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Sample records for binding site-impaired murine

  1. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D;

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of primer binding site-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors from the murine packaging cell lines psi-2 and omega E was studied. The efficiency of transduction of the neo marker of all mutated constructs was found to decrease by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared...

  2. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1997-01-01

    , but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer...... binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology....

  3. Specific receptor binding of staphylococcal enterotoxins by murine splenic lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Buxser, S; Bonventre, P F; Archer, D L

    1981-01-01

    We describe a reliable assay to measure the specific binding of 125I-labeled staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) by murine spleen cells. Toxin binding by lymphocytes was specific in that it was inhibited by unlabeled SEA but not by unrelated proteins. The biological activity of SEA (T-lymphocyte mitogenesis) correlated with toxin binding to splenic lymphocytes. In the presence of high concentrations of [125I]SEA, specific binding increased rapidly and approached saturation after 2 h. Toxin bin...

  4. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  5. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...

  6. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A;

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNA molecule annealed to an 18-bp primer binding site sequence. The sequence of the primer binding site coincides with that of a negatively acting cis element that mediates transcriptional silencing of murine leukemia virus (MLV) in undiff...

  7. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [3H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3. Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10-7. There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D3, vitamin D2, or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  8. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast α2-macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-α2M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal α(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -α2M forms, α2M-trypsin and α2M-MeNH2 cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins

  9. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  10. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebeson, Amy; Xi, Liqun; Zhang, Quanwei; Sigmund, Audrey; Wang, Ji-Ping; Widom, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  11. Protective role of mannan-binding lectin in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaur, S; Gupta, VK; Thiel, Steffen;

    2007-01-01

    Innate immune molecules such as lung collectins and serum pentraxins have evolved as important host defence proteins against Aspergillus fumigatus, a medically important opportunistic fungal pathogen. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL), an opsonin and lectin complement pathway activator, constitutes...... of externally administered recombinant human (rh) MBL towards anti-fungal defence in invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) by in vivo and in vitro studies. In murine models of IPA with corticosteroid-induced immunosuppression, rhMBL-treated mice showed 80% survival compared to untreated IPA mice...... observed only when MBL was supplemented with MBL-deficient serum. The study suggests a therapeutic role of ex vivo-administered MBL in host defence against aspergillosis, possibly through MBL-mediated complement activation and other protective mechanisms aimed both directly at the pathogen, and indirectly...

  12. Mutational analysis of the putative receptor-binding domain of Moloney murine leukemia virus glycoprotein gp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, B R; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    2000-07-20

    The entry of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to murine cells is mediated by the binding of its envelope glycoprotein gp70 to its receptor, the cationic amino acid transporter MCAT-1. The binding property of the envelope protein lies mainly in the N-terminal half of the protein. To identify essential residues involved in the binding of gp70 to its receptor, we have mutated amino acids within the putative receptor-binding domain of MoMuLV gp70. Changes in the residues P94 and W100 resulted in lower viral titers in comparison to the wild-type virions. Single, double, or triple point mutations involving the residue W100 make the envelope protein severely defective in binding to its receptor. Binding studies and cell fusion experiments with murine XC cells suggested that the residue W100 might play an important role in the process of infection by making contact between gp70 and its receptor. PMID:10891411

  13. The murine cytomegalovirus immunoevasin gp40 binds MHC class I molecules to retain them in the early secretory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janßen, Linda; Ramnarayan, Venkat Raman; Aboelmagd, Mohamed; Iliopoulou, Maro; Hein, Zeynep; Majoul, Irina; Fritzsche, Susanne; Halenius, Anne; Springer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of the murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) gp40 (m152) protein, murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules do not reach the cell surface but are retained in an early compartment of the secretory pathway. We find that gp40 does not impair the folding or high-affinity peptide binding of the class I molecules but binds to them, leading to their retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) and the cis-Golgi, most likely by retrieval from the cis-Golgi to the ER. We identify a sequence in gp40 that is required for both its own retention in the early secretory pathway and for that of class I molecules.

  14. Soluble M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 expressed in Escherichia coli: analysis of chemokine-binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matúšková, R; Pančík, P; Štibrániová, I; Belvončíková, P; Režuchová, I; Kúdelová, M

    2015-12-01

    M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) was identified as a viral chemokine-binding protein 3 (vCKBP-3) capable to bind a broad spectrum of chemokines and their receptors. During both acute and latent infection MHV-68 M3 protein provides a selective advantage for the virus by inhibiting the antiviral and inflammatory response. A unique mutation Asp307Gly was identified in the M3 protein of murine gammaherpesvirus 72 (MHV-72), localized near chemokine-binding domain. Study on chemokine-binding properties of MHV-72 M3 protein purified from medium of infected cells implied reduced binding to some chemokines when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. It was suggested that the mutation in the M3 protein might be involved in the attenuation of immune response to infection with MHV-72. Recently, Escherichia coli cells were used to prepare native recombinant M3 proteins of murine gammaherpesviruses 68 and 72 (Pančík et al., 2013). In this study, we assessed the chemokine-binding properties of three M3 proteins prepared in E. coli Rosetta-gami 2 (DE3) cells, the full length M3 protein of both MHV-68 and MHV-72 and MHV-68 M3 protein truncated in the signal sequence (the first 24 aa). They all displayed binding activity to human chemokines CCL5 (RANTES), CXCL8 (IL-8), and CCL3 (MIP-1α). The truncated MHV-68 M3 protein had more than twenty times reduced binding activity to CCL5, but only about five and three times reduced binding to CXCL8 and CCL3 when compared to its full length counterpart. Binding of the full length MHV-72 M3 protein to all chemokines was reduced when compared to MHV-68 M3 protein. Its binding to CCL5 and CCL3 was reduced over ten and seven times. However, its binding to CXCL8 was only slightly reduced (64.8 vs 91.8%). These data implied the significance of the signal sequence and also of a single mutation (at aa 307) for efficient M3 protein binding to some chemokines.

  15. Genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq) of murine Bapx1 and Sox9 proteins in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sumantra; Kraus, Petra; Sivakamasundari, V; Yap, Sook Peng; Kumar, Vibhor; Prabhakar, Shyam; Lufkin, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This work pertains to GEO submission GSE36672, in vivo and in vitro genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq) of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 proteins. We have previously shown that data from a genome wide binding assay combined with transcriptional profiling is an insightful means to divulge the mechanisms directing cell type specification and the generation of tissues and subsequent organs [1]. Our earlier work identified the role of the DNA-binding homeodomain containing protein Bapx1/Nkx3.2 in midgestation murine embryos. Microarray analysis of EGFP-tagged cells (both wildtype and null) was integrated using ChIP-Seq analysis of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 DNA-binding proteins in living tissue.

  16. Genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq) of murine Bapx1 and Sox9 proteins in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sumantra; Kraus, Petra; Sivakamasundari, V; Yap, Sook Peng; Kumar, Vibhor; Prabhakar, Shyam; Lufkin, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    This work pertains to GEO submission GSE36672, in vivo and in vitro genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq) of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 proteins. We have previously shown that data from a genome wide binding assay combined with transcriptional profiling is an insightful means to divulge the mechanisms directing cell type specification and the generation of tissues and subsequent organs [1]. Our earlier work identified the role of the DNA-binding homeodomain containing protein Bapx1/Nkx3.2 in midgestation murine embryos. Microarray analysis of EGFP-tagged cells (both wildtype and null) was integrated using ChIP-Seq analysis of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 DNA-binding proteins in living tissue. PMID:27672560

  17. Expression cloning of a cDNA encoding the murine interleukin 4 receptor based on ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, N.; Castle, B.E.; Gorman, D.M.; Itoh, A.; Schreurs, J.; Barrett, R.L.; Howard, M.; Miyajima, A. (DNAX Research Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a potent mediator of growth and differentiation for various lymphoid and myeloid cells. To isolate a cDNA encoding the murine IL-4 receptor, the authors have developed an expression cloning method that uses biotinylated ligand as a probe and that may be generally applicable to cloning of receptor genes. COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the cloned full-length cDNA bind murine IL-4 specifically with a K{sub d} = 165 pM. Crosslinking of {sup 125}I-labeled IL-4 to COS-7 cells transfected with the cDNA reveals binding to proteins of 120-140 kDa. IL-4-responsive cells also express IL-4-binding proteins of 120-140 kDa but show additional bands at 60-70 kDa; the relationship of the smaller proteins to the larger ones is unclear. The nucleotide sequence indicates that the full-length cDNA encodes 810 amino acids including the signal sequence. While no consensus sequence for protein kinases is present in the cytoplasmic domain, a sequence comparison with the erythropoietin receptor, the IL-6 receptor, and the {beta} chain of the IL-2 receptor reveals a significant homology in the extracellular domain, indicating that the IL-4 receptor is a member of a cytokine receptor family.

  18. Characterization of hyaluronate binding proteins isolated from 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus transformed 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turley, E.A.; Moore, D.; Hayden, L.J.

    1987-06-02

    A hyaluronic acid binding fraction was purified from the supernatant media of both 3T3 and murine sarcoma virus (MSV) transformed 3T3 cultures by hyaluronate and immunoaffinity chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis resolved the hyaluronate affinity-purified fraction into three major protein bands of estimated molecular weight (M/sub r,e/) 70K, 66K, and 56K which contained hyaluronate binding activity and which were termed hyaluronate binding proteins (HABP). Hyaluronate affinity chromatography combined with immunoaffinity chromatography, using antibody directed against the larger HABP, allowed a 20-fold purification of HABP. Fractions isolated from 3T3 supernatant medium also contained additional binding molecules in the molecular weight range of 20K. This material was present in vanishingly small amounts and was not detected with a silver stain or with (/sup 35/S)methionine label. The three protein species isolated by hyaluronate affinity chromatography (M/sub r,e/ 70K, 66K, and 56K) were related to one another since they shared antigenic determinants and exhibited similar pI values. In isocratic conditions, HABP occurred as aggregates of up to 580 kilodaltons. Their glycoprotein nature was indicated by their incorporation of /sup 3/H-sugars. Enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay showed they were antigenically distinct from other hyaluronate binding proteins such as fibronectin, cartilage link protein, and the hyaluronate binding region of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan. The results are discussed with regard both to the functional significance of hyaluronate-cell surface interactions in transformed as well as normal cells and to the relationship of HABP to other reported hyaluronate binding proteins.

  19. Murine interleukin 1 receptor. Direct identification by ligand blotting and purification to homogeneity of an interleukin 1-binding glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional receptors (IL1-R) for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL1) were solubilized from plasma membranes of the NOB-1 subclone of murine EL4 6.1 thymoma cells using the zwitterionic detergent 3[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Membrane extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and ligand blotted with 125I-labeled recombinant human IL1 alpha in order to reveal proteins capable of specifically binding IL1. A single polydisperse polypeptide of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 was identified in this way, which bound IL1 alpha and IL1 beta with the same affinity as the IL1-R on intact NOB-1 cells (approximately equal to 10(-10) M). The IL1-binding polypeptide was only seen in membranes from IL1-R-bearing cells and did not react with interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interferon. IL1-R was purified to apparent homogeneity from solubilized NOB-1 membranes by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose and IL1 alpha-Sepharose. Gel electrophoresis and silver staining of purified preparations revealed a single protein of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 which reacted positively in the ligand-blotting procedure and which we identify as the ligand-binding moiety of the murine IL1-R. Purified IL1-R exhibited the same affinity and specificity as the receptor on intact cells. The relationship of this protein to proteins identified by covalent cross-linking studies is discussed

  20. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 1. Photoaffinity labeling of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase and amino acid sequence of the binding region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N/sup α/-(4-Amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroyl)-N/sup epsilon/-(4-azido-5-[125I]iodosalicylyl)-L-lysine, a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, is only 2-fold less potent than methotrexate in the inhibition of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase. Irradiation of the enzyme in the presence of an equimolar concentration of the 125I-labeled analogue ultimately leads to an 8% incorporation of the photoprobe. A 100-fold molar excess of methotrexate essentially blocks this incorporation. Cyanogen bromide digestion of the labeled enzyme, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography purification of the generated peptides, indicates that greater than 85% of the total radioactivity is incorporated into a single cyanogen bromide peptide. Sequence analysis revealed this peptide to be residues 53-111, with a majority of the radioactivity centered around residues 63-65 (Lys-Asn-Arg). These data demonstrate that the photoaffinity analogue specifically binds to dihydrofolate reductase and covalently modifies the enzyme following irradiation and is therefore a photolabeling agent useful for probing the inhibitor binding domain of the enzyme

  1. Thrombin-cleaved COOH(-) terminal osteopontin peptide binds with cyclophilin C to CD147 in murine breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zhiyong; Oliver, Tim; Guo, Hongtao; Gao, Chengjiang; Kuo, Paul C

    2007-05-01

    Osteopontin is a glycoprotein that has been linked to metastatic function in breast, lung, and prostate cancers. However, the mechanism by which osteopontin acts to induce metastatic properties is largely unknown. One intriguing feature of osteopontin is the presence of a conserved thrombin cleavage site that is COOH-terminal from a well-characterized RGD domain. Although the COOH-terminal fragment may bind to cell surface CD44 receptors, little is known about the COOH-terminal osteopontin fragment. In the current study, we use the murine mammary epithelial tumor cell lines 4T1 and 4T07; these cells are thioguanine-resistant sublines derived from the parental population of 410.4 cells from Balb/cfC3H mice. Using flow cytometry and Forster resonance energy transfer, we show that the COOH-terminal fragment of osteopontin binds with another marker of metastatic function (cyclophilin C or rotamase) to the CD147 cell surface glycoprotein (also known as extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer), to activate Akt1/2 and matrix metalloproteinase-2. In in vitro assays, thrombin cleavage of osteopontin to generate short COOH-terminal osteopontin in the presence of cyclophilin C increases migration and invasion of both 4T07 and 4T1 cells. This interaction between osteopontin peptide and cyclophilin C has not been previously described but assigns a heretofore unknown function for the thrombin-cleaved osteopontin COOH-terminal fragment.

  2. Exchanging murine and human immunoglobulin constant chains affects the kinetics and thermodynamics of antigen binding and chimeric antibody autoreactivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Torres

    Full Text Available Mouse-human chimeric antibodies composed of murine variable (V and human (C chains are useful therapeutic reagents. Consequently, we investigated whether heterologous C-regions from mice and humans affected specificity and affinity, and determined the contribution of C(H glycosylation to antigen binding. The interaction of a 12-mer peptide mimetic with monoclonal antibody (mAb 18B7 to Cryptococcus neoformans glucuronoxylomannan, and its chimeric (ch and deglycosylated forms were studied by surface plasmon resonance. The equilibrium and rate association constants for the chAb were higher than for mAb 18B7. V region affinity was not affected by C(H region glycosylation whereas heterologous C region of the same isotype altered the Ab binding affinity and the specificity for self-antigens. Structural models displayed local differences that implied changes on the connectivity of residues. These findings suggest that V region conformational changes can be dictated by the C(H domains through an allosteric effect involving networks of highly connected amino acids.

  3. Chemokine binding protein M3 of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 modulates the host response to infection in a natural host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hughes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68 infection of Mus musculus-derived strains of mice is an attractive model of γ-herpesvirus infection. Surprisingly, however, ablation of expression of MHV-68 M3, a secreted protein with broad chemokine-binding properties in vitro, has no discernable effect during experimental infection via the respiratory tract. Here we demonstrate that M3 indeed contributes significantly to MHV-68 infection, but only in the context of a natural host, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus. Specifically, M3 was essential for two features unique to the wood mouse: virus-dependent inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT in the lung and highly organized secondary follicles in the spleen, both predominant sites of latency in these organs. Consequently, lack of M3 resulted in substantially reduced latency in the spleen and lung. In the absence of M3, splenic germinal centers appeared as previously described for MHV-68-infected laboratory strains of mice, further evidence that M3 is not fully functional in the established model host. Finally, analyses of M3's influence on chemokine and cytokine levels within the lungs of infected wood mice were consistent with the known chemokine-binding profile of M3, and revealed additional influences that provide further insight into its role in MHV-68 biology.

  4. The novel murine calmodulin-binding protein Sha1 disrupts mitotic spindle and replication checkpoint functions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, R; Norbury, C

    1998-12-18

    Entry into mitosis is normally blocked in eukaryotic cells that have not completed replicative DNA synthesis; this 'S-M' checkpoint control is fundamental to the maintenance of genomic integrity. Mutants of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe defective in the S-M checkpoint fail to arrest the cell cycle when DNA replication is inhibited and hence attempt mitosis and cell division with unreplicated chromosomes, resulting in the 'cut' phenotype. In an attempt to identify conserved molecules involved in the S-M checkpoint we have screened a regulatable murine cDNA library in S. pombe and have identified cDNAs that induce the cut phenotype in cells arrested in S phase by hydroxyurea. One such cDNA encodes a novel protein with multiple calmodulin-binding motifs that, in addition to its effects on the S-M checkpoint, perturbed mitotic spindle functions, although spindle pole duplication was apparently normal. Both aspects of the phenotype induced by this cDNA product, which we term Sha1 (for spindle and hydroxyurea checkpoint abnormal), were suppressed by simultaneous overexpression of calmodulin. Sha1 is structurally related to the product of the Drosophila gene abnormal spindle (asp). These data suggest that calmodulin-binding protein(s) are important in the co-ordination of mitotic spindle functions with mitotic entry in fission yeast, and probably also in multicellular eukaryotes. PMID:9819352

  5. Binding and internalization of recombinant human erythropoietin in murine erythroid precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erythropoietin (EPO) biosynthetically labelled with [35S]cysteine was produced from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells containing amplified copies of human EPO cDNA. The glycosylated recombinant [35S]EPO, purified to virtual radiochemical homogeneity, was biologically active. We studied the interaction of this labeled recombinant EPO with erythroid precursor cells from mice made anemic with phenylhydrazine. The [35S]-labeled molecule bound to erythroid precursors in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The binding was specific for EPO, and neither insulin, transferrin, epidermal growth factor, nor multiplication stimulating activity could compete for EPO binding sites. In the presence of 0.2% sodium azide, which blocks 80% to 90% of internalization, the recombinant molecule bound with an apparent Kd of 750 pmol/L and 100 to 200 binding sites per cell at 37 degrees C. Asialo-EPO was a more effective competitor than sialated EPO for the available binding sites. Thus, the enhanced biological specific activity of asialo-EPO could result from its enhanced binding affinity. We also studied recombinant human EPO labeled with 125I and found that it also bound to the erythroid cells in a saturable and specific manner. After 90 minutes of incubation at 37 degrees C, most of the bound [35S]EPO was internalized, whereas most of the [125I]EPO remained on the cell surface. The reduced internalization of the iodinated molecule could account for the previously reported functional deficit associated with iodination

  6. Binding and internalization of recombinant human erythropoietin in murine erythroid precursor cells

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    Mufson, R.A.; Gesner, T.G.

    1987-05-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) biosynthetically labelled with (/sup 35/S)cysteine was produced from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells containing amplified copies of human EPO cDNA. The glycosylated recombinant (/sup 35/S)EPO, purified to virtual radiochemical homogeneity, was biologically active. We studied the interaction of this labeled recombinant EPO with erythroid precursor cells from mice made anemic with phenylhydrazine. The (/sup 35/S)-labeled molecule bound to erythroid precursors in a time- and temperature-dependent manner. The binding was specific for EPO, and neither insulin, transferrin, epidermal growth factor, nor multiplication stimulating activity could compete for EPO binding sites. In the presence of 0.2% sodium azide, which blocks 80% to 90% of internalization, the recombinant molecule bound with an apparent Kd of 750 pmol/L and 100 to 200 binding sites per cell at 37 degrees C. Asialo-EPO was a more effective competitor than sialated EPO for the available binding sites. Thus, the enhanced biological specific activity of asialo-EPO could result from its enhanced binding affinity. We also studied recombinant human EPO labeled with /sup 125/I and found that it also bound to the erythroid cells in a saturable and specific manner. After 90 minutes of incubation at 37 degrees C, most of the bound (/sup 35/S)EPO was internalized, whereas most of the (/sup 125/I)EPO remained on the cell surface. The reduced internalization of the iodinated molecule could account for the previously reported functional deficit associated with iodination.

  7. Investigation of the selectivity of thrombin-binding aptamers for thrombin titration in murine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapaidze, Ana; Hérault, Jean-Pascal; Herbert, Jean-Marc; Bancaud, Aurélien; Gué, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-15

    Detection of thrombin in plasma raises timely challenges to enable therapeutic management of thrombosis in patients under vital threat. Thrombin binding aptamers represent promising candidates as sensing elements for the development of real-time thrombin biosensors; however implementation of such biosensor requires the clear understanding of thrombin-aptamer interaction properties in real-like environment. In this study, we used Surface Plasmon Resonance technique to answer the questions of specificity and sensitivity of thrombin detection by the thrombin-binding aptamers HD1, NU172 and HD22. We systematically characterized their properties in the presence of thrombin, as well as interfering molecular species such as the thrombin precursor prothrombin, thrombin in complex with some of its natural inhibitors, nonspecific serum proteins, and diluted plasma. Kinetic experiments show the multiple binding modes of HD1 and NU172, which both interact with multiple sites of thrombin with low nanomolar affinities and show little specificity of interaction for prothrombin vs. thrombin. HD22, on the other hand, binds specifically to thrombin exosite II and has no affinity to prothrombin at all. While thrombin in complex with some of its inhibitors could not be recognized by any aptamer, the binding of HD1 and NU172 properties is compromised by thrombin inhibitors alone, as well as with serum albumin. Finally, the complex nature of plasma was overwhelming for HD1, but we define conditions for the thrombin detection at 10nM range in 100-fold diluted plasma by HD22. Consequently HD22 showed key advantage over HD1 and NU172, and appears as the only alternative to design an aptasensor.

  8. Genome wide mapping of Foxo1 binding-sites in murine T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Liao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Forkhead box O (Foxo family of transcription factors has a critical role in controlling the development, differentiation, and function of T cells. However, the direct target genes of Foxo transcription factors in T cells have not been well characterized. In this study, we focused on mapping the genome wide Foxo1-binding sites in naïve CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg cells. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq, we identified Foxo1 binding sites that were shared among or specific to the three T cell populations. Here we describe the experiments, quality controls, as well as the deep sequencing data. Part of the data analysis has been published by Ouyang W et al. in Nature 2012 [1] and Kim MV et al. in Immunity 2013 [2], and the associated data set were uploaded to NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus.

  9. A single dose of neuron-binding human monoclonal antibody improves spontaneous activity in a murine model of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Denic

    Full Text Available Our laboratory demonstrated that a natural human serum antibody, sHIgM12, binds to neurons in vitro and promotes neurite outgrowth. We generated a recombinant form, rHIgM12, with identical properties. Intracerebral infection with Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus (TMEV of susceptible mouse strains results in chronic demyelinating disease with progressive axonal loss and neurologic dysfunction similar to progressive forms of multiple sclerosis. To study the effects of rHIgM12 on the motor function of TMEV-infected mice, we monitored spontaneous nocturnal activity over many weeks. Nocturnal behavior is a sensitive measure of rodent neurologic function because maximal activity changes are expected to occur during the normally active night time monitoring period. Mice were placed in activity boxes eight days prior to treatment to collect baseline spontaneous activity. After treatment, activity in each group was continuously recorded over 8 weeks. We chose a long 8-week monitoring period for two reasons: (1 we previously demonstrated that IgM induced remyelination is present by 5 weeks post treatment, and (2 TMEV-induced demyelinating disease in this strain progresses very slowly. Due to the long observation periods and large data sets, differences among treatment groups may be difficult to appreciate studying the original unfiltered recordings. To clearly delineate changes in the highly fluctuating original data we applied three different methods: (1 binning, (2 application of Gaussian low-pass filters (GF and (3 polynomial fitting. Using each of the three methods we showed that compared to control IgM and saline, early treatment with rHIgM12 induced improvement in both horizontal and vertical motor function, whereas later treatment improved only horizontal activity. rHIgM12 did not alter activity of normal, uninfected mice. This study supports the hypothesis that treatment with a neuron-binding IgM not only protects neurons in vitro, but

  10. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sture Lindegren

    Full Text Available The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live cells; we also assessed its biodistribution in nude mice carrying subcutaneous OVCAR-3 tumors. Tumor antigen and cell binding were similar between Rebmab200 and murine MX35, as was biodistribution, including normal tissue uptake and in-vivo tumor binding. We also demonstrated that 99mTc-Rebmab200 can be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.

  11. Induction of ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cell immunity during murine malaria infection is a critical part of the protective immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoor, Kaiissar; Li, Changchun; Inafuku, Masashi; Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Abo, Toru; Sato, Yoshiya; Watanabe, Hisami

    2013-01-01

    Although it has been hypothesized that autoimmune-like phenomena may play a critical role in the protective immune responses to both human and animal malaria, there are still no evidence-based data to support this view. In this study we demonstrate that the majority of anti-single stranded (ss) DNA autoantibody secreting B cells were confined to B220(+)CD21(+)CD23(-) cells and that these cells expanded significantly in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17X non-lethal (PyNL). To determine the role of ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cell responses in murine malaria, we conjugated generation 6 (poly) amidoamine dendrimer nanoparticles with ssDNA to deplete ssDNA-binding autoreactive B cells in vivo. Our data revealed that 55.5% of mice died after DNA-coated nanoparticle-mediated in vivo depletion of ssDNA-specific autoreactive B cells and subsequent challenge using PyNL. Adoptive transfer of B cells with ssDNA specificity to mice, followed by PyNL infection, caused a later appearance and inhibition of parasitemia. The possible mechanism by which the ssDNA-binding autoantibody secreting B cells is involved in the protection against murine malaria has also been demonstrated.

  12. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...... retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown...

  13. Molecular analysis of the murine C4b-binding protein gene. Chromosome assignment and partial gene organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barum, Scott B; Kristensen, Torsten; Chaplin, David D;

    1989-01-01

    molecules and a growing number of noncomplement molecules as well and are a major structural feature of some of these molecules. To characterize the structure of the murine C4BP gene, a cosmid library constructed from Balb/c liver DNA was screened. Several nearly identical, overlapping clones were....... Only the latter half of the second SCR was present on the clone, and it was encoded by a single exon, demonstrating that murine C4BP has a split SCR at the genomic level. Structural mapping of this portion of the gene demonstrates that the region extending from the second half of the second SCR through...

  14. Differential binding of Nocardia asteroides in the murine lung and brain suggests multiple ligands on the nocardial surface.

    OpenAIRE

    Beaman, B L

    1996-01-01

    The adherence of Nocardia asteroides in the murine brain and lungs was determined. Virulent strains had increased adherence in the brain and lungs, whereas less virulent strains bound in either the brain or lungs. Nocardiae that attached apically penetrated host cells. Multiple receptors on the nocardial surface may be involved in this differential attachment and penetration.

  15. Murine anti-vaccinia virus D8 antibodies target different epitopes and differ in their ability to block D8 binding to CS-E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Matho

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The IMV envelope protein D8 is an adhesion molecule and a major immunodominant antigen of vaccinia virus (VACV. Here we identified the optimal D8 ligand to be chondroitin sulfate E (CS-E. CS-E is characterized by a disaccharide moiety with two sulfated hydroxyl groups at positions 4' and 6' of GalNAc. To study the role of antibodies in preventing D8 adhesion to CS-E, we have used a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies, and tested their ability to compete with CS-E for D8 binding. Among four antibody specificity groups, MAbs of one group (group IV fully abrogated CS-E binding, while MAbs of a second group (group III displayed widely varying levels of CS-E blocking. Using EM, we identified the binding site for each antibody specificity group on D8. Recombinant D8 forms a hexameric arrangement, mediated by self-association of a small C-terminal domain of D8. We propose a model in which D8 oligomerization on the IMV would allow VACV to adhere to heterogeneous population of CS, including CS-C and potentially CS-A, while overall increasing binding efficiency to CS-E.

  16. Two distinct classes of IgG Fc receptors on a human monocyte line (U937) defined by differences in binding of murine IgG subclasses at low ionic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two distinct classes of IgG Fc receptors (FcR) on cells of a human monocytic line (U937) by analyzing the direct binding of murine IgG subclasses in medium of low ionic strength. Four lines of evidence support this contention. (1) The binding of aggregated murine IgB2b (AggmIgG2b) to U937 and Daudi cells was enhanced at low ionic strength, whereas monomeric murine IgG2a (mIgG2a) did not bind to Daudi cells and its high affinity binding to U937 cells was unaffected by changes in ionic strength. (2) Double reciprocal inhibition experiments with U937 cells indicated that the binding of both ligands was inhibited 30 to 135 times more efficiently by the homologous ligand than by the heterologous one. That is, the binding of 125I-AggmIgG2b was inhibited 50% by 3.5 μg/ml of AggmIgG2b and 100 μg/ml of mIgG2a. Similarly, the binding of 125I-mIgG2a was inhibited 50% by 2.5 μg/ml of mIgG2a and only 44% by 243 μg/ml of AggmIgG2b. (3) A monoclonal antibody of the IgG2b subclass raised against an IgG FcR on K562 cells inhibited binding to U937 cells of AggmIgG2b but not of mIgG2a. (4) Trypsinization of U937 cells abrogated by 32% the binding of mIgG2a but did not affect the binding of AggmIgG2b. Human IgG inhibited binding of both AggmIgG2b and mIgG2a t U937 cells. They propose that the newly recognized FcR that binds AggmIgG2b is the human homologue of the murine macrophage IgG2b/1 FcR (FcRII), and that the previously described 72,000 dalton high-affinity FcR on U937 cells that binds mIgG2a is the human equivalent of the murine macrophage IgG2a FcR (FcRI)

  17. Spike protein homology between the SARS-associated virus and murine hepatitis virus implies existence of a putative receptor-binding region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Coronavirus has been determined to be the cause of the recent outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Human coronavirus 229E had been studied well and its receptor-binding domain was restricted to aa417-547 of S protein. However, this region has no homology with the newly separated SARS-associated virus (Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Then we analyzed the phylogenesis of S1 subunit of the coronavirus spike protein (SARS-associated virus, Hong Kong isolate CUHK-W1). Interestingly, the highest homology between murine hepatitis virus (MHV) and SARS-associated coronavirus was found. And the important sites (aa62-65 and aa214-216) on the spike protein of MHV with receptor-binding capacity were highly conservative in comparison with the newly separated SARS-asso- ciated virus (the corresponding sites are aa51-54 and aa195-197). These results from bioinformatics analysis might help us to study the receptor-binding sites of SARS-associ- ated virus and the mechanism of the virus entry into the target cell, and design antiviral drugs and potent vaccines.

  18. Autoantibodies from mice exposed to Libby amphibole asbestos bind SSA/Ro52-enriched apoptotic blebs of murine macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbestos exposure is associated with increased autoimmune responses in humans. For example, in Libby, MT where significant asbestos exposure has occurred due to an asbestos-contaminated vermiculite mine near the community, residents have developed increased autoimmune responses compared to an unexposed population. However, the exact mechanism by which Libby amphibole asbestos generates autoimmune responses is unclear. A murine model of amphibole asbestos-induced autoimmunity was recently established, and one of the targets of the autoantibodies (AAs) was the SSA/Ro52 autoantigen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the SSA/Ro52 autoantigen is exposed at the surface of cells as a result of asbestos exposure as a possible mechanism leading to antigenicity. Our results indicate that Libby asbestos induces apoptosis in murine macrophages as determined by phosphatidylserine exposure, cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and morphological changes such as nuclear condensation. Moreover, asbestos-induced apoptosis results in the formation of apoptotic cell surface blebs enriched in SSA/Ro52 as determined by confocal microscopy. Most importantly, apoptotic cell surface blebs are recognized by AAs from mice exposed to amphibole asbestos suggesting that these cell surface structures may be antigenic when presented in a pro-inflammatory context. This study supports the hypothesis that the induction of apoptosis plays a key role in environmentally induced autoimmunity through cell surface exposure of a known autoantigen

  19. Cloning, expression and purification of binding domains of lethal factor and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis in Escherichia coli and evaluation of their related murine antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Honari, Hossein; Kooshk, Mohammad Reza Ashrafi

    2014-01-01

    Anthrax is common disease between human and animals caused by Bacillus anthracis. The cell binding domain of protective antigen (PAD4) and the binding domain of lethal factor (LFD1) have high immunogenicity potential and always were considered as a vaccine candidate against anthrax. The aims of this study are cloning and expressing of PAD4 and LFD1 in Escherichia coli, purification of the recombinant proteins and determination of their immunogenicity through evaluating of the relative produced polyclonal antibodies in mice. PAD4 and LFD1 genes were cloned in pET28a(+) vector and expressed in E. coli Bl21(DE3)PlysS. Expression and purification of the two recombinant proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques. The PAD4 and LFD1 were purified using Ni(+)-NTA affinity chromatography (95-98 %), yielding 37.5 and 45 mg/l of culture, respectively. The antigens were injected three times into mice and production of relative antibodies was evaluated by ELISA test. The results showed that both PAD4 and LFD1 are immunogenic, but LFD1 has higher potential to stimulate Murine immune system. With regard to the high level of LFD1 and PAD4 expression and also significant increment in produced polyclonal antibodies, these recombinant proteins can be considered as a recombinant vaccine candidate against anthrax. PMID:24430302

  20. Co-expression of IL-18 binding protein and IL-4 regulates Th1/Th2 cytokine response in murine collagen-induced arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhang Leng; Hangping Yao; Junya Shen; Keyi Wang; Guangchao Zhuo; Ziwei Wang

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing a murine interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein (mIL-18BP) and murine IL-4 (mIL-4) fusion gene (AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4)and used a gene therapy approach to investigate the role of IL-18BP and IL-4 in modulating the T-helper1 and T-helper2(Th1/Th2) balance in mice with collagen-induced arthritis(CIA). Mice with CIA were intra-articularly injected with 107 pfu/6μl of either AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4, or a control adenovirus,or with the control vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline). After intra-articular gene therapy with AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4, the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), γ-interferon (IFN-γ), IL-4, IL-10, and IL-18 in mice with CIA were assessed by ELISA. IFN-γ-expressing and IL-4-expressing CD4+ T cells from mice splenocytes were monitored by flow cytometry. Mice with CIA at weeks 1, 2, and 4 after intraarticular injection of AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4 showed significantly increased serum concentrations of IL-4 and IL-10 (P<0.01 at all time points=but greatly decreased serum concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-18 (P<0.01 at all time points=compared to both the control adenovirus and phosphatebuffered saline control groups. The percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells was significantly decreased in response to local AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4 treatment. The percentage of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells increased significantly at 1 week after local injection of AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4 then returned to normal by week 4. These data indicated the significant modifying effects on the Th1/Th2 imbalance in murine CIA produced by local overexpression of IL-18BP and IL-4. Combination treatment with IL-18BP and IL-4 is a promising potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Assessment of decorin-binding protein A to the infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi in the murine models of needle and tick infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagman Kayla E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decorin-binding proteins (Dbps A and B of Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, are surface-exposed lipoproteins that presumably bind to the extracellular matrix proteoglycan, decorin. B. burgdorferi infects various tissues including the bladder, heart, joints, skin and the central nervous system, and the ability of B. burgdorferi to bind decorin has been hypothesized to be important for this disseminatory pathogenic strategy. Results To determine the role of DbpBA in the infectious lifecycle of B. burgdorferi, we created a DbpBA-deficient mutant of B. burgdorferi strain 297 and compared the infectious phenotype of the mutant to the wild-type strain in the experimental murine model of Lyme borreliosis. The mutant strain exhibited a 4-log decrease in infectivity, relative to the wild-type strain, when needle inoculated into mice. Upon complementation of the DbpBA-mutant strain with DbpA, the wild-type level of infectivity was restored. In addition, we demonstrated that the DbpBA-deficient mutant was able to colonize Ixodes scapularis larval ticks after feeding on infected mice and persist within the ticks during the molt to the nymphal state. Moreover, surprisingly, the DbpBA-mutant strain was capable of being transmitted to naïve mice via tick bite, giving rise to infected mice. Conclusion These results suggest that DbpBA is not required for the natural tick-transmission process to mammals, despite inferences from needle-inoculation experiments implying a requirement for DbpBA during mammalian infection. The combined findings also send a cautionary note regarding how results from needle-inoculation experiments with mice should be interpreted.

  2. The role of antigen specificity in the binding of murine monoclonal anti-DNA antibodies to microparticles from apoptotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Anirudh J; Marion, Tony N; Pisetsky, David S

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and markers of underlying immune system disturbances. These antibodies bind to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA, mediating pathogenesis by forming immune complexes. As shown recently, DNA in blood exists in both free and particulate forms, with DNA representing an important component of microparticles. Microparticles are membrane-bound vesicles containing nuclear molecules, released by membrane blebbing during cell death and activation. A panel of monoclonal NZB/NZW F1 anti-DNA antibodies was tested for binding to microparticles generated from apoptotic THP-1 and Jurkat cells. These studies showed that only certain anti-DNA antibodies in the panel, specific for double-stranded DNA, bound to microparticles. Binding to particles was reduced by soluble DNA or DNase treatment. Together, these results indicate that particle binding is a feature of only certain anti-DNA antibodies, reflecting immunochemical properties of the antibodies and the nature of the exposed DNA antigens.

  3. Carbohydrate-Binding Non-Peptidic Pradimicins for the Treatment of Acute Sleeping Sickness in Murine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M.; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Reichardt, Niels C.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments available for African sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited, with poor efficacy and unacceptable safety profiles. Here, we report a new approach to address treatment of this disease based on the use of compounds that bind to parasite surface glycans leading to rapid killing of trypanosomes. Pradimicin and its derivatives are non-peptidic carbohydrate-binding agents that adhere to the carbohydrate moiety of the parasite surface glycoproteins inducing parasite lysis in vitro. Notably, pradimicin S has good pharmaceutical properties and enables cure of an acute form of the disease in mice. By inducing resistance in vitro we have established that the composition of the sugars attached to the variant surface glycoproteins are critical to the mode of action of pradimicins and play an important role in infectivity. The compounds identified represent a novel approach to develop drugs to treat HAT. PMID:27662652

  4. Liver Fatty acid binding protein (L-Fabp) modulates murine stellate cell activation and diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Anping; Tang, Youcai; Davis, Victoria; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Kennedy, Susan M; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is crucial to the development of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Quiescent HSCs contain lipid droplets (LDs), whose depletion upon activation induces a fibrogenic gene program. Here we show that liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-Fabp), an abundant cytosolic protein that modulates fatty acid (FA) metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes also modulates HSC FA utilization and in turn regulates the fibrogenic program. L-Fabp expression ...

  5. Human α-Defensin Expression Is Not Dependent on CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-ε in a Murine Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenthøj, Andreas; Dahl, Sara; Larsen, Maria T;

    2014-01-01

    Specific granule deficiency (SGD) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by recurrent infections. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε (C/EBP-ε) gene. As a consequence, specific and gelatinase granules lack most matrix proteins. Furthermore......, azurophil granules contain diminished amounts of their most abundant proteins, α-defensins, also known as human neutrophil peptides (HNPs). In accordance with this, in vitro models have demonstrated induction of HNPs by C/EBP-ε. Since mice do not express myeloid defensins, they cannot per se be used...... by lack of C/EBP-ε in these mice. Transduction of C/EBP-ε into primary bone marrow cells from HNP-1 mice induced some HNP-1 expression, but not to levels comparable to expression human cells. Taken together, our data infer that the HNP-1 of the transgenic mouse does not show an expression pattern...

  6. Human α-defensin expression is not dependent on CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Glenthøj

    Full Text Available Specific granule deficiency (SGD is a rare congenital disorder characterized by recurrent infections. The disease is caused by inactivating mutations of the CCAAT/enhancer binding protein-ε (C/EBP-ε gene. As a consequence, specific and gelatinase granules lack most matrix proteins. Furthermore, azurophil granules contain diminished amounts of their most abundant proteins, α-defensins, also known as human neutrophil peptides (HNPs. In accordance with this, in vitro models have demonstrated induction of HNPs by C/EBP-ε. Since mice do not express myeloid defensins, they cannot per se be used to characterize the role of C/EBP-ε in controlling HNP expression in vivo. We therefore crossed a transgenic HNP-1-expressing mouse with the Cebpe-/- mouse to study the in vivo significance of C/EBP-ε for HNP-1 transcription and expression. Surprisingly, neither expression nor processing of HNP-1 was affected by lack of C/EBP-ε in these mice. Transduction of C/EBP-ε into primary bone marrow cells from HNP-1 mice induced some HNP-1 expression, but not to levels comparable to expression human cells. Taken together, our data infer that the HNP-1 of the transgenic mouse does not show an expression pattern equivalent to endogenous secondary granule proteins. This limits the use of these transgenic mice as a model for human conditions.

  7. cAMP response element binding protein is required for differentiation of respiratory epithelium during murine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Daniel Bird

    Full Text Available The cAMP response element binding protein 1 (Creb1 transcription factor regulates cellular gene expression in response to elevated levels of intracellular cAMP. Creb1(-/- fetal mice are phenotypically smaller than wildtype littermates, predominantly die in utero and do not survive after birth due to respiratory failure. We have further investigated the respiratory defect of Creb1(-/- fetal mice during development. Lungs of Creb1(-/- fetal mice were pale in colour and smaller than wildtype controls in proportion to their reduced body size. Creb1(-/- lungs also did not mature morphologically beyond E16.5 with little or no expansion of airway luminal spaces, a phenotype also observed with the Creb1(-/- lung on a Crem(-/- genetic background. Creb1 was highly expressed throughout the lung at all stages examined, however activation of Creb1 was detected primarily in distal lung epithelium. Cell differentiation of E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung distal epithelium was analysed by electron microscopy and showed markedly reduced numbers of type-I and type-II alveolar epithelial cells. Furthermore, immunomarkers for specific lineages of proximal epithelium including ciliated, non-ciliated (Clara, and neuroendocrine cells showed delayed onset of expression in the Creb1(-/- lung. Finally, gene expression analyses of the E17.5 Creb1(-/- lung using whole genome microarray and qPCR collectively identified respiratory marker gene profiles and provide potential novel Creb1-regulated genes. Together, these results demonstrate a crucial role for Creb1 activity for the development and differentiation of the conducting and distal lung epithelium.

  8. Identification of murine complement receptor type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Fingeroth, J D; Benedict, M A; Levy, D.N.; Strominger, J L

    1989-01-01

    A rabbit antiserum reactive with the human complement component C3d/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (complement receptor type 2, CR2) immunoprecipitates a Mr 155,000 murine B-cell surface antigen. The apparent molecular weight and cellular distribution of this murine antigen are similar to those of human CR2. Cells expressing the murine protein bind sheep erythrocytes coated with antibody and murine C1-C3d but do not bind Epstein-Barr virus at all. The monospecific antiserum to human CR2 together...

  9. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovar...

  10. Binding of human beta 2-microglobulin to murine EL4 thymoma cells upregulates MHC class I heavy-chain epitopes, inhibits IL-2 secretion and induces resistance to killing by natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1994-01-01

    . EL4 cells which had bound h beta 2m decreased their rate of constitutive IL-2 secretion and became resistant to activated natural killer (NK) cell killing. The present data suggest the binding of h beta 2m to mouse T cells leads to conformational changes of MHC-I heavy chains which influence both......A variety of murine tumor cell lines was studied for its binding of exogeneously added human beta 2-microglobulin (h beta 2m). Three T lymphomas and one IL-2-dependent T-cell line (HT-1) bound substantial amounts of h beta 2m, whereas P815 mastocytoma cells, an Abelson virus-infected pre-B cell...... line (ABLS-8), X63 B-lymphoma cells and YAC cells did not bind h beta 2m. In two of the T lymphomas, EL4 and BW5147, binding of h beta 2m led to an increase in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) heavy-chain epitope expression as measured by anti-H-2K/D antibody binding and FACS analysis...

  11. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A;

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...... were present in capillary lumina in glomeruli and skin of all nephritic individuals. Thus, chromatin-IgG complexes accounting for lupus nephritis seem to reach skin through circulation, but other undetermined factors are required for these complexes to deposit within skin membranes....

  12. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 2. Transport studies, photoaffinity labeling, and identification of the membrane carrier protein for methotrexate from murine L1210 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A membrane-derived component of the methotrexate/one-carbon-reduced folate transport system in murine L1210 cells has been identified by using a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate. The compound, a radioiodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative of the lysine analogue of methotrexate, is transported into murine L1210 cells in a temperature-dependent, sulfhydryl reagent inhibitable manner with a K/sub t/ of 506 +/- 79 nM and a V/sub max/ of 17.9 +/- 4.2 pmol min-1 (mg of total cellular protein)-1. Uptake of the iodinated compound at 200 nM is inhibited by low amounts of methotrexate. The parent compounds of the iodinated photoprobe inhibit [3H]methotrexate uptake, with the uniodinated 4-azidosalicylyl derivative exhibiting a K/sub i/ of 66 +/- 21 nM. UV irradiation, at 4 0C, of a cell suspension that had been incubated with the probe results in the covalent modification of a 46K-48K protein. This can be demonstrated when the plasma membranes from the labeled cells are analyzed via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Labeling of this protein occurs half-maximally at a reagent concentration that correlates with the K/sub t/ for transport of the iodinated compound. Protection against labeling of this protein by increasing amounts of methotrexate parallels the concentration dependence of inhibition of photoprobe uptake by methotrexate. Evidence that, in the absence of irradiation and at 370C, the iodinated probe is actually internalized is demonstrated by the labeling of two soluble proteins (M/sub r/ 38K and 21K) derived from the cell homogenate supernatant

  13. Regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters and cholesterol efflux by glucose in primary human monocytes and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis. This may be partially attributable to suppression of macrophage ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter mediated cholesterol efflux by sustained elevated blood glucose concentrations. Two models were used...

  14. Generation and Characterization of C305, a Murine Neutralizing scFv Antibody That Can Inhibit BLyS Binding to Its Receptor BCMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Yun LIU; Wei HAN; Yan-Li DING; Tian-Hong ZHOU; Rui-Yang TIAN; Sheng-Li YANG; Hui LIU; Yi GONG

    2005-01-01

    B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family and a key regulator of B cell response. Neutralizing single-chain fragment variable (scFv) antibody against BLyS binding to its receptor BCMA has the potential to play a prominent role in autoimmune disease therapy. A phage display scFv library constructed on pIII protein of M13 filamentous phage was screened using BLyS.After five rounds of panning, their binding activity was characterized by phage-ELISA. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that at least two different scFv gene fragments (C305 and D416) were obtained. The two different scFv gene fragments were expressed to obtain the soluble scFv antibodies, then the soluble scFv antibodies were characterized by means of competitive ELISA and in vitro neutralization assay. The results indicated that C305 is the neutralizing scFv antibody that can inhibit BLyS binding to its receptor BCMA.

  15. Amelioration of Chronic Murine Colitis by Peptide-Mediated Transduction of the IκB Kinase Inhibitor NEMO Binding Domain Peptide1

    OpenAIRE

    Davé, Shaival H.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Matsuoka, Katsuyoshi; Li, Fengling; Karrasch, Thomas; Uno, Jennifer K.; Sepulveda, Antonia R; Jobin, Christian; Baldwin, Albert S.; Paul D Robbins; Plevy, Scott E.

    2007-01-01

    The NF-κB family of transcription factors is a central regulator of chronic inflammation. The phosphorylation of IκB proteins by the IκB kinase (IKK) complex (IKKα, IKKβ, and NF-κB essential modulator or NEMO) is a key step in NF-κB activation. Peptides corresponding to the NEMO binding domain (NBD) of IKK blocks NF-κB activation without inhibiting basal NF-κB activity. In this report, we determined the effects of the IKK inhibitor peptide (NBD) in a model of spontaneously occurring chronic m...

  16. The ileal lipid binding protein is required for efficient absorption and transport of bile acids in the distal portion of the murine small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praslickova, Dana; Torchia, Enrique C; Sugiyama, Michael G; Magrane, Elijah J; Zwicker, Brittnee L; Kolodzieyski, Lev; Agellon, Luis B

    2012-01-01

    The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp) is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6(-/-) mice) and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, Pexcreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (Psmall and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02) and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01), respectively, in male Fabp6(-/-) mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6(-/-) mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03) in both sexes of Fabp6(-/-) mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC) in mice.

  17. Murine hyperglycemic vasculopathy and cardiomyopathy: whole-genome gene expression analysis predicts cellular targets and regulatory networks influenced by mannose binding lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui eZou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies.

  18. A putative amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, NMB1612, from Neisseria meningitidis, induces murine bactericidal antibodies against meningococci expressing heterologous NMB1612 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Humbert, María Victoria; Laver, Jay R; Phillips, Renee; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-08-26

    The nmb1612 (NEIS1533) gene encoding the ~27-kDa putative amino acid ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, periplasmic substrate-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) strain MC58 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant (r)NMB1612 was used for animal immunization studies. Immunization of mice with rNMB1612 adsorbed to Al(OH)3 and in liposomes with and without MPLA, induced antiserum with bactericidal activity in an assay using baby rabbit complement, against the homologous strain MC58 (encoding protein representative of Allele 62) and killed heterologous strains encoding proteins of three other alleles (representative of Alleles 1, 64 and 68), with similar SBA titres. However, strain MC58 was not killed (titre protein was killed (median titres of 16-64 in the hSBA). Analysis of the NMB1612 amino acid sequences from 4351 meningococcal strains in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database and a collection of 13 isolates from colonized individuals and from patients, showed that antibodies raised against rNMB1612 could potentially kill at least 72% of the MenB strains in the complete sequence database. For MenB disease occurring specifically in the UK from 2013 to 2015, >91% of the isolates causing disease in this recent period expressed NMB1612 protein encoded by Allele 1 and could be potentially killed by sera raised to the recombinant antigen in the current study. The NMB1612 protein was surface-accessible and expressed by different meningococcal strains. In summary, the properties of (i) NMB1612 protein conservation and expression, (ii) limited amino acid sequence variation between proteins encoded by different alleles, and (iii) the ability of a recombinant protein to induce cross-strain bactericidal antibodies, would all suggest a promising antigen for consideration for inclusion in new meningococcal vaccines.

  19. The ileal lipid binding protein is required for efficient absorption and transport of bile acids in the distal portion of the murine small intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Praslickova

    Full Text Available The ileal lipid binding protein (ilbp is a cytoplasmic protein that binds bile acids with high affinity. However evidence demonstrating the role of this protein in bile acid transport and homeostasis is missing. We created a mouse strain lacking ilbp (Fabp6(-/- mice and assessed the impact of ilbp deficiency on bile acid homeostasis and transport in vivo. Elimination of ilbp increased fecal bile acid excretion (54.2%, P<0.05 in female but not male Fabp6(-/- mice. The activity of cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (cyp7a1, the rate-controlling enzyme of the classical bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was significantly increased in female (63.5%, P<0.05 but not in male Fabp6(-/- mice. The amount of [(3H]taurocholic acid (TCA excreted by 24 h after oral administration was 102% (P<0.025 higher for female Fabp6(-/- mice whereas it was 57.3% (P<0.01 lower for male Fabp6(-/- mice, compared to wild-type mice. The retained fraction of the [(3H]TCA localized in the small and large intestines was increased by 22% (P<0.02 and decreased by 62.7% (P<0.01, respectively, in male Fabp6(-/- mice relative wild-type mice, whereas no changes were seen in female Fabp6(-/- mice. Mucosal to serosal bile acid transport using everted distal gut sacs was decreased by 74% (P<0.03 in both sexes of Fabp6(-/- mice as compared to wild-type mice. The results demonstrate that ilbp is involved in the apical to basolateral transport of bile acids in ileal enterocytes, and is vital for the maintenance of bile acid homeostasis in the enterohepatic circulation (EHC in mice.

