33342 and its analogues, moreover, pulse radiolysis may provide a very useful endpoint for screening new analogues, as a preliminary to radiobiological evaluation

  16. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffatt Barbara A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. Results The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192 in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Conclusions Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure.

  17. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxey, Andrew C; Cheng, Zhenyu; Moffatt, Barbara A; McConkey, Brendan J

    2010-08-03

    Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192) in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure.

  18. Lactose Binding Induces Opposing Dynamics Changes in Human Galectins Revealed by NMR-Based Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chih-Ta Henry; Ho, Meng-Ru; Lin, Chung-Hung; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny

    2017-08-16

    Galectins are β-galactoside-binding proteins implicated in a myriad of biological functions. Despite their highly conserved carbohydrate binding motifs with essentially identical structures, their affinities for lactose, a common galectin inhibitor, vary significantly. Here, we aimed to examine the molecular basis of differential lactose affinities amongst galectins using solution-based techniques. Consistent dissociation constants of lactose binding were derived from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and bio-layer interferometry for human galectin-1 (hGal1), galectin-7 (hGal7), and the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of galectin-8 (hGal8 NTD and hGal8 CTD , respectively). Furthermore, the dissociation rates of lactose binding were extracted from NMR lineshape analyses. Structural mapping of chemical shift perturbations revealed long-range perturbations upon lactose binding for hGal1 and hGal8 NTD . We further demonstrated using the NMR-based hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX) that lactose binding increases the exchange rates of residues located on the opposite side of the ligand-binding pocket for hGal1 and hGal8 NTD , indicative of allostery. Additionally, lactose binding induces significant stabilisation of hGal8 CTD across the entire domain. Our results suggested that lactose binding reduced the internal dynamics of hGal8 CTD on a very slow timescale (minutes and slower) at the expense of reduced binding affinity due to the unfavourable loss of conformational entropy.

  19. The early asthmatic response is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondria activity as revealed by proteomic analysis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Yu-Dong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of allergens by allergic asthmatics results in the early asthmatic response (EAR, which is characterized by acute airway obstruction beginning within a few minutes. The EAR is the earliest indicator of the pathological progression of allergic asthma. Because the molecular mechanism underlying the EAR is not fully defined, this study will contribute to a better understanding of asthma. Methods In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of the EAR, we examined changes in protein expression patterns in the lung tissue of asthmatic rats during the EAR using 2-DE/MS-based proteomic techniques. Bioinformatic analysis of the proteomic data was then performed using PPI Spider and KEGG Spider to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism. Results In total, 44 differentially expressed protein spots were detected in the 2-DE gels. Of these 44 protein spots, 42 corresponded to 36 unique proteins successfully identified using mass spectrometry. During subsequent bioinformatic analysis, the gene ontology classification, the protein-protein interaction networking and the biological pathway exploration demonstrated that the identified proteins were mainly involved in glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity. Using western blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR, we confirmed the changes in expression of five selected proteins, which further supports our proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Conclusions Our results reveal that the allergen-induced EAR in asthmatic rats is associated with glycolysis, calcium binding and mitochondrial activity, which could establish a functional network in which calcium binding may play a central role in promoting the progression of asthma.

  20. A programmable DNA origami nanospring that reveals force-induced adjacent binding of myosin VI heads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, M; Wickham, S F; Ikezaki, K; Yanagida, T; Shih, W M

    2016-12-12

    Mechanosensitive biological nanomachines such as motor proteins and ion channels regulate diverse cellular behaviour. Combined optical trapping with single-molecule fluorescence imaging provides a powerful methodology to clearly characterize the mechanoresponse, structural dynamics and stability of such nanomachines. However, this system requires complicated experimental geometry, preparation and optics, and is limited by low data-acquisition efficiency. Here we develop a programmable DNA origami nanospring that overcomes these issues. We apply our nanospring to human myosin VI, a mechanosensory motor protein, and demonstrate nanometre-precision single-molecule fluorescence imaging of the individual motor domains (heads) under force. We observe force-induced transitions of myosin VI heads from non-adjacent to adjacent binding, which correspond to adapted roles for low-load and high-load transport, respectively. Our technique extends single-molecule studies under force and clarifies the effect of force on biological processes.

  1. Proteomic analysis of pig (Sus scrofa olfactory soluble proteome reveals O-GlcNAcylation of secreted odorant-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eNAGNAN-LE MEILLOUR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of olfactory binding proteins (OBPs is a key point to understand their role in molecular olfaction. Since only few different sequences were characterized in each mammalian species, they have been considered as passive carriers of odors and pheromones. We have explored the soluble proteome of pig nasal mucus, taking benefit of the powerful tools of proteomics. Combining two-dimensional electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and western-blot with specific antibodies, our analyses revealed for the first time that the pig nasal mucus is mainly composed of secreted OBP isoforms, some of them being potentially modified by O-GlcNAcylation. An ortholog gene of the glycosyltransferase responsible of the O-GlcNAc linking on extracellular proteins in Drosophila and Mouse (EOGT was amplified from tissues of pigs of different ages and sex. The sequence was used in a phylogenetic analysis, which evidenced conservation of EOGT in insect and mammalian models studied in molecular olfaction. Extracellular O-GlcNAcylation of secreted OBPs could finely modulate their binding specificities to odors and pheromones. This constitutes a new mechanism for extracellular signaling by OBPs, suggesting that they act as the first step of odor discrimination.

  2. Crystal structure of the UBR-box from UBR6/FBXO11 reveals domain swapping mediated by zinc binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2017-10-01

    The UBR-box is a 70-residue zinc finger domain present in the UBR family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that directly binds N-terminal degradation signals in substrate proteins. UBR6, also called FBXO11, is an UBR-box containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that does not bind N-terminal signals. Here, we present the crystal structure of the UBR-box domain from human UBR6. The dimeric crystal structure reveals a unique form of domain swapping mediated by zinc coordination, where three independent protein chains come together to regenerate the topology of the monomeric UBR-box fold. Analysis of the structure suggests that the absence of N-terminal residue binding arises from the lack of an amino acid binding pocket. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  3. Study of plasma binding of receptor-specific peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Gregor, David

    2008-01-01

    The binding ability of two receptor specific peptides namely 90Y-DOTA-TATE and 111In-DOTA-TATE was studied in therm of interspecies comparison by the method of equilibrium dialysis. This plasma protein binding was different for the chosen animal species (human, rat, rabbit, bovine eventually pork) whereas binding of 90Y-DOTA- TATE was higher than binding of 111In-DOTA-TATE. KEYWORDS: Protein binding, radiofarmaceuticals, equilibrium dialysis, 90Y-DOTA-TATE, 111In- DOTA-TATE

  4. Ligand Binding Induces Conformational Changes in Human Cellular Retinol-binding Protein 1 (CRBP1) Revealed by Atomic Resolution Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvaroli, Josie A; Arne, Jason M; Chelstowska, Sylwia; Kiser, Philip D; Banerjee, Surajit; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-04-15

    Important in regulating the uptake, storage, and metabolism of retinoids, cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1) is essential for trafficking vitamin A through the cytoplasm. However, the molecular details of ligand uptake and targeted release by CRBP1 remain unclear. Here we report the first structure of CRBP1 in a ligand-free form as well as ultra-high resolution structures of this protein bound to either all-trans-retinol or retinylamine, the latter a therapeutic retinoid that prevents light-induced retinal degeneration. Superpositioning of human apo- and holo-CRBP1 revealed major differences within segments surrounding the entrance to the retinoid-binding site. These included α-helix II and hairpin turns between β-strands βC-βD and βE-βF as well as several side chains, such as Phe-57, Tyr-60, and Ile-77, that change their orientations to accommodate the ligand. Additionally, we mapped hydrogen bond networks inside the retinoid-binding cavity and demonstrated their significance for the ligand affinity. Analyses of the crystallographic B-factors indicated several regions with higher backbone mobility in the apoprotein that became more rigid upon retinoid binding. This conformational flexibility of human apo-CRBP1 facilitates interaction with the ligands, whereas the more rigid holoprotein structure protects the labile retinoid moiety during vitamin A transport. These findings suggest a mechanism of induced fit upon ligand binding by mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  6. Context influences on TALE–DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M.; Barrera, Luis A.; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D.; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE–DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000–20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE–DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design. PMID:26067805

  7. Receptor binding studies of the living heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.

    1988-01-01

    Receptors form a class of intrinsic membrane proteins (or glycoproteins) defined by the high affinity and specificity with which they bind ligands. Many receptors are associated directly or indirectly with membrane ion channels that open or close after a conformational change of the receptor induced by the binding of the neurotransmitter. Changes in number and/or affinity of cardiac neurotransmitter receptors have been associated with myocardial ischemia and infarction, congestive heart failure, and cardiomyopathy as well as diabetes or thyroid-induced heart muscle disease. These alterations of cardiac receptors have been demonstrated in vitro on membrane homogenates from samples collected mainly during surgery or postmortem. The disadvantage of these in vitro binding techniques is that receptors lose their natural environment and their relationships with the other components of the tissue

  8. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Erika; Harmat, Veronika; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.; Módos, Károly; Kardos, József; Liliom, Károly

    2010-01-01

    Lipid-protein interactions are rarely characterized at a structural molecular level due to technical difficulties; however, the biological significance of understanding the mechanism of these interactions is outstanding. In this report, we provide mechanistic insight into the inhibitory complex formation of the lipid mediator sphingosylphosphorylcholine with calmodulin, the most central and ubiquitous regulator protein in calcium signaling. We applied crystallographic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic approaches using purified bovine calmodulin and bovine cerebral microsomal fraction to arrive at our conclusions. Here we present 1) a 1.6-Å resolution crystal structure of their complex, in which the sphingolipid occupies the conventional hydrophobic binding site on calmodulin; 2) a peculiar stoichiometry-dependent binding process: at low or high protein-to-lipid ratio calmodulin binds lipid micelles or a few lipid molecules in a compact globular conformation, respectively, and 3) evidence that the sphingolipid displaces calmodulin from its targets on cerebral microsomes. We have ascertained the specificity of the interaction using structurally related lipids as controls. Our observations reveal the structural basis of selective calmodulin inhibition by the sphingolipid. On the basis of the crystallographic and biophysical characterization of the calmodulin–sphingosylphosphorylcholine interaction, we propose a novel lipid-protein binding model, which might be applicable to other interactions as well.—Kovacs, E., Harmat, V., Tóth, J., Vértessy, B. G., Módos, K., Kardos, J., Liliom, K. Structure and mechanism of calmodulin binding to a signaling sphingolipid reveal new aspects of lipid-protein interactions. PMID:20522785

  9. The identification of FANCD2 DNA binding domains reveals nuclear localization sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niraj, Joshi; Caron, Marie-Christine; Drapeau, Karine; Bérubé, Stéphanie; Guitton-Sert, Laure; Coulombe, Yan; Couturier, Anthony M; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2017-08-21

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a recessive genetic disorder characterized by congenital abnormalities, progressive bone-marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. The FA pathway consists of at least 21 FANC genes (FANCA-FANCV), and the encoded protein products interact in a common cellular pathway to gain resistance against DNA interstrand crosslinks. After DNA damage, FANCD2 is monoubiquitinated and accumulates on chromatin. FANCD2 plays a central role in the FA pathway, using yet unidentified DNA binding regions. By using synthetic peptide mapping and DNA binding screen by electromobility shift assays, we found that FANCD2 bears two major DNA binding domains predominantly consisting of evolutionary conserved lysine residues. Furthermore, one domain at the N-terminus of FANCD2 bears also nuclear localization sequences for the protein. Mutations in the bifunctional DNA binding/NLS domain lead to a reduction in FANCD2 monoubiquitination and increase in mitomycin C sensitivity. Such phenotypes are not fully rescued by fusion with an heterologous NLS, which enable separation of DNA binding and nuclear import functions within this domain that are necessary for FANCD2 functions. Collectively, our results enlighten the importance of DNA binding and NLS residues in FANCD2 to activate an efficient FA pathway. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Glycoprotein profiles of macrophages at different stages of activation as revealed by lectin binding after electrophoretic separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimura, T; North, S M; Nicolson, G L

    1987-01-01

    Glycoprotein profiles of rat macrophages (M phi) at different stages of activation were studied by examining the reactivity of various lectins to the glycoproteins separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Ricinus communis agglutinin 1 (RCA1) revealed several components including glycoproteins of Mr 160 kDa and 65 kDa prominent in resident M phi. A pokeweed mitogen (PWM) isolectin, Pa-4, recognizes branched poly(N-acetyllactosamine)-type carbohydrate chains, and revealed a significant increase in glycoproteins of Mr ranging from 70 kDa to 150 kDa on thioglycolate-elicited M phi. Increased reactivity of PWM to thioglycolate-elicited M phi was observed by direct binding of 125I-labeled Pa-4 to intact or glutaraldehyde-fixed M phi. Histochemical staining of formaldehyde-fixed M phi in vitro with biotinylated Pa-4 was consistent with the gel analysis, that is, resident M phi had no reactivity while thioglycolate-elicited M phi showed slight reactivity. Alveolar and intratumoral M phi bound more Pa-4 than resident or thioglycolate-elicited M phi. The PWM isolectin may therefore serve as a marker for an early stage of M phi activation.

  11. Analysis of Metal-Binding Features of the Wild Type and Two Domain-Truncated Mutant Variants of Littorina littorea Metallothionein Reveals Its Cd-Specific Character

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Òscar Palacios

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available After the resolution of the 3D structure of the Cd9-aggregate of the Littorina littorea metallothionein (MT, we report here a detailed analysis of the metal binding capabilities of the wild type MT, LlwtMT, and of two truncated mutants lacking either the N-terminal domain, Lltr2MT, or both the N-terminal domain, plus four extra flanking residues (SSVF, Lltr1MT. The recombinant synthesis and in vitro studies of these three proteins revealed that LlwtMT forms unique M9-LlwtMT complexes with Zn(II and Cd(II, while yielding a complex mixture of heteronuclear Zn,Cu-LlwtMT species with Cu(I. As expected, the truncated mutants gave rise to unique M6-LltrMT complexes and Zn,Cu-LltrMT mixtures of lower stoichiometry with respect to LlwtMT, with the SSVF fragment having an influence on their metal binding performance. Our results also revealed a major specificity, and therefore a better metal-coordinating performance of the three proteins for Cd(II than for Zn(II, although the analysis of the Zn(II/Cd(II displacement reaction clearly demonstrates a lack of any type of cooperativity in Cd(II binding. Contrarily, the analysis of their Cu(I binding abilities revealed that every LlMT domain is prone to build Cu4-aggregates, the whole MT working by modules analogously to, as previously described, certain fungal MTs, like those of C. neoformans and T. mesenterica. It is concluded that the Littorina littorea MT is a Cd-specific protein that (beyond its extended binding capacity through an additional Cd-binding domain confers to Littorina littorea a particular adaptive advantage in its changeable marine habitat.

  12. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariya Tarazanova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities.

  13. Cell Surface Properties of Lactococcus lactis Reveal Milk Protein Binding Specifically Evolved in Dairy Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazanova, Mariya; Huppertz, Thom; Beerthuyzen, Marke; van Schalkwijk, Saskia; Janssen, Patrick; Wels, Michiel; Kok, Jan; Bachmann, Herwig

    2017-01-01

    Surface properties of bacteria are determined by the molecular composition of the cell wall and they are important for interactions of cells with their environment. Well-known examples of bacterial interactions with surfaces are biofilm formation and the fermentation of solid materials like food and feed. Lactococcus lactis is broadly used for the fermentation of cheese and buttermilk and it is primarily isolated from either plant material or the dairy environment. In this study, we characterized surface hydrophobicity, charge, emulsification properties, and the attachment to milk proteins of 55 L. lactis strains in stationary and exponential growth phases. The attachment to milk protein was assessed through a newly developed flow cytometry-based protocol. Besides finding a high degree of biodiversity, phenotype-genotype matching allowed the identification of candidate genes involved in the modification of the cell surface. Overexpression and gene deletion analysis allowed to verify the predictions for three identified proteins that altered surface hydrophobicity and attachment of milk proteins. The data also showed that lactococci isolated from a dairy environment bind higher amounts of milk proteins when compared to plant isolates. It remains to be determined whether the alteration of surface properties also has potential to alter starter culture functionalities. PMID:28936202

  14. Unique structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand binding domain mediate its binding specificity as revealed by X-ray crystallography, NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelu Huan

    Full Text Available The 16 EphA and EphB receptors represent the largest family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and their interactions with 9 ephrin-A and ephrin-B ligands initiate bidirectional signals controlling many physiological and pathological processes. Most interactions occur between receptor and ephrins of the same class, and only EphA4 can bind all A and B ephrins. To understand the structural and dynamic principles that enable Eph receptors to utilize the same jellyroll β-sandwich fold to bind ephrins, the VAPB-MSP domain, peptides and small molecules, we have used crystallography, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations to determine the first structure and dynamics of the EphA5 ligand-binding domain (LBD, which only binds ephrin-A ligands. Unexpectedly, despite being unbound, the high affinity ephrin-binding pocket of EphA5 resembles that of other Eph receptors bound to ephrins, with a helical conformation over the J-K loop and an open pocket. The openness of the pocket is further supported by NMR hydrogen/deuterium exchange data and MD simulations. Additionally, the EphA5 LBD undergoes significant picosecond-nanosecond conformational exchanges over the loops, as revealed by NMR and MD simulations, but lacks global conformational exchanges on the microsecond-millisecond time scale. This is markedly different from the EphA4 LBD, which shares 74% sequence identity and 87% homology. Consequently, the unbound EphA5 LBD appears to comprise an ensemble of open conformations that have only small variations over the loops and appear ready to bind ephrin-A ligands. These findings show how two proteins with high sequence homology and structural similarity are still able to achieve distinctive binding specificities through different dynamics, which may represent a general mechanism whereby the same protein fold can serve for different functions. Our findings also suggest that a promising strategy to design agonists/antagonists with high affinity and selectivity

  15. Sugar-Binding Profiles of Chitin-Binding Lectins from the Hevein Family: A Comprehensive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Itakura

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chitin-binding lectins form the hevein family in plants, which are defined by the presence of single or multiple structurally conserved GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine-binding domains. Although they have been used as probes for chito-oligosaccharides, their detailed specificities remain to be investigated. In this study, we analyzed six chitin-binding lectins, DSA, LEL, PWM, STL, UDA, and WGA, by quantitative frontal affinity chromatography. Some novel features were evident: WGA showed almost comparable affinity for pyridylaminated chitotriose and chitotetraose, while LEL and UDA showed much weaker affinity, and DSA, PWM, and STL had no substantial affinity for the former. WGA showed selective affinity for hybrid-type N-glycans harboring a bisecting GlcNAc residue. UDA showed extensive binding to high-mannose type N-glycans, with affinity increasing with the number of Man residues. DSA showed the highest affinity for highly branched N-glycans consisting of type II LacNAc (N-acetyllactosamine. Further, multivalent features of these lectins were investigated by using glycoconjugate and lectin microarrays. The lectins showed substantial binding to immobilized LacNAc as well as chito-oligosaccharides, although the extents to which they bound varied among them. WGA showed strong binding to heavily sialylated glycoproteins. The above observations will help interpret lectin-glycoprotein interactions in histochemical studies and glyco-biomarker investigations.

  16. Multispectroscopic and calorimetric studies on the binding of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Anirban; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2016-11-15

    Interaction of the food colorant tartrazine with human hemoglobin was studied using multispectroscopic and microcalorimetric techniques to gain insights into the binding mechanism and thereby the toxicity aspects. Hemoglobin spectrum showed hypochromic changes in the presence of tartrazine. Quenching of the fluorescence of hemoglobin occurred and the quenching mechanism was through a static mode as revealed from temperature dependent and time-resolved fluorescence studies. According to the FRET theory the distance between β-Trp37 of hemoglobin and bound tartrazine was evaluated to be 3.44nm. Synchronous fluorescence studies showed that tartrazine binding led to alteration of the microenvironment around the tryptophans more in comparison to tyrosines. 3D fluorescence and FTIR data provided evidence for conformational changes in the protein on binding. Circular dichroism studies revealed that the binding led to significant loss in the helicity of hemoglobin. The esterase activity assay further complemented the circular dichroism data. Microcalorimetric study using isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the binding to be exothermic and driven largely by positive entropic contribution. Dissection of the Gibbs energy change proposed the protein-dye complexation to be dominated by non-polyelectrolytic forces. Negative heat capacity change also corroborated the involvement of hydrophobic forces in the binding process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Murine alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. I. Radioligand binding studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, M.; Reese, J.; Cotecchia, S.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Alpha1-adrenoceptors were identified in murine tissues by [3H]prazosin saturation binding studies, with a rank order of cerebral cortex > cerebellum > liver > lung > kidney > heart > spleen, with the spleen not exhibiting detectable expression. Competition binding studies were performed with

  18. Heparin binding sites on Ross River virus revealed by electron cryo-microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Heil, Marintha; Kuhn, Richard J.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2005-01-01

    Cell surface glycosaminoglycans play important roles in cell adhesion and viral entry. Laboratory strains of two alphaviruses, Sindbis and Semliki Forest virus, have been shown to utilize heparan sulfate as an attachment receptor, whereas Ross River virus (RRV) does not significantly interact with it. However, a single amino acid substitution at residue 218 in the RRV E2 glycoprotein adapts the virus to heparan sulfate binding and expands the host range of the virus into chicken embryo fibroblasts. Structures of the RRV mutant, E2 N218R, and its complex with heparin were determined through the use of electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction methods. Heparin was found to bind at the distal end of the RRV spikes, in a region of the E2 glycoprotein that has been previously implicated in cell-receptor recognition and antibody binding

  19. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven (BMS)

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  20. BcL-xL Conformational Changes upon Fragment Binding Revealed by NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Clémentine; ten Brink, Tim; Walker, Olivier; Guillière, Florence; Davesne, Dany; Krimm, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions represent difficult but increasingly important targets for the design of therapeutic compounds able to interfere with biological processes. Recently, fragment-based strategies have been proposed as attractive approaches for the elaboration of protein-protein surface inhibitors from fragment-like molecules. One major challenge in targeting protein-protein interactions is related to the structural adaptation of the protein surface upon molecular recognition. Methods capable of identifying subtle conformational changes of proteins upon fragment binding are therefore required at the early steps of the drug design process. In this report we present a fast NMR method able to probe subtle conformational changes upon fragment binding. The approach relies on the comparison of experimental fragment-induced Chemical Shift Perturbation (CSP) of amine protons to CSP simulated for a set of docked fragment poses, considering the ring-current effect from fragment binding. We illustrate the method by the retrospective analysis of the complex between the anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL protein and the fragment 4′-fluoro-[1,1′-biphenyl]-4-carboxylic acid that was previously shown to bind one of the Bcl-xL hot spots. The CSP-based approach shows that the protein undergoes a subtle conformational rearrangement upon interaction, for residues located in helices 2, 3 and the very beginning of 5. Our observations are corroborated by residual dipolar coupling measurements performed on the free and fragment-bound forms of the Bcl-xL protein. These NMR-based results are in total agreement with previous molecular dynamic calculations that evidenced a high flexibility of Bcl-xL around the binding site. Here we show that CSP of protein amine protons are useful and reliable structural probes. Therefore, we propose to use CSP simulation to assess protein conformational changes upon ligand binding in the fragment-based drug design approach. PMID:23717610

  1. A proteomic analysis of LRRK2 binding partners reveals interactions with multiple signaling components of the WNT/PCP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salašová, Alena; Yokota, Chika; Potěšil, David; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Bryja, Vítězslav; Arenas, Ernest

    2017-07-11

    Autosomal-dominant mutations in the Park8 gene encoding Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) have been identified to cause up to 40% of the genetic forms of Parkinson's disease. However, the function and molecular pathways regulated by LRRK2 are largely unknown. It has been shown that LRRK2 serves as a scaffold during activation of WNT/β-catenin signaling via its interaction with the β-catenin destruction complex, DVL1-3 and LRP6. In this study, we examine whether LRRK2 also interacts with signaling components of the WNT/Planar Cell Polarity (WNT/PCP) pathway, which controls the maturation of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons, the main cell type lost in Parkinson's disease patients. Co-immunoprecipitation and tandem mass spectrometry was performed in a mouse substantia nigra cell line (SN4741) and human HEK293T cell line in order to identify novel LRRK2 binding partners. Inhibition of the WNT/β-catenin reporter, TOPFlash, was used as a read-out of WNT/PCP pathway activation. The capacity of LRRK2 to regulate WNT/PCP signaling in vivo was tested in Xenopus laevis' early development. Our proteomic analysis identified that LRRK2 interacts with proteins involved in WNT/PCP signaling such as the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC1 and Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in dopaminergic cells in vitro and in the mouse ventral midbrain in vivo. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that LRRK2 binds to two core components of the WNT/PCP signaling pathway, PRICKLE1 and CELSR1, as well as to FLOTILLIN-2 and CULLIN-3, which regulate WNT secretion and inhibit WNT/β-catenin signaling, respectively. We also found that PRICKLE1 and LRRK2 localize in signalosomes and act as dual regulators of WNT/PCP and β-catenin signaling. Accordingly, analysis of the function of LRRK2 in vivo, in X. laevis revelaed that LRKK2 not only inhibits WNT/β-catenin pathway, but induces a classical WNT/PCP phenotype in vivo. Our study shows for the first time that LRRK2 activates the WNT

  2. Limited tryptic proteolysis of the benzodiazepine binding proteins in different species reveals structural homologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, W; Lentes, K U; Schmitz, E; Propping, P; Hebebrand, J

    1988-12-01

    Peptide mapping can be used to elucidate further the structural similarities of the benzodiazepine binding proteins in different vertebrate species. Crude synaptic membrane preparations were photoaffinity-labeled with [3H]flunitrazepam and subsequently degraded with various concentrations of trypsin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography allowed a comparison of the molecular weights of photolabeled peptides in different species. Tryptic degradation led to a common peptide of 40K in all species investigated, a finding indicating that the benzodiazepine binding proteins are structurally homologous in higher bony fishes and tetrapods.

  3. Binding of phenazinium dye safranin T to polyriboadenylic acid: spectroscopic and thermodynamic study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Bikash Pradhan

    Full Text Available Here, we report results from experiments designed to explore the association of the phenazinium dye safranin T (ST, 3,7-diamino-2,8-dimethyl-5-phenylphenazinium chloride with single and double stranded form of polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter poly-A using several spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate that the dye binds to single stranded polyriboadenylic acid (hereafter ss poly-A with high affinity while it does not interact at all with the double stranded (ds form of the polynucleotide. Fluorescence and absorption spectral studies reveal the molecular aspects of binding of ST to single stranded form of the polynucleotide. This observation is also supported by the circular dichroism study. Thermodynamic data obtained from temperature dependence of binding constant reveals that association is driven by negative enthalpy change and opposed by negative entropy change. Ferrocyanide quenching studies have shown intercalative binding of ST to ss poly-A. Experiments on viscosity measurements confirm the binding mode of the dye to be intercalative. The effect of [Na⁺] ion concentration on the binding process suggests the role of electrostatic forces in the complexation. Present studies reveal the utility of the dye in probing nucleic acid structure.

  4. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Viktorovskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses replication.Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated.The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with DENV and reveals how DENV modulates and usurps

  5. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  6. The interaction properties of the human Rab GTPase family--comparative analysis reveals determinants of molecular binding selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Stein

    Full Text Available Rab GTPases constitute the largest subfamily of the Ras protein superfamily. Rab proteins regulate organelle biogenesis and transport, and display distinct binding preferences for effector and activator proteins, many of which have not been elucidated yet. The underlying molecular recognition motifs, binding partner preferences and selectivities are not well understood.Comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences and the three-dimensional electrostatic and hydrophobic molecular interaction fields of 62 human Rab proteins revealed a wide range of binding properties with large differences between some Rab proteins. This analysis assists the functional annotation of Rab proteins 12, 14, 26, 37 and 41 and provided an explanation for the shared function of Rab3 and 27. Rab7a and 7b have very different electrostatic potentials, indicating that they may bind to different effector proteins and thus, exert different functions. The subfamily V Rab GTPases which are associated with endosome differ subtly in the interaction properties of their switch regions, and this may explain exchange factor specificity and exchange kinetics.We have analysed conservation of sequence and of molecular interaction fields to cluster and annotate the human Rab proteins. The analysis of three dimensional molecular interaction fields provides detailed insight that is not available from a sequence-based approach alone. Based on our results, we predict novel functions for some Rab proteins and provide insights into their divergent functions and the determinants of their binding partner selectivity.

  7. In vivo binding of PRDM9 reveals interactions with noncanonical genomic sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grey, Corinne; Clément, Julie A.J.; Buard, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    In mouse and human meiosis, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) initiate homologous recombination and occur at specific sites called hotspots. The localization of these sites is determined by the sequence-specific DNA binding domain of the PRDM9 histone methyl transferase. Here, we performed...

  8. Preferential binding effects on protein structure and dynamics revealed by coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R. B.; Jacobs, D. J.; Farmer, B. L.

    2017-05-01

    The effect of preferential binding of solute molecules within an aqueous solution on the structure and dynamics of the histone H3.1 protein is examined by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation. The knowledge-based residue-residue and hydropathy-index-based residue-solvent interactions are used as input to analyze a number of local and global physical quantities as a function of the residue-solvent interaction strength (f). Results from simulations that treat the aqueous solution as a homogeneous effective solvent medium are compared to when positional fluctuations of the solute molecules are explicitly considered. While the radius of gyration (Rg) of the protein exhibits a non-monotonic dependence on solvent interaction over a wide range of f within an effective medium, an abrupt collapse in Rg occurs in a narrow range of f when solute molecules rapidly bind to a preferential set of sites on the protein. The structure factor S(q) of the protein with wave vector (q) becomes oscillatory in the collapsed state, which reflects segmental correlations caused by spatial fluctuations in solute-protein binding. Spatial fluctuations in solute binding also modify the effective dimension (D) of the protein in fibrous (D ˜ 1.3), random-coil (D ˜ 1.75), and globular (D ˜ 3) conformational ensembles as the interaction strength increases, which differ from an effective medium with respect to the magnitude of D and the length scale.

  9. Preferential microRNA targeting revealed by in vivo competitive binding and differential Argonaute immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Stanislas; Leierseder, Simon; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Kuster, Bernhard; Engelhardt, Stefan

    2017-09-29

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been described to simultaneously inhibit hundreds of targets, albeit to a modest extent. It was recently proposed that there could exist more specific, exceptionally strong binding to a subgroup of targets. However, it is unknown, whether this is the case and how such targets can be identified. Using Argonaute2-ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation and in vivo competitive binding assays, we demonstrate for miRNAs-21, -199-3p and let-7 exceptional regulation of a subset of targets, which are characterized by preferential miRNA binding. We confirm this finding by analysis of independent quantitative proteome and transcriptome datasets obtained after miRNA silencing. Our data suggest that mammalian miRNA activity is guided by preferential binding of a small set of 3'-untranslated regions, thereby shaping a steep gradient of regulation between potential targets. Our approach can be applied for transcriptome-wide identification of such targets independently of the presence of seed complementary sequences or other predictors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, M. Carmen; Sánchez Navarro, Jesús A.; Saurí Peris, Ana; Mingarro Muñoz, Ismael; Pallás Benet, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive c...

  11. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R.; Ohm, Ragnhild G.

    2017-01-01

    medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30...... natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important...

  12. Revealing vilazodone's binding mechanism underlying its partial agonism to the 5-HT1A receptor in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoxun; Xue, Weiwei; Yang, Fengyuan; Zhang, Yang; Chen, Yuzong; Yao, Xiaojun; Zhu, Feng

    2017-11-01

    It has been estimated that major depressive disorder (MDD) will become the second largest global burden among all diseases by 2030. Various types of drugs, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and serotonin receptor partial agonist/reuptake inhibitors (SPARIs), have been approved and become the primary or first-line medications prescribed for MDD. SPARI was expected to demonstrate more enhanced drug efficacy and a rapid onset of action as compared to SSRI and SNRI. As one of the most famous SPARIs, vilazodone was approved by the FDA for the treatment of MDD. Because of the great clinical importance of vilazodone, its binding mechanism underlying its partial agonism to the 5-HT 1A receptor (5-HT 1A R) could provide valuable information to SPARIs' drug-like properties. However, this mechanism has not been reported to date; consequently, the rational design of new efficacious SPARI-based MDD drugs is severely hampered. To explore the molecular mechanism of vilazodone, an integrated computational strategy was adopted in this study to reveal its binding mechanism and prospective structural feature at the agonist binding site of 5-HT 1A R. As a result, 22 residues of this receptor were identified as hotspots, consistently favoring the binding of vilazodone and its analogues, and a common binding mechanism underlying their partial agonism to 5-HT 1A R was, therefore, discovered. Moreover, three main interaction features between vilazodone and 5-HT 1A R have been revealed and schematically summarized. In summary, this newly identified binding mechanism will provide valuable information for medicinal chemists working in the field of rational design of novel SPARIs for MDD treatment.

  13. DIVERSITY in binding, regulation, and evolution revealed from high-throughput ChIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sneha; Biswas, Anushua; Narlikar, Leelavati

    2018-04-23

    Genome-wide in vivo protein-DNA interactions are routinely mapped using high-throughput chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). ChIP-reported regions are typically investigated for enriched sequence-motifs, which are likely to model the DNA-binding specificity of the profiled protein and/or of co-occurring proteins. However, simple enrichment analyses can miss insights into the binding-activity of the protein. Note that ChIP reports regions making direct contact with the protein as well as those binding through intermediaries. For example, consider a ChIP experiment targeting protein X, which binds DNA at its cognate sites, but simultaneously interacts with four other proteins. Each of these proteins also binds to its own specific cognate sites along distant parts of the genome, a scenario consistent with the current view of transcriptional hubs and chromatin loops. Since ChIP will pull down all X-associated regions, the final reported data will be a union of five distinct sets of regions, each containing binding sites of one of the five proteins, respectively. Characterizing all five different motifs and the corresponding sets is important to interpret the ChIP experiment and ultimately, the role of X in regulation. We present diversity which attempts exactly this: it partitions the data so that each partition can be characterized with its own de novo motif. Diversity uses a Bayesian approach to identify the optimal number of motifs and the associated partitions, which together explain the entire dataset. This is in contrast to standard motif finders, which report motifs individually enriched in the data, but do not necessarily explain all reported regions. We show that the different motifs and associated regions identified by diversity give insights into the various complexes that may be forming along the chromatin, something that has so far not been attempted from ChIP data. Webserver at http://diversity.ncl.res.in/; standalone (Mac OS X/Linux) from https

  14. Structural and functional analysis of cyclin D1 reveals p27 and substrate inhibitor binding requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Bolger, Joshua K; Kirkland, Lindsay O; Premnath, Padmavathy N; McInnes, Campbell

    2010-12-17

    An alternative strategy for inhibition of the cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) in antitumor drug discovery is afforded through the substrate recruitment site on the cyclin positive regulatory subunit. Critical CDK substrates such as the Rb and E2F families must undergo cyclin groove binding before phosphorylation, and hence inhibitors of this interaction also block substrate specific kinase activity. This approach offers the potential to generate highly selective and cell cycle specific CDK inhibitors and to reduce the inhibition of transcription mediated through CDK7 and 9, commonly observed with ATP competitive compounds. While highly potent peptide and small molecule inhibitors of CDK2/cyclin A, E substrate recruitment have been reported, little information has been generated on the determinants of inhibitor binding to the cyclin groove of the CDK4/cyclin D1 complex. CDK4/cyclin D is a validated anticancer drug target and continues to be widely pursued in the development of new therapeutics based on cell cycle blockade. We have therefore investigated the structural basis for peptide binding to its cyclin groove and have examined the features contributing to potency and selectivity of inhibitors. Peptidic inhibitors of CDK4/cyclin D of pRb phosphorylation have been synthesized, and their complexes with CDK4/cyclin D1 crystal structures have been generated. Based on available structural information, comparisons of the cyclin grooves of cyclin A2 and D1 are presented and provide insights into the determinants for peptide binding and the basis for differential binding and inhibition. In addition, a complex structure has been generated in order to model the interactions of the CDKI, p27(KIP)¹, with cyclin D1. This information has been used to shed light onto the endogenous inhibition of CDK4 and also to identify unique aspects of cyclin D1 that can be exploited in the design of cyclin groove based CDK inhibitors. Peptidic and nonpeptidic compounds have been

  15. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120) and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP) bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM). Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infectio...

  16. Structural Characterisation Reveals Mechanism of IL-13-Neutralising Monoclonal Antibody Tralokinumab as Inhibition of Binding to IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, B; Breed, J; Rees, D G; Gardener, M J; Vinall, L M K; Kemp, B; Spooner, J; Keen, J; Minter, R; Uddin, F; Colice, G; Wilkinson, T; Vaughan, T; May, R D

    2017-01-20

    Interleukin (IL)-13 is a pleiotropic T helper type 2 cytokine frequently associated with asthma and atopic dermatitis. IL-13-mediated signalling is initiated by binding to IL-13Rα1, which then recruits IL-4Rα to form a heterodimeric receptor complex. IL-13 also binds to IL-13Rα2, considered as either a decoy or a key mediator of fibrosis. IL-13-neutralising antibodies act by preventing IL-13 binding to IL-13Rα1, IL-4Rα and/or IL-13Rα2. Tralokinumab (CAT-354) is an IL-13-neutralising human IgG4 monoclonal antibody that has shown clinical benefit in patients with asthma. To decipher how tralokinumab inhibits the effects of IL-13, we determined the structure of tralokinumab Fab in complex with human IL-13 to 2 Å resolution. The structure analysis reveals that tralokinumab prevents IL-13 from binding to both IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2. This is supported by biochemical ligand-receptor interaction assay data. The tralokinumab epitope is mainly composed of residues in helices D and A of IL-13. It is mostly light chain complementarity-determining regions that are driving paratope interactions; the variable light complementarity-determining region 2 plays a key role by providing residue contacts for a network of hydrogen bonds and a salt bridge in the core of binding. The key residues within the paratope contributing to binding were identified as Asp50, Asp51, Ser30 and Lys31. This study demonstrates that tralokinumab prevents the IL-13 pharmacodynamic effect by binding to IL-13 helices A and D, thus preventing IL-13 from interacting with IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2. Copyright © 2016 AstraZeneca. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. A Soluble Fluorescent Binding Assay Reveals PIP2 Antagonism of TREK-1 Channels

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    Cerrone Cabanos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipid regulation of ion channels by low-abundance signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 and phosphatidic acid (PA has emerged as a central cellular mechanism for controlling ion channels and the excitability of nerves. A lack of robust assays suitable for facile detection of a lipid bound to a channel has hampered the probing of the lipid binding sites and measuring the pharmacology of putative lipid agonists for ion channels. Here, we show a fluorescent PIP2 competition assay for detergent-purified potassium channels, including TWIK-1-related K+-channel (TREK-1. Anionic lipids PA and phosphatidylglycerol (PG bind dose dependently (9.1 and 96 μM, respectively and agonize the channel. Our assay shows PIP2 binds with high affinity (0.87 μM but surprisingly can directly antagonize TREK-1 in liposomes. We propose a model for TREK-1 lipid regulation where PIP2 can compete with PA and PG agonism based on the affinity of the lipid for a site within the channel.

  18. Single-molecule photobleaching reveals increased MET receptor dimerization upon ligand binding in intact cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, Marina S; Haße, Daniel; Ferraris, Davide M; Göhler, Antonia; Niemann, Hartmut H; Heilemann, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The human receptor tyrosine kinase MET and its ligand hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are essential during embryonic development and play an important role during cancer metastasis and tissue regeneration. In addition, it was found that MET is also relevant for infectious diseases and is the target of different bacteria, amongst them Listeria monocytogenes that induces bacterial uptake through the surface protein internalin B. Binding of ligand to the MET receptor is proposed to lead to receptor dimerization. However, it is also discussed whether preformed MET dimers exist on the cell membrane. To address these issues we used single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. Our photobleaching experiments show that MET exists in dimers on the membrane of cells in the absence of ligand and that the proportion of MET dimers increases significantly upon ligand binding. Our results indicate that partially preformed MET dimers may play a role in ligand binding or MET signaling. The addition of the bacterial ligand internalin B leads to an increase of MET dimers which is in agreement with the model of ligand-induced dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  19. Complex structure of the fission yeast SREBP-SCAP binding domains reveals an oligomeric organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Shao, Wei; Li, Jingxian; Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2016-11-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors are master regulators of cellular lipid homeostasis in mammals and oxygen-responsive regulators of hypoxic adaptation in fungi. SREBP C-terminus binds to the WD40 domain of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which confers sterol regulation by controlling the ER-to-Golgi transport of the SREBP-SCAP complex and access to the activating proteases in the Golgi. Here, we biochemically and structurally show that the carboxyl terminal domains (CTD) of Sre1 and Scp1, the fission yeast SREBP and SCAP, form a functional 4:4 oligomer and Sre1-CTD forms a dimer of dimers. The crystal structure of Sre1-CTD at 3.5 Å and cryo-EM structure of the complex at 5.4 Å together with in vitro biochemical evidence elucidate three distinct regions in Sre1-CTD required for Scp1 binding, Sre1-CTD dimerization and tetrameric formation. Finally, these structurally identified domains are validated in a cellular context, demonstrating that the proper 4:4 oligomeric complex formation is required for Sre1 activation.

  20. Molecular modeling reveals the novel inhibition mechanism and binding mode of three natural compounds to staphylococcal α-hemolysin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    Full Text Available α-Hemolysin (α-HL is a self-assembling, channel-forming toxin that is produced as a soluble monomer by Staphylococcus aureus strains. Until now, α-HL has been a significant virulence target for the treatment of S. aureus infection. In our previous report, we demonstrated that some natural compounds could bind to α-HL. Due to the binding of those compounds, the conformational transition of α-HL from the monomer to the oligomer was blocked, which resulted in inhibition of the hemolytic activity of α-HL. However, these results have not indicated how the binding of the α-HL inhibitors influence the conformational transition of the whole protein during the oligomerization process. In this study, we found that three natural compounds, Oroxylin A 7-O-glucuronide (OLG, Oroxin A (ORA, and Oroxin B (ORB, when inhibiting the hemolytic activity of α-HL, could bind to the "stem" region of α-HL. This was completed using conventional Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations. By interacting with the novel binding sites of α-HL, the ligands could form strong interactions with both sides of the binding cavity. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA indicated that because of the inhibitors that bind to the "stem" region of α-HL, the conformational transition of α-HL from the monomer to the oligomer was restricted. This caused the inhibition of the hemolytic activity of α-HL. This novel inhibition mechanism has been confirmed by both the steered MD simulations and the experimental data obtained from a deoxycholate-induced oligomerization assay. This study can facilitate the design of new antibacterial drugs against S. aureus.

  1. Simplified immunoassay for rapid Dengue serotype diagnosis, revealing insensitivity to non-specific binding interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C.C.L. Loureiro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Proof of concept of an immunoassay, which is easy to implement, for rapid Dengue virus (DENV serotype diagnosis, in the early infection stage, is reported. The four-layer assay is immobilized onto a thin gold film and relies on a low cost, disposable polymer biochip for optical surface plasmon resonance sensing and detection. The protocol comprises Neutravidin-Biotin mediated monoclonal antibody (MAB attachment as the functionalized sensing element. Formation of the MAB-DENV complex results in a pronounced thickness change that is optically recorded in real time, employing a microfluidic set-up. Virus presence is confirmed by atomic force microscopy from the same sample. Serum samples were collected from a patient in acute febrile state. Simultaneous serological analysis by means of the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, independently, confirmed presence of DENV2 and DENV3. The protocol proved applicable in presence of strong non-specific binding interference that originates from, and is caused by, various blood, serum and other body fluid constituents. False positive indications for both, negative serum and blood control samples were not observed. The achievable limit of detection was estimated to be 2×104 particles/ml. Eventually, the method can be modified towards detection of other viruses by using the same protocol. Keywords: Immuno-assay, Dengue virus detection, Non-specific binding

  2. DNA exit ramps are revealed in the binding landscapes obtained from simulations in helical coordinates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacia Echeverria

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA molecules are highly charged semi-flexible polymers that are involved in a wide variety of dynamical processes such as transcription and replication. Characterizing the binding landscapes around DNA molecules is essential to understanding the energetics and kinetics of various biological processes. We present a curvilinear coordinate system that fully takes into account the helical symmetry of a DNA segment. The latter naturally allows to characterize the spatial organization and motions of ligands tracking the minor or major grooves, in a motion reminiscent of sliding. Using this approach, we performed umbrella sampling (US molecular dynamics (MD simulations to calculate the three-dimensional potentials of mean force (3D-PMFs for a Na+ cation and for methyl guanidinium, an arginine analog. The computed PMFs show that, even for small ligands, the free energy landscapes are complex. In general, energy barriers of up to ~5 kcal/mol were measured for removing the ligands from the minor groove, and of ~1.5 kcal/mol for sliding along the minor groove. We shed light on the way the minor groove geometry, defined mainly by the DNA sequence, shapes the binding landscape around DNA, providing heterogeneous environments for recognition by various ligands. For example, we identified the presence of dissociation points or "exit ramps" that naturally would terminate sliding. We discuss how our findings have important implications for understanding how proteins and ligands associate and slide along DNA.

  3. In vitro DNA binding studies of Aspartame, an artificial sweetener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Khodaei, Mohammad Mehdi; Kheirdoosh, Fahimeh

    2013-03-05

    A number of small molecules bind directly and selectively to DNA, by inhibiting replication, transcription or topoisomerase activity. In this work the interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with Aspartame (APM), an artificial sweeteners was studied at physiological pH. DNA binding study of APM is useful to understand APM-DNA interaction mechanism and to provide guidance for the application and design of new and safer artificial sweeteners. The interaction was investigated using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD). Hypochromism and red shift are shown in UV absorption band of APM. A strong fluorescence quenching reaction of DNA to APM was observed and the binding constants (Kf) of DNA with APM and corresponding number of binding sites (n) were calculated at different temperatures. Thermodynamic parameters, enthalpy changes (ΔH) and entropy changes (ΔS) were calculated to be +181kJmol(-1) and +681Jmol(-1)K(-1) according to Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Moreover, spectrofluorometric competition experiment and circular dichroism (CD) results are indicative of non-intercalative DNA binding nature of APM. We suggest that APM interacts with calf thymus DNA via groove binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 5×10(+4)M(-1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutational analysis of an archaeal minichromosome maintenance protein exterior hairpin reveals critical residues for helicase activity and DNA binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brewster Aaron S

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mini-chromosome maintenance protein (MCM complex is an essential replicative helicase for DNA replication in Archaea and Eukaryotes. While the eukaryotic complex consists of six homologous proteins (MCM2-7, the archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has only one MCM protein (ssoMCM, six subunits of which form a homohexamer. We have recently reported a 4.35Å crystal structure of the near full-length ssoMCM. The structure reveals a total of four β-hairpins per subunit, three of which are located within the main channel or side channels of the ssoMCM hexamer model generated based on the symmetry of the N-terminal Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus (mtMCM structure. The fourth β-hairpin, however, is located on the exterior of the hexamer, near the exit of the putative side channels and next to the ATP binding pocket. Results In order to better understand this hairpin's role in DNA binding and helicase activity, we performed a detailed mutational and biochemical analysis of nine residues on this exterior β-hairpin (EXT-hp. We examined the activities of the mutants related to their helicase function, including hexamerization, ATPase, DNA binding and helicase activities. The assays showed that some of the residues on this EXT-hp play a role for DNA binding as well as for helicase activity. Conclusions These results implicate several current theories regarding helicase activity by this critical hexameric enzyme. As the data suggest that EXT-hp is involved in DNA binding, the results reported here imply that the EXT-hp located near the exterior exit of the side channels may play a role in contacting DNA substrate in a manner that affects DNA unwinding.

  5. Structures of the APC–ARM domain in complexes with discrete Amer1/WTX fragments reveal that it uses a consensus mode to recognize its binding partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Akyildiz, Senem; Xiao, Yafei; Gai, Zhongchao; An, Ying; Behrens, Jürgen; Wu, Geng

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor APC employs its conserved armadillo repeat (ARM) domain to recognize many of its binding partners, including Amer1/WTX, which is mutated in Wilms' tumor and bone overgrowth syndrome. The APC–Amer1 complex has important roles in regulating Wnt signaling and cell adhesion. Three sites A1, A2, and A3 of Amer1 have been reported to mediate its interaction with APC-ARM. In this study, crystal structures of APC–ARM in complexes with Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, which is newly identified in this work, were determined. Combined with our GST pull-down, yeast two-hybrid, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay results using mutants of APC and Amer1 interface residues, our structures demonstrate that Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, as well as other APC-binding proteins such as Asef and Sam68, all employ a common recognition pattern to associate with APC–ARM. In contrast, Amer1-A3 binds to the C-terminal side of APC–ARM through a bipartite interaction mode. Composite mutations on either APC or Amer1 disrupting all four interfaces abrogated their association in cultured cells and impaired the membrane recruitment of APC by Amer1. Our study thus comprehensively elucidated the recognition mechanism between APC and Amer1, and revealed a consensus recognition sequence employed by various APC–ARM binding partners. PMID:27462415

  6. Structures of the APC-ARM domain in complexes with discrete Amer1/WTX fragments reveal that it uses a consensus mode to recognize its binding partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyi; Akyildiz, Senem; Xiao, Yafei; Gai, Zhongchao; An, Ying; Behrens, Jürgen; Wu, Geng

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor APC employs its conserved armadillo repeat (ARM) domain to recognize many of its binding partners, including Amer1/WTX, which is mutated in Wilms' tumor and bone overgrowth syndrome. The APC-Amer1 complex has important roles in regulating Wnt signaling and cell adhesion. Three sites A1, A2, and A3 of Amer1 have been reported to mediate its interaction with APC-ARM. In this study, crystal structures of APC-ARM in complexes with Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, which is newly identified in this work, were determined. Combined with our GST pull-down, yeast two-hybrid, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) assay results using mutants of APC and Amer1 interface residues, our structures demonstrate that Amer1-A1, -A2, and -A4, as well as other APC-binding proteins such as Asef and Sam68, all employ a common recognition pattern to associate with APC-ARM. In contrast, Amer1-A3 binds to the C-terminal side of APC-ARM through a bipartite interaction mode. Composite mutations on either APC or Amer1 disrupting all four interfaces abrogated their association in cultured cells and impaired the membrane recruitment of APC by Amer1. Our study thus comprehensively elucidated the recognition mechanism between APC and Amer1, and revealed a consensus recognition sequence employed by various APC-ARM binding partners.

