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Sample records for binding site-impaired murine

  1. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1997-01-01

    , but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer...... binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology....

  2. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D

    1996-01-01

    , suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...... site to allow correct second-strand transfer in reverse transcription. The system thereby selects for a reverse transcriptase-mediated recombination event in the 5' untranslated region. A panel of sequence differences between the recombination partners in this region has allowed mapping of the site...

  3. Loss of the xeroderma pigmentosum group B protein binding site impairs p210 BCR/ABL1 leukemogenic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pannucci, N L; Li, D; Sahay, S; Thomas, E K; Chen, R; Tala, I; Hu, T; Ciccarelli, B T; Megjugorac, N J; Adams III, H C; Rodriguez, P L; Fitzpatrick, E R; Lagunoff, D; Williams, D A; Whitehead, I P

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that p210 BCR/ABL1 interacts directly with the xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) protein, and that XPB is phosphorylated on tyrosine in cells that express p210 BCR/ABL1. In the current study, we have constructed a p210 BCR/ABL1 mutant that can no longer bind to XPB. The mutant has normal kinase activity and interacts with GRB2, but can no longer phosphorylate XPB. Loss of XPB binding is associated with reduced expression of c-MYC and reduced transforming potential in ex-vivo clonogenicity assays, but does not affect nucleotide excision repair in lymphoid or myeloid cells. When examined in a bone marrow transplantation (BMT) model for chronic myelogenous leukemia, mice that express the mutant exhibit attenuated myeloproliferation and lymphoproliferation when compared with mice that express unmodified p210 BCR/ABL1. Thus, the mutant-transplanted mice show predominantly neutrophilic expansion and altered progenitor expansion, and have significantly extended lifespans. This was confirmed in a BMT model for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, wherein the majority of the mutant-transplanted mice remain disease free. These results suggest that the interaction between p210 BCR/ABL1 and XPB can contribute to disease progression by influencing the lineage commitment of lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

  4. Murine alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. I. Radioligand binding studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, M.; Reese, J.; Cotecchia, S.; Michel, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Alpha1-adrenoceptors were identified in murine tissues by [3H]prazosin saturation binding studies, with a rank order of cerebral cortex > cerebellum > liver > lung > kidney > heart > spleen, with the spleen not exhibiting detectable expression. Competition binding studies were performed with

  5. EphrinA4 mimetic peptide targeted to EphA binding site impairs the formation of long-term fear memory in lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, M; Lamprecht, R

    2014-09-30

    Fear conditioning leads to long-term fear memory formation and is a model for studying fear-related psychopathologies conditions such as phobias and posttraumatic stress disorder. Long-term fear memory formation is believed to involve alterations of synaptic efficacy mediated by changes in synaptic transmission and morphology in lateral amygdala (LA). EphrinA4 and its cognate Eph receptors are intimately involved in regulating neuronal morphogenesis, synaptic transmission and plasticity. To assess possible roles of ephrinA4 in fear memory formation we designed and used a specific inhibitory ephrinA4 mimetic peptide (pep-ephrinA4) targeted to EphA binding site. We show that this peptide, composed of the ephrinA4 binding domain, interacts with EphA4 and inhibits ephrinA4-induced phosphorylation of EphA4. Microinjection of the pep-ephrinA4 into rat LA 30 min before training impaired long- but not short-term fear conditioning memory. Microinjection of a control peptide derived from a nonbinding E helix site of ephrinA4, that does not interact with EphA, had no effect on fear memory formation. Microinjection of pep-ephrinA4 into areas adjacent to the amygdala had no effect on fear memory. Acute systemic administration of pep-ephrinA4 1 h after training also impaired long-term fear conditioning memory formation. These results demonstrate that ephrinA4 binding sites in LA are essential for long-term fear memory formation. Moreover, our research shows that ephrinA4 binding sites may serve as a target for pharmacological treatment of fear and anxiety disorders.