  20. Absence of the calcium-binding protein calretinin, not of calbindin D-28k, causes a permanent impairment of murine adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran eTodkar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Calretinin (CR and calbindin D-28k (CB are cytosolic EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins and function as Ca2+ buffers affecting the spatiotemporal aspects of Ca2+ transients and possibly also as Ca2+ sensors modulating signaling cascades. In the adult hippocampal circuitry, CR and CB are expressed in specific principal neurons and subsets of interneurons. In addition, CR is transiently expressed within the neurogenic dentate gyrus (DG niche. CR and CB expression during adult neurogenesis mark critical transition stages, onset of differentiation for CR and the switch to adult-like connectivity for CB. Absence of either protein during these stages in null-mutant mice may have functional consequences and contribute to some aspects of the identified phenotypes. We report the impact of CR- and CB-deficiency on the proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells within the subgranular zone (SGZ neurogenic niche of the DG. Effects were evaluated I 2 and 4 weeks postnatally, during the transition period of the proliferative matrix to the adult state, and II in adult animals (3 months to trace possible permanent changes in adult neurogenesis. The absence of CB from differentiated DG granule cells has no retrograde effect on the proliferative activity of progenitor cells, nor affects survival or migration/differentiation of newborn neurons in the adult DG including the SGZ. On the contrary, lack of CR from immature early postmitotic granule cells causes an early loss in proliferative capacity of the SGZ that is maintained into adult age, when it has a further impact on the migration/survival of newborn granule cells. The transient CR expression at the onset of adult neurogenesis differentiation may thus have two functions: I to serve as a self-maintenance signal for the pool of cells at the same stage of neurogenesis contributing to their survival/differentiation, and II it may contribute to retrograde signaling required for maintenance of the progenitor

  1. Essential pathogenic role of endogenous IL-18 in murine diabetes induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin. Prevention of hyperglycemia and insulitis by a recombinant IL-18-binding protein: Fc construct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Di Marco, Roberto; Papaccio, Gianpaolo;

    2003-01-01

    IL-18 is a cytokine structurally and functionally related to IL-1 that, in synergy with IL-12, stimulates the synthesis of IFN-gamma from T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Because IFN-gamma plays a key pathogenic role in the development of murine immunoinflammatory diabetes induced by multi...

  2. Essential pathogenic role of endogenous IL-18 in murine diabetes induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin. Prevention of hyperglycemia and insulitis by a recombinant IL-18-binding protein: Fc construct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Di Marco, Roberto; Papaccio, Gianpaolo;

    2003-01-01

    IL-18 is a cytokine structurally and functionally related to IL-1 that, in synergy with IL-12, stimulates the synthesis of IFN-gamma from T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Because IFN-gamma plays a key pathogenic role in the development of murine immunoinflammatory diabetes induced by multi......IL-18 is a cytokine structurally and functionally related to IL-1 that, in synergy with IL-12, stimulates the synthesis of IFN-gamma from T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Because IFN-gamma plays a key pathogenic role in the development of murine immunoinflammatory diabetes induced...... to day 14 exhibited clinical and histological signs of STZ-induced diabetes similar to those of control mice treated with IgG. The protective effect of IL-18 bp:Fc was accompanied by modified ex vivo immune responses, in that spleen cells and peritoneal macrophages contained fewer IFN-gamma secreting...

  3. In vitro characterization of an iodine-125 labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor murine monoclonal antibody (MAB-425) in human high grade glioma cells: Binding, uptake, transport and localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to determine intracellular accumulation and possible nuclear translocation of 125I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 425 in human high grade glioma cells following internalization of this antibody, a prerequisite for the induction of radiotoxic effects. Four human high grade glioma cell lines known to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and a colorectal carcinoma cell line with negligible EGF-R expression were incubated for various time periods with a saturating concentration of 125I-MAb 425. No measurable intranuclear uptake of radioactivity was detected within an incubation period of less than 6 hr. After an incubation of 24-28 hr, only 0.5-2% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclear fraction. It may be possible to inhibit 125I-MAb 425 degradation with the addition of chloroquine. Overall, the data indicate that the major portion of the 125I-MAb 425 is degraded following internalization. Inhibition of lysosomal activity results in a significant increase in intracellular, but more importantly, intranuclear accumulation of 125I-MAb 425. Since radioactivity is released from the glioma cells following 125I-MAb 425 internalization, discontinuous gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the nature of the released cell products. The cell supernatants were examined at 0, 24 and 48 hr post incubation to determine the nature of any cell-associated radioactivity released from the cell surface or interior. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 167 kDa was detected in all cell supernatants. Parallel electrophoretic gels were processed for autoradiographic studies in order to indicate corresponding radioactive components. In addition, immunostaining by Western blot with peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was performed to confirm the antibody nature of the protein bands

  4. In vitro characterization of an iodine-125 labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor murine monoclonal antibody (MAB-425) in human high grade glioma cells: Binding, uptake, transport and localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emrich, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine intracellular accumulation and possible nuclear translocation of [sup 125]I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 425 in human high grade glioma cells following internalization of this antibody, a prerequisite for the induction of radiotoxic effects. Four human high grade glioma cell lines known to express epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) and a colorectal carcinoma cell line with negligible EGF-R expression were incubated for various time periods with a saturating concentration of [sup 125]I-MAb 425. No measurable intranuclear uptake of radioactivity was detected within an incubation period of less than 6 hr. After an incubation of 24-28 hr, only 0.5-2% of the internalized radioactivity was detected in the nuclear fraction. It may be possible to inhibit [sup 125]I-MAb 425 degradation with the addition of chloroquine. Overall, the data indicate that the major portion of the [sup 125]I-MAb 425 is degraded following internalization. Inhibition of lysosomal activity results in a significant increase in intracellular, but more importantly, intranuclear accumulation of [sup 125]I-MAb 425. Since radioactivity is released from the glioma cells following [sup 125]I-MAb 425 internalization, discontinuous gel electrophoresis was performed to determine the nature of the released cell products. The cell supernatants were examined at 0, 24 and 48 hr post incubation to determine the nature of any cell-associated radioactivity released from the cell surface or interior. A protein band corresponding to a molecular weight of 167 kDa was detected in all cell supernatants. Parallel electrophoretic gels were processed for autoradiographic studies in order to indicate corresponding radioactive components. In addition, immunostaining by Western blot with peroxidase-labeled goat anti-mouse antibody was performed to confirm the antibody nature of the protein bands.

  5. Proteolytically modified human beta 2-microglobulin augments the specific cytotoxic activity in murine mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claësson, M H

    1987-01-01

    (M-beta 2-m) bind to murine lymphocytes expressing H-2 class I antigens; M-beta 2-m, when added at day 0 and 1 of culture in nanomolar concentrations to a one-way murine allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) augments the generation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes; M-beta 2-m increases...... the endogenous production of interleukin 2 in the MLC culture; monoclonal antibody which reacts with both the native beta 2-m and M-beta 2-m molecule blocks the augmentation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte production induced by M-beta 2-m; murine as well as human MLC responder cells can proteolytically modify native...

  6. Glycosaminoglycan interactions in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gillet

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs commonly participate in herpesvirus entry. They are thought to provide a reversible attachment to cells that promotes subsequent receptor binding. Murine gamma-herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68 infection of fibroblasts and epithelial cells is highly GAG-dependent. This is a function of the viral gp150, in that gp150-deficient mutants are much less GAG-dependent than wild-type. Here we show that the major MHV-68 GAG-binding protein is not gp150 but gp70, a product of ORF4. Surprisingly, ORF4-deficient MHV-68 showed normal cell binding and was more sensitive than wild-type to inhibition by soluble heparin rather than less. Thus, the most obvious viral GAG interaction made little direct contribution to infection. Indeed, a large fraction of the virion gp70 had its GAG-binding domain removed by post-translational cleavage. ORF4 may therefore act mainly to absorb soluble GAGs and prevent them from engaging gp150 prematurely. In contrast to gp70, gp150 bound poorly to GAGs, implying that it provides little in the way of adhesion. We hypothesize that it acts instead as a GAG-sensitive switch that selectively activates MHV-68 entry at cell surfaces.

  7. Capto MMC mixed-mode chromatography of murine and rabbit antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Storms, Michael; Maruyama, Toshiaki; Okumura, C J; Kita, Yoshiko

    2016-11-01

    Murine antibodies have weak affinity for Protein-A. Here, we have tested binding of murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) to Protein-A or Protein-A/Protein-G mixture under salting-out conditions. The addition of ammonium sulfate to HEK conditioned medium (CM) expressing murine mAb resulted in complete binding, leading to its elution by low pH or neutral arginine solution. Alternatively, a mixed-mode chromatography using Capto MMC resin was developed as a capture step. Binding of murine mAb occurred at neutral pH. The bound mAb was eluted with a gradient from 0.3 M NaCl to 0.3 M arginine/0.3 M NaCl at pH 7.0. The Capto MMC-purified murine mAb was further purified by hydroxyl apatite chromatography. Similarly, rabbit mAb was processed with some modifications. Binding of rabbit mAb to Capto MMC required a lower pH. Elution of the bound rabbit mAb was achieved by a gradient to 0.3 M NaCl, pH 7.0. PMID:27444249

  8. Soluble interleukin 2 receptors are released from the cell surface of normal murine B lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 5.

    OpenAIRE

    Loughnan, M S; Sanderson, C. J.; Nossal, G J

    1988-01-01

    Murine T and B lymphocytes can be induced to release soluble interleukin 2 receptors (IL2Rs). This receptor is believed to be a truncated form of the 55-kDa chain of the cell-membrane-associated receptor. It has been speculated that this receptor may play an important immunoregulatory role by binding to interleukin 2 (IL-2). We report here that interleukin 5 can induce normal murine B cells to release soluble IL2Rs. This extends our finding that interleukin 5 similarly can induce murine B cel...

  9. Identification of a novel human tRNA(Ser(CGA)) functional in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmitz, A; Pedersen, F S;

    2000-01-01

    We have identified a human tRNA(Ser) isoacceptor matching the UCG codon. The tRNA was discovered via its ability to act in reverse transcription of a murine leukemia virus vector containing a complementary tRNA primer binding site (Lund et al., Nucleic Acids Res., 28 (2000) 791-799). The t...

  10. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Y.; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-01-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly,...

  11. Interleukin 1α and interleukin 1β bind to the same receptor on T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure, E. coli-derived recombinant murine interleukin 1α (IL 1α) was labeled with 125I and used for receptor binding studies. The 125I-IL 1 binds to murine EL-4 thymoma cells in a specific and saturable manner. Scatchard plot analysis for binding studies carried out at 40C reveals a single type of high affinity binding site with an apparent dissociation constant of approximately 2.6 X 10-10 M and the presence of approximately 1200 binding sites per cell. Unlabeled recombinant murine IL 1 competes for 125I-IL 1 binding in a dose-dependent manner, whereas interferon-αA, interleukin 2 (IL 2), epidermal growth factor, and nerve growth factor have no effect. The 125I-IL 1 binding site is sensitive to trypsin, suggesting that it is localized on the cell surface. The authors have also examined the ability of purified recombinant human IL 1α and IL 1β to compete for binding of the radiolabeled murine IL 1 to its receptor and to stimulate IL 2 production by EL-4 cells. They report here that both human IL 1 proteins are able to recognize the same binding site on mouse IL 1. In addition, murine as well as both human IL 1 proteins stimulate IL 2 production by EL-4 cells

  12. Murine gamma interferon fails to inhibit Toxoplasma gondii growth in murine fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, J D; Gonias, S L; Pfefferkorn, E R

    1990-01-01

    Although treatment of human macrophages or fibroblasts with human gamma interferon results in the inhibition of intracellular Toxoplasma gondii, murine gamma interferon stimulated only murine macrophages, not murine fibroblasts, to inhibit T. gondii. This species difference may be important in understanding the control of acute and chronic toxoplasmosis. PMID:2106497

  13. Murine Typhus and Febrile Illness, Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmerman, Mark D.; Murdoch, David R.; Rozmajzl, Patrick J.; Basnyat, Buddha; Woods, Christopher W.; Richards, Allen L.; Belbase, Ram Hari; Hammer, David A.; Anderson, Trevor P.; Reller, L. Barth

    2008-01-01

    Murine typhus was diagnosed by PCR in 50 (7%) of 756 adults with febrile illness seeking treatment at Patan Hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal. Of patients with murine typhus, 64% were women, 86% were residents of Kathmandu, and 90% were unwell during the winter. No characteristics clearly distinguished typhus patients from those with blood culture–positive enteric fever.

  14. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV. RESULTS: Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  15. Identification and characterization of the inducible murine mast cell gene, imc-415.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S H; Cho, J J; Kim, I S; Vliagoftis, H; Metcalfe, D D; Oh, C K

    1998-11-01

    Activation of mast cells results in the generation and release of bioactive mediators which in turn initiate allergic inflammation. Mast cell function is enhanced following stimulation in part because of the induction of specific genes and their products. To identify additional genes induced in mast cells that support this process, we thus constructed an activation-specific mast cell subtraction library. To date, we have isolated 26 novel inducible murine mast cell (imc) cDNA clones. Among them, a full-coding region of the murine gene imc-415 was found to have a greater than 90% nucleotide sequence homology and a 97.5% amino acid sequence homology to both a human beta4 integrin-binding protein (p27(BBP)) and a human translation initiation factor 6 (eIF6), which in turn are identical. In vitro translation of the imc-415 gene yielded a band of an approximately 26 kDa. This is the same as the calculated molecular weight of murine IMC-415 protein based on the predicted amino acid sequence and is the molecular weight of p27(BBP)/eIF6. Murine imc-415 message was also induced in inflamed lung tissues in a mouse model of asthma. These results suggest a role for murine imc-415 in allergic inflammation where it may enhance protein synthesis. Human eIF6/p27(BBP) may also play a role in allergic diseases based on the similarities in sequence and in gene expression patterns.

  16. Sodium-Dependent myo-Inositol Transporter 1 Is a Cellular Receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Susan R Ross; Stocking, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. T...

  17. Structure of the Murine Constitutive Androstane Receptor Complexed to Androstenol: A Molecular Basis for Inverse Agonism

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Li; Vincent, Jeremy; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Dussault, Isabelle; Lin, Min; Ianculescu, Irina; Sherman, Mark A.; Forman, Barry M.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a “reverse” paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligan...

  18. Targeted detection of murine colonic dysplasia in vivo with flexible multispectral scanning fiber endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Miller, Sharon J.; Lee, Cameron; Gustad, Adam; Seibel, Eric J.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a multi-spectral scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) that collects fluorescence images in vivo from three target peptides that bind specifically to murine colonic adenomas. This ultrathin endoscope was demonstrated in a genetically engineered mouse model of spontaneous colorectal adenomas based on somatic Apc (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene inactivation. The SFE delivers excitation at 440, 532, 635 nm with human patients by simultaneously visualizing multiple over expressed molecular targets unique to dysplasia.

  19. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  20. CD4+ T Cells Target Epitopes Residing within the RNA-Binding Domain of the U1-70-kDa Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein Autoantigen and Have Restricted TCR Diversity in an HLA-DR4-Transgenic Murine Model of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease1

    OpenAIRE

    Greidinger, Eric L.; Zang, Yun Juan; Jaimes, Kimberly; Martinez, Laisel; Nassiri, Mehdi; Hoffman, Robert W.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic autoimmune disease with significant morbidity and premature mortality of unknown pathogenesis. In the present study, we characterized U1-70-kDa small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (70-kDa) autoantigen-specific T cells in a new murine model of MCTD. These studies defined 70-kDa-reactive T cell Ag fine specificities and TCR gene usage in this model. Similar to patients with MCTD, CD4+ T cells can be readily identified from 70-kDa/U1-RNA-immunized...

  1. Mapping of the leptin binding sites and design of a leptin antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelman, Frank; Van Beneden, Katrien; Zabeau, Lennart; Iserentant, Hannes; Ulrichts, Peter; Defeau, Delphine; Verhee, Annick; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Elewaut, Dirk; Tavernier, Jan

    2004-09-24

    The leptin/leptin receptor system shows strong similarities to the long-chain cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor cytokine/receptor systems. The IL-6 family cytokines interact with their receptors through three different binding sites I-III. The leptin structure was superposed on the crystal structures of several long-chain cytokines, and a series of leptin mutants was generated focusing on binding sites I-III. The effect of the mutations on leptin receptor (LR) signaling and on binding to the membrane proximal cytokine receptor homology domain (CRH2) of the LR was determined. Mutations in binding site I at the C terminus of helix D show a modest effect on signaling and do not affect binding to CRH2. Binding site II is composed of residues at the surface of helices A and C. Mutations in this site impair binding to CRH2 but have only limited effect on signaling. Site III mutations around the N terminus of helix D impair receptor activation without affecting binding to CRH2. We identified an S120A/T121A mutant in binding site III, which lacks any signaling capacity, but which still binds to CRH2 with wild type affinity. This leptin mutant behaves as a potent leptin antagonist both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15213225

  2. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors.

  3. Apoptosis in irradiated murine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, L C; Ang, K K; Schultheiss, T E; Milas, L; Meyn, R E

    1991-09-01

    Early radiation responses of transplantable murine ovarian (OCaI) and hepatocellular (HCaI) carcinomas were examined at 6, 24, 48, 96, and 144 h after single photon doses of 25, 35, or 45 Gy. Previous studies using tumor growth delay and tumor radiocurability assays had shown OCaI tumors to be relatively radiosensitive and HCaI tumors to be radioresistant. At 6 h, approximately 20% of nuclei in OCaI tumors showed aberrations characteristic of cell death by apoptosis. This contrasted to an incidence of 3% in HCaI tumors. Mitotic activity was eliminated in OCaI tumors but was only transiently suppressed in HCaI tumors. At 24-96 h, OCaI tumors continued to display apoptosis and progressive necrosis, whereas HCaI tumors responded by exhibiting marked pleomorphism. Factors other than mitotic activity may influence tumor radiosensitivity, and one of these may be susceptibility to induction of apoptosis (programmed cell death), because this was a prominent early radiation response by the radiosensitive OCaI tumors. PMID:1886987

  4. Murine antigen-induced arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, W.B. van den; Joosten, L.A.B.; Lent, P.L.E.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Antigen induced arthritis is a unilateral T-cell driven model caused by direct injection of an antigen into the knee joint of a FCA preimmunized animal. The chronicity is determined by antigen retention in avascular structures of the joint through charge mediated binding or antibody mediated trappin

  5. The interaction pattern of murine serum ficolin-A with microorganisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Hummelshøj

    Full Text Available The ficolins are soluble pattern recognition molecules in the lectin pathway of complement, but the spectrum and mode of interaction with pathogens are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the binding properties of the murine serum ficolin-A towards a panel of different clinical relevant microorganisms (N = 45 and compared the binding profile with human serum ficolin-2 and ficolin-3. Ficolin-A was able to bind Gram-positive bacteria strains including E. faecalis, L. monocytogenes and some S. aureus strains, but not to the investigated S. agalactiae (Group B streptococcus strains. Regarding Gram-negative bacteria ficolin-A was able to bind to some E. coli and P. aeruginosa strains, but not to the investigated Salmonella strains. Of particular interest ficolin-A bound strongly to the pathogenic E. coli, O157:H7 and O149 strains, but it did not bind to the non-pathogenic E. coli, ATCC 25922 strain. Additionally, ficolin-A was able to bind purified LPS from these pathogenic strains. Furthermore, ficolin-A bound to a clinical isolate of the fungus A. fumigatus. In general ficolin-2 showed similar selective binding spectrum towards pathogenic microorganisms as observed for ficolin-A indicating specific pathophysiological roles of these molecules in host defence. In contrast, ficolin-3 did not bind to any of the investigated microorganisms and the anti-microbial role of ficolin-3 still remains elusive.

  6. Identification of the Receptor Binding Domain of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Envelope Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yuanming; Rassa, John C.; deObaldia, Maria Elena; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Susan R Ross

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a betaretrovirus that infects rodent cells and uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 for cell entry. To characterize the interaction of MMTV with its receptor, we aligned the MMTV envelope surface (SU) protein with that of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MLV) and identified a putative receptor-binding domain (RBD) that included a receptor binding sequence (RBS) of five amino acids and a heparin-binding domain (HBD). Mutation of the HBD reduced virus infectivity...

  7. Expression of murine Fc receptors for IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R E; Buku, A; Unkeless, J C

    1990-06-15

    There are two distinct genes that encode murine low affinity Fc gamma RII, murine Fc gamma RII alpha, and murine Fc gamma RII beta, which are transcribed in specific cell lineages. Fc gamma RII alpha transcripts are present in macrophages, NK cells, and mesangial cells; Fc gamma RII beta transcripts are expressed in Fc gamma R-bearing B cells, T cells, and macrophages. We have devised a sandwich ELISA to quantify the expression of Fc gamma RII alpha protein. The ELISA is specific for Fc gamma RII alpha, and does not detect the closely related Fc gamma RII beta protein. Upon stimulation with IFN-gamma the Fc gamma RII beta- macrophage cell line J774a expressed a twelvefold enhanced level of Fc gamma RII alpha protein. Peritoneal macrophages synthesized varying amounts of Fc gamma RII alpha. High levels of Fc gamma RII alpha were observed in resident and thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages, but no Fc gamma RII alpha was detected in Bacillus Calmette Guérin-elicited macrophages. J774a cells stimulated with rIL-6 bound approximately twice as much anti-Fc gamma RII mAb 2.4G2 IgG as did unstimulated controls. However, the Fc gamma RII alpha-specific ELISA showed no change in the amount of Fc gamma RII alpha expressed. A probe encompassing the extracellular coding sequence of Fc gamma RII beta hybridized to two distinct transcripts that were elevated in rIL-6-stimulated J774a cells. One of these transcripts had the same mobility in electrophoresis as Fc gamma RII alpha mRNA and hybridized to an Fc gamma RII alpha-specific probe, whereas the other transcript was larger and did not hybridize to probes specific for either Fc gamma RII alpha or Fc gamma RII beta. Moreover, we confirmed, with an Fc gamma RII beta-specific probe, that J774a cells do not make Fc gamma RII beta mRNA. Thus, the larger transcript appears to encode a novel Fc gamma RII. We suggest that the increased level of binding of the anti-Fc gamma RII mAb 2.4G2 to rIL-6-induced cells represents

  8. Murine Typhus in Child, Yucatan, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala-Castro, Jorge E.; Zavala-Velázquez, Jorge E.; Uicab, Justo Eduardo Sulú

    2009-01-01

    A case of murine typhus in Yucatan was diagnosed in a child with nonspecific signs and symptoms. The finding of Rickettsia typhi increases the number of Rickettsia species identified in Yucatan and shows that studies are needed to determine the prevalence and incidence of rickettsioses in Mexico.

  9. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in the US

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-21

    Dr. Lucas Blanton discusses the Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston Texas in 2013.  Created: 4/21/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2015.

  10. Structure of the murine Thy-1 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Giguere; K-I. Isobe; F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractWe have cloned the murine Thy-1.1 (AKR) and Thy-1.2 (Balb/c) genes. The complete exon/intron structure and the nucleotide sequence of the Thy-1.2 gene was determined. The gene contains four exons and three intervening sequences. The complete transcriptional unit gives rise to a tissue an

  11. The kissing-loop motif is a preferred site of 5' leader recombination during replication of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Mikkelsen, J G; Schmidt, J;

    1999-01-01

    A panel of mouse T-cell lymphomas induced by SL3-3 murine leukemia virus (MLV) and three primer binding site mutants thereof (A. H. Lund, J. Schmidt, A. Luz, A. B. Sorensen, M. Duch, and F. S. Pedersen, J. Virol. 73:6117-6122, 1999) were analyzed for the occurrence of recombination between...

  12. Recombination in the 5' leader of murine leukemia virus is accurate and influenced by sequence identity with a strong bias toward the kissing-loop dimerization region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    1998-01-01

    Retroviral recombination occurs frequently during reverse transcription of the dimeric RNA genome. By a forced recombination approach based on the transduction of Akv murine leukemia virus vectors harboring a primer binding site knockout mutation and the entire 5' untranslated region, we studied ...

  13. Interaction of interleukin-5 with its receptors on murine leukemic BCL1 cells and its implication in biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of interleukin (IL)-5 with its receptors on murine leukemic cell line, BCL1 cells was examined. 125I-labeled recombinant murine IL-5(rmIL-5) bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on BCL1 cells. rmIL-5, which was about 2500-fold more active than recombinant human IL-5(rhIL-5) in IgM-inducing activity on BCL1 cells, also showed about 5000-fold higher affinity to receptors. These results suggest that the bioactivity of IL-5 correlates with its receptor-binding activity. When disulfide bond formation was blocked, rmIL-5 dissociated into a monomer and lost its biological activity. This monomeric form of rmIL-5 also lost its ability to bind to cells, suggesting that dimer formation is essential for the biological activity of IL-5

  14. R-phycoerythrin-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myun Soo; Kim, Tae Sung

    2013-05-01

    Phycoerythrin (PE) is a type of phycobiliproteins found in cyanobacteria and red algae. PE-conjugated antibodies are broadly used for flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Because nonspecific binding of antibodies results in decreased analytic accuracy, numerous efforts have been made to unveil cases and mechanisms of nonspecific bindings. However, nonspecific binding of specific cell types by a fluorescent dye-conjugated form of antibody has been rarely reported. In the present study, we discovered that PE-conjugated antibodies, but not FITC- or APC-antibodies, selectively stained lamina propria plasma cells (LP-PCs) from the murine small intestine after membrane permeabilization. We demonstrated that LP-PC-selective staining with PE-antibodies was not due to interactions of antibody-epitope or antibody-Fc receptor. This unexpected staining by PE-antibody was not dependent on the mouse strain of LP-PCs, experimental methods, or origin species of the antibody, but dependent on PE itself. This phenomenon was also observed in plasma cells isolated from bone marrow, spleen, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, in vitro activated B cells and in vivo generated LP-PCs were also selectively stained by PE-conjugated antibodies. Taken together, these results show that PE-conjugated antibodies are inappropriate for intracellular staining of murine plasma cells.

  15. Comparative mapping of the actin-binding protein 280 genes in human and mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gariboldi, M.; Canzian, F.; Manenti, G.; De Gregorio, L. (Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy)); Maestrini, E.; Rivella, S. (Istituto di Genetica Biochimica ed Evoluzionistica, Pavia (Italy)); Chatterjee, A.; Herman, G.E. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Archidiacono, N.; Antonacci, R. (Institute for Molecular Genetics, Houston, TX (United States)) (and others)

    1994-05-15

    Two genes encode actin-binding protein 280 isoforms. ABP-280 or filamin (FLN1) is present in the cytoskeleton of many cell types, whereas expression of FLN2 is limited to skeletal muscle and heart. FLN1 maps to human chromosome Xq28, and, by physical mapping in YAC clones, the authors have mapped the homologous murine locus (Fln1) to mouse chromosome X, in a region of syntenic homology with human chromosome X. They mapped FLN2 to human chromosome 7q32-q35 by analysis of somatic cell hybrids containing portions of chromosome 7, and, by using a mapping panel from an interspecific murine cross, they mapped the corresponding murine locus (Fln2) to murine chromosome 6 in a region homologous to human chromosome 7. 21 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Primary T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2016-01-01

    Summary In comparison to human T cells, efficient retroviral gene transfer and subsequent expansion of murine primary T cells is more difficult to achieve. Herein, we describe an optimized gene transfer protocol utilizing an ecotropic viral vector to transduce primary murine T cells activated with magnetic beads coated with agonistic anti-CD3 and CD28 antibodies. Activated T cells are subsequently centrifuged (spinoculated) on RetroNectin-coated tissue culture plates in the context of retroviral supernatant. Variables found to be critical to high gene transfer and subsequent efficient T cell expansion included CD3/CD28 magnetic bead to cell ratio, time from T cell activation to initial spinoculation, frequency of T cell spinoculation, interleukin-2 concentration in the medium, and the initial purity of the T cell preparation. PMID:19110621

  17. Advances in Murine Models of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-li Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN is one of the microvascular complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, which is also associated with a poor life expectancy of diabetic patients. However, the pathogenesis of DN is still unclear. Thus, it is of great use to establish appropriate animal models of DN for doing research on pathogenesis and developing novel therapeutic strategies. Although a large number of murine models of DN including artificially induced, spontaneous, and genetically engineered (knockout and transgenic animal models have been developed, none of them develops renal changes sufficiently reflecting those seen in humans. Here we review the identified murine models of DN from the aspects of genetic background, type of diabetes, method of induction, gene deficiency, animal age and gender, kidney histopathology, and phenotypic alterations in the hope of enhancing our comprehension of genetic susceptibility and molecular mechanisms responsible for this disease and providing new clues as to how to choose appropriate animal models of DN.

  18. DNA extraction columns contaminated with murine sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Erlwein

    Full Text Available Sequences of the novel gammaretrovirus, xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV have been described in human prostate cancer tissue, although the amounts of DNA are low. Furthermore, XMRV sequences and polytropic (p murine leukemia viruses (MLVs have been reported in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. In assessing the prevalence of XMRV in prostate cancer tissue samples we discovered that eluates from naïve DNA purification columns, when subjected to PCR with primers designed to detect genomic mouse DNA contamination, occasionally gave rise to amplification products. Further PCR analysis, using primers to detect XMRV, revealed sequences derived from XMRV and pMLVs from mouse and human DNA and DNA of unspecified origin. Thus, DNA purification columns can present problems when used to detect minute amounts of DNA targets by highly sensitive amplification techniques.

  19. Immunodetection of Murine Lymphotoxins in Eukaryotic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitchenko, Veronika E.; Korobko, Vyacheslav G.; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Kravchenko, Vladimir V.; Kuimov, Alexander N.; Turetskaya, Regina L.; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2000-10-01

    Lymphotoxins alpha and beta (LTalpha and LTbeta) are members of tumor necrosis factor superfamily. LT heterotrimers exist on the surface of lymphocytes and signal through LTbeta receptor while soluble LTalpha homotrimer can signal through TNF receptors p55 and p75. LT-, as well as TNF-mediated signaling are important for the organogenesis and maintenance of microarchitecture of secondary lymphoid organs in mice and has been implicated in the mechanism of certain inflammatory syndromes in humans. In this study we describe the generation of eukaryotic expression plasmids encoding murine LTalpha and LTbeta genes and a prokaryotic expression construct for murine LTalpha. Using recombinant proteins expressed by these vectors as tools for antisera selection, we produced and characterized several polyclonal antibodies capable of detecting LT proteins in eukaryotic cells.

  20. Murine models of human wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  1. Eliminating Murine Norovirus by Cross-Fostering

    OpenAIRE

    Buxbaum, Laurence U.; DeRitis, Pierina C.; Chu, Niansheng; Conti, Pierre A.

    2011-01-01

    Murine norovirus (MNV) is a newly discovered and extremely prevalent pathogen of laboratory mouse colonies. MNV causes severe disease in some immunocompromised mouse strains and can cause persistent infections even in immunocompetent mice. Despite the fact that immunocompetent mice are generally asymptomatic, the possibility that MNV infection might alter immune responses makes its eradication a potentially useful goal for many facilities. Initial attempts by others to use a strategy of testi...

  2. Characterization of the tumor marker muc16 (ca125 expressed by murine ovarian tumor cell lines and identification of a panel of cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodell Cara AR

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives The ovarian tumor marker CA125 is expressed on human MUC16, a cell surface bound mucin that is also shed by proteolytic cleavage. Human MUC16 is overexpressed by ovarian cancer cells. MUC16 facilitates the binding of ovarian tumor cells to mesothelial cells lining the peritoneal cavity. Additionally, MUC16 also is a potent inhibitor of natural killer cell mediated anti-tumor cytotoxic responses. Extensive studies using human as well as murine ovarian tumor cell models are required to clearly define the function of MUC16 in the progression of ovarian tumors. The major objective of this study was to determine if the murine ovarian tumor cells, MOVCAR, express Muc16 and to characterize antibodies that recognize this mucin. Methods RT-PCR analysis was used for detecting the Muc16 message and size exclusion column chromatography for isolating Muc16 produced by MOVCAR cells. Soluble and cell-associated murine Muc16 were analyzed, respectively, by Western blotting and flow cytometry assays using a new panel of antibodies. The presence of N-linked oligosaccharides on murine Muc16 was determined by ConA chromatography. Results We demonstrate that murine Muc16 is expressed by mouse ovarian cancer cells as an ~250 kDa glycoprotein that carries both O-linked and N-linked oligosaccharides. In contrast to human MUC16, the murine ortholog is primarily released from the cells and cannot be detected on the cell surface. Since the released murine Muc16 is not detected by conventional anti-CA125 assays, we have for the first time identified a panel of anti-human MUC16 antibodies that also recognizes the murine counterpart. Conclusion The antibodies identified in this study can be used in future purification of murine Muc16 and exhaustive study of its properties. Furthermore, the initial identification and characterization of murine Muc16 is a vital preliminary step in the development of effective murine models of human ovarian cancer. These

  3. Immunomodulatory effect of Glossogyne tenuifolia in murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Choi-Lan; Weng, Ching-Yi; Wang, Lisu; Lian, Tzi-Wei; Wu, Ming-Jiuan

    2006-08-11

    Glossogyne tenuifolia Cass., a medicinal plant native to Taiwan, is traditionally used as an anti-inflammatory remedy. Oleanolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside have been previously identified as active components of Glossogyne tenuifolia in the murine macrophage-like cell line, RAW264.7. Current study investigates the effect and mechanism of the ethanol extract of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) and its major constituents on the release of inflammatory mediators in activated elicited murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes. Our results showed that GT (up to 0.15 mg/ml) inhibited the production of proinflammatory mediators, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in LPS-activated macrophages, and IFN-gamma in PHA-activated splenocytes. GT also inhibited LPS-activated murine iNOS and COX-2 promoter activities in transiently transfected RAW264.7 cells. The major constituents, oleanolic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside, as well as its aglycone, luteolin, inhibited the release of NO, PGE(2), TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in activated peritoneal macrophages. However, only luteolin-7-glucoside and luteolin were able to reduce IFN-gamma release in PHA-stimulated splenocytes. To further investigate the possible mechanisms that interfere with LPS- and PHA-signaling, this study focused on nuclear factor-kappaB activation signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that GT (0.075-0.15 mg/ml) treatment reduces nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity, as demonstrated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Collectively, the results suggest that GT inhibits proinflammatory mediator synthesis in activated murine peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes, in part through NF-kappaB-dependent pathways. PMID:16584857

  4. Non-apoptotic toxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward murine cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanhita Roy

    Full Text Available Although P. aeruginosa is especially dangerous in cystic fibrosis (CF, there is no consensus as to how it kills representative cell types that are of key importance in the lung. This study concerns the acute toxicity of the sequenced strain, PAO1, toward a murine macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7. Toxicity requires brief contact with the target cell, but is then delayed for more than 12 h. None of the classical toxic effectors of this organism is required and cell death occurs without phagocytosis or acute perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton. Apoptosis is not required for toxicity toward either RAW 264.7 cells or for alveolar macrophages. Transcriptional profiling shows that encounter between PAO1 and RAW 264.7 cells elicits an early inflammatory response, followed by growth arrest. As an independent strategy to understand the mechanism of toxicity, we selected variant RAW 264.7 cells that resist PAO1. Upon exposure to P. aeruginosa, they are hyper-responsive with regard to classical inflammatory cytokine production and show transient downregulation of transcripts that are required for cell growth. They do not show obvious morphologic changes. Although they do not increase interferon transcripts, when exposed to PAO1 they dramatically upregulate a subset of the responses that are characteristic of exposure to g-interferon, including several guanylate-binding proteins. The present observations provide a novel foundation for learning how to equip cells with resistance to a complex challenge.

  5. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TI...

  6. Structure of the murine constitutive androstane receptor complexed to androstenol: a molecular basis for inverse agonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, L.; Vincent, J.; Brunzelle, J.S.; Dussault, I.; Lin, M.; Ianculescu, I.; Sherman, M.A.; Forman, B.M.; Fernandez, E. (Tennesse)

    2010-03-08

    The nuclear receptor CAR is a xenobiotic responsive transcription factor that plays a central role in the clearance of drugs and bilirubin while promoting cocaine and acetaminophen toxicity. In addition, CAR has established a 'reverse' paradigm of nuclear receptor action where the receptor is active in the absence of ligand and inactive when bound to inverse agonists. We now report the crystal structure of murine CAR bound to the inverse agonist androstenol. Androstenol binds within the ligand binding pocket, but unlike many nuclear receptor ligands, it makes no contacts with helix H12/AF2. The transition from constitutive to basal activity (androstenol bound) appears to be associated with a ligand-induced kink between helices H10 and H11. This disrupts the previously predicted salt bridge that locks H12 in the transcriptionally active conformation. This mechanism of inverse agonism is distinct from traditional nuclear receptor antagonists thereby offering a new approach to receptor modulation.

  7. Direct and Indirect Suppression of Interleukin-6 Gene Expression in Murine Macrophages by Nuclear Orphan Receptor REV-ERBα

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shogo Sato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now evident that many nuclear hormone receptors can modulate target gene expression. REV-ERBα, one of the nuclear hormone receptors with the capacity to alter clock function, is critically involved in lipid metabolism, adipogenesis, and the inflammatory response. Recent studies suggest that REV-ERBα plays a key role in the mediation between clockwork and inflammation. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the role of REV-ERBα in the regulation of interleukin-6 (il6 gene expression in murine macrophages. REV-ERBα agonists, or overexpression of rev-erbα in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264 cells, suppressed the induction of il6 mRNA following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS endotoxin challenge. Also, rev-erbα overexpression decreased LPS-stimulated nuclear factor κB (NFκB activation in RAW264 cells. We showed that REV-ERBα represses il6 expression not only indirectly through an NFκB binding motif but also directly through a REV-ERBα binding motif in the murine il6 promoter region. Furthermore, peritoneal macrophages from mice lacking rev-erbα increased il6 mRNA expression. These data suggest that REV-ERBα regulates the inflammatory response of macrophages through the suppression of il6 expression. REV-ERBα may therefore be identified as a potent anti-inflammatory receptor and be a therapeutic target receptor of inflammatory diseases.

  8. Murine Flexor Tendon Injury and Repair Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jessica E; Loiselle, Alayna E

    2016-01-01

    Tendon connects skeletal muscle and bone, facilitating movement of nearly the entire body. In the hand, flexor tendons (FTs) enable flexion of the fingers and general hand function. Injuries to the FTs are common, and satisfactory healing is often impaired due to excess scar tissue and adhesions between the tendon and surrounding tissue. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular components of FT repair. To that end, a murine model of FT repair that recapitulates many aspects of healing in humans, including impaired range of motion and decreased mechanical properties, has been developed and previously described. Here an in-depth demonstration of this surgical procedure is provided, involving transection and subsequent repair of the flexor digitorum longus (FDL) tendon in the murine hind paw. This technique can be used to conduct lineage analysis of different cell types, assess the effects of gene gain or loss-of-function, and to test the efficacy of pharmacological interventions in the healing process. However, there are two primary limitations to this model: i) the FDL tendon in the mid-portion of the murine hind paw, where the transection and repair occur, is not surrounded by a synovial sheath. Therefore this model does not account for the potential contribution of the sheath to the scar formation process. ii) To protect the integrity of the repair site, the FT is released at the myotendinous junction, decreasing the mechanical forces of the tendon, likely contributing to increased scar formation. Isolation of sufficient cells from the granulation tissue of the FT during the healing process for flow cytometric analysis has proved challenging; cytology centrifugation to concentrate these cells is an alternate method used, and allows for generation of cell preparations on which immunofluorescent labeling can be performed. With this method, quantification of cells or proteins of interest during FT healing becomes possible. PMID:27684281

  9. Murine erythrocytes contain high levels of lysophospholipase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamp, J.A.F. op den; Roelofsen, B.; Sanderink, G.; Middelkoop, E.; Hamer, R.

    1984-01-01

    Murine erythrocytes were found to be unique in the high levels of lysophospholipase activity in the cytosol of these cells. The specific activity of the enzyme in the cytosol of the murine cells is 10-times higher than in the cytosol of rabbit erythrocytes and approximately three orders of magnitude

  10. 肾小管肝型脂肪酸结合蛋白对小鼠IgA肾病的肾脏保护作用%Protective effects of tubular liver-type fatty acid binding protein on murine IgA nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佐楠; 李艳秋; 王力宁; 李子龙; 王均; 冯江敏; 马健飞; 范秋灵; 姚丽

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨近曲小管肝型脂肪酸结合蛋白(L-FABP)对骨髓移植诱导的小鼠IgAN的肾脏保护作用.方法 通过骨髓移植在肾小管高表达人类L-FABP(hL-FABP)基因的转基因鼠(Tg)和相同背景的野生鼠(WT)上重建IgAN.受体鼠分别在骨髓移植后第6和12周处死,留取肾脏标本.用实时荧光定量PCR方法检测肾脏hL-FABP、纤连蛋白(FN)和单核细胞趋化蛋白1(MCP-1)的mRNA表达;免疫组化法检测hL-FABP和FN的蛋白表达分布;Western印迹法检测hL-FABP、4-羟壬烯醛(4-HNE)、血红素加氧酶1(HO-1)、FN、Ⅳ型胶原的蛋白表达水平;ELISA法检测血清IgA、尿白蛋白和尿hL-FABP水平.结果 骨髓移植在受体转基因鼠(Tg-ddY)和野生鼠(WT-ddY)上均重建了IgAN,血清IgA水平升高伴有系膜区IgA沉积,组间差异无统计学意义.正常Tg鼠的肾小管表达hL-FABP.与正常Tg鼠相比,骨髓移植后第6周,Tg-ddY鼠肾脏hL-FABP的mRNA(1.62±0.32比0.46±0.09,P<0.01)和蛋白(1.74±0.76比1.14±0.31,P<0.01)表达水平显著上调,伴有尿hL-FABP水平(μg/g肌酐)显著升高(59.87±26.75比31.01±14.86,P<0.05).与Tg-ddY鼠相比,WT-ddY鼠在第12周出现明显的白蛋白尿(mg/L)(828±656比82±22,P<0.01)、明显的系膜基质扩张(P<0.01),并在肾小球出现更多的FN及Ⅳ型胶原沉积.Tg-ddY鼠的肾脏HO-1和4-HNE修饰蛋白(均P<0.05)以及MCP-1 mRNA的表达(P<0.01)被显著抑制.结论 肾小管L-FABP可能通过抑制氧化应激和炎性介质的产生减轻肾小球损伤,在IgAN早期发挥了肾脏保护作用.%Objective To investigate the renoprotection of tubular L-FABP in murine IgA nephropathy (IgAN) induced by bone marrow transplantation(BMT). Methods IgAN models were reconstituted by BMT from IgAN-prone mice into mice (Tg) transgenically tubular overexpressing human L-FABP (hL-FABP) and wild type (WT) mice. These recipients were sacrificed at 6 and 12 weeks after BMT and their kidneys were collected. The expressions

  11. Structural and biochemical characterization of the inhibitor complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi; Gustchina, Alla; Matúz, Krisztina; Tözsér, Jozsef; Namwong, Sirilak; Goldfarb, Nathan E.; Dunn, Ben M.; Wlodawer, Alexander (Debrecen); (NCI); (Florida); (Suan Sunandha)

    2012-10-23

    Interactions between the protease (PR) encoded by the xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus and a number of potential inhibitors have been investigated by biochemical and structural techniques. It was observed that several inhibitors used clinically against HIV PR exhibit nanomolar or even subnanomolar values of K{sub i}, depending on the exact experimental conditions. Both TL-3, a universal inhibitor of retroviral PRs, and some inhibitors originally shown to inhibit plasmepsins were also quite potent, whereas inhibition by pepstatin A was considerably weaker. Crystal structures of the complexes of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus PR with TL-3, amprenavir and pepstatin A were solved at high resolution and compared with the structures of complexes of these inhibitors with other retropepsins. Whereas TL-3 and amprenavir bound in a predictable manner, spanning the substrate-binding site of the enzyme, two molecules of pepstatin A bound simultaneously in an unprecedented manner, leaving the catalytic water molecule in place.

  12. Comparison of the fibronectin-binding ability and antitumor efficacy of various mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M A; Ritchey, J K; Catalona, W J; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L

    1990-07-01

    Although the mechanism by which Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) exerts an antitumor effect on superficial bladder tumors is not fully understood, recent evidence has implicated binding of BCG organisms to fibronectin (FN) as requisite for this antitumor efficacy. Various substrains of BCG and other mycobacteria were tested in vitro for their relative capacities to bind both matrix and soluble FN. A substrain of Mycobacterium kansasii, designated the "high-binding strain," was found to bind FN more readily (P less than 0.05) in in vitro studies, when compared to commercially available substrains of BCG (Tice, Connaught, and Armand Frappier). The binding by the three commercial strains of BCG to FN in vitro appeared to be equivalent. The high-binding strain was further demonstrated to attach more readily in vivo to the acutely injured murine bladder (P less than 0.005) than the Armand Frappier substrain. Finally, using the MB49 murine bladder tumor model, an enhanced antitumor effect (P less than 0.05) was noted in mice treated with intravesical high-binding strain, in comparison to the Armand Frappier substrain, during five weekly treatments. It appears not only that the commercial substrains of BCG bind FN in an equivalent manner but also that the relative binding capacities of the substrains correlate directly with antitumor activity. A substrain of M. kansasii appears to have been identified which may prove more clinically effective than the currently available strains of BCG.

  13. Analyzing binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Harvey J; Neubig, Richard R

    2010-07-01

    Measuring the rate and extent of radioligand binding provides information on the number of binding sites, and their affinity and accessibility of these binding sites for various drugs. This unit explains how to design and analyze such experiments.

  14. Splenectomy normalizes hematocrit in murine polycythemia vera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Rung Mo

    Full Text Available Splenic enlargement (splenomegaly develops in numerous disease states, although a specific pathogenic role for the spleen has rarely been described. In polycythemia vera (PV, an activating mutation in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2(V617 induces splenomegaly and an increase in hematocrit. Splenectomy is sparingly performed in patients with PV, however, due to surgical complications. Thus, the role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of human PV remains unknown. We specifically tested the role of the spleen in the pathogenesis of PV by performing either sham (SH or splenectomy (SPL surgeries in a murine model of JAK2(V617F-driven PV. Compared to SH-operated mice, which rapidly develop high hematocrits after JAK2(V617F transplantation, SPL mice completely fail to develop this phenotype. Disease burden (JAK2(V617 is equivalent in the bone marrow of SH and SPL mice, however, and both groups develop fibrosis and osteosclerosis. If SPL is performed after PV is established, hematocrit rapidly declines to normal even though myelofibrosis and osteosclerosis again develop independently in the bone marrow. In contrast, SPL only blunts hematocrit elevation in secondary, erythropoietin-induced polycythemia. We conclude that the spleen is required for an elevated hematocrit in murine, JAK2(V617F-driven PV, and propose that this phenotype of PV may require a specific interaction between mutant cells and the spleen.

  15. Murine Typhus: Clinical and epidemiological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar Peniche Lara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 14.00 Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE Rickettsia typhi is an intracellular bacteria who causes murine typhus. His importance is reflected in the high frequency founding specific antibodies against R. typhi in several worldwide seroepidemiological studies, the seroprevalence ranging between 3-36%. Natural reservoirs of Rickettsia typhi are rats (some species belonging the Rattus Genus and fleas (Xenopsylla cheopis are his vector. This infection is associated with overcrowding, pollution and poor hygiene. Typically presents fever, headache, rash on trunk and extremities, in some cases may occur organ-specific complications, affecting liver, kidney, lung or brain. Initially the disease is very similar to other diseases, is very common to confuse the murine typhus with Dengue fever, therefore, ignorance of the disease is a factor related to complications or non-specific treatments for the resolution of this infection. This paper presents the most relevant information to consider about the rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia typhi.

  16. Benzaldehyde suppresses murine allergic asthma and rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Tae Young; Park, Chang-Shin; Kim, Kyu-Sung; Heo, Min-Jeong; Kim, Young Hyo

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate the antiallergic effects of oral benzaldehyde in a murine model of allergic asthma and rhinitis, we divided 20 female BALB/c mice aged 8-10 weeks into nonallergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to normal saline), allergic (intraperitoneally sensitized and intranasally challenged to ovalbumin), and 200- and 400-mg/kg benzaldehyde (allergic but treated) groups. The number of nose-scratching events in 10 min, levels of total and ovalbumin-specific IgE in serum, differential counts of inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, titers of Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13) in BAL fluid, histopathologic findings of lung and nasal tissues, and expressions of proteins involved in apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, caspase-3), inflammation (COX-2), antioxidation (extracellular SOD, HO-1), and hypoxia (HIF-1α, VEGF) in lung tissue were evaluated. The treated mice had significantly fewer nose-scratching events, less inflammatory cell infiltration in lung and nasal tissues, and lower HIF-1α and VEGF expressions in lung tissue than the allergic group. The number of eosinophils and neutrophils and Th2 cytokine titers in BAL fluid significantly decreased after the treatment (Pbenzaldehyde exerts antiallergic effects in murine allergic asthma and rhinitis, possibly through inhibition of HIF-1α and VEGF.

  17. Functional dissection of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope protein gp70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-03-01

    The envelope protein of Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MLV) is a complex glycoprotein that mediates receptor binding and entry via fusion with cell membranes. By using a series of substitution mutations and truncations in the Mo-MLV external envelope surface protein gp70, we have identified regions important for these processes. Firstly, truncations of gp70 revealed that the minimal continuous receptor-binding region is amino acids 9 to 230, in broad agreement with other studies. Secondly, within this region there are two key basic amino acids, Arg-83 and Arg-95, that are essential for receptor binding and may interact with a negatively charged residue(s) or with the pi electrons of the aromatic ring on a hydrophobic residue(s) in the basic amino acid transporter protein that is the Mo-MLV ecotropic receptor. Finally, we showed that outside the minimal receptor-binding region at amino acids 2 to 8, there is a region that is essential for postbinding fusion events. PMID:9032341

  18. Structure of a murine norovirus NS6 protease-product complex revealed by adventitious crystallisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eoin N Leen

    Full Text Available Murine noroviruses have emerged as a valuable tool for investigating the molecular basis of infection and pathogenesis of the closely related human noroviruses, which are the major cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis. The replication of noroviruses relies on the proteolytic processing of a large polyprotein precursor into six non-structural proteins (NS1-2, NS3, NS4, NS5, NS6(pro, NS7(pol by the virally-encoded NS6 protease. We report here the crystal structure of MNV NS6(pro, which has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. Adventitiously, the crystal contacts are mediated in part by the binding of the C-terminus of NS6(pro within the peptide-binding cleft of a neighbouring molecule. This insertion occurs for both molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal in a manner that is consistent with physiologically-relevant binding, thereby providing two independent views of a protease-peptide complex. Since the NS6(pro C-terminus is formed in vivo by NS6(pro processing, these crystal contacts replicate the protease-product complex that is formed immediately following cleavage of the peptide bond at the NS6-NS7 junction. The observed mode of binding of the C-terminal product peptide yields new insights into the structural basis of NS6(pro specificity.