  7. Crystal structures of a GABAA-receptor chimera reveal new endogenous neurosteroid-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Duncan; Thomas, Philip; Field, Martin; Andersen, Ole J; Gold, Matthew G; Biggin, Philip C; Gielen, Marc; Smart, Trevor G

    2017-11-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid receptors (GABA A Rs) are vital for controlling excitability in the brain. This is emphasized by the numerous neuropsychiatric disorders that result from receptor dysfunction. A critical component of most native GABA A Rs is the α subunit. Its transmembrane domain is the target for many modulators, including endogenous brain neurosteroids that impact anxiety, stress and depression, and for therapeutic drugs, such as general anesthetics. Understanding the basis for the modulation of GABA A R function requires high-resolution structures. Here we present the first atomic structures of a GABA A R chimera at 2.8-Å resolution, including those bound with potentiating and inhibitory neurosteroids. These structures define new allosteric binding sites for these modulators that are associated with the α-subunit transmembrane domain. Our findings will enable the exploitation of neurosteroids for therapeutic drug design to regulate GABA A Rs in neurological disorders.

  8. Capillary electrophoretic analysis reveals subcellular binding between individual mitochondria and cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostal, Vratislav; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between the cytoskeleton and mitochondria are essential for normal cellular function. An assessment of such interactions is commonly based on bulk analysis of mitochondrial and cytoskeletal markers present in a given sample, which assumes complete binding between these two organelle types. Such measurements are biased because they rarely account for non-bound ‘free’ subcellular species. Here we report on the use of capillary electrophoresis with dual laser induced fluorescence detection (CE-LIF) to identify, classify, count and quantify properties of individual binding events of mitochondria and cytoskeleton. Mitochondria were fluorescently labeled with DsRed2 while F-actin, a major cytoskeletal component, was fluorescently labeled with Alexa488-phalloidin. In a typical subcellular fraction of L6 myoblasts, 79% of mitochondrial events did not have detectable levels of F-actin, while the rest had on average ~2 zeptomole F-actin, which theoretically represents a ~ 2.5-μm long network of actin filaments per event. Trypsin treatment of L6 subcellular fractions prior to analysis decreased the fraction of mitochondrial events with detectable levels of F-actin, which is expected from digestion of cytoskeletal proteins on the surface of mitochondria. The electrophoretic mobility distributions of the individual events were also used to further distinguish between cytoskeleton-bound from cytoskeleton-free mitochondrial events. The CE-LIF approach described here could be further developed to explore cytoskeleton interactions with other subcellular structures, the effects of cytoskeleton destabilizing drugs, and the progression of viral infections. PMID:21309532

  9. Antimicrobial activity, cytotoxicity and DNA binding studies of carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhonsi, Mariadoss Asha; Ananth, Devanesan Arul; Nambirajan, Gayathri; Sivasudha, Thilagar; Yamini, Rekha; Bera, Soumen; Kathiravan, Arunkumar

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, quantum dots (QDs) are one of the most promising nanomaterials in life sciences community due to their unexploited potential in biomedical applications; particularly in bio-labeling and sensing. In the advanced nanomaterials, carbon dots (CDs) have shown promise in next generation bioimaging and drug delivery studies. Therefore the knowledge of the exact nature of interaction with biomolecules is of great interest to designing better biosensors. In this study, the interaction between CDs derived from tamarind and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) has been studied by vital spectroscopic techniques, which revealed that the CDs could interact with DNA via intercalation. The apparent association constant has been deduced from the absorption spectral changes of ct-DNA-CDs using the Benesi-Hildebrand equation. From the DNA induced emission quenching experiments the apparent DNA binding constant of the CDs (Kapp) have also been evaluated. Furthermore, we have analyzed the antibacterial and antifungal activity of CDs using disc diffusion assay method which exhibited excellent activity against E. coli and C. albicans with inhibition zone in the range of 7-12 mm. The biocompatible nature of CDs was confirmed by an in vitro cytotoxicity test on L6 normal rat myoblast cells by using MTT assay. The cell viability is not affected till the high dosage of CDs (200 μg/mL) for >48 h. As a consequence of the work, future development of CDs for microbial control and DNA sensing among the various biomolecules is possible in view of emerging biofields.

  10. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug-binding site

    OpenAIRE

    Handing, Katarzyna B.; Shabalin, Ivan G.; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A.; Minor, Wladek

    2016-01-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1 ?. Cetirizine is bound in two sites ? a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizi...

  11. Experimental and theoretical study on the binding of 2-mercaptothiazoline to bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Yue, E-mail: tengyue@jiangnan.edu.cn; Wang, Xiang; Zou, Luyi; Huang, Ming; Du, Xianzheng

    2015-05-15

    2-Mercaptothiazoline (MTZ) is widely utilized as a brightening and stabilization agent, corrosion inhibitor and antifungal reagent. The residue of MTZ in the environment is potentially hazardous to human health. In this study, the binding mode of MTZ with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using spectroscopic and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. MTZ could spontaneously bind with BSA through hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions with one binding site. The site marker displacement experiments and the molecular docking revealed that MTZ bound into site II (subdomain IIIA) of BSA, which further resulted in some backbone structures and microenvironmental changes of BSA. This work is helpful for understanding the transportation, distribution and toxicity effects of MTZ in blood. - Highlights: • The mechanism was explored by multiple spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. • MTZ can spontaneously bind with BSA at subdomain IIIA (site II). • MTZ can lead to some conformational changes of BSA.

  12. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a copper(II) Schiff-base complex: in vitro DNA binding, pBR322 plasmid cleavage and HSA binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Sartaj; Ahmad, Musheer; Afzal, Mohd; Zaki, Mehvash; Bharadwaj, Parimal K

    2014-11-01

    New copper(II) complex with Schiff base ligand 4-[(2-Hydroxy-3-methoxy-benzylidene)-amino]-benzoic acid (H₂L) was synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic and analytical and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies which revealed that the complex 1 exist in a distorted octahedral environment. In vitro CT-DNA binding studies were performed by employing different biophysical technique which indicated that the 1 strongly binds to DNA in comparison to ligand via electrostatic binding mode. Complex 1 cleaves pBR322 DNA via hydrolytic pathway and recognizes minor groove of DNA double helix. The HSA binding results showed that ligand and complex 1 has ability to quench the fluorescence emission intensity of Trp 214 residue available in the subdomain IIA of HSA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Single-molecule analysis reveals the kinetics and physiological relevance of MutL-ssDNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghyun Park

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA binding by MutL homologs (MLH/PMS during mismatch repair (MMR has been considered based on biochemical and genetic studies. Bulk studies with MutL and its yeast homologs Mlh1-Pms1 have suggested an integral role for a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA binding activity during MMR. We have developed single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET and a single-molecule DNA flow-extension assays to examine MutL interaction with ssDNA in real time. The smFRET assay allowed us to observe MutL-ssDNA association and dissociation. We determined that MutL-ssDNA binding required ATP and was the greatest at ionic strength below 25 mM (K(D = 29 nM while it dramatically decreases above 100 mM (K(D>2 µM. Single-molecule DNA flow-extension analysis suggests that multiple MutL proteins may bind ssDNA at low ionic strength but this activity does not enhance stability at elevated ionic strengths. These studies are consistent with the conclusion that a stable MutL-ssDNA interaction is unlikely to occur at physiological salt eliminating a number of MMR models. However, the activity may infer some related dynamic DNA transaction process during MMR.

  14. In vivo phosphoproteome characterization reveals key starch granule-binding phosphoproteins involved in wheat water-deficit response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Xing; Zhen, Shou-Min; Liu, Yan-Lin; Yan, Xing; Zhang, Ming; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2017-10-23

    Drought stress during grain development causes significant yield loss in cereal production. The phosphorylated modification of starch granule-binding proteins (SGBPs) is an important mechanism regulating wheat starch biosynthesis. In this study, we performed the first proteomics and phosphoproteomics analyses of SGBPs in elite Chinese bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar Jingdong 17 under well-watered and water-stress conditions. Water stress treatment caused significant reductions in spike grain numbers and weight, total starch and amylopectin content, and grain yield. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that the quantity of SGBPs was reduced significantly by water-deficit treatment. Phosphoproteome characterization of SGBPs under water-deficit treatment demonstrated a reduced level of phosphorylation of main starch synthesis enzymes, particularly for granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS I), starch synthase II-a (SS II-a), and starch synthase III (SS III). Specifically, the Ser34 site of the GBSSI protein, the Tyr358 site of SS II-a, and the Ser837 site of SS III-a exhibited significant less phosphorylation under water-deficit treatment than well-watered treatment. Furthermore, the expression levels of several key genes related with starch biosynthesis detected by qRT-PCR were decreased significantly at 15 days post-anthesis under water-deficit treatment. Immunolocalization showed a clear movement of GBSS I from the periphery to the interior of starch granules during grain development, under both water-deficit and well-watered conditions. Our results demonstrated that the reduction in gene expression or transcription level, protein expression and phosphorylation levels of starch biosynthesis related enzymes under water-deficit conditions is responsible for the significant decrease in total starch content and grain yield.

  15. A primary survey on bryophyte species reveals two novel classes of nucleotide-binding site (NBS genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Yu Xue

    Full Text Available Due to their potential roles in pathogen defense, genes encoding nucleotide-binding site (NBS domain have been particularly surveyed in many angiosperm genomes. Two typical classes were found: one is the TIR-NBS-LRR (TNL class and the other is the CC-NBS-LRR (CNL class. It is seldom known, however, what kind of NBS-encoding genes are mainly present in other plant groups, especially the most ancient groups of land plants, that is, bryophytes. To fill this gap of knowledge, in this study, we mainly focused on two bryophyte species: the moss Physcomitrella patens and the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha, to survey their NBS-encoding genes. Surprisingly, two novel classes of NBS-encoding genes were discovered. The first novel class is identified from the P. patens genome and a typical member of this class has a protein kinase (PK domain at the N-terminus and a LRR domain at the C-terminus, forming a complete structure of PK-NBS-LRR (PNL, reminiscent of TNL and CNL classes in angiosperms. The second class is found from the liverwort genome and a typical member of this class possesses an α/β-hydrolase domain at the N-terminus and also a LRR domain at the C-terminus (Hydrolase-NBS-LRR, HNL. Analysis on intron positions and phases also confirmed the novelty of HNL and PNL classes, as reflected by their specific intron locations or phase characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis covering all four classes of NBS-encoding genes revealed a closer relationship among the HNL, PNL and TNL classes, suggesting the CNL class having a more divergent status from the others. The presence of specific introns highlights the chimerical structures of HNL, PNL and TNL genes, and implies their possible origin via exon-shuffling during the quick lineage separation processes of early land plants.

  16. Crystal Structures of Staphylococcus epidermidis Mevalonate Diphosphate Decarboxylase Bound to Inhibitory Analogs Reveal New Insight into Substrate Binding and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, Michael L.; Skaff, D. Andrew; McWhorter, William J.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Geisbrecht, Brian V. (UMKC)

    2011-10-28

    The polyisoprenoid compound undecaprenyl phosphate is required for biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycans in Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogenic Enterococcus, Streptococcus, and Staphylococcus spp. In these organisms, the mevalonate pathway is used to produce the precursor isoprenoid, isopentenyl 5-diphosphate. Mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) catalyzes formation of isopentenyl 5-diphosphate in an ATP-dependent irreversible reaction and is therefore an attractive target for inhibitor development that could lead to new antimicrobial agents. To facilitate exploration of this possibility, we report the crystal structure of Staphylococcus epidermidis MDD (1.85 {angstrom} resolution) and, to the best of our knowledge, the first structures of liganded MDD. These structures include MDD bound to the mevalonate 5-diphosphate analogs diphosphoglycolyl proline (2.05 {angstrom} resolution) and 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP; 2.2 {angstrom} resolution). Comparison of these structures provides a physical basis for the significant differences in K{sub i} values observed for these inhibitors. Inspection of enzyme/inhibitor structures identified the side chain of invariant Ser{sup 192} as making potential contributions to catalysis. Significantly, Ser {yields} Ala substitution of this side chain decreases k{sub cat} by {approx}10{sup 3}-fold, even though binding interactions between FMVAPP and this mutant are similar to those observed with wild type MDD, as judged by the 2.1 {angstrom} cocrystal structure of S192A with FMVAPP. Comparison of microbial MDD structures with those of mammalian counterparts reveals potential targets at the active site periphery that may be exploited to selectively target the microbial enzymes. These studies provide a structural basis for previous observations regarding the MDD mechanism and inform future work toward rational inhibitor design.

  17. MD simulation of the Tat/Cyclin T1/CDK9 complex revealing the hidden catalytic cavity within the CDK9 molecule upon Tat binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Asamitsu

    Full Text Available In this study, we applied molecular dynamics (MD simulation to analyze the dynamic behavior of the Tat/CycT1/CDK9 tri-molecular complex and revealed the structural changes of P-TEFb upon Tat binding. We found that Tat could deliberately change the local flexibility of CycT1. Although the structural coordinates of the H1 and H2 helices did not substantially change, H1', H2', and H3' exhibited significant changes en masse. Consequently, the CycT1 residues involved in Tat binding, namely Tat-recognition residues (TRRs, lost their flexibility with the addition of Tat to P-TEFb. In addition, we clarified the structural variation of CDK9 in complex with CycT1 in the presence or absence of Tat. Interestingly, Tat addition significantly reduced the structural variability of the T-loop, thus consolidating the structural integrity of P-TEFb. Finally, we deciphered the formation of the hidden catalytic cavity of CDK9 upon Tat binding. MD simulation revealed that the PITALRE signature sequence of CDK9 flips the inactive kinase cavity of CDK9 into the active form by connecting with Thr186, which is crucial for its activity, thus presumably recruiting the substrate peptide such as the C-terminal domain of RNA pol II. These findings provide vital information for the development of effective novel anti-HIV drugs with CDK9 catalytic activity as the target.

  18. Revealing kinetics and state-dependent binding properties of IKur-targeting drugs that maximize atrial fibrillation selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinwood, Nicholas; Dobrev, Dobromir; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora

    2017-09-01

    The KV1.5 potassium channel, which underlies the ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier current (IKur) and is predominantly expressed in atria vs. ventricles, has emerged as a promising target to treat atrial fibrillation (AF). However, while numerous KV1.5-selective compounds have been screened, characterized, and tested in various animal models of AF, evidence of antiarrhythmic efficacy in humans is still lacking. Moreover, current guidelines for pre-clinical assessment of candidate drugs heavily rely on steady-state concentration-response curves or IC50 values, which can overlook adverse cardiotoxic effects. We sought to investigate the effects of kinetics and state-dependent binding of IKur-targeting drugs on atrial electrophysiology in silico and reveal the ideal properties of IKur blockers that maximize anti-AF efficacy and minimize pro-arrhythmic risk. To this aim, we developed a new Markov model of IKur that describes KV1.5 gating based on experimental voltage-clamp data in atrial myocytes from patient right-atrial samples in normal sinus rhythm. We extended the IKur formulation to account for state-specificity and kinetics of KV1.5-drug interactions and incorporated it into our human atrial cell model. We simulated 1- and 3-Hz pacing protocols in drug-free conditions and with a [drug] equal to the IC50 value. The effects of binding and unbinding kinetics were determined by examining permutations of the forward (kon) and reverse (koff) binding rates to the closed, open, and inactivated states of the KV1.5 channel. We identified a subset of ideal drugs exhibiting anti-AF electrophysiological parameter changes at fast pacing rates (effective refractory period prolongation), while having little effect on normal sinus rhythm (limited action potential prolongation). Our results highlight that accurately accounting for channel interactions with drugs, including kinetics and state-dependent binding, is critical for developing safer and more effective pharmacological anti

  19. A novel flow cytometric HTS assay reveals functional modulators of ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polireddy, Kishore; Khan, Mohiuddin Md Taimur; Chavan, Hemantkumar; Young, Susan; Ma, Xiaochao; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Perez, Dominique; Chavez, Stephanie; Strouse, Jacob J; Haynes, Mark K; Bologa, Cristian G; Oprea, Tudor I; Tegos, George P; Sklar, Larry A; Krishnamurthy, Partha

    2012-01-01

    ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS), can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6's ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity.

  20. A novel flow cytometric HTS assay reveals functional modulators of ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Polireddy

    Full Text Available ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS, can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6's ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity.

  1. Functional group and stereochemical requirements for substrate binding by ghrelin O-acyltransferase revealed by unnatural amino acid incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverdon, Elizabeth R; Davis, Tasha R; Hougland, James L

    2018-04-21

    Ghrelin is a small peptide hormone that undergoes a unique posttranslational modification, serine octanoylation, to play its physiological roles in processes including hunger signaling and glucose metabolism. Ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) catalyzes this posttranslational modification, which is essential for ghrelin to bind and activate its cognate GHS-R1a receptor. Inhibition of GOAT offers a potential avenue for modulating ghrelin signaling for therapeutic effect. Defining the molecular characteristics of ghrelin that lead to binding and recognition by GOAT will facilitate the development and optimization of GOAT inhibitors. We show that small peptide mimics of ghrelin substituted with 2,3-diaminopropanoic acid in place of the serine at the site of octanoylation act as submicromolar inhibitors of GOAT. Using these chemically modified analogs of desacyl ghrelin, we define key functional groups within the N-terminal sequence of ghrelin essential for binding to GOAT and determine GOAT's tolerance to backbone methylations and altered amino acid stereochemistry within ghrelin. Our study provides a structure-activity analysis of ghrelin binding to GOAT that expands upon activity-based investigations of ghrelin recognition and establishes a new class of potent substrate-mimetic GOAT inhibitors for further investigation and therapeutic interventions targeting ghrelin signaling. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N; Smith, Matthew D; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Sammond, Deanne; Whitehead, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue toward energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28-0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active, low

  3. Acetylcholine-Binding Protein Engineered to Mimic the α4-α4 Binding Pocket in α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors Reveals Interface Specific Interactions Important for Binding and Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Ahring, Philip K; Olsen, Jeppe A

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are attractive drug targets for psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and smoking cessation aids. Recently, a third agonist binding site between two α4 subunits in the (α4)(3)(β2)(2) receptor subpopulation was discovered. In particular, three......-yl)-1,4-diazepane], highlights the roles of the three residues in determining binding affinities and functional properties of ligands at the α4-α4 interface. Confirmed by mutational studies, our structures suggest a unique ligand-specific role of residue H142 on the α4 subunit. In the cocrystal...... that could not be predicted based on wild-type Ls-AChBP structures in complex with the same agonists. The results show that an unprecedented correlation between binding in engineered AChBPs and functional receptors can be obtained and provide new opportunities for structure-based design of drugs targeting...

  4. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors on eosinophils. Binding and functional studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, T.; Ukena, D.; Kroegel, C.; Chanez, P.; Dent, G.; Chung, K.F.; Barnes, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the binding characteristics and functional effects of beta-adrenoceptors on human and guinea pig eosinophils. We determined the binding of the beta-antagonist radioligand [125I]pindolol (IPIN) to intact eosinophils obtained from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs and from blood of patients with eosinophilia. Specific binding was saturable, and Scatchard analysis showed a single binding site with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 24.6 pM and maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) of 7,166 per cell. ICI 118,551, a beta 2-selective antagonist, inhibited IPIN binding with a Ki value of 0.28 nM and was approximately 5,000-fold more effective than the beta 1-selective antagonist, atenolol. Isoproterenol increased cAMP levels about 5.5-fold above basal levels (EC50 = 25 microM); albuterol, a beta 2-agonist, behaved as a partial agonist with a maximal stimulation of 80%. Binding to human eosinophils gave similar results with a Kd of 25.3 pM and a Bmax corresponding to 4,333 sites per cell. Incubation of both human and guinea pig eosinophils with opsonized zymosan (2 mg/ml) or with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (10(-8) and 10(-6) M) resulted in superoxide anion generation and the release of eosinophil peroxidase; albuterol (10(-7) to 10(-5) M) had no inhibitory effect on the release of these products. Thus, eosinophils from patients with eosinophilia and from the peritoneal cavity of guinea pigs possess beta-receptors of the beta 2-subtype that are coupled to adenylate cyclase; however, these receptors do not modulate oxidative metabolism or degranulation. The possible therapeutic consequences of these observations to asthma are discussed

  5. Mapping of barley alpha-amylases and outer subsite mutants reveals dynamic high-affinity subsites and barriers in the long substrate binding cleft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandra, L.; Abou Hachem, Maher; Gyemant, G.

    2006-01-01

    Subsite affinity maps of long substrate binding clefts in barley alpha-amylases, obtained using a series of maltooligosaccharides of degree of polymerization of 3-12, revealed unfavorable binding energies at the internal subsites -3 and -5 and at subsites -8 and +3/+4 defining these subsites...... as binding barriers. Barley a-amylase I mutants Y105A and T212Y at subsite -6 and +4 resulted in release or anchoring of bound substrate, thus modifying the affinities of other high-affinity subsites (-2 and +2) and barriers. The double mutant Y105A-T212Y displayed a hybrid subsite affinity profile......, converting barriers to binding areas. These findings highlight the dynamic binding energy distribution and the versatility of long maltooligosaccharide derivatives in mapping extended binding clefts in a-amylases....

  6. Radiotracers for per studies of neurotransmitter binding sites: Design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    Neurotransmitter binding sites, such as receptors, neuronal uptake systems, and vesicular uptake systems, are important targets for new radiopharmaceutical design. Selection of potential radioligands can be guided by in vitro laboratory data including such characteristics as selectivity and affinity for specific binding sites. However, development of PET radiotracers for use in vivo must include considerations of in vivo pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Introduction of potential radioligands is further narrowed by the demands of the radiochemical synthesis, which must produce radioligands of high chemical and radiochemical purity and of high specific activity. This paper will review examples of previous and current attempts by radiopharmaceutical chemists to meet these demands for new positron emitter-labeled radioligands for PET studies of a wide array of neurotransmitter binding sites

  7. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  8. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesús-Angel; Saurí, Ana; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallás, Vicente

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  9. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Sanchez-Navarro, Jesus-Angel; Sauri, Ana; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente

    2005-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed

  10. Differential binding of calmodulin-related proteins to their targets revealed through high-density Arabidopsis protein microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Sorina C.; Popescu, George V.; Bachan, Shawn; Zhang, Zimei; Seay, Montrell; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael; Dinesh-Kumar, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    Calmodulins (CaMs) are the most ubiquitous calcium sensors in eukaryotes. A number of CaM-binding proteins have been identified through classical methods, and many proteins have been predicted to bind CaMs based on their structural homology with known targets. However, multicellular organisms typically contain many CaM-like (CML) proteins, and a global identification of their targets and specificity of interaction is lacking. In an effort to develop a platform for large-scale analysis of proteins in plants we have developed a protein microarray and used it to study the global analysis of CaM/CML interactions. An Arabidopsis thaliana expression collection containing 1,133 ORFs was generated and used to produce proteins with an optimized medium-throughput plant-based expression system. Protein microarrays were prepared and screened with several CaMs/CMLs. A large number of previously known and novel CaM/CML targets were identified, including transcription factors, receptor and intracellular protein kinases, F-box proteins, RNA-binding proteins, and proteins of unknown function. Multiple CaM/CML proteins bound many binding partners, but the majority of targets were specific to one or a few CaMs/CMLs indicating that different CaM family members function through different targets. Based on our analyses, the emergent CaM/CML interactome is more extensive than previously predicted. Our results suggest that calcium functions through distinct CaM/CML proteins to regulate a wide range of targets and cellular activities. PMID:17360592

  11. Phloem proteomics reveals new lipid-binding proteins with a putative role in lipid-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Marie Barbaglia

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Global climate changes inversely affect our ability to grow the food required for an increasing world population. To combat future crop loss due to abiotic stress, we need to understand the signals responsible for changes in plant development and the resulting adaptations, especially the signaling molecules traveling long-distance through the plant phloem. Using a proteomics approach, we had identified several putative lipid-binding proteins in the phloem exudates. Simultaneously, we identified several complex lipids as well as jasmonates. These findings prompted us to propose that phloem (phospho- lipids could act as long-distance developmental signals in response to abiotic stress, and that they are released, sensed, and moved by phloem lipid-binding proteins (Benning et al., 2012. Indeed, the proteins we identified include lipases that could release a signaling lipid into the phloem, putative receptor components, and proteins that could mediate lipid-movement. To test this possible protein-based lipid-signaling pathway, three of the proteins, which could potentially act in a relay, are characterized here: (I a putative GDSL-motif lipase (II a PIG-P-like protein, with a possible receptor-like function; (III and PLAFP (phloem lipid-associated family protein, a predicted lipid-binding protein of unknown function. Here we show that all three proteins bind lipids, in particular phosphatidic acid (PtdOH, which is known to participate in intracellular stress signaling. Genes encoding these proteins are expressed in the vasculature, a prerequisite for phloem transport. Cellular localization studies show that the proteins are not retained in the endoplasmic reticulum but surround the cell in a spotted pattern that has been previously observed with receptors and plasmodesmatal proteins. Abiotic signals that induce the production of PtdOH also regulate the expression of GDSL-lipase and PLAFP, albeit in opposite patterns. Our findings suggest that while

  12. The study of zinc ions binding to casein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomastowski, P; Sprynskyy, M; Buszewski, B

    2014-08-01

    The presented research was focused on physicochemical study of casein properties and the kinetics of zinc ions binding to the protein. Moreover, a fast and simple method of casein extraction from cow's milk has been proposed. Casein isoforms, zeta potential (ζ) and particle size of the separated caseins were characterized with the use of capillary electrophoresis, zeta potential analysis and field flow fractionation (FFF) technique, respectively. The kinetics of the metal-binding process was investigated in batch adsorption experiments. Intraparticle diffusion model, first-order and zero-order kinetic models were applied to test the kinetic experimental data. Analysis of changes in infrared bands registered for casein before and after zinc binding was also performed. The obtained results showed that the kinetic process of zinc binding to casein is not homogeneous but is expressed with an initial rapid stage with about 70% of zinc ions immobilized by casein and with a much slower second step. Maximum amount of bound zinc in the experimental conditions was 30.04mgZn/g casein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Structural and biochemical studies on ATP binding and hydrolysis by the Escherichia coli RNA chaperone Hfq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Hämmerle

    Full Text Available In Escherichia coli the RNA chaperone Hfq is involved in riboregulation by assisting base-pairing between small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs and mRNA targets. Several structural and biochemical studies revealed RNA binding sites on either surface of the donut shaped Hfq-hexamer. Whereas sRNAs are believed to contact preferentially the YKH motifs present on the proximal site, poly(A(15 and ADP were shown to bind to tripartite binding motifs (ARE circularly positioned on the distal site. Hfq has been reported to bind and to hydrolyze ATP. Here, we present the crystal structure of a C-terminally truncated variant of E. coli Hfq (Hfq(65 in complex with ATP, showing that it binds to the distal R-sites. In addition, we revisited the reported ATPase activity of full length Hfq purified to homogeneity. At variance with previous reports, no ATPase activity was observed for Hfq. In addition, FRET assays neither indicated an impact of ATP on annealing of two model oligoribonucleotides nor did the presence of ATP induce strand displacement. Moreover, ATP did not lead to destabilization of binary and ternary Hfq-RNA complexes, unless a vast stoichiometric excess of ATP was used. Taken together, these studies strongly suggest that ATP is dispensable for and does not interfere with Hfq-mediated RNA transactions.

  15. Structural insights into conserved L-arabinose metabolic enzymes reveal the substrate binding site of a thermophilic L-arabinose isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Jik; Lee, Sang-Jae; Kim, Seong-Bo; Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sung Haeng; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2014-03-18

    Structural genomics demonstrates that despite low levels of structural similarity of proteins comprising a metabolic pathway, their substrate binding regions are likely to be conserved. Herein based on the 3D-structures of the α/β-fold proteins involved in the ara operon, we attempted to predict the substrate binding residues of thermophilic Geobacillus stearothermophilus L-arabinose isomerase (GSAI) with no 3D-structure available. Comparison of the structures of L-arabinose catabolic enzymes revealed a conserved feature to form the substrate-binding modules, which can be extended to predict the substrate binding site of GSAI (i.e., D195, E261 and E333). Moreover, these data implicated that proteins in the l-arabinose metabolic pathway might retain their substrate binding niches as the modular structure through conserved molecular evolution even with totally different structural scaffolds. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Chiral halogenated Schiff base compounds: green synthesis, anticancer activity and DNA-binding study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyaeifar, Mahnaz; Amiri Rudbari, Hadi; Sahihi, Mehdi; Kazemi, Zahra; Kajani, Abolghasem Abbasi; Zali-Boeini, Hassan; Kordestani, Nazanin; Bruno, Giuseppe; Gharaghani, Sajjad

    2018-06-01

    Eight enantiomerically pure halogenated Schiff base compounds were synthesized by reaction of halogenated salicylaldehydes with 3-Amino-1,2-propanediol (R or S) in water as green solvent at ambient temperature. All compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, NMR (1H and 13C), circular dichroism (CD) and FT-IR spectroscopy. FS-DNA binding studies of these compounds carried out by fluorescence quenching and UV-vis spectroscopy. The obtained results revealed that the ligands bind to DNA as: (Rsbnd ClBr) > (Rsbnd Cl2) > (Rsbnd Br2) > (Rsbnd I2) and (Ssbnd ClBr) > (Ssbnd Cl2) > (Ssbnd Br2) > (Ssbnd I2), indicating the effect of halogen on binding constant. In addition, DNA-binding constant of the Ssbnd and R-enantiomers are different from each other. The ligands can form halogen bonds with DNA that were confirmed by molecular docking. This method was also measured the bond distances and bond angles. The study of obtained data can have concluded that binding affinity of the ligands to DNA depends on strength of halogen bonds. The potential anticancer activity of ligands were also evaluated on MCF-7 and HeLa cancer cell lines by using MTT assay. The results showed that the anticancer activity and FS-DNA interaction is significantly dependent on the stereoisomers of Schiff base compounds as R-enantiomers displayed significantly higher activity than S-enantiomers. The molecular docking was also used to illustrate the specific DNA-binding of synthesized compounds and groove binding mode of DNA interaction was proposed for them. In addition, molecular docking results indicated that there are three types of bonds (Hsbnd and X-bond and hX-bond) between synthesized compounds and base pairs of DNA.

  17. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed CREB and serine 133 phospho-CREB binding to the CART gene proximal promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, George A; Shen, Li-Ling; Kuhar, Michael J

    2010-07-16

    Both over expression of cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), and intra-accumbal injection of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptides, have been shown to decrease cocaine reward. Also, over expression of CREB in the rat NAc increased CART mRNA and peptide levels, but it is not known if this was due to a direct action of P-CREB on the CART gene promoter. The goal of this study was to test if CREB and P-CREB bound directly to the CRE site in the CART promoter, using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. ChIP assay with anti-CREB antibodies showed an enrichment of the CART promoter fragment containing the CRE region over IgG precipitated material, a non-specific control. Forskolin, which was known to increase CART mRNA levels in GH3 cells, was utilized to show that the drug increased levels of P-CREB protein and P-CREB binding to the CART promoter CRE-containing region. A region of the c-Fos promoter containing a CRE cis-regulatory element was previously shown to bind P-CREB, and it was used here as a positive control. These data suggest that the effects of CREB over expression on blunting cocaine reward could be, at least in part, attributed to the increased expression of the CART gene by direct interaction of P-CREB with the CART promoter CRE site, rather than by some indirect action. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spectroscopic Study of the Binding of Netropsin and Hoechst 33258 to Nucleic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardevanyan, P. O.; Parsadanyan, M. A.; Antonyan, A. P.; Sahakyan, V. G.

    2018-05-01

    The interaction of groove binding compounds — peptide antibiotic (polyamide) netropsin and fluorescent dye (bisbenzimidazole) Hoechst 33258 — with the double-stranded DNA and synthetic double-stranded polynucleotide poly(rA)-poly(rU) has been studied by spectrophotometry. Absorption spectra of these ligand complexes with nucleic acids have been obtained. Spectral changes at the complexation of individual ligands with the mentioned nucleic acids reveal the similarity of binding of each of these ligands with both DNA and RNA. Based on the spectroscopic measurements, the binding parameters of netropsin and Hoechst 33258 binding to DNA and poly(rA)-poly(rU) - K and n, as well as the thermodynamic parameters ΔS, ΔG, and ΔH have been determined. It was found that the binding of Hoechst 33258 to both nucleic acids is accompanied by a positive change in enthalpy, while in the case of netropsin the change in enthalpy is negative. Moreover, the contribution of entropy to the formation of the complexes is more pronounced in the case of Hoechst 33258.

  19. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120 of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3 of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, for DARC binding and contained a consensus heparin binding site essential for DARC binding. Both HIV-1 and P. vivax can be blocked from binding to their chemokine receptors by the chemokine, RANTES and its analog AOP-RANTES. Site directed mutagenesis of the heparin binding motif in members of the DBP family, the P. knowlesi alpha, beta and gamma proteins abrogated their binding to erythrocytes. Positively charged residues within domain 1 are required for binding of P. vivax and P. knowlesi erythrocyte binding proteins. Conclusion A heparin binding site motif in members of the DBP family may form part of a conserved erythrocyte receptor binding pocket.

  20. Calorimetric study of binding of some disaccharides with crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydova, Olga I.; Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Parfenyuk, Elena V

    2004-11-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry has been applied to the determination of the thermodynamic parameters of binding of {beta}-lactose, {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose and sucrose with 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6 in water at 298.15 K. The formation of 1:1 molecular associates has been found for the systems studied except 18-crown-6 and {beta}-lactose. The associates are preferentially or completely entropy stabilized. The most stable associate is formed between {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose and 18-crown-6. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters of binding are discussed from the point of view of solute-solvent interactions as well as conformational and structural peculiarities of the disaccharides (DS) and crown ethers (CE)

  1. Calorimetric study of binding of some disaccharides with crown ethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydova, Olga I.; Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2004-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry has been applied to the determination of the thermodynamic parameters of binding of β-lactose, α,α-trehalose and sucrose with 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6 in water at 298.15 K. The formation of 1:1 molecular associates has been found for the systems studied except 18-crown-6 and β-lactose. The associates are preferentially or completely entropy stabilized. The most stable associate is formed between α,α-trehalose and 18-crown-6. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters of binding are discussed from the point of view of solute-solvent interactions as well as conformational and structural peculiarities of the disaccharides (DS) and crown ethers (CE)

  2. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  3. Binding Studies of Andrographolide with Human serum albumin: Molecular Docking, Chromatographic and Spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godugu, Deepika; Rupula, Karuna; Beedu, Sashidhar Rao

    2018-02-11

    Andrographolide, sourced from Andrographis paniculata, is an established therapeutic agent with variety of pharmacological properties in treatment of various diseases. The present study is designed to evaluate the interaction and binding affinity of andrographolide with HSA by docking and spectral studies. The docking study for screening the interaction of andrographolide with HSA protein was carried out using Auto Dock Vina software and the binding score of andrographolide was -8.7 kcal mol-1 and formed one hydrogen bond with Arg 218 residue of HSA in sub-domains IIA region. The formation of HSA-andrographolide complex was characterized by spectroscopic methods - UV absorption, HPLC, CD and FTIR analysis. The UV spectral analysis revealed a decrease in the absorption peak of HSA due to its interaction with andrographolide. A new peak was observed at retention time 7.45 min by HPLC analysis and the Bmax was found to be 7.5 ± 0.4 mg protein with a Kd value of 1.89 mM, indicating interaction of andrographolide with HSA. The CD spectra results suggested, a marginal decrease in the negative ellipticity without any significant shift in peak, indicating the stabilization of the HSA-andrographolide complex. The FTIR analysis further confirmed, a shift of amide I groups from 1646 to 1637 cm-1 and a peak at 1016 cm-1 in andrographolide, was observed in the complex, indicating the interaction. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and serum albumin binding studies of vitamin K3 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganthi, Murugesan; Elango, Kuppanagounder P

    2017-01-01

    Synthesis, characterization and bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding properties of three derivatives of vitamin K3 have been described. Results of UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra indicate complexation between BSA and the ligands with conformational changes in protein, which is strongly supported by synchronous and three dimensional fluorescence studies. Addition of the ligands quenches the fluorescence of BSA which is accompanied by reduction in quantum yield (Ф) from 0.1010 to 0.0775-0.0986 range. Thermodynamic investigations reveal that hydrophobic interaction is the major binding force in the spontaneous binding of these ligands with BSA. The binding constants obtained depend on the substituent present in the quinone ring, which correlates linearly with the Taft's field substituent constant (σ F ). The results show that compound with strong electron withdrawing nitro-group forms relatively stronger complex with BSA than amino and thioglycolate substituted ones. Circular dichroism studies show that the α-helical content of the protein, upon complexation with the ligands, decreases in the case of amino and nitro substituted vitamin K3 while increases in thioglycolate substituted compound. Molecular docking studies indicated that the vitamin K3 derivatives are surrounded by hydrophobic residues of the BSA molecule, which is in good agreement with the results of fluorescence spectral and thermodynamic studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction of D-LSD with binding sites in brain: a study in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebersole, B.L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The localization of [ 3 H]-d-lysergic acid diethylamide ([ 3 H]LSD) binding sites in the mouse brain was compared in vivo and in vitro. Radioautography of brain sections incubated with [ 3 H]LSD in vitro revealed substantial specific [ 3 H]LSD binding in cortical layers III-IV and areas CA1 and dentate gyrus in hippocampus. In contrast, in brain sections from animals that received [ 3 H]LSD in vivo, binding in hippocampus was scant and diffuse, although the pattern of labeling in cortex was similar to that seen in vitro. The low specific binding in hippocampus relative to cortex was confirmed by homogenate filtration studies of brain areas from mice that received injections of [ 3 H]LSD. Time-course studies established that peak specific binding at ten minutes was the same in cortex and hippocampus. At all times, binding in hippocampus was about one-third of that in cortex; in contrast, the concentration of free [ 3 H]LSD did not vary between regions. This finding was unexpected, because binding studies in vitro in membrane preparations indicated that the density and affinity of [ 3 H]LSD binding sites were similar in both brain regions. Saturation binding studies in vivo showed that the lower amount of [ 3 H]LSD binding in hippocampus was attributable to a lower density of sites labeled by [ 3 H]LSD. The pharmacological identify of [ 3 H]LSD binding sites in vivo may be relevant to the hallucinogenic properties of LSD and of other related hallucinogens

  6. Photoaffinity studies of the tubulin-colchicine binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of colchicine derivatives were synthesized and coupled with 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-diazapropionyl chloride (TFDP-Cl) to produce colchicine photoaffinity analogs for use in tubulin labelling studies. Photoaffinity analogs of allocolchicine and podophylotoxin were also made using the same photoreactive moiety. Several labels were found to be effective inhibitors of tubulin polymerization. The approximate tubulin binding constants of the labels, calculated from polymerization inhibition data, varied between 2.2 x 10 5 to 2.5 x 10 3 M -1 . The labels chosen for use in tubulin labelling experiments were (N-TFDP) deacetyl-thiocolchicine 1, (O-TFDP)thiocolchifoline 2, and (O-TFDP)-2-demethylthiocolchicine 3. Compound 1 was found to bind tubulin reversibly and to competitively inhibit colchicine binding. Methods for the incorporation of tritium and 14 C in these labels were developed. Conditions were found which caused labels to insert into solvent without photorearrangement of the colchicine skeleton. Catalytic base caused the α-diazo amide of 1 to rearrange to a triazole

  7. Study on dopamine D2 binding capacity in vascular parkinsonism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashi, Hiroo; Nagata, Ken; Hirata, Yutaka; Hatazawa, Jun; Utsumi, Hiroya

    2001-01-01

    To investigate whether the striatal dopamine receptor function is involved in the development of vascular parkinsonism (VP), a positron emission tomography (PET) study was conducted on 9 patients with VP by using [ 11 C] N-methylspiperone as the tracer. The rate of binding availability in the striatal dopamine D 2 receptor (k 3 ) was determined semiquantitatively, and the values were compared to the predicted normal values based on the results from 7 normal volunteers. Of 9 patients with VP, the normalized D 2 receptor binding [%k 3 ] was more than 90% in 5 patients, 89 to 87% in 3, and 75% in one. These values showed no evident correlation with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. The laterality of the striatal %k 3 did not correspond to that of the parkinsonism. Thus, the striatal dopamine D 2 receptor binding was not severely impaired and did not correlate with the neurological status in patients with VP. This may indicate that striatal dopamine D 2 receptor function is not primarily associated with the development of the parkinsonism in VP. (author)

  8. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  9. Studies on binding mechanism between carotenoids from sea buckthorn and thermally treated α-lactalbumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitraşcu, Loredana; Ursache, Florentina Mihaela; Stănciuc, Nicoleta; Aprodu, Iuliana

    2016-12-01

    Sea buckthorn is a natural food ingredient rich in bioactive compounds such as carotenoids, tocopherols, sterols, flavonoids, lipids, vitamins, tannins and minerals. Herein, fluorescence and UV-vis techniques were used to study the interaction of heat treated α-lactalbumin (α-LA) with carotenoids from sea buckthorn berries extract (CSB) and β-carotene. Further atomic level details on the interaction between α-LA and β-carotene were obtained by means of molecular modelling techniques. The quenching rate constants, binding constants, and number of binding sites were calculated in the presence of CSB. The emission spectral studies revealed that, CSB have the ability to bind α-LA and form a ground state complex via static quenching process. Maximum degree of quenching was reached at 100 °C, where β-carotene and CSB quenched the Trp fluorescence of α-LA by 56% and 47%, respectively. In order to reveal the interaction between CSB and α-LA, the thermodynamic parameters were determined from the van't Hoff plot based on the temperature dependence of the binding constant. In agreement with the in silico observations, the thermodynamic parameters enabled us to consider that the association between α-LA and β-carotene is a spontaneous process driven by enthalpy, dominated mainly by the van der Waals interaction, but hydrophobic interactions might also be considered. The interaction between CSB and α-LA was further confirmed by UV-vis absorption spectra, where a blue shift of position was noticed at higher temperature suggesting the complex formation. The results provided here supply a better understanding of the binding of CSB to α-LA, which can be further exploited in designing new healthy food applications.

  10. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  11. Design, synthesis and DNA-binding study of some novel morpholine linked thiazolidinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Javeed Ahmad; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Srivastava, Savitri Devi

    2017-02-15

    The emergence of multiple drug resistance amongst bacterial strains resulted in many clinical drugs to be ineffective. Being vulnerable to bacterial infections any lack in the development of new antimicrobial drugs could pose a serious threat to public health. Here we report design and synthesis of a novel class of morpholine linked thiazolidinone hybrid molecules. The compounds were characterized by FT-IR, NMR and HRMS techniques. Susceptibility tests showed that most of the synthesized molecules were highly active against multiple bacterial strains. Compound 3f displayed MIC values which were better than the standard drug for most of the tested strains. DNA being a well defined target for many antimicrobial drugs was probed as possible target for these synthetic molecules. DNA-binding study of 3f with sm-DNA was probed through UV-vis absorption, fluorescence quenching, gel electrophoresis and molecular docking techniques. The studies revealed that compound 3f has strong affinity towards DNA and binds at the minor groove. The docking studies revealed that the compound 3f shows preferential binding towards A/T residues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Design, synthesis and DNA-binding study of some novel morpholine linked thiazolidinone derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Javeed Ahmad; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Srivastava, Savitri Devi

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of multiple drug resistance amongst bacterial strains resulted in many clinical drugs to be ineffective. Being vulnerable to bacterial infections any lack in the development of new antimicrobial drugs could pose a serious threat to public health. Here we report design and synthesis of a novel class of morpholine linked thiazolidinone hybrid molecules. The compounds were characterized by FT-IR, NMR and HRMS techniques. Susceptibility tests showed that most of the synthesized molecules were highly active against multiple bacterial strains. Compound 3f displayed MIC values which were better than the standard drug for most of the tested strains. DNA being a well defined target for many antimicrobial drugs was probed as possible target for these synthetic molecules. DNA-binding study of 3f with sm-DNA was probed through UV-vis absorption, fluorescence quenching, gel electrophoresis and molecular docking techniques. The studies revealed that compound 3f has strong affinity towards DNA and binds at the minor groove. The docking studies revealed that the compound 3f shows preferential binding towards A/T residues.

  13. Studies on the binding behavior of prodigiosin with bovine hemoglobin by multi-spectroscopic techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Ma, Fei; Liu, Shuchao; Wei, Shaohua; Zhou, Jiahong; Zhou, Yanhuai

    2012-10-01

    In this article, the interaction mechanism of prodigiosin (PG) with bovine hemoglobin (BHb) is studied in detail using various spectroscopic technologies. UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectra demonstrate the interaction process. The Stern-Volmer plot and the time-resolved fluorescence study suggest the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of BHb by PG is a static quenching procedure, and the hydrophobic interactions play a major role in binding of PG to BHb. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence studies, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra reveal that the conformation of BHb is changed after conjugation with PG.

  14. Revisiting interaction specificity reveals neuronal and adipocyte Munc18 membrane fusion regulatory proteins differ in their binding interactions with partner SNARE Syntaxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle P Christie

    Full Text Available The efficient delivery of cellular cargo relies on the fusion of cargo-carrying vesicles with the correct membrane at the correct time. These spatiotemporal fusion events occur when SNARE proteins on the vesicle interact with cognate SNARE proteins on the target membrane. Regulatory Munc18 proteins are thought to contribute to SNARE interaction specificity through interaction with the SNARE protein Syntaxin. Neuronal Munc18a interacts with Syntaxin1 but not Syntaxin4, and adipocyte Munc18c interacts with Syntaxin4 but not Syntaxin1. Here we show that this accepted view of specificity needs revision. We find that Munc18c interacts with both Syntaxin4 and Syntaxin1, and appears to bind "non-cognate" Syntaxin1 a little more tightly than Syntaxin4. Munc18a binds Syntaxin1 and Syntaxin4, though it interacts with its cognate Syntaxin1 much more tightly. We also observed that when bound to non-cognate Munc18c, Syntaxin1 captures its neuronal SNARE partners SNAP25 and VAMP2, and Munc18c can bind to pre-formed neuronal SNARE ternary complex. These findings reveal that Munc18a and Munc18c bind Syntaxins differently. Munc18c relies principally on the Syntaxin N-peptide interaction for binding Syntaxin4 or Syntaxin1, whereas Munc18a can bind Syntaxin1 tightly whether or not the Syntaxin1 N-peptide is present. We conclude that Munc18a and Munc18c differ in their binding interactions with Syntaxins: Munc18a has two tight binding modes/sites for Syntaxins as defined previously but Munc18c has just one that requires the N-peptide. These results indicate that the interactions between Munc18 and Syntaxin proteins, and the consequences for in vivo function, are more complex than can be accounted for by binding specificity alone.

  15. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  16. An integrated model of multiple-condition ChIP-Seq data reveals predeterminants of Cdx2 binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Mahony

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory proteins can bind to different sets of genomic targets in various cell types or conditions. To reliably characterize such condition-specific regulatory binding we introduce MultiGPS, an integrated machine learning approach for the analysis of multiple related ChIP-seq experiments. MultiGPS is based on a generalized Expectation Maximization framework that shares information across multiple experiments for binding event discovery. We demonstrate that our framework enables the simultaneous modeling of sparse condition-specific binding changes, sequence dependence, and replicate-specific noise sources. MultiGPS encourages consistency in reported binding event locations across multiple-condition ChIP-seq datasets and provides accurate estimation of ChIP enrichment levels at each event. MultiGPS's multi-experiment modeling approach thus provides a reliable platform for detecting differential binding enrichment across experimental conditions. We demonstrate the advantages of MultiGPS with an analysis of Cdx2 binding in three distinct developmental contexts. By accurately characterizing condition-specific Cdx2 binding, MultiGPS enables novel insight into the mechanistic basis of Cdx2 site selectivity. Specifically, the condition-specific Cdx2 sites characterized by MultiGPS are highly associated with pre-existing genomic context, suggesting that such sites are pre-determined by cell-specific regulatory architecture. However, MultiGPS-defined condition-independent sites are not predicted by pre-existing regulatory signals, suggesting that Cdx2 can bind to a subset of locations regardless of genomic environment. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  17. Preliminary studies of 99mTc-PQQ-NMDAR binding and effect of specificity binding by mannitol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xingqin Zhou; Yanyan Kong; Guoxian Cao; Jiankang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is a powerful neuroprotectant that specifically binds to brain NMDA receptors and inhibits excitotoxicity. Imaging this binding reaction in the brain remains a long sought goal in this field of study, and one of the primary challenges remaining is enabling soluble labeled PQQ to pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Previously, our group successfully labeled PQQ with Technetium-99m ( 99m Tc), a metastable nuclear isomer used in radioactive isotope medical tests. In this work, we determined the specific binding of 99m Tc-PQQ and NMDAR by radioligand receptor assay. Ebselen (EB) and MK-801 both effectively inhibited 99m Tc-PQQ binding. We then investigated methods of opening the BBB using mannitol to enable entry to the brain by 99m Tc-PQQ. Our results showed that 7.5 mL/kg of 20 % mannitol effectively opened the BBB and 20 min was the optimum treatment time. Competition studies showed that mannitol did not affect the specific binding between 99m Tc-PQQ and NMDA receptors. Using this method, the amount of 99m Tc-PQQ uptake and retention was increased most significantly in the hippocampus and cortex, and re-opening the BBB did not affect binding. Together, our results demonstrate that the use of mannitol to open the BBB may contribute significantly to improving image quality by increasing the uptake amount of a water-soluble agent in brain. (author)

  18. Motif decomposition of the phosphotyrosine proteome reveals a new N-terminal binding motif for SHIP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Hanke, S.; Hinsby, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    set of 481 unique phosphotyrosine (Tyr(P)) peptides by sequence similarity to known ligands of the Src homology 2 (SH2) and the phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains. From 20 clusters we extracted 16 known and four new interaction motifs. Using quantitative mass spectrometry we pulled down Tyr......(P)-specific binding partners for peptides corresponding to the extracted motifs. We confirmed numerous previously known interaction motifs and found 15 new interactions mediated by phosphosites not previously known to bind SH2 or PTB. Remarkably, a novel hydrophobic N-terminal motif ((L/V/I)(L/V/I)pY) was identified...