  6. B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, binds Vitamin D3; conservation of binding among albuminoid molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farzaneh, N.K.; Walden, T.L. Jr.; Hearing, V.J.; Gersten, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    B700, a murine melanoma-specific antigen, is a member of the serum albumin protein family. Other members of this family include serum albumin (SMA), a-fetoprotein (AFP), vitamin D binding protein (DBP), and C700. The primary structure and biochemical functions of B700, as well as its in vivo metabolic fate are largely unknown. The authors examined the functional characteristics of MSA, AFP, and DBP, and for their ability to specifically bind [ 3 H]-1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D 3 . Scatchard analysis revealed a single binding site for B700 with a Kd of 51,000 M and a Bmax of 4.51 x 10 -7 . There is no significant difference between the Kd and Bmax values among the albuminoid proteins. However, differences in the binding sites could be distinguished by competition of the 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 with other steroids. 2nM of vitamin D 3 , vitamin D 2 , or estrogen competed for the specific binding of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D 3 by B700 but not by DBP. The MSA binding site for 1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D 3 more closely resembles that of DBP than B700. These data indicate that the binding function of the albuminoid proteins has been conserved in the B700 melanoma antigen

  7. Clearance and binding of radiolabeled glycoproteins by cells of the murine mononuclear phagocyte system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imber, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    The clearance and binding of radiolabeled lactoferrin and fast α 2 -macroglobulin were studied. Both glycoproteins cleared rapidly following intravenous injection in mice, and both bound specifically to discrete receptors on murine peritoneal macrophages. The simultaneous presence of excess, unlabeled ligands specific for receptors recognizing terminal fucose, mannose, N-acetylglucosamine or galactose residues did not inhibit the clearance or binding of either lactoferrin or fast-α 2 M. The clearance and binding of enzymatically defucosylated lactoferrin was indistinguishable from native lactoferrin, indicating that terminal α(1-3)-linked fucose on lactoferrin is not necessary for receptor recognition. The clearance and binding of two fast -α 2 M forms, α 2 M-trypsin and α 2 M-MeNH 2 cross compete with each other. Saturation binding studies indicated that the total binding of mannosyl -BSA, fusocyl-BSA, and N-acetylglucosaminyl-BSA to macrophages activated by BCG was approximately 15% of the levels observed with inflammatory macrophages elicited by thioglycollate broth. Cross-competition binding studies demonstrated a common surface receptor mediated binding of all three neoglycoprotein ligands and was identical to the receptor on mononuclear phagocytes that binds mannosyl- and N-acetylglucosaminyl-terminated glycoproteins. These results suggest that difference between discrete states of macrophage function may be correlated with selective changes in levels of the surface receptor for mannose-containing glycoproteins

  8. Crystal structure of mouse coronavirus receptor-binding domain complexed with its murine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Guiqing; Sun, Dawei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Qian, Zhaohui; Holmes, Kathryn V.; Li, Fang (Cornell); (UMM-MED); (Colorado)

    2011-09-28

    Coronaviruses have evolved diverse mechanisms to recognize different receptors for their cross-species transmission and host-range expansion. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) uses the N-terminal domain (NTD) of its spike protein as its receptor-binding domain. Here we present the crystal structure of MHV NTD complexed with its receptor murine carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a (mCEACAM1a). Unexpectedly, MHV NTD contains a core structure that has the same {beta}-sandwich fold as human galectins (S-lectins) and additional structural motifs that bind to the N-terminal Ig-like domain of mCEACAM1a. Despite its galectin fold, MHV NTD does not bind sugars, but instead binds mCEACAM1a through exclusive protein-protein interactions. Critical contacts at the interface have been confirmed by mutagenesis, providing a structural basis for viral and host specificities of coronavirus/CEACAM1 interactions. Sugar-binding assays reveal that galectin-like NTDs of some coronaviruses such as human coronavirus OC43 and bovine coronavirus bind sugars. Structural analysis and mutagenesis localize the sugar-binding site in coronavirus NTDs to be above the {beta}-sandwich core. We propose that coronavirus NTDs originated from a host galectin and retained sugar-binding functions in some contemporary coronaviruses, but evolved new structural features in MHV for mCEACAM1a binding.