  19. Polyfluorinated bis-styrylbenzenes as amyloid-β plaque binding ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Kapoerchan, Varsha V; Metaxas, Athanasios; de Jongh, Sanne; de Backer, Maaike; Welling, Mick M; Jiskoot, Wim; Windhorst, Albert D; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van Buchem, Mark A; Overhand, Mark; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-04-15

    Detection of cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) by targeted contrast agents remains of great interest to aid the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bis-styrylbenzenes have been previously reported as potential Aβ imaging agents. To further explore their potency as (19)F MRI contrast agents we synthetized several novel fluorinated bis-styrylbenzenes and studied their fluorescent properties and amyloid-β binding characteristics. The compounds showed a high affinity for Aβ plaques on murine and human brain sections. Interestingly, competitive binding experiments demonstrated that they bound to a different binding site than chrysamine G. Despite their high logP values, many bis-styrylbenzenes were able to enter the brain and label murine amyloid in vivo. Unfortunately initial post-mortem (19)F NMR studies showed that these compounds as yet do not warrant further MRI studies due to the reduction of the (19)F signal in the environment of the brain. PMID:24657049

  20. Transcriptomic analysis of murine embryos lacking endogenous retinoic acid signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Paschaki

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA, an active derivative of the liposoluble vitamin A (retinol, acts as an important signaling molecule during embryonic development, regulating phenomenons as diverse as anterior-posterior axial patterning, forebrain and optic vesicle development, specification of hindbrain rhombomeres, pharyngeal arches and second heart field, somitogenesis, and differentiation of spinal cord neurons. This small molecule directly triggers gene activation by binding to nuclear receptors (RARs, switching them from potential repressors to transcriptional activators. The repertoire of RA-regulated genes in embryonic tissues is poorly characterized. We performed a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes of murine wild-type and Retinaldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 null-mutant (Raldh2 (-/- embryos - unable to synthesize RA from maternally-derived retinol - using Affymetrix DNA microarrays. Transcriptomic changes were analyzed in two embryonic regions: anterior tissues including forebrain and optic vesicle, and posterior (trunk tissues, at early stages preceding the appearance of overt phenotypic abnormalities. Several genes expected to be downregulated under RA deficiency appeared in the transcriptome data (e.g. Emx2, Foxg1 anteriorly, Cdx1, Hoxa1, Rarb posteriorly, whereas reverse-transcriptase-PCR and in situ hybridization performed for additional selected genes validated the changes identified through microarray analysis. Altogether, the affected genes belonged to numerous molecular pathways and cellular/organismal functions, demonstrating the pleiotropic nature of RA-dependent events. In both tissue samples, genes upregulated were more numerous than those downregulated, probably due to feedback regulatory loops. Bioinformatic analyses highlighted groups (clusters of genes displaying similar behaviors in mutant tissues, and biological functions most significantly affected (e.g. mTOR, VEGF, ILK signaling in forebrain tissues; pyrimidine and purine

  1. Heterohybridoma for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh.Victoria Chanu and M. Ayub Ali

    Full Text Available Hybridoma technology described by kohler and Milstein produce only mouse immunoglobulins. Such immunoglobulins have limited use due to its negative side effects such as the recipient’s immune response. The production of a non murine monoclonal antibody to combat the problems of murine monoclonal antibody is again difficult due to the lack of a suitable myeloma cell line. Heterohybridoma formed by the fusion of lymphocyte of one species with the myeloma cell of a different species is the solution, which can be used for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(8.000: 390-392

  2. Isolation and culture of murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, John Q; Gordon, Siamon

    2005-01-01

    The two most convenient sources of primary murine macrophages are the bone marrow and the peritoneal cavity. Resident peritoneal macrophages can readily be harvested from mice and purified by adherence to tissue culture plastic. The injection of Bio-Gel polyacrylamide beads or thioglycollate broth into the peritoneal cavity produces an inflammatory response allowing the purification of large numbers of elicited macrophages. The production of an activated macrophage population can be achieved by using Bacillus-Calmette-Guerin as the inflammatory stimulus. Resident bone marrow macrophages can be isolated following enzymatic separation of cells from bone marrow plugs and enrichment on 30% fetal calf serum containing medium or Ficoll-Hypaque gradients. Bone marrow-derived macrophages can be produced by differentiating nonadherent macrophage precursors with medium containing macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

  3. Extracellular proteolysis in the adult murine brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sappino, A P; Madani, R; Huarte, J; Belin, D; Kiss, J Z; Wohlwend, A; Vassalli, J D

    1993-08-01

    Plasminogen activators are important mediators of extracellular metabolism. In the nervous system, plasminogen activators are thought to be involved in the remodeling events required for cell migration during development and regeneration. We have now explored the expression of the plasminogen activator/plasmin system in the adult murine central nervous system. Tissue-type plasminogen activator is synthesized by neurons of most brain regions, while prominent tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis is restricted to discrete areas, in particular within the hippocampus and hypothalamus. Our observations indicate that tissue-type plasminogen activator-catalyzed proteolysis in neural tissues is not limited to ontogeny, but may also contribute to adult central nervous system physiology, for instance by influencing neuronal plasticity and synaptic reorganization. The identification of an extracellular proteolytic system active in the adult central nervous system may also help gain insights into the pathogeny of neurodegenerative disorders associated with extracellular protein deposition.

  4. A major binding protein for leukemia inhibitory factor in normal mouse serum: identification as a soluble form of the cellular receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, M. J.; Cross, B. A.; Metcalf, D; Ward, L. D.; Simpson, R. J.; Nicola, N A

    1992-01-01

    A protein that specifically binds leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been isolated from normal mouse serum by using four successive fractionation steps: chromatography on a LIF affinity matrix, anion-exchange chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, and preparative native gel electrophoresis. The purified LIF-binding protein (LBP) is a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa that specifically binds 125I-labeled murine LIF with an affinity comparable to that of the low-a...

  5. Melanization of Cryptococcus neoformans in Murine Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Valadon, Philippe; Feldmesser, Marta; Casadevall, Arturo

    1999-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a fungus that is pathogenic in humans and that can produce melanin in vitro. Melanization is associated with virulence, but there is no evidence that melanin is made during infection. Melanins are difficult to study because they are amorphous and insoluble. Melanin-binding peptides from a phage display library were used to demonstrate that C. neoformans makes melanin-like compounds in tissue. Melanin-binding peptides were characterized by a high proportion of positi...

  6. Sequence and structural requirements for high-affinity DNA binding by the WT1 gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagama, H; Heinrich, G.; Pelletier, J; Housman, D E

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor gene, WT1, encodes a zinc finger polypeptide which plays a key role regulating cell growth and differentiation in the urogenital system. Using the whole-genome PCR approach, we searched murine genomic DNA for high-affinity WT1 binding sites and identified a 10-bp motif 5'GCGTGGGAGT3' which we term WTE). The WTE motif is similar to the consensus binding sequence 5'GCG(G/T)GGGCG3' recognized by EGR-1 and is also suggested to function as a binding site for WT1, settin...

  7. An Aromatic Side Chain Is Required at Residue 8 of SU for Fusion of Ecotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Zhaohui; Albritton, Lorraine M.

    2004-01-01

    The surface glycoprotein (SU) of most gammaretroviruses contains a conserved histidine at its amino terminus. In ecotropic murine leukemia virus SU, replacement of histidine 8 with arginine (H8R) or deletion of H8 (H8del) abolishes infection and cell-cell fusion but has no effect on binding to the cellular receptor. We report here that an aromatic ring side chain is essential to the function of residue 8. The size of the aromatic ring appears to be important, as does its ability to form a hyd...

  8. IKK NBD peptide inhibits LPS induced pulmonary inflammation and alters sphingolipid metabolism in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, Philipp; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Herzberg, Mona; Uhlig, Ulrike; Schütze, Stefan; Lucius, Ralph; Krause, Martin F

    2012-06-01

    Airway epithelial NF-κB is a key regulator of host defence in bacterial infections and has recently evolved as a target for therapeutical approaches. Evidence is accumulating that ceramide, generated by acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase), and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1-P) are important mediators in host defence as well as in pathologic processes of acute lung injury. Little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of pulmonary sphingolipid metabolism in bacterial infections of the lung. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of NF-κB on sphingolipid metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation. In a murine acute lung injury model with intranasal Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS we investigated TNF-α, KC (murine IL-8), IL-6, MCP-1 and neutrophilic infiltration next to aSMase activity and ceramide and S1-P lung tissue concentrations. Airway epithelial NF-κB was inhibited by topically applied IKK NBD, a cell penetrating NEMO binding peptide. This treatment resulted in significantly reduced inflammation and suppression of aSMase activity along with decreased ceramide and S1-P tissue concentrations down to levels observed in healthy animals. In conclusion our results confirm that changes in sphingolipid metabolim due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS inhalation are regulated by NF-κB translocation. This confirms the critical role of airway epithelial NF-κB pathway for the inflammatory response to bacterial pathogens and underlines the impact of sphingolipids in inflammatory host defence mechanisms. PMID:22469869

  9. Human recombinant erythropoietin promotes differentiation of murine megakaryocytes in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishibashi, T.; Koziol, J A; Burstein, S A

    1987-01-01

    To determine if erythropoietin affects megakaryocytopoiesis, we measured acetylcholinesterase (AchE) activity, a marker of the murine megakaryocytic lineage, after the addition of human recombinant erythropoietin to serumless murine bone marrow cultures. Erythropoietin increased AchE activity substantially. Moreover, when the hormone was added to serumless cultures of 426 isolated single megakaryocytes derived from megakaryocytic colonies, erythropoietin induced a significant increase in the ...

  10. Dynamic Determination of Oxygenation and Lung Compliance in Murine Pneumonectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Gibney, Barry; Lee, Grace S; Houdek, Jan; Lin, Miao; Miele, Lino; Chamoto, Kenji; Konerding, Moritz A; Tsuda, Akira; Mentzer, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Thoracic surgical procedures in mice have been applied to a wide range of investigations, but little is known about the murine physiologic response to pulmonary surgery. Using continuous arterial oximetry monitoring and the FlexiVent murine ventilator, we investigated the effect of anesthesia and pneumonectomy on mouse oxygen saturation and lung mechanics. Sedation resulted in a dose-dependent decline of oxygen saturation that ranged from 55–82%. Oxygen saturation was restored by mechanical v...

  11. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2‧,3‧-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase.

  12. CD40-mediated apoptosis in murine B-lymphoma lines containing mutated p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, Annette C; Gong, Qiaoke; Owens, Trevor

    2002-01-01

    Crosslinking CD40 induces normal B-cells to proliferate and differentiate but causes many tumor cell lines to undergo apoptosis. As p53 is required for many apoptotic pathways, we analyzed the effects of CD40 ligation and their correlation with p53 function in four murine B-lymphoma lines. A20...... of detectable p21 mRNA in A20 and M12 cells. P21 mRNA was increased to detectable levels in M12 cells upon CD40 ligation; however, blocking this effect with the p53 inhibitor pifithrin had no effect on CD40-mediated apoptosis. Sequencing showed that p53 in A20 and M12 cells contained point mutations leading...... to amino acid substitutions in DNA binding regions, but was unmutated in WEHI231 and WEHI 279. These results suggest that CD40-mediated apoptosis can occur in the absence of functional p53....

  13. p12 tethers the murine leukemia virus pre-integration complex to mitotic chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrat Elis

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The p12 protein of the murine leukemia virus (MLV is a constituent of the pre-integration complex (PIC but its function in this complex remains unknown. We developed an imaging system to monitor MLV PIC trafficking in live cells. This allowed the visualization of PIC docking to mitotic chromosomes and its release upon exit from mitosis. Docking occurred concomitantly with nuclear envelope breakdown and was impaired for PICs of viruses with lethal p12 mutations. Insertion of a heterologous chromatin binding module into p12 of one of these mutants restored PICs attachment to the chromosomes and partially rescued virus replication. Capsid dissociated from wild type PICs in mitotic cells but remained associated with PICs harboring tethering-negative p12 mutants. Altogether, these results explain, in part, MLV restriction to dividing cells and reveal a role for p12 as a factor that tethers MLV PIC to mitotic chromosomes.

  14. Expression and in vitro properties of guinea pig IL-5: Comparison to human and murine orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clay W Scott

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-5 (IL-5 is a key mediator of eosinophilic inflammation. The biological role of this cytokine in an allergic airway inflammatory response has been widely demonstrated in guinea pigs, yet the interaction of guinea pig IL-5 (gpIL-5 with its receptor has not been studied. Experiments were performed to quantitate the interaction of gpIL-5 with gpIL-5r and to compare this affinity with that of hIL-5 and mIL-5 and their cognate receptors. The cross-species affinity and agonist efficacy were evaluated to see if gpIL-5r had a restricted species reactivity (as is the case with mIL-5r or did not distinguish between IL-5 orthologs (similar to hIL-5r. gpIL-5 was cloned using mRNA isolated from cells obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage. Recombinant gpIL-5 was expressed in T.ni insect cells and purified from spent media. Binding assays were performed using insect cells expressing hIL-5rαβ or gpIL-5rαβ1 as previously described (Cytokine, 12:858–866, 2000 or using B13 cells which express mIL-5r. The agonist potency and efficacy properties of each IL-5 ortholog were evaluated by quantitating the proliferative response of hum an TF-1 cells and murine B13 cells. gpIL-5 bound with high affinity to recombinant gpIL-5r as demonstrated by displacing [125I]hIL-5 (Ki = 160 pM. gpIL-5 also bound to hIL-5r with high affinity (Ki = 750 pM. hIL-5 and mIL-5 showed similar, high-affinity binding profiles to both gpIL-5r and hIL-5r. In contrast, gpIL-5 and hIL5 did not bind to the mIL-5r as demonstrated by an inability to displace [125I]mIL-5, even at 1000-fold molar excess. These differences in affinity for IL-5r orthologs correlated with bioassay results: human TF1 cells showed roughly com parable proliferative responses to guinea pig, hum an and murine IL-5 whereas murine B13 cells showed a strong preference for murine over guinea pig and human IL-5(EC50 = 1.9, 2200 and 720 pM, respectively. Recombinant gpIL-5 binds to the gpIL-5r with high affinity, similar

  15. Structural Heterogeneity and Functional Domains of Murine Immunoglobulin G Fc Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Luster, Andrew D.; Weinshank, Richard; Kochan, Jarema; Pavlovec, Amalia; Portnoy, Daniel A.; Hulmes, Jeffrey; Pan, Yu-Ching E.; Unkeless, Jay C.

    1986-11-01

    Binding of antibodies to effector cells by way of receptors to their constant regions (Fc receptors) is central to the pathway that leads to clearance of antigens by the immune system. The structure and function of this important class of receptors on immune cells is addressed through the molecular characterization of Fc receptors (FcR) specific for the murine immunoglobulin G isotype. Structural diversity is encoded by two genes that by alternative splicing result in expression of molecules with highly conserved extracellular domains and different transmembrane and intracytoplasmic domains. The proteins encoded by these genes are members of the immunoglobulin supergene family, most homologous to the major histocompatibility complex molecule Eβ. Functional reconstitution of ligand binding by transfection of individual FcR genes demonstrates that the requirements for ligand binding are encoded in a single gene. These studies demonstrate the molecular basis for the functional heterogeneity of FcR's, accounting for the possible transduction of different signals in response to a single ligand.

  16. Research on Growth Behavior of Embryos for Bovine and Murine on Primary Murine Embryos Fibroblast Cell Feeder Layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Li-long; XIAO Mei; FENG Xiu-Liang; DOU Zhong-ying; QIU Huai; YANG Qi; LEI An-min; YANG Chun-rong; GAO Zhi-min

    2002-01-01

    The difference in growth behavior between bovine embryos and murine embryos was studied on PMEF(primary murine embryos fibroblast)feeder layer. The results showed as follows: With embryos having attached, bovine embryonic trophoblast formed a transparent membranous structure covering on inner cell mass (ICM), however, murine embryonic trophoblast formed disc structure. Bovine embryos formed four kinds of ICM colonies with different morphology including the mass-like, the net-like, the stream-like and the mixture-like colonies. Compared with Murine ICM, the bovine ICM grew more fast. So, the bovine ICM was passaged at first after a culture of approximately 5 - 6 days in vitro, but murine ICM was passaged at first after an attachment of 3 - 4 days on PMEF feeder layer. The mixture colonies of bovine ICM differentiated very early, while the others differentiated very late. Most ICM-like mass of Bovine grew in a defined spot, but bovine ICMs like stream and ICMs like net proliferated fast and dispersed quickly. We found that the single blastomeres derived from late bovine morula and late murine morula formed sub-blastophere; moreover, the bovine ICM cell would differentiate rapidly if the trophoblast was removed.

  17. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  18. Remodeling of alveolar septa after murine pneumonectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysasi, Alexandra B; Wagner, Willi L; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Belle, Janeil; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-06-15

    In most mammals, removing one lung (pneumonectomy) results in the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. In mice, stereological observations have demonstrated an increase in the number of mature alveoli; however, anatomic evidence of the early phases of alveolar growth has remained elusive. To identify changes in the lung microstructure associated with neoalveolarization, we used tissue histology, electron microscopy, and synchrotron imaging to examine the configuration of the alveolar duct after murine pneumonectomy. Systematic histological examination of the cardiac lobe demonstrated no change in the relative frequency of dihedral angle components (Ends, Bends, and Junctions) (P > 0.05), but a significant decrease in the length of a subset of septal ends ("E"). Septal retraction, observed in 20-30% of the alveolar ducts, was maximal on day 3 after pneumonectomy (P alveolar duct diameter ratio (Dout:Din) was significantly lower 3 days after pneumonectomy compared to all controls except for the detergent-treated lung (P surface tension within the alveolar duct, resulting in a new equilibrium at a higher total energy and lower surface area. The spatial and temporal association of these microstructural changes with postpneumonectomy lung growth suggests that these changes represent an early phase of alveolar duct remodeling. PMID:26078396

  19. Isolation of Murine Embryonic Hemogenic Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jennifer S; Gritz, Emily C; Marcelo, Kathrina L; Hirschi, Karen K

    2016-01-01

    The specification of hemogenic endothelial cells from embryonic vascular endothelium occurs during brief developmental periods within distinct tissues, and is necessary for the emergence of definitive HSPC from the murine extra embryonic yolk sac, placenta, umbilical vessels, and the embryonic aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. The transient nature and small size of this cell population renders its reproducible isolation for careful quantification and experimental applications technically difficult. We have established a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based protocol for simultaneous isolation of hemogenic endothelial cells and HSPC during their peak generation times in the yolk sac and AGM. We demonstrate methods for dissection of yolk sac and AGM tissues from mouse embryos, and we present optimized tissue digestion and antibody conjugation conditions for maximal cell survival prior to identification and retrieval via FACS. Representative FACS analysis plots are shown that identify the hemogenic endothelial cell and HSPC phenotypes, and describe a methylcellulose-based assay for evaluating their blood forming potential on a clonal level. PMID:27341393

  20. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, C; Löhler, J; Prassolov, V; Just, U; Stockschläder, M; Stocking, C

    1997-05-27

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed.

  1. Plant Hormone Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, Richard

    2004-01-01

    • Aims Receptors for plant hormones are becoming identified with increasing rapidity, although a frustrating number remain unknown. There have also been many more hormone‐binding proteins described than receptors. This Botanical Briefing summarizes what has been discovered about hormone binding sites, their discovery and descriptions, and will not dwell on receptor functions or activities except where these are relevant to understand binding.

  2. Analysis of binding heterogeneity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, M.M.

    1992-01-01

    Binding heterogeneity, due to different functional groups on a reactive surface, plays an important role in the binding of small molecules or ions to many adsorbents, both in industrial processes and in natural environments. The binding heterogeneity is described by a distribution of affinity consta

  3. The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 chemokine-binding protein M3 inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Holst, Peter J; Høgh-Petersen, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines are critical mediators of immune cell entry into the central nervous system (CNS), as occurs in neuroinflammatory disease such as multiple sclerosis. Chemokines are also implicated in the immune response to viral infections. Many viruses encode proteins that mimic or block chemokine...... M3 (AdM3) directly to the CNS to evaluate the capacity of this protein to inhibit neuroinflammation using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. Treatment with the AdM3 vector significantly reduced the clinical severity of EAE, attenuated CNS histopathology, and reduced numbers...

  4. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Harvey; Neubig, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. They can be used to study receptor regulation, discover new drugs by screening for compounds that compete with high affinity for radioligand binding to a particular receptor, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling, via measurements of agonist binding and its regulation by ions, nucleotides, and other allosteric modulators. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  5. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M;

    1999-01-01

    -impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region...

  6. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Shinsuke, E-mail: yuasa@a8.keio.jp [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tabata, Hidenori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kazunori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi [Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function and Dynamics, Advanced Technology Development Group, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  7. Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine typhus is a widely distributed flea-borne infection caused by Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms of murine typhus are nonspecific and mimic a variety of other infectious diseases. We herein report a case of murine typhus in an area where the broad use of DDT in the mid-20th century has now made it a rare disease. The patient described presented with headache, fever, and a faint macular rash. Initial laboratory studies revealed a slight transaminase elevation. Further questioning revealed exposure to opossums, prompting the consideration of murine typhus as a diagnosis. Although typhus group antibodies were not present during the patient’s acute illness, empiric therapy with doxycycline was initiated, and the patient defervesced. One month after convalescence, the patient returned to clinic with serum that contained typhus group antibodies with an IgG titer of 1 : 1024. Murine typhus is an important consideration during the workup of a patient with a nonspecific febrile illness. Exposure to reservoir hosts and the flea vector place humans at risk for this disease. Clinician recognition of this entity is required for diagnosis and effective therapy.

  8. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development

  9. Isotype specific immune responses in murine experimental toxocariasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuéllar C

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a murine experimental model of toxocariasis has been developed in BALB/c, C57BL/10 and C3H murine strains orally inoculated with 4,000 Toxocara canis embryonated eggs, in order to investigate the isotype-specific immune responses against excretory-secretory antigens from larvae. T. canis specific IgG+M, IgM, IgG, IgA, IgG1, IgG2a and IgG3 were tested by ELISA. The dynamics of the specific immunoglobulins (IgG+IgM production showed a contrasting profile regarding the murine strain. Conversely to the results obtained with the IgM isotype, the IgG antibody class showed similar patterns to those obtained with IgG+IgM antibodies, only in the case of the BALB/c strain, being different and much higher than the obtained with IgG+IgM antibodies, when the C3H murine strain was used. The antibodies IgG+IgM tested in BALB/c and C57BL/10 were both of the IgM and IgG isotypes. Conversely, in the C3H strain only IgG specific antibody levels were detected. The IgG1 subclass responses showed a similar profile in the three murine strains studied, with high values in BALB/c, as in the case of the IgG responses.

  10. Apoptosis and the thymic microenvironment in murine lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeoka, Y; Taguchi, N; Shultz, L; Boyd, R L; Naiki, M; Ansari, A A; Gershwin, M E

    1999-11-01

    The thymus of New Zealand black (NZB) mice undergoes premature involution. In addition, cultured thymic epithelial cells from NZB mice undergo accelerated preprogrammed degeneration. NZB mice also have distinctive and well-defined abnormalities of thymic architecture involving stromal cells, defined by staining with monoclonal antibodies specific for the thymic microenvironment. We took advantage of these findings, as well as our large panel of monoclonal antibodies which recognize thymic stroma, to study the induction of apoptosis in the thymus of murine lupus and including changes of epithelial architecture. We studied NZB, MRL/lpr, BXSB/Yaa, C3H/gld mice and BALB/c and C57BL/6 as control mice. Apoptosis was studied both at basal levels and following induction with either dexamethasone or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The apoptotic cells were primarily found in the thymic cortex, and the frequency of apoptosis in murine lupus was less than 20% of controls. Moreover, all strains of murine lupus had severe abnormalities of the cortical network. These changes were not accentuated by dexamethasone treatment in cultured thymocytes. However, the thymus in murine lupus was less susceptible to LPS-induced apoptosis than control mice. Finally we note that the number of thymic nurse cells (TNC) was lowest in NZB mice. Our findings demonstrate significant abnormalities in the induction of apoptosis and the formation of TNC-like epithelial cells in SLE mice, and suggest that the abnormalities of the thymic microenvironment have an important role in the pathogenesis of murine lupus.

  11. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ

    OpenAIRE

    Kay-Marie Lamar; Sasha Bogdanovich; Gardner, Brandon B.; Gao, Quan Q.; Tamari Miller; Earley, Judy U.; Michele Hadhazy; Vo, Andy H.; Lisa Wren; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular ...

  12. Synthesis, characterization, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxic activities of Ru(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Sreekanth; Vallala, Srujana; Yerra, Rajeshwar; Rodrigues, Daniel Alencar; Raghavendra, Nulgumnalli Manjunathaiah; Barreiro, Eliezer J

    2016-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of novel Ru(II) compounds (Ru-1 to Ru-8) bearing R-pdc, 4-Cl-pbinh ligands (where R=4-CF3, 4-F, 4-OH pdc=3-phenyl-5-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole-1-carbothioamide, pbinh=phenoxybenzylidene isonicotinyl hydrazides) and their in vitro antitumor activity toward the cell lines murine leukemia L1210, human lymphocyte CEM, human epithelial cervical carcinoma HeLa, BEL-7402 and Molt4/C8. Some of the complexes exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines than the standard drug cisplatin. Ruthenium complex Ru-2 displayed potent cytotoxicity with than that of cisplatin. DNA-binding, DNA cleavage and protein binding properties of ruthenium complexes with these ligands are reported. Interactions of these ruthenium complexes with DNA revealed an intercalative mode of binding between them. Synchronous fluorescence spectra proved that the interaction of ruthenium complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) resulted in a conformational change of the latter.

  13. Synthesis, DNA binding and topoisomerase inhibition of mononaphthalimide homospermidine derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yong Tian; Hong Xia Ma; Song Qiang Xie; Xue Wang; Jin Zhao; Chao Jie Wang; Wen Yuan Gao

    2008-01-01

    Two novel mononaphthalimide homospermidine derivatives (2a, 2b) with three or four methylene unit as linkages weresynthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicity against human leukemia K562, murine melanoma B 16 and Chinese hamster ovary CHOcell lines. The presence of homospermidine motif could greatly elevate the potency of 1,8-naphthalimide. Conjugate 2b with longerspacer exhibited higher in vitro cytotoxicity than 2a. The DNA binding experiments indicated that conjugates 2b could bind toherring sperm DNA. The topoisomerase Ⅱ poison trials revealed that 2b could inhibit the activity of top. Ⅱ.2008 Chao Jie Wang. Published by Elsevier B.V. on behalf of Chinese Chemical Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  15. Isoforms of murine and human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Hackler, R; Kold, B;

    1998-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) and immunofixation of murine serum amyloid P component (SAP), purified and in serum, showed a distinct and strain-dependent isoform pattern with up to seven bands (pI 5.1-5.7). Neuraminidase treatment caused a shift of the isoforms to more basic pI values, but did...... of isoforms of human SAP required the presence of urea and higher SAP concentrations. TEF and immunofixation of SAP monomers showed five to eight isoforms, ranging from pI 4.7-5.7. IEF of SAP in human serum resulted in a less distinct pattern and more acidic isoforms. As with murine SAP, neuraminidase...

  16. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  17. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    OpenAIRE

    Jarecka, Dorota; Arabas, Sylwester; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python ...

  18. In vitro interaction of uterine estrogen receptor with the estrogen response element present in the 3'-flanking region of the murine c-fos protooncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyder, S M; Stancel, G M

    1994-01-01

    Estradiol treatment rapidly stimulates transcription of the c-fos protooncogene in the rodent uterus, and transfection analysis previously identified an estrogen response element (ERE) in the 3'-flanking region of the murine gene with the sequence GGTCAnnnCAGCC. We now report that endogenous estrogen receptor (ER) obtained from either mouse or rat uterus binds to this 3'-ERE. Unoccupied receptor, receptor occupied with estradiol and receptor occupied with the antiestrogen tamoxifen all bind to this element, and the binding of receptor exhibits strict sequence specificity. By using a competition binding assay, the affinity of the ER for the c-fos-ERE is estimated to be approximately an order of magnitude less than the affinity for the consensus ERE (GGTCAnnnTGACC) found in the Xenopus and chicken vitellogenin genes. Differences in the electrophoretic mobilities of the c-fos and vitellogenin EREs bound to the ER in band-shift assays also suggest subtle structural differences in the two complexes. Mutations in either half-site of the c-fos-ERE destroy ER binding, suggesting that the receptor binds to this sequence as either a homo- or heterodimer. The 3'-fos-ERE region exhibits some homologies to both AP1 and AP2 consensus sites, but neither AP1-like proteins present in uterine extracts nor recombinant AP2 bind this protooncogene sequence. The finding that the ERE present in the 3'-region of the murine c-fos gene interacts with receptors present in the mouse and rat uterus supports a role for this element in the physiological regulation of c-fos expression in the uterus by estrogens. PMID:8136308

  19. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  20. Python bindings for libcloudph++

    CERN Document Server

    Jarecka, Dorota; Del Vento, Davide

    2015-01-01

    This technical note introduces the Python bindings for libcloudph++. The libcloudph++ is a C++ library of algorithms for representing atmospheric cloud microphysics in numerical models. The bindings expose the complete functionality of the library to the Python users. The bindings are implemented using the Boost.Python C++ library and use NumPy arrays. This note includes listings with Python scripts exemplifying the use of selected library components. An example solution for using the Python bindings to access libcloudph++ from Fortran is presented.

  1. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. ► Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. ► Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. ► Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1+/−K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5–7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 ± 5 (SEM) mm3 shrunk by 76 ± 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  2. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  3. Species Differences in the Carbohydrate Binding Preferences of Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouch, Erika C.; Smith, Kelly; McDonald, Barbara;

    2006-01-01

    Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each...... of the corresponding murine sequence (Asn324-Asn325) conferred a capacity to interact with immobilized maltose. Thus, ligand recognition by human SP-D involves a complex interplay between saccharide presentation, the valency of trimeric subunits, and species-specific residues that flank the primary carbohydrate...

  4. Crystal Structure of the Murine Cytomegalovirus MHC-I Homolog m144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan,K.; Hicks, A.; Mans, J.; Robinson, H.; Guan, R.; Mariuzza, R.; Margulies, D.

    2006-01-01

    Large DNA viruses of the herpesvirus family produce proteins that mimic host MHC-I molecules as part of their immunoevasive strategy. The m144 glycoprotein, expressed by murine cytomegalovirus, is thought to be an MHC-I homolog whose expression prolongs viral survival in vivo by preventing natural killer cell activation. To explore the structural basis of this m144 function, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of an m144/{beta}2-microglobulin ({beta}2m) complex at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This structure reveals the canonical features of MHC-I molecules including readily identifiable {alpha}1, {alpha}2, and {alpha}3 domains. A unique disulfide bond links the {alpha}1 helix to the {beta}-sheet floor, explaining the known thermal stability of m144. Close juxtaposition of the {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 helices and the lack of critical residues that normally contribute to anchoring the peptide N and C termini eliminates peptide binding. A region of 13 amino acid residues, corresponding to the amino-terminal portion of the {alpha}2 helix, is missing in the electron density map, suggesting an area of structural flexibility that may be involved in ligand binding.

  5. THE CONSTRUCTION AND EXPRESSION OF THE MURINE SCFV GENE IN E. COLI AGAINST HUMAN CERVICAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ying; Chen Wei; Li Xu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To obtain the gene of murine Single chain Fv fragment (ScFv) against human cervical cancer and to express it in E. coli. Methods The variable region gene fragments of the heavy and light chains, which were amplified respectively using recombinant DNA techniques from CsA125 hybridoma cells, were spliced together through a flexible linker to ScFv against human cervical cancer. The ScFv genes were then cloned into expression vector pCANTAB 5E and expressed in E. coli HB2151 and TG1 respectively. The soluble ScFv were characterized by SDS PAGE and Western blot. The antigen-binding activities of the soluble and phage displayed ScFv were assayed by ELISA and cell immunohistochemical analysis. Results The expressed ScFv antibodies were soluble and phage displayed. The soluble ScFv secreted and expressed in E. coli HB2151 induced by IPTG were confirmed with SDS-PAGE, Western blot and ELISA. The specific binding capacity of the soluble and phage displayed ScFv to the surface associated antigen of human cervical cancer cell line was further confirmed with immunohistochemical studies. Conclusion The soluble and phage displayed ScFv expressed in E. coli against human cervical cancer showed high, specific affinity for the cervical cancer cell line surface associated antigen.

  6. Expression pattern and mapping of the murine versican gene (Cspg2) to chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naso, M.F.; Morgan, J.L.; Buchberg, A.M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Versican is a modular proteoglycan harboring a hyaluronan-binding domain at its amino-terminal end and a selectin-like domain at its carboxyl-terminal end, separated by a large intervening region containing the attachment sites for the glycosaminoglycan side chains. By virtue of its modular nature, versican may play a role in cellular attachment, migration, and proliferation by interacting with cell surfaces and extracellular matrix molecules. To discern the function of versican through the analysis of spontaneous and targeted genetic mutations, we have isolated a mouse versican cDNA encoding part of the hyaluronan-binding region, analyzed its mRNA expression in various adult mouse tissues and embryos, and determined the chromosomal location of the gene. Murine versican was 89% identical to human versican at the amino acid level and was highly expressed in mouse embryos at Days 13, 14, and 18. Expression was also detected in adult mouse brain, heart, lung, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, tail, kidney, and testis. Using interspecific backcross analysis, we assigned the versican gene (Cspg2) to mouse chromosome 13, in a region that is syntenic with the long arm of human chromosome 5 where the human CSPG2 gene is located. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Cytotoxicity of Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Aluminum in Murine Thymocytes and Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Kamalov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of low concentrations of aluminum chloride on thymocytes and lymphocytes acutely dissociated from young mice were studied using flow cytometry with a DNA-binding dye. We demonstrate a rapid and dose-dependent injury in murine thymocytes and lymphocytes resulting from exposure to aluminum, as indicated by an increase in the entry into the cell of the DNA-binding dye, propidium iodine. A 60-minute exposure to 10 μM AlCl3 caused damage of about 5% of thymocytes, while 50% were injured after 10 minutes at 20 μM. Nearly all thymocytes showed evidence of damage at 30 μM AlCl3 after only 5 minutes of incubation. In lymphocytes, injury was observed at 15 μM AlCl3 and less than 50% of cells were injured after a 60-minute exposure to 20 μM. Injury only rarely proceeded to rapid cell death and was associated with cell swelling. These results suggest that aluminum has cytotoxic effects on cells of the immune system.

  8. Studies of a murine monoclonal antibody directed against DARC: reappraisal of its specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Smolarek

    Full Text Available Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC plays multiple roles in human health as a blood group antigen, a receptor for chemokines and the only known receptor for Plasmodium vivax merozoites. It is the target of the murine anti-Fy6 monoclonal antibody 2C3 which binds to the first extracellular domain (ECD1, but exact nature of the recognized epitope was a subject of contradictory reports. Here, using a set of complex experiments which include expression of DARC with amino acid substitutions within the Fy6 epitope in E. coli and K562 cells, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR and flow cytometry, we have resolved discrepancies between previously published reports and show that the basic epitope recognized by 2C3 antibody is 22FEDVW26, with 22F and 26W being the most important residues. In addition, we demonstrated that 30Y plays an auxiliary role in binding, particularly when the residue is sulfated. The STD-NMR studies performed using 2C3-derived Fab and synthetic peptide corroborated most of these results, and together with the molecular modelling suggested that 25V is not involved in direct interactions with the antibody, but determines folding of the epitope backbone.

  9. The BET Family of Proteins Targets Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus Integration near Transcription Start Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan De Rijck

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of retroviral replication is integration of the viral genome into host cell DNA. This characteristic makes retrovirus-based vectors attractive delivery vehicles for gene therapy. However, adverse events in gene therapeutic trials, caused by activation of proto-oncogenes due to murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived vector integration, hamper their application. Here, we show that bromodomain and extraterminal (BET proteins (BRD2, BRD3, and BRD4 and MLV integrase specifically interact and colocalize within the nucleus of the cell. Inhibition of the BET proteins’ chromatin interaction via specific bromodomain inhibitors blocks MLV virus replication at the integration step. MLV integration site distribution parallels the chromatin binding profile of BET proteins, and expression of an artificial fusion protein of the BET integrase binding domain with the chromatin interaction domain of the lentiviral targeting factor LEDGF/p75 retargets MLV integration away from transcription start sites and into the body of actively transcribed genes, conforming to the HIV integration pattern. Together, these data validate BET proteins as MLV integration targeting factors.

  10. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  11. A parallel panning scheme used for selection of a GluA4-specific Fab targeting the ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius; Mohr, Andreas; Riise, Erik;

    2016-01-01

    A method for development of murine Fab fragments towards extracellular domains of a surface receptor is presented. The GluA4 ionotropic glutamate receptor is used as a model system. Recombinant GluA4 ectodomain comprising both the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in one...

  12. Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Proteins of the G(12) Family Shape Immune Functions by Controlling CD4(+) T Cell Adhesiveness and Motility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Herroeder; P. Reichardt; A. Sassmann; B. Zimmermann; D. Jaeneke; J. Hoeckner; M.W. Hollmann; K.D. Fischer; S. Vogt; R. Grosse; N. Hogg; M. Gunzer; S. Offermanns; N. Wettschureck

    2009-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesion plays a central role in T cell trafficking and activation. Genetic inactivation of the guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein alpha-subunits G alpha(12) and G alpha(13) resulted in an increased activity of integrin leukocyte-function-antigen-1 in murine CD4(+) T cells. The

  13. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  14. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  15. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  16. Activated complement classical pathway in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Ying; Tao; Shi-Jie; Zheng; Bo; Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the complement system is involved in a murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy(OIR).METHODS: Forty C57BL/6J newborn mice were divided randomly into OIR group and control group. OIR was induced by exposing mice to 75% ±2% oxygen from postnatal 7d(P7) to P12 and then recovered in room air.For the control group, the litters were raised in room air.At the postnatal 17d(P17), gene expressions of the complement components of the classical pathway(CP),the mannose-binding lectin(MBL) pathway and the alternative pathway(AP) in the retina were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Retinal protein expressions of the key components in the CP were examined by Western blotting.· RESULTS: Whole mounted retina in the OIR mice showed area of central hypoperfusion in both superficial and deep layers and neovascular tufts in the periphery.The expressions of C1 qb and C4 b genes in the OIR retina were significantly higher than those of the controls. The expression of retinal complement factor B(CFB) gene in OIR mice was significantly lower than those of the controls. However, the expressions of C3 and complement factor H(CFH) genes were higher. The protein synthesis of the key components involved in the CP(C1q, C4 and C3) were also significantly higher in OIR mouse retina. Although MBL-associated serine protease 1(MASP1) and MASP2 were detected in both the OIR and the control groups, the expressions were weak and the difference between the two groups was not significant.CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that the complement system CP is activated during the pathogenesis of murine model of OIR.

  17. Existence of multiple isoforms of HS1-associated protein X-1 in murine and human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Delphine M; Hart, Ian R; Marshall, John F

    2008-06-13

    To date, the literature concerning the HS1 (haematopoietic cell-specific protein 1)-associated protein X-1 (HAX1) protein has reported considerable variation regarding its function in mammalian cells, subcellular localisation and binding partners. We show here that HAX1 comprises a family of proteins. Murine tissues express three mRNA variants, encoded by two genes on chromosomes 2 and 3. The chromosome 2 gene is intronless and would encode a protein 100% identical with that encoded by chromosome 3. In humans, alternative splice variants, encoded by the chromosome 1 gene, produce a family of transcripts composed of up to eight members. Based on the sequences published in GenBank and Ensembl, we designed specific primers and detected by PCR three mRNA species in murine tissues and eight variants in human cells. We screened a panel of 19 human cell lines as well as primary fibroblasts, oral keratinocytes and freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. All human cells studied expressed at least six of the possible HAX1 mRNA variants. In silico analysis of the variants revealed an open reading frame in all of them, suggesting that murine and human tissues can express two and eight HAX1 proteins, respectively. Analysis of human protein lysates by Western blotting with the use of a monoclonal anti-HAX1 antibody revealed multiple bands. These bands were decreased after treatment of cells with a single small interfering RNA duplex targeting a region common to six of the variants, confirming their identity as HAX1 proteins. Comparison of the human variants with the six HAX1 homologues described to date in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and the four homologues described in macaque (Macaca mulatta) revealed very high conservation with only one amino acid substitution between human and chimpanzee homologues. Moreover, a number of additional products were amplified and sequenced, which indicated that further human isoforms are likely to exist. These findings are

  18. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  19. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  20. Increased rejection of murine allogeneic bone marrow in presensitized recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanOs, R; deWitte, T; Dillingh, JH; Mauch, PM; Down, JD

    1997-01-01

    The role of presensitizing murine recipients with donor spleen cells prior to T cell-depleted or -repleted H-2 compatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) was investigated at two different doses of total body irradiation (TBI). Recipients that were presensitized with 2 x 10(7) irradiated

  1. Immunotherapy of hepatoma with a monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Hong Tan; Feng-Ying Huang; Hua Wang; Yong-Hao Huang; Ying-Ying Lin; Yue-Nan Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the capability of a monoclonal antibody(mAb) against murine endoglin to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and suppression of hepatoma growth in murine models.METHODS: A monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin was purified by affinity chromatography and passively transfused through tail veins in two murine hepatoma models. Tumor volume and survival time were observed at three-day intervals for 48 d. Microvessels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry against CD31, and angiogenesis in vivo was determined by alginate encapsulated assay. In addition, tumor cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy with anti-endoglin mAb could effectively suppress tumor growth, and prolonged the survival time of hepatoma-bearing mice.Angiogenesis was apparently inhibited within the tumor tissues, and the vascularization of alginate beads was also reduced in the mice passively transfused with antiendoglin mAb. In addition, increased apoptotic cells were observed within the tumor tissues from the mice passively transfused with anti-endoglin mAb.CONCLUSION: Passive immunotherapy with antiendoglin mAb effectively inhibits tumor growth via inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and increasing tumor cell apoptosis, which may be highly correlated with the blockage of endoglin-related signal pathway induced by anti-endoglin mAb.

  2. Pharmacodynamics of Doxycycline in a Murine Malaria Model▿

    OpenAIRE

    Batty, Kevin T.; Law, Angela S. F.; Stirling, Verity; Moore, Brioni R.

    2007-01-01

    Doxycycline is reported to impair second-generation parasite schizogony. The effects of doxycycline alone and combined with dihydroartemisinin were investigated in a murine malaria model. Doxycycline lowered the rate of parasite growth within 2 days, with maximum effect in 6 days. Addition of dihydroartemisinin led to an additive antimalarial effect.

  3. Turnover of T cells in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge of C57BL/6 mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 induces proliferation of T lymphocytes early after infection, as evidenced by incorporation of the DNA precursor bromodeoxyuridine. Using pulse-chase analysis, splenic and peripheral blood activated T lymphocytes were found...

  4. Murine myocardium OCT imaging with a blood substitute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehyun; Villard, Joseph W.; Lee, Ho; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2002-06-01

    Imaging of the in vivo murine myocardium using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. Application of conventional techniques (e.g. MRI, Ultrasound imaging) for imaging the murine myocardium is problematic because the wall thickness is less than 1.5mm (20g mouse), and the heart rate can be as high as six-hundred beats per minute. To acquire a real-time image of the murine myocardium, OCT can provide sufficient spatial resolution (10 micrometers ) and imaging speed (1000 A-Scans/s). Strong light scattering by blood in the heart causes significant light attenuation making delineation of the endocardium-chamber boundary problematic. By replacing whole blood in the mouse with an artificial blood substitute we demonstrate significant reduction of light scattering in the murine myocardium. The results indicate a significant reduction in light scattering as whole blood hematocrit is diminished below 5%. To measure thickness change of the myocardium during one cycle, a myocardium edge detection algorithm is developed and demonstrated.

  5. A poxvirus protein that binds to and inactivates IL-18, and inhibits NK cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, T L; Morrison, L A; Esteban, D J; VandenBos, T; Thebeau, L G; Chen, N; Spriggs, M K; Sims, J E; Buller, R M

    2000-03-15

    IL-18 induces IFN-gamma and NK cell cytotoxicity, making it a logical target for viral antagonism of host defense. We demonstrate that the ectromelia poxvirus p13 protein, bearing homology to the mammalian IL-18 binding protein, binds IL-18, and inhibits its activity in vitro. Binding of IL-18 to the viral p13 protein was compared with binding to the cellular IL-18R. The dissociation constant of p13 for murine IL-18 is 5 nM, compared with 0.2 nM for the cellular receptor heterodimer. Mice infected with a p13 deletion mutant of ectromelia virus had elevated cytotoxicity for YAC-1 tumor cell targets compared with control animals. Additionally, the p13 deletion mutant virus exhibited decreased levels of infectivity. Our data suggest that inactivation of IL-18, and subsequent impairment of NK cell cytotoxicity, may be one mechanism by which ectromelia evades the host immune response. PMID:10706717

  6. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  7. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as: Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin; TeBG Formal name: Sex Hormone Binding Globulin Related tests: Testosterone , Free Testosterone, ... I should know? How is it used? The sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) test may be used ...

  8. NMR study of xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus protease in a complex with amprenavir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Ayako; Okamura, Hideyasu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Morishita, Ryo [CellFree Sciences Co. Ltd., Ehime University, Venture Business Laboratory, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Department of Microbiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Matsunaga, Satoko [Department of Microbiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Kobayashi, Naohiro; Ikegami, Takahisa [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kodaki, Tsutomu [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Ryo, Akihide [Department of Microbiology, Yokohama City University School of Medicine, 3-9 Fukuura, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0004 (Japan); Nagata, Takashi, E-mail: nagatat@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Katahira, Masato, E-mail: katahira@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); CREST, JST, 5-3 Yonban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-8666 (Japan)

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protease (PR) of XMR virus (XMRV) was successfully synthesized with cell-free system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interface of XMRV PR with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), was identified with NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is induced for two PR protomers in the APV:PR = 1:2 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural heterogeneity is transmitted even to distant regions from the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Long-range transmission of structural change may be utilized for drug discovery. -- Abstract: Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) is a virus created through recombination of two murine leukemia proviruses under artificial conditions during the passage of human prostate cancer cells in athymic nude mice. The homodimeric protease (PR) of XMRV plays a critical role in the production of functional viral proteins and is a prerequisite for viral replication. We synthesized XMRV PR using the wheat germ cell-free expression system and carried out structural analysis of XMRV PR in a complex with an inhibitor, amprenavir (APV), by means of NMR. Five different combinatorially {sup 15}N-labeled samples were prepared and backbone resonance assignments were made by applying Otting's method, with which the amino acid types of the [{sup 1}H, {sup 15}N] HSQC resonances were automatically identified using the five samples (Wu et al., 2006) . A titration experiment involving APV revealed that one APV molecule binds to one XMRV PR dimer. For many residues, two distinct resonances were observed, which is thought to be due to the structural heterogeneity between the two protomers in the APV:XMRV PR = 1:2 complex. PR residues at the interface with APV have been identified on the basis of chemical shift perturbation and identification of the intermolecular NOEs by means of filtered NOE experiments. Interestingly, chemical shift heterogeneity between the two protomers of XMRV PR

  9. Proteomic signature of the murine intervertebral disc.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R McCann

    Full Text Available Low back pain is the most common musculoskeletal problem and the single most common cause of disability, often attributed to degeneration of the intervertebral disc. Lack of effective treatment is directly related to our limited understanding of the pathways responsible for maintaining disc health. While transcriptional analysis has permitted initial insights into the biology of the intervertebral disc, complete proteomic characterization is required. We therefore employed liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS protein/peptide separation and mass spectrometric analyses to characterize the protein content of intervertebral discs from skeletally mature wild-type mice. A total of 1360 proteins were identified and categorized using PANTHER. Identified proteins were primarily intracellular/plasma membrane (35%, organelle (30%, macromolecular complex (10%, extracellular region (9%. Molecular function categorization resulted in three distinct categories: catalytic activity (33%, binding (molecule interactions (29%, and structural activity (13%. To validate our list, we confirmed the presence of 14 of 20 previously identified IVD-associated markers, including matrix proteins, transcriptional regulators, and secreted proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed distinct localization patterns of select protein with the intervertebral disc. Characterization of the protein composition of healthy intervertebral disc tissue is an important first step in identifying cellular processes and pathways disrupted during aging or disease progression.

  10. In vitro and in vivo behavior of radiolabeled chimeric anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody: Comparison with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mutant version of the epidermal growth factor receptor EGFRvIII has been found on gliomas and other tumors, but not on normal tissues. Radioiodinated murine (mu) L8A4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) specifically targets EGFRvIII xenografts in vivo when labeled using N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC). A chimeric (ch) MAb consisting of the variable region of muL8A4 and the constant domains of human IgG2 has been developed that has an affinity and radioiodinated immunoreactive fraction comparable to muL8A4. In vitro, both MAbs were internalized and processed by EGFRvIII expressing cell lines (U87MGΔEGFR or NR6M) at similar rates (maximum intracellular retention, 35-40%). In paired-label tissue distribution studies in athymic mice bearing U87MGΔEGFR tumor xenografts, the ch:mu L8A4 uptake ratio in normal tissues rose to greater than 2:1, whereas in tumor, the ratio remained 1:1 throughout the experiment. These results indicate that chL8A4 exhibits similar binding and internalization properties as its murine parent, but suggest different intracellular processing and/or deposition of catabolites in normal tissues for chL8A4

  11. Kinetics of expression of interleukin 2 receptors on class I and class II restricted murine T cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kinetics of interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) expression has been examined on various class I and class II restricted, influenza specific murine T cell clones. Expression and relative levels of IL-2R were examined by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter analysis utilizing 3 anti-murine IL-2R monoclonal antibodies. Receptor expression was analyzed by scatchard analysis using radiolabeled recombinant human interleukin 2 to access the number of high and low affinity IL-2R per cell as well as the affinity of binding. The clones tested bound all 3 monoclonal antibodies and were inhibited in an IL-2 dependent proliferation assay by the addition of the antibodies to the culture. There was, however, differing degrees of inhibition ranging up to 99%, depending on the clone and the antibody used. IL-2R expression was detectable as early as 4-6 hours after antigenic stimulation of quiescent cells. After maximal levels of receptors were expressed, which was about 24 hours after stimulation, expression of IL-2R decreased with time on all clones examined (both class I and class II restricted). Differing rates of receptor loss is seen however, with some class II restricted clones retaining relatively high levels of receptors

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae PstS production is phosphate responsive and enhanced during growth in the murine peritoneal cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orihuela, C. J.; Mills, J.; Robb, C. W.; Wilson, C. J.; Watson, D. A.; Niesel, D. W.

    2001-01-01

    Differential display-PCR (DDPCR) was used to identify a Streptococcus pneumoniae gene with enhanced transcription during growth in the murine peritoneal cavity. Northern dot blot analysis and comparative densitometry confirmed a 1.8-fold increase in expression of the encoded sequence following murine peritoneal culture (MPC) versus laboratory culture or control culture (CC). Sequencing and basic local alignment search tool analysis identified the DDPCR fragment as pstS, the phosphate-binding protein of a high-affinity phosphate uptake system. PCR amplification of the complete pstS gene followed by restriction analysis and sequencing suggests a high level of conservation between strains and serotypes. Quantitative immunodot blotting using antiserum to recombinant PstS (rPstS) demonstrated an approximately twofold increase in PstS production during MPC from that during CCs, a finding consistent with the low levels of phosphate observed in the peritoneum. Moreover, immunodot blot and Northern analysis demonstrated phosphate-dependent production of PstS in six of seven strains examined. These results identify pstS expression as responsive to the MPC environment and extracellular phosphate concentrations. Presently, it remains unclear if phosphate concentrations in vivo contribute to the regulation of pstS. Finally, polyclonal antiserum to rPstS did not inhibit growth of the pneumococcus in vitro, suggesting that antibodies do not block phosphate uptake; moreover, vaccination of mice with rPstS did not protect against intraperitoneal challenge as assessed by the 50% lethal dose.

  13. High-neurovirulence GDVII virus induces apoptosis in murine astrocytes through tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We carried out a study to determine if the high-neurovirulence GDVII strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) and the demyelinating, low-neurovirulence BeAn strain induced apoptosis in murine astrocytes. Astrocytes, the major glial cell population of the central nervous system, were semipermissive for GDVII virus replication. Programmed cell death, demonstrated by apoptosis-specific caspase-3 protease activity, was maximal 8 h after GDVII infection at an m.o.i. of 1. Purified TMEV capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 did not induce apoptosis but antibodies to VP1 and VP2 inhibited it. Antibody inhibition of caspase-3 activity as well as flow cytometry experiments implicated TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and TNF-α-receptor (TNF-R) in apoptosis signaling. Converselly, TNF-α and the TRAIL-receptor were not upregulated. Furthermore, the number of functional TNF-α receptors, but not their affinity, was increased in apoptotic GDVII virus-infected astrocytes, as confirmed in binding experiments with 125I-labeled recombinant murine TNF-α. In vivo studies showed that most of the cells loaded with the virus when injected in the brains of SJL mice were neurons but very few showed TUNEL costaining. Conversely, many of the apoptotic cells found were also positive for GFAP staining

  14. Staphylococcal enterotoxin induced mitogenesis: toxin binding and cell-cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxser, E S; Bonventre, P F; Archer, D L

    1983-07-01

    The binding characteristics of 125I-labelled staphylococcal enterotoxin A (125I-SEA), a T-cell mitogen, to murine lymphoid cell subpopulations were analyzed. Both T- and B-lymphocytes from murine spleens possess specific binding sites for SEA, as do T-lymphocytes from thymus. B-lymphocytes appear to have a greater capacity for binding of 125-SEA than do T-lymphocytes from either thymus or spleen. Enterotoxin did not specifically bind to thioglycollate-induced peritoneal exudate cells (PECs), used as a source of macrophages. Adherent PECs however, incorporated 125-ISEA by fluid phase endocytosis. When exposed to SEA and thoroughly washed, macrophages stimulate lymphocyte mitogenesis in spleen or thymus cell cultures not directly exposed to toxin. Maximum mitogenic stimulation took place only when both PECs and lymphocytes were exposed to SEA. The presence of splenic B-lymphocytes enhanced the mitogenic response of thymus derived T-cells to SEA. Thus, B-lymphocytes appear to contribute to SEA mitogenesis. These data suggest that mitogenic stimulation and possibly other immunological phenomena associated with SEA occur as a result of complex interactions between cellular components of the immune system. PMID:6605472

  15. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments.