  19. Structural study and thermodynamic characterization of inhibitor binding to lumazine synthase from Bacillus anthracis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgunova, Ekaterina [Karolinska Institutet NOVUM, Center of Structural Biochemistry, Hälsovägen 7-9, 141 57 Huddinge (Sweden); Illarionov, Boris; Saller, Sabine [Institut für Lebensmittelchemie, Universität Hamburg, Grindelallee 117, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Popov, Aleksander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble CEDEX 09 (France); Sambaiah, Thota [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University (United States); Bacher, Adelbert [Chemistry Department, Technical University of Munich, 85747 Garching (Germany); Cushman, Mark [Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Purdue University (United States); Fischer, Markus [Institut für Lebensmittelchemie, Universität Hamburg, Grindelallee 117, 20146 Hamburg (Germany); Ladenstein, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.ladenstein@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet NOVUM, Center of Structural Biochemistry, Hälsovägen 7-9, 141 57 Huddinge (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Crystallographic studies of lumazine synthase, the penultimate enzyme of the riboflavin-biosynthetic pathway in B. anthracis, provide a structural framework for the design of antibiotic inhibitors, together with calorimetric and kinetic investigations of inhibitor binding. The crystal structure of lumazine synthase from Bacillus anthracis was solved by molecular replacement and refined to R{sub cryst} = 23.7% (R{sub free} = 28.4%) at a resolution of 3.5 Å. The structure reveals the icosahedral symmetry of the enzyme and specific features of the active site that are unique in comparison with previously determined orthologues. The application of isothermal titration calorimetry in combination with enzyme kinetics showed that three designed pyrimidine derivatives bind to lumazine synthase with micromolar dissociation constants and competitively inhibit the catalytic reaction. Structure-based modelling suggested the binding modes of the inhibitors in the active site and allowed an estimation of the possible contacts formed upon binding. The results provide a structural framework for the design of antibiotics active against B. anthracis.

  20. Structure of a prokaryotic sodium channel pore reveals essential gating elements and an outer ion binding site common to eukaryotic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, David; Findeisen, Felix; Abderemane-Ali, Fayal; Arrigoni, Cristina; Wong, Stephanie; Nurva, Shailika Reddy; Loussouarn, Gildas; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-01-23

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (NaVs) are central elements of cellular excitation. Notwithstanding advances from recent bacterial NaV (BacNaV) structures, key questions about gating and ion selectivity remain. Here, we present a closed conformation of NaVAe1p, a pore-only BacNaV derived from NaVAe1, a BacNaV from the arsenite oxidizer Alkalilimnicola ehrlichei found in Mono Lake, California, that provides insight into both fundamental properties. The structure reveals a pore domain in which the pore-lining S6 helix connects to a helical cytoplasmic tail. Electrophysiological studies of full-length BacNaVs show that two elements defined by the NaVAe1p structure, an S6 activation gate position and the cytoplasmic tail "neck", are central to BacNaV gating. The structure also reveals the selectivity filter ion entry site, termed the "outer ion" site. Comparison with mammalian voltage-gated calcium channel (CaV) selectivity filters, together with functional studies, shows that this site forms a previously unknown determinant of CaV high-affinity calcium binding. Our findings underscore commonalities between BacNaVs and eukaryotic voltage-gated channels and provide a framework for understanding gating and ion permeation in this superfamily. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional characterization of a conserved archaeal viral operon revealing single-stranded DNA binding, annealing and nuclease activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yang; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; White, Malcolm F.

    2015-01-01

    encoding proteins of unknown function and forming an operon with ORF207 (gp19). SIRV2 gp17 was found to be a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein different in structure from all previously characterized ssDNA binding proteins. Mutagenesis of a few conserved basic residues suggested a U......-shaped binding path for ssDNA. The recombinant gp18 showed an ssDNA annealing activity often associated with helicases and recombinases. To gain insight into the biological role of the entire operon, we characterized SIRV2 gp19 and showed it to possess a 5'→3' ssDNA exonuclease activity, in addition...... for rudiviruses and the close interaction among the ssDNA binding, annealing and nuclease proteins strongly point to a role of the gene operon in genome maturation and/or DNA recombination that may function in viral DNA replication/repair....

  2. Modulation of enrofloxacin binding in OmpF by Mg2+ as revealed by the analysis of fast flickering single-porin current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauser, Annemarie; Schroeder, Indra; Gutsmann, Thomas; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    One major determinant of the efficacy of antibiotics on Gram-negative bacteria is the passage through the outer membrane. During transport of the fluoroquinolone enrofloxacin through the trimeric outer membrane protein OmpF of Escherichia coli, the antibiotic interacts with two binding sites within the pore, thus partially blocking the ionic current. The modulation of one affinity site by Mg2+ reveals further details of binding sites and binding kinetics. At positive membrane potentials, the slow blocking events induced by enrofloxacin in Mg2+-free media are converted to flickery sojourns at the highest apparent current level (all three pores flickering). This indicates weaker binding in the presence of Mg2+. Analysis of the resulting amplitude histograms with β distributions revealed the rate constants of blocking (kOB) and unblocking (kBO) in the range of 1,000 to 120,000 s−1. As expected for a bimolecular reaction, kOB was proportional to blocker concentration and kBO independent of it. kOB was approximately three times lower for enrofloxacin coming from the cis side than from the trans side. The block was not complete, leading to a residual conductivity of the blocked state being ∼25% of that of the open state. Interpretation of the results has led to the following model: fast flickering as caused by interaction of Mg2+ and enrofloxacin is related to the binding site at the trans side, whereas the cis site mediates slow blocking events which are also found without Mg2+. The difference in the accessibility of the binding sites also explains the dependency of kOB on the side of enrofloxacin addition and yields a means of determining the most plausible orientation of OmpF in the bilayer. The voltage dependence suggests that the dipole of the antibiotic has to be adequately oriented to facilitate binding. PMID:22689827

  3. Crystal Structures of the Scaffolding Protein LGN Reveal the General Mechanism by Which GoLoco Binding Motifs Inhibit the Release of GDP from Gαi *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Min; Li, Jianchao; Zhu, Jinwei; Wen, Wenyu; Zhang, Mingjie; Wang, Wenning

    2012-01-01

    GoLoco (GL) motif-containing proteins regulate G protein signaling by binding to Gα subunit and acting as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. GLs of LGN are also known to bind the GDP form of Gαi/o during asymmetric cell division. Here, we show that the C-terminal GL domain of LGN binds four molecules of Gαi·GDP. The crystal structures of Gαi·GDP in complex with LGN GL3 and GL4, respectively, reveal distinct GL/Gαi interaction features when compared with the only high resolution structure known with GL/Gαi interaction between RGS14 and Gαi1. Only a few residues C-terminal to the conserved GL sequence are required for LGN GLs to bind to Gαi·GDP. A highly conserved “double Arg finger” sequence (RΨ(D/E)(D/E)QR) is responsible for LGN GL to bind to GDP bound to Gαi. Together with the sequence alignment, we suggest that the LGN GL/Gαi interaction represents a general binding mode between GL motifs and Gαi. We also show that LGN GLs are potent guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors. PMID:22952234

  4. A combined photophysical and computational study on the binding of mycophenolate mofetil and its major metabolite to transport proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell-Criado, Victoria; González-Bello, Concepción; Miranda, Miguel A; Jiménez, M Consuelo

    2018-06-15

    Binding of the immunosuppressive agent mycophenolate mofetil (MMP) and its pharmacologically active metabolite mycophenolic acid (MPA) to human serum albumin (HSA) and α 1 -acid glycoprotein (HAAG) has been investigated by means of an integrated approach involving selective excitation of the drug fluorophore, following their UV-A triggered fluorescence and docking studies. The formation of the protein/ligand complexes was evidenced by a dramatic enhancement of the fluorescence intensity and a hypsochromic shift of the emission band. In HSA, competitive studies using oleic acid as site I probe revealed site I as the main binding site of the ligands. Binding constants revealed that the affinity of the active metabolite by HSA is four-fold higher than its proactive form. Moreover, the affinity of MMP by HSA is three-fold higher than by HAAG. Docking studies revealed significant molecular binding differences in the binding of MMP and MPA to sub-domain IIA of HSA (site 1). For MPA, the aromatic moiety would be in close contact to Trp214 with the flexible chain pointing to the other end of the sub-domain; on the contrary, for MMP, the carboxylate group of the chain would be fixed nearby Trp214 through electrostatic interactions with residues Arg218 and Arg222. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Estrogen receptor-independent catechol estrogen binding activity: protein binding studies in wild-type, Estrogen receptor-alpha KO, and aromatase KO mice tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Brian J; Ansell, Pete J; Newton, Leslie G; Harada, Nobuhiro; Honda, Shin-Ichiro; Ganjam, Venkataseshu K; Rottinghaus, George E; Welshons, Wade V; Lubahn, Dennis B

    2004-06-01

    Primary evidence for novel estrogen signaling pathways is based upon well-documented estrogenic responses not inhibited by estrogen receptor antagonists. In addition to 17beta-E2, the catechol estrogen 4-hydroxyestradiol (4OHE2) has been shown to elicit biological responses independent of classical estrogen receptors in estrogen receptor-alpha knockout (ERalphaKO) mice. Consequently, our research was designed to biochemically characterize the protein(s) that could be mediating the biological effects of catechol estrogens using enzymatically synthesized, radiolabeled 4-hydroxyestrone (4OHE1) and 4OHE2. Scatchard analyses identified a single class of high-affinity (K(d) approximately 1.6 nM), saturable cytosolic binding sites in several ERalphaKO estrogen-responsive tissues. Specific catechol estrogen binding was competitively inhibited by unlabeled catechol estrogens, but not by 17beta-E2 or the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. Tissue distribution studies indicated significant binding differences both within and among various tissues in wild-type, ERalphaKO, and aromatase knockout female mice. Ligand metabolism experiments revealed extensive metabolism of labeled catechol estrogen, suggesting that catechol estrogen metabolites were responsible for the specific binding. Collectively, our data provide compelling evidence for the interaction of catechol estrogen metabolites with a novel binding protein that exhibits high affinity, specificity, and selective tissue distribution. The extensive biochemical characterization of this binding protein indicates that this protein may be a receptor, and thus may mediate ERalpha/beta-independent effects of catechol estrogens and their metabolites.

  6. Substrate Binding Drives Active-Site Closing of Human Blood Group B Galactosyltransferase as Revealed by Hot-Spot Labeling and NMR Spectroscopy Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbach, Sophie; Flügge, Friedemann; Peters, Thomas

    2018-05-04

    Crystallography has shown that human blood group A (GTA) and B (GTB) glycosyltransferases undergo transitions between "open", "semiclosed", and "closed" conformations upon substrate binding. However, the timescales of the corresponding conformational reorientations are unknown. Crystal structures show that the Trp and Met residues are located at "conformational hot spots" of the enzymes. Therefore, we utilized 15 N side-chain labeling of Trp residues and 13 C-methyl labeling of Met residues to study substrate-induced conformational transitions of GTB. Chemical-shift perturbations (CSPs) of Met and Trp residues in direct contact with substrate ligands reflect binding kinetics, whereas the CSPs of Met and Trp residues at remote sites reflect conformational changes of the enzyme upon substrate binding. Acceptor binding is fast on the chemical-shift timescale with rather small CSPs in the range of less than approximately 20 Hz. Donor binding matches the intermediate exchange regime to yield an estimate for exchange rate constants of approximately 200-300 Hz. Donor or acceptor binding to GTB saturated with acceptor or donor substrate, respectively, is slow (<10 Hz), as are coupled protein motions, reflecting mutual allosteric control of donor and acceptor binding. Remote CSPs suggest that substrate binding drives the enzyme into the closed state required for catalysis. These findings should contribute to better understanding of the mechanism of glycosyl transfer of GTA and GTB. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. The structure of the nucleoprotein binding domain of lyssavirus phosphoprotein reveals a structural relationship between the N-RNA binding domains of Rhabdoviridae and Paramyxoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Olivier; Assenberg, Rene; Grimes, Jonathan M; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    The phosphoprotein P of non-segmented negative-sense RNA viruses is an essential component of the replication and transcription complex and acts as a co-factor for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. P recruits the viral polymerase to the nucleoprotein-bound viral RNA (N-RNA) via an interaction between its C-terminal domain and the N-RNA complex. We have obtained the structure of the C-terminal domain of P of Mokola virus (MOKV), a lyssavirus that belongs to the Rhabdoviridae family and mapped at the amino acid level the crucial positions involved in interaction with N and in the formation of the viral replication complex. Comparison of the N-RNA binding domains of P solved to date suggests that the N-RNA binding domains are structurally conserved among paramyxoviruses and rhabdoviruses in spite of low sequence conservation. We also review the numerous other functions of this domain and more generally of the phosphoprotein.

  8. Location analysis for the estrogen receptor-α reveals binding to diverse ERE sequences and widespread binding within repetitive DNA elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Christopher E.; Shu, Feng-Jue; Wang, Cheng; Session, Ryan M.; Kallen, Roland G.; Sidell, Neil; Yu, Tianwei; Liu, Mei Hui; Cheung, Edwin; Kallen, Caleb B.

    2010-01-01

    Location analysis for estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-bound cis-regulatory elements was determined in MCF7 cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip. Here, we present the estrogen response element (ERE) sequences that were identified at ERα-bound loci and quantify the incidence of ERE sequences under two stringencies of detection: ERE sequence. We demonstrate that ∼50% of all ERα-bound loci do not have a discernable ERE and show that most ERα-bound EREs are not perfect consensus EREs. Approximately one-third of all ERα-bound ERE sequences reside within repetitive DNA sequences, most commonly of the AluS family. In addition, the 3-bp spacer between the inverted ERE half-sites, rather than being random nucleotides, is C(A/T)G-enriched at bona fide receptor targets. Diverse ERα-bound loci were validated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and ChIP-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional significance of receptor-bound loci was demonstrated using luciferase reporter assays which proved that repetitive element ERE sequences contribute to enhancer function. ChIP-PCR demonstrated estrogen-dependent recruitment of the coactivator SRC3 to these loci in vivo. Our data demonstrate that ERα binds to widely variant EREs with less sequence specificity than had previously been suspected and that binding at repetitive and nonrepetitive genomic targets is favored by specific trinucleotide spacers. PMID:20047966

  9. Location analysis for the estrogen receptor-alpha reveals binding to diverse ERE sequences and widespread binding within repetitive DNA elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Christopher E; Shu, Feng-Jue; Wang, Cheng; Session, Ryan M; Kallen, Roland G; Sidell, Neil; Yu, Tianwei; Liu, Mei Hui; Cheung, Edwin; Kallen, Caleb B

    2010-04-01

    Location analysis for estrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha)-bound cis-regulatory elements was determined in MCF7 cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip. Here, we present the estrogen response element (ERE) sequences that were identified at ERalpha-bound loci and quantify the incidence of ERE sequences under two stringencies of detection: ERE sequence. We demonstrate that approximately 50% of all ERalpha-bound loci do not have a discernable ERE and show that most ERalpha-bound EREs are not perfect consensus EREs. Approximately one-third of all ERalpha-bound ERE sequences reside within repetitive DNA sequences, most commonly of the AluS family. In addition, the 3-bp spacer between the inverted ERE half-sites, rather than being random nucleotides, is C(A/T)G-enriched at bona fide receptor targets. Diverse ERalpha-bound loci were validated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and ChIP-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional significance of receptor-bound loci was demonstrated using luciferase reporter assays which proved that repetitive element ERE sequences contribute to enhancer function. ChIP-PCR demonstrated estrogen-dependent recruitment of the coactivator SRC3 to these loci in vivo. Our data demonstrate that ERalpha binds to widely variant EREs with less sequence specificity than had previously been suspected and that binding at repetitive and nonrepetitive genomic targets is favored by specific trinucleotide spacers.

  10. QM/MM Molecular Dynamics Studies of Metal Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Vidossich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mixed quantum-classical (quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM simulations have strongly contributed to providing insights into the understanding of several structural and mechanistic aspects of biological molecules. They played a particularly important role in metal binding proteins, where the electronic effects of transition metals have to be explicitly taken into account for the correct representation of the underlying biochemical process. In this review, after a brief description of the basic concepts of the QM/MM method, we provide an overview of its capabilities using selected examples taken from our work. Specifically, we will focus on heme peroxidases, metallo-β-lactamases, α-synuclein and ligase ribozymes to show how this approach is capable of describing the catalytic and/or structural role played by transition (Fe, Zn or Cu and main group (Mg metals. Applications will reveal how metal ions influence the formation and reduction of high redox intermediates in catalytic cycles and enhance drug metabolism, amyloidogenic aggregate formation and nucleic acid synthesis. In turn, it will become manifest that the protein frame directs and modulates the properties and reactivity of the metal ions.

  11. Characterizing interaction forces between actin and proteins of the tropomodulin family reveals the presence of the N-terminal actin-binding site in leiomodin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Baran; Colpan, Mert; Gray, Kevin T; Abu-Lail, Nehal I; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2018-01-15

    Tropomodulin family of proteins includes several isoforms of tropomodulins (Tmod) and leiomodins (Lmod). These proteins can sequester actin monomers or nucleate actin polymerization. Although it is known that their actin-binding properties are isoform-dependent, knowledge on how they vary in strengths of interactions with G-actin is missing. While it is confirmed in many studies that Tmods have two actin-binding sites, information on number and location of actin-binding sites in Lmod2 is controversial. We used atomic force microscopy to study interactions between G-actin and proteins of the tropomodulin family. Unbinding forces between G-actin and Tmod1, Tmod2, Tmod3, or Lmod2 were quantified. Our results indicated that Tmod1 and Tmod3 had unimodal force distributions, Tmod2 had a bimodal distribution and Lmod2 had a trimodal distribution. The number of force distributions correlates with the proteins' abilities to sequester actin or to nucleate actin polymerization. We assigned specific unbinding forces to the individual actin-binding sites of Tmod2 and Lmod2 using mutations that destroy actin-binding sites of Tmod2 and truncated Lmod2. Our results confirm the existence of the N-terminal actin-binding site in Lmod2. Altogether, our data demonstrate how the differences between the number and the strength of actin-binding sites of Tmod or Lmod translate to their functional abilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals binding residues for the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Michael J; Garry, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The surface glycoprotein (SU, gp120) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) must bind to a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4, to invade CD4+ cells. Plasmodium vivax uses the Duffy Binding Protein (DBP) to bind the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) and invade reticulocytes. Results Variable loop 3 (V3) of HIV-1 SU and domain 1 of the Plasmodium vivax DBP share a sequence similarity. The site of amino acid sequence similarity was necessary, but not sufficient, ...

  13. Homology modeling and docking of AahII-Nanobody complexes reveal the epitope binding site on AahII scorpion toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksouri, Ayoub; Ghedira, Kais; Ben Abderrazek, Rahma; Shankar, B A Gowri; Benkahla, Alia; Bishop, Ozlem Tastan; Bouhaouala-Zahar, Balkiss

    2018-02-19

    Scorpion envenoming and its treatment is a public health problem in many parts of the world due to highly toxic venom polypeptides diffusing rapidly within the body of severely envenomed victims. Recently, 38 AahII-specific Nanobody sequences (Nbs) were retrieved from which the performance of NbAahII10 nanobody candidate, to neutralize the most poisonous venom compound namely AahII acting on sodium channels, was established. Herein, structural computational approach is conducted to elucidate the Nb-AahII interactions that support the biological characteristics, using Nb multiple sequence alignment (MSA) followed by modeling and molecular docking investigations (RosettaAntibody, ZDOCK software tools). Sequence and structural analysis showed two dissimilar residues of NbAahII10 CDR1 (Tyr27 and Tyr29) and an inserted polar residue Ser30 that appear to play an important role. Indeed, CDR3 region of NbAahII10 is characterized by a specific Met104 and two negatively charged residues Asp115 and Asp117. Complex dockings reveal that NbAahII17 and NbAahII38 share one common binding site on the surface of the AahII toxin divergent from the NbAahII10 one's. At least, a couple of NbAahII10 - AahII residue interactions (Gln38 - Asn44 and Arg62, His64, respectively) are mainly involved in the toxic AahII binding site. Altogether, this study gives valuable insights in the design and development of next generation of antivenom. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lauric acid and myristic acid from Allium sativum inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra: in silico analysis reveals possible binding to protein kinase B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniyan, Rajiniraja; Gurunathan, Jayaraman

    2016-12-01

    The bulb of Allium sativum Linn (Alliaceae) has numerous medicinal values. Though the petroleum ether extract of the bulb has shown to exhibit antimycobacterial activity, the phytochemical(s) responsible for this inhibitory activity is not known. To characterize the bioactive compounds in the petroleum ether extract of Allium sativum (garlic) that inhibit the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra. Bioactivity-guided fractionation was employed to isolate the bioactive compounds. Antimycobacterial activity was evaluated by well-diffusion method and microplate alamar blue assay (MABA). Infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to characterize the bioactive compounds. Autodock was used to obtain information on molecular recognition, and molecular dynamics simulation was performed using GROMACS. The bioactive compounds that inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis H37Ra were found to be lauric acid (LA) and myristic acid (MA). The minimal inhibitory concentration of LA and MA was found to be 22.2 and 66.7 μg/mL, respectively. In silico analysis revealed that these fatty acids could bind at the cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the cytosolic domain of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PknB). The inhibition activity was dependent on the alkyl chain length of the fatty acid, and the amino acid residues involved in binding to fatty acid was found to be conserved across the Pkn family of proteins. The study indicates the possibility of using fatty acid derivatives, involving Pkn family of proteins, to inhibit the signal transduction processes in M. tuberculosis.

  15. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  16. Binding Studies of Lamotrigine with Sera of Different Animal Species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research, October 2009; 8 (5): 409-415. © Pharmacotherapy Group, ... determine the effect of species variation on drug plasma-protein interaction. Method: Binding data .... to membrane binding of drugs in each case. Another control ..... Goa KL, Ross SR, Chrisp P. Lamotrigine: a review.

  17. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.; (UTSMC)

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  18. Triplex DNA-binding proteins are associated with clinical outcomes revealed by proteomic measurements in patients with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Laura D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tri- and tetra-nucleotide repeats in mammalian genomes can induce formation of alternative non-B DNA structures such as triplexes and guanine (G-quadruplexes. These structures can induce mutagenesis, chromosomal translocations and genomic instability. We wanted to determine if proteins that bind triplex DNA structures are quantitatively or qualitatively different between colorectal tumor and adjacent normal tissue and if this binding activity correlates with patient clinical characteristics. Methods Extracts from 63 human colorectal tumor and adjacent normal tissues were examined by gel shifts (EMSA for triplex DNA-binding proteins, which were correlated with clinicopathological tumor characteristics using the Mann-Whitney U, Spearman’s rho, Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox log-rank tests. Biotinylated triplex DNA and streptavidin agarose affinity binding were used to purify triplex-binding proteins in RKO cells. Western blotting and reverse-phase protein array were used to measure protein expression in tissue extracts. Results Increased triplex DNA-binding activity in tumor extracts correlated significantly with lymphatic disease, metastasis, and reduced overall survival. We identified three multifunctional splicing factors with biotinylated triplex DNA affinity: U2AF65 in cytoplasmic extracts, and PSF and p54nrb in nuclear extracts. Super-shift EMSA with anti-U2AF65 antibodies produced a shifted band of the major EMSA H3 complex, identifying U2AF65 as the protein present in the major EMSA band. U2AF65 expression correlated significantly with EMSA H3 values in all extracts and was higher in extracts from Stage III/IV vs. Stage I/II colon tumors (p = 0.024. EMSA H3 values and U2AF65 expression also correlated significantly with GSK3 beta, beta-catenin, and NF- B p65 expression, whereas p54nrb and PSF expression correlated with c-Myc, cyclin D1, and CDK4. EMSA values and expression of all three splicing factors correlated

  19. Binding of carbendazim to bovine serum albumin: Insights from experimental and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Zhang, Yulei; Hu, Lin; Kong, Yaling; Jin, Changqing; Xi, Zengzhe

    2017-07-01

    Carbendazim (CBZ) is a widely used benzimidazole fungicide in agriculture to control a wide range of fruit and vegetable pathogens, which may lead to potential health hazards. To evaluate the potential toxicity of CBZ, the binding mechanism of bovine serum albumin (BSA) with CBZ was investigated by the fluorescence quenching technology, UV absorbance spectra, circular dichroism (CD), and molecular modeling. The fluorescence titration and UV absorbance spectra revealed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA by CBZ was a combined quenching process. In addition, the studies of CD spectra suggested that the binding of CBZ to BSA changed the secondary structure of protein. Furthermore, the thermodynamic functions of enthalpy change (ΔH0) and entropy change (ΔS0) for the reaction were calculated to be 24.87 kJ mol-1 and 162.95 J mol-1 K-1 according to Van't Hoff equation. These data suggested that hydrophobic interaction play a major role in the binding of CBZ to BSA, which was in good agreement with the result of molecular modeling study.

  20. Binding of ethyl pyruvate to bovine serum albumin: Calorimetric, spectroscopic and molecular docking studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Mallika [Department of Chemistry, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 11007 (India); Mishra, Rashmi; Agarwala, Paban K. [Department of Radiation Genetics and Epigenetics, Division of Radioprotective Drug Development Research, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi 110054 (India); Ojha, Himanshu, E-mail: himanshu.drdo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Genetics and Epigenetics, Division of Radioprotective Drug Development Research, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi 110054 (India); Singh, Bhawna [Department of Radiation Genetics and Epigenetics, Division of Radioprotective Drug Development Research, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi 110054 (India); Singh, Anju; Kukreti, Shrikant [Nucleic Acid Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 11007 (India)

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • ITC study showed binding of ethyl pyruvate with BSA with high binding affinity. • Ethyl pyruvate binding caused conformation alteration of BSA. • Fluorescence quenching mechanism is static in nature. • Electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces involved in binding. • Docking confirmed role of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces. - Abstract: Various in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential role of ethyl pyruvate. Bio-distribution of drugs is significantly influenced by the drug-serum protein binding. Therefore, the binding mechanism of the ethyl pyruvate with bovine serum albumin was investigated using UV–vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking techniques. Absorption and fluorescence quenching studies indicated the binding of ethyl pyruvate with protein. Circular dichroism spectra of bovine serum albumin confirmed significant change in the conformation of protein upon binding. Thermodynamic data confirmed that ethyl pyruvate binds to bovine serum albumin at the two different sites with high affinity. Binding of ethyl pyruvate to bovine serum albumin involves hydrogen bonding, van der Waal and hydrophobic interactions. Further, docking studies indicated that ethyl pyruvate could bind significantly at the three binding sites. The results will definitely contribute to the development of ethyl pyruvate as drug.

  1. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  2. Study of deutero-isotopomer-induced inhibition of caffeine and phenobarbitone binding to human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherrah, Y.; Falconnet, J.B.; Desage, M.; Brazier, J.L.; Zini, R.; Tillement, J.P.

    1988-01-01

    The present study of inhibition provides confirmation to previously observed deuterium isotope effects on in vitro caffeine and phenobarbitone binding to human serum albumin (HSA). Addition of either 3,7(C(/sup 2/H)/sub 3/)/sub 2/ or 1,3,7(C(/sup 2/H)/sub 3/)/sub 3/ caffeine induces a 50% loss in both the extent of binding and binding parameters of the unlabelled analog. As concerns caffeine displacement from its HSA sites, it is shown that phenobarbitone and its 5-pentadeuterophenyl analog are equally potent inhibitors of caffeine binding, though individual HSA binding profiles differ. As for HSA binding interactions between phenobarbitone isotopomers, a 50% decrease in unlabelled phenobarbitone extent of binding is observed in the presence of its 5-pentadeuterophenyl analog. Results favor the hypothesis of differing binding sites for each isotopomer.

  3. Computer modelling reveals new conformers of the ATP binding loop of Na+/K+-ATPase involved in the transphosphorylation process of the sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejral, Gracian; Sopko, Bruno; Necas, Alois; Schoner, Wilhelm; Amler, Evzen

    2017-01-01

    Hydrolysis of ATP by Na + /K + -ATPase, a P-Type ATPase, catalyzing active Na + and K + transport through cellular membranes leads transiently to a phosphorylation of its catalytical α -subunit. Surprisingly, three-dimensional molecular structure analysis of P-type ATPases reveals that binding of ATP to the N-domain connected by a hinge to the P-domain is much too far away from the Asp 369 to allow the transfer of ATP's terminal phosphate to its aspartyl-phosphorylation site. In order to get information for how the transfer of the γ -phosphate group of ATP to the Asp 369 is achieved, analogous molecular modeling of the M 4 -M 5 loop of ATPase was performed using the crystal data of Na + /K + -ATPase of different species. Analogous molecular modeling of the cytoplasmic loop between Thr 338 and Ile 760 of the α 2 -subunit of Na + /K + -ATPase and the analysis of distances between the ATP binding site and phosphorylation site revealed the existence of two ATP binding sites in the open conformation; the first one close to Phe 475 in the N-domain, the other one close to Asp 369 in the P-domain. However, binding of Mg 2+ •ATP to any of these sites in the "open conformation" may not lead to phosphorylation of Asp 369 . Additional conformations of the cytoplasmic loop were found wobbling between "open conformation"  "semi-open conformation  "closed conformation" in the absence of 2Mg 2+ •ATP. The cytoplasmic loop's conformational change to the "semi-open conformation"-characterized by a hydrogen bond between Arg 543 and Asp 611 -triggers by binding of 2Mg 2+ •ATP to a single ATP site and conversion to the "closed conformation" the phosphorylation of Asp 369 in the P-domain, and hence the start of Na + /K + -activated ATP hydrolysis.

  4. Dynamic regulation of GDP binding to G proteins revealed by magnetic field-dependent NMR relaxation analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Yuki; Kano, Hanaho; Mase, Yoko; Yokogawa, Mariko; Osawa, Masanori; Shimada, Ichio

    2017-02-22

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) serve as molecular switches in signalling pathways, by coupling the activation of cell surface receptors to intracellular responses. Mutations in the G protein α-subunit (Gα) that accelerate guanosine diphosphate (GDP) dissociation cause hyperactivation of the downstream effector proteins, leading to oncogenesis. However, the structural mechanism of the accelerated GDP dissociation has remained unclear. Here, we use magnetic field-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analyses to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of GDP bound Gα on a microsecond timescale. We show that Gα rapidly exchanges between a ground-state conformation, which tightly binds to GDP and an excited conformation with reduced GDP affinity. The oncogenic D150N mutation accelerates GDP dissociation by shifting the equilibrium towards the excited conformation.

  5. Structural and binding studies of a C-type galactose-binding lectin from Bothrops jararacussu snake venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartim, Marco A; Pinheiro, Matheus P; de Pádua, Ricardo A P; Sampaio, Suely V; Nonato, M Cristina

    2017-02-01

    BJcuL is a snake venom galactoside-binding lectin (SVgalL) isolated from Bothrops jararacussu and is involved in a wide variety of biological activities including triggering of pro-inflammatory response, disruption of microbial biofilm structure and induction of apoptosis. In the present work, we determined the crystallographic structure of BJcuL, the first holo structure of a SVgalL, and introduced the fluorescence-based thermal stability assay (Thermofluor) as a tool for screening and characterization of the binding mechanism of SVgalL ligands. BJcuL structure revealed the existence of a porous and flexible decameric arrangement composed of disulfide-linked dimers related by a five-fold symmetry. Each monomer contains the canonical carbohydrate recognition domain, a calcium ion required for BJcuL lectinic activity and a sodium ion required for protein stabilization. BJcuL thermostability was found to be induced by calcium ion and galactoside sugars which exhibit hyperbolic saturation profiles dependent on ligand concentration. Serendipitously, the gentamicin group of aminoglycoside antibiotics (gAGAs) was also identified as BJcuL ligands. On contrast, gAGAs exhibited a sigmoidal saturation profile compatible with a cooperative mechanism of binding. Thermofluor, hemagglutination inhibition assay and molecular docking strategies were used to identify a distinct binding site in BJcuL localized at the dimeric interface near the fully conserved intermolecular Cys86-Cys86 disulfide bond. The hybrid approach used in the present work provided novel insights into structural behavior and functional diversification of SVgaLs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across...... the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes...

  7. Circular dichroism study of the interaction between mutagens and bilirubin bound to different binding sites of serum albumins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, Sergey; Goncharova, Iryna; Urbanová, Marie

    Although recent investigations have shown that bilirubin not only has a negative role in the organism but also exhibits significant antimutagenic properties, the mechanisms of interactions between bilirubin and mutagens are not clear. In this study, interaction between bilirubin bound to different binding sites of mammalian serum albumins with structural analogues of the mutagens 2-aminofluorene, 2,7-diaminofluorene and mutagen 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone were investigated by circular dichroism and absorption spectroscopy. Homological human and bovine serum albumins were used as chiral matrices, which preferentially bind different conformers of bilirubin in the primary binding sites and make it observable by circular dichroism. These molecular systems approximated a real system for the study of mutagens in blood serum. Differences between the interaction of bilirubin bound to primary and to secondary binding sites of serum albumins with mutagens were shown. For bilirubin bound to secondary binding sites with low affinity, partial displacement and the formation of self-associates were observed in all studied mutagens. The associates of bilirubin bound to primary binding sites of serum albumins are formed with 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone. It was proposed that 2,7-diaminofluorene does not interact with bilirubin bound to primary sites of human and bovine serum albumins due to the spatial hindrance of the albumins binding domains. The spatial arrangement of the bilirubin bound to serum albumin along with the studied mutagens was modelled using ligand docking, which revealed a possibility of an arrangement of the both bilirubin and 2-aminofluorene and 2,4,7-trinitrofluorenone in the primary binding site of human serum albumin.

  8. Genome-wide binding site analysis of FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 reveals its novel function in Arabidopsis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Xinhao; Li, Jigang; Li, Gang; Li, Bosheng; Chen, Beibei; Shen, Huaishun; Huang, Xi; Mo, Xiaorong; Wan, Xiangyuan; Lin, Rongcheng; Li, Shigui; Wang, Haiyang; Deng, Xing Wang

    2011-07-01

    FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 (FHY3) and its homolog FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE1 (FAR1), two transposase-derived transcription factors, are key components in phytochrome A signaling and the circadian clock. Here, we use chromatin immunoprecipitation-based sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify 1559 and 1009 FHY3 direct target genes in darkness (D) and far-red (FR) light conditions, respectively, in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome. FHY3 preferentially binds to promoters through the FHY3/FAR1 binding motif (CACGCGC). Interestingly, FHY3 also binds to two motifs in the 178-bp Arabidopsis centromeric repeats. Comparison between the ChIP-seq and microarray data indicates that FHY3 quickly regulates the expression of 197 and 86 genes in D and FR, respectively. FHY3 also coregulates a number of common target genes with PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3-LIKE5 and ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL5. Moreover, we uncover a role for FHY3 in controlling chloroplast development by directly activating the expression of ACCUMULATION AND REPLICATION OF CHLOROPLASTS5, whose product is a structural component of the latter stages of chloroplast division in Arabidopsis. Taken together, our data suggest that FHY3 regulates multiple facets of plant development, thus providing insights into its functions beyond light and circadian pathways.

  9. Trans-Binding Mechanism of Ubiquitin-like Protein Activation Revealed by a UBA5-UFM1 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Oweis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modification of proteins by ubiquitin or ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs is a critical cellular process implicated in a variety of cellular states and outcomes. A prerequisite for target protein modification by a UBL is the activation of the latter by activating enzymes (E1s. Here, we present the crystal structure of the non-canonical homodimeric E1, UBA5, in complex with its cognate UBL, UFM1, and supporting biochemical experiments. We find that UBA5 binds to UFM1 via a trans-binding mechanism in which UFM1 interacts with distinct sites in both subunits of the UBA5 dimer. This binding mechanism requires a region C-terminal to the adenylation domain that brings UFM1 to the active site of the adjacent UBA5 subunit. We also find that transfer of UFM1 from UBA5 to the E2, UFC1, occurs via a trans mechanism, thereby requiring a homodimer of UBA5. These findings explicitly elucidate the role of UBA5 dimerization in UFM1 activation.

  10. Saturation Mutagenesis of the HIV-1 Envelope CD4 Binding Loop Reveals Residues Controlling Distinct Trimer Conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Duenas-Decamp

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The conformation of HIV-1 envelope (Env glycoprotein trimers is key in ensuring protection against waves of neutralizing antibodies generated during infection, while maintaining sufficient exposure of the CD4 binding site (CD4bs for viral entry. The CD4 binding loop on Env is an early contact site for CD4 while penetration of a proximal cavity by CD4 triggers Env conformational changes for entry. The role of residues in the CD4 binding loop in regulating the conformation of the trimer and trimer association domain (TAD was investigated using a novel saturation mutagenesis approach. Single mutations identified, resulted in distinct trimer conformations affecting CD4bs exposure, the glycan shield and the TAD across diverse HIV-1 clades. Importantly, mutations that improve access to the CD4bs without exposing the immunodominant V3 loop were identified. The different trimer conformations identified will affect the specificity and breadth of nabs elicited in vivo and are important to consider in design of Env immunogens for vaccines.

  11. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  12. Crystallographic Analysis Reveals a Novel Second Binding Site for Trimethoprim in Active Site Double Mutants of Human Dihydrofolate Reductase†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Piraino, Jennifer; Queener, Sherry F.

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce a more potent replacement for trimethoprim (TMP) used as a therapy for Pneumocystis pneumonia and targets dihydrofolate reductase from Pneumocystis jirovecii (pjDHFR), it is necessary to understand the determinants of potency and selectivity against DHFR from the mammalian host and fungal pathogen cells. To this end, active site residues in human (h)DHFR were replaced with those from pjDHFR. Structural data are reported for two complexes of TMP with the double mutants Gln35Ser/Asn64Phe (Q35S/N64F) and Gln35Lys/Asn64Phe (Q35K/N64F) of hDHFR that unexpectedly show evidence for the binding of two molecules of TMP: one molecule that binds in the normal folate binding site and the second molecule that binds in a novel subpocket site such that the mutated residue Phe64 is involved in van der Waals contacts to the trimethoxyphenyl ring of the second TMP molecule. Kinetic data for the binding of TMP to hDHFR and pjDHFR reveal an 84-fold selectivity of TMP against pjDHFR (Ki 49 nM) compared to hDHFR (Ki 4093 nM). Two mutants that contain one substitution from pj- and one from the closely related Pneumocystis carinii DHFR (pcDHFR) (Q35K/N64F and Q35S/N64F) show Ki values of 593 and 617 nM, respectively; these Ki values are well above both the Ki for pjDHFR and are similar to pcDHFR (Q35K/N64F) and Q35S/N64F) (305 nM). These results suggest that active site residues 35 and 64 play key roles in determining selectivity for pneumocystis DHFR, but that other residues contribute to the unique binding of inhibitors to these enzymes. PMID:21684339

  13. Synthesis and DNA-binding study of imidazole linked thiazolidinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    War, Javeed Ahmad; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar; Srivastava, Savitri Devi

    2017-02-01

    A novel series of imidazole-linked thiazolidinone hybrid molecules were designed and synthesized through a feasible synthetic protocol. The molecules were characterized with Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), 13 C NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) techniques. In vitro susceptibility tests against Gram-positive (S. aureus and B. subtilis) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli and P. aeruginosa) gave highly promising results. The most active molecule (3e) gave a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 3.125 μg/mL which is on par with the reference drug streptomycin. Structure-activity relationships revealed activity enhancement by nitro and chloro groups when they occupied meta position of the arylidene ring in 2-((3-(imidazol-1-yl)propyl)amino)-5-benzylidenethiazolidin-4-ones. DNA-binding study of the most potent molecule 3e with salmon milt DNA (sm-DNA) under simulated physiological pH was probed with UV-visible absorption, fluorescence quenching, gel electrophoresis and molecular docking techniques. These studies established that compound 3e has a strong affinity towards DNA and binds at DNA minor groove with a binding constant (K b ) 0.18 × 10 2  L mol -1 . Molecular docking simulations predicted strong affinity of 3e towards DNA with a binding affinity (ΔG) -8.5 kcal/mol. Van der Waals forces, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were predicted as the main forces of interaction. The molecule 3e exhibited specific affinity towards adenine-thiamine base pairs. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Dong; Wu, Jing; Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan; Xiao, Jian; Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo; Zhang, Rongbo

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy

  15. Autophagy regulation revealed by SapM-induced block of autophagosome-lysosome fusion via binding RAB7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Dong, E-mail: austhudong@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wu, Jing, E-mail: wujing8008@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Wang, Wan; Mu, Min; Zhao, Runpeng; Xu, Xuewei; Chen, Zhaoquan [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China); Xiao, Jian [School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou (China); Hu, Fengyu; Yang, Yabo [Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rongbo, E-mail: lory456@126.com [Institute of Infection and Immunology, Department of Medical Immunology, Medical School, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan (China)

    2015-05-29

    The mechanism underlying autophagy alteration by mycobacterium tuberculosis remains unclear. Our previous study shows LpqH, a lipoprotein of mycobacterium tuberculosis, can cause autophagosomes accumulation in murine macrophages. It is well known that SapM, another virulence factor, plays an important role in blocking phagosome-endosome fusion. However, the mechanism that SapM interferes with autophagy remains poorly defined. In this study, we report that SapM suppresses the autophagy flux by blocking autophagosome fusion with lysosome. Exposure to SapM results in accumulations of autophagosomes and decreased co-localization of autophagosome with lysosome. Molecularly, Rab7, a small GTPase, is blocked by SapM through its CT domain and is prevented from involvement of autophagosome-lysosome fusion. In conclusion, our study reveals that SapM takes Rab7 as a previously unknown target to govern a distinct molecular mechanism underlying autophagosome-lysosome fusion, which may bring light to a new thought about developing potential drugs or vaccines against tuberculosis. - Highlights: • A mechanism for disrupting autophagosome-lysosome fusion induced by SapM. • Rab7 is involved in SapM-inhibited autophagy. • SapM interacts with Rab7 by CT-domain. • CT-domain is indispensable to SapM-inhibited autophagy.

  16. Promoter Engineering Reveals the Importance of Heptameric Direct Repeats for DNA Binding by Streptomyces Antibiotic Regulatory Protein-Large ATP-Binding Regulator of the LuxR Family (SARP-LAL) Regulators in Streptomyces natalensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreales, Eva G; Vicente, Cláudia M; de Pedro, Antonio; Santos-Aberturas, Javier; Aparicio, Jesús F

    2018-05-15

    The biosynthesis of small-size polyene macrolides is ultimately controlled by a couple of transcriptional regulators that act in a hierarchical way. A Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein-large ATP-binding regulator of the LuxR family (SARP-LAL) regulator binds the promoter of a PAS-LuxR regulator-encoding gene and activates its transcription, and in turn, the gene product of the latter activates transcription from various promoters of the polyene gene cluster directly. The primary operator of PimR, the archetype of SARP-LAL regulators, contains three heptameric direct repeats separated by four-nucleotide spacers, but the regulator can also bind a secondary operator with only two direct repeats separated by a 3-nucleotide spacer, both located in the promoter region of its unique target gene, pimM A similar arrangement of operators has been identified for PimR counterparts encoded by gene clusters for different antifungal secondary metabolites, including not only polyene macrolides but peptidyl nucleosides, phoslactomycins, or cycloheximide. Here, we used promoter engineering and quantitative transcriptional analyses to determine the contributions of the different heptameric repeats to transcriptional activation and final polyene production. Optimized promoters have thus been developed. Deletion studies and electrophoretic mobility assays were used for the definition of DNA-binding boxes formed by 22-nucleotide sequences comprising two conserved heptameric direct repeats separated by four-nucleotide less conserved spacers. The cooperative binding of PimR SARP appears to be the mechanism involved in the binding of regulator monomers to operators, and at least two protein monomers are required for efficient binding. IMPORTANCE Here, we have shown that a modulation of the production of the antifungal pimaricin in Streptomyces natalensis can be accomplished via promoter engineering of the PAS-LuxR transcriptional activator pimM The expression of this gene is

  17. Silencing ß1,2-xylosyltransferase in transgenic tomato fruits reveals xylose as constitutive component of IgE binding epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Elisabeth Paulus

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex plant N-glycans containing β1,2-xylose and core α1,3-fucose are regarded as the major class of the so-called ‘carbohydrate cross-reactive determinants’ reactive with IgE antibodies in sera of many allergic patients, but their clinical relevance is still under debate. Plant glycosyltransferases, β1,2-xylosyltransferase (XylT and core α1,3-fucosyltransferase (FucT are responsible for the transfer of β1,2-linked xylose and core α1,3-linked fucose residues to N-glycans of glycoproteins, respectively. To test the clinical relevance of ß 1,2-xylose containing epitopes, expression of the tomato β1,2-xylosyltransferase was down-regulated by RNA interference (RNAi in transgenic plants. Fruits harvested from these transgenic plants were analysed for accumulation of XylT mRNA, abundance of ß1,2-xylose epitopes and their allergenic potential. Based on qPCR analysis XylT mRNA levels were reduced up to 10-fold in independent transgenic lines as compared to untransformed control, whereas no xylosylated N-glycans could be revealed by MS analysis. Immunoblotting using anti-xylose-specific IgG antibodies revealed a strong reduction of ß1,2-xylose containing epitopes. Incubating protein extracts from untransformed controls and XylT_RNAi plants with sera from tomato allergic patients showed a patient-specific reduction in IgE binding, indicating a reduced allergenic potential of XylT_RNAi tomato fruits, in vitro. To elucidate the clinical relevance of ß1,2-xylose containing complex N-glycans skin prick tests were performed demonstrating a reduced responsiveness of tomato allergic patients, in vivo. This study provides strong evidence for the clinical relevance of ß1,2-xylose containing epitopes in vivo.

  18. The solution structure of the N-terminal zinc finger of GATA-1 reveals a specific binding face for the transcriptional co-factor FOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, K.; Czolij, R.; King, G.F.; Crossley, M.; Mackay, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Zinc fingers (ZnFs) are generally regarded as DNA-binding motifs. However, a number of recent reports have implicated particular ZnFs in the mediation of protein-protein interactions. The N-terminal ZnF of GATA-1 (NF) is one such finger, having been shown to interact with a number of other proteins, including the recently discovered transcriptional co-factor FOG. Here we solve the three-dimensional structure of the NF in solution using multidimensional 1H/15N NMR spectroscopy, and we use 1H/15N spin relaxation measurements to investigate its backbone dynamics. The structure consists of two distorted β-hairpins and a single α-helix, and is similar to that of the C-terminal ZnF of chicken GATA-1. Comparisons of the NF structure with those of other C4-type zinc binding motifs, including hormone receptor and LIM domains, also reveal substantial structural homology. Finally, we use the structure to map the spatial locations of NF residues shown by mutagenesis to be essential for FOG binding, and demonstrate that these residues all lie on a single face of the NF. Notably, this face is well removed from the putative DNA- binding face of the NF, an observation which is suggestive of simultaneous roles for the NF; that is, stabilisation of GATA-1 DNA complexes and recruitment of FOG to GATA-1-controlled promoter regions

  19. Various Bee Pheromones Binding Affinity, Exclusive Chemosensillar Localization, and Key Amino Acid Sites Reveal the Distinctive Characteristics of Odorant-Binding Protein 11 in the Eastern Honey Bee, Apis cerana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin-Mi; Zhang, Lin-Ya; Fu, Xiao-Bin; Wu, Fan; Tan, Jing; Li, Hong-Liang

    2018-01-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are the critical elements responsible for binding and transporting odors and pheromones in the sensitive olfactory system in insects. Honey bees are representative social insects that have complex odorants and pheromone communication systems relative to solitary insects. Here, we first cloned and characterized OBP11 ( AcerOBP11 ), from the worker bees antennae of Eastern honey bee, Apis cerana . Based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis, most sequences homologous to AcerOBP11 belong to the typical OBPs family. The transcriptional expression profiles showed that AcerOBP11 was expressed throughout the developmental stages and highly specifically expressed in adult antennae. Using immunofluorescence localization, AcerOBP11 in worker bee's antennae was only localized in the sensilla basiconica (SB) near the fringe of each segment. Fluorescence ligand-binding assay showed that AcerOBP11 protein had strong binding affinity with the tested various bee pheromones components, including the main queen mandibular pheromones (QMPs), methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB), and ( E )-9-oxo-2-decanoic acid (9-ODA), alarm pheromone (n-hexanol), and worker pheromone components. AcerOBP11 also had strong binding affinity to plant volatiles, such as 4-Allylveratrole. Based on the docking and site-directed mutagenesis, two key amino acid residues (Ile97 and Ile140) were involved in the binding of AcerOBP11 to various bee pheromones. Taken together, we identified that AcerOBP11 was localized in a single type of antennal chemosensilla and had complex ligand-binding properties, which confer the dual-role with the primary characteristics of sensing various bee pheromones and secondary characteristics of sensing general odorants. This study not only prompts the theoretical basis of OBPs-mediated bee pheromones recognition of honey bee, but also extends the understanding of differences in pheromone communication between social and solitary insects.

  20. Various Bee Pheromones Binding Affinity, Exclusive Chemosensillar Localization, and Key Amino Acid Sites Reveal the Distinctive Characteristics of Odorant-Binding Protein 11 in the Eastern Honey Bee, Apis cerana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Mi Song

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs are the critical elements responsible for binding and transporting odors and pheromones in the sensitive olfactory system in insects. Honey bees are representative social insects that have complex odorants and pheromone communication systems relative to solitary insects. Here, we first cloned and characterized OBP11 (AcerOBP11, from the worker bees antennae of Eastern honey bee, Apis cerana. Based on sequence and phylogenetic analysis, most sequences homologous to AcerOBP11 belong to the typical OBPs family. The transcriptional expression profiles showed that AcerOBP11 was expressed throughout the developmental stages and highly specifically expressed in adult antennae. Using immunofluorescence localization, AcerOBP11 in worker bee's antennae was only localized in the sensilla basiconica (SB near the fringe of each segment. Fluorescence ligand-binding assay showed that AcerOBP11 protein had strong binding affinity with the tested various bee pheromones components, including the main queen mandibular pheromones (QMPs, methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (HOB, and (E-9-oxo-2-decanoic acid (9-ODA, alarm pheromone (n-hexanol, and worker pheromone components. AcerOBP11 also had strong binding affinity to plant volatiles, such as 4-Allylveratrole. Based on the docking and site-directed mutagenesis, two key amino acid residues (Ile97 and Ile140 were involved in the binding of AcerOBP11 to various bee pheromones. Taken together, we identified that AcerOBP11 was localized in a single type of antennal chemosensilla and had complex ligand-binding properties, which confer the dual-role with the primary characteristics of sensing various bee pheromones and secondary characteristics of sensing general odorants. This study not only prompts the theoretical basis of OBPs-mediated bee pheromones recognition of honey bee, but also extends the understanding of differences in pheromone communication between social and solitary insects.