  9. Characterization of the binding of radioiodinated hybrid recombinant IFN-alpha A/D to murine and human lymphoid cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltynek, C.R.; Princler, G.L.; Schwabe, M.; Shata, M.T.; Lewis, G.K.; Kamin-Lewis, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The hybrid recombinant human interferon (IFN) rIFN-alpha A/D was radioiodinated. Specific binding of [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D was observed with both human and murine cell lines. The binding of [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D to human Daudi cells had similar characteristics to the previously described binding of [125I]rIFN-alpha A or -alpha 2. The following lines of evidence demonstrated that [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D bound with high affinity to the same receptor on murine cells as murine IFN-alpha and -beta: (i) the binding of [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D to murine LBRM cells was inhibited to a similar extent by natural murine IFN-alpha, natural murine IFN-beta, and rIFN-A/D; (ii) the Kd (approximately 2 X 10(-10) M) obtained from both competition experiments and saturation binding experiments with [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D was comparable to the previously reported Kd for the binding of natural murine IFN-alpha and -beta to other murine cell lines; (iii) the size of the cross-linked [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D receptor complex formed on murine LBRM cells was similar to the previously reported cross-linked complex formed after binding radioiodinated natural murine IFN-beta to other murine cell lines. Due to the current lack of readily available recombinant murine IFN-alpha or -beta for radiolabeling and the previously demonstrated biological activity of rIFN-alpha A/D on murine cells, [125I]rIFN-alpha A/D should prove to be a useful reagent for further studies of murine IFN receptors

  10. Genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq of murine Bapx1 and Sox9 proteins in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumantra Chatterjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This work pertains to GEO submission GSE36672, in vivo and in vitro genome wide binding (ChIP-Seq of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 proteins. We have previously shown that data from a genome wide binding assay combined with transcriptional profiling is an insightful means to divulge the mechanisms directing cell type specification and the generation of tissues and subsequent organs [1]. Our earlier work identified the role of the DNA-binding homeodomain containing protein Bapx1/Nkx3.2 in midgestation murine embryos. Microarray analysis of EGFP-tagged cells (both wildtype and null was integrated using ChIP-Seq analysis of Bapx1/Nkx3.2 and Sox9 DNA-binding proteins in living tissue.

  11. Selective binding and oligomerization of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor by a low molecular weight, nonpeptidyl ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Michael L; Tian, Shin-Shay; Miller, Stephen G; Kessler, Linda; Baker, Audrey E; Brigham-Burke, Michael R; Dillon, Susan B; Duffy, Kevin J; Keenan, Richard M; Lehr, Ruth; Rosen, Jon; Schneeweis, Lumelle A; Trill, John; Young, Peter R; Luengo, Juan I; Lamb, Peter

    2003-03-14

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor regulates neutrophil production by binding to a specific receptor, the granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor, expressed on cells of the granulocytic lineage. Recombinant forms of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor are used clinically to treat neutropenias. As part of an effort to develop granulocyte colony-stimulating factor mimics with the potential for oral bioavailability, we previously identified a nonpeptidyl small molecule (SB-247464) that selectively activates murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor signal transduction pathways and promotes neutrophil formation in vivo. To elucidate the mechanism of action of SB-247464, a series of cell-based and biochemical assays were performed. The activity of SB-247464 is strictly dependent on the presence of zinc ions. Titration microcalorimetry experiments using a soluble murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor construct show that SB-247464 binds to the extracellular domain of the receptor in a zinc ion-dependent manner. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies demonstrate that SB-247464 induces self-association of the N-terminal three-domain fragment in a manner that is consistent with dimerization. SB-247464 induces internalization of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor on intact cells, consistent with a mechanism involving receptor oligomerization. These data show that small nonpeptidyl compounds are capable of selectively binding and inducing productive oligomerization of cytokine receptors.

  12. Murine interleukin 1 receptor. Direct identification by ligand blotting and purification to homogeneity of an interleukin 1-binding glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, T.A.; Gearing, A.J.; Saklatvala, J.

    1988-01-01

    Functional receptors (IL1-R) for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL1) were solubilized from plasma membranes of the NOB-1 subclone of murine EL4 6.1 thymoma cells using the zwitterionic detergent 3[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Membrane extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and ligand blotted with 125 I-labeled recombinant human IL1 alpha in order to reveal proteins capable of specifically binding IL1. A single polydisperse polypeptide of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 was identified in this way, which bound IL1 alpha and IL1 beta with the same affinity as the IL1-R on intact NOB-1 cells (approximately equal to 10(-10) M). The IL1-binding polypeptide was only seen in membranes from IL1-R-bearing cells and did not react with interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interferon. IL1-R was purified to apparent homogeneity from solubilized NOB-1 membranes by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose and IL1 alpha-Sepharose. Gel electrophoresis and silver staining of purified preparations revealed a single protein of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 which reacted positively in the ligand-blotting procedure and which we identify as the ligand-binding moiety of the murine IL1-R. Purified IL1-R exhibited the same affinity and specificity as the receptor on intact cells. The relationship of this protein to proteins identified by covalent cross-linking studies is discussed