  16. T Cell Integrin Overexpression as a Model of Murine Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Raymond L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrin adhesion molecules have important adhesion and signaling functions. They also play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Over the past few years we have described a T cell adoptive transfer model to investigate the role of T cell integrin adhesion molecules in the development of autoimmunity. This report summarizes the methods we used in establishing this murine model. By treating murine CD4+ T cells with DNA hypomethylating agents and by transfection we were able to test the in vitro effects of integrin overexpression on T cell autoreactive proliferation, cytotoxicity, adhesion and trafficking. Furthermore, we showed that the ability to induce in vivo autoimmunity may be unique to the integrin lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1.

  17. IgG Conformer's Binding to Amyloidogenic Aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monichan Phay

    Full Text Available Amyloid-reactive IgGs isolated from pooled blood of normal individuals (pAbs have demonstrated clinical utility for amyloid diseases by in vivo targeting and clearing amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. We now report the following three novel findings on pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates: 1 pAb aggregates have greater activity than monomers (HMW species > dimers > monomers, 2 pAbs interactions with amyloidogenic aggregates at least partially involves unconventional (non-CDR interactions of F(ab regions, and 3 pAb's activity can be easily modulated by trace aggregates generated during sample processing. Specifically, we show that HMW aggregates and dimeric pAbs present in commercial preparations of pAbs, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, had up to ~200- and ~7-fold stronger binding to aggregates of Aβ and transthyretin (TTR than the monomeric antibody. Notably, HMW aggregates were primarily responsible for the enhanced anti-amyloid activities of Aβ- and Cibacron blue-isolated IVIg IgGs. Human pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates was retained in normal human sera, and mimicked by murine pAbs isolated from normal pooled plasmas. An unconventional (non-CDR component to pAb's activity was indicated from control human mAbs, generated against non-amyloid targets, binding to aggregated Aβ and TTR. Similar to pAbs, HMW and dimeric mAb conformers bound stronger than their monomeric forms to amyloidogenic aggregates. However, mAbs had lower maximum binding signals, indicating that pAbs were required to saturate a diverse collection of binding sites. Taken together, our findings strongly support further investigations on the physiological function and clinical utility of the inherent anti-amyloid activities of monomeric but not aggregated IgGs.

  18. Pharmacodynamics of Fluconazole in a Murine Model of Systemic Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Louie, Arnold; Drusano, George L.; Banerjee, Partha; Liu, Qing-Feng; Liu, Weiguo; Kaw, Pamela; Shayegani, Mehdi; Taber, Harry; Miller, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we defined the pharmacodynamic parameter that optimizes outcome in deep-seated Candida albicans infections treated with fluconazole. Using a murine model of systemic candidiasis, we conducted single-dose dose-ranging studies with fluconazole to determine the dosage of this drug that resulted in a 50% reduction in fungal densities (50% effective dose [ED50]) in kidneys versus the fungal densities in the kidneys of untreated controls. We found that the ED50 of fluconazole given in...

  19. A Murine Model of Contact Lens–Associated Fusarium Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Chandra, Jyotsna; Mukherjee, Pranab; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Pearlman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The 2006 outbreak of contact lens–associated Fusarium keratitis resulted in more than 300 cases in the United States in which a commercial lens care product was implicated. In the current study, Fusarium grown as biofilm on silicone hydrogel lenses induced keratitis in a murine model and severity of disease and survival of the organisms were dependent on MyD88, IL-1R1, and TLR4.

  20. Integration of murine leukemia virus DNA depends on mitosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, T.; Reynolds, T. C.; Yu, G.; Brown, P O

    1993-01-01

    In synchronized rat or mouse cells infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV), integration of viral DNA and production of viral proteins occur only after the cells traverse mitosis. Integration is blocked when cells are prevented from progressing through mitosis. Viral nucleoprotein complexes isolated from arrested cells contain full-length viral DNA and can integrate this viral DNA in vitro, showing that the block to integration in arrested cells is not due to a lack of mature integra...

  1. Factors Influencing RBC Alloimmunization: Lessons Learned from Murine Models

    OpenAIRE

    Ryder, Alex B.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization may occur following transfusion or pregnancy/delivery. Although observational human studies have described the immunogenicity of RBC antigens and the clinical significance of RBC alloantibodies, studies of factors influencing RBC alloimmunization in humans are inherently limited by the large number of independent variables involved. This manuscript reviews data generated in murine models that utilize transgenic donor mice, which express RBC-specific model...

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG as an Effective Probiotic for Murine Giardiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nisha Goyal; Ram Prakash Tiwari; Geeta Shukla

    2011-01-01

    The gut microflora is an important constituent in the intestinal mucosal barrier and has been introduced as the concept of probiotic therapy that beneficially affects the host by improving its intestinal microbial balance. Therefore, the main objective of the study was to explore the protective potential of various lactobacilli strains for murine giardiasis. By experimentation, it was found that the probiotic supplementation of either Lactobacillus casei, L. acidophilus, L. plantarum, or L. r...

  3. Characterization of murine macrophages from bone marrow, spleen and peritoneum

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Changqi; Yu Xiao; Cao Qi; Wang Ya; Zheng Guoping; Tan Thian Kui; Zhao Hong; Zhao Ye; Wang Yiping; Harris David CH

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Macrophages have heterogeneous phenotypes and complex functions within both innate and adaptive immune responses. To date, most experimental studies have been performed on macrophages derived from bone marrow, spleen and peritoneum. However, differences among macrophages from these particular sources remain unclear. In this study, the features of murine macrophages from bone marrow, spleen and peritoneum were compared. Results We found that peritoneal macrophages (PMs) app...

  4. Osteopontin Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Acute Schistosomiasis Mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Thiago Almeida; Syn, Wing-Kin; Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Cunha, Pedro Henrique Diniz; Caporali, Julia Fonseca Morais; Trindade, Guilherme Vaz de Melo; Santos, Elisângela Trindade; Souza, Márcia Maria; Andrade, Zilton Araújo; Witek, Rafal P; Secor, William Evan; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Diehl, Anna Mae

    2016-01-01

    Background Symptomatic acute schistosomiasis mansoni is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction against the migrating schistosomula and mature eggs after a primary infection. The mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of acute schistosomiasis are not fully elucidated. Osteopontin has been implicated in granulomatous reactions and in acute hepatic injury. Our aims were to evaluate if osteopontin plays a role in acute Schistosoma mansoni infection in both human and experimentally infected mice and if circulating OPN levels could be a novel biomarker of this infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Serum/plasma osteopontin levels were measured by ELISA in patients with acute (n = 28), hepatointestinal (n = 26), hepatosplenic (n = 39) schistosomiasis and in uninfected controls (n = 21). Liver osteopontin was assessed by immunohistochemistry in needle biopsies of 5 patients. Sera and hepatic osteopontin were quantified in the murine model of schistosomiasis mansoni during acute (7 and 8 weeks post infection, n = 10) and chronic (30 weeks post infection, n = 8) phase. Circulating osteopontin levels are increased in patients with acute schistosomiasis (p = 0.0001). The highest levels of OPN were observed during the peak of clinical symptoms (7–11 weeks post infection), returning to baseline level once the granulomas were modulated (>12 weeks post infection). The plasma levels in acute schistosomiasis were even higher than in hepatosplenic patients. The murine model mirrored the human disease. Macrophages were the major source of OPN in human and murine acute schistosomiasis, while the ductular reaction maintains OPN production in hepatosplenic disease. Soluble egg antigens from S. mansoni induced OPN expression in primary human kupffer cells. Conclusions/Significance S. mansoni egg antigens induce the production of OPN by macrophages in the necrotic-exudative granulomas characteristic of acute schistosomiasis mansoni. Circulating OPN levels are upregulated in human and

  5. Use of monoclonal antibodies for the characterization of novel DNA- binding proteins recognized by human autoimmune sera

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Autoantibodies to a DNA-binding heterodimer consisting of 70,000 and 80,000 dalton subunits were identified in 30-50% of human autoimmune sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and scleroderma. Three murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the heterodimer were produced in BALB/c mice by immunizing with isolated human B cell nuclei. By immunofluorescence, the mAb and autoimmune sera demonstrated both speckled nucleoplasmic stainin...

  6. Discrimination of different forms of the murine urokinase plasminogen activator receptor on the cell surface using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, M.G.; Pass, J.; Illemann, M.;

    2008-01-01

    of saturation with the amino-terminal fragment of uPA, ATF. However, the signal intensity obtained using another uPAR domain I specific mAb, mR1, was significantly reduced upon ATF saturation. Furthermore, when adding ATF, mR4 selectively stained the cleaved receptor. Applying these newly generated mAbs, we...... and pathological extracellular tissue remodelling processes. uPA can also cleave uPAR, resulting in liberation of the amino-terminal domain I, which encompasses binding sites for both uPA and the adhesion molecule, vitronectin. In order to localise the different uPAR forms on the plasma membrane of murine monocyte...

  7. Atomic resolution structure of Moloney murine leukemia virus matrix protein and its relationship to other retroviral matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffel, Nico; Harlos, Karl; Iourin, Oleg; Rao, Zihe; Kingsman, Alan; Stuart, David; Fry, Elizabeth

    2002-12-01

    Matrix proteins associated with the viral membrane are important in the formation of the viral particle and in virus maturation. The 1.0 A crystal structure of the ecotropic Gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) matrix protein reveals the conserved topology of other retroviral matrix proteins, despite undetectable sequence similarity. The N terminus (normally myristylated) is exposed and adjacent to a basic surface patch, features likely to contribute to membrane binding. The four proteins in the asymmetric unit make varied contacts. The M-MuLV matrix structure is intermediate, between those of the lentiviruses and other retroviruses. The protein fold appears to be maintained, in part, by the conservation of side chain packing, which may provide a useful tool for searching for weak distant similarities in proteins. PMID:12467570

  8. Expression of IMP1 enhances production of murine leukemia virus vector by facilitating viral genomic RNA packaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Mai

    Full Text Available Murine leukemia virus (MLV-based retroviral vector is widely used for gene transfer. Efficient packaging of the genomic RNA is critical for production of high-titer virus. Here, we report that expression of the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA binding protein 1 (IMP1 enhanced the production of infectious MLV vector. Overexpression of IMP1 increased the stability of viral genomic RNA in virus producer cells and packaging of the RNA into progeny virus in a dose-dependent manner. Downregulation of IMP1 in virus producer cells resulted in reduced production of the retroviral vector. These results indicate that IMP1 plays a role in regulating the packaging of MLV genomic RNA and can be used for improving production of retroviral vectors.

  9. Cloning and characterization of a murine SIL gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazo-Garcia, N.; Scherer, P.; Aplan, P.D. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    1995-12-10

    The human SIL gene is disrupted by a site-specific interstitial deletion in 25% of children with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Since transcriptionally active genes are prone to recombination events, the recurrent nature of this lesion suggests that the SIL gene product is transcriptionally active in the cell type that undergoes this interstitial deletion and that the SIL gene product may play a role in normal lymphoid development. To facilitate studies of SIL gene function, we have cloned and characterized a murine SIL gene. The predicted murine SIL protein is 75% identical to the human gene, with good homology throughout the open reading frame. An in vitro translated SIL cDNA generated a protein slightly larger than the predicted 139-kDa protein. Although a prior report detected SIL mRNA expression exclusively in hematopoietic tissues, a sensitive RT-PCR assay demonstrated SIL expression to be ubiquitous, detectable in all tissues examined. Since the RT-PCR assay suggested that SIL mRNA expression was higher in rapidly proliferating tissues, we assayed SIL mRNA expression using a murine erythroleukemia model of terminal differentiation and found it to be dramatically decreased in conjunction with terminal differentiation. These studies demonstrate that the human SIL gene product is quite well conserved in rodents and suggest that the SIL gene product may play a role in cell proliferation. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Activation of murine macrophages and lymphocytes by Ureaplasma diversum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelmonska-Soyta, A; Miller, R B; Ruhnke, L; Rosendal, S

    1994-01-01

    Ureaplasma diversum is a pathogen in the bovine reproductive tract. The objective of the research was to study interactions with macrophages and lymphocytes which might elucidate aspects of pathogenetic mechanisms of this organism. We studied the activation of murine macrophages of C3H/HeN (LPS-responder) and C3H/HeJ (LPS-low-responder) genotype for TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-1 and nitric oxide production and blastogenic response of C3H/HeJ splenocytes after Ureaplasma diversum stimulation. Live and heat-killed U. diversum induced TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 in peritoneal macrophage cultures of both C3H/HeN and C3H/HeJ mice in a dose dependent manner. Interferon-gamma modulated the cytokine production, by increasing the production of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and nitric oxide, but IL-1 secretion was only enhanced in C3H/HeJ macrophages stimulated by live ureaplasmas. Supernatant of U. diversum sonicate was mitogenic for murine spleen lymphocytes. The blastogenic response was dose dependent, and stimulation with both U. diversum and Concanavalin A seemed to have an additive effect. These results suggest that U. diversum, similar to other mycoplasmas, activates murine macrophages and lymphoid cells. The studies should be repeated with bovine cells in order to elucidate pathogenetic aspects of inflammation in cattle caused by U. diversum. PMID:7889459

  11. Human and Murine Interleukin 23 Receptors Are Novel Substrates for A Disintegrin and Metalloproteases ADAM10 and ADAM17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manuel; Schröder, Jutta; Monhasery, Niloufar; Ackfeld, Theresa; Hummel, Thorben M; Rabe, Björn; Garbers, Christoph; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Floss, Doreen M; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-05-13

    IL-23 (interleukin 23) regulates immune responses against pathogens and plays a major role in the differentiation and maintenance of TH17 cells and the development of autoimmune diseases and cancer. The IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) complex consists of the unique IL-23R and the common IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1). Differential splicing generates antagonistic soluble IL-23R (sIL-23R) variants, which might limit IL-23-mediated immune responses. Here, ectodomain shedding of human and murine IL-23R was identified as an alternative pathway for the generation of sIL-23R. Importantly, proteolytically released sIL-23R has IL-23 binding activity. Shedding of IL-23R was induced by stimulation with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), but not by ionomycin. PMA-induced shedding was abrogated by an ADAM (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) 10 and 17 selective inhibitor, but not by an ADAM10 selective inhibitor. ADAM17-deficient but not ADAM10-deficient HEK293 cells failed to shed IL-23R after PMA stimulation, demonstrating that ADAM17 but not ADAM10 cleaves the IL-23R. Constitutive shedding was, however, inhibited by an ADAM10 selective inhibitor. Using deletions and specific amino acid residue exchanges, we identified critical determinants of ectodomain shedding within the stalk region of the IL-23R. Finally, interaction studies identified domains 1 and 3 of the IL-23R as the main ADAM17 binding sites. In summary, we describe human and murine IL-23R as novel targets for protein ectodomain shedding by ADAM10 and ADAM17.

  12. High-Resolution X-Ray Structure and Functional Analysis of the Murine Norovirus 1 Capsid Protein Protruding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, Stefan; Rubin, John R.; Katpally, Umesh; Smith, Thomas J.; Kendall, Ann; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wobus, Christiane E. (Michigan); (Danforth)

    2010-07-23

    Murine noroviruses (MNV) are closely related to the human noroviruses (HuNoV), which cause the majority of nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Unlike HuNoV, MNV grow in culture and in a small-animal model that represents a tractable model to study norovirus biology. To begin a detailed investigation of molecular events that occur during norovirus binding to cells, the crystallographic structure of the murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) capsid protein protruding (P) domain has been determined. Crystallization of the bacterially expressed protein yielded two different crystal forms (Protein Data Bank identifiers [PDB ID], 3LQ6 and 3LQE). Comparison of the structures indicated a large degree of structural mobility in loops on the surface of the P2 subdomain. Specifically, the A{prime}-B{prime} and E{prime}-F{prime} loops were found in open and closed conformations. These regions of high mobility include the known escape mutation site for the neutralizing antibody A6.2 and an attenuation mutation site, which arose after serial passaging in culture and led to a loss in lethality in STAT1{sup -/-} mice, respectively. Modeling of a Fab fragment and crystal structures of the P dimer into the cryoelectron microscopy three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction of the A6.2/MNV-1 complex indicated that the closed conformation is most likely bound to the Fab fragment and that the antibody contact is localized to the A{prime}-B{prime} and E{prime}-F{prime} loops. Therefore, we hypothesize that these loop regions and the flexibility of the P domains play important roles during MNV-1 binding to the cell surface.

  13. Human and Murine Interleukin 23 Receptors Are Novel Substrates for A Disintegrin and Metalloproteases ADAM10 and ADAM17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Manuel; Schröder, Jutta; Monhasery, Niloufar; Ackfeld, Theresa; Hummel, Thorben M; Rabe, Björn; Garbers, Christoph; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Floss, Doreen M; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-05-13

    IL-23 (interleukin 23) regulates immune responses against pathogens and plays a major role in the differentiation and maintenance of TH17 cells and the development of autoimmune diseases and cancer. The IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) complex consists of the unique IL-23R and the common IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1). Differential splicing generates antagonistic soluble IL-23R (sIL-23R) variants, which might limit IL-23-mediated immune responses. Here, ectodomain shedding of human and murine IL-23R was identified as an alternative pathway for the generation of sIL-23R. Importantly, proteolytically released sIL-23R has IL-23 binding activity. Shedding of IL-23R was induced by stimulation with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), but not by ionomycin. PMA-induced shedding was abrogated by an ADAM (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) 10 and 17 selective inhibitor, but not by an ADAM10 selective inhibitor. ADAM17-deficient but not ADAM10-deficient HEK293 cells failed to shed IL-23R after PMA stimulation, demonstrating that ADAM17 but not ADAM10 cleaves the IL-23R. Constitutive shedding was, however, inhibited by an ADAM10 selective inhibitor. Using deletions and specific amino acid residue exchanges, we identified critical determinants of ectodomain shedding within the stalk region of the IL-23R. Finally, interaction studies identified domains 1 and 3 of the IL-23R as the main ADAM17 binding sites. In summary, we describe human and murine IL-23R as novel targets for protein ectodomain shedding by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:26961870

  14. Modulation of fibronectin-mediated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin attachment to murine bladder mucosa by drugs influencing the coagulation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M A; Brown, E J; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1991-07-15

    Adjuvant intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has proved to be an effective treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Intraluminal attachment of BCG organisms via binding to the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin (FN), appears to be required for expression of the antitumor efficacy of BCG against a murine bladder tumor. Initial studies demonstrated that radiolabeled FN localized to the acutely injured urothelium but not to intact urothelium. These studies also demonstrated that exogenous administration of FN enhanced BCG attachment to the injured but not to the intact urothelium. Because FN has been shown to be an integral part of clot formation at sites of urothelial injury, drugs known to affect fibrin clot formation were tested for their effects on BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model. A stabilizer of fibrin clot formation was shown to enhance both BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in the same model. An increased number of BCG organisms were also retained in the lymph nodes and spleens of mice receiving fibrin clot stabilizers, suggesting indirectly that immunological mechanisms are involved in the antitumor efficacy of BCG. The data presented herein provide further support for the hypothesis that BCG attachment to the injured bladder is mediated by FN. Furthermore, modulation of BCG-FN attachment is demonstrated to be possible with drugs influencing the coagulation pathway. This attachment is shown to be required for the antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model, and thus modulation of BCG-FN attachment appears to have significant influence on the antitumor efficacy of BCG in the murine bladder tumor model.

  15. Optimization of Gene Transfection in Murine Myeloma Cell Lines using Different Transfection Reagents

    OpenAIRE

    Shabani, Mahdi; Hemmati, Sheyda; Hadavi, Reza; Amirghofran, Zahra; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjatallah; Shokri, Fazel

    2010-01-01

    Purification and isolation of cellular target proteins for monoclonal antibody (MAb) production is a difficult and time-consuming process. Immunization of mice with murine cell lines stably transfected with genes coding for xenogenic target molecules is an alternative method for mouse immunization and MAb production. Here we present data on transfection efficiency of some commercial reagents used for transfection of murine myeloma cell lines. Little is known about transfectability of murine m...

  16. Murine eosinophil differentiation factor. An eosinophil-specific colony- stimulating factor with activity for human cells

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A purified murine lymphokine, eosinophil differentiation factor (EDF), was found to be a selective stimulus for the clonal proliferation and differentiation of murine eosinophil progenitor cells, establishing it as the murine eosinophil colony-stimulating factor (Eo-CSF). EDF was also active on human eosinophil progenitors and mature blood eosinophils, but had no effect on neutrophil or macrophage precursor cells, nor on blood neutrophils. In culture of human bone marrow cells, EDF stimulated...

  17. Afzelin attenuates asthma phenotypes by downregulation of GATA3 in a murine model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenbo; Nie, Xiuhong

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is a serious health problem causing significant mortality and morbidity globally. Persistent airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, increased immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels and mucus hypersecretion are key characteristics of the condition. Asthma is mediated via a dominant T-helper 2 (Th2) immune response, causing enhanced expression of Th2 cytokines. These cytokines are responsible for the various pathological changes associated with allergic asthma. To investigate the anti-asthmatic potential of afzelin, as well as the underlying mechanisms involved, its anti-asthmatic potential were investigated in a murine model of asthma. In the present study, BALB/c mice were systemically sensitized using ovalbumin (OVA) followed by aerosol allergen challenges. The effect of afzelin on airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic infiltration, Th2 cytokine and OVA‑specific IgE production in a mouse model of asthma were investigated. It was found that afzelin‑treated groups suppressed eosinophil infiltration, allergic airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, OVA-specific IgE and Th2 cytokine secretion. The results of the present study suggested that the therapeutic mechanism by which afzelin effectively treats asthma is based on reduction of Th2 cytokine via inhibition of GATA-binding protein 3 transcription factor, which is the master regulator of Th2 cytokine differentiation and production. PMID:25738969

  18. Nonessential Role for the NLRP1 Inflammasome Complex in a Murine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brickler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI elicits the immediate production of proinflammatory cytokines which participate in regulating the immune response. While the mechanisms of adaptive immunity in secondary injury are well characterized, the role of the innate response is unclear. Recently, the NLR inflammasome has been shown to become activated following TBI, causing processing and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β. The inflammasome is a multiprotein complex consisting of nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLR, caspase-1, and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC. ASC is upregulated after TBI and is critical in coupling the proteins during complex formation resulting in IL-1β cleavage. To directly test whether inflammasome activation contributes to acute TBI-induced damage, we assessed IL-1β, IL-18, and IL-6 expression, contusion volume, hippocampal cell death, and motor behavior recovery in Nlrp1−/−, Asc−/−, and wild type mice after moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI injury. Although IL-1β expression is significantly attenuated in the cortex of Nlrp1−/− and Asc−/− mice following CCI injury, no difference in motor recovery, cell death, or contusion volume is observed compared to wild type. These findings indicate that inflammasome activation does not significantly contribute to acute neural injury in the murine model of moderate CCI injury.

  19. Endophilins interact with Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag and modulate virion production

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    De Camilli Pietro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroviral Gag protein is the central player in the process of virion assembly at the plasma membrane, and is sufficient to induce the formation and release of virus-like particles. Recent evidence suggests that Gag may co-opt the host cell's endocytic machinery to facilitate retroviral assembly and release. Results A search for novel partners interacting with the Gag protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV via the yeast two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assay resulted in the identification of endophilin 2, a component of the machinery involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We demonstrate that endophilin interacts with the matrix or MA domain of the Gag protein of Mo-MuLV, but not of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. Both exogenously expressed and endogenous endophilin are incorporated into Mo-MuLV viral particles. Titration experiments suggest that the binding sites for inclusion of endophilin into viral particles are limited and saturable. Knock-down of endophilin with small interfering RNA (siRNA had no effect on virion production, but overexpression of endophilin and, to a lesser extent, of several fragments of the protein, result in inhibition of Mo-MuLV virion production, but not of HIV virion production. Conclusions This study shows that endophilins interact with Mo-MuLV Gag and affect virion production. The findings imply that endophilin is another component of the large complex that is hijacked by retroviruses to promote virion production.

  20. Caveolin-1 interacts with the Gag precursor of murine leukaemia virus and modulates virus production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koester Mario

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral Gag determines virus assembly at the plasma membrane and the formation of virus-like particles in intracellular multivesicular bodies. Thereby, retroviruses exploit by interaction with cellular partners the cellular machineries for vesicular transport in various ways. Results The retroviral Gag precursor protein drives assembly of murine leukaemia viruses (MLV at the plasma membrane (PM and the formation of virus like particles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs. In our study we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a multifunctional membrane-associated protein, co-localizes with Gag in a punctate pattern at the PM of infected NIH 3T3 cells. We provide evidence that Cav-1 interacts with the matrix protein (MA of the Gag precursor. This interaction is mediated by a Cav-1 binding domain (CBD within the N-terminus of MA. Interestingly, the CBD motif identified within MA is highly conserved among most other γ-retroviruses. Furthermore, Cav-1 is incorporated into MLV released from NIH 3T3 cells. Overexpression of a GFP fusion protein containing the putative CBD of the retroviral MA resulted in a considerable decrease in production of infectious retrovirus. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant affected retroviral titres significantly. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Cav-1 interacts with MLV Gag, co-localizes with Gag at the PM and affects the production of infectious virus. The results strongly suggest a role for Cav-1 in the process of virus assembly.

  1. Structural basis of suppression of host translation termination by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuhua; Zhu, Yiping; Baker, Stacey L.; Bowler, Matthew W.; Chen, Benjamin Jieming; Chen, Chen; Hogg, J. Robert; Goff, Stephen P.; Song, Haiwei

    2016-06-01

    Retroviral reverse transcriptase (RT) of Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is expressed in the form of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein by suppression of translational termination in which the maximal efficiency of stop codon read-through depends on the interaction between MoMLV RT and peptidyl release factor 1 (eRF1). Here, we report the crystal structure of MoMLV RT in complex with eRF1. The MoMLV RT interacts with the C-terminal domain of eRF1 via its RNase H domain to sterically occlude the binding of peptidyl release factor 3 (eRF3) to eRF1. Promotion of read-through by MoMLV RNase H prevents nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) of mRNAs. Comparison of our structure with that of HIV RT explains why HIV RT cannot interact with eRF1. Our results provide a mechanistic view of how MoMLV manipulates the host translation termination machinery for the synthesis of its own proteins.

  2. In vivo tumor localization using tumor-specific monkey xenoantibody, alloantibody, and murine monoclonal xenoantibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific in vivo localization of antibodies reactive with human melanoma cell membrane tumor associated antigens (TAA) has been attempted using congenitally athymic nude mice bearing subcutaneous human melanoma tumor xenografts as the experimental model. IgG fractions were prepared from each of several immune and control sera. Antimelanoma antibody sources included human alloantibody obtained from melanoma patients immunized against allogeneic melanoma cells, a monkey antiserum raised by immunization against a single human melanoma cell line, and a murine monoclonal antimelanoma antibody-secreting hybridoma cell line. Localization of these radiolabeled antibodies and of control IgG preparations to tumor tissue was determined by whole body scintigraphy and by differential tissue counting. Compared with the different control IgG preparations, each of the antimelanoma IgG preparations exhibited significant specific accumulation within the melanoma tissue. However, variation existed in the ability of each antimelanoma IgG to tumor preparation to localize despite attempts to control model parameters such as tumor source, in vivo passage number and mass. This variation appears to reflect basic biologic differences between tumors in different animals and possibly differences in the antigen-binding capacities of each IgG preparation following radioiodination. This technique for tumor localization is very promising and has obvious potential for clinical application

  3. Heterogeneity of Matrin 3 in the developing and aging murine central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayaprolu, Sruti; D'Alton, Simon; Crosby, Keith; Moloney, Christina; Howard, John; Duffy, Colin; Cabrera, Mariela; Siemienski, Zoe; Hernandez, Abigail R; Gallego-Iradi, Carolina; Borchelt, David R; Lewis, Jada

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the MATR3 gene encoding the nucleotide binding protein Matrin 3 have recently been identified as causing a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS) and more rarely causing distal myopathy. Translating the identification of MATR3 mutations into an understanding of disease pathogenesis and the creation of mouse models requires a complete understanding of normal Matrin 3 levels and distribution in vivo. Consequently, we examined the levels of murine Matrin 3 in body tissues and regions of the central nervous system (CNS). We observed a significant degree of variability in Matrin 3 protein levels among different tissues of adult animals, with the highest levels found in reproductive organs and the lowest in muscle. Within the adult CNS, Matrin 3 levels were lowest in spinal cord. Further, we found that Matrin 3 declines significantly in CNS through early development and young adulthood before stabilizing. As previously reported, antibodies to Matrin 3 primarily stain nuclei, but the intensity of staining was not uniform in all nuclei. The low levels of Matrin 3 in spinal cord and muscle could mean that that these tissues are particularly vulnerable to alterations in Matrin 3 function. Our study is the first to characterize endogenous Matrin 3 in rodents across the lifespan, providing the groundwork for deciphering disease mechanisms and developing mouse models of MATR3-linked ALS. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2740-2752, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26878116

  4. Targeting of influenza epitopes to murine CR1/CR2 using single-chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, J; Tchorbanov, A; Horváth, A; Baiu, D C; Hazenbos, W; Rajnavölgyi, E; Kurucz, I; Capel, P J; Erdei, A

    1999-05-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are genetically engineered molecules comprising the variable regions responsible for specific binding. scFv that recognize certain surface molecules on professional antigen presenting cells could therefore be suitable for targeting Ag to these cells. We have produced an scFv that recognizes murine complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/CR2) and genetically fused it with different numbers of influenza hemagglutinin peptides which contain both B and T cell epitopes. The CR1/CR2 specific hybridoma 7G6 was used for RT-PCR to obtain the variable regions, which were then combined to create an scFv fragment. The influenza hemagglutinin intersubunit peptide HA317-41 (IP) was engineered to the N terminus of the scFv in one, two or three copies. The so obtained IP(1-3)7G6scFv still bound the complement receptors; the peptides in the construct were recognized by the peptide specific monoclonal IP2-11-1 on Western blots and ELISAs. The CR1/CR2 positive B lymphomas A20 and 2PK3 presented the peptide to an I-Ed restricted IP specific T cell hybridoma more efficiently when incubated with the IP(1)7G6 constructs as compared to the free peptide. The results suggest that scFv could work as targeting devices in subunit vaccines. PMID:10408376

  5. Targeting of influenza epitopes to murine CR1/CR2 using single-chain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, J; Tchorbanov, A; Horváth, A; Baiu, D C; Hazenbos, W; Rajnavölgyi, E; Kurucz, I; Capel, P J; Erdei, A

    1999-05-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are genetically engineered molecules comprising the variable regions responsible for specific binding. scFv that recognize certain surface molecules on professional antigen presenting cells could therefore be suitable for targeting Ag to these cells. We have produced an scFv that recognizes murine complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/CR2) and genetically fused it with different numbers of influenza hemagglutinin peptides which contain both B and T cell epitopes. The CR1/CR2 specific hybridoma 7G6 was used for RT-PCR to obtain the variable regions, which were then combined to create an scFv fragment. The influenza hemagglutinin intersubunit peptide HA317-41 (IP) was engineered to the N terminus of the scFv in one, two or three copies. The so obtained IP(1-3)7G6scFv still bound the complement receptors; the peptides in the construct were recognized by the peptide specific monoclonal IP2-11-1 on Western blots and ELISAs. The CR1/CR2 positive B lymphomas A20 and 2PK3 presented the peptide to an I-Ed restricted IP specific T cell hybridoma more efficiently when incubated with the IP(1)7G6 constructs as compared to the free peptide. The results suggest that scFv could work as targeting devices in subunit vaccines.

  6. Cloning and characterizing of the murine IRF-3 gene promoter region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hua-Guo; Liu, Lifei; Gao, Shan; Jin, Rui; Ren, Wei; Zhou, Guo-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3) plays essential roles in inflammation and immune response. Here, we cloned the nucleotide sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the murine IRF-3 gene (mIRF-3) and characterized the molecular mechanisms controlling the mIRF-3 transcriptional activity in NIH3T3 cells. Analyses of a series of 5' deletion constructs demonstrated that a 301 bp region (-255/+46) of the mIRF-3 gene is sufficient for full promoter activity. This region contains IK1, Egr2, Cmyb, E2F1 and YY1 putative transcription factor binding sites. Mutation of Egr2 or YY1 site led to 52-68 % decrease of the mIRF-3 promoter activity, and double Egr2 and YY1 mutation reduced the promoter activity to 20 % of the wild-type promoter activity. Furthermore, knockingdown of endogenous Egr2 or YY1 by a siRNA strategy markedly inhibited the mIRF-3 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Egr2 and YY1 interact with the mIRF-3 promoter in vivo. These results suggested that the basal promoter activity of the mIRF-3 gene is regulated by transcription factors Egr2 and YY1 in NIH3T3 cells. PMID:26740329

  7. Mus cervicolor murine leukemia virus isolate M813 belongs to a unique receptor interference group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassolov, V; Hein, S; Ziegler, M; Ivanov, D; Münk, C; Löhler, J; Stocking, C

    2001-05-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MuLV) M813 was originally isolated from the Southeast Asian rodent Mus cervicolor. As with the ecotropic MuLVs derived from Mus musculus, its host range is limited to rodent cells. Earlier studies have mapped its receptor to chromosome 2, but it has not been established whether M813 shares a common receptor with any other MuLVs. In this study, we have performed interference assays with M813 and viruses from four interference groups of MuLV. The infection efficiency of M813 was not compromised in cells expressing any one of the other MuLVs, demonstrating that M813 must use a distinct receptor for cell entry. The entire M813 env coding region was molecularly cloned. Sequence analysis revealed high similarity with other MuLVs but with a unique receptor-binding domain. Substitution of M813 env sequences in Moloney MuLV resulted in a replication-competent virus with a host range and interference profile similar to those of the biological clone M813. M813 thus defines a novel receptor interference group of type C MuLVs.

  8. Reduced synaptic activity in neuronal networks derived from embryonic stem cells of murine Rett syndrome model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Lydia; Sütterlin, Rosmarie; Nenniger, Markus; Vogt, Kaspar E

    2014-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental diseases such as the Rett syndrome (RTT) have received renewed attention, since the mechanisms involved may underlie a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. In vertebrates early stages in the functional development of neurons and neuronal networks are difficult to study. Embryonic stem cell-derived neurons provide an easily accessible tool to investigate neuronal differentiation and early network formation. We used in vitro cultures of neurons derived from murine embryonic stem cells missing the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene (MeCP2-/y) and from wild type cells of the corresponding background. Cultures were assessed using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunofluorescence. We studied the functional maturation of developing neurons and the activity of the synaptic connections they formed. Neurons exhibited minor differences in the developmental patterns for their intrinsic parameters, such as resting membrane potential and excitability; with the MeCP2-/y cells showing a slightly accelerated development, with shorter action potential half-widths at early stages. There was no difference in the early phase of synapse development, but as the cultures matured, significant deficits became apparent, particularly for inhibitory synaptic activity. MeCP2-/y embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cultures show clear developmental deficits that match phenotypes observed in slice preparations and thus provide a compelling tool to further investigate the mechanisms behind RTT pathophysiology.

  9. Impact of disruption of secondary binding site S2 on dopamine transporter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten E A

    2016-09-01

    The structures of the leucine transporter, drosophila dopamine transporter, and human serotonin transporter show a secondary binding site (designated S2 ) for drugs and substrate in the extracellular vestibule toward the membrane exterior in relation to the primary substrate recognition site (S1 ). The present experiments are aimed at disrupting S2 by mutating Asp476 and Ile159 to Ala. Both mutants displayed a profound decrease in [(3) H]DA uptake compared with wild-type associated with a reduced turnover rate kcat . This was not caused by a conformational bias as the mutants responded to Zn(2+) (10 μM) similarly as WT. The dopamine transporters with either the D476A or I159A mutation both displayed a higher Ki for dopamine for the inhibition of [3H](-)-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-fluorophenyl)tropane binding than did the WT transporter, in accordance with an allosteric interaction between the S1 and S2 sites. The results provide evidence in favor of a general applicability of the two-site allosteric model of the Javitch/Weinstein group from LeuT to dopamine transporter and possibly other monoamine transporters. X-ray structures of transporters closely related to the dopamine (DA) transporter show a secondary binding site S2 in the extracellular vestibule proximal to the primary binding site S1 which is closely linked to one of the Na(+) binding sites. This work examines the relationship between S2 and S1 sites. We found that S2 site impairment severely reduced DA transport and allosterically reduced S1 site affinity for the cocaine analog [(3) H]CFT. Our results are the first to lend direct support for the application of the two-site allosteric model, advanced for bacterial LeuT, to the human DA transporter. The model states that, after binding of the first DA molecule (DA1 ) to the primary S1 site (along with Na(+) ), binding of a second DA (DA2 ) to the S2 site triggers, through an allosteric interaction, the release of DA1 and Na(+) into the cytoplasm. PMID

  10. Regulatory elements associated with paternally-expressed genes in the imprinted murine Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rodriguez-Jato

    Full Text Available The Angelman/Prader-Willi syndrome (AS/PWS domain contains at least 8 imprinted genes regulated by a bipartite imprinting center (IC associated with the SNRPN gene. One component of the IC, the PWS-IC, governs the paternal epigenotype and expression of paternal genes. The mechanisms by which imprinting and expression of paternal genes within the AS/PWS domain - such as MKRN3 and NDN - are regulated by the PWS-IC are unclear. The syntenic region in the mouse is organized and imprinted similarly to the human domain with the murine PWS-IC defined by a 6 kb interval within the Snrpn locus that includes the promoter. To identify regulatory elements that may mediate PWS-IC function, we mapped the location and allele-specificity of DNase I hypersensitive (DH sites within the PWS-IC in brain cells, then identified transcription factor binding sites within a subset of these DH sites. Six major paternal-specific DH sites were detected in the Snrpn gene, five of which map within the 6 kb PWS-IC. We postulate these five DH sites represent functional components of the murine PWS-IC. Analysis of transcription factor binding within multiple DH sites detected nuclear respiratory factors (NRF's and YY1 specifically on the paternal allele. NRF's and YY1 were also detected in the paternal promoter region of the murine Mrkn3 and Ndn genes. These results suggest that NRF's and YY1 may facilitate PWS-IC function and coordinately regulate expression of paternal genes. The presence of NRF's also suggests a link between transcriptional regulation within the AS/PWS domain and regulation of respiration. 3C analyses indicated Mkrn3 lies in close proximity to the PWS-IC on the paternal chromosome, evidence that the PWS-IC functions by allele-specific interaction with its distal target genes. This could occur by allele-specific co-localization of the PWS-IC and its target genes to transcription factories containing NRF's and YY1.

  11. Induction of murine interleukin-1 beta expression by water-soluble components from Hericium erinaceum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-gue SON; Jang-woo SHIN; Jung-hyo CHO; Chong-kwan CHO; Cheol-heui YUN; Seung-hyun HAN

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the inductive effect of water extract from Hericium erinaceum (WEHE) on interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression. Methods: A murine macrophage cell-line, RAW 264.7 was stimulated with 1 to 10 mg/L WEHE and inductions of IL-1βprotein and its steady state mRNA were examined using a bioassay, Western blotting, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. The inductive effect of WEHE on IL-1βgene expression was further investigated by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene assay using a transient transfection with pIL-1(870 bp)-CAT where the expression of the CAT gene was regulated by a IL-1P promoter. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was also performed to examine transcription factors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), activator protein 1 (AP-1), nuclear factor interleukin-6 (NF-IL6), and cAMP response element (CRE)/activating transcription factor (ATF). Results: WEHE induced IL-1β production in both its mRNA and protein expression in a dosedependent manner. The inductive effect of WEHE on IL-1βgene expression was due to the augmentation of the IL-1β transcription. Furthermore, EMSA showed that WEHE markedly increased the binding activities of NF-κB, and to a lesser extent, those of AP-1 and NF-IL6 to their cognate DNA recognition sites, whereas CRE/ATF binding remained constant, all of which are known to be involved in the regulation of IL-1β gene expression. Conclusion: WEHE induces IL-1β expression in macrophages at a transcriptional level by enhancing the activation of transcription factors, NF-κB, NF-IL6, and AP-1.

  12. Bcl11b mutations identified in murine lymphomas increase the proliferation rate of hematopoietic progenitor cells

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    Söderkvist Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The telomeric region of mouse chromosome 12 has previously shown frequent allelic loss in murine lymphoma. The Bcl11b gene has been identified and suggested as a candidate tumor suppressor gene within this region. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Bcl11b is mutated in lymphomas with allelic loss, and whether the mutations we detected conferred any effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods Mouse lymphomas induced by 1,3-butadiene or 2',3'-dideoxycytidine were analysed for mutations in the Bcl11b gene using single strand conformation analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Effects on cell proliferation by the detected mutations were studied by expressing wild-type and mutant Bcl11b in the cytokine-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line FDC-P1, lacking endogenous Bcl11b expression. Results Missense and frameshift (FS mutations were identified in 7 of 47 tumors (15%. Interestingly, all mutations were found between amino acids 778–844 which encode the three C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. In FDC-P1 cells, wild-type Bcl11b suppressed cell proliferation, whereas the mutated versions (S778N, K828T, Y844C and FS823 enhanced proliferation several-fold. Conclusion The genetic alterations detected in this study suggest that the three C-terminal zinc fingers of Bcl11b are important for the DNA-binding. Cell proliferation was suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Bcl11b but enhanced by mutant Bcl11b, indicating that these mutations may be an important contributing factor to lymphomagenesis in a subset of tumors.

  13. Effects of brevetoxins on murine myeloma SP2/O cells: aberrant cellular division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Thomas K; Derby, Melissa; Martin, Dean F; Wright, Scott D; Dao, My Lien

    2003-01-01

    Massive deaths of manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) during the red tide seasons have been attributed to brevetoxins produced by the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (formerly Ptychodiscus breve and Gymnodinium breve). Although these toxins have been found in macrophages and lymphocytes in the lung, liver, and secondary lymphoid tissues of these animals, the molecular mechanisms of brevetoxicosis have not yet been identified. To investigate the effects of brevetoxins on immune cells, a murine myeloma cell line (SP2/O) was used as a model for in vitro studies. By adding brevetoxins to cultures of the SP2/O cells at concentrations ranging from 20 to 600 ng/ml, an apparent increase in proliferation was observed at around 2 hours post challenge as compared to the unchallenged cell cultures. This was followed by a drop in cell number at around 3 hours, suggesting an aberrant effect of brevetoxins on cellular division, the cells generated at 2 hours being apparently short-lived. In situ immunochemical staining of the SP2/O cells at 1 and 2 hour post challenge showed an accumulation of the toxins in the nucleus. A 21-kDa protein was subsequently isolated from the SP2/O cells as having brevetoxin-binding properties, and immunologically identified as p21, a nuclear factor known to down-regulate cellular proliferation through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases. These data are the first on a possible effect of brevetoxins on the cell cycle via binding to p21, a phenomenon that needs to be further investigated and validated in normal immune cells. PMID:12745987

  14. Signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis of transcriptional regulation in murine embryonic stem cells

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    Zhou Qing

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has revealed that a core group of transcription factors (TFs regulates the key characteristics of embryonic stem (ES cells: pluripotency and self-renewal. Current efforts focus on identifying genes that play important roles in maintaining pluripotency and self-renewal in ES cells and aim to understand the interactions among these genes. To that end, we investigated the use of unsigned and signed network analysis to identify pluripotency and differentiation related genes. Results We show that signed networks provide a better systems level understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of ES cells than unsigned networks, using two independent murine ES cell expression data sets. Specifically, using signed weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA, we found a pluripotency module and a differentiation module, which are not identified in unsigned networks. We confirmed the importance of these modules by incorporating genome-wide TF binding data for key ES cell regulators. Interestingly, we find that the pluripotency module is enriched with genes related to DNA damage repair and mitochondrial function in addition to transcriptional regulation. Using a connectivity measure of module membership, we not only identify known regulators of ES cells but also show that Mrpl15, Msh6, Nrf1, Nup133, Ppif, Rbpj, Sh3gl2, and Zfp39, among other genes, have important roles in maintaining ES cell pluripotency and self-renewal. We also report highly significant relationships between module membership and epigenetic modifications (histone modifications and promoter CpG methylation status, which are known to play a role in controlling gene expression during ES cell self-renewal and differentiation. Conclusion Our systems biologic re-analysis of gene expression, transcription factor binding, epigenetic and gene ontology data provides a novel integrative view of ES cell biology.

  15. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Norton

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1 to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1, on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1. We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV, rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3 focus forming units (ffu/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a

  16. A Point Mutation in the Binding Subunit of a Retroviral Envelope Protein Arrests Virus Entry at Hemifusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zavorotinskaya, Tatiana; Qian, Zhaohui; Franks, John; Albritton, Lorraine M.

    2004-01-01

    The transmembrane subunits of viral envelope proteins are thought to perform all of the functions required for membrane fusion during entry of enveloped viruses. However, changes in a conserved SPHQ motif near the N terminus of the receptor binding subunit of a murine leukemia virus (MLV) envelope protein block infection and induction of cell-cell fusion but not receptor binding. Here we report evidence that a histidine-to-arginine change at position 8 (H8R) in the SPHQ motif of Moloney MLV b...

  17. A monoclonal antibody (8H3) that binds to rat T lineage cells and augments in vitro proliferative responses

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody, designated 8H3, recognizes a cell surface antigen expressed exclusively on rat T lineage cells. 8H3 antibody immunoprecipitated 180-, 120-, and 90-kD components from rat thymocytes as well as splenic T cells under nonreducing conditions. 8H3 antibody specifically inhibited the binding of thymocytes to fibronectin. Furthermore, binding of rat thymocytes to immobilized synthetic peptide Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro-Cys-BSA was inhibited by 8H3 antibody as was Gly-Arg-Gl...

  18. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  19. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  20. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  1. Identification of the Receptor Binding Domain of the Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus Envelope Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanming; Rassa, John C.; deObaldia, Maria Elena; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Ross, Susan R.

    2003-01-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a betaretrovirus that infects rodent cells and uses mouse transferrin receptor 1 for cell entry. To characterize the interaction of MMTV with its receptor, we aligned the MMTV envelope surface (SU) protein with that of Friend murine leukemia virus (F-MLV) and identified a putative receptor-binding domain (RBD) that included a receptor binding sequence (RBS) of five amino acids and a heparin-binding domain (HBD). Mutation of the HBD reduced virus infectivity, and soluble heparan sulfate blocked infection of cells by wild-type pseudovirus. Interestingly, some but not all MMTV-like elements found in primary and cultured human breast cancer cell lines, termed h-MTVs, had sequence alterations in the putative RBS. Single substitution of one of the amino acids found in an h-MTV RBS variant in the RBD of MMTV, Phe40 to Ser, did not alter species tropism but abolished both virus binding to cells and infectivity. Neutralizing anti-SU monoclonal antibodies also recognized a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein that contained the five-amino-acid RBS region from MMTV. The critical Phe40 residue is located on a surface of the MMTV RBD model that is distant from and may be structurally more rigid than the region of F-MLV RBD that contains its critical binding site residues. This suggests that, in contrast to other murine retroviruses, binding to its receptor may result in few or no changes in MMTV envelope protein conformation. PMID:12970432

  2. Identification of cysteine-644 as the covalent site of attachment of dexamethasone 21-mesylate to murine glucocorticoid receptors in WEHI-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dexamethasone 21-mesylate is a highly specific synthetic glucocorticoid derivative that binds covalently to glucocorticoid receptors via sulfhydryl groups. The authors have identified the amino acid that reacts with the dexamethasone 21-mesylate by using enzymatic digestion and microsequencing for radiolabel. Nonactivated glucocorticoid receptors obtained from labeling intact WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells with [3H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate were immunopurified and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Trypsin digestion followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (reversed-phase HPLC) produced a single [3H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled peptide. Automated Edman degradation of this peptide revealed that the [3H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate was located at position 5 from the amino terminus. Dual-isotope labeling studies with [3H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate and [35S]methionine demonstrated that this peptide contained methionine. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of [3H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled steroid-binding subunits generated a different radiolabeled peptide containing label at position 7 from the amino terminus. On the basis of the published amino acid sequence of the murine glucocorticoid receptor, their data clearly identify cysteine-644 as the single residue in the steroid-binding domain that covalently binds dexamethasone 21-mesylate. They have confirmed this finding by demonstrating that a synthetic peptide representing the amino acid sequence 640-650 of the murine glucocorticoid receptor behaves in an identical manner on reversed-phase HPLC as the trypsin-generated peptide from intact cells

  3. Identification of potential cytokine pathways for therapeutic intervention in murine primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhito Kawata

    Full Text Available Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC is considered a model autoimmune disease, with the most highly directed and specific autoantibody in both murine and human autoimmunity, the anti-mitochondrial autoantibody (AMA. However, therapeutic advances in this disease have lagged behind. Herein we have taken advantage of our unique model of murine PBC in which mice immunized with 2-octynoic acid coupled to BSA (2OA-BSA, a compound identified by quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR of human AMA binding, develop an intense inflammatory cholangitis with striking similarities to humans with PBC. In particular, we have constructed several unique gene-deleted mice, including mice deleted of IL-12p40, IL-12p35, IFN-γ, IL-23p19, IL-17A, IL-17F and IL-22, immunized these animals with 2OA-BSA and followed the natural history of immunopathology to identify key pathways that might provide clues for successful therapy. Our data indicate that whereas both IL-12/Th1 and IL-23/Th17 are involved in cholangitis, it is the IL-12/Th1 signaling pathway that elicits pathology. In fact, deletion of IFN-γ prevents disease and suppresses autoantibodies. Importantly, deletion of the Th17 cytokines IL-17A and IL-22, but not IL-17F, reduces biliary damage; IL-17A-knockout mice have reduced levels of anti-mitochondrial antibody. We further demonstrate that the production of IFN-γ is significantly decreased in the liver of IL-23p19(-/-, IL-17A(-/- and IL-22(-/- mice compared with controls. However, the ability of T cells to produce IFN-γ was not affected in Th17 cytokine-deficient mice. Our data indicate that a deficient Th17 pathway suppresses the accumulation of IFN-γ producing cells in liver during the early phase of cholangitis. In conclusion, whereas IFN-γ has a pivotal role in the early events involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune cholangitis induced by 2OA-BSA, the IL-23/Th17 pathway potentiates the effects of IL-12/IFN-γ-mediated immunopathology.

  4. Nanomechanical phenotype of chondroadherin-null murine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Michael A; Nia, Hadi T; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Cox, Karen A; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J; Heinegård, Dick; Han, Lin

    2014-09-01

    Chondroadherin (CHAD), a class IV small leucine rich proteoglycan/protein (SLRP), was hypothesized to play important roles in regulating chondrocyte signaling and cartilage homeostasis. However, its roles in cartilage development and function are not well understood, and no major osteoarthritis-like phenotype was found in the murine model with CHAD genetically deleted (CHAD(-/-)). In this study, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation to quantify the effects of CHAD deletion on changes in the biomechanical function of murine cartilage. In comparison to wild-type (WT) mice, CHAD-deletion resulted in a significant ≈70-80% reduction in the indentation modulus, Eind, of the superficial zone knee cartilage of 11 weeks, 4 months and 1 year old animals. This mechanical phenotype correlates well with observed increases in the heterogeneity collagen fibril diameters in the surface zone. The results suggest that CHAD mainly plays a major role in regulating the formation of the collagen fibrillar network during the early skeletal development. In contrast, CHAD-deletion had no appreciable effects on the indentation mechanics of middle/deep zone cartilage, likely due to the dominating role of aggrecan in the middle/deep zone. The presence of significant rate dependence of the indentation stiffness in both WT and CHAD(-/-) knee cartilage suggested the importance of both fluid flow induced poroelasticity and intrinsic viscoelasticity in murine cartilage biomechanical properties. Furthermore, the marked differences in the nanomechanical behavior of WT versus CHAD(-/-) cartilage contrasted sharply with the relative absence of overt differences in histological appearance. These observations highlight the sensitivity of nanomechanical tools in evaluating structural and mechanical phenotypes in transgenic mice. PMID:24892719

  5. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  6. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L.; Tesh, Robert B.; Azar, Sasha R.; Muruato, Antonio E.; Hanley, Kathryn A.; Auguste, Albert J.; Langsjoen, Rose M.; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C.