  1. Erythrocytes 125I-Insulin Binding Studies in Viral Hepatitis and Schistosomiasis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the alterations of insulin binding sites in human erythrocytes in patients with chronic viral B and C hepatitis and in schistosomiasis. Fifty men with ages ranged from 20-45 years were diagnosed into five groups; hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, mixed hepatitis B and C, schistosomiasis and normal healthy volunteers as a control group. Biochemical analyses as erythrocyte insulin radioreceptor, plasma insulin estimation, fasting and post prandial blood glucose levels and liver function tests were performed. The results revealed significant decrease in insulin binding sites/cell in patients with hepatitis C virus, mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis compared to the control group. There were significant increase in fasting plasma glucose levels in groups of hepatitis C virus mixed B and C viruses, while there were highly significant increase in post prandial plasma glucose levels in patients with mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis groups compared to the normal control. Also, fasting plasma insulin levels were significantly elevated in groups of hepatitis C mixed B and C viruses and in schistosomiasis group. The obtained results revealed the importance of laboratory follow up of glucose and insulin levels in patients with chronic liver diseases

  2. Quantitative Molecular Imaging with a Single Gd-Based Contrast Agent Reveals Specific Tumor Binding and Retention in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Mette L; Gao, Ying; Hutnick, Melanie A; Craig, Sonya E L; Pokorski, Jonathan K; Flask, Chris A; Brady-Kalnay, Susann M

    2017-06-06

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an indispensable tool in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases, especially cancer. However, the poor sensitivity of MRI relative to other imaging modalities, such as PET, has hindered the development and clinical use of molecular MRI contrast agents that could provide vital diagnostic information by specifically locating a molecular target altered in the disease process. This work describes the specific and sustained in vivo binding and retention of a protein tyrosine phosphatase mu (PTPμ)-targeted, molecular magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent with a single gadolinium (Gd) chelate using a quantitative MRI T 1 mapping technique in glioma xenografts. Quantitative T 1 mapping is an imaging method used to measure the longitudinal relaxation time, the T 1 relaxation time, of protons in a magnetic field after excitation by a radiofrequency pulse. T 1 relaxation times can in turn be used to calculate the concentration of a gadolinium-containing contrast agent in a region of interest, thereby allowing the retention or clearance of an agent to be quantified. In this context, retention is a measure of molecular contrast agent binding. Using conventional peptide chemistry, a PTPμ-targeted peptide was linked to a chelator that had been conjugated to a lysine residue. Following complexation with Gd, this PTPμ-targeted molecular contrast agent containing a single Gd ion showed significant tumor enhancement and a sustained increase in Gd concentration in both heterotopic and orthotopic tumors using dynamic quantitative MRI. This single Gd-containing PTPμ agent was more effective than our previous version with three Gd ions. Differences between nonspecific and specific agents, due to specific tumor binding, can be determined within the first 30 min after agent administration by examining clearance rates. This more facile chemistry, when combined with quantitative MR techniques, allows for widespread adoption by academic

  3. Sequence and structural analysis of the chitinase insertion domain reveals two conserved motifs involved in chitin-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitinases are prevalent in life and are found in species including archaea, bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. They break down chitin, which is the second most abundant carbohydrate in nature after cellulose. Hence, they are important for maintaining a balance between carbon and nitrogen trapped as insoluble chitin in biomass. Chitinases are classified into two families, 18 and 19 glycoside hydrolases. In addition to a catalytic domain, which is a triosephosphate isomerase barrel, many family 18 chitinases contain another module, i.e., chitinase insertion domain. While numerous studies focus on the biological role of the catalytic domain in chitinase activity, the function of the chitinase insertion domain is not completely understood. Bioinformatics offers an important avenue in which to facilitate understanding the role of residues within the chitinase insertion domain in chitinase function.Twenty-seven chitinase insertion domain sequences, which include four experimentally determined structures and span five kingdoms, were aligned and analyzed using a modified sequence entropy parameter. Thirty-two positions with conserved residues were identified. The role of these conserved residues was explored by conducting a structural analysis of a number of holo-enzymes. Hydrogen bonding and van der Waals calculations revealed a distinct subset of four conserved residues constituting two sequence motifs that interact with oligosaccharides. The other conserved residues may be key to the structure, folding, and stability of this domain.Sequence and structural studies of the chitinase insertion domains conducted within the framework of evolution identified four conserved residues which clearly interact with the substrates. Furthermore, evolutionary studies propose a link between the appearance of the chitinase insertion domain and the function of family 18 chitinases in the subfamily A.

  4. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  5. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zhongshan; Xiang, Quanju; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Dong, Haohao; He, Chuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng; Wang, Wenjian; Dong, Changjiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ . • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg 2+ , which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics

  6. Structure of conjugated polyketone reductase from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 reveals conformational changes for substrate recognition upon NADPH binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui-Min; Yamamura, Akihiro; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Nagai, Takahiro; Kitamura, Nahoko; Urano, Nobuyuki; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708, identified as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ketopantoyl lactone reductase, belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. This enzyme reduces ketopantoyl lactone to D-pantoyl lactone in a strictly stereospecific manner. To elucidate the structural basis of the substrate specificity, we determined the crystal structures of the apo CPR-C2 and CPR-C2/NADPH complex at 1.70 and 1.80 Å resolutions, respectively. CPR-C2 adopted a triose-phosphate isomerase barrel fold at the core of the structure. Binding with the cofactor NADPH induced conformational changes in which Thr27 and Lys28 moved 15 and 5.0 Å, respectively, in the close vicinity of the adenosine 2'-phosphate group of NADPH to form hydrogen bonds. Based on the comparison of the CPR-C2/NADPH structure with 3-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and mutation analyses, we constructed substrate binding models with ketopantoyl lactone, which provided insight into the substrate specificity by the cofactor-induced structure. The results will be useful for the rational design of CPR-C2 mutants targeted for use in the industrial manufacture of ketopantoyl lactone.

  7. Helper T cell epitope-mapping reveals MHC-peptide binding affinities that correlate with T helper cell responses to pneumococcal surface protein A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Singh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the requirements for protection against pneumococcal carriage and pneumonia will greatly benefit efforts in controlling these diseases. Several proteins and polysaccharide capsule have recently been implicated in the virulence of and protective immunity against Streptococcus pneumonia. Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA is highly conserved among S. pneumonia strains, inhibits complement activation, binds lactoferrin, elicits protective systemic immunity against pneumococcal infection, and is necessary for full pneumococcal virulence. Identification of PspA peptides that optimally bind human leukocyte antigen (HLA would greatly contribute to global vaccine efforts, but this is hindered by the multitude of HLA polymorphisms. Here, we have used an experimental data set of 54 PspA peptides and in silico methods to predict peptide binding to HLA and murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II. We also characterized spleen- and cervical lymph node (CLN-derived helper T lymphocyte (HTL cytokine responses to these peptides after S. pneumonia strain EF3030-challenge in mice. Individual, yet overlapping peptides, 15 amino acids in length revealed residues 199 to 246 of PspA (PspA(199-246 consistently caused the greatest IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-5 and proliferation as well as moderate IL-10 and IL-4 responses by ex vivo stimulated splenic and CLN CD4(+ T cells isolated from S. pneumonia strain EF3030-challeged F(1 (B6xBALB/c mice. IEDB, RANKPEP, SVMHC, MHCPred, and SYFPEITHI in silico analysis tools revealed peptides in PspA(199-246 also interact with a broad range of HLA-DR, -DQ, and -DP allelles. These data suggest that predicted MHC class II-peptide binding affinities do not always correlate with T helper (Th cytokine or proliferative responses to PspA peptides, but when used together with in vivo validation can be a useful tool to choose candidate pneumococcal HTL epitopes.

  8. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyasena, R.D.; Weerasekera, D.A.; Hettiaratchi, N.; Wikramanayake, T.W.; Sri Lanka Univ., Peradeniya Campus. Nuclear Medicine Unit)

    1977-01-01

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo, and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable use as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole blood folate. The binding of folate by cow mild preparations in particular was found to be very poor. (orig.) [de

  9. The function of the RNA-binding protein TEL1 in moss reveals ancient regulatory mechanisms of shoot development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, Julien; Spinner, Lara; Mazubert, Christelle; Charlot, Florence; Paquet, Nicolas; Thareau, Vincent; Dron, Michel; Nogué, Fabien; Charon, Céline

    2012-03-01

    The shoot represents the basic body plan in land plants. It consists of a repeated structure composed of stems and leaves. Whereas vascular plants generate a shoot in their diploid phase, non-vascular plants such as mosses form a shoot (called the gametophore) in their haploid generation. The evolution of regulatory mechanisms or genetic networks used in the development of these two kinds of shoots is unclear. TERMINAL EAR1-like genes have been involved in diploid shoot development in vascular plants. Here, we show that disruption of PpTEL1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens, causes reduced protonema growth and gametophore initiation, as well as defects in gametophore development. Leafy shoots formed on ΔTEL1 mutants exhibit shorter stems with more leaves per shoot, suggesting an accelerated leaf initiation (shortened plastochron), a phenotype shared with the Poaceae vascular plants TE1 and PLA2/LHD2 mutants. Moreover, the positive correlation between plastochron length and leaf size observed in ΔTEL1 mutants suggests a conserved compensatory mechanism correlating leaf growth and leaf initiation rate that would minimize overall changes in plant biomass. The RNA-binding protein encoded by PpTEL1 contains two N-terminus RNA-recognition motifs, and a third C-terminus non-canonical RRM, specific to TEL proteins. Removal of the PpTEL1 C-terminus (including this third RRM) or only 16-18 amino acids within it seriously impairs PpTEL1 function, suggesting a critical role for this third RRM. These results show a conserved function of the RNA-binding PpTEL1 protein in the regulation of shoot development, from early ancestors to vascular plants, that depends on the third TEL-specific RRM.

  10. Molecular simulations of lactose-bound and unbound forms of the FaeG adhesin reveal critical amino acids involved in sugar binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph L; Jafri, Heba

    2016-11-01

    F4 fimbriae are protein filaments found in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli cells and are implicated in the process of bacterial infection due to their function as bacterial adhesins. These filaments are comprised from several proteins, but the bacterial adhesin FaeG, which is a lactose-binding protein, is the major subunit comprising F4 fimbriae. Crystal structures for three variants of the FaeG protein were recently solved, including the ad variant of FaeG that was crystallized in complex with lactose. However, the dynamics of the FaeG protein bound to lactose have not been explored previously using molecular dynamics simulations. Therefore, in order to study the dynamical interactions between the FaeG ad variant and lactose, we have carried out the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of this system. We have also probed the role of crystallographic water molecules on the stability of lactose in the FaeG binding site, and have simulated seven FaeG mutants to probe the influence of amino acid substitutions on the ability of FaeG to bind lactose effectively. Our simulations agree well with experimental results for the influence of mutations on lactose binding, provide dynamical insights into the interactions of FaeG with lactose, and also suggest the possibility of additional regions of the FaeG protein that may act as secondary lactose binding sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spectroscopic profiling and computational study of the binding of tschimgine: A natural monoterpene derivative, with calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajeh, Masoumeh Ashrafi; Dehghan, Gholamreza; Dastmalchi, Siavoush; Shaghaghi, Masoomeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad

    2018-03-01

    DNA is a major target for a number of anticancer substances. Interaction studies between small molecules and DNA are essential for rational drug designing to influence main biological processes and also introducing new probes for the assay of DNA. Tschimgine (TMG) is a monoterpene derivative with anticancer properties. In the present study we tried to elucidate the interaction of TMG with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) using different spectroscopic methods. UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies as well as molecular docking study revealed formation of complex between TMG and CT-DNA. Binding constant (Kb) between TMG and DNA was 2.27 × 104 M- 1, that is comparable to groove binding agents. The fluorescence spectroscopic data revealed that the quenching mechanism of fluorescence of TMG by CT-DNA is static quenching. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH TMG with CT-DNA. Competitive binding assay with methylene blue (MB) and Hoechst 33258 using fluorescence spectroscopy displayed that TMG possibly binds to the minor groove of CT-DNA. These observations were further confirmed by CD spectral analysis, viscosity measurements and molecular docking.

  12. ``In silico'' study of the binding of two novel antagonists to the nociceptin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Longa, Stefano; Arcovito, Alessandro

    2018-02-01

    Antagonists of the nociceptin receptor (NOP) are raising interest for their possible clinical use as antidepressant drugs. Recently, the structure of NOP in complex with some piperidine-based antagonists has been revealed by X-ray crystallography. In this study, a multi-flexible docking (MF-docking) procedure, i.e. docking to multiple receptor conformations extracted by preliminary molecular dynamics trajectories, together with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations have been carried out to provide the binding mode of two novel NOP antagonists, one of them selective (BTRX-246040, formerly named LY-2940094) and one non selective (AT-076), i.e. able to inactivate NOP as well as the classical µ- k- and δ-opioid receptors (MOP KOP and DOP). According to our results, the pivotal role of residue D1303,32 (upper indexes are Ballesteros-Weinstein notations) is analogous to that enlighten by the already known X-ray structures of opioid receptors: binding of the molecules are predicted to require a slight readjustment of the hydrophobic pocket (residues Y1313,33, M1343,36, I2195,43, Q2806,52 and V2836,55) in the orthosteric site of NOP, accommodating either the pyridine-pyrazole (BTRX-246040) or the isoquinoline (AT-076) moiety of the ligand, in turn allowing the protonated piperidine nitrogen to maximize interaction (salt-bridge) with residue D1303,32 of the NOP, and the aromatic head to be sandwiched in optimal π-stacking between Y1313,33 and M1343,36. The QM/MM optimization after the MF-docking procedure has provided the more likely conformations for the binding to the NOP receptor of BTRX-246040 and AT-076, based on different pharmacophores and exhibiting different selectivity profiles. While the high selectivity for NOP of BTRX-246040 can be explained by interactions with NOP specific residues, the lack of selectivity of AT-076 could be associated to its ability to penetrate into the deep hydrophobic pocket of NOP, while retaining a

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on binding of a flavonoid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    six principal binding sites have been identified for several important biomolecules.4 ... lized), tryptophan and quercetin from Sigma were used as received. .... +..... (6). Here Fo and F are the fluorescence intensity from the fluorophore, albumin, at 342 nm in the absence and the presence of different concentrations of ...

  14. Landmark Study Reveals Antarctic Glacier's Long History of Retreat

    OpenAIRE

    Kuska, Dale M.

    2016-01-01

    Faculty Showcase Archive Article Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. A major study, released in late November in the journal “Nature,” reveals the history of retreat of the massive Pine Island Glacier (PIG) in western Antarctica, widely considered one of the largest contributors to global sea-level rise.

  15. Marine Natural Products Acting on the Acetylcholine-Binding Protein and Nicotinic Receptors: From Computer Modeling to Binding Studies and Electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Kudryavtsev

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available For a small library of natural products from marine sponges and ascidians, in silico docking to the Lymnaea stagnalis acetylcholine-binding protein (AChBP, a model for the ligand-binding domains of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, was carried out and the possibility of complex formation was revealed. It was further experimentally confirmed via competition with radioiodinated α-bungarotoxin ([125I]-αBgt for binding to AChBP of the majority of analyzed compounds. Alkaloids pibocin, varacin and makaluvamines С and G had relatively high affinities (Ki 0.5–1.3 μM. With the muscle-type nAChR from Torpedo californica ray and human neuronal α7 nAChR, heterologously expressed in the GH4C1 cell line, no competition with [125I]-αBgt was detected in four compounds, while the rest showed an inhibition. Makaluvamines (Ki ~ 1.5 μM were the most active compounds, but only makaluvamine G and crambescidine 359 revealed a weak selectivity towards muscle-type nAChR. Rhizochalin, aglycone of rhizochalin, pibocin, makaluvamine G, monanchocidin, crambescidine 359 and aaptamine showed inhibitory activities in electrophysiology experiments on the mouse muscle and human α7 nAChRs, expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Thus, our results confirm the utility of the modeling studies on AChBPs in a search for natural compounds with cholinergic activity and demonstrate the presence of the latter in the analyzed marine biological sources.

  16. BINDING OF THE RESPIRATORY CHAIN INHIBITOR ANTIMYCIN TO THE MITOCHONDRIAL bc1 COMPLEX: A NEW CRYSTAL STRUCTURE REVEALS AN ALTERED INTRAMOLECULAR HYDROGEN-BONDING PATTERN.

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-01-01

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Tw...

  17. Markov State Models Reveal a Two-Step Mechanism of miRNA Loading into the Human Argonaute Protein: Selective Binding followed by Structural Re-arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Hanlun

    2015-07-16

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) are central components in RNA interference, which is a key cellular mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Despite intensive studies, molecular mechanisms of how Ago recognizes miRNA remain largely elusive. In this study, we propose a two-step mechanism for this molecular recognition: selective binding followed by structural re-arrangement. Our model is based on the results of a combination of Markov State Models (MSMs), large-scale protein-RNA docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using MSMs, we identify an open state of apo human Ago-2 in fast equilibrium with partially open and closed states. Conformations in this open state are distinguished by their largely exposed binding grooves that can geometrically accommodate miRNA as indicated in our protein-RNA docking studies. miRNA may then selectively bind to these open conformations. Upon the initial binding, the complex may perform further structural re-arrangement as shown in our MD simulations and eventually reach the stable binary complex structure. Our results provide novel insights in Ago-miRNA recognition mechanisms and our methodology holds great potential to be widely applied in the studies of other important molecular recognition systems.

  18. Markov State Models Reveal a Two-Step Mechanism of miRNA Loading into the Human Argonaute Protein: Selective Binding followed by Structural Re-arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Hanlun; Sheong, Fu Kit; Zhu, Lizhe; Gao, Xin; Bernauer, Julie; Huang, Xuhui

    2015-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) are central components in RNA interference, which is a key cellular mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Despite intensive studies, molecular mechanisms of how Ago recognizes miRNA remain largely elusive. In this study, we propose a two-step mechanism for this molecular recognition: selective binding followed by structural re-arrangement. Our model is based on the results of a combination of Markov State Models (MSMs), large-scale protein-RNA docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using MSMs, we identify an open state of apo human Ago-2 in fast equilibrium with partially open and closed states. Conformations in this open state are distinguished by their largely exposed binding grooves that can geometrically accommodate miRNA as indicated in our protein-RNA docking studies. miRNA may then selectively bind to these open conformations. Upon the initial binding, the complex may perform further structural re-arrangement as shown in our MD simulations and eventually reach the stable binary complex structure. Our results provide novel insights in Ago-miRNA recognition mechanisms and our methodology holds great potential to be widely applied in the studies of other important molecular recognition systems.

  19. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  20. Computer modelling reveals new conformers of the ATP binding loop of Na+/K+-ATPase involved in the transphosphorylation process of the sodium pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracian Tejral

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolysis of ATP by Na+/K+-ATPase, a P-Type ATPase, catalyzing active Na+ and K+ transport through cellular membranes leads transiently to a phosphorylation of its catalytical α-subunit. Surprisingly, three-dimensional molecular structure analysis of P-type ATPases reveals that binding of ATP to the N-domain connected by a hinge to the P-domain is much too far away from the Asp369 to allow the transfer of ATP’s terminal phosphate to its aspartyl-phosphorylation site. In order to get information for how the transfer of the γ-phosphate group of ATP to the Asp369 is achieved, analogous molecular modeling of the M4–M5 loop of ATPase was performed using the crystal data of Na+/K+-ATPase of different species. Analogous molecular modeling of the cytoplasmic loop between Thr338 and Ile760 of the α2-subunit of Na+/K+-ATPase and the analysis of distances between the ATP binding site and phosphorylation site revealed the existence of two ATP binding sites in the open conformation; the first one close to Phe475 in the N-domain, the other one close to Asp369 in the P-domain. However, binding of Mg2+•ATP to any of these sites in the “open conformation” may not lead to phosphorylation of Asp369. Additional conformations of the cytoplasmic loop were found wobbling between “open conformation”  “semi-open conformation  “closed conformation” in the absence of 2Mg2+•ATP. The cytoplasmic loop’s conformational change to the “semi-open conformation”—characterized by a hydrogen bond between Arg543 and Asp611—triggers by binding of 2Mg2+•ATP to a single ATP site and conversion to the “closed conformation” the phosphorylation of Asp369 in the P-domain, and hence the start of Na+/K+-activated ATP hydrolysis.

  1. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholdt, Zachary A; Ndungo, Esther; Fusco, Marnie L; Bale, Shridhar; Flyak, Andrew I; Crowe, James E; Chandran, Kartik; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-02-23

    The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP) mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS) that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics. Ebola virus uses its glycoprotein (GP) to enter new host cells. During entry, GP must be cleaved by human enzymes in order for receptor binding to occur. Here, we provide the crystal structure of the cleaved form of Ebola virus GP. We demonstrate that cleavage exposes a site at the top of GP and that this site binds the critical domain C of the receptor, termed Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1). We perform mutagenesis to find parts of the site essential for binding NPC1 and map distinct roles for an upper, charged crest and lower, hydrophobic trough in cleaved GP. We find that this 3-dimensional site is conserved across the filovirus family and that antibody directed against this site is able to bind cleaved GP from every filovirus tested and neutralize viruses bearing those GPs. Copyright © 2016 Bornholdt et al.

  2. Proteomic analysis of the intestinal adaptation response reveals altered expression of fatty acid binding proteins following massive small bowel resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Andrew N; Pereira-Fantini, Prue M; Wilson, Guineva; Taylor, Russell G; Rainczuk, Adam; Meehan, Katie L; Sourial, Magdy; Fuller, Peter J; Stanton, Peter G; Robertson, David M; Bines, Julie E

    2010-03-05

    Intestinal adaptation in response to the loss of the small intestine is essential to restore enteral autonomy in patients who have undergone massive small bowel resection (MSBR). In a proportion of patients, intestinal function is not restored, resulting in chronic intestinal failure (IF). Early referral of such patients for transplant provides the best prognosis; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intestinal adaptation remain elusive and there is currently no convenient marker to predict whether patients will develop IF. We have investigated the adaptation response in a well-characterized porcine model of intestinal adaptation. 2D DIGE analysis of ileal epithelium from piglets recovering from massive small bowel resection (MSBR) identified over 60 proteins that changed specifically in MSBR animals relative to nonoperational or sham-operated controls. Three fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP, FABP-6, and I-FABP) showed changes in MSBR animals. The expression changes and localization of each FABP were validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemical analysis. FABP expression changes in MSBR animals occurred concurrently with altered triglyceride and bile acid metabolism as well as weight gain. The observed FABP expression changes in the ileal epithelium occur as part of the intestinal adaptation response and could provide a clinically useful marker to evaluate adaptation following MSBR.

  3. Melanin binding study of clinical drugs with cassette dosing and rapid equilibrium dialysis inserts

    OpenAIRE

    Pelkonen L; Tengvall-Unadike U; Ruponen M; Kidron H; del Amo EM; Reinisalo M; Urtti A

    2017-01-01

    Melanin pigment is a negatively charged polymer found in pigmented human tissues. In the eye, iris, ciliary body, choroid and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) are heavily pigmented. Several drug molecules are known to bind to melanin, but larger sets of drugs have not been compared often in similar test conditions. In this study, we introduce a powerful tool for screening of melanin binding. The binding of a set of 34 compounds to isolated porcine RPE melanin was determined by cassette (n-in-...

  4. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Profiling Revealed High Proportions of Odorant Binding and Antimicrobial Defense Proteins in Olfactory Tissues of the House Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Kuntová

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian olfaction depends on chemosensory neurons of the main olfactory epithelia (MOE, and/or of the accessory olfactory epithelia in the vomeronasal organ (VNO. Thus, we have generated the VNO and MOE transcriptomes and the nasal cavity proteome of the house mouse, Mus musculus musculus. Both transcriptomes had low levels of sexual dimorphisms, while the soluble proteome of the nasal cavity revealed high levels of sexual dimorphism similar to that previously reported in tears and saliva. Due to low levels of sexual dimorphism in the olfactory receptors in MOE and VNO, the sex-specific sensing seems less likely to be dependent on receptor repertoires. However, olfaction may also depend on a continuous removal of background compounds from the sites of detection. Odorant binding proteins (OBPs are thought to be involved in this process and in our study Obp transcripts were most expressed along other lipocalins (e.g., Lcn13, Lcn14 and antimicrobial proteins. At the level of proteome, OBPs were highly abundant with only few being sexually dimorphic. We have, however, detected the major urinary proteins MUP4 and MUP5 in males and females and the male-biased central/group-B MUPs that were thought to be abundant mainly in the urine. The exocrine gland-secreted peptides ESP1 and ESP22 were male-biased but not male-specific in the nose. For the first time, we demonstrate that the expression of nasal lipocalins correlates with antimicrobial proteins thus suggesting that their individual variation may be linked to evolvable mechanisms that regulate natural microbiota and pathogens that regularly enter the body along the ‘eyes-nose-oral cavity’ axis.

  5. Global analysis of estrogen receptor beta binding to breast cancer cell genome reveals an extensive interplay with estrogen receptor alpha for target gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptors alpha (ERα and beta (ERβ are transcription factors (TFs that mediate estrogen signaling and define the hormone-responsive phenotype of breast cancer (BC. The two receptors can be found co-expressed and play specific, often opposite, roles, with ERβ being able to modulate the effects of ERα on gene transcription and cell proliferation. ERβ is frequently lost in BC, where its presence generally correlates with a better prognosis of the disease. The identification of the genomic targets of ERβ in hormone-responsive BC cells is thus a critical step to elucidate the roles of this receptor in estrogen signaling and tumor cell biology. Results Expression of full-length ERβ in hormone-responsive, ERα-positive MCF-7 cells resulted in a marked reduction in cell proliferation in response to estrogen and marked effects on the cell transcriptome. By ChIP-Seq we identified 9702 ERβ and 6024 ERα binding sites in estrogen-stimulated cells, comprising sites occupied by either ERβ, ERα or both ER subtypes. A search for TF binding matrices revealed that the majority of the binding sites identified comprise one or more Estrogen Response Element and the remaining show binding matrixes for other TFs known to mediate ER interaction with chromatin by tethering, including AP2, E2F and SP1. Of 921 genes differentially regulated by estrogen in ERβ+ vs ERβ- cells, 424 showed one or more ERβ site within 10 kb. These putative primary ERβ target genes control cell proliferation, death, differentiation, motility and adhesion, signal transduction and transcription, key cellular processes that might explain the biological and clinical phenotype of tumors expressing this ER subtype. ERβ binding in close proximity of several miRNA genes and in the mitochondrial genome, suggests the possible involvement of this receptor in small non-coding RNA biogenesis and mitochondrial genome functions. Conclusions Results indicate that the

  6. Structural study of LEDGF/p75 binding partners

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Těšina, Petr; Čermáková, Kateřina; Procházková, Kateřina; Hořejší, Magdalena; Christ, F.; De Rijck, J.; Veverka, Václav; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 12-12 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /11./. 14.03.2013-16.03.2013, Nové Hrady] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LK11205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : LEDGF/p75 * HIV * integrase-binding domain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. EPR studies of cooperative binding of Cu (II) to hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louro, S.R.W.; Tabak, M.

    1983-07-01

    The investigation of the relative affinities of the two pairs of hemoglobin copper sites by monitoring the EPR spectra of the complexes formed by the reaction of copper with deoxyhemoglobin is reported. A model in which two sites are assumed to accept copper ions in a noncooperative way is not able to predict the experimental results. Thus it is conclude that the binding of these ions to hemoglobin is a cooperative phenomenon. (Author) [pt

  8. The binding study advice in medical education: a 2-year experience.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Goorden, R.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2015-01-01

    To improve the effectiveness of higher education, Dutch universities implemented the binding study advice at medical faculties. Accordingly, medicine students of Radboud University need to gain >/= 42 out of 60 European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) credits to obtain a positive binding study advice

  9. DNA-cisplatin binding mechanism peculiarities studied with single molecule stretching experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafuli, F. A. P.; Cesconetto, E. C.; Ramos, E. B.; Rocha, M. S.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a method to determine the DNA-cisplatin binding mechanism peculiarities by monitoring the mechanical properties of these complexes. To accomplish this task, we have performed single molecule stretching experiments by using optical tweezers, from which the persistence and contour lengths of the complexes can be promptly measured. The persistence length of the complexes as a function of the drug total concentration in the sample was used to deduce the binding data, from which we show that cisplatin binds cooperatively to the DNA molecule, a point which so far has not been stressed in binding equilibrium studies of this ligand.

  10. Studies on the metabolism of chlorotrianisene to a reactive intermediate and subsequent covalent binding to microsomal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juedes, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The studies on chlorotrianisene were conducted to determine whether metabolism of chlorotrianisene occurs via the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system and whether a reactive intermediate is being formed that is capable of binding covalently to microsomal proteins. [ 3 H]-chlorotrianisene was incubated with liver microsomes supplemented with NADPH. At the termination of the incubation, the protein was trapped on a glass filter and the unbound chlorotrianisene was removed by extensive washing of the protein with organic solvent. A dramatic stimulation of covalent binding was demonstrated in microsomes from rats treated with methylcholanthrene (60 fold increase) versus control or phenobarbital treatment. Verification of covalent binding was achieved by localization of radiolabeled bands following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of the macromolecules in the incubation mixture. Further analysis of the radiolabeled macromolecules separated on SDS-PAGE revealed that these macromolecules were degraded by protease degradation indicating that the macromolecules were proteins. Further investigations were done to determine the cause of the dramatic stimulation of covalent binding detected in microsomes from methylcholanthrene treated rats versus control or phenobarbital treated rats. Further evidence for the participation of P-450c was obtained with a reconstituted cytochrome P-450 system. Incubations of chlorotrianisene with reconstituted P-450c and NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase exhibited covalent binding characteristics comparable to those seen in microsomal incubations. Investigations into the nature of the binding site and the reactive intermediate are currently being conducted. By analyzing the BSA adduct, the author intends to isolate the specific amino acid binding site(s)

  11. Tannic acid and chromic chloride-induced binding of protein to red cells: a preliminary study of possible binding sites and reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A F; Reed, M I

    1990-07-01

    The binding mechanisms and binding sites involved in the tannic acid and chromic chloride-induced binding of protein to red cells were investigated using the binding of IgA paraprotein to red cells as model systems. Inhibition studies of these model systems using amino acid homopolymers and compounds (common as red cell membrane constituents) suggest that the mechanisms involved are similar to those proposed for the conversion of hide or skin collagen to leather, as in commercial tanning. These studies also suggest that tannic acid-induced binding of IgA paraprotein to red cells involves the amino acid residues of L-arginine, L-lysine, L-histidine, and L-proline analogous to tanning with phenolic plant extracts. The amino acid residues of L-aspartate, L-glutamate and L-asparagine are involved in a similar manner in chronic chloride-induced binding of protein to red cells.

  12. The mechanism of reduced IgG/IgE-binding of β-lactoglobulin by pulsed electric field pretreatment combined with glycation revealed by ECD/FTICR-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenhua; Tu, Zongcai; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Kaltashov, Igor A; Zhao, Yunlong; Niu, Chendi; Yao, Honglin; Ye, Wenfeng

    2018-01-24

    Bovine β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) is a major allergen existing in milk and causes about 90% of IgE-mediated cow's milk allergies. Previous studies showed that pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment could partially unfold the protein, which may contribute to the improvement of protein glycation. In this study, the effect of PEF pretreatment combined with glycation on the IgG/IgE-binding ability and the structure of β-Lg was investigated. The result showed that PEF pretreatment combined with glycation significantly reduced the IgG and IgE binding abilities, which was attributed to the changes of secondary and tertiary structure and the increase in glycation sites and degree of substitution per peptide (DSP) value determined by electron capture dissociation Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ECD/FTICR-MS). Unexpectedly, glycation sites (K47, K91 and K135) added by two mannose molecules were identified in glycated β-Lg with PEF pretreatment. Moreover, the results indicated that PEF pretreatment at 25 kV cm -1 for 60 μs promoted the reduction of IgG/IgE-binding capacity by increasing the glycation degree of β-Lg, whereas single PEF treatment under the same conditions markedly enhanced the IgG/IgE-binding ability by partially unfolding the structure of β-Lg. The results suggested that ECD/FTICR-MS could help us to understand the mechanism of reduction in the IgG/IgE-binding of β-Lg by structural characterization at the molecular level. Therefore, PEF pretreatment combined with glycation may provide an alternative method for β-Lg desensitization.

  13. Binding of alpha2ML1 to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1 reveals a new role for LRP1 in the human epidermis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Florence Galliano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The multifunctional receptor LRP1 has been shown to bind and internalize a large number of protein ligands with biological importance such as the pan-protease inhibitor alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M. We recently identified Alpha2ML1, a new member of the alpha2M gene family, expressed in epidermis. alpha2ML1 might contribute to the regulation of desquamation through its inhibitory activity towards proteases of the chymotrypsin family, notably KLK7. The expression of LRP1 in epidermis as well as its ability to internalize alpha2ML1 was investigated. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In human epidermis, LRP1 is mainly expressed within the granular layer of the epidermis, which gathers the most differentiated keratinocytes, as shown by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence using two different antibodies. By using various experimental approaches, we show that the receptor binding domain of alpha2ML1 (RBDl is specifically internalized into the macrophage-like cell line RAW and colocalizes with LRP1 upon internalization. Coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrate that RBDl binds LRP1 at the cell surface. Addition of RAP, a universal inhibitor of ligand binding to LRP1, prevents RBDl binding at the cell surface as well as internalization into RAW cells. Silencing Lrp1 expression with specific siRNA strongly reduces RBDl internalization. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Keratinocytes of the upper differentiated layers of epidermis express LRP1 as well as alpha2ML1. Our study also reveals that alpha2ML1 is a new ligand for LRP1. Our findings are consistent with endocytosis by LRP1 of complexes formed between alpha2ML1 and proteases. LRP1 may thus control desquamation by regulating the biodisponibility of extracellular proteases.

  14. Global alteration of the drug-binding pocket of human P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) by substitution of fifteen conserved residues reveals a negative correlation between substrate size and transport efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahedi, Shahrooz; Chufan, Eduardo E; Ambudkar, Suresh V

    2017-11-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-dependent efflux pump, is linked to the development of multidrug resistance in cancer cells. However, the drug-binding sites and translocation pathways of this transporter are not yet well-characterized. We recently demonstrated the important role of tyrosine residues in regulating P-gp ATP hydrolysis via hydrogen bond formations with high affinity modulators. Since tyrosine is both a hydrogen bond donor and acceptor, and non-covalent interactions are key in drug transport, in this study we investigated the global effect of enrichment of tyrosine residues in the drug-binding pocket on the drug binding and transport function of P-gp. By employing computational analysis, 15 conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket of human P-gp that interact with substrates were identified and then substituted with tyrosine, including 11 phenylalanine (F72, F303, F314, F336, F732, F759, F770, F938, F942, F983, F994), two leucine (L339, L975), one isoleucine (I306), and one methionine (M949). Characterization of the tyrosine-rich P-gp mutant in HeLa cells demonstrated that this major alteration in the drug-binding pocket by introducing fifteen additional tyrosine residues is well tolerated and has no measurable effect on total or cell surface expression of this mutant. Although the tyrosine-enriched mutant P-gp could transport small to moderate size (transport large (>1000 Daltons) substrates such as NBD-cyclosporine A, Bodipy-paclitaxel and Bodipy-vinblastine was significantly decreased. This was further supported by the physico-chemical characterization of seventeen tested substrates, which revealed a negative correlation between drug transport and molecular size for the tyrosine-enriched P-gp mutant. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. High-Affinity Low-Capacity and Low-Affinity High-Capacity N-Acetyl-2-Aminofluorene (AAF) Macromolecular Binding Sites Are Revealed During the Growth Cycle of Adult Rat Hepatocytes in Primary Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Katherine S; Moran, Tom; Shier, W Thomas; Leffert, Hyam L

    2018-05-01

    Long-term cultures of primary adult rat hepatocytes were used to study the effects of N-acetyl-2-aminofluorene (AAF) on hepatocyte proliferation during the growth cycle; on the initiation of hepatocyte DNA synthesis in quiescent cultures; and, on hepatocyte DNA replication following the initiation of DNA synthesis. Scatchard analyses were used to identify the pharmacologic properties of radiolabeled AAF metabolite binding to hepatocyte macromolecules. Two classes of growth cycle-dependent AAF metabolite binding sites-a high-affinity low-capacity site (designated Site I) and a low-affinity high-capacity site (designated Site II)-associated with two spatially distinct classes of macromolecular targets, were revealed. Based upon radiolabeled AAF metabolite binding to purified hepatocyte genomic DNA or to DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids from isolated nuclei, Site IDAY 4 targets (KD[APPARENT] ≈ 2-4×10-6 M and BMAX[APPARENT] ≈ 6 pmol/106 cells/24 h) were consistent with genomic DNA; and with AAF metabolized by a nuclear cytochrome P450. Based upon radiolabeled AAF binding to total cellular lysates, Site IIDAY 4 targets (KD[APPARENT] ≈ 1.5×10-3 M and BMAX[APPARENT] ≈ 350 pmol/106 cells/24 h) were consistent with cytoplasmic proteins; and with AAF metabolized by cytoplasmic cytochrome P450s. DNA synthesis was not inhibited by concentrations of AAF that saturated DNA binding in the neighborhood of the Site I KD. Instead, hepatocyte DNA synthesis inhibition required higher concentrations of AAF approaching the Site II KD. These observations raise the possibility that carcinogenic DNA adducts derived from AAF metabolites form below concentrations of AAF that inhibit replicative and repair DNA synthesis.

  16. Genome-wide mapping of Sox6 binding sites in skeletal muscle reveals both direct and indirect regulation of muscle terminal differentiation by Sox6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Chung-Il

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox6 is a multi-faceted transcription factor involved in the terminal differentiation of many different cell types in vertebrates. It has been suggested that in mice as well as in zebrafish Sox6 plays a role in the terminal differentiation of skeletal muscle by suppressing transcription of slow fiber specific genes. In order to understand how Sox6 coordinately regulates the transcription of multiple fiber type specific genes during muscle development, we have performed ChIP-seq analyses to identify Sox6 target genes in mouse fetal myotubes and generated muscle-specific Sox6 knockout (KO mice to determine the Sox6 null muscle phenotype in adult mice. Results We have identified 1,066 Sox6 binding sites using mouse fetal myotubes. The Sox6 binding sites were found to be associated with slow fiber-specific, cardiac, and embryonic isoform genes that are expressed in the sarcomere as well as transcription factor genes known to play roles in muscle development. The concurrently performed RNA polymerase II (Pol II ChIP-seq analysis revealed that 84% of the Sox6 peak-associated genes exhibited little to no binding of Pol II, suggesting that the majority of the Sox6 target genes are transcriptionally inactive. These results indicate that Sox6 directly regulates terminal differentiation of muscle by affecting the expression of sarcomere protein genes as well as indirectly through influencing the expression of transcription factors relevant to muscle development. Gene expression profiling of Sox6 KO skeletal and cardiac muscle revealed a significant increase in the expression of the genes associated with Sox6 binding. In the absence of the Sox6 gene, there was dramatic upregulation of slow fiber-specific, cardiac, and embryonic isoform gene expression in Sox6 KO skeletal muscle and fetal isoform gene expression in Sox6 KO cardiac muscle, thus confirming the role Sox6 plays as a transcriptional suppressor in muscle development

  17. Binding of naringin and naringenin with hen egg white lysozyme: A spectroscopic investigation and molecular docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sourav; Ghosh, Pooja; Koley, Sudipta; Singha Roy, Atanu

    2018-03-01

    The interactions of naringenin (NG) and naringin (NR) with Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL) in aqueous medium have been investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and molecular docking analyses. Both NG and NR can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HEWL via static quenching mechanism. At 300 K, the value of binding constant (Kb) of HEWL-NG complex (5.596 ± 0.063 × 104 M- 1) was found to be greater than that of HEWL-NR complex (3.404 ± 0.407 × 104 M- 1). The negative ΔG° values in cases of both the complexes specify the spontaneous binding. The binding distance between the donor (HEWL) and acceptor (NG/NR) was estimated using the Försters theory and the possibility of non-radiative energy transfer from HEWL to NG/NR was observed. The presence of metal ions (Ca2 +, Cu2 + and Fe2 +) decreased the binding affinity of NG/NR towards HEWL. Synchronous fluorescence studies indicate the change in Trp micro-environment due to the incorporation of NG/NR into HEWL. CD and FT-IR studies indicated that the α-helicity of the HEWL was slightly enhanced due to ligand binding. NG and NR inhibited the enzymatic activity of HEWL and exhibited their affinity for the active site of HEWL. Molecular docking studies revealed that both NG and NR bind in the close vicinity of Trp 62 and Trp 63 residues which is vital for the catalytic activity.

  18. Synthesis and binding studies of Alzheimer ligands on solid support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepecki, Petra; Geib, Nina; Peifer, Manuel; Biesemeier, Frank; Schrader, Thomas

    2007-05-11

    Aminopyrazole derivatives constitute the first class of nonpeptidic rationally designed beta-sheet ligands. Here we describe a double solid-phase protocol for both synthesis and affinity testing. The presented solid-phase synthesis of four types of hybrid compounds relies on the Fmoc strategy and circumvents subsequent HPLC purification by precipitating the final product from organic solution in pure form. Hexa- and octapeptide pendants with internal di- and tetrapeptide bridges are now amenable in high yields to combinatorial synthesis of compound libraries for high-throughput screening purposes. Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) on an acid-resistant PAM allows us, after PMB deprotection, to subject the free aminopyrazole binding sites in an immobilized state to on-bead assays with fluorescence-labeled peptides. From the fluorescence emission intensity decrease, individual binding constants can be calculated via reference curves by simple application of the law of mass action. Gratifyingly, host/guest complexation can be monitored quantitatively even for those ligands, which are almost insoluble in water.

  19. Epitope mapping of the major allergen from Atlantic cod in Spanish population reveals different IgE-binding patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gordo, Marina; Pastor-Vargas, Carlos; Lin, Jing; Bardina, Ludmilla; Cases, Barbara; Ibáñez, Maria Dolores; Vivanco, Fernando; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Sampson, Hugh A

    2013-07-01

    IgE-epitope mapping of allergens reveal important information about antigen components involved in allergic reactions. The peptide-based microarray immunoassay has been used to map epitopes of some food allergens. We developed a peptide microarray immunoassay to map allergenic epitopes in parvalbumin from Atlantic cod (Gad m 1), the most consumed cod species in Spain. Sera from 13 fish-allergic patients with specific IgE to cod parvalbumin were used. A library of overlapping peptides was synthesized, representing the primary sequence of Gad m 1. Peptides were used to analyze allergen-specific IgE antibodies in patient sera. 100% of the patients recognized one antigenic region of 15 amino acids in length in Gad m 1. This region only partially correlated with one of the three antigenic determinants of Gad c 1 (Allergen M), parvalbumin from Baltic cod (Gadus callarias). In the 3D model of the protein, this region was located on the surface of the protein. We have identified a relevant antigenic region in Gad m 1. This epitope could be considered as a severity marker and provides additional information to improve fish allergy diagnosis and the design of safe immunotherapeutic tools. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. In vitro study on binding interaction of quinapril with bovine serum albumin (BSA) using multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jie-Hua; Pan, Dong-Qi; Jiang, Min; Liu, Ting-Ting; Wang, Qi

    2017-08-01

    The binding interaction between quinapril (QNPL) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in vitro has been investigated using UV absorption spectroscopy, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopic, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy, 3D fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and molecular docking methods for obtaining the binding information of QNPL with BSA. The experimental results confirm that the quenching mechanism of the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA induced by QNPL is static quenching based on the decrease in the quenching constants of BSA in the presence of QNPL with the increase in temperature and the quenching rates of BSA larger than 10 10  L mol -1  s -1 , indicating forming QNPL-BSA complex through the intermolecular binding interaction. The binding constant for the QNPL-BSA complex is in the order of 10 5  M -1 , indicating there is stronger binding interaction of QNPL with BSA. The analysis of thermodynamic parameters together with molecular docking study reveal that the main binding forces in the binding process of QNPL with BSA are van der Waal's forces and hydrogen bonding interaction. And, the binding interaction of BSA with QNPL is an enthalpy-driven process. Based on Förster resonance energy transfer, the binding distance between QNPL and BSA is calculated to be 2.76 nm. The results of the competitive binding experiments and molecular docking confirm that QNPL binds to sub-domain IIA (site I) of BSA. It is confirmed there is a slight change in the conformation of BSA after binding QNPL, but BSA still retains its secondary structure α-helicity.

  1. RNA-seq reveals the RNA binding proteins, Hfq and RsmA, play various roles in virulence, antibiotic production and genomic flux in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Nabil M; Reid, Adam J; Ramsay, Joshua P; Williamson, Neil R; Croucher, Nicholas J; Gatto, Laurent; Hester, Svenja S; Goulding, David; Barquist, Lars; Lilley, Kathryn S; Kingsley, Robert A; Dougan, Gordon; Salmond, George Pc

    2013-11-22

    Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 (S39006) is a Gram-negative enterobacterium that is virulent in plant and animal models. It produces a red-pigmented trypyrrole secondary metabolite, prodigiosin (Pig), and a carbapenem antibiotic (Car), as well as the exoenzymes, pectate lyase and cellulase. Secondary metabolite production in this strain is controlled by a complex regulatory network involving quorum sensing (QS). Hfq and RsmA (two RNA binding proteins and major post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression) play opposing roles in the regulation of several key phenotypes within S39006. Prodigiosin and carbapenem production was abolished, and virulence attenuated, in an S39006 ∆hfq mutant, while the converse was observed in an S39006 rsmA transposon insertion mutant. In order to define the complete regulon of Hfq and RsmA, deep sequencing of cDNA libraries (RNA-seq) was used to analyse the whole transcriptome of S39006 ∆hfq and rsmA::Tn mutants. Moreover, we investigated global changes in the proteome using an LC-MS/MS approach. Analysis of differential gene expression showed that Hfq and RsmA directly or indirectly regulate (at the level of RNA) 4% and 19% of the genome, respectively, with some correlation between RNA and protein expression. Pathways affected include those involved in antibiotic regulation, virulence, flagella synthesis, and surfactant production. Although Hfq and RsmA are reported to activate flagellum production in E. coli and an adherent-invasive E. coli hfq mutant was shown to have no flagella by electron microscopy, we found that flagellar production was increased in the S39006 rsmA and hfq mutants. Additionally, deletion of rsmA resulted in greater genomic flux with increased activity of two mobile genetic elements. This was confirmed by qPCR and analysis of rsmA culture supernatant revealed the presence of prophage DNA and phage particles. Finally, expression of a hypothetical protein containing DUF364 increased prodigiosin production and was

  2. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27927989

  3. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-20

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Dielectric and gravimetric studies of water binding to lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone, S.

    1996-01-01

    Time domain dielectric spectroscopy and hydration isotherm measurements as a function of temperature have been applied to hydrated lysozyme powder. Two dielectric dispersions were identified, the first centred at approximately 8 MHz and a second above 1 GHz. The higher dispersion is considered to be the result of rotational relaxation of water molecules bound to the enzyme. In this case the results indicate the existence of a population of 32 water molecules per lysozyme molecule which are irrotationally bound to the lysozyme structure. A larger population of water molecules is relatively free to respond to the electric field and exhibits a dipole moment close to that of vapour phase water molecules. Multi-temperature hydration isotherm measurements are used to calculate enthalpies and entropies associated with the binding of water to lysozyme. Discontinuities both in dielectric and in thermodynamic characteristics in the range 10-14% hydration are interpreted as a re-ordering of the water structure on the enzyme surface

  5. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  6. Crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana Dawdle forkhead-associated domain reveals a conserved phospho-threonine recognition cleft for dicer-like 1 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Satoru; Yuan, Y Adam

    2013-07-01

    Dawdle (DDL) is a microRNA processing protein essential for the development of Arabidopsis. DDL contains a putative nuclear localization signal at its amino-terminus and forkhead-associated (FHA) domain at the carboxyl-terminus. Here, we report the crystal structure of the FHA domain of Arabidopsis Dawdle, determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion method at 1.7-Å resolution. DDL FHA structure displays a seven-stranded β-sandwich architecture that contains a unique structural motif comprising two long anti-parallel strands. Strikingly, crystal packing of the DDL FHA domain reveals that a glutamate residue from the symmetry-related DDL FHA domain, a structural mimic of the phospho-threonine, is specifically recognized by the structurally conserved phospho-threonine binding cleft. Consistently with the structural observations, co-immuno-precipitation experiments performed in Nicotiana benthamiana show that the DDL FHA domain co-immuno-precipitates with DCL1 fragments containing the predicted pThr+3(Ile/Val/Leu/Asp) motif. Taken together, we count the recognition of the target residue by the canonical binding cleft of the DDL FHA domain as the key molecular event to instate FHA domain-mediated protein-protein interaction in plant miRNA processing.

  7. Fibrillin binds calcium and is coded by cDNAs that reveal a multidomain structure and alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corson, G.M.; Chalberg, S.C.; Charbonneau, N.L.; Sakai, L.Y. (Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland (United States)); Dietz, H.C. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Fibrillin is an important structural protein of the extracellular matrix. It is a large cysteine-rich glycoprotein with extensive intrachain disulfide bonds, likely contributed by multiple EGF-like repeats. The authors have previously published 6.9 kb of FBN1 cDNA sequence. FBN1 cDNA clones that extend the sequence 3089 bp in the 5[prime] direction are described in this report. The deduced primary structure suggests that fibrillin in composed of multiple domains. The most predominant features the presence of 43 calcium binding EGF-like repeats. They demonstrate here that fibrillin molecules bind calcium. In addition, three alternatively spliced exons at the 5[prime] end are described. Analysis of 5.8 kb of surrounding genomic sequence revealed a 1.8-kb CpG island spanning the alternatively spliced exons and the next downstream exon. Since FBN1 is the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, the information presented here will be useful in identifying new mutations and in understanding the function of fibrillin in the pathogenesis of the disease. 42 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  9. Biochemistry and structural studies of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reveal allosteric inhibition by Ro 61-8048.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jingjing; Yao, Licheng; Xia, Tingting; Liao, Xuebin; Zhu, Deyu; Xiang, Ye

    2018-04-01

    The human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (hKMO) is a potential therapeutic target for neurodegenerative and neurologic disorders. Inhibition of KMO by Ro 61-8048, a potent, selective, and the most widely used inhibitor of KMO, was shown effective in various models of neurodegenerative or neurologic disorders. However, the molecular basis of hKMO inhibition by Ro 61-8048 is not clearly understood. Here, we report biochemistry studies on hKMO and crystal structures of an hKMO homolog, pfKMO from Pseudomonas fluorescens, in complex with the substrate l-kynurenine and Ro 61-8048. We found that the C-terminal ∼110 aa are essential for the enzymatic activity of hKMO and the homologous C-terminal region of pfKMO folds into a distinct, all-α-helical domain, which associates with the N-terminal catalytic domain to form a unique tunnel in proximity to the substrate-binding pocket. The tunnel binds the Ro 61-8048 molecule, which fills most of the tunnel, and Ro 61-8048 is hydrogen bonded with several completely conserved residues, including an essential catalytic residue. Modification of Ro 61-8048 and biochemical studies of the modified Ro 61-8048 derivatives suggested that Ro 61-8048 inhibits the enzyme in an allosteric manner by affecting the conformation of the essential catalytic residue and by blocking entry of the substrate or product release. The unique binding sites distinguish Ro 61-8048 as a noncompetitive and highly selective inhibitor from other competitive inhibitors, which should facilitate further optimization of Ro 61-8048 and the development of new inhibitory drugs to hKMO.-Gao, J., Yao, L., Xia, T., Liao, X., Zhu, D., Xiang, Y. Biochemistry and structural studies of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase reveal allosteric inhibition by Ro 61-8048.