  13. A natural human IgM that binds to gangliosides is therapeutic in murine models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, fatal neurological disease that primarily affects spinal cord anterior horn cells and their axons for which there is no treatment. Here we report the use of a recombinant natural human IgM that binds to the surface of neurons and supports neurite extension, rHIgM12, as a therapeutic strategy in murine models of human ALS. A single 200 µg intraperitoneal dose of rHIgM12 increases survival in two independent genetic-based mutant SOD1 mouse strains (SOD1G86R and SOD1G93A by 8 and 10 days, delays the onset of neurological deficits by 16 days, delays the onset of weight loss by 5 days, and preserves spinal cord axons and anterior horn neurons. Immuno-overlay of thin layer chromatography and surface plasmon resonance show that rHIgM12 binds with high affinity to the complex gangliosides GD1a and GT1b. Addition of rHIgM12 to neurons in culture increases α-tubulin tyrosination levels, suggesting an alteration of microtubule dynamics. We previously reported that a single peripheral dose of rHIgM12 preserved neurological function in a murine model of demyelination with axon loss. Because rHIgM12 improves three different models of neurological disease, we propose that the IgM might act late in the cascade of neuronal stress and/or death by a broad mechanism.

  14. Photoaffinity analogues of methotrexate as folate antagonist binding probes. 1. Photoaffinity labeling of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase and amino acid sequence of the binding region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.M.; Smith, P.L.; Klein, T.E.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    N/sup α/-(4-Amino-4-deoxy-10-methylpteroyl)-N/sup epsilon/-(4-azido-5-[ 125 I]iodosalicylyl)-L-lysine, a photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, is only 2-fold less potent than methotrexate in the inhibition of murine L1210 dihydrofolate reductase. Irradiation of the enzyme in the presence of an equimolar concentration of the 125 I-labeled analogue ultimately leads to an 8% incorporation of the photoprobe. A 100-fold molar excess of methotrexate essentially blocks this incorporation. Cyanogen bromide digestion of the labeled enzyme, followed by high-pressure liquid chromatography purification of the generated peptides, indicates that greater than 85% of the total radioactivity is incorporated into a single cyanogen bromide peptide. Sequence analysis revealed this peptide to be residues 53-111, with a majority of the radioactivity centered around residues 63-65 (Lys-Asn-Arg). These data demonstrate that the photoaffinity analogue specifically binds to dihydrofolate reductase and covalently modifies the enzyme following irradiation and is therefore a photolabeling agent useful for probing the inhibitor binding domain of the enzyme

  15. Frequent dual initiation of reverse transcription in murine leukemia virus-based vectors containing two primer-binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voronin, Yegor A.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2003-01-01

    Retroviruses package two copies of viral RNA into each virion. Although each RNA contains a primer-binding site for initiation of DNA synthesis, it is unknown whether reverse transcription is initiated on both RNAs. To determine whether a single virion is capable of initiating reverse transcription more than once, we constructed a murine leukemia virus-based vector containing a second primer-binding site (PBS) derived from spleen necrosis virus and inserted the green fluorescent protein gene (GFP) between the two PBSs. Initiation of reverse transcription at either PBS results in a provirus that expresses GFP. However, initiation at both PBSs can result in the deletion of GFP, which can be detected by flow cytometry and Southern blotting analysis. Approximately 22-29% of the proviruses formed deleted the GFP in a single replication cycle, indicating the minimum proportion of virions that initiated reverse transcription on both PBSs. These results show that a significant proportion of MLV-based vectors containing two PBSs have the capacity to initiate reverse transcription more than once

  16. Crystallographic analysis of murine constitutive androstane receptor ligand-binding domain complexed with 5α-androst-16-en-3α-ol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincent, Jeremy; Shan, Li; Fan, Ming; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Forman, Barry M.; Fernandez, Elias J.