    2016-01-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain–Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼107 plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. PMID:27022155

  7. Purification of Murine Monoclonal IgM Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the purification of a monoclonal IgM antibody against human tumor associated antigen Lewis-Y by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to identify purified IgM antibody.In flow cytometry analysis, the purified IgM antibody recognizes human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 which expresses Lewis-Y antigen.This work presents a new way for the purification of murine monoclonal IgM antibody.

  8. Protective role of murine norovirus against Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépaut, Marion; Grandjean, Teddy; Hober, Didier; Lobert, Pierre-Emmanuel; Bortolotti, Perrine; Faure, Karine; Dessein, Rodrigue; Kipnis, Eric; Guery, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The murine norovirus (MNV) is a recently discovered mouse pathogen, representing the most common contaminant in laboratory mouse colonies. Nevertheless, the effects of MNV infection on biomedical research are still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that MNV infection could alter immune response in mice with acute lung infection. Here we report that co-infection with MNV increases survival of mice with Pseudomonas aeruginosa acute lung injury and decreases in vivo production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that MNV infection can deeply modify the parameters studied in conventional models of infection and lead to false conclusions in experimental models. PMID:26338794

  9. Adrenaline influences the release of interleukin-6 from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J D; Hansen, E W; Frederiksen, C;

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of adrenaline and interleukin-1beta on interleukin-6 secretion from cultured murine neurohypophyseal cells. Cells were cultured from neurohypophyses of 3- to 5-week-old mice and experiments were performed after 13 days in culture. Interleukin-6 was measured...... in 24-h samples using a sandwich fluoroimmunoassay. Unstimulated cells released 19+/-3 fmol interleukin-6/neurohypophysis/24 h (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 42). Adrenaline and interleukin-1beta increased the release of interleukin-6 from the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation with adrenaline...

  10. Dystrophic Spinal Deformities in a Neurofibromatosis Type 1 Murine Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Steven D.; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Guise, Theresa A.; Amanda L Bergner; Stevenson, David A.; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf1flox/−;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/−;PeriCre and Nf...

  11. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ...Sweet MJ, Beasley SJ, Cronau SL, Hume DA. J Leukoc Biol. 1999 Oct;66(4):542-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The action...s of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial D

  12. The N-terminus of murine leukaemia virus p12 protein is required for mature core stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren J Wight

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The murine leukaemia virus (MLV gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices.

  13. The N-Terminus of Murine Leukaemia Virus p12 Protein Is Required for Mature Core Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wight, Darren J.; Boucherit, Virginie C.; Wanaguru, Madushi; Elis, Efrat; Hirst, Elizabeth M. A.; Li, Wilson; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Bacharach, Eran; Bishop, Kate N.

    2014-01-01

    The murine leukaemia virus (MLV) gag gene encodes a small protein called p12 that is essential for the early steps of viral replication. The N- and C-terminal regions of p12 are sequentially acting domains, both required for p12 function. Defects in the C-terminal domain can be overcome by introducing a chromatin binding motif into the protein. However, the function of the N-terminal domain remains unknown. Here, we undertook a detailed analysis of the effects of p12 mutation on incoming viral cores. We found that both reverse transcription complexes and isolated mature cores from N-terminal p12 mutants have altered capsid complexes compared to wild type virions. Electron microscopy revealed that mature N-terminal p12 mutant cores have different morphologies, although immature cores appear normal. Moreover, in immunofluorescent studies, both p12 and capsid proteins were lost rapidly from N-terminal p12 mutant viral cores after entry into target cells. Importantly, we determined that p12 binds directly to the MLV capsid lattice. However, we could not detect binding of an N-terminally altered p12 to capsid. Altogether, our data imply that p12 stabilises the mature MLV core, preventing premature loss of capsid, and that this is mediated by direct binding of p12 to the capsid shell. In this manner, p12 is also retained in the pre-integration complex where it facilitates tethering to mitotic chromosomes. These data also explain our previous observations that modifications to the N-terminus of p12 alter the ability of particles to abrogate restriction by TRIM5alpha and Fv1, factors that recognise viral capsid lattices. PMID:25356837

  14. Increased susceptibility to diet-induced gallstones in liver fatty acid binding protein knockout mices⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yan; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Kennedy, Susan M; Luo, Jianyang; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative trait mapping identified a locus colocalizing with L-Fabp, encoding liver fatty acid binding protein, as a positional candidate for murine gallstone susceptibility. When fed a lithogenic diet (LD) for 2 weeks, L-Fabp−/− mice became hypercholesterolemic with increased hepatic VLDL cholesterol secretion. Seventy-five percent of L-Fabp−/− mice developed solid gallstones compared with 6% of wild-type mice with an increased gallstone score (3.29 versus 0.62, respectively; P < 0.01). H...

  15. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  16. Fluorescence tomography in a murine model of Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Scott B.; Kumar, Anand T. N.; Dunn, Andrew K.; Boas, David A.; Bacskai, Brian J.

    2007-02-01

    Noninvasive molecular imaging of amyloid plaques in murine Alzheimer's disease models would accelerate drug development and basic Alzheimer's research. Amyloid plaques differ from traditional fluorescent targets in size and spatial distribution and therefore present a unique challenge for biomarker development and tomography. To study imaging feasibility and establish biomarker criteria, we developed a digital mouse head model from a 100 μm-resolution, digital, segmented mouse atlas1. The cortical region of the brain was filled with a spatially uniform distribution of plaques that had different fluorescent properties from the surrounding brain tissue, similar to current transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence was simulated with a Monte Carlo algorithm using different plaque densities, detection geometries, and background fluorescence. Our preliminary results demonstrated that shielding effects might require nonlinear reconstruction algorithms and that background fluorescence would seriously hinder quantitative burden estimation. The Monte Carlo based approach presented here offers a powerful way to study the feasibility of non-invasive imaging in murine Alzheimer's models and to optimize experimental conditions.

  17. Great efficacy of sulfachloropyrazine-sodium against acute murine toxoplasmosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Bo Zeng; Bing Huang; Shun-Hai Zhu; Hui Dong; Hong-Yu Han; Lian-Lian Jiang; Quan Wang; Jun Cheng; Qi-Ping Zhao; Wei-Jiao Ma

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify more effective and less toxic drugs to treat animal toxoplasmosis.Methods:Efficacy of seven kinds of sulfonamides against Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in an acute murine model was evaluated. The mice used throughout the study were randomly assigned to many groups (10 mice each), which either remained uninfected or were infected intraperitoneally with tachyzoites of T. gondii (strains RH and CN). All groups were then treated with different sulfonamides and the optimal treatment protocol was determined candidates. Sulfadiazine-sodium (SD) was used for comparison. Results: The optimal therapy involved gavaging mice twice per day with 250 mg/kg bw of sulfachloropyrazine-sodium (SPZ) for five days. Using this protocol, the average survival time and the time-point of 50% fatalities were prolonged significantly compared with SD treatment. Treatment with SPZ protected 40% of mice from death, and the heart and kidney tissue of these animals was parasite-free, as determined by nested-PCR. SPZ showed excellent therapeutic effects in the treatment of T. gondii in an acute murine model and is therefore a promising drug candidate for the treatment and prevention of T. gondii in animals. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the effective drug sulfachloropyrazine may be the new therapeutic options against animal toxoplasmosis.

  18. Bifidobacteria DNA Induces Murine Macrophages Activation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yalin Li; Xun Qu; Hua Yang; Li Kang; Yingping Xu; Bo Bai; Wengang Song

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that oligodeoxynucleotides containing unmethylated CpG motifs were used as adjuvants for immunoregulation and immune response. This study was to explore the activation effects of Bifidobacteria DNA containing unmethylated CpG motifs (CpG DNA) on murine macrophage J774A.1 cells. The genomic DNA of Bifidobacteria was extracted and purified, and the methylation degree of CpG motifs was tested.The phagocytic ability of the macrophages was detected by flow cytometry. The cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40 and TNF-α) levels in the culture supernatants of Bifidobacteria DNA treated J774A.1 cells were assayed by ELISA. The content of nitric oxide (NO) was detected by Griess reagent. After treated with Bifidobacteria DNA for 24h,Nile Red stain increased in J774A.1 macrophage, which suggested that the lipid metabolism increased in the macrophages. The phagocytic ability and levels of NO and cytokines of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-12p40 and TNF-α were significantly higher than PBS group and CT DNA group. The results indicated that Bifidobacteria DNA could activate murine macrophages J774A.1, which could provide scientific basis for the research and application of microorganism DNA preparation.

  19. Toxocara canis: anthelmintic activity of quinone derivatives in murine toxocarosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Santos, T; Mata-Santos, H A; Carneiro, P F; De Moura, K C G; Fenalti, J M; Klafke, G B; Cruz, L A X; Martins, L H R; Pinto, N F; Pinto, M C F R; Berne, M E A; Da Silva, P E A; Scaini, C J

    2016-04-01

    Human toxocarosis is a chronic tissue parasitosis most often caused by Toxocara canis. The seroprevalence can reach up to 50%, especially among children and adolescents. The anthelmintics used in the treatment have moderate efficacy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of quinones and their derivatives against T. canis larvae and the cytotoxicity of the larvicidal compounds. The compounds were evaluated at 1 mg mL(-1) concentration in microculture plates containing third stage larvae in an Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) 1640 environment, incubated at 37 °C in 5% CO2 tension for 48 h. Five naphthoxiranes were selected for the cytotoxicity analysis. The cell viability evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays using murine peritoneal macrophages isolated from C57BL/6 mice revealed that the naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) were less cytotoxic at a concentration of 0.05 mg mL(-1). The efficacy of naphthoxiranes (1 and 3) was examined in murine toxocarosis also. The anthelmintic activity was examined by evaluating the number of larvae in the brain, carcass, liver, lungs, heart, kidneys and eyes. Compound (3) demonstrated anthelmintic activity similar to that of albendazole by decreasing the number of larvae in the organs of mice and thus could form the basis of the development of a new anthelmintic drug. PMID:26887285

  20. Heat shock response down-regulates IL-18 expression in the murine macrophage cell line, RAW264.7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Heat shock response is a self-defense mechanism for protection of cells and organisms from a wide range of harmful stressors. Recent studies revealed that it is involved in the regulation of cytokines expression. IL-18 is an important cytokine in mediating immune response. We studied LPS-induced IL-18 expression in heat shock treated RAW264.7 murine macrophages. Our results show that the heat shock response significantly inhibited the expression of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18. Further research on the down-regulation mechanism shows that this inhibitory effect is correlated to the great suppression of the binding activity of AP-1, which is a transcription factor binding to the promoter of IL-18 (-1120 to -1083) and regulates the transcription of IL-18. Meanwhile, we observed that the phosphorylation of JNK, which is AP-1 upstream kinase, was greatly decreased. These results confirmed that the down-regulation effect on IL-18 production in heat shock response is related to the suppression of the JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway.

  1. The receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus and amphotropic murine leukemia virus are not downregulated in productively infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Maribeth V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last several decades it has been noted, using a variety of different methods, that cells infected by a specific gammaretrovirus are resistant to infection by other retroviruses that employ the same receptor; a phenomenon termed receptor interference. Receptor masking is thought to provide an earlier means of blocking superinfection, whereas receptor down regulation is generally considered to occur in chronically infected cells. Results We used replication-competent GFP-expressing viruses containing either an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV envelope. We also constructed similar viruses containing fluorescence-labeled Gag proteins for the detection of viral particles. Using this repertoire of reagents together with a wide range of antibodies, we were able to determine the presence and availability of viral receptors, and detect viral envelope proteins and particles presence on the cell surface of chronically infected cells. Conclusions A-MLV or GALV receptors remain on the surface of chronically infected cells and are detectable by respective antibodies, indicating that these receptors are not downregulated in these infected cells as previously proposed. We were also able to detect viral envelope proteins on the infected cell surface and infected cells are unable to bind soluble A-MLV or GALV envelopes indicating that receptor binding sites are masked by endogenously expressed A-MLV or GALV viral envelope. However, receptor masking does not completely prevent A-MLV or GALV superinfection.

  2. Epiplakin deficiency aggravates murine caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and favors the formation of acinar keratin granules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl L Wögenstein

    Full Text Available Epiplakin, a member of the plakin protein family, is exclusively expressed in epithelial tissues and was shown to bind to keratins. Epiplakin-deficient (EPPK-/- mice showed no obvious spontaneous phenotype, however, EPPK-/- keratinocytes displayed faster keratin network breakdown in response to stress. The role of epiplakin in pancreas, a tissue with abundant keratin expression, was not yet known. We analyzed epiplakin's expression in healthy and inflamed pancreatic tissue and compared wild-type and EPPK-/- mice during caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. We found that epiplakin was expressed primarily in ductal cells of the pancreas and colocalized with apicolateral keratin bundles in murine pancreatic acinar cells. Epiplakin's diffuse subcellular localization in keratin filament-free acini of K8-deficient mice indicated that its filament-associated localization in acinar cells completely depends on its binding partner keratin. During acute pancreatitis, epiplakin was upregulated in acinar cells and its redistribution closely paralleled keratin reorganization. EPPK-/- mice suffered from aggravated pancreatitis but showed no obvious regeneration phenotype. At the most severe stage of the disease, EPPK-/- acinar cells displayed more keratin aggregates than those of wild-type mice. Our data propose epiplakin to be a protective protein during acute pancreatitis, and that its loss causes impaired disease-associated keratin reorganization.

  3. Sodium-Dependent myo-Inositol Transporter 1 Is a Cellular Receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 Murine Leukemia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Ross, Susan R.; Stocking, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. To delineate the molecular mechanisms of its restricted host range and its high fusogenic potential, we initiated studies to characterize the cell surface protein that mediates M813 infection. Screening of the T31 mouse-hamster radiation hybrid panel for M813 infectivity localized the receptor gene to the distal end of mouse chromosome 16. Expression of one of the likely candidate genes (slc5a3) within this region in human cells conferred susceptibility to both M813 infection and M813-induced fusogenicity. slc5a3 encodes sodium myo-inositol transporter 1 (SMIT1), thus adding another sodium-dependent transporter to the growing list of proteins used by MuLVs for cell entry. Characterization of SMIT1 orthologues in different species identified several amino acid variations within two extracellular loops that may restrict susceptibility to M813 infection. PMID:12719585

  4. Sodium-dependent myo-inositol transporter 1 is a cellular receptor for Mus cervicolor M813 murine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Sibyll; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhang, Yuanming; Ivanov, Dmitry; Löhler, Jürgen; Ross, Susan R; Stocking, Carol

    2003-05-01

    Retrovirus infection is initiated by binding of the surface (SU) portion of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) to specific receptors on cells. This binding triggers conformational changes in the transmembrane portion of Env, leading to membrane fusion and cell entry, and is thus a major determinant of retrovirus tissue and species tropism. The M813 murine leukemia virus (MuLV) is a highly fusogenic gammaretrovirus, isolated from Mus cervicolor, whose host range is limited to mouse cells. To delineate the molecular mechanisms of its restricted host range and its high fusogenic potential, we initiated studies to characterize the cell surface protein that mediates M813 infection. Screening of the T31 mouse-hamster radiation hybrid panel for M813 infectivity localized the receptor gene to the distal end of mouse chromosome 16. Expression of one of the likely candidate genes (slc5a3) within this region in human cells conferred susceptibility to both M813 infection and M813-induced fusogenicity. slc5a3 encodes sodium myo-inositol transporter 1 (SMIT1), thus adding another sodium-dependent transporter to the growing list of proteins used by MuLVs for cell entry. Characterization of SMIT1 orthologues in different species identified several amino acid variations within two extracellular loops that may restrict susceptibility to M813 infection.

  5. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...... to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...

  6. Characterization and polyanion-binding properties of purified recombinant prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, D B; Bennett, A D; Wusteman, F S; Gill, A C; Dann, J C; Bostock, C J

    1999-09-15

    Certain polysulphated polyanions have been shown to have prophylactic effects on the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy disease, presumably because they bind to prion protein (PrP). Until now, the difficulty of obtaining large quantities of native PrP has precluded detailed studies of these interactions. We have over-expressed murine recombinant PrP (recPrP), lacking its glycophosphoinositol membrane anchor, in modified mammalian cells. Milligram quantities of secreted, soluble and partially glycosylated protein were purified under non-denaturing conditions and the identities of mature-length aglycosyl recPrP and two cleavage fragments were determined by electrospray MS. Binding was assessed by surface plasmon resonance techniques using both direct and competitive ligand-binding approaches. recPrP binding to immobilized polyanions was enhanced by divalent metal ions. Polyanion binding was strong and showed complex association and dissociation kinetics that were consistent with ligand-directed recPrP aggregation. The differences in the binding strengths of recPrP to pentosan polysulphate and to other sulphated polyanions were found to parallel their in vivo anti-scrapie and in vitro anti-scrapie-specific PrP formation potencies. When recPrP was immobilized by capture on metal-ion chelates it was found, contrary to expectation, that the addition of polyanions promoted the dissociation of the protein. PMID:10477271

  7. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  8. The antimicrobial antiproteinase elafin binds to lipopolysaccharide and modulates macrophage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Jonathan W; Roghanian, Ali; Jiang, Lu; Ramage, Robert; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2005-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria represent a primary target for innate immune responses. We demonstrate here that the antimicrobial/anti-neutrophil elastase full-length elafin (FL-EL) is able to bind both smooth and rough forms of LPS. The N-terminus was shown to bind both forms of LPS more avidly. We demonstrate that the lipid A core-binding proteins polymyxin B (PB) and LPS-binding protein (LBP) compete with elafin for binding, and that LBP is able to displace prebound elafin from LPS. When PB, FL-EL, N-EL, and C-EL were pre-incubated with LPS before addition to immobilized LBP, PB was the most potent inhibitor of LPS transfer to LBP. These data prompted us to examine the biological consequences of elafin binding to LPS, using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release by murine macrophages. In serum-containing conditions, N-EL had no effect, whereas both C-EL and FL-EL inhibited TNF-alpha production. In serum-free conditions, however, all moieties had a stimulatory activity on TNF-alpha release, with C-EL being the most potent at the highest concentration. The differential biological activity of elafin in different conditions suggests a role for this molecule in either LPS detoxification or activation of innate immune responses, depending on the external cellular environment. PMID:15668324

  9. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  10. Mechanism of quinine-dependent monoclonal antibody binding to platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougie, Daniel W; Peterson, Julie; Rasmussen, Mark; Aster, Richard H

    2015-10-29

    Drug-dependent antibodies (DDAbs) that cause acute thrombocytopenia upon drug exposure are nonreactive in the absence of the drug but bind tightly to a platelet membrane glycoprotein, usually α(IIb)/β3 integrin (GPIIb/IIIa) when the drug is present. How a drug promotes binding of antibody to its target is unknown and is difficult to study with human DDAbs, which are poly-specific and in limited supply. We addressed this question using quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which, in vitro and in vivo, closely mimic antibodies that cause thrombocytopenia in patients sensitive to quinine. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we found that quinine binds with very high affinity (K(D) ≈ 10⁻⁹ mol/L) to these mAbs at a molar ratio of ≈ 2:1 but does not bind detectably to an irrelevant mAb. Also using SPR analysis, GPIIb/IIIa was found to bind monovalently to immobilized mAb with low affinity in the absence of quinine and with fivefold greater affinity (K(D) ≈ 2.2 × 10⁻⁶) when quinine was present. Measurements of quinine-dependent binding of intact mAb and fragment antigen-binding (Fab) fragments to platelets showed that affinity is increased 10 000- to 100 000-fold by bivalent interaction between antibody and its target. Together, the findings indicate that the first step in drug-dependent binding of a DDAb is the interaction of the drug with antibody, rather than with antigen, as has been widely thought, where it induces structural changes that enhance the affinity/specificity of antibody for its target epitope. Bivalent binding may be essential for a DDAb to cause thrombocytopenia.

  11. Murine liver damage caused by exposure to nano-titanium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jie; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to its unique physiochemical properties, nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) is widely used in all aspects of people’s daily lives, bringing it into increasing contact with humans. Thus, this material’s security issues for humans have become a heavily researched subject. Nano-TiO2 can enter the body through the mouth, skin, respiratory tract or in other ways, after which it enters the blood circulation and is deposited in the liver, changing biochemical indicators and causing liver inflammation. Meanwhile, the light sensitivity of these nanoparticles allows them to become media-generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing an imbalance between oxidation and anti-oxidation that leads to oxidative stress and liver damage. Nano-TiO2 can be transported into cells via phagocytosis, where the nanoparticles bind to the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the disintegration of the membrane and the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. Thus, more ROS are produced. Nano-TiO2 can also enter the nucleus, where it can directly embed into or indirectly affect DNA, thereby causing DNA breakage or affecting gene expression. These effects include increased mRNA and protein expression levels of inflammation-related factors and decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of IκB and IL-2, resulting in inflammation. Long-term inflammation of the liver causes HSC cell activation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition is promoted by multiple signalling pathways, resulting in liver fibrosis. In this paper, the latest progress on murine liver injury induced by environmental TiO2 is systematically described. The toxicity of nano-TiO2 also depends on size, exposure time, surface properties, dosage, administration route, and its surface modification. Therefore, its toxic effects in humans should be studied in greater depth. This paper also provides useful reference information regarding the safe use of nano-TiO2 in the future.

  12. Induction of Murine Mucosal CCR5-Reactive Antibodies as an Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barassi, C.; Soprana, E.; Pastori, C.; Longhi, R.; Buratti, E.; Lillo, F.; Marenzi, C.; Lazzarin, A.; Siccardi, A. G.; Lopalco, L.

    2005-01-01

    The genital mucosa is the main site of initial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) contact with its host. In spite of repeated sexual exposure, some individuals remain seronegative, and a small fraction of them produce immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA autoantibodies directed against CCR5, which is probably the cause of the CCR5-minus phenotype observed in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of these subjects. These antibodies recognize the 89-to-102 extracellular loop of CCR5 in its native conformation. The aim of this study was to induce infection-preventing mucosal anti-CCR5 autoantibodies in individuals at high risk of HIV infection. Thus, we generated chimeric immunogens containing the relevant CCR5 peptide in the context of the capsid protein of Flock House virus, a presentation system in which it is possible to engineer conformationally constrained peptide in a highly immunogenic form. Administered in mice via the systemic or mucosal route, the immunogens elicited anti-CCR5 IgG and IgA (in sera and vaginal fluids). Analogous to exposed seronegative individuals, mice producing anti-CCR5 autoantibodies express significantly reduced levels of CCR5 on the surfaces of CD4+ cells from peripheral blood and vaginal washes. In vitro studies have shown that murine IgG and IgA (i) specifically bind human and mouse CD4+ lymphocytes and the CCR5-transfected U87 cell line, (ii) down-regulate CCR5 expression of CD4+ cells from both humans and untreated mice, (iii) inhibit Mip-1β chemotaxis of CD4+ CCR5+ lymphocytes, and (iv) neutralize HIV R5 strains. These data suggest that immune strategies aimed at generating anti-CCR5 antibodies at the level of the genital mucosa might be feasible and represent a strategy to induce mucosal HIV-protective immunity. PMID:15890924

  13. Janus kinase inhibition lessens inflammation and ameliorates disease in murine models of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Sprague, Leslee; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; An, Qi Angel; Cheng, Cheng; Kurachi, Makoto; Levine, Ross; Wherry, E John; Canna, Scott W; Behrens, Edward M; Nichols, Kim E

    2016-03-31

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) comprises an emerging spectrum of inherited and noninherited disorders of the immune system characterized by the excessive production of cytokines, including interferon-γ and interleukins 2, 6, and 10 (IL-2, IL-6, and IL-10). The Janus kinases (JAKs) transduce signals initiated following engagement of specific receptors that bind a broad array of cytokines, including those overproduced in HLH. Based on the central role for cytokines in the pathogenesis of HLH, we sought to examine whether the inhibition of JAK function might lessen inflammation in murine models of the disease. Toward this end, we examined the effects of JAK inhibition using a model of primary (inherited) HLH in which perforin-deficient (Prf1(-∕-)) mice are infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) and secondary (noninherited) HLH in which C57BL/6 mice receive repeated injections of CpG DNA. In both models, treatment with the JAK1/2 inhibitor ruxolitinib significantly lessened the clinical and laboratory manifestations of HLH, including weight loss, organomegaly, anemia, thrombocytopenia, hypercytokinemia, and tissue inflammation. Importantly, ruxolitinib treatment also significantly improved the survival of LCMV-infectedPrf1(-∕-)mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that in vivo exposure to ruxolitinib inhibited signal transducer and activation of transcription 1-dependent gene expression, limited CD8(+)T-cell expansion, and greatly reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, without effecting degranulation and cytotoxic function. Collectively, these findings highlight the JAKs as novel, druggable targets for mitigating the cytokine-driven hyperinflammation that occurs in HLH. These observations also support the incorporation of JAK inhibitors such as ruxolitinib into future clinical trials for patients with these life-threatening disorders. PMID:26825707

  14. PASylation of Murine Leptin Leads to Extended Plasma Half-Life and Enhanced in Vivo Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morath, Volker; Bolze, Florian; Schlapschy, Martin; Schneider, Sarah; Sedlmayer, Ferdinand; Seyfarth, Katrin; Klingenspor, Martin; Skerra, Arne

    2015-05-01

    Leptin plays a central role in the control of energy homeostasis and appetite and, thus, has attracted attention for therapeutic approaches in spite of its limited pharmacological activity owing to the very short circulation in the body. To improve drug delivery and prolong plasma half-life, we have fused murine leptin with Pro/Ala/Ser (PAS) polypeptides of up to 600 residues, which adopt random coil conformation with expanded hydrodynamic volume in solution and, consequently, retard kidney filtration in a similar manner as polyethylene glycol (PEG). Relative to unmodified leptin, size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering revealed an approximately 21-fold increase in apparent size and a much larger molecular diameter of around 18 nm for PAS(600)-leptin. High receptor-binding activity for all PASylated leptin versions was confirmed in BIAcore measurements and cell-based dual-luciferase assays. Pharmacokinetic studies in mice revealed a much extended plasma half-life after ip injection, from 26 min for the unmodified leptin to 19.6 h for the PAS(600) fusion. In vivo activity was investigated after single ip injection of equimolar doses of each leptin version. Strongly increased and prolonged hypothalamic STAT3 phosphorylation was detected for PAS(600)-leptin. Also, a reduction in daily food intake by up to 60% as well as loss in body weight of >10% lasting for >5 days was observed, whereas unmodified leptin was merely effective for 1 day. Notably, application of a PASylated superactive mouse leptin antagonist (SMLA) led to the opposite effects. Thus, PASylated leptin not only provides a promising reagent to study its physiological role in vivo but also may offer a superior drug candidate for clinical therapy. PMID:25811325

  15. Murine Norovirus Infection Variably Alters Atherosclerosis in Mice Lacking Apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Charlie C; Paik, Jisun; Brabb, Thea L; O'Brien, Kevin D; Kim, Jinkyu; Sullivan, Brittany G; Hudkins, Kelly L; Seamons, Audrey; Finley, Jennifer C; Meeker, Stacey M; Maggio-Price, Lillian

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages play a key role in the development of atherosclerosis. Murine noroviruses (MNV) are highly prevalent in research mouse colonies and infect macrophages and dendritic cells. Our laboratory found that MNV4 infection in mice lacking the LDL receptor alters the development of atherosclerosis, potentially confounding research outcomes. Therefore, we investigated whether MNV4 likewise altered atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. In the presence of oxidized LDL, MNV4 infection of ApoE(-/-) bone marrow-derived macrophages increased the gene expression of the inflammatory markers inducible nitric oxide synthase, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and IL6. In addition, proteins involved in cholesterol transport were altered in MNV4-infected ApoE -/- bone marrow-derived macrophages and consisted of increased CD36 and decreased ATP-binding cassette transporter A1. MNV4 infection of ApoE(-/-) mice at 12 wk of age (during the development of atherosclerosis) had a variable effect on atherosclerotic lesion size. In one study, MNV4 significantly increased atherosclerotic plaque area whereas in a second study, no effect was observed. Compared with controls, MNV4-infected mice had higher circulating Ly6C-positive monocytes, and viral RNA was detected in the aortas of some mice, suggesting potential mechanisms by which MNV4 alters disease progression. Plaque size did not differ when ApoE -/- mice were infected at 4 wk of age (early during disease development) or in ApoE -/- mice maintained on a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet. Therefore, these data show that MNV4 has the potential to exert a variable and unpredictable effect on atherosclerosis in ApoE(-/-) mice. We therefore propose that performing experiments in MNV-free mouse colonies is warranted. PMID:26473341

  16. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  17. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux;

    2016-01-01

    , and a comparison of these models with the human AD transcriptomic fingerprint is lacking. We sought to evaluate the transcriptomic profiles of six common murine models and determine how they relate to human AD skin. Transcriptomic profiling was performed using microarrays and qRT-PCR on biopsies from NC/Nga, flaky...... different immune or barrier disease aspects. Overall, among the six murine models, IL-23-injected mice best simulate human AD; still, the translational focus of the investigation should determine which model is most applicable. When testing new drugs for atopic dermatitis, murine models might be used...

  18. Monoclonal antibody to murine PECAM-1 (CD31) blocks acute inflammation in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    A murine model of peritonitis was used to test the role of platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1/CD31) in acute inflammation. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) specific for murine PECAM-1 injected intravenously 4 h before the intraperitoneal injection of thioglycollate broth blocked leukocyte emigration into the peritoneal cavity for up to 48 h. This block was particularly evident for neutrophils. Control mAb, including one that bound to murine CD18 without blocking its function, f...

  19. Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa Extract Attenuates DSS-Induced Murine Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jong-Chan; Lee, Kang Min; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    We examined the protective effects of Angelica acutiloba Kitagawa (AAK) extract on a murine model of acute experimental colitis. Colitis was induced by 4% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water of male C57BL/6 mice, for 7 consecutive days. Oral administration of AAK extract (500 mg/kg/day) significantly alleviated DSS-induced symptoms such as anorexia, weight loss, events of diarrhea or bloody stools, and colon shortening. Histological damage was also ameliorated, as evidenced by the architectural preservation and suppression of inflammatory cell infiltration in colonic samples. Treatment improved the colonic mRNA expression of different inflammatory markers: cytokines, inducible enzymes, matrix metalloproteinases, and tight junction-related proteins. In the isolated serum, IgE levels were downregulated. Collectively, these findings indicate the therapeutic potentials of AAK as an effective complementary or alternative modality for the treatment of ulcerative colitis.

  20. Zika Virus Infection and Development of a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ankit; Kumar, Anil

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), there is an urgent need to investigate the pathogenesis of the symptoms associated with ZIKV infection. Since the first identification of the virus in 1947, the pathologies associated with ZIKV infection were thought to be limited with mild illness that presented fever, rashes, muscle aches, and weakness. However, ZIKV infection has been shown to cause Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and numerous cases of congenital microcephaly in children have been reported when pregnant females were exposed to the virus. The severity and the rate of spread of ZIKV in the last year has drawn alarming interest among researchers to investigate murine models to study viral pathogenesis and develop candidate vaccines. A recent study by Lazear and colleagues, in the May 2016 issue of cell host and microbe, is an effort to study the pathogenesis of contemporary and historical virus strains in various mouse models. PMID:27260223

  1. The kin17 Protein in Murine Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise C. Ramos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available kin17 has been described as a protein involved in the processes of DNA replication initiation, DNA recombination, and DNA repair. kin17 has been studied as a potential molecular marker of breast cancer. This work reports the detection and localization of this protein in the murine melanoma cell line B16F10-Nex2 and in two derived subclones with different metastatic potential, B16-8HR and B16-10CR. Nuclear and chromatin-associated protein fractions were analyzed, and kin17 was detected in all fractions, with an elevated concentration observed in the chromatin-associated fraction of the clone with low metastatic potential, suggesting that the kin17 expression level could be a marker of melanoma.

  2. Macropinocytosis is the Entry Mechanism of Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    infection. Understanding how pathogens and toxins exploit or divert endocytosis pathways has advanced our understanding of membrane trafficking pathways, which benefits development of new therapeutical schemes and methods of drug delivery. We show here that Murine Leukemia Virus (A-MLV) pseudotyped with the......, or NIH-3T3 cells knocked-down for caveolin expression, was unaffected. Conversely, A-MLV infection of NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells was sensitive to amiloride analogues and actin-depolymerizing drugs that interfere with macropinocytosis. Further manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton through conditional...... amphotropic (expands the host range to many mammalian cells) envelope protein gains entry into host cells by macropinocytosis. Macropinosomes form as large, fluid-filled vacuoles (up to 10 μm) following collapse of cell surface protrusions and membrane scission. We use drugs or introduction of mutant proteins...

  3. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  4. Large-scale characterization of the murine cardiac proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Jake; Emili, Andrew; Gramolini, Anthony O

    2013-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are diseases of the heart that result in impaired cardiac muscle function. This dysfunction can progress to an inability to supply blood to the body. Cardiovascular diseases play a large role in overall global morbidity. Investigating the protein changes in the heart during disease can uncover pathophysiological mechanisms and potential therapeutic targets. Establishing a global protein expression "footprint" can facilitate more targeted studies of diseases of the heart.In the technical review presented here, we present methods to elucidate the heart's proteome through subfractionation of the cellular compartments to reduce sample complexity and improve detection of lower abundant proteins during multidimensional protein identification technology analysis. Analysis of the cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial subproteomes separately in order to characterize the murine cardiac proteome is advantageous by simplifying complex cardiac protein mixtures. In combination with bioinformatic analysis and genome correlation, large-scale protein changes can be identified at the cellular compartment level in this animal model. PMID:23606244

  5. Role of calcium in differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUDAN; NONGGAOHE; 等

    1993-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in the normal and abnomal cell metabolism.The role of calcium in the differentiation process of murine erythroleukemia cells(MELC)remains controversial.Here,based upon quantitative measurement of fluorescence in single cells,a method was developed to investigate the intracellular free calcium[Ca2+]i concentration and DNA contents simultaneously,by employing the fluorescent probe,fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester and DNA dye Hoechst 33342.During MELC differentiation.[Ca2+]i concentration incresed.We also demonstrated that calcium ionophore,A23187,enhanced the HMB-induced MELC differentiation,while verapamil,an inhibitor of calcuim uptake,slightly reduced differentiation.These results suggested that an increase in the [Ca2+]i level was an essential step in HMBA-induced MELC differentiation.

  6. Functional expression of murine multidrug resistance in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, G.; Vera, J.C.; Rosen, O.M. (Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Research Center, New York, NY (USA)); Yang, Chiaping Huang; Horwitz, S.B. (Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is associated with the overproduction of a plasma membrane glycoprotein, P glycoprotein. Here the authors report the functional expression of a member of the murine MDR family of proteins and show that Xenopus oocytes injected with RNA encoding the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein develop a MDR-like phenotype. Immunological analysis indicated that oocytes injected with the mdr1b RNA synthesized a protein with the size and immunological characteristics of the mouse mdr1b P glycoprotein. These oocytes exhibited a decreased accumulation of ({sup 3}H)vinblastine and showed an increased capacity to extrude the drug compared to control oocytes not expressing the P glycoprotein. In addition, competition experiments indicated that verapamil, vincristine, daunomycin, and quinidine, but not colchicine, can overcome the rapid drug efflux conferred by the expression of the mouse P glycoprotein.

  7. Statins improve the resolution of established murine venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessinger, Chase W; Kim, Jin Won; Henke, Peter K;

    2015-01-01

    significantly reduced stasis venous thrombus burden by 25% without affecting lipid levels, blood coagulation parameters, or blood cell counts. Statin-driven reductions in VT burden (thrombus mass for stasis thrombi, intravital microscopy thrombus area for non-stasis thrombi) compared similarly to the......-lipid-lowering agents with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties-in decreasing thrombus burden and decreasing vein wall injury, mediators of PTS, in established murine stasis and non-stasis chemical-induced venous thrombosis (N = 282 mice). Treatment of mice with daily atorvastatin or rosuvastatin...... therapeutic anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin. Blood from statin-treated mice showed significant reductions in platelet aggregation and clot stability. Statins additionally reduced thrombus plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue factor, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil...

  8. Hyperlipidemia affects multiscale structure and strength of murine femur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Maria-Grazia; Lutz, Andre; Du, Xia; Klimecky, Laureen; Kawas, Neal; Hourany, Talia; Jahng, Joelle; Chin, Jesse; Tintut, Yin; Nackenhors, Udo; Keyak, Joyce

    2014-07-18

    To improve bone strength prediction beyond limitations of assessment founded solely on the bone mineral component, we investigated the effect of hyperlipidemia, present in more than 40% of osteoporotic patients, on multiscale structure of murine bone. Our overarching purpose is to estimate bone strength accurately, to facilitate mitigating fracture morbidity and mortality in patients. Because (i) orientation of collagen type I affects, independently of degree of mineralization, cortical bone׳s micro-structural strength; and, (ii) hyperlipidemia affects collagen orientation and μCT volumetric tissue mineral density (vTMD) in murine cortical bone, we have constructed the first multiscale finite element (mFE), mouse-specific femoral model to study the effect of collagen orientation and vTMD on strength in Ldlr(-/-), a mouse model of hyperlipidemia, and its control wild type, on either high fat diet or normal diet. Each µCT scan-based mFE model included either element-specific elastic orthotropic properties calculated from collagen orientation and vTMD (collagen-density model) by experimentally validated formulation, or usual element-specific elastic isotropic material properties dependent on vTMD-only (density-only model). We found that collagen orientation, assessed by circularly polarized light and confocal microscopies, and vTMD, differed among groups and that microindentation results strongly correlate with elastic modulus of collagen-density models (r(2)=0.85, p=10(-5)). Collagen-density models yielded (1) larger strains, and therefore lower strength, in simulations of 3-point bending and physiological loading; and (2) higher correlation between mFE-predicted strength and 3-point bending experimental strength, than density-only models. This novel method supports ongoing translational research to achieve the as yet elusive goal of accurate bone strength prediction.

  9. Deep sequencing of the murine olfactory receptor neuron transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninthujah Kanageswaran

    Full Text Available The ability of animals to sense and differentiate among thousands of odorants relies on a large set of olfactory receptors (OR and a multitude of accessory proteins within the olfactory epithelium (OE. ORs and related signaling mechanisms have been the subject of intensive studies over the past years, but our knowledge regarding olfactory processing remains limited. The recent development of next generation sequencing (NGS techniques encouraged us to assess the transcriptome of the murine OE. We analyzed RNA from OEs of female and male adult mice and from fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS-sorted olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs obtained from transgenic OMP-GFP mice. The Illumina RNA-Seq protocol was utilized to generate up to 86 million reads per transcriptome. In OE samples, nearly all OR and trace amine-associated receptor (TAAR genes involved in the perception of volatile amines were detectably expressed. Other genes known to participate in olfactory signaling pathways were among the 200 genes with the highest expression levels in the OE. To identify OE-specific genes, we compared olfactory neuron expression profiles with RNA-Seq transcriptome data from different murine tissues. By analyzing different transcript classes, we detected the expression of non-olfactory GPCRs in ORNs and established an expression ranking for GPCRs detected in the OE. We also identified other previously undescribed membrane proteins as potential new players in olfaction. The quantitative and comprehensive transcriptome data provide a virtually complete catalogue of genes expressed in the OE and present a useful tool to uncover candidate genes involved in, for example, olfactory signaling, OR trafficking and recycling, and proliferation.

  10. Gene expression in IFN-g-activated murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critical for natural immunity and play a central role in specific acquired immunity. The IFN-gamma activation of macrophages derived from A/J or BALB/c mice yielded two different patterns of antiviral state in murine hepatitis virus 3 infection, which were related to a down-regulation of the main virus receptor. Using cDNA hybridization to evaluate mRNA accumulation in the cells, we were able to identify several genes that are differently up- or down-regulated by IFN-gamma in A/J (267 and 266 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated or BALB/c (297 and 58 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated mouse macrophages. Macrophages from mice with different genetic backgrounds behave differently at the molecular level and comparison of the patterns of non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated A/J or BALB/c mouse macrophages revealed, for instance, an up-regulation and a down-regulation of genes coding for biological functions such as enzymatic reactions, nucleic acid synthesis and transport, protein synthesis, transport and metabolism, cytoskeleton arrangement and extracellular matrix, phagocytosis, resistance and susceptibility to infection and tumors, inflammation, and cell differentiation or activation. The present data are reported in order to facilitate future correlation of proteomic/transcriptomic findings as well as of results obtained from a classical approach for the understanding of biological phenomena. The possible implication of the role of some of the gene products relevant to macrophage biology can now be further scrutinized. In this respect, a down-regulation of the main murine hepatitis virus 3 receptor gene was detected only in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages of resistant mice.

  11. Functional comparison of the binding of factor H short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6) to factor H binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis and the binding of factor H SCR 18 to 20 to Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lewis, Lisa A; Jarva, Hanna; Ram, Sanjay

    2009-05-01

    Both Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae recruit the alternative pathway complement inhibitory protein factor H (fH) to their surfaces to evade complement-dependent killing. Meningococci bind fH via fH binding protein (fHbp), a surface-exposed lipoprotein that is subdivided into three variant families based on one classification scheme. Chimeric proteins that comprise contiguous domains of fH fused to murine Fc were used to localize the binding site for all three fHbp variants on fH to short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6). As expected, fH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), which contains fH SCR 6, also bound to fHbp-expressing meningococci. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified histidine 337 and histidine 371 in SCR 6 as important for binding to fHbp. These findings may provide the molecular basis for recent observations that demonstrated human-specific fH binding to meningococci. Differences in the interactions of fHbp variants with SCR 6 were evident. Gonococci bind fH via their porin (Por) molecules (PorB.1A or PorB.1B); sialylation of lipooligosaccharide enhances fH binding. Both sialylated PorB.1B- and (unsialylated) PorB.1A-bearing gonococci bind fH through SCR 18 to 20; PorB.1A can also bind SCR 6, but only weakly, as evidenced by a low level of binding of FHL-1 relative to that of fH. Using isogenic strains expressing either meningococcal fHbp or gonococcal PorB.1B, we discovered that strains expressing gonococcal PorB.1B in the presence of sialylated lipooligosaccharide bound more fH, more effectively limited C3 deposition, and were more serum resistant than their isogenic counterparts expressing fHbp. Differences in fH binding to these two related pathogens may be important for modulating their individual responses to host immune attack.

  12. Analytic QCD Binding Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Fried, H M; Grandou, T; Sheu, Y -M

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies the analytic forms of a recent non-perturbative, manifestly gauge- and Lorentz-invariant description (of the exchange of all possible virtual gluons between quarks ($Q$) and/or anti-quarks ($\\bar{Q}$) in a quenched, eikonal approximation) to extract analytic forms for the binding potentials generating a model $Q$-$\\bar{Q}$ "pion", and a model $QQQ$ "nucleon". Other, more complicated $Q$, $\\bar{Q}$ contributions to such color-singlet states may also be identified analytically. An elementary minimization technique, relevant to the ground states of such bound systems, is adopted to approximate the solutions to a more proper, but far more complicated Schroedinger/Dirac equation; the existence of possible contributions to the pion and nucleon masses due to spin, angular momentum, and "deformation" degrees of freedom is noted but not pursued. Neglecting electromagnetic and weak interactions, this analysis illustrates how the one new parameter making its appearance in this exact, realistic formali...

  13. In vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a new triazole, voriconazole, in a murine candidiasis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, D; Marchillo, K; Stamstad, T; Conklin, R

    2003-10-01

    In vivo studies have described the pharmacodynamic (PD) characteristics of several triazoles. These investigations have demonstrated that the 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)/MIC ratio is the critical pharmacokinetic (PK)-PD parameter associated with treatment efficacy. Further analyses from these in vivo studies have demonstrated that a triazole free drug 24-h AUC/MIC of 20 to 25 is predictive of treatment success. We used a neutropenic murine model of disseminated Candida albicans infection to similarly characterize the PK-PD of the new triazole voriconazole. PK and PD parameters (percentage of time that the concentration remains above the MIC [T > MIC], AUC/MIC ratio, and peak level in serum/MIC ratio) were correlated with in vivo efficacy, as measured by the organism number in kidney cultures after 24 h of therapy. Voriconazole kinetics and protein binding were studied in infected neutropenic mice. Peak level/dose and AUC/dose values ranged from 0.1 to 0.2 and 0.1 to 0.7, respectively. The serum elimination half-life ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 h. The level of protein binding in mouse serum was 78%. Treatment efficacy with the four dosing intervals studied was similar, supporting the AUC/MIC ratio as the PK-PD parameter predictive of efficacy. Nonlinear regression analysis also suggested that the AUC/MIC ratio was strongly predictive of treatment outcomes (R(2) for AUC/MIC ratio = 82%, R(2) for peak level/MIC ratio = 63%, R(2) for T > MIC = 75%). Similar studies were conducted with nine additional C. albicans isolates with various voriconazole susceptibilities (MICs, 0.007 to 0.25 micro g/ml) to determine if a similar 24-h AUC/MIC ratio was associated with efficacy. The voriconazole free drug AUC/MIC ratios were similar for all of the organisms studied (range, 11 to 58; mean +/- standard deviation, 24 +/- 17 [P = 0.45]). These AUC/MIC ratios observed for free drug are similar to those observed for other triazoles in this model. PMID:14506026

  14. Quarkonium Binding and Entropic Force

    CERN Document Server

    Satz, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    A Q-Qbar bound state represents a balance between repulsive kinetic and attractive potential energy. In a hot quark-gluon plasma, the interaction potential experiences medium effects. Color screening modifies the attractive binding force between the quarks, while the increase of entropy with Q-Qbar separation gives rise to a growing repulsion. We study the role of these phenomena for in-medium Q-Qbar binding and dissociation. It is found that the relevant potential for Q-Qbar binding is the free energy F; with increasing Q-Qbar separation, further binding through the internal energy U is compensated by repulsive entropic effects.

  15. PEGylated cationic nanoemulsions can efficiently bind and transfect pIDUA in a mucopolysaccharidosis type I murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Michelle; Bruxel, Fernanda; Diel, Dirnete; de Carvalho, Talita Giacomet; Perez, Carlos Alberto; Magalhães-Paniago, Rogério; Malachias, Ângelo; Oliveira, Mônica Cristina; Matte, Ursula; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira

    2015-07-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal disease caused by alpha-L-iduronidase deficiency. This study proposed the use of cationic nanoemulsions as non-viral vectors for a plasmid (pIDUA) containing the gene that codes for alpha-L-iduronidase. Nanoemulsions composed of medium chain triglycerides (MCT)/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE)/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP)/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG) were prepared by high pressure homogenization. Formulations were prepared by the adsorption or encapsulation of preformed pIDUA-DOTAP complexes into the oil core of nanoemulsions at different charge ratios. pIDUA complexed was protected from enzymatic degradation by DNase I. The physicochemical characteristics of complexes in protein-containing medium were mainly influenced by the presence of DSPE-PEG. Bragg reflections corresponding to a lamellar organization were identified for blank formulations by energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, which could not be detected after pIDUA complexation. The intravenous injection of these formulations in MPS I knockout mice led to a significant increase in IDUA activity (fluorescence assay) and expression (RT-qPCR) in different organs, especially the lungs and liver. These findings were more significant for formulations prepared at higher charge ratios (+4/-), suggesting a correlation between charge ratio and transfection efficiency. The present preclinical results demonstrated that these nanocomplexes represent a potential therapeutic option for the treatment of MPS I. PMID:25886705

  16. Linoleic acid suppresses cholesterol efflux and ATP-binding cassette transporters in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), possibly associated with elevated plasma free fatty acid concentrations. Paradoxically, evidence suggests that unsaturated, compared to saturated fatty acids, suppress macrophage chole...

  17. Murine T cell activation is regulated by surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warford, Jordan, E-mail: jordan.warford@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Doucette, Carolyn D., E-mail: carolyn.doucette@dal.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Hoskin, David W., E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Easton, Alexander S., E-mail: alexander.easton@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Surfen is the first inhibitor of glycosaminoglycan function to be studied in murine T cells. •Surfen reduces T cell proliferation stimulated in vitro and in vivo. •Surfen reduces CD25 expression in T cells activated in vivo but not in vitro. •Surfen increases T cell proliferation when T cell receptor activation is bypassed. •Surfen’s effects are blocked by co-administration of heparin sulfate. -- Abstract: Surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide) binds to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and has been shown to influence their function, and the function of proteoglycans (complexes of GAGs linked to a core protein). T cells synthesize, secrete and express GAGs and proteoglycans which are involved in several aspects of T cell function. However, there are as yet no studies on the effect of GAG-binding agents such as surfen on T cell function. In this study, surfen was found to influence murine T cell activation. Doses between 2.5 and 20 μM produced a graduated reduction in the proliferation of T cells activated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibody-coated T cell expander beads. Surfen (20 mg/kg) was also administered to mice treated with anti-CD3 antibody to activate T cells in vivo. Lymphocytes from surfen-treated mice also showed reduced proliferation and lymph node cell counts were reduced. Surfen reduced labeling with a cell viability marker (7-ADD) but to a much lower extent than its effect on proliferation. Surfen also reduced CD25 (the α-subunit of the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor) expression with no effect on CD69 expression in T cells treated in vivo but not in vitro. When receptor activation was bypassed by treating T cells in vitro with phorbyl myristate acetate (10 ng/ml) and ionomycin (100 ng/ml), surfen treatment either increased proliferation (10 μM) or had no effect (2.5, 5 and 20 μM). In vitro treatment of T cells with surfen had no effect on IL-2 or interferon-γ synthesis and did not alter proliferation of the IL-2 dependent cell

  18. Study of MMLV RT- Binding with DNA using Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei WU; Ming-Hui HUANG; Jian-Long ZHAO; Meng-Su YANG

    2005-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance biosensor technique was used to study the binding of Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase without RNase H domain (MMLV RT-) with DNA in the absence and in the presence of inhibitors. Different DNA substrates, including single-stranded DNA (ssDNA),DNA template-primer (T-P) duplex and gapped DNA, were immobilized on the biosensor chip surface using streptavidin-biotin, and MMLV RT--DNA binding kinetics were analyzed by different models. MMLV RT-could bind with ssDNA and the binding was involved in conformation change. MMLV RT- binding DNA T-P duplex and gapped DNA could be analyzed using the simple 1:1 Langmuir model. The lack of RNase H domain reduced the affinity between MMLV RT- and T-P duplex. The effects of RT inhibitors, including efavirenz, nevirapine and quercetin, on the interaction between MMLV RT- and gapped DNA were analyzed according to recovered kinetics parameters. Efavirenz slightly interfered with the binding between RT and DNA and the affinity constant in the presence of the inhibitor (KA=1.21× 106 M-1) was lower than in the absence of the inhibitor (KA=4.61× 106 M-1). Nevirapine induced relatively tight binding between RT and DNA and the affinity constant in the presence of the inhibsitor (KA=l.47×107 M-1) was approximately three folds higher than without nevirapine, mainly due to rapid association and slow dissociation. Quercetin, a flavonoid originating from plant which has previously shown strong inhibition of the activity of RT, was found to have minimal effect on the RT-DNA binding.

  19. Infection of Murine Macrophages by Salmonella enterica Serovar Heidelberg Blocks Murine Norovirus Infectivity and Virus-induced Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar S Agnihothram

    Full Text Available Gastroenteritis caused by bacterial and viral pathogens constitutes a major public health threat in the United States accounting for 35% of hospitalizations. In particular, Salmonella enterica and noroviruses cause the majority of gastroenteritis infections, with emergence of sporadic outbreaks and incidence of increased infections. Although mechanisms underlying infections by these pathogens have been individually studied, little is known about the mechanisms regulating co-infection by these pathogens. In this study, we utilized RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cells to investigate the mechanisms governing co-infection with S. enterica serovar Heidelberg and murine norovirus (MNV. We demonstrate that infection of RAW 264.7 cells with S. enterica reduces the replication of MNV, in part by blocking virus entry early in the virus life cycle, and inducing antiviral cytokines later in the infection cycle. In particular, bacterial infection prior to, or during MNV infection affected virus entry, whereas MNV entry remained unaltered when the virus infection preceded bacterial invasion. This block in virus entry resulted in reduced virus replication, with the highest impact on replication observed during conditions of co-infection. In contrast, bacterial replication showed a threefold increase in MNV-infected cells, despite the presence of antibiotic in the medium. Most importantly, we present evidence that the infection of MNV-infected macrophages by S. enterica blocked MNV-induced apoptosis, despite allowing efficient virus replication. This apoptosis blockade was evidenced by reduction in DNA fragmentation and absence of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP, caspase 3 and caspase 9 cleavage events. Our study suggests a novel mechanism of pathogenesis whereby initial co-infection with these pathogens could result in prolonged infection by either of these pathogens or both together.