  10. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  11. Structure of thrombospondin type 3 repeats in bacterial outer membrane protein A reveals its intra-repeat disulfide bond-dependent calcium-binding capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuyan; Sun, Cancan; Tan, Kemin; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2017-09-01

    Eukaryotic thrombospondin type 3 repeat (TT3R) is an efficient calcium ion (Ca2+) binding motif only found in mammalian thrombospondin family. TT3R has also been found in prokaryotic cellulase Cel5G, which was thought to forfeit the Ca2+-binding capability due to the formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, instead of the inter-repeat ones possessed by eukaryotic TT3Rs. In this study, we have identified an enormous number of prokaryotic TT3R-containing proteins belonging to several different protein families, including outer membrane protein A (OmpA), an important structural protein connecting the outer membrane and the periplasmic peptidoglycan layer in gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic region of OmpA from Capnocytophaga gingivalis, which contains a linker region comprising five consecutive TT3Rs. The structure of OmpA-TT3R exhibits a well-ordered architecture organized around two tightly-coordinated Ca2+ and confirms the presence of abnormal intra-repeat disulfide bonds. Further mutagenesis studies showed that the Ca2+-binding capability of OmpA-TT3R is indeed dependent on the proper formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, which help to fix a conserved glycine residue at its proper position for Ca2+ coordination. Additionally, despite lacking inter repeat disulfide bonds, the interfaces between adjacent OmpA-TT3Rs are enhanced by both hydrophobic and conserved aromatic-proline interactions.

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation reveals insights into the mechanism of unfolding by the A130T/V mutations within the MID1 zinc-binding Bbox1 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjie Zhao

    Full Text Available The zinc-binding Bbox1 domain in protein MID1, a member of the TRIM family of proteins, facilitates the ubiquitination of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 2A and alpha4, a protein regulator of PP2A. The natural mutation of residue A130 to a valine or threonine disrupts substrate recognition and catalysis. While NMR data revealed the A130T mutant Bbox1 domain failed to coordinate both structurally essential zinc ions and resulted in an unfolded structure, the unfolding mechanism is unknown. Principle component analysis revealed that residue A130 served as a hinge point between the structured β-strand-turn-β-strand (β-turn-β and the lasso-like loop sub-structures that constitute loop1 of the ββα-RING fold that the Bbox1 domain adopts. Backbone RMSD data indicate significant flexibility and departure from the native structure within the first 5 ns of the molecular dynamics (MD simulation for the A130V mutant (>6 Å and after 30 ns for A130T mutant (>6 Å. Overall RMSF values were higher for the mutant structures and showed increased flexibility around residues 125 and 155, regions with zinc-coordinating residues. Simulated pKa values of the sulfhydryl group of C142 located near A130 suggested an increased in value to ~9.0, paralleling the increase in the apparent dielectric constants for the small cavity near residue A130. Protonation of the sulfhydryl group would disrupt zinc-coordination, directly contributing to unfolding of the Bbox1. Together, the increased motion of residues of loop 1, which contains four of the six zinc-binding cysteine residues, and the increased pKa of C142 could destabilize the structure of the zinc-coordinating residues and contribute to the unfolding.

  13. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu2 + with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15 K in 20 mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu2 + ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu2 + ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu2 + ions are discussed.

  14. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Being First Matters: Topographical Representational Similarity Analysis of ERP Signals Reveals Separate Networks for Audiovisual Temporal Binding Depending on the Leading Sense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecere, Roberto; Gross, Joachim; Willis, Ashleigh; Thut, Gregor

    2017-05-24

    In multisensory integration, processing in one sensory modality is enhanced by complementary information from other modalities. Intersensory timing is crucial in this process because only inputs reaching the brain within a restricted temporal window are perceptually bound. Previous research in the audiovisual field has investigated various features of the temporal binding window, revealing asymmetries in its size and plasticity depending on the leading input: auditory-visual (AV) or visual-auditory (VA). Here, we tested whether separate neuronal mechanisms underlie this AV-VA dichotomy in humans. We recorded high-density EEG while participants performed an audiovisual simultaneity judgment task including various AV-VA asynchronies and unisensory control conditions (visual-only, auditory-only) and tested whether AV and VA processing generate different patterns of brain activity. After isolating the multisensory components of AV-VA event-related potentials (ERPs) from the sum of their unisensory constituents, we ran a time-resolved topographical representational similarity analysis (tRSA) comparing the AV and VA ERP maps. Spatial cross-correlation matrices were built from real data to index the similarity between the AV and VA maps at each time point (500 ms window after stimulus) and then correlated with two alternative similarity model matrices: AV maps = VA maps versus AV maps ≠ VA maps The tRSA results favored the AV maps ≠ VA maps model across all time points, suggesting that audiovisual temporal binding (indexed by synchrony perception) engages different neural pathways depending on the leading sense. The existence of such dual route supports recent theoretical accounts proposing that multiple binding mechanisms are implemented in the brain to accommodate different information parsing strategies in auditory and visual sensory systems. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Intersensory timing is a crucial aspect of multisensory integration, determining whether and how

  16. Binding of the respiratory chain inhibitor antimycin to the mitochondrial bc1 complex: a new crystal structure reveals an altered intramolecular hydrogen-bonding pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y; Berry, Edward A

    2005-08-19

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28 A resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cytochrome b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density, the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alphaA helix.

  17. Homology modeling and docking analyses of M. leprae Mur ligases reveals the common binding residues for structure based drug designing to eradicate leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Anusuya; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2012-06-01

    Multi drug resistance capacity for Mycobacterium leprae (MDR-Mle) demands the profound need for developing new anti-leprosy drugs. Since most of the drugs target a single enzyme, mutation in the active site renders the antibiotic ineffective. However, structural and mechanistic information on essential bacterial enzymes in a pathway could lead to the development of antibiotics that targets multiple enzymes. Peptidoglycan is an important component of the cell wall of M. leprae. The biosynthesis of bacterial peptidoglycan represents important targets for the development of new antibacterial drugs. Biosynthesis of peptidoglycan is a multi-step process that involves four key Mur ligase enzymes: MurC (EC:6.3.2.8), MurD (EC:6.3.2.9), MurE (EC:6.3.2.13) and MurF (EC:6.3.2.10). Hence in our work, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of the above Mur ligases using homology modeling method and analyzed its common binding features. The residues playing an important role in the catalytic activity of each of the Mur enzymes were predicted by docking these Mur ligases with their substrates and ATP. The conserved sequence motifs significant for ATP binding were predicted as the probable residues for structure based drug designing. Overall, the study was successful in listing significant and common binding residues of Mur enzymes in peptidoglycan pathway for multi targeted therapy.

  18. Binding of the Respiratory Chain Inhibitor Antimycin to theMitochondrial bc1 Complex: A New Crystal Structure Reveals an AlteredIntramolecular Hydrogen-Bonding Pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-shar; Cobessi, David; Tung, Eric Y.; Berry, Edward A.

    2005-05-10

    Antimycin A (antimycin), one of the first known and most potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, binds to the quinone reduction site of the cytochrome bc1 complex.Structure-activity-relationship studies have shown that the N-formylamino-salicyl-amide group is responsible for most of the binding specificity, and suggested that a low pKa for the phenolic OH group and an intramolecular H-bond between that OH and the carbonyl O of the salicylamide linkage are important. Two previous X-ray structures of antimycin bound to vertebrate bc1 complex gave conflicting results. A new structure reported here of the bovine mitochondrial bc1 complex at 2.28Angstrom resolution with antimycin bound, allows us for the first time to reliably describe the binding of antimycin and shows that the intramolecular hydrogen bond described in solution and in the small-molecule structure is replaced by one involving the NH rather than carbonyl O of the amide linkage, with rotation of the amide group relative to the aromatic ring. The phenolic OH and formylamino N form H-bonds with conserved Asp228 of cyt b, and the formylamino O H-bonds via a water molecule to Lys227. A strong density the right size and shape for a diatomic molecule is found between the other side of the dilactone ring and the alpha-A helix.

  19. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien Pillet

    Full Text Available Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  20. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Flavien; Passot, Fanny Marie; Pasta, Franck; Anton Leberre, Véronique; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi) mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  1. Revealing Ligand Binding Sites and Quantifying Subunit Variants of Noncovalent Protein Complexes in a Single Native Top-Down FTICR MS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huilin; Wongkongkathep, Piriya; Van Orden, Steve L.; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R.; Loo, Joseph A.

    2014-12-01

    "Native" mass spectrometry (MS) has been proven to be increasingly useful for structural biology studies of macromolecular assemblies. Using horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (hADH) and yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (yADH) as examples, we demonstrate that rich information can be obtained in a single native top-down MS experiment using Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FTICR MS). Beyond measuring the molecular weights of the protein complexes, isotopic mass resolution was achieved for yeast ADH tetramer (147 kDa) with an average resolving power of 412,700 at m/z 5466 in absorption mode, and the mass reflects that each subunit binds to two zinc atoms. The N-terminal 89 amino acid residues were sequenced in a top-down electron capture dissociation (ECD) experiment, along with the identifications of the zinc binding site at Cys46 and a point mutation (V58T). With the combination of various activation/dissociation techniques, including ECD, in-source dissociation (ISD), collisionally activated dissociation (CAD), and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD), 40% of the yADH sequence was derived directly from the native tetramer complex. For hADH, native top-down ECD-MS shows that both E and S subunits are present in the hADH sample, with a relative ratio of 4:1. Native top-down ISD of the hADH dimer shows that each subunit (E and S chains) binds not only to two zinc atoms, but also the NAD/NADH ligand, with a higher NAD/NADH binding preference for the S chain relative to the E chain. In total, 32% sequence coverage was achieved for both E and S chains.

  2. Genomic and proteomic analyses of Prdm5 reveal interactions with insulator binding proteins in embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Giorgio Giacomo; Carrara, Matteo; Francavilla, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    PRDM proteins belong to the SET- domain protein family involved in the regulation of gene expression. Although few PRDM members possess histone methyltransferase activity, the molecular mechanisms by which the other members exert transcriptional regulation remain to be delineated. In this study, we...... find that Prdm5 is highly expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (mES) and exploit this cellular system to characterize molecular functions of Prdm5. By combining proteomics and next generation sequencing technologies we identify Prdm5 interaction partners and genomic occupancy. We demonstrate that......, despite Prdm5 is dispensable for mES cell maintenance, it directly targets genomic regions involved in early embryonic development and affects the expression of a subset of developmental regulators during cell differentiation. Importantly, Prdm5 interacts with Ctcf, Cohesin and TFIIIC and co...

  3. Properties of the Membrane Binding Component of Catechol-O-methyltransferase Revealed by Atomistic Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowski, A.; St-Pierre, J. F.; Magarkar, A.

    2011-01-01

    We used atomistic simulations to study the membrane-bound form of catechol-O-methyltransferase (MB-COMT). In particular we investigated the 26-residue transmembrane a-helical segment of MB-COMT together with the 24-residue fragment that links the transmembrane component to the main protein unit...... that was not included in our model. In numerous independent simulations we observed the formation of a salt bridge between ARC 27 and GLU40. The salt bridge closed the flexible loop that formed in the linker and kept it in the vicinity of the membrane-water interface. All simulations supported this conclusion...... that the linker has a clear affinity for the interface and preferentially arranges its residues to reside next to the membrane, without a tendency to relocate into the water phase. Furthermore, an extensive analysis of databases for sequences of membrane proteins that have a single transmembrane helical segment...

  4. Semiphenomenological studies of the ground state binding energies of hypernuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mian, M.

    1987-01-01

    We show that the binding energies of /sub Λ/ 5 He and p-shell hypernuclei can be satisfactorily explained in the folding model approach using a density dependent effective ΛN interaction. Our analysis predicts a very reasonable value of the range of the ΛN interaction. The calculated value of B/sub Λ/ of /sub Λ/ 7 Li using the cluster model density for 6 Li and the best fit parameters of this potential supports the view that 6 Li possesses an α-d cluster structure. Using this potential we also determine the average size parameter (a 0 ) of the oscillator shell model density of nucleons in Nnot =Z core nuclei from fitting the B/sub Λ/ values of the corresponding hypernuclei. The effect of different forms of density distribution of core nuclei on the values of potential parameters is investigated and is found to be very small. As regards the form of density dependence, a rho/sup 2/3/ form is found to be the most appropriate for this purpose and is used throughout this work. Other forms do not give a satisfactory account of the data

  5. Molecular binding of toxic phenothiazinium derivatives, azures to bovine serum albumin: A comparative spectroscopic, calorimetric, and in silico study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Somnath; Islam, Md Maidul; Jana, Gopal Chandra; Patra, Anirudha; Jha, Pradeep K; Hossain, Maidul

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the comparative binding behavior of antimalarial drug azure A, azure B and azure C with bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied. The interaction has been confirmed by multispectroscopic (UV, fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and circular dichroism) and molecular docking techniques. The experimental results show that azure B has the highest BSA binding affinity followed by azure A and azure C. The experimental evidence of binding showed a static quenching mechanism in the interaction azures with BSA. The isothermal titration calorimetry result reveals that the binding was exothermic with positive entropy contribution in each case. The thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS at 25°C were calculated, which indicates that the weak van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding rather than the hydrophobic effect played an important role in the interaction. According to the theory of Förster nonradiative energy transfer, the distance (r) between the donor (BSA) and acceptor azures found to be albumins. We hope, the outcome of this work will be most helpful for synthesizing a new type of phenothiazinium derivatives of the better therapeutic application. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Kang, Xiaohui [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Wu, Jing; Song, Chuanjun [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported.

  7. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Ruiyong; Kang, Xiaohui; Wang, Ruiqiang; Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Wu, Jing; Song, Chuanjun; Chang, Junbiao

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported

  8. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, Patricia A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I•C base pairs are functional analogs of A•T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure and electrochemical and DNA binding studies of oxygen bridged-copper(II) carboxylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Muhammad, Niaz; Shah, Naseer Ali; Sohail, Manzar; Pandarinathan, Vedapriya

    2015-08-01

    A new binuclear O-bridged Cu(II) complex with 4-chlorophenyl acetate and 2,2‧-bipyridine has been synthesized and characterized using FT-IR, powder and single crystal XRD and electrochemical solution studies. The results revealed that the two penta-coordinated Cu(II) centers are linked by two carboxylate ligands in end-on bonding fashion. The coordination geometry is slightly distorted square pyramidal (SP) with bridging oxygen atoms occupying the apical position and other ligands lying in the equatorial plane. The striking difference in Cu-O bond distance of the bridging oxygen atom in the complex may be responsible for the SP geometry of Cu(II) ion. The complex gave rise to metal centered irreversible electro-activity where one electron Cu(II)/Cu(III) oxidation process and a single step two electron Cu(II)/Cu(0) reduction process was observed. The redox processes were found predominantly adsorption controlled. The values of diffusion coefficient and heterogeneous rate constant for oxidation process were 6.98 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 and 4.60 × 10-5 cm s-1 while the corresponding values for reduction were 5.30 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 and 5.41 × 10-6 cm s-1, respectively. The formal potential and charge transfer coefficient were also calculated. The DNA-binding ability was explored through cyclic voltammetry and UV-Visible spectroscopy. Diminution in the value of Do for oxidation indicated the binding of the complex with DNA corresponding to Kb = 8.58 × 104 M-1. UV-Visible spectroscopy yielded ε = 49 L mol-1 cm-1 and Kb = 2.96 × 104 M-1. The data of both techniques support each other. The self-induced redox activation of the complex, as indicated by cyclic voltammetry heralds its potential applications in redox catalysis and anticancer activity.

  10. Dopamine receptors in the guinea-pig heart. A binding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandrini, M.; Benelli, A.; Baraldi, M.

    1984-01-01

    The binding of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists to guinea-pig myocardial membrane preparations was studied using 3 H-dopamine and 3 H-spiperone as radioligand. 3 H-Dopamine bound specifically to heart membranes while 3 H-spiperone did not. A Scatchard analysis of 3 H-dopamine binding showed a curvilinear plot indicating the presence of two dopamine receptor populations that we have termed high- (K/sub d/ = 1.2 nM, B/sub mx/ = 52.9 fmol/mg prot.) and low- (K/sub d/ = 11.8 nM, B/sub mx/ = 267.3 fmol/gm prot.) affinity binding sites, respectively. The charactization of the high-affinity component of 3 H-dopamine binding indicated that the binding is rapid, saturable, stereospecific, pH- and temperature-dependent, and displaced by dopaminergic agonists and antagonists known to act similarly in vivo. The finding that pretreatment with dibenamine (which has been described as an α-adrenoceptor irreversible blocker) did not affect the binding of dopamine to cardiac membrane preparations suggests that α-adrenoceptors and dopamine receptors have separate recognition sites in the heart. It is concluded that 3 H-dopamine binds to specific dopamine receptors in the heart of guinea-pigs

  11. Ferrocene-based guanidine derivatives: in vitro antimicrobial, DNA binding and docking supported urease inhibition studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Rukhsana; Rauf, Muhammad Khawar; Badshah, Amin; Azam, Syed Sikander; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Khan, Azim

    2014-10-06

    Some novel ferrocenyl guanidines 1-8 were synthesized and characterized by different spectroscopic methods, elemental analysis and single crystal X-rays diffraction techniques. The crystallographic studies revealed that the existence of the strong non-bonding interactions facilitate these molecules to interact with biological macro-molecules like DNA that described to inherit good biological activities. The DNA interaction studies carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and UV-visible spectroscopy are in close agreement with the binding constants (K) (0.79-5.4) × 10(5) (CV) and (0.72-5.1) × 10(5) (UV-vis). The shift in peak potential, current and absorption maxima of the studied ferrocenyl guanidines in the presence of DNA revealed that CV coupled with UV-vis spectroscopy could provide an opportune to characterize metal-based compounds-DNA interaction mechanism, a prerequisite for the design of new anticancer agents and understanding the molecular basis of their action. The compounds 1-8 have been screened for their antibacterial, antifungal and urease inhibition potency. A concurrent in silico study has also been applied on ferrocene moiety impregnated guanidines 1-8 to identify most active compounds having for inhibiting the activity of urease (pdb id 3LA4). Most of the compounds were found as potent inhibitors of urease and the compound 1 was found to be the most active with an IC50 of 16.83 ± 0.03 μM. The docking scores are in close agreement with the in vitro obtained IC50 values of inhibitors 1-8. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of cigarette smoke extract on thrombomodulin-thrombin binding: an atomic force microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yujie; Zhang, Xuejie; Xu, Li; Yi, Shaoqiong; Li, Yi; Fang, Xiaohong; Liu, Huiliang

    2012-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is a well-known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Smoking can cause vascular endothelial dysfunction and consequently trigger haemostatic activation and thrombosis. However, the mechanism of how smoking promotes thrombosis is not fully understood. Thrombosis is associated with the imbalance of the coagulant system due to endothelial dysfunction. As a vital anticoagulation cofactor, thrombomodulin (TM) located on the endothelial cell surface is able to regulate intravascular coagulation by binding to thrombin, and the binding results in thrombosis inhibition. This work focused on the effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on TM-thrombin binding by atomic force microscopy (AFM) based single-molecule force spectroscopy. The results from both in vitro and live-cell experiments indicated that CSE could notably reduce the binding probability of TM and thrombin. This study provided a new approach and new evidence for studying the mechanism of thrombosis triggered by cigarette smoking.

  13. Structures of human Golgi-resident glutaminyl cyclase and its complexes with inhibitors reveal a large loop movement upon inhibitor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Fa; Liaw, Su-Sen; Huang, Wei-Lin; Chia, Cho-Yun; Lo, Yan-Chung; Chen, Yi-Ling; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2011-04-08

    Aberrant pyroglutamate formation at the N terminus of certain peptides and proteins, catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases (QCs), is linked to some pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer disease. Recently, a glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitor, PBD150, was shown to be able to reduce the deposition of pyroglutamate-modified amyloid-β peptides in brain of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease, leading to a significant improvement of learning and memory in those transgenic animals. Here, we report the 1.05-1.40 Å resolution structures, solved by the sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing method, of the Golgi-luminal catalytic domain of the recently identified Golgi-resident QC (gQC) and its complex with PBD150. We also describe the high-resolution structures of secretory QC (sQC)-PBD150 complex and two other gQC-inhibitor complexes. gQC structure has a scaffold similar to that of sQC but with a relatively wider and negatively charged active site, suggesting a distinct substrate specificity from sQC. Upon binding to PBD150, a large loop movement in gQC allows the inhibitor to be tightly held in its active site primarily by hydrophobic interactions. Further comparisons of the inhibitor-bound structures revealed distinct interactions of the inhibitors with gQC and sQC, which are consistent with the results from our inhibitor assays reported here. Because gQC and sQC may play different biological roles in vivo, the different inhibitor binding modes allow the design of specific inhibitors toward gQC and sQC.

  14. Novel binding motif and new flexibility revealed by structural analyses of a pyruvate dehydrogenase-dihydrolipoyl acetyltransferase subcomplex from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-10-24

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Novel Binding Motif and New Flexibility Revealed by Structural Analyses of a Pyruvate Dehydrogenase-Dihydrolipoyl Acetyltransferase Subcomplex from the Escherichia coli Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Multienzyme Complex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wang, Junjie; Nemeria, Natalia S.; Reynolds, Shelley; Brown, Ian; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Calero, Guillermo; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex contains multiple copies of three enzymatic components, E1p, E2p, and E3, that sequentially carry out distinct steps in the overall reaction converting pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. Efficient functioning requires the enzymatic components to assemble into a large complex, the integrity of which is maintained by tethering of the displaced, peripheral E1p and E3 components to the E2p core through non-covalent binding. We here report the crystal structure of a subcomplex between E1p and an E2p didomain containing a hybrid lipoyl domain along with the peripheral subunit-binding domain responsible for tethering to the core. In the structure, a region at the N terminus of each subunit in the E1p homodimer previously unseen due to crystallographic disorder was observed, revealing a new folding motif involved in E1p-E2p didomain interactions, and an additional, unexpected, flexibility was discovered in the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex, both of which probably have consequences in the overall multienzyme complex assembly. This represents the first structure of an E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex involving a homodimeric E1p, and the results may be applicable to a large range of complexes with homodimeric E1 components. Results of HD exchange mass spectrometric experiments using the intact, wild type 3-lipoyl E2p and E1p are consistent with the crystallographic data obtained from the E1p-E2p didomain subcomplex as well as with other biochemical and NMR data reported from our groups, confirming that our findings are applicable to the entire E1p-E2p assembly. PMID:25210042

  16. The binding of cytochrome c to neuroglobin: A docking and surface plasmon resonance study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønding, Signe Helbo; Henty, K.; Dingley, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    is associated with a small unfavourable enthalpy change (1.9 kcal mol-1) and a moderately large, favourable entropy change (14.8 cal mol-1 deg-1). The sensitivity of the binding constant to the presence of salt suggests that the complex formation involves electrostatic interactions....... one major binding site for cytochrome c to neuroglobin. The results yield a plausible structure for the most likely complex structure in which the hemes of each protein are in close contact. NMR analysis identifies the formation of a weak complex in which the heme group of cytochrome c is involved....... surface plasmon resonance studies provide a value of 45 μM for the equilibrium constant for cytochrome c binding to neuroglobin, which increases significantly as the ionic strength of the solution increases. The temperature dependence of the binding constant indicates that the complex formation...

  17. Studies of the viral binding proteins of shrimp BP53, a receptor of white spot syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Xiao; Huang, Jie; Liang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The specific binding between viral attachment proteins (VAPs) of a virus and its cellular receptors on host cells mediates virus entry into host cells, which triggers subsequent viral infections. Previous studies indicate that F1 ATP synthase β subunit (named BP53), is found on the surface of shrimp cells and involved in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection by functioning as a potential viral receptor. Herein, in a far-western blotting assay, three WSSV proteins with molecular weights of 28 kDa, 37 kDa, and >50 kDa were found to interact with BP53. The 28 kDa and 37 kDa proteins were identified as the envelope protein VP28 and VP37 of WSSV respectively, which could be recognized by the polyclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent binding assays revealed that VP37 contributed to almost 80% of the binding capability for BP53 compared with the same amount of total WSSV protein. The relationship between BP53 and its complementary interacting protein, VP37, was visualized using a co-localization assay. Bound VP37 on the cell surface co-localized with BP53 and shared a similar subcellular location on the outer surface of shrimp cells. Pearson's correlation coefficients reached to 0.67 ± 0.05 and the Mander's overlap coefficients reached 0.70 ± 0.05, which indicated a strong relationship between the localization of BP53 and bound rVP37. This provides evidence for an interaction between BP53 and VP37 obtained at the molecular and cellular levels, supporting the hypothesis that BP53 serves as a receptor for WSSV by binding to VP37. The identification of the viral binding proteins of shrimp BP53 is helpful for better understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of WSSV to infect shrimp at the cellular level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Crystal complexes of a predicted S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferase reveal a typical AdoMet binding domain and a substrate recognition domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D.J.; Ouellette, N.; Evodokimova, E.; Savchenko, A.; Edwards, A.; Anderson, W.F. (Toronto); (NWU)

    2010-03-08

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases (MTs) are abundant, and highly conserved across phylogeny. These enzymes use the cofactor AdoMet to methylate a wide variety of molecular targets, thereby modulating important cellular and metabolic activities. Thermotoga maritima protein 0872 (TM0872) belongs to a large sequence family of predicted MTs, ranging phylogenetically from relatively simple bacteria to humans. The genes for many of the bacterial homologs are located within operons involved in cell wall synthesis and cell division. Despite preliminary biochemical studies in E. coli and B. subtilis, the substrate specificity of this group of more than 150 proteins is unknown. As part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics initiative (www.mcsg.anl.gov), we have determined the structure of TM0872 in complexes with AdoMet and with S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy). As predicted, TM0872 has a typical MT domain, and binds endogenous AdoMet, or co-crystallized AdoHcy, in a manner consistent with other known MT structures. In addition, TM0872 has a second domain that is novel among MTs in both its location in the sequence and its structure. The second domain likely acts in substrate recognition and binding, and there is a potential substrate-binding cleft spanning the two domains. This long and narrow cleft is lined with positively charged residues which are located opposite the S{sup +}-CH{sub 3} bond, suggesting that a negatively charged molecule might be targeted for catalysis. However, AdoMet and AdoHcy are both buried, and access to the methyl group would presumably require structural rearrangement. These TM0872 crystal structures offer the first structural glimpses at this phylogenetically conserved sequence family.

  19. Neutron scattering with deuterium labeling reveals the nature of complexes formed by Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and their regulatory targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering with deuterium labeling is extremely useful for studying the structures of complex biomolecular assemblies in solution. The different neutron scattering properties of their isotopes of hydrogen combines with the ability to uniformly label biomolecules with deuterium allow one to characterize the structures and relative dispositions of the individual components of an assembly using methods of {open_quotes}contrast variation.{close_quotes} We have applied these techniques to studies of the evolutionarily related dumbbell-shaped Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins calmodulin and troponin C and their interactions with the target proteins whose activities they regulate. Ca{sup 2+} is one of the simplest of nature`s messengers used in the communication pathways between physiological stimulus and cellular response. The signaling mechanism generally involves Ca{sup 2+} binding to a protein and inducing a conformational change that transmits a signal to modify the activity of a specific target protein. Ca{sup 2+} is thus important in the regulation of a diverse array of intracellular responses, including neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, the degradation of glycogen to glucose to generate energy, microtubule assembly, membrane phosphorylation, etc. It is the conformational language of the Ca{sup 2+} induced signal transduction that we have sought to understand because of its central importance to biochemical regulation and, hence, to healthy cellular function.

  20. Reveal genes functionally associated with ACADS by a network study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulong; Su, Zhiguang

    2015-09-15

    Establishing a systematic network is aimed at finding essential human gene-gene/gene-disease pathway by means of network inter-connecting patterns and functional annotation analysis. In the present study, we have analyzed functional gene interactions of short-chain acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase gene (ACADS). ACADS plays a vital role in free fatty acid β-oxidation and regulates energy homeostasis. Modules of highly inter-connected genes in disease-specific ACADS network are derived by integrating gene function and protein interaction data. Among the 8 genes in ACADS web retrieved from both STRING and GeneMANIA, ACADS is effectively conjoined with 4 genes including HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. The functional analysis is done via ontological briefing and candidate disease identification. We observed that the highly efficient-interlinked genes connected with ACADS are HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1. Interestingly, the ontological aspect of genes in the ACADS network reveals that ACADS, HAHDA and HADHB play equally vital roles in fatty acid metabolism. The gene ACAT1 together with ACADS indulges in ketone metabolism. Our computational gene web analysis also predicts potential candidate disease recognition, thus indicating the involvement of ACADS, HAHDA, HADHB, ECHS1 and ACAT1 not only with lipid metabolism but also with infant death syndrome, skeletal myopathy, acute hepatic encephalopathy, Reye-like syndrome, episodic ketosis, and metabolic acidosis. The current study presents a comprehensible layout of ACADS network, its functional strategies and candidate disease approach associated with ACADS network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  2. Binding and Translocation of Termination Factor Rho Studied at the Single-Molecule Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslover, Daniel J.; Fazal, Furqan M.; Mooney, Rachel A.; Landick, Robert; Block, Steven M.

    2012-01-01

    Rho termination factor is an essential hexameric helicase responsible for terminating 20–50% of all mRNA synthesis in E. coli. We used single- molecule force spectroscopy to investigate Rho-RNA binding interactions at the Rho- utilization (rut) site of the ? tR1 terminator. Our results are consistent with Rho complexes adopting two states, one that binds 57 ±2 nucleotides of RNA across all six of the Rho primary binding sites, and another that binds 85 ±2 nucleotides at the six primary sites plus a single secondary site situated at the center of the hexamer. The single-molecule data serve to establish that Rho translocates 5′-to-3′ towards RNA polymerase (RNAP) by a tethered-tracking mechanism, looping out the intervening RNA between the rut site and RNAP. These findings lead to a general model for Rho binding and translocation, and establish a novel experimental approach that should facilitate additional single- molecule studies of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:22885804

  3. Molecular modeling studies of novel retro-binding tripeptide active-site inhibitors of thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W F; Tabernero, L; Sack, J S; Iwanowicz, E J

    1995-08-01

    A novel series of retro-binding tripeptide thrombin active-site inhibitors was recently developed (Iwanowicz, E. I. et al. J. Med. Chem. 1994, 37, 2111(1)). It was hypothesized that the binding mode for these inhibitors is similar to that of the first three N-terminal residues of hirudin. This binding hypothesis was subsequently verified when the crystal structure of a member of this series, BMS-183,507 (N-[N-[N-[4-(Aminoiminomethyl)amino[-1-oxobutyl]-L- phenylalanyl]-L-allo-threonyl]-L-phenylalanine, methyl ester), was determined (Taberno, L.J. Mol. Biol. 1995, 246, 14). The methodology for developing the binding models of these inhibitors, the structure-activity relationships (SAR) and modeling studies that led to the elucidation of the proposed binding mode is described. The crystal structure of BMS-183,507/human alpha-thrombin is compared with the crystal structure of hirudin/human alpha-thrombin (Rydel, T.J. et al. Science 1990, 249,227; Rydel, T.J. et al. J. Mol Biol. 1991, 221, 583; Grutter, M.G. et al. EMBO J. 1990, 9, 2361) and with the computational binding model of BMS-183,507.

  4. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A. Bornholdt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics.

  5. Deletion of the Androgen Receptor in Adipose Tissue in Male Mice Elevates Retinol Binding Protein 4 and Reveals Independent Effects on Visceral Fat Mass and on Glucose Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Kerry J.; Smith, Lee B.; Hunger, Nicole I.; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Andrew, Ruth; Walker, Brian R.

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is epidemic in obese ageing males with type 2 diabetes, but the direction of causality remains unclear. Testosterone-deficient males and global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice are insulin resistant with increased fat, but it is unclear whether AR signaling in adipose tissue mediates body fat redistribution and alters glucose homoeostasis. To investigate this, mice with selective knockdown of AR in adipocytes (fARKO) were generated. Male fARKO mice on normal diet had reduced perigonadal fat but were hyperinsulinemic and by age 12 months, were insulin deficient in the absence of obesity. On high-fat diet, fARKO mice had impaired compensatory insulin secretion and hyperglycemia, with increased susceptibility to visceral obesity. Adipokine screening in fARKO mice revealed a selective increase in plasma and intra-adipose retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) that preceded obesity. AR activation in murine 3T3 adipocytes downregulated RBP4 mRNA. We conclude that AR signaling in adipocytes not only protects against high-fat diet–induced visceral obesity but also regulates insulin action and glucose homeostasis, independently of adiposity. Androgen deficiency in adipocytes in mice resembles human type 2 diabetes, with early insulin resistance and evolving insulin deficiency. PMID:22415878

  6. Genome-wide Comparative Analyses Reveal the Dynamic Evolution of Nucleotide-Binding Leucine-Rich Repeat Gene Family among Solanaceae Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunyoung Seo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Plants have evolved an elaborate innate immune system against invading pathogens. Within this system, intracellular nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR immune receptors are known play critical roles in effector-triggered immunity (ETI plant defense. We performed genome-wide identification and classification of NLR-coding sequences from the genomes of pepper, tomato, and potato using fixed criteria. We then compared genomic duplication and evolution features. We identified intact 267, 443, and 755 NLR-encoding genes in tomato, potato, and pepper genomes, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and classification of Solanaceae NLRs revealed that the majority of NLR super family members fell into 14 subgroups, including a TIR-NLR (TNL subgroup and 13 non-TNL subgroups. Specific subgroups have expanded in each genome, with the expansion in pepper showing subgroup-specific physical clusters. Comparative analysis of duplications showed distinct duplication patterns within pepper and among Solanaceae plants suggesting subgroup- or species-specific gene duplication events after speciation, resulting in divergent evolution. Taken together, genome-wide analyses of NLR family members provide insights into their evolutionary history in Solanaceae. These findings also provide important foundational knowledge for understanding NLR evolution and will empower broader characterization of disease resistance genes to be used for crop breeding.

  7. Talaromyces marneffei Genomic, Transcriptomic, Proteomic and Metabolomic Studies Reveal Mechanisms for Environmental Adaptations and Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K. P. Lau

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Talaromyces marneffei is a thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic infections in patients positive for HIV or other immunocompromised statuses. Analysis of its ~28.9 Mb draft genome and additional transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic studies revealed mechanisms for environmental adaptations and virulence. Meiotic genes and genes for pheromone receptors, enzymes which process pheromones, and proteins involved in pheromone response pathway are present, indicating its possibility as a heterothallic fungus. Among the 14 Mp1p homologs, only Mp1p is a virulence factor binding a variety of host proteins, fatty acids and lipids. There are 23 polyketide synthase genes, one for melanin and two for mitorubrinic acid/mitorubrinol biosynthesis, which are virulence factors. Another polyketide synthase is for biogenesis of the diffusible red pigment, which consists of amino acid conjugates of monascorubin and rubropunctatin. Novel microRNA-like RNAs (milRNAs and processing proteins are present. The dicer protein, dcl-2, is required for biogenesis of two milRNAs, PM-milR-M1 and PM-milR-M2, which are more highly expressed in hyphal cells. Comparative transcriptomics showed that tandem repeat-containing genes were overexpressed in yeast phase, generating protein polymorphism among cells, evading host’s immunity. Comparative proteomics between yeast and hyphal cells revealed that glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, up-regulated in hyphal cells, is an adhesion factor for conidial attachment.

  8. Pyrene–nucleobase conjugates: synthesis, oligonucleotide binding and confocal bioimaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Jabłoński

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pyrene–linker–nucleobase (nucleobase = thymine, adenine conjugates with carbonyl and hydroxy functionalities in the linker were synthesized and characterized. X-ray single-crystal structure analysis performed for the pyrene–C(OCH2CH2–thymine (2 conjugate reveals dimers of molecules 2 stabilized by hydrogen bonds between the thymine moieties. The photochemical characterization showed structure-dependent fluorescence properties of the investigated compounds. The conjugates bearing a carbonyl function represent weak emitters as compared to compounds with a hydroxy function in the linker. The self-assembly properties of pyrene nucleobases were investigated in respect to their binding to single and double strand oligonucleotides in water and in buffer solution. In respect to the complementary oligothymidine T10 template in water, compounds 3 and 5 both show a self-assembling behavior according to canonical base–base pairing. However, in buffer solution, derivative 5 was much more effective than 3 in binding to the T10 template. Furthermore the adenine derivative 5 binds to the double-stranded (dA10–T10 template with a self-assembly ratio of 112%. Such a high value of a self-assembly ratio can be rationalized by a triple-helix-like binding, intercalation, or a mixture of both. Remarkably, compound 5 also shows dual staining pattern in living HeLa cells. Confocal microscopy confirmed that 5 predominantly stains mitochondria but it also accumulates in the nucleoli of the cells.

  9. Interference of anaesthetics with radioligand binding in neuroreceptor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elfving, Betina; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Bjoernholm, Berith

    2003-01-01

    Evaluations of new emission tomography ligands are usually carried out in animals. In order to keep the animals in a restricted position during the scan session, anaesthesia is almost inevitable. In ex vivo rat studies we investigated the interference of ketamine/xylazine, zoletile mixture, isoflurane and halothane with the serotonin re-uptake site, the serotonin 2A receptor and the dopamine re-uptake site by use of [ 3 H]-(S)-citalopram, [ 18 F]altanserin and [ 125 I]PE2I, respectively. Ketamine/xylazine decreased the target-to-background ratio (mean ± SD) of [ 3 H]-(S)-citalopram from 1.5±0.19 to 0.81±0.19 (P 18 F]altanserin. The [ 125 I]PE2I target-to-background ratio decreased with both ketamine/xylazine (from 12.4±0.81 to 10.1±1.4, P<0.05) and isoflurane (from 12.4±0.81 to 9.5±1.1, P<0.05) treated rats, whereas treatment with zoletile mixture and halothane left the ratio unaltered. It is concluded that prior to performance of neuroreceptor radioligand studies, the possible interaction between radioligands and anaesthetics should be carefully evaluated. (orig.)

  10. Synthesis of schiff bases of pyridine-4-carbaldehyde and their antioxidant and DNA binding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, S.; Murtaza, S.; Nazar, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Schiff bases of pyridine-4-carbaldehyde with 3-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 4-aminobenzoic acid, 1,3-phenylenediamine, 1,2-phenylenediamine, 2-aminothiophenol, 4-aminoantipyrene, 2-aminophenol and naphthalene-1-amine was synthesized and compounds were characterized by FTIR, NMR and mass spectrometry. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their antioxidant and DNA binding interaction studies. DPPH scavenging method was used to evaluate the antioxidant activities of synthesized Schiff bases at six gradually increasing concentrations of 0.5-5mg/ml. 2-((pyridin-4-ylmethylidene)amino)phenol came out to be the most efficient antioxidant at a concentration of 4mg/ml with 74% inhibition of free radicals generated by DPPH. The DNA binding interaction of the synthesized Schiff bases was determined using UV-Vis absorption titration method. Both the hypochromic and hyperchromic effects were observed along the series. The values for the binding constant (K) and free energy change (G) were calculated and most of the Schiff bases have high positive K values which indicate the efficient binding of Schiff bases with DNA. Molecular docking studies as carried out using PatchDock molecular algorithm software also indicated the high values for geometrical shape complementarity score suggesting the stabilities of Schiff bases/DNA complex. Docking studies also suggested the minor groove binding of the Schiff bases with DNA. Drug-likeness of the synthesized compounds was also tested in silico and the results are accordingly discussed. (author)

  11. A new graphic plot analysis for determination of neuroreceptor binding in positron emission tomography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Yokoi, Takashi; Ikoma, Yoko; Shidahara, Miho; Seki, Chie; Naganawa, Mika; Takahashi, Hidehiko; Takano, Harumasa; Kimura, Yuichi; Ichise, Masanori; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    In positron emission tomography (PET) studies with radioligands for neuroreceptors, tracer kinetics have been described by the standard two-tissue compartment model that includes the compartments of nondisplaceable binding and specific binding to receptors. In the present study, we have developed a new graphic plot analysis to determine the total distribution volume (V(T)) and nondisplaceable distribution volume (V(ND)) independently, and therefore the binding potential (BP(ND)). In this plot, Y(t) is the ratio of brain tissue activity to time-integrated arterial input function, and X(t) is the ratio of time-integrated brain tissue activity to time-integrated arterial input function. The x-intercept of linear regression of the plots for early phase represents V(ND), and the x-intercept of linear regression of the plots for delayed phase after the equilibrium time represents V(T). BP(ND) can be calculated by BP(ND)=V(T)/V(ND)-1. Dynamic PET scanning with measurement of arterial input function was performed on six healthy men after intravenous rapid bolus injection of [(11)C]FLB457. The plot yielded a curve in regions with specific binding while it yielded a straight line through all plot data in regions with no specific binding. V(ND), V(T), and BP(ND) values calculated by the present method were in good agreement with those by conventional non-linear least-squares fitting procedure. This method can be used to distinguish graphically whether the radioligand binding includes specific binding or not.

  12. Interference of anaesthetics with radioligand binding in neuroreceptor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elfving, Betina; Knudsen, Gitte Moos [Neurobiology Research Unit N9201, University hospital Rigshospitalet, 9 Blegdamsvej, 2100, Copenhagen (Denmark); Bjoernholm, Berith [Department of Computational Chemistry, H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen-Valby (Denmark)

    2003-06-01

    Evaluations of new emission tomography ligands are usually carried out in animals. In order to keep the animals in a restricted position during the scan session, anaesthesia is almost inevitable. In ex vivo rat studies we investigated the interference of ketamine/xylazine, zoletile mixture, isoflurane and halothane with the serotonin re-uptake site, the serotonin{sub 2A} receptor and the dopamine re-uptake site by use of [{sup 3}H]-(S)-citalopram, [{sup 18}F]altanserin and [{sup 125}I]PE2I, respectively. Ketamine/xylazine decreased the target-to-background ratio (mean {+-} SD) of [{sup 3}H]-(S)-citalopram from 1.5{+-}0.19 to 0.81{+-}0.19 (P<0.05), whereas isoflurane and halothane increased the ratio from 1.5{+-}0.19 to 1.9{+-}0.24 and 2.1{+-}0.13 (P<0.05), respectively. Only with the zoletile mixture did the ratio remain unaltered. None of the tested anaesthetics affected the target-to-background ratio of [{sup 18}F]altanserin. The [{sup 125}I]PE2I target-to-background ratio decreased with both ketamine/xylazine (from 12.4{+-}0.81 to 10.1{+-}1.4, P<0.05) and isoflurane (from 12.4{+-}0.81 to 9.5{+-}1.1, P<0.05) treated rats, whereas treatment with zoletile mixture and halothane left the ratio unaltered. It is concluded that prior to performance of neuroreceptor radioligand studies, the possible interaction between radioligands and anaesthetics should be carefully evaluated. (orig.)

  13. Resonance energy transfer study on the proximity relationship between the GTP binding site and the rifampicin binding site of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.P.; Chatterji, D.

    1990-01-01

    Terbium(III) upon complexation with guanosine 5'-triphosphate showed remarkable enhancement of fluorescence emission at 488 and 545 nm when excited at 295 nm. Analysis of the binding data yielded a value for the mean K d between Tb(III) and GTP of 0.2 μM, with three binding sites for TB(III) on GTP. 31 P and 1 H NMR measurements revealed that Tb(III) mainly binds the phosphate moiety of GTP. Fluorescence titration of the emission signals of the TbGTP complex with varying concentrations of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase resulted in a K d values of 4 μM between the TbGTP and the enzyme. It was observed that TbGTP can be incorporated in the place of GTP during E. coli RNA polymerase catalyzed abortive synthesis of dinucleotide tetraphosphate at T7A2 promoter. Both the substrate TbGTP and the inhibitor of the initiation of transcription rifampicin bind to the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. This allows the measurement of the fluorescence excited-state energy transfer from the donor TbGTP-RNA polymerase to the acceptor rifampicin. Both emission bands of Tb(III) overlap with the rifampicin absorption, and the distances at 50% efficiency of energy transfer were calculated to be 28 and 24 angstrom for the 488- and 545-nm emission bands, respectively. The distance between the substrate binding site and the rifampicin binding site on the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase was measured to be around 30 angstrom. This suggest that the nature of inhibition of transcription by rifampicin is essentially noncompetitive with the substrate

  14. Binding of caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine with human serum albumin: A spectroscopic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhou, Qiu-Hua; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2009-12-01

    The interaction between three purine alkaloids (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using UV/vis absorption, circular dichroism (CD), fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques. The results revealed that three alkaloids caused the fluorescence quenching of HSA by the formation of alkaloid-HSA complex. The binding site number n and apparent binding constant KA, corresponding thermodynamic parameters the free energy change (Δ G), enthalpy change (Δ H), and entropy change (Δ S) at different temperatures were calculated. The hydrophobic interaction plays a major role in stabilizing the complex. The distance r between donor (HSA) and acceptor (alkaloids) was obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The effect of alkaloids on the conformation of HSA was analyzed using circular dichroism (CD), UV/vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra techniques.

  15. Epitope structure and binding affinity of single chain llama anti-β-amyloid antibodies revealed by proteolytic excision affinity-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraschiv, Gabriela; Vincke, Cécile; Czaplewska, Paulina; Manea, Marilena; Muyldermans, Serge; Przybylski, Michael

    2013-01-01

    ß-Amyloid (Aß) immunotherapy has become a promising strategy for reducing the level of Aß in brain. New immunological approaches have been recently proposed for rapid, early diagnosis, and molecular treatment of neurodegenerative diseases related to Alzheimer's Disease (AD). The combination of proteolytic epitope excision and extraction and mass spectrometry using digestion with various proteases has been shown to be an efficient tool for the identification and molecular characterization of antigenic determinants. Here, we report the identification of the Aβ epitope recognized by the variable domain of single chain llama anti-Aβ-antibodies, termed Aβ-nanobodies, that have been discovered in the blood of camelids and found to be promising candidates for immunotherapy of AD. The epitope recognized by two Aβ-specific nanobodies was identified by proteolytic epitope extraction- and excision-mass spectrometry using a series of proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, GluC-protease, and LysC-protease). Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization--mass spectrometric analysis of the affinity--elution fraction provided the epitope, Aβ(17-28), in the mid- to carboxy-terminal domain of Aβ, which has been shown to exert an Aß-fibril inhibiting effect. Affinity studies of the synthetic epitope confirmed that the Aβ(17-28) peptide is the minimal fragment that binds to the nanobodies. The interactions between the nanobodies and full length Aβ(1-40) or Aβ-peptides containing or lacking the epitope sequence were further characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and bioaffinity analysis. Determinations of binding affinities between the Aβ-nanobodies and Aβ(1-40) and the Aβ(17-28) epitope provided K(D) values of approximately 150 and 700 nmol, respectively. Thus, the knowledge of the epitope may be highly useful for future studies of Aβ-aggregation (oligomerization and fibril formation) and for designing new aggregation inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley

  16. c-MYC G-quadruplex binding by the RNA polymerase I inhibitor BMH-21 and analogues revealed by a combined NMR and biochemical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Loana; Mazzini, Stefania; Rossini, Anna; Castagnoli, Lorenzo; Scaglioni, Leonardo; Artali, Roberto; Di Nicola, Massimo; Zunino, Franco; Dallavalle, Sabrina

    2018-03-01

    Pyridoquinazolinecarboxamides have been reported as RNA polymerase I inhibitors and represent a novel class of potential antitumor agents. BMH-21, was reported to intercalate with GC-rich rDNA, resulting in nucleolar stress as a primary mechanism of cytotoxicity. The interaction of BMH-21 and analogues with DNA G-quadruplex structures was studied by NMR and molecular modelling. The cellular response was investigated in a panel of human tumor cell lines and protein expression was examined by Western Blot analysis. We explored the ability of BMH-21 and its analogue 2 to bind to G-quadruplex present in the c-MYC promoter, by NMR and molecular modelling studies. We provide evidence that both compounds are not typical DNA intercalators but are effective binders of the tested G-quadruplex. The interaction with c-MYC G-quadruplex was reflected in down-regulation of c-Myc expression in human tumor cells. The inhibitory effect was almost complete in lymphoma cells SUDHL4 characterized by overexpression of c-Myc protein. This downregulation reflected an early and persistent modulation of cMyc mRNA. Given the relevance of c-MYC in regulation of ribosome biogenesis, it is conceivable that the inhibition of c-MYC contributes to the perturbation of nuclear functions and RNA polymerase I activity. Similar experiments with CX-5461, another RNA polymerase I transcription inhibitor, indicate the same behaviour in G-quadruplex stabilization. Our results support the hypothesis that BMH-21 and analogue compounds share the same mechanism, i.e. G-quadruplex binding as a primary event of a cascade leading to inhibition of RNA polymerase I and apoptosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro DNA binding studies of lenalidomide using spectroscopic in combination with molecular docking techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Hu, Yan-Xi; Li, Yan-Cheng; Zhang, Li; Ai, Hai-Xin; Liu, Yu-Feng; Liu, Hong-Sheng

    2018-02-01

    In the present work, the binding interaction between lenalidomide (LEN) and calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was systematically studied by using fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies under imitated physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) coupled with molecular docking. It was found that LEN was bound to ct-DNA with high binding affinity (Ka = 2.308 × 105 M-1 at 283 K) through groove binding as evidenced by a slight decrease in the absorption intensity in combination with CD spectra. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG 0 and ΔS interaction. Furthermore, competitive binding experiments with ethidium bromide and 4‧, 6-dia-midino-2-phenylindoleas probes showed that LEN could preferentially bind in the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. The average lifetime of LEN was calculated to be 7.645 ns. The φ of LEN was measured as 0.09 and non-radiation energy transfer between LEN and DNA had occurred. The results of the molecular docking were consistent with the experimental results. This study explored the potential applicability of the spectroscopic properties of LEN and also investigated its interactions with relevant biological targets. In addition, it will provide some theoretical references for the deep research of simultaneous administration of LEN with other drugs.