    2004-01-01

    The purification and structure determination of the murine constitutive androstane receptor bound to its inverse agonist/antagonist androstenol is described. The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. In contrast to classical nuclear receptors, which possess small-molecule ligand-inducible activity, CAR exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity in the apparent absence of ligand. CAR is among the most important transcription factors; it coordinately regulates the expression of microsomal cytochrome P450 genes and other drug-metabolizing enzymes. The murine CAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) was coexpressed with the steroid receptor coactivator protein (SRC-1) receptor-interacting domain (RID) in Escherichia coli. The mCAR LBD subunit was purified away from SRC-1 by affinity, anion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, crystallized with androstenol and the structure of the complex determined by molecular replacement

  17. Circulating chromatin-anti-chromatin antibody complexes bind with high affinity to dermo-epidermal structures in murine and human lupus nephritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fismen, S; Hedberg, A; Fenton, K A

    2009-01-01

    Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo-epidermal i......Murine and human lupus nephritis are characterized by glomerular deposits of electron-dense structures (EDS). Dominant components of EDS are chromatin fragments and IgG antibodies. Whether glomerular EDS predispose for similar deposits in skin is unknown. We analysed (i) whether dermo......-epidermal immune complex deposits have similar molecular composition as glomerular deposits, (ii) whether chromatin fragments bind dermo-epidermal structures, and (iii) whether deposits in nephritic glomeruli predispose for accumulation of similar deposits in skin. Paired skin and kidney biopsies from nephritic...... (NZBxNZW)F1 and MRL-lpr/lpr mice and from five patients with lupus nephritis were analysed by immunofluorescence, immune electron microscopy (IEM) and co-localization TUNEL IEM. Affinity of chromatin fragments for membrane structures was determined by surface plasmon resonance. Results demonstrated (i...

  18. The egg coat zona pellucida 3 glycoprotein - evolution of its putative sperm-binding region in Old World murine rodents (Rodentia: Muridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Christine A; Cooper, Steven J B; Breed, William G

    2017-11-01

    In eutherian mammals, before fertilisation can occur the spermatozoon has to bind to, and penetrate, the egg coat, the zona pellucida (ZP). In the laboratory mouse there is good evidence that the primary sperm-binding site is a protein region encoded by Exon 7 of the ZP3 gene and it has been proposed that binding is species specific and evolves by sexual selection. In the present study we investigate these hypotheses by comparing Exon 6 and 7 sequences of ZP3 in 28 species of murine rodents of eight different divisions from Asia, Africa and Australasia, in which a diverse array of sperm morphologies occurs. We found considerable nucleotide (and corresponding amino acid) sequence divergence in Exon 7, but not in Exon 6, across these species, with evidence for positive selection at five codon positions. This molecular divergence does not appear to be due to reinforcement to reduce hybridisation, nor does it correlate with divergence in sperm head morphology or tail length, thus it is unlikely to be driven by inter-male sperm competition. Other forms of post-copulatory sexual selection therefore appear to have resulted in the molecular divergence of this region of ZP3 in this highly speciose group of mammals.

  19. Oligomer formation and G-quadruplex binding by purified murine Rif1 protein, a key organizer of higher-order chromatin architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yoshizawa-Sugata, Naoko; Masai, Hisao

    2018-03-09

    Rap1-interacting protein 1 (Rif1) regulates telomere length in budding yeast. We previously reported that, in metazoans and fission yeast, Rif1 also plays pivotal roles in controlling genome-wide DNA replication timing. We proposed that Rif1 may assemble chromatin compartments that contain specific replication-timing domains by promoting chromatin loop formation. Rif1 also is involved in DNA lesion repair, restart after replication fork collapse, anti-apoptosis activities, replicative senescence, and transcriptional regulation. Although multiple physiological functions of Rif1 have been characterized, biochemical and structural information on mammalian Rif1 is limited, mainly because of difficulties in purifying the full-length protein. Here, we expressed and purified the 2418-amino-acid-long, full-length murine Rif1 as well as its partially truncated variants in human 293T cells. Hydrodynamic analyses indicated that Rif1 forms elongated or extended homo-oligomers in solution, consistent with the presence of a HEAT-type helical repeat segment known to adopt an elongated shape. We also observed that the purified murine Rif1 bound G-quadruplex (G4) DNA with high specificity and affinity, as was previously shown for Rif1 from fission yeast. Both the N-terminal (HEAT-repeat) and C-terminal segments were involved in oligomer formation and specifically bound G4 DNA, and the central intrinsically disordered polypeptide segment increased the affinity for G4. Of note, pulldown assays revealed that Rif1 simultaneously binds multiple G4 molecules. Our findings support a model in which Rif1 modulates chromatin loop structures through binding to multiple G4 assemblies and by holding chromatin fibers together. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Non-invasive in vivo imaging of arthritis in a collagen-induced murine model with phosphatidylserine-binding near-infrared (NIR) dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Marion M; Gray, Brian D; Pak, Koon Y; Fong, Dunne