  20. Changes in 5-HT4 receptor and 5-HT transporter binding in olfactory bulbectomized and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie L; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Zueger, Maha;

    2010-01-01

    ]citalopram in two murine models of depression-related states, olfactory bulbectomy and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous (GR(+/-)) mice. The olfactory bulbectomy model is characterized by 5-HT system changes, while the GR(+/-) mice have a deficit in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system control....... The olfactory bulbectomized mice displayed increased activity in the open field test, a characteristic depression-like feature of this model. After bulbectomy, 5-HT(4) receptor binding was increased in the ventral hippocampus (12%) but unchanged in the dorsal hippocampus, frontal and caudal caudate putamen....... Among post hoc analyzed regions, there was a 14% decrease in 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the olfactory tubercles. The 5-HTT binding was unchanged in the hippocampus and caudate putamen of bulbectomized mice but post hoc analysis showed small decreases in lateral septum and lateral globus pallidus...

  1. Amaranthus leucocarpus lectin recognizes a moesin-like O-glycoprotein and costimulates murine CD3-activated CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas-Del Ángel, Maria; Legorreta-Herrera, Martha; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Garfias, Yonathan; Chávez, Raul; Zenteno, Edgar; Lascurain, Ricardo

    2015-09-01

    The Galβ1,3GalNAcα1,O-Ser/Thr specific lectin from Amaranthus leucocarpus (ALL) binds a ∼70 kDa glycoprotein on murine T cell surface. We show that in the absence of antigen presenting cells, murine CD4(+) T cells activated by an anti-CD3 antibody plus ALL enhanced cell proliferation similar to those cells activated via CD3/CD28 at 48 h of culture. Moreover, ALL induced the production of IL-4, IL-10, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta in CD3-activated cells. Proteomic assay using two-dimensional electrophoresis and far-Western blotting, ALL recognized two prominent proteins associated to the lipid raft microdomains in CD3/CD28-activated CD4(+) T cells. By mass spectrometry, the peptide fragments from ALL-recognized proteins showed sequences with 33% homology to matricin (gi|347839 NCBInr) and 41% identity to an unnamed protein related to moesin (gi|74186081 NCBInr). Confocal microscopy analysis of CD3/CD28-activated CD4(+) T cells confirmed that staining by ALL colocalized with anti-moesin FERM domain antibody along the plasma membrane and in the intercellular contact sites. Our findings suggest that a moesin-like O-glycoprotein is the ALL-recognized molecule in lipid rats, which induces costimulatory signals on CD4(+) T cells. PMID:26417436

  2. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract ameliorates intestinal inflammation through MAPKs/NF-κB signaling in a murine model of acute experimental colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicherla, Kanakaraju; Ketkar, Avanee; Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Sudhakar, Godi; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2016-07-13

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory and anti-colitis effects of Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract (RE) by using both in vitro LPS-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced experimental murine colitis and suggested the underlying possible mechanisms. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was performed to identify the major components present in the RE. The clinical signs, biochemistry, immunoblot, ELISA and histology in colon tissues were assessed in order to elucidate the beneficial effect of RE. RE suppressed the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production and the expressions of inflammatory proteins in macrophages. Administration of RE (50 and 100 mg kg(-1)) also significantly reduced the severity of DSS-induced murine colitis, as assessed by the clinical symptoms, colon length and histology. RE administration prevented the DSS-induced activation of p38, ERK and JNK MAPKs, attenuated IκBα phosphorylation and subsequent nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB (p65). RE also suppressed the COX-2 and iNOS expressions, decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines and the myeloperoxidase activity in the colon tissue. Histological observation revealed that RE administration alleviated mucosal damage and inflammatory cell infiltration induced by DSS in the colon tissue. Hence, RE could be used as a new preventive and therapeutic food ingredient or as a dietary supplement for inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27349640

  3. Flanking regulatory sequences of the locus encoding the murine GDNF receptor, c-ret, directs lac Z (beta-galactosidase) expression in developing somatosensory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, M; Waxman, S G; Wood, J N; Pachnis, V

    2001-11-01

    RET forms the catalytic component within the receptor complex that transmits signals from the GDNF family of neurotrophic factors. To study the mechanisms regulating the cell-type specific expression of this gene, we have cloned and characterised the murine c-ret locus. A cosmid contig comprising approximately 60 kb of the mouse genome encompassing the entire structural gene and flanking sequences have been isolated and the transcription initiation site identified and promoter characterised. The murine c-ret promoter lacks a TATA initiation motif and has GC enriched DNA sequences reminiscent of CpG islands. Analysis of transgenic mice lines bearing the Lac Z (beta-galactosidase) reporter gene under the control of 5' flanking sequences show modularity in the organisation of cis-regulatory domains within the locus. Cloned 5' flanking sequences comprise a distal regulatory domain directing Lac Z expression at the primitive streak, lateral mesoderm and facial ganglia and a proximal sensory neurones specific regulatory domain inducing Lac Z expression primarily within the developing somatosensory system. The spatial and temporal progression of transgene expression precisely recapitulates endogenous gene expression in developing sensory ganglia including its induction in postnatal Isolectin B4 binding nociceptive neurones. PMID:11747074

  4. Restriction of Human Polyomavirus BK Virus DNA Replication in Murine Cells and Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, C.; Liang, B.; Tikhanovich, I.; et al

    2009-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) causes persistent and asymptomatic infections in most humans and is the etiologic agent of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN) and other pathologies. Unfortunately, there are no animal models with which to study activation of BKV replication in the human kidney and the accompanying PVAN. Here we report studies of the restriction of BKV replication in murine cells and extracts and the cause(s) of this restriction. Upon infection of murine cells, BKV expressed large T anti...

  5. Alternate utilization of two regulatory domains within the Moloney murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat.

    OpenAIRE

    Graves, B J; Eisenberg, S P; Coen, D M; McKnight, S L

    1985-01-01

    The Moloney murine sarcoma virus long terminal repeat (LTR) harbors two distinct positive activators of transcription, namely, a distal signal and an enhancer. In this report we demonstrate that infection by herpes simplex virus (HSV) can markedly affect the utilization of these two Moloney murine sarcoma virus transcription signals. We investigated the HSV-mediated trans-acting effects with two goals in mind: first, to gain insight into LTR function, and second, to probe the mechanisms used ...

  6. Consistent deregulation of gene expression between human and murine MLL-rearrangement leukemias

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zejuan; Luo, Roger T.; Mi, Shuangli; Sun, Miao; Ping CHEN; Bao, Jingyue; Neilly, Mary Beth; Jayathilaka, Nimanthi; Johnson, Deborah S.; Wang, Lili; Lavau, Catherine; Zhang, Yanming; Tseng, Charles; Zhang, Xiuqing; Wang, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Important biological and pathological properties are often conserved across species. Although several mouse leukemia models have been well established, the genes deregulated in both human and murine leukemia cells have not been studied systematically. We performed a serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) analysis on gene expression in both human and murine MLL-ELL or MLL-ENL leukemia cells, and identified 88 genes that appeared to be significantly deregulated in both types of leukemia cell...

  7. Dependence on exogenous methionine of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziorowska, J; Pieńkowska, K; Tautt, J

    1980-01-01

    A comparative study was performed on methionine auxotrophy of rat sarcoma and murine leukemia cells taken directly from the organism and grown in culture in media lacking methionine or in which methionine was substituted by homocysteine. Methionine auxotrophy was observed in both kinds of cells. At low levels of methionine in the media containing homocysteine rat sarcoma cells showed an increase in growth. Addition of homocysteine to the media with low levels of methionine did not influence the survival of murine leukemia cells.

  8. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Madera; Anna Greenshields; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated...

  9. Repeated Bouts of Aerobic Exercise Enhance Regulatory T Cell Responses in a Murine Asthma Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lowder, Thomas; Dugger, Kari; Deshane, Jessy; Estell, Kim; Schwiebert, Lisa M

    2009-01-01

    We have reported previously that moderate intensity aerobic exercise training attenuates airway inflammation in a murine asthma model. Recent studies implicate regulatory T (Treg) cells in decreasing asthma-related airway inflammation; as such, the current study examined the effect of exercise on Treg cell function in a murine asthma model. Mice were sensitized with ovalbumin (OVA) prior to the start of exercise training at a moderate intensity 3× / week for 4 wks; exercise was performed as t...

  10. Sequencing and bacterial expression of a novel murine alpha interferon gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王焱; 王征宇; 周鸣南; 蔡菊娥; 孙兰英; 刘新垣; B.L.Daugherty; S.Pestka

    1997-01-01

    A murine new alpha interferon gene (mIFN-αB) was found by primer-based sequencing method in a murine genomic DNA library. The gene was cloned and its sequence was determined. It was expressed in Escherichia coli under the control of the PL promoter which resulted in antiviral activity on mouse L-cells. The sequence of mlFN-αB has been accepted by GENEBANK.

  11. Assessment of murine lung mechanics outcome measures: alignment with those made in asthmatics

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Julia K. L.; Kraft, Monica; Fisher, John T

    2013-01-01

    Although asthma is characterized as an inflammatory disease, recent reports highlight the importance of pulmonary physiology outcome measures to the clinical assessment of asthma control and risk of asthma exacerbation. Murine models of allergic inflammatory airway disease have been widely used to gain mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of asthma; however, several aspects of murine models could benefit from improvement. This review focuses on aligning lung mechanics measures made in mi...

  12. Comparison of histochemical methods for murine eosinophil detection in a RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model

    OpenAIRE

    Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Castilow, Elaine M.; Varga, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study of histochemical detection of eosinophils in fixed murine tissue is lacking. Five histochemical methods previously reported for eosinophil detection were quantitatively and qualitatively compared in an established murine RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model. Nonspecific neutrophil staining was evaluated in tissue sections of neutrophilic soft tissue lesions and bone marrow from respective animals. Eosinophils had granular red to orange-red cytoplasmic staining, dependin...

  13. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  14. Binding Energy and Enzymatic Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David E.; Raines, Ronald T.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the fundamental role that the favorable free energy of binding of the rate-determining transition state plays in catalysis. The principle that all of the catalytic factors discussed are realized by the use of this binding energy is reviewed. (CW)

  15. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...... receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns...

  16. Chromosomal mapping of the human and murine orphan receptors ERRalpha (ESRRA) and ERRbeta (ESRRB) and identification of a novel human ERRalpha-related pseudogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sladek, R; Beatty, B; Squire, J; Copeland, N G; Gilbert, D J; Jenkins, N A; Giguère, V

    1997-10-15

    The estrogen-related receptors ERRalpha and ERRbeta (formerly ERR1 and ERR2) form a subgroup of the steroid/thyroid/retinoid receptor family. ERRalpha and ERRbeta are homologous to the estrogen receptor and bind similar DNA targets; however, they are unable to activate gene transcription in response to estrogens. We have used interspecific backcross analysis to map the murine Estrra locus to chromosome 19 and Estrrb to mouse chromosome 12. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the human ESRRA gene to chromosome 11q12-q13 and the human ESRRB gene to chromosome 14q24.3. In addition, we report the isolation of a processed human ERRalpha pseudogene mapping to chromosome 13q12.1. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of a pseudogene associated with a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily.

  17. Cyclosporine Inhibits Apoptosis in Experimental Murine Xerophthalamia Conjunctival Epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jinghua; WANG Jingxin

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the inhibitory effect of topical cyclosporine (CsA) treatment on conjunctiva epithelial apoptosis in a murine model of xerophthalamia. Dry eye was induced in 3 groups of C57BL6 mice by subcutaneous injection of scopolamine (t.i.d) and exposure to an air draft and low-humidity environment for 16 h each day for 12 days. The dry eye control group received no topical treatment; another group received 1 μL of 0.05 % CsA topically (t.i.d, dry eye+CsA); and the third group received 1 μL of the castor oil vehicle of CsA topically (t.i.d, dry eye + vehicle). Normal mice were used as untreated controls. Twelve days later, the mice were killed, and their conjunctivas were excised. The number of the conjunctival goblet cells was counted in tissue sections stained with periodic acid Schiff (PAS) reagent. Their conjunctiva epithelium had been investigated by immuno-histochemical staining to detect the goblet cells and the expression of Caspase-3, Bax and bcl-2.Our results showed that compared with dry eye control and dry eye mice + vehicle groups, the number of conjunctival epithelial goblet cells was significantly greater in the untreated controls and dry eye mice receiving CsA (P <0.01 for both groups). There was no significant difference in the number of conjunctival epithelial goblet cells between the dry eye control and dry eye+vehicle group. It was also true of the number of conjunctival epithelial goblet cells when comparison was made between the normal group and the dry eye+CsA group. Expressions of Caspas-3 and Bax were increased and ex-pression of bcl-2 was decreased in conjunctival epithelial cells in dry eye control and dry eye mice+vehicle groups. There was a significant positive correlation between goblet cell number and the number of cells that expressed bcl-2, and a negative correlation between goblet cells and Caspase-3 and Bax expression. It is concluded that the topical use of CsA could significantly reduce conjuncti-val epithelial

  18. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  19. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Y Choi

    Full Text Available Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30 showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3 were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5 in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs

  20. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca2+ depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol

  1. A 100-kilodalton protein is associated with the murine interleukin 2 receptor: Biochemical evidence that p100 is distinct from the α and β chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two proteins that specifically bind the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2 (IL-2) have been identified previously on the surface of T cells; these proteins have been designated IL-2Rα and IL-2Rβ for the α and β chains of the IL-2 receptor (IL-2R). The association of these independent binding proteins with each other on the surface of activated T cells correlates with the generation of high-affinity binding sites. These high-affinity sites transduce the major mitogenic signal of IL-2, yet the mechanisms of association of the α and β chains with each other as well as signal transduction in response to IL-2 are unknown. Cotransfection experiments of cDNAs encoding the α and β chains in T cells and fibroblasts have suggested functional requirements for other T cell-specific factor(s). The authors now provide biochemical evidence for a distinct 100-kDa protein that interacts with the α or β chains, or both, on the surface of the IL-2-dependent cell line CTLL-2 as well as activated murine splenocytes. This same 100-kDa protein is capable of being chemically cross-linked to 125I-labeled IL-2

  2. Modulation of O-glycans and N-glycans on murine CD8 T cells fails to alter annexin V ligand induction by galectin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlow, Douglas A; Williams, Michael J; Ziltener, Hermann J

    2003-11-15

    Thymic negative selection and contraction of responding T cell oligoclones after infection represent important cell ablation processes required for maintaining T cell homeostasis. It has been proposed that galectin 1 contributes to these processes through interaction with lactosyl sequences principally on cell surface glycoproteins bearing core 2 (C2GnT1)-branched O-glycans. According to this model, specific T cell surface proteins cross-linked by galectin 1 induce signaling, ligand redistribution, and apoptosis in both immature thymocytes and activated T cells. The influence of lactosyl residues contained in branched O-glycans or complex N-glycans on galectin 1 binding and induction of annexin V ligand in murine CD8 T cells was assessed. Neither galectin binding nor galectin-induced expression of annexin V ligand was perturbed under conditions in which: 1) C2GnT1 activity was differentially induced by CD8 T cell activation/culture with IL-2 vs IL-4; 2) activated CD8(+) T cells lacked C2GnT1 expression; or 3) complex N-glycan formation was blocked by swainsonine. The maintenance of galectin 1 binding and induced annexin V expression under conditions that alter lactosamine abundance on O- or complex N-glycans suggest that galectin 1-mediated apoptosis is neither a simple function of fluctuating C2GnT1 activity nor a general C2GnT1-dependent mechanism underlying contraction of CD8 T cells subsequent to activation.

  3. Characterization of the methotrexate transport pathway in murine L1210 leukemia cells: Involvement of a membrane receptor and a cytosolic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioiodinated photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, Nα-(4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methyl-pteroyl)-Nε-(4-azidosalicylyl)-L-lysine (APA-ASA-Lys), was recently used to identify the plasma membrane derived binding protein involved in the transport of this folate antagonist into murine L1210 cells. The labeled protein has an apparent molecular weight of 46K-48K when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but no such labeling occurs in a methotrexate transport-defective cell line (L1210/R81). Labeling of the total cytosolic protein from disrupted cells, followed by electrophoresis and autoradiography, showed, among other proteins, a 21K band, corresponding to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), in both the parent and R81 cells and a 38K band only in the parent cells. However, when whole cells were UV irradiated at various times at 37 degree C following addition of radiolabeled APA-ASA-Lys, the 38K protein and DHFR were the only cytosolic proteins labeled in the parent cells, while the intact R81 cells showed no labeled cytosolic protein, since the photoprobe is not transported. Further, when the parent cells were treated with a pulse of radiolabeled photoprobe, followed by UV irradiation at different times at 37 degree C, the probe appeared sequentially on the 48K membrane protein and both the 38K cytosolic protein and dihydrofolate reductase. A 48K protein could be detected in both parent L1210 cells and the R81 cells on Western blots using antisera to a membrane folate binding protein from human placenta. These results suggest a vectorial transport of APA-ASA-Lys or methotrexate and reduced folate coenzymes into murine L1210 cells mediated by a 48K integral membrane protein and a 38K cytosolic or peripheral membrane protein. The 38K protein may help in the trafficking of reduced folate coenzymes, shuttling them to various cytosolic targets

  4. Contribution of Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase to the Intracellular Survival of Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus in Murine Macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Debaditya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed in order to carefully investigate the interaction of Staphylococcus aureus with murine macrophages and the contribution of catalase and superoxide dismutase in intracellular persistence of Staphylococcus aureus within murine macrophages during in vitro infection. We have reported that Staphylococcus aureus internalized by murine macrophages did not appear to be rapidly killed. Data indicating the contribution of a single catalase and superoxide dismutase in int...

  5. Cooperative binding: a multiple personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Johannes W R; Diambra, Luis; Habeck, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Cooperative binding has been described in many publications and has been related to or defined by several different properties of the binding behavior of the ligand to the target molecule. In addition to the commonly used Hill coefficient, other characteristics such as a sigmoidal shape of the overall titration curve in a linear plot, a change of ligand affinity of the other binding sites when a site of the target molecule becomes occupied, or complex roots of the binding polynomial have been used to define or to quantify cooperative binding. In this work, we analyze how the different properties are related in the most general model for binding curves based on the grand canonical partition function and present several examples which highlight differences between the cooperativity characterizing properties which are discussed. Our results mainly show that among the presented definitions there are not two which fully coincide. Moreover, this work poses the question whether it can make sense to distinguish between positive and negative cooperativity based on the macroscopic binding isotherm only. This article shall emphasize that scientists who investigate cooperative effects in biological systems could help avoiding misunderstandings by stating clearly which kind of cooperativity they discuss.

  6. Evaluation of murine models of permanent focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    席刚明; 汪华侨; 何国厚; 黄朝芬; 魏国耀

    2004-01-01

    Background To date murine models of permanent focal cerebral ischemia have not been well characterized. The purposes of this paper were to compare three different permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) models with or without craniectomy, and to identify an ideal mouse model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia.Methods Experiments were performed on 45 healthy adult male Kunming mice, weighing 28 to 42 g. The animals were randomly assigned to three groups (n=15 in every group) based on surgical procedure: MCAo via the external carotid artery (ECA), MCAo via the common carotid artery (CCA), and direct ligation of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Each day post-ischemia, the animals were scored using an eight-grade neurological function scale, and mortality was also recorded. Seven days post-ischemia, the brains were removed for lesion size determination using triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Correlation analysis of lesion volume and neurological score was carried out. Results Mortality in the group receiving direct MCA ligation was lowest among the three groups, and there was a significant difference between the direct MCA ligation group and the two intraluminal occlusion groups (P0.7, P<0.05), suggesting good reproducibility of lesion volume in the three groups, but the infarct volume was more constant in the direct MCA ligation group. Conclusion The direct ligation model of MCAo provides an optimal means of studying permanent focal cerebral ischemia, and is preferable to the models using intraluminal sutures.

  7. SERCA overexpression reduces hydroxyl radical injury in murine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranandani, Nitisha; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Janssen, Paul M L

    2006-12-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (*OH) are involved in the pathogenesis of ischemia-reperfusion injury and are observed in clinical situations, including acute heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Acute transient exposure to *OH causes an intracellular Ca(2+) overload and leads to impaired contractility. We investigated whether upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase function (SERCA) can attenuate *OH-induced dysfunction. Small, contracting right ventricular papillary muscles from wild-type (WT) SERCA1a-overexpressing (transgenic, TG) and SERCA2a heterogeneous knockout (HET) mice were directly exposed to *OH. This brief 2-min exposure led to a transient elevation of diastolic force (F(dia)) and depression of developed force (F(dev)). In WT mice, F(dia) increased to 485 +/- 49% and F(dev) decreased to 11 +/- 3%. In sharp contrast, in TG mice F(dia) increased only to 241 +/- 17%, whereas F(dev) decreased only to 51 +/- 5% (P group. The results indicate that SERCA overexpression can reduce the *OH-induced contractile dysfunction in murine myocardium, whereas a reduced SR Ca(2+)-ATPase activity aggravates this injury. Loss of pPLB levels at Ser16 likely amplifies the differences observed in injury response.

  8. Snake venoms components with antitumor activity in murine melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the constant advances in the treatment of cancer, this disease remains one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. So, the development of new treatment modalities is imperative. Snake venom causes a variety of biological effects because they constitute a complex mixture of substances as disintegrins, proteases (serine and metalo), phospholipases A2, L-amino acid oxidases and others. The goal of the present work is to evaluate a anti-tumor activity of some snake venoms fractions. There are several studies of components derived from snake venoms with this kind of activity. After fractionation of snake venoms of the families Viperidae and Elapidae, the fractions were assayed towards murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 and fibroblasts L929. The results showed that the fractions of venom of the snake Notechis ater niger had higher specificity and potential antitumor activity on B16-F10 cell line than the other studied venoms. Since the components of this venom are not explored yet coupled with the potential activity showed in this work, we decided to choose this venom to develop further studies. The cytotoxic fractions were evaluated to identify and characterize the components that showed antitumoral activity. Western blot assays and zymography suggests that these proteins do not belong to the class of metallo and serine proteinases. (author)

  9. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanuel eMuindi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages.

  10. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouffler, S.D.; Breckon, G.; Cox, R. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author).

  11. Cysteine protease activation and apoptosis in Murine norovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettayebi Khalil

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis. Because a suitable in vitro culture system for the human virus has yet to be developed, many basic details of the infection process are unknown. Murine norovirus (MNV serves as a model system for the study of norovirus infection. Recently it was shown that infection of RAW 264.7 cells involved a novel apoptotic pathway involving survivin. Results Using a different set of approaches, the up-regulation of caspases, DNA condensation/fragmentation, and membrane blebbing, all of which are markers of apoptosis, were confirmed. Live cell imaging and activity-based protein profiling showed that activation of caspase-like proteases occurred within two hours of infection, followed by morphological changes to the cells. MNV infection in the presence of caspase inhibitors proceeded via a distinct pathway of rapid cellular necrosis and reduced viral production. Affinity purification of activity-based protein profiling targets and identification by peptide mass fingerprinting showed that the cysteine protease cathepsin B was activated early in infection, establishing this protein as an upstream activator of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conclusion This work adds cathepsin B to the noncanonical programmed cell death induced by MNV, and provides data suggesting that the virus may induce apoptosis to expand the window of time for viral replication. This work also highlights the significant power of activity-based protein profiling in the study of viral pathogenesis.

  12. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism whereby small resting (high buoyant density) murine B cells are induced to express interleukin-2 receptors (IL-2R) and to respond to IL-2 was addressed by staining with anti-IL-2R alpha and -IL-2R beta monoclonal antibodies (mAb), and using receptor-specific cDNA probes. Resting B...... staining and mRNA were induced by the combination of LPS plus IL-5. LPS+IL-5-treated B cells responded to IL-2 by Ig secretion. This indicates that B cells regulate their responsiveness to IL-2 similarly to T cells, via the combined level of expression of IL-2R beta and IL-2R alpha. The synergy between IL...... cells expressed undetectable levels of both IL-2R alpha and beta chains on their surface and did not respond to IL-2, even at supra-physiological concentrations. Sepharose-coupled, but not streptavidin-cross-linked, plastic-adsorbed or soluble, anti-mu up-regulated the expression of IL-2R alpha and beta...

  13. The murine cardiac 26S proteasome: an organelle awaiting exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Aldrin V; Zong, Chenggong; Edmondson, Ricky D; Berhane, Beniam T; Wang, Guang-Wu; Le, Steven; Young, Glen; Zhang, Jun; Vondriska, Thomas M; Whitelegge, Julian P; Jones, Richard C; Joshua, Irving G; Thyparambil, Sheeno; Pantaleon, Dawn; Qiao, Joe; Loo, Joseph; Ping, Peipei

    2005-06-01

    Multiprotein complexes have been increasingly recognized as essential functional units for a variety of cellular processes, including the protein degradation system. Selective degradation of proteins in eukaryotes is primarily conducted by the ubiquitin proteasome system. The current knowledge base, pertaining to the proteasome complexes in mammalian cells, relies largely upon information gained in the yeast system, where the 26S proteasome is hypothesized to contain a 20S multiprotein core complex and one or two 19S regulatory complexes. To date, the molecular structure of the proteasome system, the proteomic composition of the entire 26S multiprotein complexes, and the specific designated function of individual components within this essential protein degradation system in the heart remain virtually unknown. A functional proteomic approach, employing multidimensional chromatography purification combined with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and protein chemistry, was utilized to explore the murine cardiac 26S proteasome system. This article presents an overview on the subject of protein degradation in mammalian cells. In addition, this review shares the limited information that has been garnered thus far pertaining to the molecular composition, function, and regulation of this important organelle in the cardiac cells. PMID:16093497

  14. Gene expression of lactobacilli in murine forestomach biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Clarissa; Tveit, Alexander Tøsdal; Schleper, Christa; Urich, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Lactobacilli populate the gastro-intestinal tract of vertebrates, and are used in food fermentations and as probiotics. Lactobacilli are also major constituents of stable biofilms in the forestomach of rodents. In order to investigate the lifestyle of these biofilm lactobacilli in C57BL/6 mice, we applied metatranscriptomics to analyse gene expression (assessed by mRNA) and community composition (assessed by rRNA). Lactobacillales were the major biofilm inhabitants (62-82% of rRNA reads), followed by Clostridiales (8-31% of rRNA reads). To identify mRNA transcripts specific for the forestomach, we compared forestomach and hindgut metatranscriptomes. Gene expression of the biofilm microbiota was characterized by high abundance of transcripts related to glucose and maltose utilization, peptide degradation, and amino acid transport, indicating their major catabolic and anabolic pathways. The microbiota transcribed genes encoding pathways enhancing oxidative stress (glutathione synthesis) and acid tolerance. Various pathways, including metabolite formation (urea degradation, arginine pathway, γ-aminobutyrate) and cell wall modification (DltA, cyclopropane-fatty-acyl-phospholipid synthase), contributed to acid tolerance, as judged from the transcript profile. In addition, the biofilm microbiota expressed numerous genes encoding extracellular proteins involved in adhesion and/or biofilm formation (e.g. MucBP, glycosyl hydrolase families 68 and 70). This study shed light on the lifestyle and specific adaptations of lactobacilli in the murine forestomach that might also be relevant for lactobacilli biofilms in other vertebrates, including humans.

  15. Immunodetection of osteoadherin in murine tooth extracellular matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couble, Marie-Lise; Bleicher, Françoise; Farges, Jean-Christophe; Peyrol, Simone; Lucchini, Marion; Magloire, Henry; Staquet, Marie-Jeanne

    2004-01-01

    An antiserum was generated from synthetic peptides highly conserved between different mammalian species to immunolocalise the small leucine-rich proteoglycan osteoadherin (OSAD) in murine teeth. In 19-day-old embryos of rats and mice, a positive staining was found in incisor predentin and alveolar bone surrounding developing incisors and molars. In newborns, OSAD was detected at the tip of the first molar cusp where it accumulated in predentin concomitantly with odontoblast differentiation. In 2-day-old rats and mice, in the first molar, immunostaining revealed positive predentin, enamel matrix close to the apical pole of ameloblasts and a strong signal in dentin. At this stage, OSAD was detected in predentin in the second molar. Ultrastructural immunocytochemistry showed gold particles associated with collagen fibres in predentin and in foci at the dentin mineralisation front. Gold particles were also detected near the secretory pole of ameloblasts where enamel crystallites elongate. No staining was detected in pulp tissue and dental follicle. Restriction of OSAD expression to the extracellular matrix of bone, dentin and enamel suggests a role of this proteoglycan in the organisation of mineralised tissues. PMID:14673660

  16. Dystrophic spinal deformities in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven D Rhodes

    Full Text Available Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1, the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36-60% of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD. While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population.

  17. Dystrophic spinal deformities in a neurofibromatosis type 1 murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Steven D; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Dalong; Yang, Hao; Chen, Shi; Wu, Xiaohua; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Xianlin; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Bergner, Amanda L; Stevenson, David A; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and significant morbidity of spinal anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), the pathogenesis of these defects remains largely unknown. Here, we present two murine models: Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col.2.3Cre mice, which recapitulate spinal deformities seen in the human disease. Dynamic histomorphometry and microtomographic studies show recalcitrant bone remodeling and distorted bone microarchitecture within the vertebral spine of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice, with analogous histological features present in a human patient with dystrophic scoliosis. Intriguingly, 36-60% of Nf1flox/-;PeriCre and Nf1flox/-;Col2.3Cre mice exhibit segmental vertebral fusion anomalies with boney obliteration of the intervertebral disc (IVD). While analogous findings have not yet been reported in the NF1 patient population, we herein present two case reports of IVD defects and interarticular vertebral fusion in patients with NF1. Collectively, these data provide novel insights regarding the pathophysiology of dystrophic spinal anomalies in NF1, and provide impetus for future radiographic analyses of larger patient cohorts to determine whether IVD and vertebral fusion defects may have been previously overlooked or underreported in the NF1 patient population. PMID:25786243

  18. Effects of sodium fluoride on immune response in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Beatriz; Vázquez, Marta; Rocha, René Antonio; Devesa, Vicenta; Vélez, Dinoraz

    2016-08-01

    Excessive fluoride intake may be harmful for health, producing dental and skeletal fluorosis, and effects upon neurobehavioral development. Studies in animals have revealed effects upon the gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems. Some of the disorders may be a consequence of immune system alterations. In this study, an in vitro evaluation is made of fluoride immunotoxicity using the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage line over a broad range of concentrations (2.5-75mg/L). The results show that the highest fluoride concentrations used (50-75mg/L) reduce the macrophage population in part as a consequence of the generation of reactive oxygen and/or nitrogen species and consequent redox imbalance, which in turn is accompanied by lipid peroxidation. A decrease in the expression of the antiinflammatory cytokine Il10 is observed from the lowest concentrations (5mg/L). High concentrations (50mg/L) in turn produce a significant increase in the proinflammatory cytokines Il6 and Mip2 from 4h of exposure. In addition, cell phagocytic capacity is seen to decrease at concentrations of ≥20mg/L. These data indicate that fluoride, at high concentrations, may affect macrophages and thus immune system function - particularly with regard to the inflammation autoregulatory processes, in which macrophages play a key role. PMID:26965474

  19. Cinnarizine and flunarizine as radiation sensitisers in two murine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, P. J.; Hirst, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the calcium antagonists, cinnarizine and flunarizine on the radiation sensitivity of two murine tumours, RIF-1 and SCCVII/St was investigated. Initial experiments giving the compounds at 50 mg kg-1 i.p. indicated that cinnarizine had no effect on cell survival after 20 Gy of X-rays in the RIF-1 sarcoma and only a small effect in the SCCVII/St carcinoma. However, flunarizine produced a small radiosensitisation in the RIF-1 tumour and a substantial sensitisation in the SCCVII/St tumour. Subsequent experiments in the SCCVII/St tumour indicated that the optimal radiosensitising dose of flunarizine was approximately 5 mg kg-1, although some sensitisation was apparent throughout the range of 0.05-500 mg kg-1. Flunarizine produced a parallel shift in the X-ray dose response curve, equivalent to a 5-fold reduction in hypoxic fraction. In a normal tissue study, 5 mg kg-1 flunarizine did not enhance the reduction in white cell counts produced by X-ray doses of 2-8 Gy. These data suggest that flunarizine may have some potential use as a radiosensitiser. PMID:3224079

  20. Cinnarizine and flunarizine as radiation sensitisers in two murine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, P.J.; Hirst, D.G.

    1988-12-01

    The effect of calcium antagonists, cinnarizine and flunarizine on the radiation sensitivity of two murine tumours, RIF-1 and SCCVII/St was investigated. Initial experiments giving the compounds at 50 mg kg/sup -1/ i.p. indicated cinnarizine had no effect on cell survival after 20 Gy of X-rays in the RIF-1 sarcoma and only a small effect in the SCCVII/St carcinoma. Flunarizine produced a small radiosensitisation in the RIF-1 tumour and a substantial sensitisation in the SCCVII/St tumour. Subsequent experiments in the SCCVII/St tumour indicated the optimal radiosensitising dose of flurnarizine was /similar to/5 mg kg/sup -1/, although some sensitisation was apparent throughout the range of 0.05-500 mg kg/sup -1/. Flunarizine produced a parallel shift in the X-ray dose response curve, equivalent to a 5-fold reduction in hypoxic fraction. In a normal tissue study, 5 mg kg/sup -1/ flunarizine did not enhance reduction in white cell counts produced by X-ray doses of 2-8 Gy.

  1. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations without artificial overexpression of inherited Alzheimer's disease genes. PMID:25991605

  2. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  3. Saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis in murine bone marrow cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballé-Serrano, J; Cvikl, B; Bosshardt, D D; Buser, D; Lussi, A; Gruber, R

    2015-01-01

    Saliva can reach mineralized surfaces in the oral cavity; however, the relationship between saliva and bone resorption is unclear. Herein, we examined whether saliva affects the process of osteoclastogenesis in vitro. We used murine bone marrow cultures to study osteoclast formation. The addition of fresh sterile saliva eliminated the formation of multinucleated cells that stained positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). In line with the histochemical staining, saliva substantially reduced gene expression of cathepsin K, calcitonin receptor, and TRAP. Addition of saliva led to considerably decreased gene expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK) and, to a lesser extent, that of c-fms. The respective master regulators of osteoclastogenesis (c-fos and NFATc1) and the downstream cell fusion genes (DC-STAMP and Atp6v0d2) showed decreased expression after the addition of saliva. Among the costimulatory molecules for osteoclastogenesis, only OSCAR showed decreased expression. In contrast, CD40, CD80, and CD86-all costimulatory molecules of phagocytic cells-were increasingly expressed with saliva. The phagocytic capacity of the cells was confirmed by latex bead ingestion. Based on these in vitro results, it can be concluded that saliva suppresses osteoclastogenesis and leads to the development of a phagocytic cell phenotype.

  4. Amphotropic murine leukemia viruses induce spongiform encephalomyelopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münk, Carsten; Löhler, Jürgen; Prassolov, Vladimir; Just, Ursula; Stockschläder, Marcus; Stocking, Carol

    1997-01-01

    Recombinants of amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) have found widespread use in retroviral vector systems due to their ability to efficiently and stably infect cells of several different species, including human. Previous work has shown that replication-competent recombinants containing the amphotropic env gene, encoding the major SU envelope glycoprotein that determines host tropism, induce lymphomas in vivo. We show here that these viruses also induce a spongiform encephalomyelopathy in mice inoculated perinatally. This fatal central nervous system disease is characterized by noninflammatory spongiform lesions of nerve and glial cells and their processes, and is associated with moderate astro- and microgliosis. The first clinical symptoms are ataxia, tremor, and spasticity, progressing to complete tetraparesis and incontinence, and finally death of the animal. Sequences within the amphotropic env gene are necessary for disease induction. Coinfection of A-MuLV recombinants with nonneuropathogenic ecotropic or polytropic MuLV drastically increases the incidence, degree, and distribution of the neurodegenerative disorder. The consequence of these results in view of the use of A-MuLV recombinants in the clinic is discussed. PMID:9159161

  5. A Molecular Model for Cocaine Binding by the Immunotherapeutic Human/Mouse Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody 2E2

    OpenAIRE

    Lape, Michael; Paula, Stefan; Ball, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy by cocaine-binding monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of cocaine addiction. The human (γ1 heavy chain)/murine (λ light chain) chimeric mAb 2E2 has excellent affinity and specificity for cocaine and recent animal studies have demonstrated 2E2’s ability in vivo to reduce cocaine levels in the brain as well as alter cocaine self-administration behavior in rats. In this study, we used mAb 2E2 amino acid sequence information to create a...

  6. Evidence of a Role for Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein (IGFBP)-3 in Metabolic Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, P. M.; Mehta, H. H.; Hwang, D.; Roos, K P; Hevener, A. L.; Lee, K.W.

    2010-01-01

    IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 is a metabolic regulator that has been shown to inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in murine models. This finding contrasts with epidemiological evidence of decreased serum IGFBP-3 in patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of IGFBP-3 in metabolism. Four-week-old male IGFBP-3−/− and control mice were subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk. IGFBP-3−/− mice were heavier before the initiation of HFD and at the en...

  7. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [3]tetrahydrotrazodone ([3] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [3]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [3] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [3]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  8. Contrast-enhanced X-ray detection of breast microcalcifications in a murine model using targeted gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2014-07-22

    Microcalcifications are deposits of hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral within breast tissue and the most common abnormality detected by mammography when screening for breast cancer due to exhibiting greater X-ray attenuation than the surrounding tissue. However, the detection of microcalcifications is limited by the sensitivity and specificity of mammography. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate in vivo targeted delivery of bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles (BP-Au NPs) for contrast-enhanced detection of microcalcifications using computed tomography (CT). A murine model was developed for precise, a priori control over the level of microcalcification burden by injecting varying concentrations of HA crystals in a Matrigel carrier into mammary glands. The measured X-ray attenuation of microcalcifications containing varying HA concentrations demonstrated that the model was reproducible and able to recapitulate varying levels of microcalcification burden, including levels undetectable by CT in the absence of contrast enhancement. After intramammary delivery, BP-Au NPs provided enhanced contrast for the detection of microcalcifications that were otherwise below the CT detection limit. BP-Au NPs targeted microcalcifications due to specific binding to HA crystal surfaces, resulting in contrast between the HA microcalcification site and surrounding tissue which was visibly apparent (∼30-135 HU) within 2 days after delivery. Therefore, targeted BP-Au NPs enabled improved sensitivity and specificity for the detection of microcalcifications. PMID:24992365

  9. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS. PMID:25168779

  11. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces virus immune defence genes in murine dendritic cells by a Toll-like receptor-2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Gudrun Margarethe; Rasmussen, Simon; Hjerrild Zeuthen, L.;

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacilli are probiotics that, among other health-promoting effects, have been ascribed immunostimulating and virus-preventive properties. Certain Lactobacillus spp. have been shown to possess strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) -inducing properties. As IL-12 production depends on the up-regulation ......Lactobacilli are probiotics that, among other health-promoting effects, have been ascribed immunostimulating and virus-preventive properties. Certain Lactobacillus spp. have been shown to possess strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) -inducing properties. As IL-12 production depends on the up......-regulation of type I interferons (IFNs), we hypothesized that the strong IL-12-inducing capacity of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is caused by an up-regulation of IFN-beta, which subsequently induces IL-12 and the double-stranded RNA binding Toll-like receptor-3...... (TLR-3). The expression of the genes encoding IFN-beta, TLR-3, IL-12 and IL-10 in DCs upon stimulation with L. acidophilus NCFM was determined. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM induced a much stronger expression of Ifn-beta, Il-12 and Il-10 compared with the synthetic double-stranded RNA ligand Poly I...

  12. A Novel Murine Anti-Lactoferrin Monoclonal Antibody Activates Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes through Membrane-Bound Lactoferrin and TLR4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Min Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble lactoferrin (LTF is a versatile molecule that not only regulates the iron homeostasis, but also harbors direct microbicidal and immunomodulating abilities in mammalian body fluids. In contrast, little is known about the function of membrane-bound LTF (mbLTF, although its expression on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (huPMNs has been reported for decades. Given that LTF/anti-LTF antibodies represent a potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in patients with immune disorders, we wished, in the present study, to generate a novel human LTF- (huLTF- specific mAb suitable for detailed analyses on the expression and function of mbLTF as well as for deciphering the underlying mechanisms. By using the traditional hybridoma cell fusion technology, we obtained a murine IgG1 (kappa mAb, M-860, against huLTF. M-860 recognizes a conformational epitope of huLTF as it binds to natural, but not denatured, huLTF in ELISA. Moreover, M-860 detects mbLTF by FACS and captures endogenous huLTF in total cell lysates of huPMNs. Functionally, M-860 induces the activation of huPMNs partially through TLR4 but independently of phagocytosis. M-860 is thus a powerful tool to analyze the expression and function of human mbLTF, which will further our understanding of the roles of LTF in health and disease.

  13. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício C. Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate. HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2 genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  14. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G) and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Fabrício C.; Mendes-Junior, Celso T.; Silva, Maria C.; Tristão, Fabrine S. M.; Dellalibera-Joviliano, Renata; Soares, Edson G.; Menezes, Jean G.; Schmidt, André; Dantas, Roberto O.; Marin-Neto, José A.; Silva, João S.; Donadi, Eduardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding) and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus) in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate). HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2) genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection. PMID:25688175

  15. The POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso (ZBTB33 induces inflammation and progenitor cell differentiation in the murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali Chaudhary

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, several studies have implicated the POZ-ZF protein Kaiso in both developmental and tumorigenic processes. However, most of the information regarding Kaiso's function to date has been gleaned from studies in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian cultured cells. To examine Kaiso's role in a relevant, mammalian organ-specific context, we generated and characterized a Kaiso transgenic mouse expressing a murine Kaiso transgene under the control of the intestine-specific villin promoter. Kaiso transgenic mice were viable and fertile but pathological examination of the small intestine revealed distinct morphological changes. Kaiso transgenics (Kaiso(Tg/+ exhibited a crypt expansion phenotype that was accompanied by increased differentiation of epithelial progenitor cells into secretory cell lineages; this was evidenced by increased cell populations expressing Goblet, Paneth and enteroendocrine markers. Paradoxically however, enhanced differentiation in Kaiso(Tg/+ was accompanied by reduced proliferation, a phenotype reminiscent of Notch inhibition. Indeed, expression of the Notch signalling target HES-1 was decreased in Kaiso(Tg/+ animals. Finally, our Kaiso transgenics exhibited several hallmarks of inflammation, including increased neutrophil infiltration and activation, villi fusion and crypt hyperplasia. Interestingly, the Kaiso binding partner and emerging anti-inflammatory mediator p120(ctn is recruited to the nucleus in Kaiso(Tg/+ mice intestinal cells suggesting that Kaiso may elicit inflammation by antagonizing p120(ctn function.

  16. Genome-wide analysis of murine renal distal convoluted tubular cells for the target genes of mineralocorticoid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Kohei [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiki, Katsunori; Shirahige, Katsuhiko [Research Center for Epigenetic Disease, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E. [Endocrine Section, G.V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center, MS (United States); Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, MS (United States); Fujita, Toshiro [Division of Clinical Epigenetics, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nangaku, Masaomi [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nagase, Miki, E-mail: mnagase-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Anatomy and Life Structure, School of Medicine Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • We define a target gene of MR as that with MR-binding to the adjacent region of DNA. • We use ChIP-seq analysis in combination with microarray. • We, for the first time, explore the genome-wide binding profile of MR. • We reveal 5 genes as the direct target genes of MR in the renal epithelial cell-line. - Abstract: Background and objective: Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of nuclear receptor family proteins and contributes to fluid homeostasis in the kidney. Although aldosterone-MR pathway induces several gene expressions in the kidney, it is often unclear whether the gene expressions are accompanied by direct regulations of MR through its binding to the regulatory region of each gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the direct target genes of MR in a murine distal convoluted tubular epithelial cell-line (mDCT). Methods: We analyzed the DNA samples of mDCT cells overexpressing 3xFLAG-hMR after treatment with 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 1 h by chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep-sequence (ChIP-seq) and mRNA of the cell-line with treatment of 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 3 h by microarray. Results: 3xFLAG-hMR overexpressed in mDCT cells accumulated in the nucleus in response to 10{sup −9} M aldosterone. Twenty-five genes were indicated as the candidate target genes of MR by ChIP-seq and microarray analyses. Five genes, Sgk1, Fkbp5, Rasl12, Tns1 and Tsc22d3 (Gilz), were validated as the direct target genes of MR by quantitative RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR. MR binding regions adjacent to Ctgf and Serpine1 were also validated. Conclusions: We, for the first time, captured the genome-wide distribution of MR in mDCT cells and, furthermore, identified five MR target genes in the cell-line. These results will contribute to further studies on the mechanisms of kidney diseases.

  17. Genome-wide analysis of murine renal distal convoluted tubular cells for the target genes of mineralocorticoid receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We define a target gene of MR as that with MR-binding to the adjacent region of DNA. • We use ChIP-seq analysis in combination with microarray. • We, for the first time, explore the genome-wide binding profile of MR. • We reveal 5 genes as the direct target genes of MR in the renal epithelial cell-line. - Abstract: Background and objective: Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of nuclear receptor family proteins and contributes to fluid homeostasis in the kidney. Although aldosterone-MR pathway induces several gene expressions in the kidney, it is often unclear whether the gene expressions are accompanied by direct regulations of MR through its binding to the regulatory region of each gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the direct target genes of MR in a murine distal convoluted tubular epithelial cell-line (mDCT). Methods: We analyzed the DNA samples of mDCT cells overexpressing 3xFLAG-hMR after treatment with 10−7 M aldosterone for 1 h by chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep-sequence (ChIP-seq) and mRNA of the cell-line with treatment of 10−7 M aldosterone for 3 h by microarray. Results: 3xFLAG-hMR overexpressed in mDCT cells accumulated in the nucleus in response to 10−9 M aldosterone. Twenty-five genes were indicated as the candidate target genes of MR by ChIP-seq and microarray analyses. Five genes, Sgk1, Fkbp5, Rasl12, Tns1 and Tsc22d3 (Gilz), were validated as the direct target genes of MR by quantitative RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR. MR binding regions adjacent to Ctgf and Serpine1 were also validated. Conclusions: We, for the first time, captured the genome-wide distribution of MR in mDCT cells and, furthermore, identified five MR target genes in the cell-line. These results will contribute to further studies on the mechanisms of kidney diseases

  18. IsdB-dependent hemoglobin binding is required for acquisition of heme by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishchany, Gleb; Sheldon, Jessica R; Dickson, Claire F; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D; Gell, David A; Heinrichs, David E; Skaar, Eric P

    2014-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality. As with most bacteria, S. aureus requires iron to cause disease, and it can acquire iron from host hemoglobin. The current model for staphylococcal hemoglobin-iron acquisition proposes that S. aureus binds hemoglobin through the surface-exposed hemoglobin receptor IsdB. IsdB removes heme from bound hemoglobin and transfers this cofactor to other proteins of the Isd system, which import and degrade heme to release iron in the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that the individual components of the Isd system are required for growth on low nanomolar concentrations of hemoglobin as a sole source of iron. An in-depth study of hemoglobin binding by IsdB revealed key residues that are required for hemoglobin binding. Further, we show that these residues are necessary for heme extraction from hemoglobin and growth on hemoglobin as a sole iron source. These processes are found to contribute to the pathogenicity of S. aureus in a murine model of infection. Together these results build on the model for Isd-mediated hemoglobin binding and heme-iron acquisition during the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection.

  19. Molecular docking characterizes substrate-binding sites and efflux modulation mechanisms within P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Maria-José U; dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-22

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best characterized ABC transporters, often involved in the multidrug-resistance phenotype overexpressed by several cancer cell lines. Experimental studies contributed to important knowledge concerning substrate polyspecificity, efflux mechanism, and drug-binding sites. This information is, however, scattered through different perspectives, not existing a unifying model for the knowledge available for this transporter. Using a previously refined structure of murine Pgp, three putative drug-binding sites were hereby characterized by means of molecular docking. The modulator site (M-site) is characterized by cross interactions between both Pgp halves herein defined for the first time, having an important role in impairing conformational changes leading to substrate efflux. Two other binding sites, located next to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer, were identified as the substrate-binding H and R sites by matching docking and experimental results. A new classification model with the ability to discriminate substrates from modulators is also proposed, integrating a vast number of theoretical and experimental data. PMID:23802684

  20. Polyomavirus large T antigen binds symmetrical repeats at the viral origin in an asymmetrical manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Celia; Jiang, Tao; Banerjee, Pubali; Meinke, Gretchen; D'Abramo, Claudia M; Schaffhausen, Brian; Bohm, Andrew

    2013-12-01

    Polyomaviruses have repeating sequences at their origins of replication that bind the origin-binding domain of virus-encoded large T antigen. In murine polyomavirus, the central region of the origin contains four copies (P1 to P4) of the sequence G(A/G)GGC. They are arranged as a pair of inverted repeats with a 2-bp overlap between the repeats at the center. In contrast to simian virus 40 (SV40), where the repeats are nonoverlapping and all four repeats can be simultaneously occupied, the crystal structure of the four central murine polyomavirus sequence repeats in complex with the polyomavirus origin-binding domain reveals that only three of the four repeats (P1, P2, and P4) are occupied. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirms that the stoichiometry is the same in solution as in the crystal structure. Consistent with these results, mutation of the third repeat has little effect on DNA replication in vivo. Thus, the apparent 2-fold symmetry within the DNA repeats is not carried over to the protein-DNA complex. Flanking sequences, such as the AT-rich region, are known to be important for DNA replication. When the orientation of the central region was reversed with respect to these flanking regions, the origin was still able to replicate and the P3 sequence (now located at the P2 position with respect to the flanking regions) was again dispensable. This highlights the critical importance of the precise sequence of the region containing the pentamers in replication.

  1. Binding Activity Difference of Anti-CD20 scFv-Fc Fusion Protein Derived from Variable Domain Exchange

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shusheng Geng; Beifen Shen; Jiannan Feng; Yan Li; Yingxun Sun; Xin Gu; Ying Huang; Yugang Wang; Xianjiang Kang; Hong Chang

    2006-01-01

    Two novel engineered antibody fragments binding to antigen CD20 were generated by fusing a murine IgM-type anti-CD20 single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) to the human IgG1 CH2 (I.e., Cγ2) and CH3 (I.e., Cγ3) domains with the human IgG1 hinge (I.e. Hγ). Given the relationship between structure and function of protein, the 3-D structures of the two engineered antibody fragments were modeled using computer-aided homology modeling method.Furthermore, the relationship between 3-D conformation and their binding activity was evaluated theoretically.Due to the change of active pocket formed by CDRs, the HL23 (VH-Linker-VL-Hγ-Cγ2-Cγ3) remained its activity because of its preserved conformation, while the binding activity of the LH23 (VL-Linker-VH-Hγ-Cγ2-Cγ3) was impaired severely. Experimental studies by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that HL23 possessed significantly superior binding activity to CD20-expressing target cells than LH23. That is to say, the order of variable regions could influence the binding activity of the fusion protein to CD20+ cell lines, which was in accordance with the theoretical results. The study highlights the potential relationship between the antibody binding activity and their 3-D conformation, which appears to be worthwhile in providing direction for future antibody design of recombinant antibody.