  18. A semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation model for ion binding to ionizable surfaces: proton binding of carboxylated latex particles as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madurga, Sergio; Rey-Castro, Carlos; Pastor, Isabel; Vilaseca, Eudald; David, Calin; Garcés, Josep Lluís; Puy, Jaume; Mas, Francesc

    2011-11-14

    In this paper, we present a computer simulation study of the ion binding process at an ionizable surface using a semi-grand canonical Monte Carlo method that models the surface as a discrete distribution of charged and neutral functional groups in equilibrium with explicit ions modelled in the context of the primitive model. The parameters of the simulation model were tuned and checked by comparison with experimental titrations of carboxylated latex particles in the presence of different ionic strengths of monovalent ions. The titration of these particles was analysed by calculating the degree of dissociation of the latex functional groups vs. pH curves at different background salt concentrations. As the charge of the titrated surface changes during the simulation, a procedure to keep the electroneutrality of the system is required. Here, two approaches are used with the choice depending on the ion selected to maintain electroneutrality: counterion or coion procedures. We compare and discuss the difference between the procedures. The simulations also provided a microscopic description of the electrostatic double layer (EDL) structure as a function of pH and ionic strength. The results allow us to quantify the effect of the size of the background salt ions and of the surface functional groups on the degree of dissociation. The non-homogeneous structure of the EDL was revealed by plotting the counterion density profiles around charged and neutral surface functional groups. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  19. Chronic cobalt-induced epilepsy: noradrenaline ionophoresis and adrenoceptor binding studies in the rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bregman, B.; Le Saux, F.; Maurin, Y.; Trottier, S.; Chauvel, P.

    1985-01-01

    Several studies indicate that brain noradrenaline (NA) depletion facilitates the occurrence of epileptogenic syndromes in various animal models. In cobalt-induced epilepsy in the rat, seizure activity is associated with a cortical NA denervation. In order to search for cortical adrenoceptor modifications, inonophoretic studies and adrenoceptor binding assays were performed. At the period of maximal seizure activity, there was a significant supersensitivity of cortial neurons to the ionophoretic application of NA. An increase in the density of β-adrenoceptor binding sites was observed. No modification in α 1 - and α 2 -adrenoceptor binding sites was found. This suggests that in cobalt-induced epilepsy there is a denervation supersensitivity which rests on a selective involvement of β-adrenoceptors. (Author)

  20. Radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine receptors and PK (peripheral benzodiazepine) binding sites -current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, V.W.; Osman, S.; Shah, F.; Turton, D.R.; Waters, S.L.; Crouzel, C.; Nutt, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    The status of the radiochemical development and biological evaluation of radioligands for PET studies of central benzodiazepine (BZ) receptors and the so-called peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites, here discriminated and referred to as PK binding sites, is reviewed against current pharmacological knowledge, indicating those agents with present value and those with future potential. Practical recommendations are given for the preparation of two useful radioligands for PET studies, [N-methyl- 11 C]flumazenil for central BZ receptors, and [N-methyl- 11 C]PK 11195 for PK binding sites. Quality assurance and plasma metabolite analysis are also reviewed for these radioligands and practical recommendations are given on methodology for their performance. (Author)

  1. Conformational Dynamics of a Y-Family DNA Polymerase during Substrate Binding and Catalysis As Revealed by Interdomain F?rster Resonance Energy Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, Brian A.; Xu, Cuiling; Suo, Zucai

    2014-01-01

    Numerous kinetic, structural, and theoretical studies have established that DNA polymerases adjust their domain structures to enclose nucleotides in their active sites and then rearrange critical active site residues and substrates for catalysis, with the latter conformational change acting to kinetically limit the correct nucleotide incorporation rate. Additionally, structural studies have revealed a large conformational change between the apoprotein and the DNA?protein binary state for Y-fa...

  2. Understanding the physical and chemical nature of the warfarin drug binding site in human serum albumin: experimental and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is one of the major carrier proteins in the body and constitutes approximately half of the protein found in blood plasma. It plays an important role in lipid metabolism, and its ability to reversibly bind a large variety of pharmaceutical compounds makes it a crucial determinant of drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. This review deals with one of the protein's major binding sites "Sudlow I" which includes a binding pocket for the drug warfarin (WAR). The binding nature of this important site can be characterized by measuring the spectroscopic changes when a ligand is bound. Using several drugs, including WAR, and other drug-like molecules as ligands, the results emphasize the nature of Sudlow I as a flexible binding site, capable of binding a variety of ligands by adapting its binding pockets. The high affinity of the WAR pocket for binding versatile molecular structures stems from the flexibility of the amino acids forming the pocket. The binding site is shown to have an ionization ability which is important to consider when using drugs that are known to bind in Sudlow I. Several studies point to the important role of water molecules trapped inside the binding site in molecular recognition and ligand binding. Water inside the protein's cavity is crucial in maintaining the balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature of the binding site. Upon the unfolding and refolding of HSA, more water molecules are trapped inside the binding site which cause some swelling that prevents a full recovery from the denatured state. Better understanding of the mechanism of binding in macromolecules such as HSA and other proteins can be achieved by combining experimental and theoretical studies which produce significant synergies in studying complex biochemical phenomena.

  3. Surface Proteome Analysis of a Natural Isolate of Lactococcus lactis Reveals the Presence of Pili Able to Bind Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyrand, Mickael; Guillot, Alain; Goin, Mélodie; Furlan, Sylviane; Armalyte, Julija; Kulakauskas, Saulius; Cortes-Perez, Naima G.; Thomas, Ginette; Chat, Sophie; Péchoux, Christine; Dupres, Vincent; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Trugnan, Germain; Chapot-Chartier, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Surface proteins of Gram-positive bacteria play crucial roles in bacterial adhesion to host tissues. Regarding commensal or probiotic bacteria, adhesion to intestinal mucosa may promote their persistence in the gastro-intestinal tract and their beneficial effects to the host. In this study, seven Lactococcus lactis strains exhibiting variable surface physico-chemical properties were compared for their adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells. In this test, only one vegetal isolate TIL448 expressed a high-adhesion phenotype. A nonadhesive derivative was obtained by plasmid curing from TIL448, indicating that the adhesion determinants were plasmid-encoded. Surface-exposed proteins in TIL448 were analyzed by a proteomic approach consisting in shaving of the bacterial surface with trypsin and analysis of the released peptides by LC-MS/MS. As the TIL448 complete genome sequence was not available, the tryptic peptides were identified by a mass matching approach against a database including all Lactococcus protein sequences and the sequences deduced from partial DNA sequences of the TIL448 plasmids. Two surface proteins, encoded by plasmids in TIL448, were identified as candidate adhesins, the first one displaying pilin characteristics and the second one containing two mucus-binding domains. Inactivation of the pilin gene abolished adhesion to Caco-2 cells whereas inactivation of the mucus-binding protein gene had no effect on adhesion. The pilin gene is located inside a cluster of four genes encoding two other pilin-like proteins and one class-C sortase. Synthesis of pili was confirmed by immunoblotting detection of high molecular weight forms of pilins associated to the cell wall as well as by electron and atomic force microscopy observations. As a conclusion, surface proteome analysis allowed us to detect pilins at the surface of L. lactis TIL448. Moreover we showed that pili appendages are formed and involved in adhesion to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells

  4. Crystal structure of the thioesterification conformation of Bacillus subtilis o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase reveals a distinct substrate-binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yaozong; Li, Tin Lok; Lin, Xingbang; Li, Xin; Li, Xiang David; Guo, Zhihong

    2017-07-21

    o -Succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase (MenE) is an essential enzyme in bacterial vitamin K biosynthesis and an important target in the development of new antibiotics. It is a member of the adenylating enzymes (ANL) family, which reconfigure their active site in two different active conformations, one for the adenylation half-reaction and the other for a thioesterification half-reaction, in a domain-alternation catalytic mechanism. Although several aspects of the adenylating mechanism in MenE have recently been uncovered, its thioesterification conformation remains elusive. Here, using a catalytically competent Bacillus subtilis mutant protein complexed with an OSB-CoA analogue, we determined MenE high-resolution structures to 1.76 and 1.90 Å resolution in a thioester-forming conformation. By comparison with the adenylation conformation, we found that MenE's C-domain rotates around the Ser-384 hinge by 139.5° during domain-alternation catalysis. The structures also revealed a thioesterification active site specifically conserved among MenE orthologues and a substrate-binding mode distinct from those of many other acyl/aryl-CoA synthetases. Of note, using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified several residues that specifically contribute to the thioesterification half-reaction without affecting the adenylation half-reaction. Moreover, we observed a substantial movement of the activated succinyl group in the thioesterification half-reaction. These findings provide new insights into the domain-alternation catalysis of a bacterial enzyme essential for vitamin K biosynthesis and of its adenylating homologues in the ANL enzyme family. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Synthesis and receptor binding studies of (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, D.J.; Ciliax, B.J.; Van Dort, M.E.; Gildersleeve, D.; Pirat, J.L.; Young, A.B.; Wieland, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The glutamate analogue N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) binds to a subset of glutamate receptors that are coupled to a voltage-sensitive cation channel. This NMDA-linked channel is the likely binding locus of the potent anticonvulsant MK-801. To develop single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) probes of this brain channel, we synthesized (+/)1-iodo-MK-801 and (+/-)1-[ 125 I]iodo-MK-801. The effect of (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801 on ligand binding to the NMDA-linked glutamate receptor site was assessed using a rat brain homogenate assay. (+/-)1-Iodo-MK-801 displaced the dissociative anesthetic ligand [ 3 H]N-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine ([ 3 H]TCP) binding with an IC50 of 1 microM, which is a 10-fold lower binding affinity than that of (+/-)MK-801. In in vivo autoradiographic studies, (+/-)MK-801 failed to block selective uptake of (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801 in rat brain. These results suggest that (+/-)1-iodo-MK-801 may not be a suitable ligand for mapping NMDA-linked glutamate receptor channels

  6. Serotonin transporter binding in the hypothalamus correlates negatively with tonic heat pain ratings in healthy subjects: A [11C]DASB PET study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kupers, Ron; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Erritzoe, David

    2010-01-01

    There is a large body of evidence that the serotonergic system plays an important role in the transmission and regulation of pain. Here we used positron emission tomography (PET) with the serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer [11C]DASB to study the relationship between SERT binding in the brain and....... The negative correlation between SERT binding in the hypothalamus and insula with tonic pain ratings suggests a possible serotonergic control of the role of these areas in the modulation or in the affective appreciation of pain.......) tonic noxious heat stimulus. PET data were analyzed using both volume-of-interest (VOI) and voxel-based approaches. VOI analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between tonic pain ratings and SERT binding in the hypothalamus (r = −0.59; p = 0.008), a finding confirmed by the parametric...... analysis. The parametric analysis also revealed a negative correlation between tonic pain ratings and SERT binding in the right anterior insula. Measures of regional SERT binding did not correlate with pain threshold or with responses to short phasic suprathreshold phasic heat stimuli. Finally, the VOI...

  7. Studies of the Interaction between Isoimperatorin and Human Serum Albumin by Multispectroscopic Method: Identification of Possible Binding Site of the Compound Using Esterase Activity of the Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Ranjbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoimperatorin is one of the main components of Prangos ferulacea as a linear furanocoumarin and used as anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antispasmodic, and anticancer drug. Human serum albumin (HSA is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Since the carrying of drug by HSA may affect on its structure and action, we decided to investigate the interaction between HSA and isoimperatorin using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy. Fluorescence data indicated that isoimperatorin quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of the HSA via a static mechanism and hydrophobic interaction play the major role in the drug binding. The binding average distance between isoimperatorin and Trp 214 of HSA was estimated on the basis of the theory of Förster energy transfer. Decrease of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH was also documented upon isoimperatorin binding. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Site marker compettive and fluorescence experiments revealed that the binding of isoimperatorin to HSA occurred at or near site I. Finally, the binding details between isoimperatorin and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking and esterase activity inhibition studies which revealed that drug was bound at subdomain IIA.

  8. A novel comparative pattern count analysis reveals a chronic ethanol-induced dynamic shift in immediate early NF-κB genome-wide promoter binding during liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttippurathu, Lakshmi; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2016-03-01

    Liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy is a clinically important process that is impaired by adaptation to chronic alcohol intake. We focused on the initial time points following partial hepatectomy (PHx) to analyze the genome-wide binding activity of NF-κB, a key immediate early regulator. We investigated the effect of chronic alcohol intake on immediate early NF-κB genome-wide localization, in the adapted state as well as in response to partial hepatectomy, using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by promoter microarray analysis. We found many ethanol-specific NF-κB binding target promoters in the ethanol-adapted state, corresponding to the regulation of biosynthetic processes, oxidation-reduction and apoptosis. Partial hepatectomy induced a diet-independent shift in NF-κB binding loci relative to the transcription start sites. We employed a novel pattern count analysis to exhaustively enumerate and compare the number of promoters corresponding to the temporal binding patterns in ethanol and pair-fed control groups. The highest pattern count corresponded to promoters with NF-κB binding exclusively in the ethanol group at 1 h post PHx. This set was associated with the regulation of cell death, response to oxidative stress, histone modification, mitochondrial function, and metabolic processes. Integration with the global gene expression profiles to identify putative transcriptional consequences of NF-κB binding patterns revealed that several of ethanol-specific 1 h binding targets showed ethanol-specific differential expression through 6 h post PHx. Motif analysis yielded co-incident binding loci for STAT3, AP-1, CREB, C/EBP-β, PPAR-γ and C/EBP-α, likely participating in co-regulatory modules with NF-κB in shaping the immediate early response to PHx. We conclude that adaptation to chronic ethanol intake disrupts the NF-κB promoter binding landscape with consequences for the immediate early gene regulatory response to the acute challenge of PHx.

  9. Short term memory for single surface features and bindings in ageing: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Valeria; Molteni, Federica; Mapelli, Cristina; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    In the present study we replicated a previous experiment investigating visuo-spatial short term memory binding in young and older healthy individuals, in the attempt to verify the pattern of impairment that can be observed in normal elderly for short term memory for single items vs short term memory for bindings. Assessing a larger sample size (25 young and 25 older subjects), using a more appropriate measure of accuracy for a change detection task (A'), and adding the evaluation of speed of performance, we confirmed that old normals show a decline in short term memory for bindings of shape and colour that is of comparable extent, and not major, to the decline in memory for single shapes and single colours. The absence of a specific deficit of short term memory for conjunctions of surface features seems to distinguish cognitive ageing from Alzheimer's Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Seeking for Non-Zinc-Binding MMP-2 Inhibitors: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ammazzalorso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are an important family of zinc-containing enzymes with a central role in many physiological and pathological processes. Although several MMP inhibitors have been synthesized over the years, none reached the market because of off-target effects, due to the presence of a zinc binding group in the inhibitor structure. To overcome this problem non-zinc-binding inhibitors (NZIs have been recently designed. In a previous article, a virtual screening campaign identified some hydroxynaphtyridine and hydroxyquinoline as MMP-2 non-zinc-binding inhibitors. In the present work, simplified analogues of previously-identified hits have been synthesized and tested in enzyme inhibition assays. Docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out to rationalize the activity data.

  11. Iron hexacyanide/cytochrome-C - intramolecular electron transfer and binding constants - (pulse radiolytic study). Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilan, Y.; Shafferman, A.

    Internal oxidation and reduction rates of horse cytochrome-c in the complexes, CII.Fe/sup III/(CN) -3 6 and CIII.Fe/sup II/(CN) -4 6 , are 4.6.10 4 s -1 and 3.3.10 2 s -1 , respectively. The binding sites of the iron hexacyanide ions on either CII or CIII are kinetically almost indistinguishable; binding constants range from 0.87.10 3 to 2.10 3 M -1 . The present pulse radiolytic kinetic data are compared with that from N.M.R, T-jump and equilibrium dialysis studies

  12. Study on the thermodynamics of the binding of iminium and alkanolamine forms of the anticancer agent sanguinarine to human serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, Maidul; Khan, Asma Yasmeen; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Energetics of sanguinarine–human serum albumin has been elucidated. ► The alkanolamine binds stronger than iminium. ► Enthalpy driven binding for iminium was revealed. ► Alkanolamine form binding was favored by negative enthalpy and entropy changes. ► Spectroscopic results support calorimetry data. - Abstract: Sanguinarine is an anticancer plant alkaloid that can exist in the charged iminium and neutral alkanolamine forms. The thermodynamics of the interaction of the two forms with human serum albumin was investigated using calorimetric techniques, and the data supplemented with circular dichroism and spectrofluorimetric studies. The thermodynamic results show that there is only one class of binding for sanguinarine on HSA. The equilibrium constant was four times higher for the alkanolamine (K a = 2.18 · 10 5 M −1 ) than for iminium (K a = 5.97 · 10 4 M −1 ). The binding was enthalpy driven for iminium and favoured by both a negative enthalpy and a stronger favourable entropy contribution for the alkanolamine. Temperature dependent calorimetric data yielded values of ΔC p ∘ that are consistent with the involvement of different molecular forces in the complexation of the two forms of sanguinarine to HSA. The fluorescence quenching data suggest a static quenching mechanism. Synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroic data are consistent with a conformational change in the protein on binding that was also higher for the alkanolamine form.

  13. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...

  14. A phylogenetic study of SPBP and RAI1: evolutionary conservation of chromatin binding modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Darvekar

    Full Text Available Our genome is assembled into and array of highly dynamic nucleosome structures allowing spatial and temporal access to DNA. The nucleosomes are subject to a wide array of post-translational modifications, altering the DNA-histone interaction and serving as docking sites for proteins exhibiting effector or "reader" modules. The nuclear proteins SPBP and RAI1 are composed of several putative "reader" modules which may have ability to recognise a set of histone modification marks. Here we have performed a phylogenetic study of their putative reader modules, the C-terminal ePHD/ADD like domain, a novel nucleosome binding region and an AT-hook motif. Interactions studies in vitro and in yeast cells suggested that despite the extraordinary long loop region in their ePHD/ADD-like chromatin binding domains, the C-terminal region of both proteins seem to adopt a cross-braced topology of zinc finger interactions similar to other structurally determined ePHD/ADD structures. Both their ePHD/ADD-like domain and their novel nucleosome binding domain are highly conserved in vertebrate evolution, and construction of a phylogenetic tree displayed two well supported clusters representing SPBP and RAI1, respectively. Their genome and domain organisation suggest that SPBP and RAI1 have occurred from a gene duplication event. The phylogenetic tree suggests that this duplication has happened early in vertebrate evolution, since only one gene was identified in insects and lancelet. Finally, experimental data confirm that the conserved novel nucleosome binding region of RAI1 has the ability to bind the nucleosome core and histones. However, an adjacent conserved AT-hook motif as identified in SPBP is not present in RAI1, and deletion of the novel nucleosome binding region of RAI1 did not significantly affect its nuclear localisation.

  15. Structural, stability, dynamic and binding properties of the ALS-causing T46I mutant of the hVAPB MSP domain as revealed by NMR and MD simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shixiong Lua

    Full Text Available T46I is the second mutation on the hVAPB MSP domain which was recently identified from non-Brazilian kindred to cause a familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Here using CD, NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations, we characterized the structure, stability, dynamics and binding capacity of the T46I-MSP domain. The results reveal: 1 unlike P56S which we previously showed to completely eliminate the native MSP structure, T46I leads to no significant disruption of the native secondary and tertiary structures, as evidenced from its far-UV CD spectrum, as well as Cα and Cβ NMR chemical shifts. 2 Nevertheless, T46I does result in a reduced thermodynamic stability and loss of the cooperative urea-unfolding transition. As such, the T46I-MSP domain is more prone to aggregation than WT at high protein concentrations and temperatures in vitro, which may become more severe in the crowded cellular environments. 3 T46I only causes a 3-fold affinity reduction to the Nir2 peptide, but a significant elimination of its binding to EphA4. 4 EphA4 and Nir2 peptide appear to have overlapped binding interfaces on the MSP domain, which strongly implies that two signaling networks may have a functional interplay in vivo. 5 As explored by both H/D exchange and MD simulations, the MSP domain is very dynamic, with most loop residues and many residues on secondary structures highly fluctuated or/and exposed to bulk solvent. Although T46I does not alter overall dynamics, it does trigger increased dynamics of several local regions of the MSP domain which are implicated in binding to EphA4 and Nir2 peptide. Our study provides the structural and dynamic understanding of the T46I-causing ALS; and strongly highlights the possibility that the interplay of two signaling networks mediated by the FFAT-containing proteins and Eph receptors may play a key role in ALS pathogenesis.

  16. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I.

    2014-01-01

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented

  17. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  18. Substrate and cofactor binding to nitrile reductase : A mass spectrometry based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gjonaj, L.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Fernandez Fueyo, E.; Hollmann, F.; Hanefeld, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrile reductases catalyse a two-step reduction of nitriles to amines. This requires the binding of two NADPH molecules during one catalytic cycle. For the nitrile reductase from E. coli (EcoNR) mass spectrometry studies of the catalytic mechanism were performed. EcoNR is dimeric and has no Rossman

  19. A model for the study of electrostatic binding between a pair of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model for the study of electrostatic binding between a pair of molecules at large distances. A Umar, G Hussin. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research Vol 5 2000: 1-9. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  20. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ontko, Alyn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a 13C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  1. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting...

  2. Studies on folate binding and a radioassay for serum and whole-blood folate using goat milk as binding agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piyasena, R.D.; Weerasekera, D.A.; Hettiaratchi, N.; Wikramanayake, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Preparations of cow, goat, buffalo and human milk in addition to pig plasma were tested for folate binding properties. Of these, only pig plasma and goat milk showed sufficient binding to enable them to be used as binding agents in a radioassay for serum and whole-blood folate. The binding of folate by cow milk preparations in particular was found to be very poor. Goat milk was preferred to pig plasma as a binder for folate radioassay for reasons of convenience, economy and greater stability, and because pteroylglutamic acid (PGA) can be used both as tracer and standard. Where pig plasma is used with the inclusion of folate-free serum in the standard tubes, differences were observed between the standard and serum blanks which themselves varied from sample to sample. By contrast, with goat milk, all blank readings were normally 3% or less. Five out of eight samples of goat milk were seen to contain 'releasing factor' necessary to liberate folate from endogenous binder (FABP). Where present, the factor was found to be stable for at least three months when the partially purified milk was stored freeze dried at 4 0 C. Goat milk binder was found unable to distinguish between PGA and methyltetrahydrofolic acid (MTFA) at pH9.3. This enabled PGA rather than the more unstable MTFA to be used as tracer and standard. The assay employs a one-step incubation procedure at room temperature. It is sensitive to about 0.1 ng of PGA and is reproducible to less than 5% variation. The mean % recovery of inactive added folate was 101+-4%. (author)

  3. Studies on the digitalis binding site in Na, K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; McParland, R.; Becker, R.; From, A.; Schimerlik, M.; Fullerton, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    Na, K-ATPase is believed to be the receptor for digitalis glycosides. The authors have previously documented that C17 side group of the cardenolide molecule is crucial to α subunit receptor binding. They have attempted to identify the structure of this binding site by labelling the enzyme with a 3 H-labelled photoactive probe localized in the C17 side group of the genin molecule. 3 H-α-subunit was purified and subjected to tryptic digestion. The digest was fractionated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Fractions containing 3 H-labelled peptide were pooled and rechromatographed. The central peak fractions of 3 H-peptide were pooled, analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. The tryptic peptide containing the 3 H-probe showed considerable sequence heterogeneity. Comparison of the sequence data with the published cDNA-based α-subunit sequence revealed that this peptide material was indeed a mixture of two tryptic peptides of nearly identical size containing the sequences from residue 68 through residue 146, and residues 263 through 342. The latter peptide contains the sequence ... glu tyr thr try leu glu ... speculated by Shull et al. as a possible ouabain binding site

  4. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  5. Towards accurate free energy calculations in ligand protein-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrecher, Thomas; Labahn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Cells contain a multitude of different chemical reaction paths running simultaneously and quite independently next to each other. This amazing feat is enabled by molecular recognition, the ability of biomolecules to form stable and specific complexes with each other and with their substrates. A better understanding of this process, i.e. of the kinetics, structures and thermodynamic properties of biomolecule binding, would be invaluable in the study of biological systems. In addition, as the mode of action of many pharmaceuticals is based upon their inhibition or activation of biomolecule targets, predictive models of small molecule receptor binding are very helpful tools in rational drug design. Since the goal here is normally to design a new compound with a high inhibition strength, one of the most important thermodynamic properties is the binding free energy DeltaG(0). The prediction of binding constants has always been one of the major goals in the field of computational chemistry, because the ability to reliably assess a hypothetical compound's binding properties without having to synthesize it first would save a tremendous amount of work. The different approaches to this question range from fast and simple empirical descriptor methods to elaborate simulation protocols aimed at putting the computation of free energies onto a solid foundation of statistical thermodynamics. While the later methods are still not suited for the screenings of thousands of compounds that are routinely performed in computational drug design studies, they are increasingly put to use for the detailed study of protein ligand interactions. This review will focus on molecular mechanics force field based free energy calculations and their application to the study of protein ligand interactions. After a brief overview of other popular methods for the calculation of free energies, we will describe recent advances in methodology and a variety of exemplary studies of molecular dynamics

  6. In silico analysis reveals sequential interactions and protein conformational changes during the binding of chemokine CXCL-8 to its receptor CXCR1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Je-Wen Liou

    Full Text Available Chemokine CXCL-8 plays a central role in human immune response by binding to and activate its cognate receptor CXCR1, a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family. The full-length structure of CXCR1 is modeled by combining the structures of previous NMR experiments with those from homology modeling. Molecular docking is performed to search favorable binding sites of monomeric and dimeric CXCL-8 with CXCR1 and a mutated form of it. The receptor-ligand complex is embedded into a lipid bilayer and used in multi ns molecular dynamics (MD simulations. A multi-steps binding mode is proposed: (i the N-loop of CXCL-8 initially binds to the N-terminal domain of receptor CXCR1 driven predominantly by electrostatic interactions; (ii hydrophobic interactions allow the N-terminal Glu-Leu-Arg (ELR motif of CXCL-8 to move closer to the extracellular loops of CXCR1; (iii electrostatic interactions finally dominate the interaction between the N-terminal ELR motif of CXCL-8 and the EC-loops of CXCR1. Mutation of CXCR1 abrogates this mode of binding. The detailed binding process may help to facilitate the discovery of agonists and antagonists for rational drug design.

  7. Autolytic Activity and Plasma Binding Study of Aap, a Novel Minor Autolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramina Mahboobi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pneumococcal autolysins are enzymes involved in cell wall turnover and cellular division physiologically. They have been found to be involved in the pneumococcus pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to identify the autolytic activity of Spr1754 as a novel protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Moreover, the binding of the recombinant protein to plasma proteins was also determined. The spr1754 gene was amplified by PCR and cloned into the pET21a(+ prokaryotic expression vector. The constructed pET21a(+/spr1754 recombinant plasmid was transformed into E. coli Origami (DE3 and induced using IPTG. The recombinant protein of Spr1754 was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis using anti-His tag monoclonal antibody. Autolytic activity and the ability of the recombinant protein in binding to plasma proteins were performed using zymogram analysis and western blot, respectively. The spr1754 with expected size was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli Origami (DE3, successfully. After purification of the Spr1754 recombinant protein, the autolytic activity was observed by zymography. Of the four plasma proteins used in this study, binding of lactoferrin to Spr1754 recombinant protein was shown. The Spr1754 recombinant protein has a bifunctional activity, i.e., as being autolysin and lactoferrin binding and designated as Aap (autolytic/ adhesion/ pneumococcus. Nevertheless, characterization of the Aap needs to be followed using gene inactivation and cell wall localization.

  8. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and cytotoxicity studies of two anthraquinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholivand, M B; Kashanian, S; Peyman, H

    2012-02-15

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) with two anthraquinones including quinizarin (1,4-dihydroxy anthraquinone) and danthron (1,8-dihydroxy anthraquinone) in a mixture of 0.04M Brittone-Robinson buffer and 50% of ethanol were studied at physiological pH by spectrofluorometric and cyclic voltammetry techniques. The former technique was used to calculate the binding constants of anthraquinones-DNA complexes at different temperatures. Thermodynamic study indicated that the reactions of both anthraquinone-DNA systems are predominantly entropically driven. Furthermore, the binding mechanisms on the reaction of the two anthraquinones with DNA and the effect of ionic strength on the fluorescence property of the system have also been investigated. The results of the experiments indicated that the binding modes of quinizarin and danthron with DNA were evaluated to be groove binding. Moreover, the cytotoxic activity of both compounds against human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cell line and DNA cleavage were investigated. The results indicated that these compounds slightly cleavage pUC18 plasmid DNA and showed minor antitumor activity against K562 (human chronic myeloid leukemia) cell line. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mathematics Teachers' Views of Accountability Testing Revealed through Lesson Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarema, Connie H.

    2010-01-01

    The practice of lesson study, a professional development model originating in Japan, aligns well with recommendations from research for teacher professional development. Lesson study is also an inductive research method that uncovers student thinking and, in parallel, grants teacher-educators the opportunity to study teachers' thinking about…

  10. Binding of Bisphenol-F, a bisphenol analogue, to calf thymus DNA by multi-spectroscopic and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Afia; Ahmad, Masood

    2017-08-01

    BPF (Bisphenol-F), a member of the bisphenol family, having a wide range of industrial applications is gradually replacing Bisphenol-A. It is a recognized endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC). EDCs have been implicated in increased incidences of breast, prostate and testis cancers besides diabetes, obesity and decreased fertility. Due to the adverse effects of EDCs on human health, attempts have been directed towards their mechanism of toxicity especially at the molecular level. Hence, to understand the mechanism at the DNA level, interaction of BPF with calf thymus DNA was studied employing multi-spectroscopic, voltammetric and molecular docking techniques. Fluorescence spectra, cyclic voltammetry (CV), circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking studies of BPF with DNA were suggestive of minor groove binding of BPF. UV-visible absorption and fluorescence spectra suggested static quenching due to complex formation between BPF and ctDNA. Hoechst 33258 (HO) and ethidium bromide (EB) displacement studies further confirmed such mode of BPF interaction. Thermodynamic and molecular docking parameters revealed the mechanism of binding of BPF with ctDNA to be favorable and spontaneous due to negative ΔG and occurring through hydrogen bonds and van der waals interactions. BPF induced DNA cleavage under in vitro conditions by plasmid nicking assay suggested it to be genotoxic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-spectroscopic studies on the interaction of human serum albumin with astilbin: Binding characteristics and structural analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin; Li, Shuang; Peng, Xialian; Yu, Qing [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China); Bian, Hedong, E-mail: gxnuchem312@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China); Huang, Fuping [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China); Liang, Hong, E-mail: lianghongby@yahoo.com.cn [Key Laboratory for the Chemistry and Molecular Engineering of Medicinal Resources, Department Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Ministry of Education of China, Guilin 541004 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Five spectroscopic techniques were used to investigate the interaction of astilbin (ASN) with human serum albumin (HSA). UV–vis absorption measurements prove that ASN–HSA complex can be formed. The analysis of fluorescence spectra reveal that in the presence of ASN, quenching mechanism of HSA is considered as static quenching. The quenching rate constant k{sub q}, K{sub SV} and the binding constant K were estimated. According to the van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔΗ) and entropy change (ΔS) were calculated to be −12.94 kJ mol{sup −1} and 35.92 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. These indicate that the hydrophobic interaction is the major forces between ASN and HSA, but the hydrogen bond interaction cannot be excluded. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA which was induced by ASN were determined by circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. -- Graphical abstract: In this paper, the interaction of HSA with ASN was systematically studied under simulated physiological conditions by using UV–vis absorption, CD, FT-IR, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopic approaches. The quenching constant k{sub q}, K{sub SV} and the binding constant K were estimated. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA were studied by Circular dichroism (CD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The UV–visible absorption spectra of HSA in the absence and presence of different concentration of ASN (1) and fluorescence spectra of HSA in the absence and the presence of ASN (2). Highlights: ► Interaction of ASN and HSA has been studied by five spectroscopic techniques. ► Hydrophobic interaction is the major forces between ASN and HSA. ► Binding of ASN induced the changes in the secondary structure of HSA.

  12. Understanding binding affinity : A combined isothermal titration calorimetry/molecular dynamics study of the binding of a series of hydrophobically modified benzamidinium chloride inhibitors to trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talhout, Reinskje; Villa, Alessandra; Mark, AE; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    The binding of a series of p-alkylbenzamidinium chloride inhibitors to the serine proteinase trypsin over a range of temperatures has been studied using isothermal titration (micro)calorimetry and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The inhibitors have small structural variations at the para

  13. Study Reveals Brain Biology behind Self-Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    A new neuroscience twist on a classic psychology study offers some clues to what makes one student able to buckle down for hours of homework before a test while his classmates party. The study published in the September 2011 edition of "Proceedings of the National Academy of Science," suggests environmental cues may "hijack" the brain's mechanisms…

  14. A matrix-focused structure-activity and binding site flexibility study of quinolinol inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William A; Vieira, Rebecca C; Ensel, Susan M; Montgomery, Vicki; Guernieri, Rebecca; Eccard, Vanessa S; Campbell, Yvette; Roxas-Duncan, Virginia; Cardellina, John H; Webb, Robert P; Smith, Leonard A

    2017-02-01

    Our initial discovery of 8-hydroxyquinoline inhibitors of BoNT/A and separation/testing of enantiomers of one of the more active leads indicated considerable flexibility in the binding site. We designed a limited study to investigate this flexibility and probe structure-activity relationships; utilizing the Betti reaction, a 36 compound matrix of quinolinol BoNT/A LC inhibitors was developed using three 8-hydroxyquinolines, three heteroaromatic amines, and four substituted benzaldehydes. This study has revealed some of the most effective quinolinol-based BoNT/A inhibitors to date, with 7 compounds displaying IC 50 values ⩽1μM and 11 effective at ⩽2μM in an ex vivo assay. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Comparative studies of human and chicken retinol-binding proteins and prealbumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopelman, M; Mokady, S; Cogan, U

    1976-08-09

    Microheterogeneity of retinol-binding proteins of human plasma and urine, and of chicken plasma was studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. All three protein systems were found microheterogenous. Incorporation of retinol into the protein preparations on the one hand, and depletion of these proteins from retinol on the other hand, enabled us to clarify the extent to which the presence or absence of the ligand affects the apparent heterogeneity. Upon electrophoresis, each of the native proteins displayed two pairs of protein zones. It appeared that within each pair the fast moving band corresponded to aporetinol-binding protein which upon binding of retinol was converted to a holoprotein with a slightly lower mobility. However, it did not seem that proteins of one pair were converted to proteins of the second pair upon binding of retinol, substantiating ghe microheterogenous character of this protein system. A rapid, two step procedure for isolation of prealbumins from plasma is described. The method which consists of DEAE-cellulose chromatography follwed by preparative electrophoresis was utilized to separate human and chicken prealbumins. Routine dodecyl sulphate electrophoresis resulted in partial dissociation of human prealbumin but in no dissociation of the chicken protein. More drastic treatments prior to electrophoresis were needed to effect complete disruption of both proteins into subunits.

  16. Human Islet Amyloid Polypeptide Fibril Binding to Catalase: A Transmission Electron Microscopy and Microplate Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G. N. Milton

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The diabetes-associated human islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP is a 37-amino-acid peptide that forms fibrils in vitro and in vivo. Human IAPP fibrils are toxic in a similar manner to Alzheimer's amyloid-β (Aβ and prion protein (PrP fibrils. Previous studies have shown that catalase binds to Aβ fibrils and appears to recognize a region containing the Gly-Ala-Ile-Ile sequence that is similar to the Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu sequence found in human IAPP residues 24-27. This study presents a transmission electron microscopy (TEM—based analysis of fibril formation and the binding of human erythrocyte catalase to IAPP fibrils. The results show that human IAPP 1-37, 8-37, and 20-29 peptides form fibrils with diverse and polymorphic structures. All three forms of IAPP bound catalase, and complexes of IAPP 1-37 or 8-37 with catalase were identified by immunoassay. The binding of biotinylated IAPP to catalase was high affinity with a KD of 0.77nM, and could be inhibited by either human or rat IAPP 1-37 and 8-37 forms. Fibrils formed by the PrP 118-135 peptide with a Gly-Ala-Val-Val sequence also bound catalase. These results suggest that catalase recognizes a Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu—like sequence in amyloid fibril-forming peptides. For IAPP 1-37 and 8-37, the catalase binding was primarily directed towards fibrillar rather than ribbon-like structures, suggesting differences in the accessibility of the human IAPP 24-27 Gly-Ala-Ile-Leu region. This suggests that catalase may be able to discriminate between different structural forms of IAPP fibrils. The ability of catalase to bind IAPP, Aβ, and PrP fibrils demonstrates the presence of similar accessible structural motifs that may be targets for antiamyloid therapeutic development.

  17. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding and cleavage studies of mixed-ligand copper (II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sunita

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available New two copper complexes of type [Cu(Bzimpy(LH2O]SO4 (where L = 2,2′ bipyridine (bpy, and ethylene diamine (en, Bzimpy = 2,6-bis(benzimidazole-2ylpyridine have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, magnetic susceptibility measurements, mass, IR, electronic and EPR spectral studies. Based on elemental and spectral studies six coordinated geometries were assigned to the two complexes. DNA-binding properties of these metal complexes were investigated using absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and thermal denaturation methods. Experimental studies suggest that the complexes bind to DNA through intercalation. These complexes also promote the cleavage of plasmid pBR322, in the presence of H2O2.

  18. 4-Aminoquinoline-pyrimidine hybrids: synthesis, antimalarial activity, heme binding and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Khan, Shabana I; Tekwani, Babu L; Ponnan, Prija; Rawat, Diwan S

    2015-01-07

    A series of novel 4-aminoquinoline-pyrimidine hybrids has been synthesized and evaluated for their antimalarial activity. Several compounds showed promising in vitro antimalarial activity against both CQ-sensitive and CQ-resistant strains with high selectivity index. All the compounds were found to be non-toxic to the mammalian cell lines. Selected compound 7g exhibited significant suppression of parasitemia in the in vivo assay. The heme binding studies were conducted to determine the mode of action of these hybrid molecules. These compounds form a stable 1:1 complex with hematin suggesting that heme may be one of the possible targets of these hybrids. The interaction of these conjugate hybrids was also investigated by the molecular docking studies in the binding site of PfDHFR. The pharmacokinetic property analysis of best active compounds was also studied using ADMET prediction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Mannobiose Binding Induces Changes in Hydrogen Bonding and Protonation States of Acidic Residues in Concanavalin A As Revealed by Neutron Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlits, Oksana O. [UT/ORNL; Coates, Leighton [Biology; Woods, Robert J. [Complex; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Biology

    2017-08-30

    Plant lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with various biomedical applications. Concanavalin A (Con A) holds promise in treating cancerous tumors. To better understand the Con A carbohydrate binding specificity, we obtained a room-temperature neutron structure of this legume lectin in complex with a disaccharide Manα1–2Man, mannobiose. The neutron structure afforded direct visualization of the hydrogen bonding between the protein and ligand, showing that the ligand is able to alter both protonation states and interactions for residues located close to and distant from the binding site. An unprecedented low-barrier hydrogen bond was observed forming between the carboxylic side chains of Asp28 and Glu8, with the D atom positioned equidistant from the oxygen atoms having an O···D···O angle of 101.5°.

  20. Temporal mapping of CEBPA and CEBPB binding during liver regeneration reveals dynamic occupancy and specific regulatory codes for homeostatic and cell cycle gene batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Schou; Waage, Johannes; Rapin, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    quantified the genome-wide binding patterns of two key hepatocyte transcription factors, CEBPA and CEBPB (also known as C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta), at multiple time points during the highly dynamic process of liver regeneration elicited by partial hepatectomy in mouse. Combining these profiles with RNA...... polymerase II binding data, we find three temporal classes of transcription factor binding to be associated with distinct sets of regulated genes involved in the acute phase response, metabolic/homeostatic functions, or cell cycle progression. Moreover, we demonstrate a previously unrecognized early phase......IP experiments involving a panel of central transcription factors and/or by comparison to external ChIP-seq data. Our quantitative investigation not only provides in vivo evidence for the involvement of many new factors in liver regeneration but also points to similarities in the circuitries regulating self...

  1. Characterisation of peptide microarrays for studying antibody-antigen binding using surface plasmon resonance imagery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Nogues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Non-specific binding to biosensor surfaces is a major obstacle to quantitative analysis of selective retention of analytes at immobilized target molecules. Although a range of chemical antifouling monolayers has been developed to address this problem, many macromolecular interactions still remain refractory to analysis due to the prevalent high degree of non-specific binding. We describe how we use the dynamic process of the formation of self assembling monolayers and optimise physical and chemical properties thus reducing considerably non-specific binding and allowing analysis of specific binding of analytes to immobilized target molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We illustrate this approach by the production of specific protein arrays for the analysis of interactions between the 65kDa isoform of human glutamate decarboxylase (GAD65 and a human monoclonal antibody. Our data illustrate that we have effectively eliminated non-specific interactions with the surface containing the immobilised GAD65 molecules. The findings have several implications. First, this approach obviates the dubious process of background subtraction and gives access to more accurate kinetic and equilibrium values that are no longer contaminated by multiphase non-specific binding. Second, an enhanced signal to noise ratio increases not only the sensitivity but also confidence in the use of SPR to generate kinetic constants that may then be inserted into van't Hoff type analyses to provide comparative DeltaG, DeltaS and DeltaH values, making this an efficient, rapid and competitive alternative to ITC measurements used in drug and macromolecular-interaction mechanistic studies. Third, the accuracy of the measurements allows the application of more intricate interaction models than simple Langmuir monophasic binding. CONCLUSIONS: The detection and measurement of antibody binding by the type 1 diabetes autoantigen GAD65 represents an example of an antibody

  2. A trade-off study revealing nested timescales of constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnants, M.L.; Cox, R.F.A; Hasselman, F.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Van Orden, G.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates human performance in a cyclic Fitts task at three different scales of observation, either in the presence (difficult condition) or in the absence (easy condition) of a speed–accuracy trade-off. At the fastest scale, the harmonicity of the back and forth movements, which

  3. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos; Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes; Cassali, Geovanni D.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  4. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: consuelo@pq.cnpq.br; Cassali, Geovanni D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada], e-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  5. In vitro study revealed different size behavior of different nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaudien, Dirk; Knebel, Jan; Creutzenberg, Otto

    2012-01-01

    Toxicity of nanoparticles is depending not only on the size of the primary particles but on the size of their agglomerates. Therefore, further studies are needed to examine the behavior of nanoparticles after they have gotten in contact with cells. The presented study investigated the change of size of different commercially available nanoparticles after applying them to different cell lines such as A549, Calu-3, 16HBE14o and LK004 representative for the different parts of the human lung. The different nanoparticles exhibited differences in behavior of size. TiO 2 P25 showed a tendency to increase, whereas TiO 2 T805 and Printex ® 90 remained more or less at the same size. In contrast, ZnO < 50 nm particles showed a significant decrease of size.

  6. A comparative study of recombinant and native frutalin binding to human prostate tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Lucília

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies indicate that cancer cells present an aberrant glycosylation pattern that can be detected by lectin histochemistry. Lectins have shown the ability to recognise these modifications in several carcinomas, namely in the prostate carcinoma, one of the most lethal diseases in man. Thus, the aim of this work was to investigate if the α-D-galactose-binding plant lectin frutalin is able to detect such changes in the referred carcinoma. Frutalin was obtained from different sources namely, its natural source (plant origin and a recombinant source (Pichia expression system. Finally, the results obtained with the two lectins were compared and their potential use as prostate tumour biomarkers was discussed. Results The binding of recombinant and native frutalin to specific glycoconjugates expressed in human prostate tissues was assessed by using an immuhistochemical technique. A total of 20 cases of prostate carcinoma and 25 cases of benign prostate hyperplasia were studied. Lectins bound directly to the tissues and anti-frutalin polyclonal antibody was used as the bridge to react with the complex biotinilated anti-rabbit IgG plus streptavidin-conjugated peroxidase. DAB was used as visual indicator to specifically localise the binding of the lectins to the tissues. Both lectins bound to the cells cytoplasm of the prostate carcinoma glands. The binding intensity of native frutalin was stronger in the neoplasic cells than in hyperplasic cells; however no significant statistical correlation could be found (P = 0.051. On the other hand, recombinant frutalin bound exclusively to the neoplasic cells and a significant positive statistical correlation was obtained (P Conclusion Native and recombinant frutalin yielded different binding responses in the prostate tissues due to their differences in carbohydrate-binding affinities. Also, this study shows that both lectins may be used as histochemical biomarkers for the prostate

  7. Unexpected Binding Mode of a Potent Indeno[1,2-b]indole-Type Inhibitor of Protein Kinase CK2 Revealed by Complex Structures with the Catalytic Subunit CK2α and Its Paralog CK2α′

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hochscherf

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase CK2, a member of the eukaryotic protein kinase superfamily, is associated with cancer and other human pathologies and thus an attractive drug target. The indeno[1,2-b]indole scaffold is a novel lead structure to develop ATP-competitive CK2 inhibitors. Some indeno[1,2-b]indole-based CK2 inhibitors additionally obstruct ABCG2, an ABC half transporter overexpressed in breast cancer and co-responsible for drug efflux and resistance. Comprehensive derivatization studies revealed substitutions of the indeno[1,2-b]indole framework that boost either the CK2 or the ABCG2 selectivity or even support the dual inhibition potential. The best indeno[1,2-b]indole-based CK2 inhibitor described yet (IC50 = 25 nM is 5-isopropyl-4-(3-methylbut-2-enyl-oxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydroindeno[1,2-b]indole-9,10-dione (4p. Herein, we demonstrate the membrane permeability of 4p and describe co-crystal structures of 4p with CK2α and CK2α′, the paralogs of human CK2 catalytic subunit. As expected, 4p occupies the narrow, hydrophobic ATP site of CK2α/CK2α′, but surprisingly with a unique orientation: its hydrophobic substituents point towards the solvent while its two oxo groups are hydrogen-bonded to a hidden water molecule. An equivalent water molecule was found in many CK2α structures, but never as a critical mediator of ligand binding. This unexpected binding mode is independent of the interdomain hinge/helix αD region conformation and of the salt content in the crystallization medium.

  8. The structure of SSO2064, the first representative of Pfam family PF01796, reveals a novel two-domain zinc-ribbon OB-fold architecture with a potential acyl-CoA-binding role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishna, S. Sri; Aravind, L.; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Caruthers, Jonathan; Carlton, Dennis; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kumar, Abhinav; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Okach, Linda; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The crystal structure of SSO2064, the first structural representative of Pfam family PF01796 (DUF35), reveals a two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal zinc-ribbon domain and a C-terminal OB-fold domain. Analysis of the domain architecture, operon organization and bacterial orthologs combined with the structural features of SSO2064 suggests a role involving acyl-CoA binding for this family of proteins. SSO2064 is the first structural representative of PF01796 (DUF35), a large prokaryotic family with a wide phylogenetic distribution. The structure reveals a novel two-domain architecture comprising an N-terminal, rubredoxin-like, zinc ribbon and a C-terminal, oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold domain. Additional N-terminal helical segments may be involved in protein–protein interactions. Domain architectures, genomic context analysis and functional evidence from certain bacterial representatives of this family suggest that these proteins form a novel fatty-acid-binding component that is involved in the biosynthesis of lipids and polyketide antibiotics and that they possibly function as acyl-CoA-binding proteins. This structure has led to a re-evaluation of the DUF35 family, which has now been split into two entries in the latest Pfam release (v.24.0)

  9. Synthesis, characterization, anti-microbial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of Schiff base metal complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poomalai Jayaseelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A novel Schiff base ligand has been prepared by the condensation between butanedione monoxime with 3,3′-diaminobenzidine. The ligand and metal complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, UV, IR, 1H NMR, conductivity measurements, EPR and magnetic studies. The molar conductance studies of Cu(II, Ni(II, Co(II and Mn(II complexes showed non-electrolyte in nature. The ligand acts as dibasic with two N4-tetradentate sites and can coordinate with two metal ions to form binuclear complexes. The spectroscopic data of metal complexes indicated that the metal ions are complexed with azomethine nitrogen and oxyimino nitrogen atoms. The binuclear metal complexes exhibit octahedral arrangements. DNA binding properties of copper(II metal complex have been investigated by electronic absorption spectroscopy. Results suggest that the copper(II complex bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode. The nucleolytic cleavage activities of the ligand and their complexes were assayed on CT-DNA using gel electrophoresis in the presence and absence of H2O2. The ligand showed increased nuclease activity when administered as copper complex and copper(II complex behave as efficient chemical nucleases with hydrogen peroxide activation. The anti-microbial activities and thermal studies have also been studied. In anti-microbial activity all complexes showed good anti-microbial activity higher than ligand against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and fungi.

  10. Kinetic modeling of receptor-ligand binding applied to positron emission tomographic studies with neuroleptic tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, J; Wolf, A P; Shiue, C Y; Fowler, J S

    1987-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with labeled neuroleptics has made possible the study of neurotransmitter-receptor systems in vivo. In this study we investigate the kinetics of the 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine) receptor-ligand binding using PET data from a series of experiments in the baboon with the /sup 18/F-labeled drugs spiperone, haloperidol, and benperidol. Models used to describe these systems are based on first-order kinetics which applies at high specific activity (low receptor occupancy). The parameters governing the uptake and loss of drug from the brain were found by fitting PET data from regions with little or no receptor concentration (cerebellum) and from experiments in which specific binding was blocked by pretreatment with the drug (+)-butaclamol. Receptor constants were determined by fitting data from receptor-containing structures. Correcting the arterial plasma activities (the model driving function) for the presence of drug metabolites was found to be important in the modeling of these systems.

  11. Gate dielectric strength dependent performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET: A tight binding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shamim Sarker

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study between CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET taking into account of different dielectric strength of gate oxide materials. Here we have studied the transfer characteristics, on/off current (ION/IOFF ratio and subthreshold slope of the device using Non Equilibrium Greens Function (NEGF formalism in tight binding frameworks. The results are obtained by solving the NEGF and Poisson’s equation self-consistently in NanoTCADViDES environment and found that the ON state performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET have significant dependency on the dielectric strength of the gate oxide materials. The figure of merits of the devices also demonstrates that the CNT TFET is promising for high-speed and low-power logic applications. Keywords: CNT TFET, Subthreshold slop, Barrier width, Conduction band (C.B and Valance band (V.B, Oxide dielectric strength, Tight binding approach

  12. Despite some concerns, impact study reveals support for nuke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of 37 Hartsville, Tennessee community leaders indicates the community supports construction of a nuclear generating plant and does not see any major environmental impacts. The leaders do anticipate growth-related disruptions during the construction phase. The ERDA-sponsored social impact study is being conducted by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to serve as a guide in planning future energy projects and for comparison with a coal-fired project under development in Georgia. Statistics from the survey are summarized. General observations note that the leaders tend to overestimate opposition to the nuclear plant and that local concerns focus on housing and traffic problems. The Tennessee Valley Authority is supplying funds for a mitigation plan, which is generally well received by the community

  13. The HLA-B*5101 molecule-binding capacity to antigens used in animal models of Behçet's disease: a bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharav, Ehud; Weinberger, Abraham

    2012-07-01

    The human lymphocyte antigen (HLA) molecule B*5101 is a functioning receptor of the immune system and is generally accepted as a genetic marker for Behçet disease (BD), a multi-organ, chronic inflammatory disorder. The role of the HLA-B*5101 in the pathogenesis of BD is elusive. The assumption that HLA-B*5101 has an active role in BD is suggestive, but no antigen has yet been identified. To evaluate the potential binding capacity of various antigens to the HLA-B*5101 molecule. Using bioinformatics programs, we studied the binding capacity of HLA-B*5101 and its corresponding rat molecule RT.A1 to the following antigens: heatshock protein-60 (HSP60), major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA), retinal S-antigen (S-Ag), HLA-B27 molecule and its peptide (PD) and tropomyosin (TPM), all of which serve as antigens in animal models corresponding to BD. In each protein including the B*5101 molecule itself, the computerized programs revealed several short sequences with potential high binding capacity to HLA-B*5101 with the exception of B-27PD. The rat MHC RT1. Al. had no binding capacity to S-Ag. The evaluated proteins have the potential to bind to and to serve as potential antigens to the HLA-B*5101 and the rat MHC RT1.Al. molecules. The pathogenicity of these suggested short peptides should be evaluated in animal models of BD.