  2. Anti-DNA autoantibodies initiate experimental lupus nephritis by binding directly to the glomerular basement membrane in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Meera R; Wang, Congmiao; Marion, Tony N

    2012-07-01

    The strongest serological correlate for lupus nephritis is antibody to double-stranded DNA, although the mechanism by which anti-DNA antibodies initiate lupus nephritis is unresolved. Most recent reports indicate that anti-DNA must bind chromatin in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix to form glomerular deposits. Here we determined whether direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to glomerular basement membrane is critical to initiate glomerular binding of anti-DNA in experimental lupus nephritis. Mice were co-injected with IgG monoclonal antibodies or hybridomas with similar specificity for DNA and chromatin but different IgG subclass and different relative affinity for basement membrane. Only anti-DNA antibodies that bound basement membrane bound to glomeruli, activated complement, and induced proteinuria whether injected alone or co-injected with a non-basement-membrane-binding anti-DNA antibody. Basement membrane-binding anti-DNA antibodies co-localized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan in glomerular basement membrane and mesangial matrix but not with chromatin. Thus, direct binding of anti-DNA antibody to antigens in the glomerular basement membrane or mesangial matrix may be critical to initiate glomerular inflammation. This may accelerate and exacerbate glomerular immune complex formation in human and murine lupus nephritis.

  3. Membrane-dependent Activities of Human 15-LOX-2 and Its Murine Counterpart: IMPLICATIONS FOR MURINE MODELS OF ATHEROSCLEROSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Gunes; Schexnaydre, Erin E; Murphy, Robert C; Uhlson, Charis; Newcomer, Marcia E

    2016-09-01

    The enzyme encoded by the ALOX15B gene has been linked to the development of atherosclerotic plaques in humans and in a mouse model of hypercholesterolemia. In vitro, these enzymes, which share 78% sequence identity, generate distinct products from their substrate arachidonic acid: the human enzyme, a 15-S-hydroperoxy product; and the murine enzyme, an 8-S-product. We probed the activities of these enzymes with nanodiscs as membrane mimics to determine whether they can access substrate esterified in a bilayer and characterized their activities at the membrane interface. We observed that both enzymes transform phospholipid-esterified arachidonic acid to a 15-S-product. Moreover, when expressed in transfected HEK cells, both enzymes result in significant increases in the amounts of 15-hydroxyderivatives of eicosanoids detected. In addition, we show that 15-LOX-2 is distributed at the plasma membrane when the HEK293 cells are stimulated by the addition Ca(2+) ionophore and that cellular localization is dependent upon the presence of a putative membrane insertion loop. We also report that sequence differences between the human and mouse enzymes in this loop appear to confer distinct mechanisms of enzyme-membrane interaction for the homologues.

  4. Structural studies of sugar binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani

    2010-01-01

    Binding proteins, which are themselves non-enzymatic, play an important role in enzymatic reactions as well as non-enzymatic processes by providing a binding platform for the specific recognition of particular molecules. For example, periplasmic binding proteins play a vital role in nutrient uptake in Gram-negative bacteria. In the present study, three sugar binding proteins, including two periplasmic binding proteins and a β-glucan binding protein, are described. The glucose/galactose bindin...

  5. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 ± 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 ± 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 ± 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO2 values, or [3H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. PMID:26729813

  7. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency.

  8. Effect of resveratrol on cell cycle proteins in murine transplantable liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Yu; Zhong-Jie Sun; Sheng-Li Wu; Cheng-En Pan

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the antitumour activity of resveratrol and its effect on the expression of ceil cycle proteins including cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and p34cdc2 in transplanted liver cancer of murine.METHODS: Murine transplanted hepatoma H22 model was used to evaluate the in vivo antitumor activity of resveratrol.Following abdominal administration of resveratrol, the change in tumour size was recorded and the protein expression of cyclin D1, cyclin B1 and p34cdc2 in the tumor and adjacent noncancerous liver tissues were measured by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Following treatment of H22 tumour bearing mice with resveratrol at 10 or 15 mg/kg bodyweight for 10 days,the growth of murine transplantable liver cancer was inhibited by 36.3% or 49.3%, respectively. The inhibitory effect was significant compared to that in control group (P<0.05).The level of expression of cyclin B1 and p34cdc2 protein was decreased in the transplantable murine hepatoma 22treated with resveratrol whereas the expression of cyclin D1 protein did not change.CONCLUSION: Resveratrol exhibits anti-tumour activities on murine hepatoma H22. The underlying anti-tumour mechanism of resveratrol might involve the inhibition of the cell cycle progression by decreasing the expression of cyclinB1 and p34cdc2 protein.

  9. Enhanced detection and study of murine norovirus-1 using a more efficient microglial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yuanan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Noroviruses are the predominant cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. To facilitate prevention and control, a norovirus isolated from mice can provide a model to understand human noroviruses. To establish optimal viral infectivity conditions for murine noroviruses, several cell lines of hematopoietic lineage, including murine BV-2, RAW 264.7, and TIB, as well as human CHME-5, were tested comparatively for their sensitivity to murine norovirus-1. Results Except for CHME-5, all three murine-derived cell lines were susceptible to MNV infection. Viral infection of these cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. Using both viral plaque and replication assays, BV-2 and RAW 264.7 cells were determined to have comparable sensitivities to MNV-1 infection. Comparisons of cell growth characteristics, general laboratory handling and potential in-field applications suggest the use of BV-2 to be more advantageous. Conclusion Results obtained from these studies demonstrate that an immortalized microglial cell line can support MNV-1 replication and provides a more efficient method to detect and study murine noroviruses, facilitating future investigations using MNV-1 as a model to study, detect, and control Human Norovirus.

  10. Murine fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells lacking SP phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the field of stem cell research, SP (side population) phenotype is used to define the property that cells maintain a high efflux capability for some fluorescent dye, such as Hoechst 33342. Recently, many researches proposed that SP phenotype is a phenotype shared by some stem cells and some progenitor cells, and that SP phenotype is regarded as a candidate purification marker for stem cells. In this research, murine fertilized ova (including conjugate and single nucleus fertilized ova), 2-cell stage and 8-cell stage blastomeres, morulas and blastocysts were isolated and directly stained by Hoechst 33342 dye. The results show that fertilized ovum, blastomere and morula cells do not demonstrate any ability to efflux the dye. However, the inner cell mass (ICM) cells of blastocyst exhibit SP phenotype, which is consistent with the result of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro. These results indicate that the SP phenotype of ICM-derived ESCs is an intrinsic property and independent of the culture condition in vitro, and that SP phenotype is one of the characteristics of at least some pluripotent stem cells, but is not shared by totipotent stem cells. In addition, the result that the SP phenotype of ICM cells disappeared when the inhibitor verapamil was added into medium implies that the SP phenotype is directly associated with ABCG2. These results suggest that not all the stem cells demonstrate SP phenotype, and that SP phenotype might act as a purification marker for partial stem cells such as some pluripotent embryonic stem cells and multipotent adult stem cells, but not for all stem cells exampled by the totipotent stem cells in the very early stage of mouse embryos.

  11. Expression of heteromeric amino acid transporters along the murine intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Schulz, Nicole; Zecevic, Marija; Wagner, Carsten A; Verrey, Francois

    2004-07-15

    Members of the new heterodimeric amino acid transporter family are composed of two subunits, a catalytic multitransmembrane spanning protein (light chain) and a type II glycoprotein (heavy chain). These transporters function as exchangers and thereby extend the transmembrane amino acid transport selectivity to specific amino acids. The heavy chain rBAT associates with the light chain b degrees (,+)AT to form a cystine and cationic amino acid transporter. The other heavy chain, 4F2hc, can interact with seven different light chains to form various transporters corresponding to systems L, y(+)L, asc or x(-)(c). The importance of some of these transporters in intestinal and renal (re)absorption of amino acids is highlighted by the fact that mutations in either the rBAT or b degrees (,+)AT subunit result in cystinuria whereas a defect in the y(+)-LAT1 light chain causes lysinuric protein intolerance. Here we investigated the localization of these transporters in intestine since both diseases are also characterized by altered intestinal amino acid absorption. Real time PCR showed organ-specific expression patterns for all transporter subunit mRNAs along the intestine and Western blotting confirmed these findings on the protein level. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated basolateral coexpression of 4F2hc, LAT2 and y(+)-LAT1 in stomach and small intestine, whereas rBAT and b degrees (,+)AT were found colocalizing on the apical side of small intestine epithelium. In stomach, 4F2hc and LAT2 were localized in H(+)/K(+)-ATPase-expressing parietal cells. The abundant expression of several members of the heterodimeric transporter family along the murine small intestine suggests their involvement in amino acids absorption. Furthermore, strong expression of rBAT, b degrees (,+)AT and y(+)-LAT1 in the small intestine explains the reduced intestinal absorption of some amino acid in patients with cystinuria or lysinuric protein intolerance.

  12. Effects of Murine Cytomegalovirus Infection on Sperm Viability in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to explore the effects of testicular infection of murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) on mature sperm viability at different periods following MCMV inoculation in mice, 91 BALB/c mice without MCMV infection were randomly divided into two groups: an experimental group (n=56) and a control group (n= 35). The mice in the experimental group were treated by inoculating MCMV intratesticularly, while those in the controlled group were directly inoculated with DMEM without MCMV. The mice in both groups were sacrificed separately on the day 1,1.5, 2, 4, 6, 9 and 14 post-inoculation (D1, 1.5,2, 4, 6, 9 and 14 PI). The MCMV M83 mRNA gene was detected in the testis by in situ hybridization (ISH) with MCMV late-mRNA probe labeled with digoxin.Sperm viability of mature sperm in the epididymis cauda was measured. The results demonstrated the positive signal of ISH of MCMV was found mainly in the cytoplasm of the testicular interstitial cells and spermatogenic cells in the experimental group. Compared with that in the controlled group, the sperm viability in the experimental group was decreased significantly on D1 PI and D1.5PI (P< 0.05). No statistically significant difference in the sperm viability was found after D2 PI between two groups (P>0.05). This suggested that sperm viability in mice might be descended significantly shortly after MCMV infection and might return to normal with time, indicating that MCMV acute infection might temporarily degrade sperm quality and influence procreation transiently.

  13. Ureaplasma urealyticum Causes Hyperammonemia in an Experimental Immunocompromised Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Block, Darci R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Cunningham, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    Hyperammonemia syndrome is an often fatal complication of lung transplantation which has been recently associated with Ureaplasma infection. It has not been definitely established that Ureaplasma species can cause hyperammonemia. We established a novel immunocompromised murine model of Ureaplasma urealyticum infection and used it to confirm that U. urealyticum can cause hyperammonemia. Male C3H mice were pharmacologically immunosuppressed with mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus and oral prednisone for seven days, and then challenged intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP) with 107 CFU U. urealyticum over six days, while continuing immunosuppression. Spent U. urealyticum-free U9 broth was used as a negative control, with uninfected immunocompetent mice, uninfected immunosuppressed mice, and infected immunocompetent mice serving as additional controls. Plasma ammonia concentrations were compared using Wilcoxon ranks sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (n = 14) (range 155–330 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal mice (n = 5), uninfected immunosuppressed mice (n = 5), and U. urealyticum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent mice (n = 5) [range 99–340 μmol/L, p = 0.60]. However, immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. urealyticum IT/IP (n = 20) or IP (n = 15) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations (range 225–945 μmol/L and 276–687 μmol/L, respectively) than those challenged IT/IP with spent U9 broth (p<0.001). U. urealyticum administered IT/IP or IP causes hyperammonemia in mice pharmacologically immunosuppressed with a regimen similar to that administered to lung transplant recipients. PMID:27537683

  14. A Murine Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Model: The DBA/2J Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyuan Zhao

    Full Text Available Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is attributed to mutations in genes that encode for the sarcomere proteins, especially Mybpc3 and Myh7. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies show significant variability in HCM phenotypes among affected individuals with identical causal mutations. Morphological changes and clinical expression of HCM are the result of interactions with modifier genes. With the exceptions of angiotensin converting enzyme, these modifiers have not been identified. Although mouse models have been used to investigate the genetics of many complex diseases, natural murine models for HCM are still lacking. In this study we show that the DBA/2J (D2 strain of mouse has sequence variants in Mybpc3 and Myh7, relative to widely used C57BL/6J (B6 reference strain and the key features of human HCM. Four-month-old of male D2 mice exhibit hallmarks of HCM including increased heart weight and cardiomyocyte size relative to B6 mice, as well as elevated markers for cardiac hypertrophy including β-myosin heavy chain (MHC, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, and skeletal muscle alpha actin (α1-actin. Furthermore, cardiac interstitial fibrosis, another feature of HCM, is also evident in the D2 strain, and is accompanied by up-regulation of type I collagen and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA-markers of fibrosis. Of great interest, blood pressure and cardiac function are within the normal range in the D2 strain, demonstrating that cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis are not secondary to hypertension, myocardial infarction, or heart failure. Because D2 and B6 strains have been used to generate a large family of recombinant inbred strains, the BXD cohort, the D2 model can be effectively exploited for in-depth genetic analysis of HCM susceptibility and modifier screens.

  15. Effects of murine natural killer cells on Cryptococcus neoformans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavi Nouri, N.

    1985-01-01

    Previous data generated by Murphy and McDaniel indicate that normal murine nylon wool nonadherent splenic cells, with the characteristics of natural killer (NK) cells, effectively inhibit the in vitro growth of Cryptococcus neoformans, a yeast-like pathogen. Nylon wood nonadherent cells from spleens of 7-8 week old mice were further fractionated on discontinuous Percoll gradients. The enrichment of NK cells in Percoll fractions 1 and 2 was confirmed by morphological examination, immunofluorescent staining, and by assessing the cytolytic activity of each Percoll cell fraction against YAC-1 targets in the 4 h /sup 51/Cr release assay. Cells isolated from each Percoll fraction were tested for growth inhibitory activity against C neoformans, using an in vitro 18 h growth inhibition assay. The results showed that NK cell enrichment was concomitant with the enrichment of anti-cryptococcal activity the Percoll fractions 1 and 2. An immunolabeling method combined with scanning electron microscopy was used to demonstrate that the effector cells attached to C. neoformans were asialo GM/sub 1/ positive and, therefore, had NK cell characteristics. NK cells have Fc receptors on their surfaces , and are capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against IgG-coated target cells. The author examined the effects of the IgG fraction of rabbit anti-cryptococcal antibody on the NK cell-mediated growth inhibition of C. neoformans. The data indicated that the effector cells involved in antibody-dependent growth inhibition of cryptococci are either NK cells or copurify and coexist in the same population with NK cells.

  16. Inhibition of murine cardiomyocyte respiration by amine local anesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburawi, Elhadi H; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2014-12-01

    The hydrophobic amino acyl amide-linked local anesthetics (e.g., lidocaine and bupivacaine) impose potent cardiac toxicity and direct mitochondrial dysfunction. To investigate these adverse events, an in vitro system was employed to measure their effects on O2 consumption (cellular respiration) by murine myocardium. Specimens were collected from the ventricular myocardium and immediately immersed in ice-cold Krebs-Henseleit buffer saturated with 95 % O2:5 % CO2. O2 concentration was determined as a function of time from the phosphorescence decay rates of Pd(II)-meso-tetra-(4-sulfonatophenyl)-tetrabenzoporphyrin. Myocardial O2 consumption was linear with time (zero-order kinetics); its rate (k, in μM O2 min(-1)), thus, was the negative of the slope of [O2] vs. time. Cyanide inhibited O2 consumption, confirming the oxidation occurred in the respiratory chain. Lidocaine and bupivacaine produced immediate and sustained inhibition of cellular respiration at plasma concentrations of the drugs (low micromolar range). Bupivacaine was twice as potent as lidocaine. The inhibition was dose-dependent, saturating at concentrations ≥30 μM. At saturating doses, lidocaine produced ~20 % inhibition and bupivacaine ~40 % inhibition. Cellular ATP was also decreased in the presence of 30 μM lidocaine or bupivacaine. The studied amines inhibited myocardial cellular respiration. This effect is consistent with their known adverse events on mitochondrial function. The described approach allows accurate assessments and comparisons of the toxic effects of local anesthetics on heart tissue bioenergetics. PMID:24254523

  17. Nuclear localization of Annexin A7 during murine brain development

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    Noegel Angelika A

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin A7 is a member of the annexin protein family, which is characterized by its ability to interact with phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+-ions and which is thought to function in Ca2+-homeostasis. Results from mutant mice showed altered Ca2+-wave propagation in astrocytes. As the appearance and distribution of Annexin A7 during brain development has not been investigated so far, we focused on the distribution of Annexin A7 protein during mouse embryogenesis in the developing central nervous system and in the adult mouse brain. Results Annexin A7 is expressed in cells of the developing brain where a change in its subcellular localization from cytoplasm to nucleus was observed. In the adult CNS, the subcellular distribution of Annexin A7 depends on the cell type. By immunohistochemistry analysis Annexin A7 was detected in the cytosol of undifferentiated cells at embryonic days E5–E8. At E11–E15 the protein is still present in the cytosol of cells predominantly located in the ventricular germinative zone surrounding the lateral ventricle. Later on, at embryonic day E16, Annexin A7 in cells of the intermediate and marginal zone of the neopallium translocates to the nucleus. Neuronal cells of all areas in the adult brain present Annexin A7 in the nucleus, whereas glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive astrocytes exhibit both, a cytoplasmic and nuclear staining. The presence of nuclear Annexin A7 was confirmed by extraction of the nucleoplasm from isolated nuclei obtained from neuronal and astroglial cell lines. Conclusion We have demonstrated a translocation of Annexin A7 to nuclei of cells in early murine brain development and the presence of Annexin A7 in nuclei of neuronal cells in the adult animal. The role of Annexin A7 in nuclei of differentiating and mature neuronal cells remains elusive.

  18. Tim-4 Inhibits NO Generation by Murine Macrophages.

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    Li-yun Xu

    Full Text Available T cell immunoglobulin- and mucin-domain-containing molecule-4 (Tim-4 receives much attention as a potentially negative regulator of immune responses. However, its modulation on macrophages has not been fully elucidated so far. This study aimed to identify the role of Tim-4 in nitric oxide (NO modulation.Macrophages were stimulated with 100 ng/ml LPS or 100 U/ml IFN-γ. RT-PCR was performed to detect TIM-4 mRNA expression. Tim-4 blocking antibody and NF-κB inhibitory ligand were involved in the study. NO levels were assayed by Griess reaction. Phosphorylation of NF-κB, Jak2 or Stat1 was verified by western blot.Tim-4 was up-regulated in murine macrophages after interferon-gamma (IFN-γ stimulation. Tim-4 over-expression decreased NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS or IFN-γ-stimulated macrophages. Consistently, Tim-4 blockade promoted LPS or IFN-γ-induced NO secretion and iNOS expression. Tim-4 over-expression decreased LPS-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB p65 phosphorylation in macrophages, which was abrogated by NF-κB inhibitory ligand. On the contrary, Tim-4 blocking increased LPS-induced NF-κB signaling, which was also abrogated by NF-κB inhibition. In addition, Tim-4 blockade promoted Jak2 and Stat1 phosphorylation in IFN-γ stimulated macrophages.These results indicate that Tim-4 is involved in negative regulation of NO production in macrophages, suggesting the critical role of Tim-4 in immune related diseases.

  19. Expansion of intestinal epithelial stem cells during murine development.

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    Jeffrey J Dehmer

    Full Text Available Murine small intestinal crypt development is initiated during the first postnatal week. Soon after formation, overall increases in the number of crypts occurs through a bifurcating process called crypt fission, which is believed to be driven by developmental increases in the number of intestinal stem cells (ISCs. Recent evidence suggests that a heterogeneous population of ISCs exists within the adult intestine. Actively cycling ISCs are labeled by Lgr5, Ascl2 and Olfm4; whereas slowly cycling or quiescent ISC are marked by Bmi1 and mTert. The goal of this study was to correlate the expression of these markers with indirect measures of ISC expansion during development, including quantification of crypt fission and side population (SP sorting. Significant changes were observed in the percent of crypt fission and SP cells consistent with ISC expansion between postnatal day 14 and 21. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR for the various ISC marker mRNAs demonstrated divergent patterns of expression. mTert surged earliest, during the first week of life as crypts are initially being formed, whereas Lgr5 and Bmi1 peaked on day 14. Olfm4 and Ascl2 had variable expression patterns. To assess the number and location of Lgr5-expressing cells during this period, histologic sections from intestines of Lgr5-EGFP mice were subjected to quantitative analysis. There was attenuated Lgr5-EGFP expression at birth and through the first week of life. Once crypts were formed, the overall number and percent of Lgr5-EGFP positive cells per crypt remain stable throughout development and into adulthood. These data were supported by Lgr5 in situ hybridization in wild-type mice. We conclude that heterogeneous populations of ISCs are expanding as measured by SP sorting and mRNA expression at distinct developmental time points.

  20. Critical transition in tissue homeostasis accompanies murine lung senescence.

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    Carla L Calvi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory dysfunction is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in aged populations. The susceptibility to pulmonary insults is attributed to "low pulmonary reserve", ostensibly reflecting a combination of age-related musculoskeletal, immunologic and intrinsic pulmonary dysfunction. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a murine model of the aging lung, senescent DBA/2 mice, we correlated a longitudinal survey of airspace size and injury measures with a transcriptome from the aging lung at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months of age. Morphometric analysis demonstrated a nonlinear pattern of airspace caliber enlargement with a critical transition occurring between 8 and 12 months of age marked by an initial increase in oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation which is soon followed by inflammatory cell infiltration, immune complex deposition and the onset of airspace enlargement. The temporally correlative transcriptome showed exuberant induction of immunoglobulin genes coincident with airspace enlargement. Immunohistochemistry, ELISA analysis and flow cytometry demonstrated increased immunoglobulin deposition in the lung associated with a contemporaneous increase in activated B-cells expressing high levels of TLR4 (toll receptor 4 and CD86 and macrophages during midlife. These midlife changes culminate in progressive airspace enlargement during late life stages. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings establish that a tissue-specific aging program is evident during a presenescent interval which involves early oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation, followed by B lymphocyte and macrophage expansion/activation. This sequence heralds the progression to overt airspace enlargement in the aged lung. These signature events, during middle age, indicate that early stages of the aging immune system may have important correlates in the maintenance of tissue morphology. We further show that time-course analyses of aging

  1. PCR master mixes harbour murine DNA sequences. Caveat emptor!

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    Philip W Tuke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: XMRV is the most recently described retrovirus to be found in Man, firstly in patients with prostate cancer (PC and secondly in 67% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS and 3.7% of controls. Both disease associations remain contentious. Indeed, a recent publication has concluded that "XMRV is unlikely to be a human pathogen". Subsequently related but different polytropic MLV (pMLV sequences were also reported from the blood of 86.5% of patients with CFS. and 6.8% of controls. Consequently we decided to investigate blood donors for evidence of XMRV/pMLV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Testing of cDNA prepared from the whole blood of 80 random blood donors, generated gag PCR signals from two samples (7C and 9C. These had previously tested negative for XMRV by two other PCR based techniques. To test whether the PCR mix was the source of these sequences 88 replicates of water were amplified using Invitrogen Platinum Taq (IPT and Applied Biosystems Taq Gold LD (ABTG. Four gag sequences (2D, 3F, 7H, 12C were generated with the IPT, a further sequence (12D by ABTG re-amplification of an IPT first round product. Sequence comparisons revealed remarkable similarities between these sequences, endogeous MLVs and the pMLV sequences reported in patients with CFS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Methodologies for the detection of viruses highly homologous to endogenous murine viruses require special caution as the very reagents used in the detection process can be a source of contamination and at a level where it is not immediately apparent. It is suggested that such contamination is likely to explain the apparent presence of pMLV in CFS.

  2. Comparing human norovirus surrogates: murine norovirus and Tulane virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirneisen, Kirsten A; Kniel, Kalmia E

    2013-01-01

    Viral surrogates are widely used by researchers to predict human norovirus behavior. Murine norovirus (MNV) is currently accepted as the best surrogate and is assumed to mimic the survival and inactivation of human noroviruses. Recently, a new calicivirus, the Tulane virus (TV), was discovered, and its potential as a human norovirus surrogate is being explored. This study aimed to compare the behavior of the two potential surrogates under varying treatments of pH (2.0 to 10.0), chlorine (0.2 to 2,000 ppm), heat (50 to 75°C), and survival in tap water at room (20°C) and refrigeration (4°C) temperatures for up to 30 days. Viral infectivity was determined by the plaque assay for both MNV and TV. There was no significant difference between the inactivation of MNV and TV in all heat treatments, and for both MNV and TV survival in tap water at 20°C over 30 days. At 4°C, MNV remained infectious over 30 days at a titer of approximately 5 log PFU/ml, whereas TV titers decreased significantly by 5 days. MNV was more pH stable, as TV titers were reduced significantly at pH 2.0, 9.0, and 10.0, as compared with pH 7.0, whereas MNV titers were only significantly reduced at pH 10.0. After chlorine treatment, there was no significant difference in virus with the exception of at 2 ppm, where TV decreased significantly compared with MNV. Compared with TV, MNV is likely a better surrogate for human noroviruses, as MNV persisted over a wider range of pH values, at 2 ppm of chlorine, and without a loss of titer at 4°C. PMID:23317870

  3. Cyclophilin D regulates necrosis, but not apoptosis, of murine eosinophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang; Hogan, Simon P; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Zimmermann, Nives

    2016-04-15

    Eosinophil degranulation and clusters of free extracellular granules are frequently observed in diverse diseases, including atopic dermatitis, nasal polyposis, and eosinophilic esophagitis. Whether these intact granules are released by necrosis or a biochemically mediated cytolysis remains unknown. Recently, a peptidyl-prolyl isomerase located within the mitochondrial matrix, cyclophilin D (PPIF), was shown to regulate necrotic, but not apoptotic, cell death in vitro in fibroblasts, hepatocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Whether cyclophilin D regulates necrosis in hematopoietic cells such as eosinophils remains unknown. We used PPIF-deficient (Ppif(-/-)) mice to test whether cyclophilin D is required for regulating eosinophil necrosis. PPIF deficiency did not affect eosinophil development or maturation at baseline. After in vitro ionomycin or H2O2 treatment, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils were significantly protected from Ca(2+) overload- or oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Additionally, Ppif(-/-) eosinophils demonstrated significantly decreased necrosis, but not apoptosis, in response to Siglec-F cross-linking, a stimulus associated with eosinophil-mediated processes in vitro and in vivo. When treated with apoptosis inducers, Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) eosinophils exhibited no significant difference in apoptosis or secondary necrosis. Finally, in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model, although levels of colitogenic cytokines and eosinophil-selective chemokines were comparable between Ppif(+/+) and Ppif(-/-) mice, the latter exhibited decreased clinical outcomes. This correlated with significantly reduced eosinophil cytolysis in the colon. Collectively, our present studies demonstrate that murine eosinophil necrosis is regulated in vitro and in vivo by cyclophilin D, at least in part, thus providing new insight into the mechanism of eosinophil necrosis and release of free extracellular granules in eosinophil-associated diseases. PMID:26893161

  4. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

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    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  5. Space radiation-associated lung injury in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofidou-Solomidou, Melpo; Pietrofesa, Ralph A; Arguiri, Evguenia; Schweitzer, Kelly S; Berdyshev, Evgeny V; McCarthy, Maureen; Corbitt, Astrid; Alwood, Joshua S; Yu, Yongjia; Globus, Ruth K; Solomides, Charalambos C; Ullrich, Robert L; Petrache, Irina

    2015-03-01

    Despite considerable progress in identifying health risks to crewmembers related to exposure to galactic/cosmic rays and solar particle events (SPE) during space travel, its long-term effects on the pulmonary system are unknown. We used a murine risk projection model to investigate the impact of exposure to space-relevant radiation (SR) on the lung. C3H mice were exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays, protons (acute, low-dose exposure mimicking the 1972 SPE), 600 MeV/u (56)Fe ions, or 350 MeV/u (28)Si ions at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Animals were irradiated at the age of 2.5 mo and evaluated 23.5 mo postirradiation, at 26 mo of age. Compared with age-matched nonirradiated mice, SR exposures led to significant air space enlargement and dose-dependent decreased systemic oxygenation levels. These were associated with late mild lung inflammation and prominent cellular injury, with significant oxidative stress and apoptosis (caspase-3 activation) in the lung parenchyma. SR, especially high-energy (56)Fe or (28)Si ions markedly decreased sphingosine-1-phosphate levels and Akt- and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, depleted anti-senescence sirtuin-1 and increased biochemical markers of autophagy. Exposure to SR caused dose-dependent, pronounced late lung pathological sequelae consistent with alveolar simplification and cellular signaling of increased injury and decreased repair. The associated systemic hypoxemia suggested that this previously uncharacterized space radiation-associated lung injury was functionally significant, indicating that further studies are needed to define the risk and to develop appropriate lung-protective countermeasures for manned deep space missions. PMID:25526737

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Murine Embryos Lacking Endogenous Retinoic Acid Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Marie Paschaki; Carole Schneider; Muriel Rhinn; Christelle Thibault-Carpentier; Doulaye Dembélé; Karen Niederreither; Pascal Dollé

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), an active derivative of the liposoluble vitamin A (retinol), acts as an important signaling molecule during embryonic development, regulating phenomenons as diverse as anterior-posterior axial patterning, forebrain and optic vesicle development, specification of hindbrain rhombomeres, pharyngeal arches and second heart field, somitogenesis, and differentiation of spinal cord neurons. This small molecule directly triggers gene activation by binding to nuclear receptors (RAR...

  7. The sclerostin-neutralizing antibody AbD09097 recognizes an epitope adjacent to sclerostin's binding site for the Wnt co-receptor LRP6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschert, V; Frisch, C; Back, J W; van Pee, K; Weidauer, S E; Muth, E-M; Schmieder, P; Beerbaum, M; Knappik, A; Timmerman, P; Mueller, T D

    2016-08-01

    The glycoprotein sclerostin has been identified as a negative regulator of bone growth. It exerts its function by interacting with the Wnt co-receptor LRP5/6, blocks the binding of Wnt factors and thereby inhibits Wnt signalling. Neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies are able to restore Wnt activity and enhance bone growth thereby presenting a new osteoanabolic therapy approach for diseases such as osteoporosis. We have generated various Fab antibodies against human and murine sclerostin using a phage display set-up. Biochemical analyses have identified one Fab developed against murine sclerostin, AbD09097 that efficiently neutralizes sclerostin's Wnt inhibitory activity. In vitro interaction analysis using sclerostin variants revealed that this neutralizing Fab binds to sclerostin's flexible second loop, which has been shown to harbour the LRP5/6 binding motif. Affinity maturation was then applied to AbD09097, providing a set of improved neutralizing Fab antibodies which particularly bind human sclerostin with enhanced affinity. Determining the crystal structure of AbD09097 provides first insights into how this antibody might recognize and neutralize sclerostin. Together with the structure-function relationship derived from affinity maturation these new data will foster the rational design of new and highly efficient anti-sclerostin antibodies for the therapy of bone loss diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:27558933

  8. Scaffold Optimisation of Tetravalent Antagonists of the Mannose Binding Lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goti, Giulio; Palmioli, Alessandro; Stravalaci, Matteo; Sattin, Sara; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Gobbi, Marco; Bernardi, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Antagonists of mannose binding lectin (MBL) have shown a protective role against brain reperfusion damage after acute ischemic stroke. Here we describe the design and streamlined synthesis of glycomimetic MBL antagonists based on a new tetravalent dendron scaffold. The dendron was developed by optimisation of a known polyester structure previously demonstrated to be very efficient for ligand presentation to MBL. Replacement of a labile succinyl ester bond with a more robust amide functionality, use of a longer and more hydrophilic linker, fast modular synthesis and orthogonal functionalisation at the focal point are the main features of the new scaffold. The glycoconjugate constructs become stable to silica gel chromatography and to water solutions at physiological pH, while preserving water solubility and activity in an SPR assay against the murine MBL-C isoform. Higher-order constructs were easily assembled, as demonstrated by the synthesis of a 16-valent dendrimer, which leads to two orders of magnitude increase in activity over the tetravalent version against MBL-C. PMID:26696414

  9. Oral Administration of Polymyxin B Modulates the Activity of Lipooligosaccharide E. coli B against Lung Metastases in Murine Tumor Models.

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    Jagoda Kicielińska

    Full Text Available Polymyxin B (PmB belongs to the group of cyclic peptide antibiotics, which neutralize the activity of LPS by binding to lipid A. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of PmB on the biological activity of lipooligosaccharide (LOS E. coli B,rough form of LPS in vitro and in experimental metastasis models.Cultures of murine macrophage J774A.1 cells and murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC stimulated in vitro with LOS and supplemented with PmB demonstrated a decrease in inflammatory cytokine production (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and down-regulation of CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC class II molecule expression. Additionally, PmB suspended in drinking water was given to the C57BL/6 mice seven or five days prior to the intravenous injection of B16 or LLC cells and intraperitoneal application of LOS. This strategy of PmB administration was continued throughout the duration of the experiments (29 or 21 days. In B16 model, statistically significant decrease in the number of metastases in mice treated with PmB and LOS (p<0.01 was found on the 14th day of the experiments, whereas the most intensive changes in surface-antigen expression and ex vivo production of IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α by peritoneal cells were observed 7 days earlier. By contrast, antigen expression and ex vivo production of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ by splenocytes remained relatively high and stable. Statistically significant decrease in LLC metastases number was observed after the application of LOS (p<0.01 and in the group of mice preconditioned by PmB and subsequently treated with LOS (LOS + PmB, p<0.01.In conclusion, prolonged in vivo application of PmB was not able to neutralize the LOS-induced immune cell activity but its presence in the organism of treated mice was important in modulation of the LOS-mediated response against the development of metastases.

  10. Structure determination of Murine Norovirus NS6 proteases with C-terminal extensions designed to probe protease–substrate interactions

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    Humberto Fernandes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. They encode an NS6 protease that cleaves a viral polyprotein at specific sites to produce mature viral proteins. In an earlier study we obtained crystals of murine norovirus (MNV NS6 protease in which crystal contacts were mediated by specific insertion of the C-terminus of one protein (which contains residues P5-P1 of the NS6-7 cleavage junction into the peptide binding site of an adjacent molecule, forming an adventitious protease-product complex. We sought to reproduce this crystal form to investigate protease–substrate complexes by extending the C-terminus of NS6 construct to include residues on the C-terminal (P′ side of the cleavage junction. We report the crystallization and crystal structure determination of inactive mutants of murine norovirus NS6 protease with C-terminal extensions of one, two and four residues from the N-terminus of the adjacent NS7 protein (NS6 1′, NS6 2′, NS6 4′. We also determined the structure of a chimeric extended NS6 protease in which the P4-P4′ sequence of the NS6-7 cleavage site was replaced with the corresponding sequence from the NS2-3 cleavage junction (NS6 4′ 2|3.The constructs NS6 1′ and NS6 2′ yielded crystals that diffracted anisotropically. We found that, although the uncorrected data could be phased by molecular replacement, refinement of the structures stalled unless the data were ellipsoidally truncated and corrected with anisotropic B-factors. These corrections significantly improved phasing by molecular replacement and subsequent refinement.The refined structures of all four extended NS6 proteases are very similar in structure to the mature MNV NS6—and in one case reveal additional details of a surface loop. Although the packing arrangement observed showed some similarities to those observed in the adventitious protease-product crystals reported previously, in no case were specific protease–substrate interactions

  11. Protective effects of astaxanthin from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on murine gastric ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenta; Oyagi, Atsushi; Takahira, Dai; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishibashi, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin extracted from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on gastric mucosal damage in murine gastric ulcer models. Mice were pretreated with astaxanthin for 1 h before ulcer induction. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by oral administration of hydrochloride (HCl)/ethanol or acidified aspirin. The effect of astaxanthin on lipid peroxidation in murine stomach homogenates was also evaluated by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The free radical scavenging activities of astaxanthin were also measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Astaxanthin significantly decreased the extent of HCl/ethanol- and acidified aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. Astaxanthin also decreased the level of TBARS. The ESR measurement showed that astaxanthin had radical scavenging activities against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and the superoxide anion radical. These results suggest that astaxanthin has antioxidant properties and exerts a protective effect against ulcer formation in murine models.

  12. Erythropoietin treatment alleviates ultrastructural myelin changes induced by murine cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Staalsø, Trine;

    2012-01-01

    , adjunctive therapy, which is not available at present. Previously, erythropoietin (EPO) was reported to significantly improve the survival and outcome in a murine CM model. The study objectives were to assess myelin thickness and ultrastructural morphology in the corpus callosum in murine CM and to adress...... for electron microscopy. Myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum were analysed with transmission electron microscopy and stereology. RESULTS: The infection caused clinical CM, which was counteracted by EPO. The total number of myelinated axons was identical in the four groups and mice with CM did not......, perivascular oedemas and intracerebral haemorrhages. CONCLUSIONS: EPO treatment reduced clinical signs of CM and reduced cerebral pathology. Murine CM does not reduce the general thickness of myelin sheaths in the corpus callosum....

  13. Cloning of murine BRI3 gene and study on its function for inducing cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanism of TNFα effects, the cDNA of murine BRI3 gene was cloned from the total RNA of murine brain endothelial cells (bEnd.3)treated with hTNFα by using the suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and the RT-PCR method. The fusion expression vector harbouring BRI3 gene and enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) thus obtained were designated as pEGFP/I3. Then pEGFP/I3 was transiently transfected into L929 cells and the fusion protein EGFP/I3 was localized in cytoplasm. It is found that the expression of EGFP/I3 could induce cell death in L929 cells detected by TUNEL method and flow cytometry. And the overexpression of Bci-2 in L929 cells can block cell death induced by EGFP/I3, indicating that murine BRI3 gene might related to the TNFα mediated cytotoxicity.

  14. Binding of estrogen receptor with estrogen conjugated to bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Yasuto; Koslowski, Mirek; Bodenner, Donald L

    2004-08-19

    BACKGROUND: The classic model of estrogen action requires that the estrogen receptor (ER) activates gene expression by binding directly or indirectly to DNA. Recent studies, however, strongly suggest that ER can act through nongenomic signal transduction pathways and may be mediated by a membrane bound form of the ER. Estradiol covalently linked to membrane impermeable BSA (E2-BSA) has been widely used as an agent to study these novel membrane-associated ER events. However, a recent report suggests that E2-BSA does not compete for E2 binding to purified ER in vitro. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we performed competition studies examining the binding of E2 and E2-BSA to both purified ER preparations and ER within intact cells. To eliminate potential artifacts due to contamination of commercially available E2-BSA preparations with unconjugated E2 (usually between 3-5%), the latter was carefully removed by ultrafiltration. RESULTS: As previously reported, a 10-to 1000-fold molar excess of E2-BSA was unable to compete with 3H-E2 binding to ER when added simultaneously. However, when ER was pre-incubated with the same concentrations of E2-BSA, the binding of 3H-E2 was significantly reduced. E2-BSA binding to a putative membrane-associated ER was directly visualized using fluorescein labeled E2-BSA (E2-BSA-FITC). Staining was restricted to the cell membrane when E2-BSA-FITC was incubated with stable transfectants of the murine ERalpha within ER-negative HeLa cells and with MC7 cells that endogenously produce ERalpha. This staining appeared highly specific since it was competed by pre-incubation with E2 in a dose dependent manner and with the competitor ICI-182,780. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that E2-BSA does bind to purified ER in vitro and to ER in intact cells. It seems likely that the size and structure of E2-BSA requires more energy for it to bind to the ER and consequently binds more slowly than E2. More importantly, these findings demonstrate

  15. Analysis of the capacity to produce IL-3 in murine AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenschwander, A U; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukaemia virus represent a model of murine AIDS (MAIDS). In this study we have analysed the capacity of CD4+ T cells from infected mice to produce IL-3 following stimulation with ConA for 24-72 h. In contrast to the position with IL-2, the productio...... is basically intact at the cellular level in T cells during MAIDS; but when in a situation requiring clonal expansion of the activated T cells, IL-3 production will be inhibited owing to the impaired capacity for proliferation....

  16. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M.; Messenheimer, David J.; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  17. Multispectral Imaging of T and B Cells in Murine Spleen and Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zipei; Jensen, Shawn M; Messenheimer, David J; Farhad, Mohammed; Neuberger, Michael; Bifulco, Carlo B; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in multiplex immunohistochemistry techniques allow for quantitative, spatial identification of multiple immune parameters for enhanced diagnostic and prognostic insight. However, applying such techniques to murine fixed tissues, particularly sensitive epitopes, such as CD4, CD8α, and CD19, has been difficult. We compared different fixation protocols and Ag-retrieval techniques and validated the use of multiplex immunohistochemistry for detection of CD3(+)CD4(+) and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell subsets in murine spleen and tumor. This allows for enumeration of these T cell subsets within immune environments, as well as the study of their spatial distribution. PMID:26994219

  18. Changes in gene-expression during development of the murine molar tooth germ

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In a matter of a few days the murine tooth germ develops into a complex, mineralized, structure. Murine 30K microarrays were used to examine gene expression in the mandibular first molar tooth germs isolated at 15.5dpc and at 2DPN. Microarray results were validated using real-time RT-PCR. The results suggested that only 25 genes (3 without known functions) exhibited significantly higher expression at 15.5dpc compared to 2DPN. In contrast, almost 1400 genes exhibited significantly (P

  19. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides...... around the phosphorylated residue are important for the binding affinity of ILKAP. We conclude that solid-phase affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures can be applied in phosphoproteomics and systems biology.......Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...

  20. Water binding in legume seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  1. EFFECTS OF INTERLEUKIN-4 ON GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE-COLONY FORMATION FROM MURINE BONE MARROW CELLS AND HEMATOPOIETIC RECONSTITUTION FOLLOWING MURINE ALLOGENEIC BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱康儿; KerryAtkinson

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mouse recombinant IL-4 on hematopoiesis in vitro and in vivo.IL-4 alone was found to be incapable of stimulating colony formation,but it inhibited both IL-3-and GM-CSF-induced colony for-mation by murine hematopoietic progenitor cells.In contrast,colony formation induced by G-CSF was enhanced in the presence of IL-4.We also studied the influence of IL-4 on hematopoietie reconstiution after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation in a murine model,and found that IL-4 and G-CSF was significantly suppressed by IL-4.The combination of IL-4 and GM-CSF caused a significant decrease in the absolute mumber of meutrophils.

  2. Evaluation of Antibody Responses Elicited by Immunization of Mice with a Pneumococcal Antigen Genetically Fused to Murine HSP70 and Murine Interleukin-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dennis O. GOR; Salamatu S. MAMBULA

    2006-01-01

    The heat shock (stress) protein HSP70 has been shown to be a potent stimulator of cellular immune responses. In order to determine whether HSP70 has the ability to stimulate antibody responses, we constructed and expressed fusion proteins consisting of murine HSP70 or murine interleukin (IL)-4 covalently linked to a pneumococcal cell wall-associated protein antigen designated PpmA. Immunization of mice with the PpmA-HSP70 fusion protein (PpmA-70) failed to elicit an increased PpmA-specific serum antibody response. In contrast, mice immunized with PpmA fused to IL-4 (PpmA-IL4), or PpmA fused to both IL-4 and HSP70 (PpmA-IL4-70) fusion proteins elicited high levels of PpmA-specific antibody responses.These data suggest that HSP70 has a limited capacity to stimulate immune responses to heterologous antigens in vivo.

  3. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  4. Potentiators exert distinct effects on human, murine, and Xenopus CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guiying; Khazanov, Netaly; Stauffer, Brandon B; Infield, Daniel T; Imhoff, Barry R; Senderowitz, Hanoch; McCarty, Nael A

    2016-08-01

    VX-770 (Ivacaftor) has been approved for clinical usage in cystic fibrosis patients with several CFTR mutations. Yet the binding site(s) on CFTR for this compound and other small molecule potentiators are unknown. We hypothesize that insight into this question could be gained by comparing the effect of potentiators on CFTR channels from different origins, e.g., human, mouse, and Xenopus (frog). In the present study, we combined this comparative molecular pharmacology approach with that of computer-aided drug discovery to identify and characterize new potentiators of CFTR and to explore possible mechanism of action. Our results demonstrate that 1) VX-770, NPPB, GlyH-101, P1, P2, and P3 all exhibited ortholog-specific behavior in that they potentiated hCFTR, mCFTR, and xCFTR with different efficacies; 2) P1, P2, and P3 potentiated hCFTR in excised macropatches in a manner dependent on the degree of PKA-mediated stimulation; 3) P1 and P2 did not have additive effects, suggesting that these compounds might share binding sites. Also 4) using a pharmacophore modeling approach, we identified three new potentiators (IOWH-032, OSSK-2, and OSSK-3) that have structures similar to GlyH-101 and that also exhibit ortholog-specific potentiation of CFTR. These could potentially serve as lead compounds for development of new drugs for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. The ortholog-specific behavior of these compounds suggest that a comparative pharmacology approach, using cross-ortholog chimeras, may be useful for identification of binding sites on human CFTR. PMID:27288484

  5. Altering Antibody-Drug Conjugate Binding to the Neonatal Fc Receptor Impacts Efficacy and Tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblett, Kevin J; Le, Tiep; Rock, Brooke M; Rock, Dan A; Siu, Sophia; Huard, Justin N; Conner, Kip P; Milburn, Robert R; O'Neill, Jason W; Tometsko, Mark E; Fanslow, William C

    2016-07-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) rely on the target-binding specificity of an antibody to selectively deliver potent drugs to cancer cells. IgG antibody half-life is regulated by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) binding. Histidine 435 of human IgG was mutated to alanine (H435A) to explore the effect of FcRn binding on the pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and tolerability of two separate maytansine-based ADC pairs with noncleavable linkers, (c-DM1 and c-H435A-DM1) and (7v-Cys-may and 7v-H435A-Cys-may). The in vitro cell-killing potency of each pair of ADCs was similar, demonstrating that H435A showed no measurable impact on ADC bioactivity. The H435A mutant antibodies showed no detectable binding to human or mouse FcRn in vitro, whereas their counterpart wild-type IgG ADCs were found to bind to FcRn at pH = 6.0. In xenograft bearing SCID mice expressing mouse FcRn, the AUC of 7v-Cys-may was 1.6-fold higher than that of 7v-H435A-may, yet the observed efficacy was similar. More severe thrombocytopenia was observed with 7v-H435A-Cys-may as compared to 7v-Cys-may at multiple dose levels. The AUC of c-DM1 was approximately 3-fold higher than that of c-H435A-DM1 in 786-0 xenograft bearing SCID mice, which led to a 3-fold difference in efficacy by dose. Murine FcRn knockout, human FcRn transgenic line 32 SCID animals bearing 786-0 xenografts showed an amplified exposure difference between c-DM1 and c-H435A-DM1 as compared to murine FcRn expressing SCID mice, leading to a 10-fold higher dose required for efficacy despite a 6-fold higher AUC of the c-H435A-DM1. The accelerated clearance observed for the noncleavable maytansine ADCs with the H435A FcRn mutation led to reduced efficacy at equivalent doses and exacerbation of clinical pathology parameters (decreased tolerability) at equivalent doses. The results show that reduced ADC clearance mediated by FcRn modulation can improve therapeutic index. PMID:27248573

  6. Transplacental murine cytomegalovirus infection in the brain of SCID mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaquish Dawn V

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the most common congenital viral infection in humans and the major nonhereditary cause of central nervous system (CNS developmental disorders. Previous attempts to develop a murine CMV (MCMV model of natural congenital human CMV (HCMV infection have failed because MCMV does not cross the placenta in immunocompetent mice. Results In marked contrast with immunocompetent mice, C.B-17 SCID (severe combined immunodeficient mice were found to be highly susceptible to natural MCMV transplacental transmission and congenital infection. Timed-pregnant SCID mice were intraperitoneally (IP injected with MCMV at embryonic (E stages E0-E7, and vertical MCMV transmission was evaluated using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR, in situ hybridization (ISH and immunohistochemical (IHC assays. SCID mouse dams IP injected at E0 with 102 PFU of MCMV died or resorbed their fetuses by E18. Viable fetuses collected at E18 from SCID mice IP injected with 102–104 PFU of MCMV at E7 did not demonstrate vertical MCMV transmission. Notably, transplacental MCMV transmission was confirmed in E18 fetuses from SCID mice IP injected with 103 PFU of MCMV at stages E3-E5. The maximum rate of transplacental MCMV transmission (53% at E18 occurred when SCID mouse dams were IP injected with 103 PFU of MCMV at E4. Congenital infection was confirmed by IHC immunostaining of MCMV antigens in 26% of the MCMV nPCR positive E18 fetuses. Transplacental MCMV transmission was associated with intrauterine growth retardation and microcephaly. Additionally, E18 fetuses with MCMV nPCR positive brains had cerebral interleukin-1α (IL-1α expression significantly upregulated and cerebral IL-1 receptor II (IL-1RII transcription significantly downregulated. However, MCMV-induced changes in cerebral cytokine expression were not associated with any histological signs of MCMV infection or inflammation in the brain. Conclusion Severe T

  7. Sgk1 Sensitive Pendrin Expression in Murine Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisann Pelzl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The anion exchanger pendrin (SLC26A4 is required for proper development of the inner ear, and contributes to iodide organification in thyroid glands as well as anion transport in various epithelia, such as airways and renal tubules. SLC26A4 deficiency leads to Pendred syndrome, which is characterized by hearing loss with enlarged vestibular aqueducts and variable hypothyroidism and goiter. Pendrin expression in kidney, heart, lung and thyroid is up-regulated by the mineralocorticoid deoxycorticosterone (DOCA. Platelets express anion exchangers but virtually nothing is known about the molecular identity and regulation of those carriers. Other carriers such as the Na+/H+ exchanger are regulated by the mineralocorticoid-sensitive serum and glucocorticoid inducible kinase SGK1. Methods: The present study utilized i quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR to quantify the transcript levels of Slc26a4 as compared to Gapdh and ii western blotting to assess Slc26a4 protein abundance in murine platelets from gene-targeted mice lacking Sgk1 (sgk1-/- and respective wild type animals (sgk1+/+ treated without or with a subcutaneous injection of 2.5 mg DOCA for 3 h, or in sgk1+/+ platelets with or without in vitro treatment for 1 h with 10 µg/ml DOCA. Results: Slc26a4 was expressed in platelets, and in vitro DOCA treatment increased Slc26a4 mRNA levels in platelets isolated from sgk1+/+ mice. Moreover, in vivo DOCA treatment significantly up-regulated Slc26a4 mRNA levels in platelets isolated from sgk1+/+ but not sgk1-/- mice. An increase in Sgk1 mRNA levels paralleled that of Slc26a4 mRNA levels in platelets of sgk1+/+ mice. In addition, DOCA treatment further increased Slc26a4 protein abundance in platelets isolated from sgk1+/+ mice. Conclusions: Pendrin is expressed in platelets and is presumably regulated by SGK1 and mineralocorticoids.

  8. Transcriptome analysis of the ependymal barrier during murine neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Pramod

    2012-06-01

    to be upregulated at the protein level using immunofluorescence microcopy. This is important, because these molecules are members of the most significant pathways by IPA analyses. Conclusion Thus, our study indicates that ependymal cells actively express immune mediators and likely contribute to the observed immunopathogenesis during infection. Of particular interest is the major upregulation of antigen presentation pathway-related genes and chemokines/cytokines. This could explain how the ependyma is a prominent source of leukocyte infiltration into ventricles through the disrupted ependymal lining by way of pial vessels present in the internal leptomeninges in murine NCC.