  14. Structural differences in the two agonist binding sites of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor revealed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, K. L.; Corringer, P. J.; Edelstein, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) from Torpedo marmorata carries two nonequivalent agonist binding sites at the αδ and αγ subunit interfaces. These sites have been characterized by time-resolved fluorescence with the partial nicotinic agonist dansyl-C6-choline (Dnscho). When bound...

  15. Crystal structures reveal metal-binding plasticity at the metallo-β-lactamase active site of PqqB from Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Xiongying; Latham, John A.; Klema, Valerie J.; Evans III, Robert L.; Li, Chao; Klinman, Judith P.; Wilmot, Carrie M. (UMM); (UCB)

    2017-08-19

    PqqB is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone and a distal member of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. PqqB lacks two residues in the conserved signature motif HxHxDH that makes up the key metal-chelating elements that can bind up to two metal ions at the active site of MBLs and other members of its superfamily. Here, we report crystal structures of PqqB bound to Mn2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+. These structures demonstrate that PqqB can still bind metal ions at the canonical MBL active site. The fact that PqqB can adapt its side chains to chelate a wide spectrum of metal ions with different coordination features on a uniform main chain scaffold demonstrates its metal-binding plasticity. This plasticity may provide insights into the structural basis of promiscuous activities found in ensembles of metal complexes within this superfamily. Furthermore, PqqB belongs to a small subclass of MBLs that contain an additional CxCxxC motif that binds a structural Zn2+. Our data support a key role for this motif in dimerization.

  16. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet; Gai, Feng; Hochstrasser, Robin M.; Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F.; Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V.; Zanni, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs

  17. 2D IR spectroscopy reveals the role of water in the binding of channel-blocking drugs to the influenza M2 channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Ayanjeet, E-mail: ayanjeet@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Gai, Feng, E-mail: ayanjeet@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: gai@sas.upenn.edu; Hochstrasser, Robin M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Wang, Jun; DeGrado, William F. [Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Moroz, Yurii S.; Korendovych, Ivan V. [Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York 13244 (United States); Zanni, Martin [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    Water is an integral part of the homotetrameric M2 proton channel of the influenza A virus, which not only assists proton conduction but could also play an important role in stabilizing channel-blocking drugs. Herein, we employ two dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy and site-specific IR probes, i.e., the amide I bands arising from isotopically labeled Ala30 and Gly34 residues, to probe how binding of either rimantadine or 7,7-spiran amine affects the water dynamics inside the M2 channel. Our results show, at neutral pH where the channel is non-conducting, that drug binding leads to a significant increase in the mobility of the channel water. A similar trend is also observed at pH 5.0 although the difference becomes smaller. Taken together, these results indicate that the channel water facilitates drug binding by increasing its entropy. Furthermore, the 2D IR spectral signatures obtained for both probes under different conditions collectively support a binding mechanism whereby amantadine-like drugs dock in the channel with their ammonium moiety pointing toward the histidine residues and interacting with a nearby water cluster, as predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. We believe these findings have important implications for designing new anti-influenza drugs.

  18. Crystal Structure of the VapBC Toxin–Antitoxin Complex from Shigella flexneri Reveals a Hetero-Octameric DNA-Binding Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienemann, Christian; Bøggild, Andreas; Winther, Kristoffer S.

    2011-01-01

    the crystal structure of the intact Shigella flexneri VapBC TA complex, determined to 2.7 Å resolution. Both in solution and in the crystal structure, four molecules of each protein combine to form a large and globular hetero-octameric assembly with SpoVT/AbrB-type DNA-binding domains at each end and a total...

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Weak Albumin Binding Contrast Agent can Reveal Additional Endo leaks in Patients with an Enlarging Aneurysm after EVAR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, J.; Zandvoort, H. J. A.; Moll, F. L.; Bartels, L. W.; Vonken, E. P. A.; van Herwaarden, J. A.; Leiner, T.

    WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS In patients with enlarging aneurysms of unknown origin after endovascular aneurysm repair, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a weak albumin binding contrast agent has additional diagnostic value for both the detection and determination of the origin of the endoleak.

  20. Crystal Structure of Botulinum Neurotoxin A2 in Complex with the Human Protein Receptor SV2C Reveals Plasticity in Receptor Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gustafsson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs are a family of highly dangerous bacterial toxins, with seven major serotypes (BoNT/A-G. Members of BoNTs, BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B1, have been utilized to treat an increasing number of medical conditions. The clinical trials are ongoing for BoNT/A2, another subtype of BoNT/A, which showed promising therapeutic properties. Both BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 utilize three isoforms of synaptic vesicle protein SV2 (SV2A, B, and C as their protein receptors. We here present a high resolution (2.0 Å co-crystal structure of the BoNT/A2 receptor-binding domain in complex with the human SV2C luminal domain. The structure is similar to previously reported BoNT/A-SV2C complexes, but a shift of the receptor-binding segment in BoNT/A2 rotates SV2C in two dimensions giving insight into the dynamic behavior of the interaction. Small differences in key residues at the binding interface may influence the binding to different SV2 isoforms, which may contribute to the differences between BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2 observed in the clinic.

  1. Development of a lectin binding assay to differentiate between recombinant and endogenous proteins in pharmacokinetic studies of protein-biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alfred; Minibeck, Eva; Scheiflinger, Friedrich; Turecek, Peter L

    2015-04-10

    Human glycoproteins, expressed in hamster cell lines, show similar glycosylation patterns to naturally occurring human molecules except for a minute difference in the linkage of terminal sialic acid: both cell types lack α2,6-galactosyl-sialyltransferase, abundantly expressed in human hepatocytes and responsible for the α2,6-sialylation of circulating glycoproteins. This minute difference, which is currently not known to have any physiological relevance, was the basis for the selective measurement of recombinant glycoproteins in the presence of their endogenous counterparts. The assay is based on using the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), selectively binding to α2,6-sialylated N-glycans. Using von Willebrand factor (VWF), factor IX (FIX), and factor VIIa (FVIIa), it was demonstrated that (i) the plasma-derived proteins, but not the corresponding recombinant proteins, specifically bind to SNA and (ii) this binding can be used to deplete the plasma-derived proteins. The feasibility of this approach was confirmed in spike-recovery studies for all three recombinant coagulation proteins in human plasma and for recombinant VWF (rVWF) in macaque plasma. Analysis of plasma samples from macaques after administration of recombinant and a plasma-derived VWF demonstrated the suitability and robustness of this approach. Data showed that rVWF could be selectively measured without changing the ELISAs and furthermore revealed the limitations of baseline adjustment using a single measurement of the predose concentration only. The SNA gel-based depletion procedure can easily be integrated in existing procedures as a specific sample pre-treatment step. While ELISA-based methods were used to measure the recombinant coagulation proteins in the supernatants obtained by depletion, this procedure is applicable for all biochemical analyses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ab initio study of the binding of collagen amino acids to graphene and A-doped (A = H, Ca) graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazorla, Claudio, E-mail: c.silva@ucl.ac.u

    2010-09-30

    We present a theoretical study of the binding of collagen amino acids (AA, namely glycine, Gly; proline, Pro; and hydroxyproline, Hyp) to graphene (Gr), Ca-doped graphene and graphane (Gra) using density functional theory calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations. It is found that binding of Gly, Pro and Hyp to Gr and Gra is thermodynamically favorable yet dependent on the amino acid orientation and always very weak (adsorption energies E{sub ads} range from -90 to -20 meV). AIMD simulations reveal that room-temperature thermal excitations are enough to induce detachment of Gly and Pro from Gr and of all three amino acids from Gra. Interestingly, we show that collagen AA binding to Gr is enhanced dramatically by doping the carbon surface with calcium atoms (corresponding E{sub ads} values decrease by practically two orders of magnitude with respect to the non-doped case). This effect is result of electronic charge transfers from the Ca impurity (donor) to Gr (acceptor) and the carboxyl group (COOH) of the amino acid (acceptor). The possibility of using Gr and Gra as nanoframes for sensing of collagen amino acids has also been investigated by performing electronic density of states analysis. It is found that, whether Gr is hardly sensitive, the electronic band gap of Gra can be modulated by attaching different number and species of AAs onto it. The results presented in this work provide fundamental insights on the quantum interactions of collagen protein components with carbon-based nanostructures and can be useful for developments in bio and nanotechnology fields.

  3. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  4. Nationwide Genomic Study in Denmark Reveals Remarkable Population Homogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, Georgios; Cheng, Jade Y; Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J; Jørgensen, Frank G; Als, Thomas D; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Espeseth, Thomas; Sullivan, Patrick F; Hultman, Christina M; Kjærgaard, Peter C; Schierup, Mikkel H; Mailund, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Denmark has played a substantial role in the history of Northern Europe. Through a nationwide scientific outreach initiative, we collected genetic and anthropometrical data from ∼800 high school students and used them to elucidate the genetic makeup of the Danish population, as well as to assess polygenic predictions of phenotypic traits in adolescents. We observed remarkable homogeneity across different geographic regions, although we could still detect weak signals of genetic structure reflecting the history of the country. Denmark presented genomic affinity with primarily neighboring countries with overall resemblance of decreasing weight from Britain, Sweden, Norway, Germany, and France. A Polish admixture signal was detected in Zealand and Funen, and our date estimates coincided with historical evidence of Wend settlements in the south of Denmark. We also observed considerably diverse demographic histories among Scandinavian countries, with Denmark having the smallest current effective population size compared to Norway and Sweden. Finally, we found that polygenic prediction of self-reported adolescent height in the population was remarkably accurate (R 2 = 0.639 ± 0.015). The high homogeneity of the Danish population could render population structure a lesser concern for the upcoming large-scale gene-mapping studies in the country. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. A mechanistic understanding of ageing revealed by studying the young.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Erica J

    2012-03-01

    A main focus within biomedical research is to understand how adverse environmental conditions experienced during early development affects lifelong health (Barker 1992). Within this context, extensive research in rodent models and humans has shown that intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) caused by nutrient restriction during early development is often followed by post-natal 'catch-up' growth when access to food resources improves. However, this accelerated growth rate seems to come at a cost, as metabolic and endocrine processes that are programmed during this time cause later-life onset of diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease (reviewed in Crespi & Denver 2005). In this issue Molecular Ecology, Geiger et al. (2012) asked what are the costs of catch-up growth in nutrient-restricted king penguin chicks (Fig. 1) by measuring lengths of telomeres, the protective DNA sequences at the end of chromosomes, before and after catch-up growth, as the amount and rate of telomere sequence loss over time has been associated with reduced lifespan in both model and nonmodel organisms (see reviews of Costantini et al. 2010; Haussmann & Marchetto 2010). Geiger et al. (2011) found that chicks entering the post-winter growth season at a smaller size exhibited increased growth rates (i.e. catch-up growth) at the cost of increased oxidative stress and reduced telomere lengths compared with the chicks entering the growth period at a larger size. Furthermore, chicks that did not survive had drastically shorter telomere lengths and reduced antioxidant capacities at the beginning of the growth period than all other chicks, thereby directly associating telomere length to mortality. These results suggest that while catch-up growth allows smaller chicks to head off into the world on equal footing with chicks that hatched at a larger size, it likely comes at the cost of a shortened lifespan. Thus, this study provides a mechanism that supports the

  6. One-pot synthesis and sigma receptor binding studies of novel spirocyclic-2,6-diketopiperazine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandi, Mehdi; Sherafat, Fatemeh; Sadeghzadeh, Masoud; Alirezapour, Behrouz

    2016-06-01

    New spirocyclic-2,6-diketopiperazine derivatives containing benzylpiperidine and cycloalkane moieties were synthesized by a one-pot two-step sequential Ugi/intramolecular N-amidation process in moderate to good yields. The in vitro ligand-binding profile studies performed on the sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors revealed that the σ1 affinities and subtype selectivities of three spirocyclic piperidine derivatives are generally comparable to those of spirocycloalkane analogues. Compared to the low σ1 affinities obtained for cycloalkyl-substituted spirocyclic-2,6-diketopiperazines with n=2, those with n=1 proved to have optimal fitting with σ2 subtype by exhibiting higher affinities. Moreover, the best binding affinity and subtype selectivity was identified for compound 3c with Kiσ1=5.9±0.5nM and Kiσ2=563±21nM as well as 95-fold σ1/σ2 selectivity ratio, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. In silico peptide-binding predictions of passerine MHC class I reveal similarities across distantly related species, suggesting convergence on the level of protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin, Elna; Karlsson, Maria; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Wallin, Stefan; Paulsson, Kajsa; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-04-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are the most polymorphic genes found in the vertebrate genome, and they encode proteins that play an essential role in the adaptive immune response. Many songbirds (passerines) have been shown to have a large number of transcribed MHC class I genes compared to most mammals. To elucidate the reason for this large number of genes, we compared 14 MHC class I alleles (α1-α3 domains), from great reed warbler, house sparrow and tree sparrow, via phylogenetic analysis, homology modelling and in silico peptide-binding predictions to investigate their functional and genetic relationships. We found more pronounced clustering of the MHC class I allomorphs (allele specific proteins) in regards to their function (peptide-binding specificities) compared to their genetic relationships (amino acid sequences), indicating that the high number of alleles is of functional significance. The MHC class I allomorphs from house sparrow and tree sparrow, species that diverged 10 million years ago (MYA), had overlapping peptide-binding specificities, and these similarities across species were also confirmed in phylogenetic analyses based on amino acid sequences. Notably, there were also overlapping peptide-binding specificities in the allomorphs from house sparrow and great reed warbler, although these species diverged 30 MYA. This overlap was not found in a tree based on amino acid sequences. Our interpretation is that convergent evolution on the level of the protein function, possibly driven by selection from shared pathogens, has resulted in allomorphs with similar peptide-binding repertoires, although trans-species evolution in combination with gene conversion cannot be ruled out.

  8. Crystal structures of the transpeptidase domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis penicillin-binding protein PonA1 reveal potential mechanisms of antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Ekaterina V; Kieser, Karen J; Luan, Chi-Hao; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Kiryukhina, Olga; Rubin, Eric J; Anderson, Wayne F

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a human respiratory pathogen that causes the deadly disease tuberculosis. The rapid global spread of antibiotic-resistant M. tuberculosis makes tuberculosis infections difficult to treat. To overcome this problem new effective antimicrobial strategies are urgently needed. One promising target for new therapeutic approaches is PonA1, a class A penicillin-binding protein, which is required for maintaining physiological cell wall synthesis and cell shape during growth in mycobacteria. Here, crystal structures of the transpeptidase domain, the enzymatic domain responsible for penicillin binding, of PonA1 from M. tuberculosis in the inhibitor-free form and in complex with penicillin V are reported. We used site-directed mutagenesis, antibiotic profiling experiments, and fluorescence thermal shift assays to measure PonA1's sensitivity to different classes of β-lactams. Structural comparison of the PonA1 apo-form and the antibiotic-bound form shows that binding of penicillin V induces conformational changes in the position of the loop β4'-α3 surrounding the penicillin-binding site. We have also found that binding of different antibiotics including penicillin V positively impacts protein stability, while other tested β-lactams such as clavulanate or meropenem resulted in destabilization of PonA1. Our antibiotic profiling experiments indicate that the transpeptidase activity of PonA1 in both M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis mediates tolerance to specific cell wall-targeting antibiotics, particularly to penicillin V and meropenem. Because M. tuberculosis is an important human pathogen, these structural data provide a template to design novel transpeptidase inhibitors to treat tuberculosis infections. Structural data are available in the PDB database under the accession numbers 5CRF and 5CXW. © 2016 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. Binding studies of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone with HSA by spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Wenhua; Li Nana; Chen Gaopan; Xu Yanping; Chen Yaowen; Hu Shunlin; Hu Zhide

    2011-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), a major plasma protein and plasma-derived therapeutic, interacts with a wide variety of drugs and native plasma metabolites. In this study the interactions of costunolide (CE) and dehydrocostuslactone (DE) with HSA were investigated by molecule modeling, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and different optical techniques. In the mechanism discussion, it was proved that fluorescence quenching of HSA by both of the drugs is a result of the formation of drug-HSA complexes. Binding parameters for the reactions were determined according to the Stern-Volmer equation and static quenching. The results of thermodynamic parameters ΔG 0 , ΔH 0 , and ΔS 0 at different temperatures indicated that hydrogen bonding interactions play a major role in the drug-HSA associations process. The binding properties were further studied by quantitative analysis of CD, FTIR, and Raman spectra. Furthermore, AFM results showed that the dimension of HSA molecules became more swollen after binding with the drugs. - Highlights: → Interactions of costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone with HSA have been investigated for the first time. → Raman spectra were used to analyze the drug-HSA interactions. → Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the topography change of HSA by addition of the drugs. → These results are important for the drugs containing costunolide and dehydrocostuslactone distribution and metabolism.

  10. DNA-binding studies of valrubicin as a chemotherapy drug using spectroscopy and electrochemical techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Hajian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the molecular interactions between valrubicin, an anticancer drug, and fish sperm DNA have been studied in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.4 using UV–Vis spectrophotometry and cyclic voltammetry techniques. Valrubicin intercalated into double stranded DNA under a weak displacement reaction with methylene blue (MB molecule in a competitive reaction. The binding constant (kb of valrubicin-DNA was determined as 1.75×103 L/mol by spectrophotometric titration. The value of non-electrostatic binding constant (kt0 was almost constant at different ionic strengths while the ratio of kt0/kb increased from 4.51% to 23.77%. These results indicate that valrubicin binds to ds-DNA via electrostatic and intercalation modes. Thermodynamic parameters including ΔH0, ΔS0 and ΔG0 for valrubicin-DNA interaction were determined as −25.21×103 kJ/mol, 1.55×102 kJ/mol K and −22.03 kJ/mol, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry study shows a pair of redox peaks for valrubicin at 0.45 V and 0.36 V (vs. Ag/AgCl. The peak currents decreased and peak positions shifted to positive direction in the presence of DNA, showing intercalation mechanism due to the variation in formal potential.

  11. Europium-labeled epidermal growth factor and neurotensin: novel probes for receptor-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Ohad; Hillairet de Boisferon, Marc; Lombet, Alain; Gruaz-Guyon, Anne; Gayer, Batya; Skrzydelsky, Delphine; Kohen, Fortune; Forgez, Patricia; Scherz, Avigdor; Rostene, William; Salomon, Yoram

    2002-02-01

    We investigated the possibility of labeling two biologically active peptides, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and neurotensin (NT), with europium (Eu)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. More specifically, we tested them as probes in studying receptor binding using time-resolved fluorescence of Eu3+. The relatively simple synthesis yields ligands with acceptable binding characteristics similar to isotopically labeled derivatives. The binding affinity (Kd) of labeled Eu-EGF to human A431 epidermal carcinoid cells was 3.6 +/- 1.2 nM, similar to the reported Kd values of EGF, whereas the Kd of Eu-NT to human HT29 colon cancer cells (7.4 +/- 0.5 nM) or to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the high-affinity NT receptor (CHO-NT1) were about 10-fold higher than the Kd values of NT. The bioactivity of the Eu-labeled EGF as determined by stimulation of cultured murine D1 hematopoietic cell proliferation was nearly the same as that obtained with native EGF. The maximal stimulation of Ca2+ influx with NT and Eu-NT in CHO-NT1 cells was similar, but the respective K0.5 values were 20 pM and 1 nM, corresponding to differences in the binding affinities previously described. The results of these studies indicate that Eu labeling of peptide hormones and growth factor molecules ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) Da can be conveniently accomplished. Importantly, the Eu-labeled products are stable for approximately 2 years and are completely safe for laboratory use compared to the biohazardous radioligands. Thus, Eu-labeled peptides present an attractive alternative for commonly used radiolabeled ligands in biological studies in general and in receptor assays in particular.

  12. Study of xenon binding in cryptophane-A using laser-induced NMR polarization enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luhmer, M.; Goodson, B.M.; Song, Y.Q.; Laws, D.D.; Kaiser, L.; Pines, A.; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA

    1999-01-01

    Xenon is chemically inert, yet exhibits NMR parameters that are highly sensitive to its chemical environment. Considerable work has therefore capitalized on the utility of 129 Xe (I = 1/2) as a magnetic resonance probe of molecules, materials, and biological systems. In solution, spin-polarization transfer between laser-polarized xenon and the hydrogen nuclei of nearby molecules leads to signal enhancements in the resolved 1 H NMR spectrum, offering new opportunities for probing the chemical environment of xenon atoms. Following binding of laser-polarized xenon to molecules of cryptophane-A, selective enhancements of the 1 H NMR signals were observed. A theoretical framework for the interpretation of such experimental results is provided, and the spin polarization-induced nuclear Overhauser effects are shown to yield information about the molecular environment of xenon. The observed selective 1 H enhancements allowed xenon-proton internuclear distances to be estimated. These distances reveal structural characteristics of the complex, including the preferred molecular conformations adopted by cryptophane-A upon binding of xenon

  13. Studies on the characterization and regulation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors and [3H]WB4101 binding sites in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrow, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of these studies has been to resolve the anomalous binding characteristics of two alpha adrenergic receptor ligands, [ 3 H]WB4101 and [ 3 H]prazosin and to study the regulation of the receptors labeled by these compounds after surgical denervation and chronic drug treatments. Preliminary studies indicated that [ 3 H]WB4101 binding sites, which were believed to represent alpha-1 adrenergic receptors, were increased in number following removal of the fimbrial afferents to the hippocampus. This increase was not due to removal of the adrenergic input into this structure since destruction of the locus coeruleus or the dorsal noradrenergic bundle did not produce the up-regulation. Characterization of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors using [ 3 H]prazosin and [ 3 H]WB4101 revealed evidence for subtypes of alpha-1 receptors designated alpha-1A and alpha-1B. The nanomolar affinity component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding is not adrenergic but serotonergic. The serotonergic agonists, serotonin and 8-hydroxy-dipropylaminotetraline have affinities of 1.5 and 3.0 nM for this site, when studied in the presence of a 30 nM prazosin mask of the alpha-1 component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding. Fimbria transection or 5,7 dihydroxytryptamine injections produced increases in the Bmax of the nanomolar affinity component of [ 3 H]WB4101 binding in the presence of a prazosin mask. The up-regulated site showed identical serotonergic pharmacology compared to control tissue. Thus, the author concluded that serotonergic denervation of the hippocampus produces the increase in serotonergic binding sites labeled by [ 3 H]WB4101

  14. Synthesis of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine: comparative binding and distribution studies with natural enantiomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincek, W.C.; Martin, B.R.; Aceto, M.D.; Tripathi, H.L.; May, E.L.; Harris, L.S.

    1981-11-01

    The preparation of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine (Vb) (specific activity 10.3 Ci/mmole)from (+)-nicotine (Ib) via (-) 4,4-dibromocotinine (IIIb) is described. Although Ib is 10-30 times less potent than (-)-nicotine (Ia) in the CNS, its binding affinity for the crude mitochondrial or nuclear fraction of whole rat brain is only three times less than that of Ia. However, distribution studies showed that the maximum brain levels of (-)-(3H) nicotine are nearly twice those of (+)-(3H)-nicotine following administration of a 2-micrograms/kg dose. Binding affinity and disposition of the stereoisomers account for a portion of the pharmacological stereospecificity of nicotine.

  15. Study on models of O2 binding to heme using density functional theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hovorun D. M.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study a mechanism of molecular oxygen binding to heme three models of geometry structure of the complex are considered: the axis of O2 molecule is situated perpendicularly to the porphin macrocycle, parallel, and angularly. Methods. The Fe(II porphin complexes with dioxygen are calculated by the quantum-chemical method of density functional theory with the UB3LYP/6-311G approximation. Results. The optimized geometry and electron structures as well as the absorption IR spectra of the complexes in the high-spin (septet state are described. Conclusions. It is shown that the main mechanism of spin-orbit coupling during the O2 binding to heme is connected with peculiarity of the O2 molecule electronic structure.

  16. Molecular docking and NMR binding studies to identify novel inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsri, Pornthip [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M. [Division of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Hannongbua, Supa [Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Sem, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.sem@cuw.edu [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural and synthetic inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Virtual screening yielded a hit rate of 15%, with inhibitor K{sub d}'s of 10-60 {mu}M. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR studies indicate significant protein conformational changes upon binding. -- Abstract: Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (K{sub d}). Tight binding compounds with K{sub d}'s ranging from 6-60 {mu}M were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC cross peak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development.

  17. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortez, Luis; Berrios, Cristhian; Yanez, Mauricio; Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I.

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  18. Theoretical study of the binding nature of glassy carbon with nickel(II) phthalocyanine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortez, Luis [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Berrios, Cristhian [Laboratorio de Electrocatalisis, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Yanez, Mauricio [Laboratorio de Recursos Renovables, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla-160 C, Concepcion (Chile); Cardenas-Jiron, Gloria I., E-mail: gloria.cardenas@usach.cl [Laboratorio de Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica y Biologia, Universidad de Santiago de Chile (USACH), Casilla 40, Correo 33, Santiago (Chile)

    2009-11-26

    A theoretical study at the semiempirical RHF/PM3(tm) level (tm: transition metal) of the binding nature between a glassy carbon (GC) cluster and a nickel(II) complex (nickel(II) phthalocyanine NiPc, nickel(II) tetrasulphophthalocyanine NiTSPc) was performed. Three types of interactions for GC...NiPc (NiTSPc) were studied: (a) through an oxo (O) bridge, (b) through an hydroxo (OH) bridge, and (c) non-bridge. One layer (NiPc, NiTSPc) and two layers (NiPc...NiPc) of complex were considered. The binding energy calculated showed that in both cases NiPc and NiTSPc, the oxo structures are more stable than the hydroxo ones, and than the non-bridge systems. Charge analysis (NAO) predicted that GC gained more electrons in an oxo structure than in the analogues hydroxo. The theoretical results showed an agreement with the experimental data available, an oxo binding between GC and a nickel complex (NiPc, NiTSPc) in aqueous alkaline solutions is formed.

  19. Synthesis, structure, DNA/BSA binding and antibacterial studies of NNO tridentate Schiff base metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthi, Marimuthu; Ramu, Andy

    2017-12-01

    A new salicylaldehyde derived 2,4-diiodo-6-((2-phenylaminoethylimino)methyl)phenol Schiff base(L) and its transition metal complexes of the type MLCl where, M = Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), Mn(II) and Zn(II) have been synthesized. The coordination mode of Schiff base holding NNO donor atoms with metal ions was well investigated by elemental analysis, ESI-mass as well as IR, UV-vis, CV and NMR spectral studies. The binding efficiency and mode of these complexes with biological macromolecules viz., herring sperm DNA (HS- DNA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) have been explored through various spectroscopic techniques. The characteristic changes in absorption, emission and, circular dichroism spectra of the complexes with DNA indicate the noticeable interaction between them. From the all spectral information complexes could interact with DNA via non-intercalation mode of binding. The hyperchromisim in absorption band and hypochromisim in emission intensity of BSA with different complex concentrations shown significant information, and the binding affinity value has been predicted from Stern-Volmer plots. Further, all the complexes could cleave the circular plasmid pUC19 DNA efficiently by using an activator H2O2. The ligand and all metal(II) complexes showed good antibacterial activities. The molecular docking studies of the complexes with DNA were performed in order to make a comparison and conclusion with spectral technic results.

  20. Isothermal titration calorimetric and computational studies on the binding of chitooligosaccharides to pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narahari, Akkaladevi; Singla, Hitesh; Nareddy, Pavan Kumar; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Surolia, Avadhesha; Swamy, Musti J

    2011-04-14

    The interaction of chitooligosaccharides [(GlcNAc)(2-6)] with pumpkin phloem exudate lectin (PPL) was investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry and computational methods. The dimeric PPL binds to (GlcNAc)(3-5) with binding constants of 1.26-1.53 × 10(5) M(-1) at 25 °C, whereas chitobiose exhibits approximately 66-fold lower affinity. Interestingly, chitohexaose shows nearly 40-fold higher affinity than chitopentaose with a binding constant of 6.16 × 10(6) M(-1). The binding stoichiometry decreases with an increase in the oligosaccharide size from 2.26 for chitobiose to 1.08 for chitohexaose. The binding reaction was essentially enthalpy driven with negative entropic contribution, suggesting that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' interactions are the main factors that stabilize PPL-saccharide association. The three-dimensional structure of PPL was predicted by homology modeling, and binding of chitooligosaccharides was investigated by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, which showed that the protein binding pocket can accommodate up to three GlcNAc residues, whereas additional residues in chitotetraose and chitopentaose did not exhibit any interactions with the binding pocket. Docking studies with chitohexaose indicated that the two triose units of the molecule could interact with different protein binding sites, suggesting formation of higher order complexes by the higher oligomers of GlcNAc by their simultaneous interaction with two protein molecules.

  1. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TAL effectors (TALEs contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE.

  2. Differential scanning calorimetry study on the binding of nucleic acids to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-sphingosine liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõiv, A; Mustonen, P; Kinnunen, P K

    1994-03-31

    Binding of DNA and RNA to sphingosine-containing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) liposomes was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal phase behaviour of neat DMPC liposomes was unaffected by the presence of the nucleic acids. However, significant alterations in the melting profiles of the DMPC/sphingosine composite membranes were produced by DNA and RNA, thus revealing their binding to the liposomes. For example, for 79:21 (molar ratio) DMPC/sphingosine liposomes a single endotherm at 29.1 degrees C with an enthalpy of 6.3 kcal/mol lipid was observed. In the presence of DNA at the nucleotide/sphingosine ratio of 0.6 this endotherm separated into three distinct peaks at 28.0, 31.4 and 35.1 degrees C, together with an approximately 22% reduction in the total enthalpy. Further increase in DNA concentration up to 1.5 nucleotides per sphingosine led to complete loss of the original heat absorption peak of the DMPC/sphingosine liposomes, while an endotherm at 34.3 degrees C with delta H of 2.7 kcal/mol developed. By visual inspection, rapid and extensive aggregation of the liposomes due to DNA was evident. Evidence for DNA-induced phase separation was also provided by compression isotherms of sphingosine containing DMPC monolayers recorded over an aqueous buffer both in the presence and absence of DNA. The effects of RNA on the thermal phase behaviour of the composite liposomes were qualitatively similar to those described above for DNA. Notably, the presence of eggPA abolished the nucleic acid induced heat capacity changes for DMPC/sphingosine liposomes probably because of neutralization of the positive charge of sphingosine. The binding of DNA to DMPC/sphingosine liposomes occurred both below and above the lipid phase transition temperature, as shown by fluorescence resonance energy transfer utilizing adriamycin-labelled DNA as a quencher and membrane incorporated pyrene-labelled phospholipid as a donor. However, the apparent binding to

  3. To bind or not to bind? Different temporal binding effects from voluntary pressing and releasing actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Wen-Jing; Fu, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    Binding effect refers to the perceptual attraction between an action and an outcome leading to a subjective compression of time. Most studies investigating binding effects exclusively employ the "pressing" action without exploring other types of actions. The present study addresses this issue by introducing another action, releasing action or the voluntary lifting of the finger/wrist, to investigate the differences between voluntary pressing and releasing actions. Results reveal that releasing actions led to robust yet short-lived temporal binding effects, whereas pressing condition had steady temporal binding effects up to super-seconds. The two actions also differ in sensitivity to changes in temporal contiguity and contingency, which could be attributed to the difference in awareness of action. Extending upon current models of "willed action," our results provide insights from a temporal point of view and support the concept of a dual system consisting of predictive motor control and top-down mechanisms.

  4. Structural and functional studies of the modulator NS9283 reveal agonist-like mechanism of action at α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe A; Ahring, Philip K; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen

    2014-01-01

    Modulation of Cys loop receptor ion channels is a proven drug discovery strategy, but many underlying mechanisms of the mode of action are poorly understood. We report the x-ray structure of the acetylcholine-binding protein from Lymnaea stagnalis with NS9283, a stoichiometry selective positive...... on efficacy. The shared modulatory profile along with a binding site located in an extracellular subunit interface suggest that modulation via an agonist-like mechanism may be a common mechanism of action that potentially could apply to Cys loop receptors beyond the α4β2 nAChRs....... modulator that targets the α4-α4 interface of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Together with homology modeling, mutational data, quantum mechanical calculations, and pharmacological studies on α4β2 nAChRs, the structure reveals a modulator binding mode that overlaps the α4-α4 interface...

  5. Reference tissue modeling with parameter coupling: application to a study of SERT binding in HIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endres, Christopher J; Pomper, Martin G [Russell H Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Hammoud, Dima A, E-mail: endres@jhmi.edu [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health/Clinical Center, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-04-21

    When applicable, it is generally preferred to evaluate positron emission tomography (PET) studies using a reference tissue-based approach as that avoids the need for invasive arterial blood sampling. However, most reference tissue methods have been shown to have a bias that is dependent on the level of tracer binding, and the variability of parameter estimates may be substantially affected by noise level. In a study of serotonin transporter (SERT) binding in HIV dementia, it was determined that applying parameter coupling to the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) reduced the variability of parameter estimates and yielded the strongest between-group significant differences in SERT binding. The use of parameter coupling makes the application of SRTM more consistent with conventional blood input models and reduces the total number of fitted parameters, thus should yield more robust parameter estimates. Here, we provide a detailed evaluation of the application of parameter constraint and parameter coupling to [{sup 11}C]DASB PET studies. Five quantitative methods, including three methods that constrain the reference tissue clearance (k{sup r}{sub 2}) to a common value across regions were applied to the clinical and simulated data to compare measurement of the tracer binding potential (BP{sub ND}). Compared with standard SRTM, either coupling of k{sup r}{sub 2} across regions or constraining k{sup r}{sub 2} to a first-pass estimate improved the sensitivity of SRTM to measuring a significant difference in BP{sub ND} between patients and controls. Parameter coupling was particularly effective in reducing the variance of parameter estimates, which was less than 50% of the variance obtained with standard SRTM. A linear approach was also improved when constraining k{sup r}{sub 2} to a first-pass estimate, although the SRTM-based methods yielded stronger significant differences when applied to the clinical study. This work shows that parameter coupling reduces the

  6. Crystal structure of inhibitor of growth 4 (ING4) dimerization domain reveals functional organization of ING family of chromatin-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culurgioni, Simone; Muñoz, Inés G; Moreno, Alberto; Palacios, Alicia; Villate, Maider; Palmero, Ignacio; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J

    2012-03-30

    The protein ING4 binds to histone H3 trimethylated at Lys-4 (H3K4me3) through its C-terminal plant homeodomain, thus recruiting the HBO1 histone acetyltransferase complex to target promoters. The structure of the plant homeodomain finger bound to an H3K4me3 peptide has been described, as well as the disorder and flexibility in the ING4 central region. We report the crystal structure of the ING4 N-terminal domain, which shows an antiparallel coiled-coil homodimer with each protomer folded into a helix-loop-helix structure. This arrangement suggests that ING4 can bind simultaneously two histone tails on the same or different nucleosomes. Dimerization has a direct impact on ING4 tumor suppressor activity because monomeric mutants lose the ability to induce apoptosis after genotoxic stress. Homology modeling based on the ING4 structure suggests that other ING dimers may also exist.

  7. Insight on AV-45 binding in white and grey matter from histogram analysis: a study on early Alzheimer's disease patients and healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmi, Federico; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Adel, Djilali; Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Pariente, Jérémie; Barbeau, Emmanuel; Payoux, Pierre; Péran, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Purpose AV-45 amyloid biomarker is known to show uptake in white matter in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but also in healthy population. This binding; thought to be of a non-specific lipophilic nature has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the differential pattern of AV-45 binding in healthy and pathological populations in white matter. Methods We recruited 24 patients presenting with AD at early stage and 17 matched, healthy subjects. We used an optimized PET-MRI registration method and an approach based on intensity histogram using several indexes. We compared the results of the intensity histogram analyses with a more canonical approach based on target-to-cerebellum Standard Uptake Value (SUVr) in white and grey matters using MANOVA and discriminant analyses. A cluster analysis on white and grey matter histograms was also performed. Results White matter histogram analysis revealed significant differences between AD and healthy subjects, which were not revealed by SUVr analysis. However, white matter histograms was not decisive to discriminate groups, and indexes based on grey matter only showed better discriminative power than SUVr. The cluster analysis divided our sample in two clusters, showing different uptakes in grey but also in white matter. Conclusion These results demonstrate that AV-45 binding in white matter conveys subtle information not detectable using SUVr approach. Although it is not better than standard SUVr to discriminate AD patients from healthy subjects, this information could reveal white matter modifications. PMID:24573658

  8. Crystal structure of Yersinia pestis virulence factor YfeA reveals two polyspecific metal-binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radka, Christopher D.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, Landon S.; Lawrenz, Matthew B.; Perry, Robert D.; Aller, Stephen G.

    2017-06-30

    Gram-negative bacteria use siderophores, outer membrane receptors, inner membrane transporters and substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) to transport transition metals through the periplasm. The SBPs share a similar protein fold that has undergone significant structural evolution to communicate with a variety of differentially regulated transporters in the cell. InYersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, YfeA (YPO2439, y1897), an SBP, is important for full virulence during mammalian infection. To better understand the role of YfeA in infection, crystal structures were determined under several environmental conditions with respect to transition-metal levels. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and anomalous X-ray scattering data show that YfeA is polyspecific and can alter its substrate specificity. In minimal-media experiments, YfeA crystals grown after iron supplementation showed a threefold increase in iron fluorescence emission over the iron fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions, and YfeA crystals grown after manganese supplementation during overexpression showed a fivefold increase in manganese fluorescence emission over the manganese fluorescence emission from YfeA crystals grown from nutrient-rich conditions. In all experiments, the YfeA crystals produced the strongest fluorescence emission from zinc and could not be manipulated otherwise. Additionally, this report documents the discovery of a novel surface metal-binding site that prefers to chelate zinc but can also bind manganese. Flexibility across YfeA crystal forms in three loops and a helix near the buried metal-binding site suggest that a structural rearrangement is required for metal loading and unloading.

  9. Crucial role of dynamic linker histone binding and divalent ions for DNA accessibility and gene regulation revealed by mesoscale modeling of oligonucleosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Schlick, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of a mesoscale model of oligonucleosomes are analyzed to examine the role of dynamic-linker histone (LH) binding/unbinding in high monovalent salt with divalent ions, and to further interpret noted chromatin fiber softening by dynamic LH in monovalent salt conditions. We find that divalent ions produce a fiber stiffening effect that competes with, but does not overshadow, the dramatic softening triggered by dynamic-LH behavior. Indeed, we find that in typical in vivo conditions, dynamic-LH binding/unbinding reduces fiber stiffening dramatically (by a factor of almost 5, as measured by the elasticity modulus) compared with rigidly fixed LH, and also the force needed to initiate chromatin unfolding, making it consistent with those of molecular motors. Our data also show that, during unfolding, divalent ions together with LHs induce linker-DNA bending and DNA–DNA repulsion screening, which guarantee formation of heteromorphic superbeads-on-a-string structures that combine regions of loose and compact fiber independently of the characteristics of the LH–core bond. These structures might be important for gene regulation as they expose regions of the DNA selectively. Dynamic control of LH binding/unbinding, either globally or locally, in the presence of divalent ions, might constitute a mechanism for regulation of gene expression. PMID:22790986

  10. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Asencio-Hernández

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA, a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER, estrogen-related receptor (ERR and androgen receptor (AR. BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD, which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules.

  11. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  12. Study on dopamine D{sub 2} binding capacity in vascular parkinsonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashi, Hiroo; Nagata, Ken; Hirata, Yutaka; Hatazawa, Jun [Research Inst. for Brain and Blood Vessels, Akita (Japan); Utsumi, Hiroya [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    To investigate whether the striatal dopamine receptor function is involved in the development of vascular parkinsonism (VP), a positron emission tomography (PET) study was conducted on 9 patients with VP by using [{sup 11}C] N-methylspiperone as the tracer. The rate of binding availability in the striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (k{sub 3}) was determined semiquantitatively, and the values were compared to the predicted normal values based on the results from 7 normal volunteers. Of 9 patients with VP, the normalized D{sub 2} receptor binding [%k{sub 3}] was more than 90% in 5 patients, 89 to 87% in 3, and 75% in one. These values showed no evident correlation with the Hoehn and Yahr stage. The laterality of the striatal %k{sub 3} did not correspond to that of the parkinsonism. Thus, the striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor binding was not severely impaired and did not correlate with the neurological status in patients with VP. This may indicate that striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptor function is not primarily associated with the development of the parkinsonism in VP. (author)

  13. Binding induced conformational changes of proteins correlate with their intrinsic fluctuations: a case study of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keskin Ozlem

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background How antibodies recognize and bind to antigens can not be totally explained by rigid shape and electrostatic complimentarity models. Alternatively, pre-existing equilibrium hypothesis states that the native state of an antibody is not defined by a single rigid conformation but instead with an ensemble of similar conformations that co-exist at equilibrium. Antigens bind to one of the preferred conformations making this conformation more abundant shifting the equilibrium. Results Here, two antibodies, a germline antibody of 36–65 Fab and a monoclonal antibody, SPE7 are studied in detail to elucidate the mechanism of antibody-antigen recognition and to understand how a single antibody recognizes different antigens. An elastic network model, Anisotropic Network Model (ANM is used in the calculations. Pre-existing equilibrium is not restricted to apply to antibodies. Intrinsic fluctuations of eight proteins, from different classes of proteins, such as enzymes, binding and transport proteins are investigated to test the suitability of the method. The intrinsic fluctuations are compared with the experimentally observed ligand induced conformational changes of these proteins. The results show that the intrinsic fluctuations obtained by theoretical methods correlate with structural changes observed when a ligand is bound to the protein. The decomposition of the total fluctuations serves to identify the different individual modes of motion, ranging from the most cooperative ones involving the overall structure, to the most localized ones. Conclusion Results suggest that the pre-equilibrium concept holds for antibodies and the promiscuity of antibodies can also be explained this hypothesis: a limited number of conformational states driven by intrinsic motions of an antibody might be adequate to bind to different antigens.

  14. Resonance Raman study on indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase: Control of reactivity by substrate-binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Sachiko; Hara, Masayuki [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu [Biometal Science Laboratory, RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Harima Institute, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ogura, Takashi, E-mail: ogura@sci.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Life Science and Picobiology Institute, University of Hyogo, Koto 3-2-1, Kamigori-cho, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: • Indoleamine 2,3-dioygenase has been studied by resonance Raman spectroscopy. • Trp-binding to the enzyme induces high frequency shift of the Fe–His stretching mode. • Increased imidazolate character of histidine promotes the O–O bond cleavage step. • A fine-tuning of the reactivity of the O–O bond cleavage reaction is identified. • The results are consistent with the sequential oxygen-atom-transfer mechanism. - Abstract: Resonance Raman spectra of ligand-bound complexes including the 4-phenylimidazole complex and of free and L-Trp-bound forms of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase in the ferric state were examined. Effects on the vinyl and propionate substituent groups of the heme were detected in a ligand-dependent fashion. The effects of phenyl group of 4-phenylimidazole on the vinyl and propionate Raman bands were evident when compared with the case of imidazole ligand. Substrate binding to the ferrous protein caused an upshift of the iron–histidine stretching mode by 3 cm{sup −1}, indicating an increase in negativity of the imidazole ring, which favors the O–O bond cleavage. The substrate binding event is likely to be communicated from the heme distal side to the iron–histidine bond through heme substituent groups and the hydrogen-bond network which includes water molecules, as identified in an X-ray structure of a 4-phenylimidazole complex. The results provide evidence for fine-tuning of the reactivity of O–O bond cleavage by the oxygenated heme upon binding of L-Trp.

  15. Binding of several anti-tumor drugs to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi Shuyun [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)], E-mail: sy_bi@sina.com; Sun Yantao [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Qiao Chunyu; Zhang Hanqi [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Liu Chunming [College of Chemistry, Changchun Normal University, Changchun 130032 (China)

    2009-05-15

    The interactions of mitomycin C (MMC), fluorouracil (FU), mercaptopurine (MP) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DXR) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by spectroscopic method. Quenching of fluorescence of serum albumin by these drugs was found to be a static quenching process. The binding constants (K{sub A}) were 9.66x10{sup 3}, 2.08x10{sup 3}, 8.20x10{sup 2} and 7.50x10{sup 3} L mol{sup -1} for MMC-, FU-, MP- and DXR-BSA, respectively, at pH 7.4 Britton-Robinson buffer at 28 deg. C. The thermodynamic functions such as enthalpy change ({delta}H), entropy change ({delta}S) and Gibbs free-energy change ({delta}G) for the reactions were also calculated according to the thermodynamic equations. The main forces in the interactions of these drugs with BSA were evaluated. It was found that the interactions of MMC and FU with BSA were exothermic processes and those of MP and DXR with BSA were endothermic. In addition, the binding sites on BSA for the four drugs were probed by the changes of binding properties of these drugs with BSA in the presence of two important site markers such as ibuprofen and indomethacin. Based on the Foester theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding distances between the drugs and tryptophane were calculated and they were 3.00, 1.14, 2.85, and 2.79 nm for MMC, FU, MP and DXR, respectively.

  16. Binding thermodynamics of Diclofenac and Naproxen with human and bovine serum albumins: A calorimetric and spectroscopic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Sprague, Samuel E.; Smith, Britannia M.; Giffune, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The binding affinity of Diclofenac and Naproxen to BSA and HSA is on the order of 10 4 –10 6 M −1 . • Two Diclofenac molecules bind per BSA or HSA but only 0.75 and 3 Naproxen molecules bind to BSA and HSA, respectively. • Drugs binding to BSA is only enthalpically favored and both enthalpically and entropically favored for HSA. • Fluorescence quenching data suggest dynamic collisions and the formation of ground-state protein-drug complexes. • DSC data show multiple sequential unfolding events and strong drug stabilization effects. - Abstract: Serum albumins are ubiquitous proteins able to bind a variety of exogenous and endogenous ligands including hydrophobic pharmaceuticals. Most drugs bind to two very active binding regions located within sub-domains IIA and IIIA of the protein, also known as Sudlow’s sites. The drug binding mode of serum albumin provides important pharmacological information and influences drug solubility, efficacy, biological distribution, and excretion. Here, the binding thermodynamics of Diclofenac and Naproxen, two non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to bovine and human serum albumins (BSA and HSA, respectively) were studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), fluorescence spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The ITC data show that the binding affinity (K) of Diclofenac to BSA and HSA is on the order of 10 4 M −1 with a binding stoichiometry (n) of 2 drug molecules per protein. Naproxen binding to the two proteins exhibits a different profile with K and n values on the order of 10 6 M −1 and 0.75 for BSA, and 10 5 M −1 and 3 for HSA, respectively. The binding of the two drugs to HSA is found to be both enthalpically and entropically favored suggesting the formation of hydrogen bonds and van der Waals hydrophobic effects. Binding of the two drugs to BSA is only enthalpically favored with an unfavorable entropy term. Significant enthalpy–entropy compensation

  17. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of circulating sex hormone-binding globulin reveals multiple Loci implicated in sex steroid hormone regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea D Coviello

    Full Text Available Sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG is a glycoprotein responsible for the transport and biologic availability of sex steroid hormones, primarily testosterone and estradiol. SHBG has been associated with chronic diseases including type 2 diabetes (T2D and with hormone-sensitive cancers such as breast and prostate cancer. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS meta-analysis of 21,791 individuals from 10 epidemiologic studies and validated these findings in 7,046 individuals in an additional six studies. We identified twelve genomic regions (SNPs associated with circulating SHBG concentrations. Loci near the identified SNPs included SHBG (rs12150660, 17p13.1, p = 1.8 × 10(-106, PRMT6 (rs17496332, 1p13.3, p = 1.4 × 10(-11, GCKR (rs780093, 2p23.3, p = 2.2 × 10(-16, ZBTB10 (rs440837, 8q21.13, p = 3.4 × 10(-09, JMJD1C (rs7910927, 10q21.3, p = 6.1 × 10(-35, SLCO1B1 (rs4149056, 12p12.1, p = 1.9 × 10(-08, NR2F2 (rs8023580, 15q26.2, p = 8.3 × 10(-12, ZNF652 (rs2411984, 17q21.32, p = 3.5 × 10(-14, TDGF3 (rs1573036, Xq22.3, p = 4.1 × 10(-14, LHCGR (rs10454142, 2p16.3, p = 1.3 × 10(-07, BAIAP2L1 (rs3779195, 7q21.3, p = 2.7 × 10(-08, and UGT2B15 (rs293428, 4q13.2, p = 5.5 × 10(-06. These genes encompass multiple biologic pathways, including hepatic function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism and T2D, androgen and estrogen receptor function, epigenetic effects, and the biology of sex steroid hormone-responsive cancers including breast and prostate cancer. We found evidence of sex-differentiated genetic influences on SHBG. In a sex-specific GWAS, the loci 4q13.2-UGT2B15 was significant in men only (men p = 2.5 × 10(-08, women p = 0.66, heterogeneity p = 0.003. Additionally, three loci showed strong sex-differentiated effects: 17p13.1-SHBG and Xq22.3-TDGF3 were stronger in men, whereas 8q21.12-ZBTB10 was stronger in women. Conditional analyses identified additional signals at the SHBG gene that together almost double the proportion

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter Gene Family in Pineapple (Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.) Reveal the Role of AcABCG38 in Pollen Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Piaojuan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Lihua; Hou, Zhimin; Yan, Maokai; Hu, Bingyan; Liu, Yanhui; Azam, Syed Muhammad; Zhang, Ziyan; Rahman, Zia Ur; Liu, Liping; Qin, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Pineapple ( Ananas comosus L .) cultivation commonly relies on asexual reproduction which is easily impeded by many factors in agriculture production. Sexual reproduction might be a novel approach to improve the pineapple planting. However, genes controlling pineapple sexual reproduction are still remain elusive. In different organisms a conserved superfamily proteins known as ATP binding cassette (ABC) participate in various biological processes. Whereas, till today the ABC gene family has not been identified in pineapple. Here 100 ABC genes were identified in the pineapple genome and grouped into eight subfamilies (5 ABCAs , 20 ABCB s, 16 ABCCs , 2 ABCDs , one ABCEs , 5 ABCFs , 42 ABCGs and 9 ABCIs ). Gene expression profiling revealed the dynamic expression pattern of ABC gene family in various tissues and different developmental stages. AcABCA5, AcABCB6, AcABCC4 , AcABCC7 , AcABCC9 , AcABCG26 , AcABCG38 and AcABCG42 exhibited preferential expression in ovule and stamen. Over-expression of AcABCG38 in the Arabidopsis double mutant abcg1-2abcg16-2 partially restored its pollen abortion defects, indicating that AcABCG38 plays important roles in pollen development. Our study on ABC gene family in pineapple provides useful information for developing sexual pineapple plantation which could be utilized to improve pineapple agricultural production.