  9. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  10. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  11. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Gillard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  12. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, Mike, E-mail: m.n.gillard@leeds.ac.uk; Harland, Derek, E-mail: d.g.harland@leeds.ac.uk; Speight, Martin, E-mail: speight@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  13. Modulation of gene expression via overlapping binding sites exerted by ZNF143, Notch1 and THAP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngondo-Mbongo, Richard Patryk; Myslinski, Evelyne; Aster, Jon C; Carbon, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    ZNF143 is a zinc-finger protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of both coding and non-coding genes from polymerase II and III promoters. Our study deciphers the genome-wide regulatory role of ZNF143 in relation with the two previously unrelated transcription factors Notch1/ICN1 and thanatos-associated protein 11 (THAP11) in several human and murine cells. We show that two distinct motifs, SBS1 and SBS2, are associated to ZNF143-binding events in promoters of >3000 genes. Without co-occupation, these sites are also bound by Notch1/ICN1 in T-lymphoblastic leukaemia cells as well as by THAP11, a factor involved in self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. We present evidence that ICN1 binding overlaps with ZNF143 binding events at the SBS1 and SBS2 motifs, whereas the overlap occurs only at SBS2 for THAP11. We demonstrate that the three factors modulate expression of common target genes through the mutually exclusive occupation of overlapping binding sites. The model we propose predicts that the binding competition between the three factors controls biological processes such as rapid cell growth of both neoplastic and stem cells. Overall, our study establishes a novel relationship between ZNF143, THAP11 and ICN1 and reveals important insights into ZNF143-mediated gene regulation. PMID:23408857

  14. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  15. Yes and PI3K bind CD95 to signal invasion of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleber, Susanne; Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio; Wiestler, Benedict; Beisel, Alexandra; Gieffers, Christian; Hill, Oliver; Thiemann, Meinolf; Mueller, Wolf; Sykora, Jaromir; Kuhn, Andreas; Schreglmann, Nina; Letellier, Elisabeth; Zuliani, Cecilia; Klussmann, Stefan; Teodorczyk, Marcin; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Ganten, Tom M; Sültmann, Holger; Tüttenberg, Jochen; von Deimling, Andreas; Regnier-Vigouroux, Anne; Herold-Mende, Christel; Martin-Villalba, Ana

    2008-03-01

    Invasion of surrounding brain tissue by isolated tumor cells represents one of the main obstacles to a curative therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Here we unravel a mechanism regulating glioma infiltration. Tumor interaction with the surrounding brain tissue induces CD95 Ligand expression. Binding of CD95 Ligand to CD95 on glioblastoma cells recruits the Src family member Yes and the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to CD95, which signal invasion via the glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta pathway and subsequent expression of matrix metalloproteinases. In a murine syngeneic model of intracranial GBM, neutralization of CD95 activity dramatically reduced the number of invading cells. Our results uncover CD95 as an activator of PI3K and, most importantly, as a crucial trigger of basal invasion of glioblastoma in vivo. PMID:18328427

  16. HTLV-1 and -2 envelope SU subdomains and critical determinants in receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valle Carine

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV -1 and -2 are deltaretroviruses that infect a wide range of cells. Glut1, the major vertebrate glucose transporter, has been shown to be the HTLV Env receptor. While it is well established that the extracellular surface component (SU of the HTLV envelope glycoprotein (Env harbors all of the determinants of interaction with the receptor, identification of SU subdomains that are necessary and sufficient for interaction with the receptor, as well as critical amino acids therein, remain to be precisely defined. Although highly divergent in the rest of their genomes, HTLV and murine leukemia virus (MLV Env appear to be related and based on homologous motifs between the HTLV and MLV SU, we derived chimeric HTLV/MLV Env and soluble HTLV-1 and -2 truncated amino terminal SU subdomains. Results Using these SU constructs, we found that the 183 and 178 amino terminal residues of the HTLV-1 and -2 Env, respectively, were sufficient to efficiently bind target cells of different species. Binding resulted from bona fide interaction with the HTLV receptor as isolated SU subdomains specifically interfered with HTLV Env-mediated binding, cell fusion, and cell-free as well as cell-to-cell infection. Therefore, the HTLV receptor-binding domain (RBD lies in the amino terminus of the SU, immediately upstream of a central immunodominant proline rich region (Env residues 180 to 205, that we show to be dispensible for receptor-binding and interference. Moreover, we identified a highly conserved tyrosine residue at position 114 of HTLV-1 Env, Tyr114, as critical for receptor-binding and subsequent interference to cell-to-cell fusion and infection. Finally, we observed that residues in the vicinity of Tyr114 have lesser impact on receptor binding and had various efficiency in interference to post-binding events. Conclusions The first 160 residues of the HTLV-1 and -2 mature cleaved SU fold as autonomous domains that

  17. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  18. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Irina Moater; Cristiana Radulescu; Ionica Ionita

    2011-01-01

    The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ...

  19. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc A. (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy H. (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  20. Sulfate-binding protein, CysP, is a candidate vaccine antigen of Moraxella catarrhalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F; Kirkham, Charmaine; Johnson, Antoinette; Brauer, Aimee L; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G

    2016-07-19

    Moraxella catarrhalis causes otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous impact globally in preventing morbidity caused by M. catarrhalis in these populations. Using a genome mining approach we have identified a sulfate binding protein, CysP, of an ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter system as a novel candidate vaccine antigen. CysP expresses epitopes on the bacterial surface and is highly conserved among strains. Immunization with CysP induces potentially protective immune responses in a murine pulmonary clearance model. In view of these features that indicate CysP is a promising vaccine antigen, we conducted further studies to elucidate its function. These studies demonstrated that CysP binds sulfate and thiosulfate ions, plays a nutritional role for the organism and functions in intracellular survival of M. catarrhalis in human respiratory epithelial cells. The observations that CysP has features of a vaccine antigen and also plays an important role in growth and survival of the organism indicate that CysP is an excellent candidate vaccine antigen to prevent M. catarrhalis otitis media and infections in adults with COPD. PMID:27265455

  1. Functional interaction between herpes simplex virus type 2 gD and HVEM transiently dampens local chemokine production after murine mucosal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miri Yoon

    Full Text Available Herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM is one of two principal receptors mediating herpes simplex virus (HSV entry into murine and human cells. It functions naturally as an immune signaling co-receptor, and may participate in enhancing or repressing immune responses depending on the natural ligand used. To investigate whether engagement of HVEM by HSV affects the in vivo response to HSV infection, we generated recombinants of HSV-2(333 that expressed wild-type gD (HSV-2/gD or mutant gD able to bind to nectin-1 (the other principal entry receptor but not HVEM. Replication kinetics and yields of the recombinant strains on Vero cells were indistinguishable from those of wild-type HSV-2(333. After intravaginal inoculation with mutant or wild-type virus, adult female C57BL/6 mice developed vaginal lesions and mortality in similar proportions, and mucosal viral titers were similar or lower for mutant strains at different times. Relative to HSV-2/gD, percentages of HSV-specific CD8(+ T-cells were similar or only slightly reduced after infection with the mutant strain HSV-2/gD-Δ7-15, in all tissues up to 9 days after infection. Levels of HSV-specific CD4(+ T-cells five days after infection also did not differ after infection with either strain. Levels of the cytokine IL-6 and of the chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CCL4 were significantly lower in vaginal washes one day after infection with HSV-2/gD compared with HSV-2/gD-Δ7-15. We conclude that the interaction of HSV gD with HVEM may alter early innate events in the murine immune response to infection, without significantly affecting acute mortality, morbidity, or initial T-cell responses after lethal challenge.

  2. Murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector has differential integration patterns in human cell lines used to produce recombinant factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cristina Correa de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nowadays recombinant factor VIII is produced in murine cells including in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO and baby hamster kidney cells (BHK. Previous studies, using the murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K, modified two recombinant human cell lines, HepG2 and Hek293 to produce recombinant factor VIII. In order to characterize these cells, the present study aimed to analyze the integration pattern of retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K.METHODS: This study used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction to locate the site of viral vector integration by sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The sequences were compared to genomic databases to characterize respective clones.RESULTS: The retroviral vector presented different and non-random profiles of integration between cells lines. A preference of integration for chromosomes 19, 17 and 11 was observed for HepG2FVIIIdB/P140K and chromosome 9 for Hek293FVIIIdB/P140K. In genomic regions such as CpG islands and transcription factor binding sites, there was no difference in the integration profiles for both cell lines. Integration in intronic regions of encoding protein genes (RefSeq genes was also observed in both cell lines. Twenty percent of integrations occurred at fragile sites in the genome of the HepG2 cell line and 17% in Hek293.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the cell type can affect the profile of chromosomal integration of the retroviral vector used; these differences may interfere in the level of expression of recombinant proteins.

  3. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gang G.; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L.; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Allis, C. David; (MSKCC); (Scripps); (Rockefeller)

    2009-07-21

    Histone H3 lysine4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  4. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Marie Lamar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  5. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression. PMID:27148972

  6. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren;

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  7. Measles virus-specific murine T cell clones: characterization of fine specificity function.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); J.P.M. Versteeg-van Oosten (José); I.K.G. Visser (Ilona); R.S. van Binnendijk (Rob); S.A. Langeveld (Sacha); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Ab); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus (MV)-specific murine helper T cell clones (Thy-1.2+, CD4+, CD8-) were generated from mice immunized with MV-infected mouse brain homogenate by limiting dilution and in vitro stimulation of spleen cells with UV-inactivated MV Ag. The protein specificity of 7 out of 37 stable

  8. Murine Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Is Converted into the Inactive Fold by the Ser195Cys Mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scavenius, Carsten; Petersen, Jane Savskov; Thomsen, Line Rold;

    2013-01-01

    of the murine EC-SOD was significantly reduced by the mutation. Collectively, these data suggest that Cys195 actuates the formation of iEC-SOD, independent of the expression system or host. In addition, the dual-folding pathway most likely requires biosynthesis factors that are common to both humans and rodents....

  9. Limited Role of Murine ATM in Oncogene-Induced Senescence and p53-Dependent Tumor Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pastor, Barbara; Ortega-Molina, Ana; Soria, Rebeca; Collado, Manuel; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Serrano, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:19421407

  10. Expression profile and protein translation of TMEM16A in murine smooth muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Alison J; Forrest, Abigail S; Jepps, Thomas Andrew;

    2010-01-01

    , including slow kinetics, steep outward rectification, and a response similar to the pharmacological agent niflumic acid. This study shows that TMEM16A expression is robust in murine vascular smooth muscle cells, consolidating the view that this gene is a viable candidate for the native Ca(2+)-activated Cl...

  11. An ES-Like pluripotent state in FGF-dependent murine iPS cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. di Stefano (Bruno); C. Buecker (Christa); F. Ungaro (Federica); A. Prigione (Alessandro); H.H. Chen; M. Welling (Maaike); M. Eijpe (Maureen); G. Mostoslavsky (Gustavo); P. Tesar (Paul); J. Adjaye (James); N. Geijsen (Niels); V. Broccoli (Vania)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractRecent data demonstrates that stem cells can exist in two morphologically, molecularly and functionally distinct pluripotent states; a naïve LIF-dependent pluripotent state which is represented by murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and an FGFdependent primed pluripotent state represente

  12. Viral Engineering of Chimeric Antigen Receptor Expression on Murine and Human T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammill, Joanne A; Afsahi, Arya; Bramson, Jonathan L; Helsen, Christopher W

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of a bolus of tumor-specific T lymphocytes into cancer patients is a promising therapeutic strategy. In one approach, tumor specificity is conferred upon T cells via engineering expression of exogenous receptors, such as chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). Here, we describe the generation and production of both murine and human CAR-engineered T lymphocytes using retroviruses. PMID:27581020

  13. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M;

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  14. Structure of the gene encoding the murine protein kinase CK2 beta subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boldyreff, B; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    The mouse protein kinase CK2 beta subunit gene (Csnk2b) is composed of seven exons contained within 7874 bp. The exon and intron lengths extend from 76 to 321 and 111 to 1272 bp, respectively. The lengths of the murine coding exons correspond exactly to the lengths of the exons in the human CK2...

  15. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo; L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPS

  16. A Murine ESC-like State Facilitates Transgenesis and Homologous Recombination in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose Maria; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPSC reprogramm

  17. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  18. Midline 1 controls polarization and migration of murine cytotoxic T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boding, Lasse; Hansen, Ann K; Nielsen, Morten M;

    2014-01-01

    is strongly up-regulated in murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and that it has a significant impact on exocytosis of lytic granules and the killing capacity of CTLs. The aims of the present study were to determine the localization of MID1 in migrating CTLs, and to investigate whether MID1 affects CTL...

  19. Anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa IgY antibodies augment bacterial clearance in a murine pneumonia model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K; Christophersen, L; Bjarnsholt, T;

    2016-01-01

    -P. aeruginosa IgY antibodies on bacterial eradication in a murine pneumonia model. METHODS: P. aeruginosa pneumonia was established in Balb/c mice and the effects of prophylactic IgY administration on lung bacteriology, clinical parameters and subsequent inflammation were compared to controls. RESULTS...

  20. Local IL-23 Expression in Murine Vaginal Candidiasis and Its Relationship with Infection and Immune Status

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan; TAN Zhijian; LIU Zhixiang; XIA Dechao; LI Jiawen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal IL-23 and its role in experimental murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status, immuno-competent (group A) and immuno-suppressed (group B) murine models of vaginal candidiasis were established in estrogentreated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls (group C). The level of IL-23 p19 mRNA in murine vaginal tissue was determined by RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of IL23p19mRNA were observed on the 4th, the 7th and 14th day after inoculation in immuno-competent group when compared with that in control group (P<0.01, P<0.05), However, significant increase of IL-23 p19mRNA were only observed on the 7th day and the 14th day after inoculatuon in immuno-suppressed groups (P<0.05). On the 4th and 7th day, the levels of IL-23 p19mRNA were significantly increased in immuno-competent group than those in immuno-suppressed group (P <0.05). Local IL-23 may play a role in the pathogenesis of murine vaginal candidiasis and has a protective function during infection. Low vaginal IL-23 level may correlate with the increased susceptibility to Candida albicans in immuno-suppressed group.

  1. Perforin and Fas in murine gammaherpesvirus-specific CD8(+) T cell control and morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topham, D J; Cardin, R C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard;

    2001-01-01

    The immune system uses both virus-specific T cells and B cells to control the acute and latent phases of respiratory infection with the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (gammaHV-68). We sought to further define the important effector mechanisms for CD8(+) T cells. First, depletion of the CD4(+) T cells...

  2. Fetal wound healing using a genetically modified murine model: the contribution of P-selectin

    Science.gov (United States)

    During early gestation, fetal wounds heal with paucity of inflammation and absent scar formation. P-selectin is an adhesion molecule that is important for leukocyte recruitment to injury sites. We used a murine fetal wound healing model to study the specific contribution of P-selectin to scarless wo...

  3. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K;

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...

  4. Murine Typhus and Leptospirosis as Causes of Acute Undifferentiated Fever, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Gasem; J.F.P. Wagenaar; M.G.A. Goris; M.S. Adi; B.B. Isbandrio; R.A. Hartskeerl; J.M. Rolain; D. Raoult; E.C.M. van Gorp

    2009-01-01

    To investigate rickettsioses and leptospirosis among urban residents of Semarang, Indonesia, we tested the blood of 137 patients with fever. Evidence of Rickettsia typhi, the agent of murine typhus, was found in 9 patients. Another 9 patients showed inconclusive serologic results. Thirteen patients

  5. CHEMOIMMUNOTHERAPY OF MURINE LIVER METASTASES WITH 5-FLUOROURACIL IN COMBINATION WITH LIPOSOME-ENCAPSULATED MURAMYL DIPEPTIDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAEMEN, T; DONTJE, BHJ; REGTS, J; SCHERPHOF, GL

    1993-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of a combination of liposomal muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and 5-fluorouracil (5FU) was studied in a murine tumor model of hepatic metastases of the tumor cell line C26, a colon adenocarcinoma. Liposomal MDP (250 mug/kg body wt) and a low, nontoxic, dose of 5FU (10 mg/kg body wt) w

  6. Immune recognition of AIDS virus antigens by human and murine cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlade-Demoyen, P; Michel, F; Hoffenbach, A; Vilmer, E; Dadaglio, G; Garicia-Pons, F; Mayaud, C; Autran, B; Wain-Hobson, S; Plata, F

    1988-09-15

    The CTL response to HIV was analyzed in humans and in mice. By using a novel and strictly autologous lymphocyte culture system, human CTL lines were established with PBL from seropositive asymptomatic donors and from patients suffering from AIDS or presenting AIDS-related complex. CTL from HLA-A2 donors recognize and kill murine P815 mastocytoma cells doubly transfected with the human HLA-A2 gene and the HIV env gene; they also kill HLA-compatible human macrophages infected with HIV. CTL specific for the HIV env Ag were also generated in BALB/c mice by immunization with syngeneic murine cells transfected with the HIV env gene. Human and murine HIV-immune CTL populations belong to the CD8 subset of T lymphocytes and are restricted by class I HLA or H-2 transplantation Ag, respectively, in the recognition of HIV env Ag. The two different experimental systems presented here can be used to study CD8 lymphocyte immunity against HIV. The murine model of CTL immunity offers the additional advantage of avoiding the manipulation of infectious virus isolates.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Clone pKV(37-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbey, Jane E; Fujinami, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    The murine pneumotropic virus genome encoded by the pKV(37-1) clone was sequenced to completion. The regulatory region harbored a mutation not previously reported. The protein coding regions (large and small T antigens, viral proteins 1 to 3) showed multiple regions of high amino acid identity to the human, simian, and bovine polyomaviruses. PMID:27198030

  8. Transgene stability for three replication-competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, Maria L; Hansen, Bettina Dencker;

    2004-01-01

    cassette consisting of an internal ribosome entry site followed by the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding sequence inserted in different configurations into murine leukemia virus genomes. In two of the constructs, the insert was located in the upstream part of the U3 region while in the third...

  9. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses.

  10. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses. PMID:26798094

  11. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  12. Unbiased mutagenesis of MHV68 LANA reveals a DNA-binding domain required for LANA function in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clinton R Paden

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen (LANA, encoded by ORF73, is a conserved gene among the γ2-herpesviruses (rhadinoviruses. The Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV LANA is consistently expressed in KSHV-associated malignancies. In the case of the rodent γ2-herpesvirus, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, the LANA homolog (mLANA is required for efficient virus replication, reactivation from latency and immortalization of murine fetal liver-derived B cells. To gain insights into mLANA function(s, knowing that KSHV LANA binds DNA and can modulate transcription of a variety of promoters, we sought out and identified a mLANA-responsive promoter which maps to the terminal repeat (TR of MHV68. Notably, mLANA strongly repressed activity from this promoter. We extended these analyses to demonstrate direct, sequence-specific binding of recombinant mLANA to TR DNA by DNase I footprinting. To assess whether the DNA-binding and/or transcription modulating function is important in the known mLANA phenotypes, we generated an unbiased library of mLANA point mutants using error-prone PCR, and screened a large panel of mutants for repression of the mLANA-responsive promoter to identify loss of function mutants. Notably, among the mutant mLANA proteins recovered, many of the mutations are in a predicted EBNA-1-like DNA-binding domain. Consistent with this prediction, those tested displayed loss of DNA binding activity. We engineered six of these mLANA mutants into the MHV68 genome and tested the resulting mutant viruses for: (i replication fitness; (ii efficiency of latency establishment; and (iii reactivation from latency. Interestingly, each of these mLANA-mutant viruses exhibited phenotypes similar to the mLANA-null mutant virus, indicating that DNA-binding is critical for mLANA function.

  13. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W; Aster, Richard H; Springer, Timothy A

    2015-10-29

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin.

  14. Loss of Glycosaminoglycan Receptor Binding after Mosquito Cell Passage Reduces Chikungunya Virus Infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhiraj Acharya

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that can cause fever and chronic arthritis in humans. CHIKV that is generated in mosquito or mammalian cells differs in glycosylation patterns of viral proteins, which may affect its replication and virulence. Herein, we compare replication, pathogenicity, and receptor binding of CHIKV generated in Vero cells (mammal or C6/36 cells (mosquito through a single passage. We demonstrate that mosquito cell-derived CHIKV (CHIKV mos has slower replication than mammalian cell-derived CHIKV (CHIKV vero, when tested in both human and murine cell lines. Consistent with this, CHIKV mos infection in both cell lines produce less cytopathic effects and reduced antiviral responses. In addition, infection in mice show that CHIKV mos produces a lower level of viremia and less severe footpad swelling when compared with CHIKV vero. Interestingly, CHIKV mos has impaired ability to bind to glycosaminoglycan (GAG receptors on mammalian cells. However, sequencing analysis shows that this impairment is not due to a mutation in the CHIKV E2 gene, which encodes for the viral receptor binding protein. Moreover, CHIKV mos progenies can regain GAG receptor binding capability and can replicate similarly to CHIKV vero after a single passage in mammalian cells. Furthermore, CHIKV vero and CHIKV mos no longer differ in replication when N-glycosylation of viral proteins was inhibited by growing these viruses in the presence of tunicamycin. Collectively, these results suggest that N-glycosylation of viral proteins within mosquito cells can result in loss of GAG receptor binding capability of CHIKV and reduction of its infectivity in mammalian cells.

  15. Antimicrobial Peptide-Lipid Binding Interactions and Binding Selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lad, Mitaben D.; Birembaut, Fabrice; Clifton, Luke A.; Frazier, Richard A.; Webster, John R. P.; Green, Rebecca J.

    2007-01-01

    Surface pressure measurements, external reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and neutron reflectivity have been used to investigate the lipid-binding behavior of three antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin II, and cecropin P1. As expected, all three cationic peptides were shown to interact more strongly with the anionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-(phosphor-rac-(1-glycerol)) (DPPG), compared to the zwitterionic lipid, 1,2 dihexadecanoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocho...

  16. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUAN ZHOU; YU XIA CUI; XI QIANG YANG; ZHOU FU; LI PING JIANG; LI JIA WANG

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to distinguish respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and immunology between immunocompetent and immunocompromised murine and to explore immune mechanism of RSV infection. At various time points after RSV infection of BALB/c mice and nude mice, pulmonary viral titers were assayed, RSV antigen was tested by direct immunofluorescent assay and immunohistochemistry. Pulmonary mRNA expressions of Toll like receptor (TLR)2 and TLR4 were assayed by RT-PCR. CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells in peripheral blood were examined by flow cytometry and plasma total IgE was assayed by ELISA. Leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and pulmonary histology were identified to reflect airway inflammation. It was found that RSV titers of both mice peaked on the 3rd day post infection with a much higher level of viral titer in nude mice than in BALB/c mice and a longer viral duration in nude mice (over 9 days post infection) than in BALB/c mice (6 days post infection). RSV infection induced higher viral antigen expression in nude mice (0.267 ±0.045) than in BALB/c mice (0. 168 ± 0.031). RSV infection enhanced pulmonary TLR4 expression of BALB/c mice (51.96% ± 11.34%) and nude mice (48.96% ± 12.35%) compared with each control (34.04% ± 10.06% and 32.37% ± 9.87% respectively). CD4+ peripheral blood cells increased in RSV infected BALB/c mice (66.51% ± 2.09% ) compared with the control BALB/c mice (51.63% ± 5.90% ), and CD4+ cells and CD8+ cells were deficient in nude mice. RSV infection increased plasma total IgE in both mice, and BALB/c mice had a larger amount of IgE on the 7th day post infection (9.02 ng/ml ± 2.90 ng/ml) and on the 14th day post infection (12.76 ng/ml ± 4.15 ng/ml) than corresponding nude mice (3.72 ng/ml ± 1.06 ng/ml and 7.62 ng/ml ± 3.08 ng/ml respectively on the 7th and 14th day post infection). RSV infected nude mice had more severe airway inflammation than infected BALB/c mice. It is concluded that BALB/c mice and

  17. GLP-1 improves neuropathology after murine cold lesion brain trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DellaValle, Brian; Hempel, Casper; Johansen, Flemming Fryd;

    2014-01-01

    cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway in the brain in vivo, and whether activation leads to observable increases in protective, anti-neurodegenerative proteins. Finally, we report the first use of a highly sensitive in vivo imaging agent to assess reactive species generation after...... brain trauma. METHODS: Severe trauma was induced with a stereotactic cryo-lesion in mice and thereafter treated with vehicle, liraglutide, or liraglutide + GLP-1 receptor antagonist. A therapeutic window was established and lesion size post-trauma was determined. Reactive oxygen species were visualized...... the GLP-1 receptor. Reactive species generation was reduced by ∼40-60%. Necrotic and apoptotic tone maintained similar to sham in diseased animals with Lira treatment. Phosphorylation of CREB was markedly increased by Lira in a GLP-1 receptor-dependent manner. CREB-regulated cytoprotective and anti-neurodegenerative...

  18. Isolation and characterization of the murine Nanog gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da Yong WU; Zhen YAO

    2005-01-01

    Nanog protein is expressed in the interior cells of compacted morulae and maintained till epiblasts but downregulated by implantation stage. It is also expressed in embryonic stem cells, embryonic carcinoma cells and embryonic germ cells but disappeared in differentiated ES cells. In this study, we have isolated, sequenced, and performed the first characterization of the Nanog promoter. The transcription start sites were mapped by primer extension analysis. Two promoter regions were found upstream the transcription start sites and the expression of major Nanog promoter/reporter gene construct is abolished in differentiated F9 EC cells as compared to the undifferentiated counterpart. We also showed that a putative octamer motif (ATGCAAAA) is necessary for the major promoter activity. Gel shift and supershift assays showed that Oct-1, Oct-4 and Oct-6 protein selectively bind to the octamer motif.

  19. Characteristics of human erythrocyte insulin binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    Insulin and human erythrocyte cell membrane interactions were studied with respect to binding and dissociation. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin to erythrocytes was directly proportional to the cell concentration. The optimum pH for binding was 8.1. The initial binding rate was directly proportional to, and the steady state insulin binding was reversely proportional to, the incubation temperature. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin was 12.10 +/- 1...

  20. Comparative effects in vivo of recombinant murine interleukin 3, natural murine colony-stimulating factor-1, and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor on myelopoiesis in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Broxmeyer, H E; Williams, D.E.; Cooper, S; Shadduck, R K; Gillis, S.; Waheed, A.; Urdal, D L; Bicknell, D C

    1987-01-01

    Purified murine colony-stimulating factors (CSF) recombinant interleukin 3 (IL-3), natural CSF-1, and recombinant granulocyte-macrophage (GM) CSF were assessed in vivo for their effects on BDF1 mouse bone marrow and spleen granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM), erythroid (BFU-E), and multipotential (CFU-GEMM) progenitor cells in untreated mice and in mice pretreated with purified iron-saturated human lactoferrin (LF). The CSF and LF preparations did not contain detectable endotoxin (less than 0.1 n...

  1. Generation and characterization of a tetraspanin CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain competitively binding monoclonal antibody for inhibition of tumor progression in HCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia-Bin; Huang, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Lu; Kang, Qiang; Liu, Li-Xin; Xie, Nan; Shen, Zao-Zhuo; Hu, Mei-Yu; Cao, Ya; Qiu, Shuang-Jian; Sun, Hui-Chuan; Zhou, Jian; Fan, Jia; Shi, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that tetraspanin CD151 plays multiple roles in the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by forming a functional complex with integrin α6β1. Herein, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb) that dissociates the CD151/integrin α6β1 complex, and we evaluated its bioactivity in HCCs. A murine mAb, tetraspanin CD151 (IgG1, called CD151 mAb 9B), was successfully generated against the CD151-integrin α6β1 binding site of CD151 extracellular domains. Co-immunoprecipitation using CD151 mAb 9B followed by Western blotting detected a 28 kDa protein. Both immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining showed a good reactivity of CD151 mAb 9B in the plasma membrane and cytoplasm of HCC cells, as well as in liver cells. In vitro assays demonstrated that CD151 mAb 9B could inhibit neoangiogenesis and both the mobility and the invasiveness of HCC cells. An in vivo assay showed that CD151 mAb 9B inhibited tumor growth potential and HCC cells metastasis. We successfully produced a CD151 mAb 9B targeting the CD151/integrin α6β1-binding domain, which not only can displayed good reactivity to the CD151 antigen but also prevented tumor progression in HCC. PMID:26756217

  2. Dissection of the Critical Binding Determinants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II by Mutagenesis and Fluorescence Binding Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Crist, Rachael M.; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Goins, Sarah M.; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2009-01-01

    The binding of retinoic acid to mutants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II (CRABPII) was evaluated to better understand the importance of the direct protein/ligand interactions. The important role of Arg111 for the correct structure and function of the protein was verified and other residues that directly affect retinoic acid binding have been identified. Furthermore, retinoic acid binding to CRABPII mutants that lack all previously identified interacting amino acids was rescued by ...

  3. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B;

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  4. Myxoma virus induces type I interferon production in murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs. PMID:21835795

  5. Anti-EphA2 Antibodies Decrease EphA2 Protein Levels in Murine CT26 Colorectal and Human MDA-231 Breast Tumors But Do Not Inhibit Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kiewlich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to be over-expressed in cancer and a monoclonal antibody (mAb that activates and down-modulates EphA2 was reported to inhibit the growth of human breast and lung tumor xenografts in nude mice. Reduction of EphA2 levels by treatment with anti-EphA2 siRNA also inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that the anti-tumor effects of these agents are mediated by decreasing the levels of EphA2. As these studies employed human tumor xenograft models in nude mice with reagents whose crossreactivity with murine EphA2 is unknown, we generated a mAb (Ab20 that preferentially binds, activates, and induces the degradation of murine EphA2. Treatment of established murine CT26 colorectal tumors with Ab20 reduced EphA2 protein levels to ~12% of control tumor levels, yet had no effect on tumor growth. CT26 tumor cell colonization of the lung was also not affected by Ab20 administration despite having barely detectable levels of EphA2. We also generated and tested a potent agonistic mAb against human EphA2 (1G9-H7. No inhibition of human MDA-231 breast tumor xenograft growth was observed despite evidence for >85% reduction of EphA2 protein levels in the tumors. These results suggest that molecular characteristics of the tumors in addition to EphA2 over-expression may be important for predicting responsiveness to EphA2-directed therapies.

  6. Binding effects and nuclear shadowing

    OpenAIRE

    Indumathi, D.; Wei ZHU

    1996-01-01

    The effects of nuclear binding on nuclear structure functions have so far been studied mainly at fixed target experiments, and there is currently much interest in obtaining a clearer understanding of this phenomenon. We use an existing dynamical model of nuclear structure functions, that gives good agreement with current data, to study this effect in a kinematical regime (low $x$, high $Q^2$) that can possibly be probed by an upgrade of {\\sc hera} at {\\sc desy} into a nuclear accelerator.

  7. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  8. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  9. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  10. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  11. TWEAK activates the non-canonical NFkappaB pathway in murine renal tubular cells: modulation of CCL21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Sanz

    Full Text Available TWEAK is a member of the TNF superfamily of cytokines that contribute to kidney tubulointerstitial injury. It has previously been reported that TWEAK induces transient nuclear translocation of RelA and expression of RelA-dependent cytokines in renal tubular cells. Additionally, TWEAK induced long-lasting NFkappaB activation suggestive of engagement of the non-canonical NFkappaB pathway. We now explore TWEAK-induced activation of NFkappaB2 and RelB, as well as expression of CCL21, a T-cell chemotactic factor, in cultured murine tubular epithelial cells and in healthy kidneys in vivo. In cultured tubular cells, TWEAK and TNFalpha activated different DNA-binding NFkappaB complexes. TWEAK-induced sustained NFkappaB activation was associated with NFkappaB2 p100 processing to p52 via proteasome and nuclear translocation and DNA-binding of p52 and RelB. TWEAK, but not TNFalpha used as control, induced a delayed increase in CCL21a mRNA (3.5+/-1.22-fold over control and CCL21 protein (2.5+/-0.8-fold over control, which was prevented by inhibition of the proteasome, or siRNA targeting of NIK or RelB, but not by RelA inhibition with parthenolide. A second NFkappaB2-dependent chemokine, CCL19, was upregulates by TWEAK, but not by TNFalpha. However, both cytokines promoted chemokine RANTES expression (3-fold mRNA at 24 h. In vivo, TWEAK induced nuclear NFkappaB2 and RelB translocation and CCL21a mRNA (1.5+/-0.3-fold over control and CCL21 protein (1.6+/-0.5-fold over control expression in normal kidney. Increased tubular nuclear RelB and tubular CCL21 expression in acute kidney injury were decreased by neutralization (2+/-0.9 vs 1.3+/-0.6-fold over healthy control or deficiency of TWEAK (2+/-0.9 vs 0.8+/-0.6-fold over healthy control. Moreover, anti-TWEAK treatment prevented the recruitment of T cells to the kidney in this model (4.1+/-1.4 vs 1.8+/-1-fold over healthy control. Our results thus identify TWEAK as a regulator of non-canonical NFkappa

  12. Murine Efficacy and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Flaviviral NS5 Capping Enzyme 2-Thioxothiazolidin-4-One Inhibitor BG-323.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M Bullard

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne flavivirus infection continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identification of drug targets and novel antiflaviviral compounds to treat these diseases has become a global health imperative. A previous screen of 235,456 commercially available small molecules identified the 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one family of compounds as inhibitors of the flaviviral NS5 capping enzyme, a promising target for antiviral drug development. Rational drug design methodologies enabled identification of lead compound BG-323 from this series. We have shown previously that BG-323 potently inhibits NS5 capping enzyme activity, displays antiviral effects in dengue virus replicon assays and inhibits growth of West Nile and yellow fever viruses with low cytotoxicity in vitro. In this study we further characterized BG-323's antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that BG-323 was able to reduce replication of WNV (NY99 and Powassan viruses in culture, and we were unable to force resistance into WNV (Kunjin in long-term culture experiments. We then evaluated the antiviral activity of BG-323 in a murine model. Mice were challenged with WNV NY99 and administered BG-323 or mock by IP inoculation immediately post challenge and twice daily thereafter. Mice were bled and viremia was quantified on day three. No significant differences in viremia were observed between BG-323-treated and control groups and clinical scores indicated both BG-323-treated and control mice developed signs of illness on approximately the same day post challenge. To determine whether differences in in vitro and in vivo efficacy were due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties of BG-323, we conducted a pharmacokinetic evaluation of this small molecule. Insights from pharmacokinetic studies indicate that BG-323 is cell permeable, has a low efflux ratio and does not significantly inhibit two common cytochrome P450 (CYP P450 isoforms thus suggesting this molecule

  13. Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding human calumenin, expression in Escherichia coli and analysis of its Ca2+-binding activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Liu, X; Madsen, Peder;

    1998-01-01

    By microsequencing and cDNA cloning we have identified the transformation-sensitive protein No. IEF SSP 9302 as the human homologue of calumenin. The nucleotide sequence predicts a 315 amino acid protein with high identity to murine and rat calumenin. The deduced protein contains a 19 amino acid N...... and pancreas and at very low levels in brain and liver. Calumenin belongs to a family of multiple EF-hand proteins that include the ER localized proteins reticulocalbin and ERC-55 and the Golgi localized Cab45. Since its Ca2+ binding may be important for the function of the protein we have used microdialysis...

  14. Extended minus-strand DNA as template for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer in recombinational rescue of primer binding site-modified retroviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Dybkaer, K;

    1998-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated recombinational rescue of primer binding site (PBS)-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors involving initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and template switching during cDNA synthesis to obtain PBS complementarity in second-strand transfer of...... mutated PBS during minus-strand synthesis, and subsequent second-strand transfer mediated by the R-U5 complementarity of the plus strand and the extended minus-strand DNA acceptor template. Mechanisms for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer and its possible role in retrovirus replication and evolution...

  15. Cellular expression or binding of desLys58-beta2 microglobulin is not dependent on the presence of the tri-molecular MHC class I complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Corlin, D B; Heegaard, N H H;

    2008-01-01

    increased when cells were pre-incubated with dbeta2m and when TIB-202 cells were exposed to lipopolysaccharide. dbeta2m was also expressed on T leukaemic Jurkat cells as well as on low HLA-expressing erythroleukaemic K562 cells. beta2m gene-deleted murine splenocytes only bound 332-01 after pre......The monoclonal antibody 332-01 is a newly developed antibody which specifically recognizes human desLys58-beta2 microglobulin (dbeta2m). In the present study, we characterized the binding of 332-01 to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), a number of human leukaemic and monocytic cell lines...

  16. Solute-vacancy binding in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous efforts to understand solute-vacancy binding in aluminum alloys have been hampered by a scarcity of reliable, quantitative experimental measurements. Here, we report a large database of solute-vacancy binding energies determined from first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated binding energies agree well with accurate measurements where available, and provide an accurate predictor of solute-vacancy binding in other systems. We find: (i) some common solutes in commercial Al alloys (e.g., Cu and Mg) possess either very weak (Cu), or even repulsive (Mg), binding energies. Hence, we assert that some previously reported large binding energies for these solutes are erroneous. (ii) Large binding energies are found for Sn, Cd and In, confirming the proposed mechanism for the reduced natural aging in Al-Cu alloys containing microalloying additions of these solutes. (iii) In addition, we predict that similar reduction in natural aging should occur with additions of Si, Ge and Au. (iv) Even larger binding energies are found for other solutes (e.g., Pb, Bi, Sr, Ba), but these solutes possess essentially no solubility in Al. (v) We have explored the physical effects controlling solute-vacancy binding in Al. We find that there is a strong correlation between binding energy and solute size, with larger solute atoms possessing a stronger binding with vacancies. (vi) Most transition-metal 3d solutes do not bind strongly with vacancies, and some are even energetically strongly repelled from vacancies, particularly for the early 3d solutes, Ti and V

  17. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  18. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, Gisela K. (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  19. DMPD: Toll-like receptor 9 in murine lupus: more friend than foe! [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18241699 Toll-like receptor 9 in murine lupus: more friend than foe! Yu P, Musette P, Peng SL. Immunobiology...pus: more friend than foe! Authors Yu P, Musette P, Peng SL. Publication Immunobiology

  20. Expression of Prothrombinase/fibroleukin Gene fg12 in Lung Impairment in a Murine Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming YAN; Jia-quan HUANG; Xiao-ping LUO; Qin NING

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the role of murine fibrinogen like protein 2 (mfgl2) /fibroleukin in lung impairment in Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a murine SARS model induced by Murine hepatitis virus strain 3 (MHV-3) through trachea was established. Impressively, all the animals developed interstitial pneumonia with extensive hyaline membranes formation within alveoli, and presence of micro-vascular thrombosis in the pulmonary vessels. MHV-3 nucleocapsid gene transcripts were identified in multiple organs including lungs, spleen etc. As a representative proinflammatory gene, mfgl2 prothrombinase expression was evident in terminal and respiratory bronchioles, alveolar epithelia and infiltrated cells in the lungs associated with fibrin deposition and micro-vascular thrombosis. In summary, the established murine SARS model could mimic the pathologic characteristics of lungs in patients with SARS. Besides the physical damages due to virus replication in organs, the up-regulation of novel gene mfgl2 in lungs may play a vital role in the development of SARS associated lung damage.

  1. EFFECTS OF IMMUNOSUPPRESSION WITH CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE ON ACUTE MURINE CYTOMEGALOVIRUS INFECTION AND VIRUS-AUGMENTED NATURAL KILLER CELL ACTIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of cyclophosphamide (CY) treatment on acute murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection were studied to explore the potential usefulness of MCMV as a means of detecting immune dysfunction and to identify host defense mechanisms important for protection against MCMV.

  2. Effect of Control-released Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Incorporated in β-Tricalcium Phosphate for Murine Cranial Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Shimizu, MD

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration in the murine cranial defect model and may be promising for the clinical treatment of cranial defects.

  3. In vitro Staphylococcus aureus–induced oxidative stress in mice murine peritoneal macrophages: a duration–dependent approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhankari Prasad Chakraborty

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro VSSA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant status and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophages.

  4. Efficacy of paracetamol on patent ductus arteriosus closure may be dose dependent: evidence from human and murine studies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    El-Khuffash, Afif

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical effectiveness of variable courses of paracetamol on patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure and examined its effect on the in vitro term and preterm murine ductus arteriosus (DA).

  5. Detection of adulterated murine components in meat products by TaqMan© real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Zhang, Chi

    2016-02-01

    Using murine meat to substitute mutton has been identified as a new type of meat fraud in China, yet no detection method for murine species has been reported. Here, three kinds of rodent were used as target species to establish a murine-specific real-time PCR method of detection. The mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (cytb) of each target was sequenced and a TaqMan probe was designed based on the cytb. Simultaneously, an internal positive control (IPC) plasmid along with its respective probe were designed to monitor the PCR reaction. As a result, the duplex real-time PCR system was verified to be specific. The limit of detection (LOD) was lower than 1 pg of DNA per reaction and 0.1% murine contamination in meat mixtures. Standard curves were generated for a quantitative analysis. Thus, this study provided a new tool to control the quality of meat products for official and third-party laboratories. PMID:26304376

  6. Alarmin function of galectin-9 in murine respiratory tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steichen, Anthony L; Simonson, Tanner J; Salmon, Sharon L; Metzger, Dennis W; Mishra, Bibhuti B; Sharma, Jyotika

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis is a complex immune disorder that is characterized by systemic hyperinflammation. Alarmins, which are multifunctional endogenous factors, have been implicated in exacerbation of inflammation in many immune disorders including sepsis. Here we show that Galectin-9, a host endogenous β-galactoside binding lectin, functions as an alarmin capable of mediating inflammatory response during sepsis resulting from pulmonary infection with Francisella novicida, a Gram negative bacterial pathogen. Our results show that this galectin is upregulated and is likely released during tissue damage in the lungs of F. novicida infected septic mice. In vitro, purified recombinant galectin-9 exacerbated F. novicida-induced production of the inflammatory mediators by macrophages and neutrophils. Concomitantly, Galectin-9 deficient (Gal-9-/-) mice exhibited improved lung pathology, reduced cell death and reduced leukocyte infiltration, particularly neutrophils, in their lungs. This positively correlated with overall improved survival of F. novicida infected Gal-9-/- mice as compared to their wild-type counterparts. Collectively, these findings suggest that galectin-9 functions as a novel alarmin by augmenting the inflammatory response in sepsis development during pulmonary F. novicida infection.

  7. Nesprin-1 mutations in human and murine cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckelwartz, Megan J.; Kessler, Eric J.; Kim, Gene; DeWitt, Megan M.; Zhang, Yuan; Earley, Judy U.; Depreux, Frederic F.S.; Holaska, James; Mewborn, Stephanie K.; Pytel, Peter; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in LMNA, the gene encoding the nuclear membrane proteins, lamins A and C, produce cardiac and muscle disease. In the heart, these autosomal dominant LMNA mutations lead to cardiomyopathy frequently associated with cardiac conduction system disease. Herein, we describe a patient with the R374H missense variant in nesprin-1α, a protein that binds lamin A/C. This individual developed dilated cardiomyopathy requiring cardiac transplantation. Fibroblasts from this individual had increased expression of nesprin-1α and lamins A and C, indicating changes in the nuclear membrane complex. We characterized mice lacking the carboxy-terminus of nesprin-1 since this model expresses nesprin-1 without its carboxy-terminal KASH domain. These Δ/Δ KASH mice have a normally assembled but dysfunctional nuclear membrane complex and provide a model for nesprin-1 mutations. We found that Δ/Δ KASH mice develop cardiomyopathy with associated cardiac conduction system disease. Older mutant animals were found to have elongated P wave duration, elevated atrial and ventricular effective refractory periods indicating conduction defects in the myocardium, and reduced fractional shortening. Cardiomyocyte nuclei were found to be elongated with reduced heterochromatin in the Δ/Δ KASH hearts. These findings mirror what has been described from lamin A/C gene mutations and reinforce the importance of an intact nuclear membrane complex for a normally functioning heart. PMID:19944109

  8. TGF-β and IL-6 signals modulate chromatin binding and promoter occupancy by acetylated FOXP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Arabinda; Li, Bin; Song, Xiaomin; Bembas, Kathryn; Zhang, Geng; Katsumata, Makoto; Saouaf, Sandra J.; Wang, Qiang; Hancock, Wayne W.; Shen, Yuan; Greene, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Expression of FOXP3, a potent gene-specific transcriptional repressor, in regulatory T cells is required to suppress autoreactive and alloreactive effector T cell function. Recent studies have shown that FOXP3 is an acetylated protein in a large nuclear complex and FOXP3 actively represses transcription by recruiting enzymatic corepressors, including histone modification enzymes. The mechanism by which extracellular stimuli regulate the FOXP3 complex ensemble is currently unknown. Although TGF-β is known to induce murine FOXP3+ Treg cells, TGF-β in combination with IL-6 attenuates the induction of FOXP3 functional activities. Here we show that TCR stimuli and TGF-β signals modulate the disposition of FOXP3 into different subnuclear compartments, leading to enhanced chromatin binding in human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. TGF-β treatment increases the level of acetylated FOXP3 on chromatin and site-specific recruitment of FOXP3 on the human IL-2 promoter. However, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 down-regulates FOXP3 binding to chromatin in the presence of TGF-β. Moreover, histone deacetylation inhibitor (HDACi) treatment abrogates the down-regulating effects of IL-6 and TGF-β. These studies indicate that HDACi can enhance regulatory T cell function via promoting FOXP3 binding to chromatin even in a proinflammatory cellular microenvironment. Collectively, our data provide a framework of how different signals affect intranuclear redistribution, posttranslational modifications, and chromatin binding patterns of FOXP3. PMID:18779564

  9. TGF-beta and IL-6 signals modulate chromatin binding and promoter occupancy by acetylated FOXP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Arabinda; Li, Bin; Song, Xiaomin; Bembas, Kathryn; Zhang, Geng; Katsumata, Makoto; Saouaf, Sandra J; Wang, Qiang; Hancock, Wayne W; Shen, Yuan; Greene, Mark I

    2008-09-16

    Expression of FOXP3, a potent gene-specific transcriptional repressor, in regulatory T cells is required to suppress autoreactive and alloreactive effector T cell function. Recent studies have shown that FOXP3 is an acetylated protein in a large nuclear complex and FOXP3 actively represses transcription by recruiting enzymatic corepressors, including histone modification enzymes. The mechanism by which extracellular stimuli regulate the FOXP3 complex ensemble is currently unknown. Although TGF-beta is known to induce murine FOXP3(+) Treg cells, TGF-beta in combination with IL-6 attenuates the induction of FOXP3 functional activities. Here we show that TCR stimuli and TGF-beta signals modulate the disposition of FOXP3 into different subnuclear compartments, leading to enhanced chromatin binding in human CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. TGF-beta treatment increases the level of acetylated FOXP3 on chromatin and site-specific recruitment of FOXP3 on the human IL-2 promoter. However, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 down-regulates FOXP3 binding to chromatin in the presence of TGF-beta. Moreover, histone deacetylation inhibitor (HDACi) treatment abrogates the down-regulating effects of IL-6 and TGF-beta. These studies indicate that HDACi can enhance regulatory T cell function via promoting FOXP3 binding to chromatin even in a proinflammatory cellular microenvironment. Collectively, our data provide a framework of how different signals affect intranuclear redistribution, posttranslational modifications, and chromatin binding patterns of FOXP3. PMID:18779564

  10. NAC1 is an actin-binding protein that is essential for effective cytokinesis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kai Lee; Fraley, Stephanie I; Thiaville, Michelle M; Jinawath, Natini; Nakayama, Kentaro; Wang, Jianlong; Wang, Tian-Li; Wirtz, Denis; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2012-08-15

    NAC1 is a transcriptional corepressor protein that is essential to sustain cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of NAC1 function in cancer cells remain unknown. In this study, we show that NAC1 functions as an actin monomer-binding protein. The conserved BTB protein interaction domain in NAC1 is the minimal region for actin binding. Disrupting NAC1 complex function by dominant-negative or siRNA strategies reduced cell retraction and abscission during late-stage cytokinesis, causing multinucleation in cancer cells. In Nac1-deficient murine fibroblasts, restoring NAC1 expression was sufficient to partially avert multinucleation. We found that siRNA-mediated silencing of the actin-binding protein profilin-1 in cancer cells caused a similar multinucleation phenotype and that NAC1 modulated the binding of actin to profillin-1. Taken together, our results indicate that the NAC1/actin/profilin-1 complex is crucial for cancer cell cytokinesis, with a variety of important biologic and clinical implications.

  11. Murine patellar tendon biomechanical properties and regional strain patterns during natural tendon-to-bone healing after acute injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gilday, Steven D.; Casstevens, E. Chris; Kenter, Keith; Jason T Shearn; David L Butler

    2013-01-01

    Tendon-to-bone healing following acute injury is generally poor and often fails to restore normal tendon biomechanical properties. In recent years, the murine patellar tendon (PT) has become an important model system for studying tendon healing and repair due to its genetic tractability and accessible location within the knee. However, the mechanical properties of native murine PT, specifically the regional differences in tissue strains during loading, and the biomechanical outcomes of natura...

  12. Inhibition of Src kinase activity attenuates amyloid associated microgliosis in a murine model of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dhawan Gunjan; Combs Colin K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Microglial activation is an important histologic characteristic of the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). One hypothesis is that amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide serves as a specific stimulus for tyrosine kinase-based microglial activation leading to pro-inflammatory changes that contribute to disease. Therefore, inhibiting Aβ stimulation of microglia may prove to be an important therapeutic strategy for AD. Methods Primary murine microglia cultures and the murine microglia c...

  13. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid ethyl esters differentially enhance B-cell activity in murine obesity[S

    OpenAIRE

    Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Fenton, Jenifer; Lallemand, Perrine; Shewchuk, Brian M.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2014-01-01

    EPA and DHA are not biologically equivalent; however, their individual activity on B cells is unknown. We previously reported fish oil enhanced murine B-cell activity in obesity. To distinguish between the effects of EPA and DHA, we studied the ethyl esters of EPA and DHA on murine B-cell function as a function of time. We first demonstrate that EPA and DHA maintained the obese phenotype, with no improvements in fat mass, adipose inflammatory cytokines, fasting insulin, or glucose clearance. ...

  14. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  15. Kinetics of leptin binding to the Q223R leptin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Verkerke

    Full Text Available Studies in human populations and mouse models of disease have linked the common leptin receptor Q223R mutation to obesity, multiple forms of cancer, adverse drug reactions, and susceptibility to enteric and respiratory infections. Contradictory results cast doubt on the phenotypic consequences of this variant. We set out to determine whether the Q223R substitution affects leptin binding kinetics using surface plasmon resonance (SPR, a technique that allows sensitive real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions. We measured the binding and dissociation rate constants for leptin to the extracellular domain of WT and Q223R murine leptin receptors expressed as Fc-fusion proteins and found that the mutant receptor does not significantly differ in kinetics of leptin binding from the WT leptin receptor. (WT: ka 1.76×106±0.193×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.21×10-4±0.707×10-4 s-1, KD 6.47×10-11±3.30×10-11 M; Q223R: ka 1.75×106±0.0245×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.47×10-4±0.0505×10-4 s-1, KD 8.43×10-11±0.407×10-11 M. Our results support earlier findings that differences in affinity and kinetics of leptin binding are unlikely to explain mechanistically the phenotypes that have been linked to this common genetic variant. Future studies will seek to elucidate the mechanism by which this mutation influences susceptibility to metabolic, infectious, and malignant pathologies.

  16. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  17. Three-dimensional in vivo imaging of the murine liver: a micro-computed tomography-based anatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Various murine models are currently used to study acute and chronic pathological processes of the liver, and the efficacy of novel therapeutic regimens. The increasing availability of high-resolution small animal imaging modalities presents researchers with the opportunity to precisely identify and describe pathological processes of the liver. To meet the demands, the objective of this study was to provide a three-dimensional illustration of the macroscopic anatomical location of the murine liver lobes and hepatic vessels using small animal imaging modalities. We analysed micro-CT images of the murine liver by integrating additional information from the published literature to develop comprehensive illustrations of the macroscopic anatomical features of the murine liver and hepatic vasculature. As a result, we provide updated three-dimensional illustrations of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver and hepatic vessels using micro-CT. The information presented here provides researchers working in the field of experimental liver disease with a comprehensive, easily accessable overview of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver.

  18. Transduction of Murine Hematopoietic Stem Cells with Tetracycline-regulated Lentiviral Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlhut, Maike; Schambach, Axel; Kustikova, Olga S

    2016-01-01

    Tetracycline-regulated integrating vectors allow pharmacologically controlled genetic modification of murine and human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). This approach combines the stable transgene insertion into a host genome with the opportunity for time- and dose-controlled reversible transgene expression in HSCs. Here, we describe the step-by-step protocol for transduction of murine stem-cell enriched populations of bone marrow cells, such as lineage negative cells (Lin(-)), with a lentiviral vector expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the tetracycline-regulated promoter. This chapter explains how to establish in vitro and in vivo systems to study transgene dose-dependent mechanisms affecting cell fate decisions of genetically modified hematopoietic cells. PMID:27317173

  19. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture

  20. Different expression patterns of TRP genes in murine B and T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prolonged increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is essential for lymphocyte activation that includes cell proliferation and differentiation. This increase in [Ca2+]i results from Ca2+ release from the intracellular store and the subsequent Ca2+ influx from the extracellular environment via calcium channels located on the plasma membrane. Although transient receptor potential (TRP) channels have been reported to play important roles in the [Ca2+]i increase in lymphocytes, the function of these channels in lymphocyte activation remains unknown. Here, we report the comprehensive expression profile of TRP channel gene families including TRPC, TRPV, and TRPM in the murine immune system. RT-PCR analysis revealed different expression patterns of the TRP channel genes in B and T lymphocytes isolated from the spleen. Therefore, our results provide an appropriate reference of TRP gene expression in murine lymphocytes