  19. Tight binding simulation study on zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepa; Jaggi, Neena; Gupta, Vishu

    2018-01-01

    Tight binding simulation studies using the density functional tight binding (DFTB) model have been performed on various zigzag single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs) to investigate their electronic properties using DFTB module of the Material Studio Software version 7.0. Various combinations of different eigen-solvers and charge mixing schemes available in the DFTB Module have been tried to chalk out the electronic structure. The analytically deduced values of the bandgap of (9, 0) SWCNT were compared with the experimentally determined value reported in the literature. On comparison, it was found that the tight binding approximations tend to drastically underestimate the bandgap values. However, the combination of Anderson charge mixing method with standard eigensolver when implemented using the smart algorithm was found to produce fairly close results. These optimized model parameters were then used to determine the band structures of various zigzag SWCNTs. (9, 0) Single-walled Nanotube which is extensively being used for sensing NH3, CH4 and NO2 has been picked up as a reference material since its experimental bandgap value has been reported in the literature. It has been found to exhibit a finite energy bandgap in contrast to its expected metallic nature. The study is of utmost significance as it not only probes and validates the simulation route for predicting suitable properties of nanomaterials but also throws light on the comparative efficacy of the different approximation and rationalization quantum mechanical techniques used in simulation studies. Such simulation studies if used intelligently prove to be immensely useful to the material scientists as they not only save time and effort but also pave the way to new experiments by making valuable predictions.

  20. Studies on the effect of AgNP binding on α-amylase structure of porcine pancreas and Bacillus subtilis by multi-spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, Vinita; Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N., E-mail: nchandrasekaran@vit.ac.in

    2014-02-15

    Functionalizing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with biomolecules have a number of applications in catalysis, sensing, pharmaceutics and therapy. For the first time, herein we report the interaction of amylase-AgNPs through various spectroscopic techniques. AgNPs are synthesized and characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The binding of AgNPs to α-amylase are investigated by UV–vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Absorption intensity and Stern–Volmer plots confirmed the formation of the ground state complex with AgNPs. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of different concentrations of AgNP was observed. The apparent binding constant (K) and number of binding sites (n) was calculated from the Stern–Volmer plot was found to be 4.92×10{sup 3}, 3.8×10{sup 3} and 1.57, 1.3 for porcine pancreas and Bacillus subtilis α-amylase, respectively. Far-UV CD studies revealed the characteristic dichoric band at 222 nm for α-helical structure was shifted to 215 nm in porcine pancreatic α-amylase upon AgNP binding. Further, structural conformation change with peak shifts and the possible binding residues was confirmed through FTIR spectroscopy. -- Highlights: • AgNPs were synthesized using modified Creighton's method and characterized. • Structural changes analyzed by UV–vis, fluorescence spectroscopy. • CD and FTIR spectra reveal the secondary structure conformation change. • Potential application in food industry.

  1. Studies on the effect of AgNP binding on α-amylase structure of porcine pancreas and Bacillus subtilis by multi-spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernest, Vinita; Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N.

    2014-01-01

    Functionalizing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with biomolecules have a number of applications in catalysis, sensing, pharmaceutics and therapy. For the first time, herein we report the interaction of amylase-AgNPs through various spectroscopic techniques. AgNPs are synthesized and characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The binding of AgNPs to α-amylase are investigated by UV–vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism and FTIR spectroscopic techniques. Absorption intensity and Stern–Volmer plots confirmed the formation of the ground state complex with AgNPs. The quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of different concentrations of AgNP was observed. The apparent binding constant (K) and number of binding sites (n) was calculated from the Stern–Volmer plot was found to be 4.92×10 3 , 3.8×10 3 and 1.57, 1.3 for porcine pancreas and Bacillus subtilis α-amylase, respectively. Far-UV CD studies revealed the characteristic dichoric band at 222 nm for α-helical structure was shifted to 215 nm in porcine pancreatic α-amylase upon AgNP binding. Further, structural conformation change with peak shifts and the possible binding residues was confirmed through FTIR spectroscopy. -- Highlights: • AgNPs were synthesized using modified Creighton's method and characterized. • Structural changes analyzed by UV–vis, fluorescence spectroscopy. • CD and FTIR spectra reveal the secondary structure conformation change. • Potential application in food industry

  2. Metal binding characterization and conformational studies using Raman microscopy of resin-bound poly(aspartic acid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stair, Jacqueline L; Holcombe, James A

    2007-03-01

    The metal binding capacities, conditional stability constants, and secondary structure of immobilized polyaspartic acid (PLAsp) (n = 6, 20, and 30) on TentaGel resin were determined when binding Mg2+, Co2+, Cd2+, and Ni2+. Metal binding to the synthesized peptides was evaluated using breakthrough curves from a packed microcolumn and flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FAAS) detection. The metal capacities reached values of 590, 2160, and 3710 mumol of metal/g of resin for the 6-mer, 20-mer, and 30-mer, respectively, and this resulted in 2-3 residues per metal for all peptides and metals tested. Surprisingly, the concentrated environment of the resin along with the spatial distribution of attachment groups allowed for most residues to participate in metal binding regardless of the peptide length. Conditional stability constants calculated using single metal binding isotherms indicated that binding strength decreased as the chain length increased on the resin. Raman microscopy on single beads was used to determine PLAsp secondary structure, and all peptides were of a mixed conformation (i.e., beta-sheets, alpha-helices, random chain, etc.) during neutral conditioning and metal binding. Uniquely, the longer 20-mer and 30-mer peptides showed a distinct change from a mixed conformation to beta-sheets and alpha-helices during metal release with acid. This study confirms that metal release by longer immobilized peptides is often assisted by a conformational change, which easily spoils the binding cavity, while shorter peptides may release metal primarily by H+ displacement.

  3. Genome-Wide Profiling of Liver X Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α in Mouse Liver Reveals Extensive Sharing of Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boergesen, Michael; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Gross, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    and correlate with an LXR-dependent hepatic induction of lipogenic genes. To further investigate the roles of RXR and LXR in the regulation of hepatic gene expression, we have mapped the ligand-regulated genome-wide binding of these factors in mouse liver. We find that the RXR agonist bexarotene primarily......The liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that form permissive heterodimers with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and are important regulators of lipid metabolism in the liver. We have recently shown that RXR agonist-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis in mice are dependent on LXRs...

  4. From in silico to in vitro: a trip to reveal flavonoid binding on the Rattus norvegicus Kir6.1 ATP-sensitive inward rectifier potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Alfonso; Cicaloni, Vittoria; Porciatti, Piera; Langella, Andrea; Fusi, Fabio; Saponara, Simona; Spiga, Ottavia

    2018-01-01

    ATP-sensitive inward rectifier potassium channels (Kir), are a potassium channel family involved in many physiological processes. K ATP dysfunctions are observed in several diseases such as hypoglycaemia, hyperinsulinemia, Prinzmetal angina-like symptoms, cardiovascular diseases. A broader view of the K ATP mechanism is needed in order to operate on their regulation, and in this work we clarify the structure of the Rattus norvegicus ATP-sensitive inward rectifier potassium channel 8 (Kir6.1), which has been obtained through a homology modelling procedure. Due to the medical use of flavonoids, a considerable increase in studies on their influence on human health has recently been observed, therefore our aim is to study, through computational methods, the three-dimensional (3D) conformation together with mechanism of action of Kir6.1 with three flavonoids. Computational analysis by performing molecular dynamics (MD) and docking simulation on rat 3D modelled structure have been completed, in its closed and open conformation state and in complex with Quercetin, 5-Hydroxyflavone and Rutin flavonoids. Our study showed that only Quercetin and 5-Hydroxyflavone were responsible for a significant down-regulation of the Kir6.1 activity, stabilising it in a closed conformation. This hypothesis was supported by in vitro experiments demonstrating that Quercetin and 5-Hydroxyflavone were capable to inhibit K ATP currents of rat tail main artery myocytes recorded by the patch-clamp technique. Combined methodological approaches, such as molecular modelling, docking and MD simulations of Kir6.1 channel, used to elucidate flavonoids intrinsic mechanism of action, are introduced, revealing a new potential druggable protein site.

  5. The crystal structure of human protein α1M reveals a chromophore-binding site and two putative protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yangli; Gao, Zengqiang; Guo, Zhen; Zhang, Hongpeng; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Luo, Miao; Hou, Haifeng; Huang, Ailong; Dong, Yuhui; Wang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •We determined the first structure of human α1M with heavy electron density of the chromophore. •We proposed a new structural model of the chromophore. •We first revealed that the two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. -- Abstract: Lipocalin α1-microglobulin (α1M) is a conserved glycoprotein present in plasma and in the interstitial fluids of all tissues. α1M is linked to a heterogeneous yellow–brown chromophore of unknown structure, and interacts with several target proteins, including α1-inhibitor-3, fibronectin, prothrombin and albumin. To date, there is little knowledge about the interaction sites between α1M and its partners. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human α1M. Due to the crystallization occurring in a low ionic strength solution, the unidentified chromophore with heavy electron density is observed at a hydrophobic inner tube of α1M. In addition, two conserved surface regions of α1M are proposed as putative protein–protein interface sites. Further study is needed to unravel the detailed information about the interaction between α1M and its partners

  6. Study of the nucleotide binding site of the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe plasma membrane H+-ATPase using formycin triphosphate-terbium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronjat, M.; Lacapere, J.J.; Dufour, J.P.; Dupont, Y.

    1987-01-01

    The plasma membrane of yeasts contains an H+-ATPase similar to the other cation transport ATPases of eukaryotic organisms. This enzyme has been purified and shows H+ transport in reconstituted vesicles. In the presence of Mg2+, formycin triphosphate (FTP) is hydrolyzed by the H+-ATPase and supports H+ transport. When combined with terbium ion, FTP (Tb-FTP) and ATP (Tb-ATP) are no longer hydrolyzed. Competition between Mg-ATP and Tb-FTP for ATP hydrolysis indicates that terbium-associated nucleotides bind to the catalytic site of the H+-ATPase. The fluorescent properties of the Tb-FTP complex were used to study the active site of the H+-ATPase. Fluorescence of Tb-FTP is greatly enhanced upon binding into the nucleotide site of H+-ATPase with a dissociation constant of 1 microM. Tb-ATP, Tb-ADP, and Tb-ITP are competitive inhibitors of Tb-FTP binding with Ki = 4.5, 5.0, and 6.0 microM, respectively. Binding of Tb-FTP is observed only in the presence of an excess of Tb3+ with an activation constant Ka = 25 microM for Tb3+. Analysis of the data reveals that the sites for Tb-FTP and Tb3+ binding are independent entities. In standard conditions these sites would be occupied by Mg-ATP and Mg2+, respectively. These findings suggest an important regulatory role of divalent cations on the activity of H+-ATPase. Replacement of H 2 O by D 2 O in the medium suggests the existence of two types of nucleotide binding sites differing by the hydration state of the Tb3+ ion in the bound Tb-FTP complex

  7. Label-Free LC-MS Profiling of Skeletal Muscle Reveals Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein as a Candidate Biomarker of Aerobic Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulezwan A. Malik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis provides robust comparative analysis of skeletal muscle, but this technique is laborious and limited by its inability to resolve all proteins. In contrast, orthogonal separation by SDS-PAGE and reverse-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC coupled to mass spectrometry (MS affords deep mining of the muscle proteome, but differential analysis between samples is challenging due to the greater level of fractionation and the complexities of quantifying proteins based on the abundances of their tryptic peptides. Here we report simple, semi-automated and time efficient (i.e., 3 h per sample proteome profiling of skeletal muscle by 1-dimensional RPLC electrospray ionisation tandem MS. Solei were analysed from rats (n = 5, in each group bred as either high- or low-capacity runners (HCR and LCR, respectively that exhibited a 6.4-fold difference (1,625 ± 112 m vs. 252 ± 43 m, p < 0.0001 in running capacity during a standardized treadmill test. Soluble muscle proteins were extracted, digested with trypsin and individual biological replicates (50 ng of tryptic peptides subjected to LC-MS profiling. Proteins were identified by triplicate LC-MS/MS analysis of a pooled sample of each biological replicate. Differential expression profiling was performed on relative abundances (RA of parent ions, which spanned three orders of magnitude. In total, 207 proteins were analysed, which encompassed almost all enzymes of the major metabolic pathways in skeletal muscle. The most abundant protein detected was type I myosin heavy chain (RA = 5,843 ± 897 and the least abundant protein detected was heat shock 70 kDa protein (RA = 2 ± 0.5. Sixteen proteins were significantly (p < 0.05 more abundant in HCR muscle and hierarchal clustering of the profiling data highlighted two protein subgroups, which encompassed proteins associated with either the respiratory chain or fatty acid oxidation. Heart-type fatty acid binding protein (FABPH was 1

  8. A combined spectroscopic and molecular docking study on site selective binding interaction of Toluidine blue O with Human and Bovine serum albumins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selva Sharma, Arumugam [Department of Chemistry, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Anandakumar, Shanmugam [Department of Bioinformatics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India); Ilanchelian, Malaichamy, E-mail: chelian73@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641046 (India)

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation the interaction of a biologically active photodynamic therapeutic agent Toluidine blue O (TBO) with Serum albumins viz Human serum albumin (HSA) and Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied using absorption, emission, circular dichroism spectroscopy and molecular docking experiments. The emission titration experiments between HSA/BSA and TBO revealed the existence of strong interactions between TBO and the proteins. The site competitive experiment of HSA and BSA showed that the primary binding site of TBO is located in site I of HSA/BSA involving hydrophobic, hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. To ascertain the results of site competitive experiments, molecular docking was utilized to characterize the binding models of TBO–HSA/BSA complexes. From the molecular docking studies, free energy calculations were undertaken to examine the energy contributions and the role of various amino acid residues of HSA/BSA in TBO binding. The existence of Forster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between the ligand and the protein was utilized to calculate the donor–acceptor distance of TBO and protein. The TBO induced conformational changes of HSA/BSA was established using synchronous emission, three dimensional emission and circular dichroism studies. - Highlights: • Site selective binding interaction of TBO with HSA and BSA were investigated. • TBO quenches the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA/BSA by static quenching process. • Computational studies of TBO with HSA/BSA substantiate the experimental findings. • 3D and CD spectral studies of TBO–HSA/BSA revealed structural changes in protein. • The distance (r) between TBO and HSA/BSA were estimated from FRET theory.

  9. radiochemical studies on the binding of humic materials with toxic elements and compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afifi, D.M.I.

    2001-01-01

    industrial nations produce several billion tons of waste every year . this figure will increase as both population and industrial growth increase. there are many kinds of waste, including refinery waste, which consists of hydrocarbons, heavy metals, metal catalysts and caustic solution; dredge spoils, some of which are highly polluted and cntains substances potentially hazardous to human health or the marine ecosystem; chemical waste such as insecticides, pesticides, other complex chemicals and heavy metals; radioactive waste and agricultural waste, anmd most of them are extremely hazardous and harmful to the marine ecosystem and its inhabitants.the aim of this thesis is to study the binding of humic materials with toxic elements and compounds

  10. A tight binding model study of tunneling conductance spectra of spin and orbitally ordered CMR manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Saswati; Sahoo, D. D.; Rout, G. C.

    2018-04-01

    We report here a tight binding model for colossal magnetoresistive (CMR) manganites to study the pseudo gap (PG) behavior near Fermi level. In the Kubo-Ohata type DE model, we consider first and second nearest neighbor interactions for transverse spin fluctuations in core band and hopping integrals in conduction band, in the presence of static band Jahn-Teller distortion. The model Hamiltonian is solved using Zubarev's Green's function technique. The electron density of states (DOS) is found out from the Green's functions. We observe clear PG near Fermi level in the electron DOS.

  11. Crystal Structures of the Helicobacter pylori MTAN Enzyme Reveal Specific Interactions between S-Adenosylhomocysteine and the 5'-Alkylthio Binding Subsite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Vidhi [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Ronning, Donald R. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    2012-11-13

    The bacterial 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzyme is a multifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-ribosidic bond of at least four different adenosine-based metabolites: S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), 5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), 5'-deoxyadenosine (5'-DOA), and 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine. These activities place the enzyme at the hub of seven fundamental bacterial metabolic pathways: S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) utilization, polyamine biosynthesis, the purine salvage pathway, the methionine salvage pathway, the SAM radical pathways, autoinducer-2 biosynthesis, and menaquinone biosynthesis. The last pathway makes MTAN essential for Helicobacter pylori viability. Although structures of various bacterial and plant MTANs have been described, the interactions between the homocysteine moiety of SAH and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of MTAN have never been resolved. We have determined crystal structures of an inactive mutant form of H. pylori MTAN bound to MTA and SAH to 1.63 and 1.20 Å, respectively. The active form of MTAN was also crystallized in the presence of SAH, allowing the determination of the structure of a ternary enzyme–product complex resolved at 1.50 Å. These structures identify interactions between the homocysteine moiety and the 5'-alkylthiol binding site of the enzyme. This information can be leveraged for the development of species-specific MTAN inhibitors that prevent the growth of H. pylori.

  12. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM) to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM) to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after adding a large concentration of

  13. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  14. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  15. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, John

    2015-01-01

    The uranyl cation (UO 2 2+ ) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  16. Synthesis and Structural Investigation of New Bio-Relevant Complexes of Lanthanides with 5-Hydroxyflavone: DNA Binding and Protein Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra-Cristina Munteanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we attempted to develop new metal coordination complexes of the natural flavonoid 5-hydroxyflavone with Sm(III, Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III. The resultant hydroxo complexes have been characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and mass spectral studies. The general chemical formula of the complexes is [Ln(C15H9O33(OH2(H2Ox]·nH2O, where Ln is the lanthanide cation and x = 0 for Sm(III, x = 1 for Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III and n = 0 for Sm(III, Gd(III, Tb(III, n = 1 for Eu(III, respectively. The proposed structures of the complexes were optimized by DFT calculations. Theoretical calculations and experimental determinations sustain the proposed structures of the hydroxo complexes, with two molecules of 5-hydroxyflavone acting as monoanionic bidentate chelate ligands. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA has been explored by fluorescence titration and UV-Vis absorption binding studies, and revealed that the synthesized complexes interact with DNA with binding constants (Kb ~ 104. Human serum albumin (HSA and transferrin (Tf binding studies have also been performed by fluorescence titration techniques (fluorescence quenching studies, synchronous fluorescence spectra. The apparent association constants (Ka and thermodynamic parameters have been calculated from the fluorescence quenching experiment at 299 K, 308 K, and 318 K. The quenching curves indicate that the complexes bind to HSA with smaller affinity than the ligand, but to Tf with higher binding affinities than the ligand.

  17. Azadirachtin(A) distinctively modulates subdomain 2 of actin - novel mechanism to induce depolymerization revealed by molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin Kumar, R; Roopa, L; Sudheer Mohammed, M M; Kulkarni, Naveen

    2016-12-01

    Azadirachtin(A) (AZA), a potential insecticide from neem, binds to actin and induces depolymerization in Drosophila. AZA binds to the pocket same as that of Latrunculin A (LAT), but LAT inhibits actin polymerization by stiffening the actin structure and affects the ADP-ATP exchange. The mechanism by which AZA induces actin depolymerization is not clearly understood. Therefore, different computational experiments were conducted to delineate the precise mechanism of AZA-induced actin depolymerization. Molecular dynamics studies showed that AZA strongly interacted with subdomain 2 and destabilized the interactions between subdomain 2 of one actin and subdomains 1 and 4 of the adjacent actin, causing the separation of actin subunits. The separation was observed between subdomain 3 of subunit n and subdomain 4 of subunit n + 2. However, the specific triggering point for the separation of the subunits was the destabilization of direct interactions between subdomain 2 of subunit n (Arg39, Val45, Gly46 and Arg62) and subdomain 4 of subunit n + 2 (Asp286, Ile287, Asp288, Ile289, Asp244 and Lys291). These results reveal a unique mechanism of an actin filament modulator that induces depolymerization. This mechanism of AZA can be used to design similar molecules against mammalian actins for cancer therapy.

  18. The mechanism of DNA ejection in the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a revealed by cryo-electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Xiaofeng [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Walter, Michael H. [Department of Biology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA 50614 (United States); Paredes, Angel [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Morais, Marc C., E-mail: mcmorais@utmb.edu [Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Liu, Jun, E-mail: Jun.Liu.1@uth.tmc.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-12-20

    The structure of the Bacillus anthracis spore-binding phage 8a was determined by cryo-electron tomography. The phage capsid forms a T = 16 icosahedron attached to a contractile tail via a head-tail connector protein. The tail consists of a six-start helical sheath surrounding a central tail tube, and a structurally novel baseplate at the distal end of the tail that recognizes and attaches to host cells. The parameters of the icosahedral capsid lattice and the helical tail sheath suggest protein folds for the capsid and tail-sheath proteins, respectively, and indicate evolutionary relationships to other dsDNA viruses. Analysis of 2518 intact phage particles show four distinct conformations that likely correspond to four sequential states of the DNA ejection process during infection. Comparison of the four observed conformations suggests a mechanism for DNA ejection, including the molecular basis underlying coordination of tail sheath contraction and genome release from the capsid.

  19. Immunological properties of prolactin and studies on a gonadotropin binding inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological role of prolactin in horses has not yet been well defined. With the availability of highly purified ePRL for inducing antibody formation in rabbits and for radiolabeling with Na 125 I, a very sensitive (0.4-0.6 ng/ml) and highly specific homologous RIA for ePRL was developed. A heterologous RIA using 125 I-labeled ovine PRL and anti-ePRL antiserum was also developed and compared to the homologous RIA for ePRL. Of the two systems, it is concluded that this homologous RIA system is more suitable and more reliable for measuring prolactin concentration in horse serum samples. Until now, biochemical information on PRL has not been available for reptilian species. Sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) prolactin was purified from pituitary extracts by selective precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gel filtration. Similar to other species of PRL, sea turtle PRL is a 22,000-24,000 daltons protein and contains a high content of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine and leucine, the N-terminal amino acid residue. Gonadotropin (FSH) binding inhibitor was partially purified from sheep testes by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. The FSH-BI (molecular weight: 50,000 daltons, estimated by gel filtration) contains a protein moiety necessary for binding inhibitory activity. The inhibition of the binding of 125 I-labeled ovine FSH to its receptor by the FSH-BI is not competitive. Both in vivo and in vitro biological studies of FSH-BI preparations in rats indicated various effects on FSH and LH activities at the gonadal level. These findings suggest a physiological role for FSH-BI in the regulation of reproduction

  20. Lysine-functionalized nanodiamonds: synthesis, physiochemical characterization, and nucleic acid binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Randeep; Chitanda, Jackson M; Michel, Deborah; Maley, Jason; Borondics, Ferenc; Yang, Peng; Verrall, Ronald E; Badea, Ildiko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) are carbon-based nanomaterials that, because of their size (4–5 nm), stable inert core, alterable surface chemistry, fluorescence, and biocompatibility, are emerging as bioimaging agents and promising tools for the delivery of biochemical molecules into cellular systems. However, diamond particles possess a strong propensity to aggregate in liquid formulation media, restricting their applicability in biomedical sciences. Here, the authors describe the covalent functionalization of NDs with lysine in an attempt to develop nanoparticles able to act as suitable nonviral vectors for transferring genetic materials across cellular membranes. Methods: NDs were oxidized and functionalized by binding lysine moieties attached to a three-carbon-length linker (1,3-diaminopropane) to their surfaces through amide bonds. Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, zeta potential measurement, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopic imaging, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize the lysine-functionalized NDs. Finally, the ability of the functionalized diamonds to bind plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA was investigated by gel electrophoresis assay and through size and zeta potential measurements. Results: NDs were successfully functionalized with the lysine linker, producing surface loading of 1.7 mmol g−1 of ND. These modified NDs formed highly stable aqueous dispersions with a zeta potential of 49 mV and particle size of approximately 20 nm. The functionalized NDs were found to be able to bind plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA by forming nanosized “diamoplexes”. Conclusion: The lysine-substituted ND particles generated in this study exhibit stable aqueous formulations and show potential for use as carriers for genetic materials. PMID:22904623

  1. Gene targeting by the vitamin D response element binding protein reveals a role for vitamin D in osteoblast mTOR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Liu, Ting; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; Chen, Hong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2011-03-01

    Transcriptional regulation by hormonal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)] involves occupancy of vitamin D response elements (VDREs) by the VDRE binding protein (VDRE-BP) or 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-bound vitamin D receptor (VDR). This relationship is disrupted by elevated VDRE-BP, causing a form of hereditary vitamin D-resistant rickets (HVDRR). DNA array analysis showed that of 114 genes regulated by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) in control cells, almost all (113) were rendered insensitive to the hormone in VDRE-BP-overexpressing HVDRR cells. Among these was the gene for DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4), an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Chromatin immunoprecipitation PCR using 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-treated osteoblasts confirmed that VDR and VDRE-BP compete for binding to the DDIT4 gene promoter. Expression of DDIT4 mRNA in these cells was induced (1.6-6 fold) by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) (10-100 nM), and Western blot and flow cytometry analysis showed that this response involved suppression of phosphorylated S6K1(T389) (a downstream target of mTOR) similar to rapamycin treatment. siRNA knockdown of DDIT4 completely abrogated antiproliferative responses to 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), whereas overexpression of VDRE-BP exerted a dominant-negative effect on transcription of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-target genes. DDIT4, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, is a direct target for 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and VDRE-BP, and functions to suppress cell proliferation in response to vitamin D.

  2. A polyether biotoxin binding site on the lipid-exposed face of the pore domain of Kv channels revealed by the marine toxin gambierol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopljar, Ivan; Labro, Alain J.; Cuypers, Eva; Johnson, Henry W. B.; Rainier, Jon D.; Tytgat, Jan; Snyders, Dirk J.

    2009-01-01

    Gambierol is a marine polycyclic ether toxin belonging to the group of ciguatera toxins. It does not activate voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) but inhibits Kv1 potassium channels by an unknown mechanism. While testing whether Kv2, Kv3, and Kv4 channels also serve as targets, we found that Kv3.1 was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.2 nM, whereas Kv2 and Kv4 channels were insensitive to 1 μM gambierol. Onset of block was similar from either side of the membrane, and gambierol did not compete with internal cavity blockers. The inhibition did not require channel opening and could not be reversed by strong depolarization. Using chimeric Kv3.1–Kv2.1 constructs, the toxin sensitivity was traced to S6, in which T427 was identified as a key determinant. In Kv3.1 homology models, T427 and other molecular determinants (L348, F351) reside in a space between S5 and S6 outside the permeation pathway. In conclusion, we propose that gambierol acts as a gating modifier that binds to the lipid-exposed surface of the pore domain, thereby stabilizing the closed state. This site may be the topological equivalent of the neurotoxin site 5 of VGSCs. Further elucidation of this previously undescribed binding site may explain why most ciguatoxins activate VGSCs, whereas others inhibit voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels. This previously undescribed Kv neurotoxin site may have wide implications not only for our understanding of channel function at the molecular level but for future development of drugs to alleviate ciguatera poisoning or to modulate electrical excitability in general. PMID:19482941

  3. The DNA-recognition mode shared by archaeal feast/famine-regulatory proteins revealed by the DNA-binding specificities of TvFL3, FL10, FL11 and Ss-LrpB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Katsushi; Nogami, Hideki; Kabasawa, Mamiko; Ebihara, Sonomi; Shimowasa, Ai; Hashimoto, Keiko; Kawashima, Tsuyoshi; Ishijima, Sanae A.; Suzuki, Masashi

    2009-01-01

    The DNA-binding mode of archaeal feast/famine-regulatory proteins (FFRPs), i.e. paralogs of the Esherichia coli leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp), was studied. Using the method of systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), optimal DNA duplexes for interacting with TvFL3, FL10, FL11 and Ss-LrpB were identified as TACGA[AAT/ATT]TCGTA, GTTCGA[AAT/ATT]TCGAAC, CCGAAA[AAT/ATT]TTTCGG and TTGCAA[AAT/ATT]TTGCAA, respectively, all fitting into the form abcdeWWWedcba. Here W is A or T, and e.g. a and a are bases complementary to each other. Apparent equilibrium binding constants of the FFRPs and various DNA duplexes were determined, thereby confirming the DNA-binding specificities of the FFRPs. It is likely that these FFRPs recognize DNA in essentially the same way, since their DNA-binding specificities were all explained by the same pattern of relationship between amino-acid positions and base positions to form chemical interactions. As predicted from this relationship, when Gly36 of TvFL3 was replaced by Thr, the b base in the optimal DNA duplex changed from A to T, and, when Thr36 of FL10 was replaced by Ser, the b base changed from T to G/A. DNA-binding characteristics of other archaeal FFRPs, Ptr1, Ptr2, Ss-Lrp and LysM, are also consistent with the relationship. PMID:19468044

  4. Study of the binding of {sup 114m}In radiotracer to human serum components by ultrafiltration and chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulle, M. van; De Cremer, K.; Cornelis, R. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Lab. for Analytical Chemistry

    2000-10-01

    The chemical speciation of indium in serum was studied. Ultrafiltration was used to investigate the influence of several buffer systems on the binding characteristics of indium in serum and to study the association of indium with transferrin and albumin. This was performed by means of batch incubation experiments with a {sup 114m}In tracer. Different buffer systems were investigated. A series of bicarbonate, Tris:HCl and HEPES buffers were found to fit for this purpose. Phosphate buffer was not suitable, as it is capable of disrupting the binding between indium and transferrin. Batch ultrafiltration experiments with {sup 114m}In incubated solutions of transferrin and albumin showed that both proteins are capable of binding indium to a high degree. Three chromatographic techniques (SEC, AEC, AC) were used to study the different chemically active species of indium in serum. It is concluded that next to transferrin, albumin is also responsible for the binding and transport of indium in serum. (orig.)

  5. Clicked bis-PEG-peptide conjugates for studying calmodulin-Kv7.2 channel binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonache, M Angeles; Alaimo, Alessandro; Malo, Covadonga; Millet, Oscar; Villarroel, Alvaro; González-Muñiz, Rosario

    2014-11-28

    The recombinant Kv7.2 calmodulin (CaM) binding site (Q2AB CaMBD) shows a high tendency to aggregate, thus complicating biochemical and structural studies. To facilitate these studies we have conceived bis-PEG-peptide CaMBD-mimetics linking helices A and B in single, easy to handle molecules. Short PEG chains were selected as spacers between the two peptide molecules, and a Cu(i)-catalyzed cycloaddition (CuAAC) protocol was used to assemble the final bis-PEG-peptide conjugate, by the convenient functionalization of PEG arms with azide and alkyne groups. The resulting conjugates, with a certain helical character in TFE solutions (CD), showed nanomolar affinity in a fluorescence CaM binding in vitro assay, higher than just the sum of the precursor PEG-peptide affinities, thus validating our design. The approach to these first described examples of Kv7.2 CaMBD-mimetics could pave the way to chimeric conjugates merging helices A and B from different Kv7 subunits.

  6. Tight-binding study of the structural and magnetic properties of vanadium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jijun; Lain, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of small vanadium clusters are studied in the framework of tight-binding theory. According to parameters of the cluster dimer and bulk solid, we developed a tight-binding interatomic potential and calculated the bonding energies for the different possible structures to determine the ground state atomic configurations of the small vanadium clusters. The theoretical bonding energies for the vanadium clusters agree with the experiment much better than the simple droplet model. However, the calculated values for the clusters of odd atomic number are somewhat higher than the measured ones, corresponding to the pair occupation of delocalized 4s 1 electrons. Based on the optimized geometries, we study the magnetic properties of these clusters through a parametrized Hubbard Hamiltonian. We find the small V clusters of ground-state structures exhibit antiferromagnetic behavior while the alignment of local moments in the clusters with the unoptimized structures may show either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic characteristics. The average magnetic moments of the clusters decrease nonmonotonically as cluster size increases and the theoretical results are consistent with the upper limits obtained from a recent experiment. (orig.)

  7. Chondroitin sulfate-derivatized agarose beads: a new system for studying cation binding to glycosaminoglycans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, G.K.

    1987-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) has been covalently attached to aminoethyl-agarose beads in a carbodiimide-catalyzed reaction. In this process, an amide bond is formed between carboxylate groups on the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and the primary amine groups of the beads. Under optimal conditions, up to 160 micrograms of CS is attached per milligram of beads. CS-agarose beads have been used to study Ca binding to GAGs. The beads are mixed with a solution containing CaCl 2 and 45 Ca and allowed to sediment under unit gravity. An aliquot of supernatant is then removed and 45 Ca activity is determined to quantitate remaining (free) Ca. Using this system, it was shown that CS binds approximately 0.7 Ca/disaccharide unit at saturation. Under the conditions used, the apparent association constant (KA) is approximately 14 mM. In principle, this derivatization protocol may be used to attach any proteoglycan or GAG (except keratan sulfate) to an insoluble support. CS-agarose beads provide a rapid, simple, and relatively artifact-free system for studying cation-GAG interactions

  8. Binding of the neuroleptic drug, gabapentin, to bovine serum albumin: Insights from experimental and computational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalali, Fahimeh; Dorraji, Parisa S.; Mahdiuni, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between antiepileptic drug, gabapentin (GP), and bovin serum albumin (BSA) was studied by spectroscopic and computational methods. The native fluorescence of BSA was quenched by GP. Stern–Volmer quenching constant was calculated at different temperatures which suggested a static mechanism. The association constant (K a ) was calculated from fluorescence quenching studies, which increased with temperature rising. GP competed well with warfarine for hydrophobic subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I) on the protein. Enthalpy and entropy changes during the interaction of GP with BSA were obtained using van't Hoff plot, which showed an entropy-driven process and involvement of hydrophobic forces (ΔH>0 and ΔS>0). Synchronous fluorescence measurements of BSA solution in the presence of GP showed a considerable blue shift when Δλ=15 nm, therefore, GP interacts with tyrosine-rich sites on BSA. Optimized docked model of BSA–GP mixture confirmed the experimental results. -- Highlights: • Interaction of gabapentin and bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated by spectroscopic techniques. • Gabapentin can quench the fluorescence of BSA through a static quenching procedure. • The binding of gabapentin to BSA is driven mainly by hydrophobic interactions. • Subdomain IIA (Sudlow's site I) of BSA is found to be the main binding site for gabapentin. • Molecular docking modeling confirmed the experimental results

  9. Changes in cell surface structure by viral transformation studied by binding of lectins differing in sugar specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, M; Kurokawa, T; Takeuchi, M; Sugino, Y

    1975-10-01

    Changes in cell surface structure by viral transformation were studied by examining changes in the binding of various lectins differing in carbohydrate specificities. Binding of lectins was assayed directly using cells grown in coverslips. The following 125I-lectins were used: Concanavalin-A (specific for glucose and mannose), wheat germ agglutinin (specific for N-acetylglucosamine), castor bean agglutinin (specific for galactose), Wistaria floribunda agglutinin (specific for N-acetylgalactosamine), and soybean agglutinin (specific for N-acetyl-galactosamine). Cells for a clone, SS7, transformed by bovine adenovirus type-3, were found to bind 5 to 6 times more Wistaria floribunda agglutinin than the normal counterpart cells (clone C31, from C3H mouse kidney). In contrast, the binding of soybean agglutinin, which has a sugar specificity similar to Wistaria floribunda agglutinin, to normal and transformed cells was similar. The binding of wheat germ agglutinin and castor bean agglutinin, respectively, to normal and transformed cells was also similar. However, normal cells bound twice as much concanavalin-A as transformed cells. Only half as much Wistaria floribunda agglutinin was bound to transformed cells when they had been dispersed with EDTA. These changes in the number of lectin binding sites on transformation are thought to reflect alteration of the cell surface structure. The amount of lectins bound per cell decreased with increase in cell density, especially in the case of binding of Wistaria floribunda agglutinin to normal cells.

  10. How Arousal Affects Younger and Older Adults' Memory Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashiro, Kaoru; Mather, Mara

    2009-01-01

    A number of recent studies have shown that associative memory for within-item features is enhanced for emotionally arousing items, whereas arousal-enhanced binding is not seen for associations between distinct items (for a review see Mather, 2007). The costs and benefits of arousal in memory binding have been examined for younger adults but not for older adults. The present experiment examined whether arousal would enhance younger and older adults' within-item and between-item memory binding. The results revealed that arousal improved younger adults' within-item memory binding but not that of older adults. Arousal worsened both groups' between-item memory binding. PMID:21240821

  11. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  12. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  13. Molecular modeling and docking studies of human 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT2A) receptor for the identification of hotspots for ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagarajadurai, Karuppiah; Malini, Manoharan; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Panicker, Mitradas M; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2009-12-01

    The serotonergic system has been implicated in emotional and cognitive function. In particular, 5-HT(2A) (5-hydroxytrytamine receptor 2A) is attributed to a number of disorders like schizophrenia, depression, eating disorders and anxiety. 5-HT(2A), being a GPCR (G-protein coupled receptor), is important in the pharmaceutical industry as a proven target for these disorders. Despite their extensive clinical importance, the structural studies of this protein is lacking due to difficulties in determining its crystal structure. We have performed sequence analysis and molecular modeling of 5-HT(2A) that has revealed a set of conserved residues and motifs considered to play an important role in maintaining structural integrity and function of the receptor. The analysis also revealed a set of residues specific to the receptor which distinguishes them from other members of the subclass and their orthologs. Further, starting from the model structure of human 5-HT(2A) receptor, docking studies were attempted to envisage how it might interact with eight of its ligands (such as serotonin, dopamine, DOI, LSD, haloperidol, ketanserin, risperidone and clozapine). The binding studies of dopamine to 5-HT(2A) receptor can bring up better understanding in the etiology of a number of neurological disorders involving both these two receptors. Our sequence analysis and study of interactions of this receptor with other ligands reveal additional residue hotspots such as Asn 363 and Tyr 370. The function of these residues can be further analyzed by rational design of site-directed mutagenesis. Two distinct binding sites are identified which could play important roles in ligand binding and signaling.

  14. Binding activity of patterned concanavalin A studied by atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebed, Kateryna; Pyka-Fosciak, Grazyna; Raczkowska, Joanna; Lekka, Malgorzata; Styczen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    The mode of protein immobilization plays a crucial role in the preparation of protein microarrays used for a wide spectrum of applications in analytical biochemistry. The microcontact printing technique was used to form a protein pattern using concanavalin A (Con A) since Con A belongs to a group of proteins widely used in analytical assays due to their selectivity as regards different kinds of carbohydrates. Atomic force microscopy was used to image surface topography, delivering information about the quality of the protein pattern. The force spectroscopy mode was used to verify the functional activity of deposited proteins via determination of the forces of interaction between Con A and carboxypeptidase Y bearing carbohydrate structure recognized by Con A. The calculated binding force between Con A and CaY was 105 ± 2 pN and it was compared with that measured for Con A deposited directly from the protein solution. The similarity of the value obtained for the interaction force was independent of the mode of protein deposition, thereby verifying that the microcontact printing technique did not influence the carbohydrate binding activity of Con A. The correlation between the surface topography of patterned samples and adhesion maps obtained showed the possible use of AFM for studying the chemical properties of different regions of the micropatterns produced

  15. Spectroscopic studies on the binding of barbital to bovine serum albumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Fei; Pan Hong; Li Zhiyuan; Liu Feng; Sun Ying

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the interaction between barbital and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by the method of fluorescence spectroscopy under simulative physiological conditions. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by barbital was the result of the formation of BSA-barbital complex, and the effective quenching constants (K a ) were 1.468x10 4 , 1.445x10 4 and 1.403x10 4 M -1 at 297, 303 and 310 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (ΔH) and entropy change (ΔS) for the reaction were calculated to be -2.679 kJ mol -1 and 70.76 J mol -1 K -1 , respectively, according to the van't Hoff equation. The results indicated that hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were the dominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the complex. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that binding of barbital with BSA can induce conformational changes in BSA. In addition, the effects of Cu 2+ and Zn 2+ on the constants of BSA-barbital complex were also discussed.

  16. Spectroscopic studies on the binding of barbital to bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Fei, E-mail: caudf@163.co [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Pan Hong; Li Zhiyuan; Liu Feng [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Sun Ying, E-mail: sunying@cau.edu.c [Department of Chemistry, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2009-06-15

    In this paper, the interaction between barbital and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by the method of fluorescence spectroscopy under simulative physiological conditions. Fluorescence data revealed that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by barbital was the result of the formation of BSA-barbital complex, and the effective quenching constants (K{sub a}) were 1.468x10{sup 4}, 1.445x10{sup 4} and 1.403x10{sup 4} M{sup -1} at 297, 303 and 310 K, respectively. The thermodynamic parameters enthalpy change (DELTAH) and entropy change (DELTAS) for the reaction were calculated to be -2.679 kJ mol{sup -1} and 70.76 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}, respectively, according to the van't Hoff equation. The results indicated that hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were the dominant intermolecular force in stabilizing the complex. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that binding of barbital with BSA can induce conformational changes in BSA. In addition, the effects of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} on the constants of BSA-barbital complex were also discussed.

  17. In silico predictive studies of mAHR congener binding using homology modelling and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Roshni; Cleave, A Suneetha Susan; Suresh, P K

    2014-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is one of the principal xenobiotic, nuclear receptor that is responsible for the early events involved in the transcription of a complex set of genes comprising the CYP450 gene family. In the present computational study, homology modelling and molecular docking were carried out with the objective of predicting the relationship between the binding efficiency and the lipophilicity of different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and the AHR in silico. Homology model of the murine AHR was constructed by several automated servers and assessed by PROCHECK, ERRAT, VERIFY3D and WHAT IF. The resulting model of the AHR by MODWEB was used to carry out molecular docking of 36 PCB congeners using PatchDock server. The lipophilicity of the congeners was predicted using the XLOGP3 tool. The results suggest that the lipophilicity influences binding energy scores and is positively correlated with the same. Score and Log P were correlated with r = +0.506 at p = 0.01 level. In addition, the number of chlorine (Cl) atoms and Log P were highly correlated with r = +0.900 at p = 0.01 level. The number of Cl atoms and scores also showed a moderate positive correlation of r = +0.481 at p = 0.01 level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study employing PatchDock in the docking of AHR to the environmentally deleterious congeners and attempting to correlate structural features of the AHR with its biochemical properties with regards to PCBs. The result of this study are consistent with those of other computational studies reported in the previous literature that suggests that a combination of docking, scoring and ranking organic pollutants could be a possible predictive tool for investigating ligand-mediated toxicity, for their subsequent validation using wet lab-based studies. © The Author(s) 2012.

  18. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer

  19. Genomewide Analysis of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Binding Targets Reveals an Extensive Array of Gene Clusters that Control Morphogenetic and Developmental Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartor, Maureen A.; Schnekenburger, Michael; Marlowe, Jennifer L.; Reichard, John F.; Wang, Ying; Fan, Yunxia; Ma, Ci; Karyala, Saikumar; Halbleib, Danielle; Liu, Xiangdong; Medvedovic, Mario; Puga, Alvaro

    2009-01-01

    Background The vertebrate aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that regulates cellular responses to environmental polycyclic and halogenated compounds. The naive receptor is believed to reside in an inactive cytosolic complex that translocates to the nucleus and induces transcription of xenobiotic detoxification genes after activation by ligand. Objectives We conducted an integrative genomewide analysis of AHR gene targets in mouse hepatoma cells and determined whether AHR regulatory functions may take place in the absence of an exogenous ligand. Methods The network of AHR-binding targets in the mouse genome was mapped through a multipronged approach involving chromatin immunoprecipitation/chip and global gene expression signatures. The findings were integrated into a prior functional knowledge base from Gene Ontology, interaction networks, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, sequence motif analysis, and literature molecular concepts. Results We found the naive receptor in unstimulated cells bound to an extensive array of gene clusters with functions in regulation of gene expression, differentiation, and pattern specification, connecting multiple morphogenetic and developmental programs. Activation by the ligand displaced the receptor from some of these targets toward sites in the promoters of xenobiotic metabolism genes. Conclusions The vertebrate AHR appears to possess unsuspected regulatory functions that may be potential targets of environmental injury. PMID:19654925

  20. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Kristin N., E-mail: kparent@msu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Gilcrease, Eddie B. [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); Casjens, Sherwood R., E-mail: sherwood.casjens@path.utah.edu [University of Utah School of Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Baker, Timothy S., E-mail: tsb@ucsd.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0378 (United States); University of California, San Diego, Division of Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  1. Structural analysis of papain-like NlpC/P60 superfamily enzymes with a circularly permuted topology reveals potential lipid binding sites.

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    Qingping Xu

    Full Text Available NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, "closed" conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6 identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  2. Mechanism of the Dual Activities of Human CYP17A1 and Binding to Anti-Prostate Cancer Drug Abiraterone Revealed by a Novel V366M Mutation Causing 17,20 Lyase Deficiency

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    Mónica Fernández-Cancio

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The CYP17A1 gene regulates sex steroid biosynthesis in humans through 17α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase activities and is a target of anti-prostate cancer drug abiraterone. In a 46, XY patient with female external genitalia, together with a loss of function mutation S441P, we identified a novel missense mutation V366M at the catalytic center of CYP17A1 which preferentially impaired 17,20 lyase activity. Kinetic experiments with bacterially expressed proteins revealed that V366M mutant enzyme can bind and metabolize pregnenolone to 17OH-pregnenolone, but 17OH-pregnenolone binding and conversion to dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA was impaired, explaining the patient’s steroid profile. Abiraterone could not bind and inhibit the 17α-hydroxylase activity of the CYP17A1-V366M mutant. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations showed that V366M creates a “one-way valve” and suggests a mechanism for dual activities of human CYP17A1 where, after the conversion of pregnenolone to 17OH-pregnenolone, the product exits the active site and re-enters for conversion to dehydroepiandrosterone. The V366M mutant also explained the effectiveness of the anti-prostate cancer drug abiraterone as a potent inhibitor of CYP17A1 by binding tightly at the active site in the WT enzyme. The V366M is the first human mutation to be described at the active site of CYP17A1 that causes isolated 17,20 lyase deficiency. Knowledge about the specificity of CYP17A1 activities is of importance for the development of treatments for polycystic ovary syndrome and inhibitors for prostate cancer therapy.

  3. EPR study of manganese(II) binding to 55'-ATP, hemoglobin, and hemocyanin

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    Chang, S.S. (Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh); Li, N.C.; Pratt, D.W.

    1975-01-01

    Several divalent metal ions affect the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin and hemocyanin. It is important, therefore, to understand the nature of metal-ion binding to these proteins. By comparing the EPR spectra of Mn(II), 0.001 M, in the absence and presence of carboxyhemoglobin or Limulus oxyhemocyanin (pH 7.3, Trizma buffer), the number of Mn binding sites, n, and the binding constant, K, can be determined. For carboxyhemoglobin, HbCO, we find 0.5 Mn binding sites per heme, K = 450 M/sup -1/. Each hemoglobin tetramer therefore binds two manganous ions suggesting that Mn(II), like Cu(II), may bind preferentially to one of the two types of subunits in hemoglobin. For hemocyanin, HcO/sub 2/, we find n = 5.8, K = 1.55 x 10/sup 3/ M/sup -1/. Each oxyhemocyanine therefore binds approximately six manganous ions, and the binding constant is three times larger than that for HbCO. We have also carried out similar experiments on 5'-ATP, and on solutions of HbCO and ATP containing McCl/sub 2/ or ZnCl/sub 2/. Zn(II) effectively competes with Mn(II) in binding hemoglobin and ATP, whereas Mg(II) does not, in accord with expectations from data on oxygen affinity of hemoglobin. (auth)

  4. X-ray diffraction study of the binding of the antisickling agent 12C79 to human hemoglobin

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    Wireko, R.C.; Abraham, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The hemoglobin binding site of the antisickling agent 12C79 has been determined by x-ray crystallography. 12C79 is recognized as one of the first molecules to reach clinical trials that was designed, de novo, from x-ray-determined atomic coordinates of a protein. Several previous attempts to verify the proposed Hb binding sites via crystallographic studies have failed. Using revised experimental procedures, the authors obtained 12C79-deoxhemoglobin crystals grown after reaction with oxyhemoglobin and cyanoborohydride reduction to stabilize the Schiff base linkage. The difference electron-density Fourier maps show that two 12C79 molecules bind covalently to both symmetry-related N-terminal amino groups of the hemoglobin α chains. This is in contrast to the original design that proposed the binding of one drug molecule that spans the molecular dyad to interact with both N-terminal α-amino groups

  5. Fluorescence-Based Comparative Binding Studies of the Supramolecular Host Properties of PAMAM Dendrimers Using Anilinonaphthalene Sulfonates: Unusual Host-Dependent Fluorescence Titration Behavior

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    Natasa Stojanovic

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the fluorescence enhancement of the anilinonaphthalene sulfonate probes 1,8-ANS, 2,6-ANS, and 2,6-TNS via complexation with PAMAM dendrimer hosts of Generation 4, 5 and 6. The use of this set of three very closely related probes allows for comparative binding studies, with specific pairs of probes differing only in shape (1,8-ANS and 2,6-ANS, or in the presence of a methyl substituent (2,6-TNS vs. 2,6-ANS. The fluorescence of all three probes was significantly enhanced upon binding with PAMAM dendrimers, however in all cases except one, a very unusual spike was consistently observed in the host fluorescence titration plots (fluorescence enhancement vs. host concentration at low dendrimer concentration. This unprecedented fluorescence titration curve shape makes fitting the data to a simple model such as 1:1 or 2:1 host: guest complexation very difficult; thus only qualitative comparisons of the relative binding of the three guests could be made based on host titrations. In the case of G4 and G5 dendrimers, the order of binding strength was qualitatively determined to be 1,8-ANS < 2,6-ANS indicating that the more streamlined 2,6-substituted probes are a better match for the dendrimer cavity shape than the bulkier 1,8-substituted probe. This order of binding strength was also indicated by double fluorometric titration experiments, involving both host and guest titrations. Further double fluorometric titration experiments on 2,6-ANS in G4 dendrimer revealed a host concentration-dependent change in the nature of the host: guest complexation, wit