    2015-03-09

    Development of non-invasive molecular imaging techniques that are based on cellular changes in inflammation has been of active interest for arthritis diagnosis. This technology will allow real-time detection of tissue damage and facilitate earlier treatment of the disease, thus representing an improvement over X-rays, which detect bone damage at the advanced stage. Tracing apoptosis, an event occurring in inflammation, has been a strategy used. PSVue 794 is a low-molecular-weight, near-infrared (NIR)-emitting complex of bis(zinc2+-dipicolylamine) (Zn-DPA) that binds to phosphatidylserine (PS), a plasma membrane anionic phospholipid that becomes flipped externally upon cell death by apoptosis. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of PSVue 794 to act as an in vivo probe for non-invasive molecular imaging assessment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) via metabolic function in murine collagen-induced arthritis, a widely adopted animal model for RA. Male DBA/1 strain mice were treated twice with chicken collagen type II in Freund's adjuvant. Their arthritis development was determined by measuring footpad thickness and confirmed with X-ray analysis and histology. In vivo imaging was performed with the NIR dye and the LI-COR Odyssey Image System. The level of emission was compared among mice with different disease severity, non-arthritic mice and arthritic mice injected with a control dye without the Zn-DPA targeting moiety. Fluorescent emission correlated reliably with the degree of footpad swelling and the manifestation of arthritis. Ex vivo examination showed emission was from the joint. Specificity of binding was confirmed by the lack of emission when arthritic mice were given the control dye. Furthermore, the PS-binding protein annexin V displaced the NIR dye from binding, and the difference in emission was numerically measurable on a scale. This report introduces an economical alternative method for assessing arthritis non-invasively in murine models. Inflammation in

  1. The Effects of Dietary Calcium and/or Iron Deficiency upon Murine Intestinal Calcium Binding Protein Activity and Calcium Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, Catherine M.

    1980-01-01

    Iron deficiency has been shown to impair calcium absorption, leading to decreased bone mass. Vitamin D3-dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP) has been demonstrated to be necessary for the active transport of calcium in the intestine of numerous species. Iron deficiency might affect the activity of the calcium binding protein. Four experimental diets were formulated as follows: Diet 1, iron adequate, calcium adequate; Diet 2, iron deficient, calcium adequate; Diet 3, iron adequate, calci...

  2. A Central Nervous System-Dependent Intron-Embedded Gene Encodes a Novel Murine Fyn Binding Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khalaf, Noureddine; Taha, Safa; Bakhiet, Moiz; Fathallah, M Dahmani

    2016-01-01

    The interplay between the nervous and immune systems is gradually being unraveled. We previously reported in the mouse the novel soluble immune system factor ISRAA, whose activation in the spleen is central nervous system-dependent. We also showed that ISRAA plays a role in modulating anti-infection immunity. Herein, we report the genomic description of the israa locus, along with some insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein. Our findings revealed that israa is nested within intron 6 of the mouse zmiz1 gene. Protein sequence analysis revealed a typical SH2 binding motif (Y102TEV), with Fyn being the most likely binding partner. Docking simulation showed a favorable conformation for the ISRAA-Fyn complex, with a specific binding mode for the binding of the YTEV motif to the SH2 domain. Experimental studies showed that in vitro, recombinant ISRAA is phosphorylated by Fyn at tyrosine 102. Cell transfection and pull-down experiments revealed Fyn as a binding partner of ISRAA in the EL4 mouse T-cell line. Indeed, we demonstrated that ISRAA downregulates T-cell activation and the phosphorylation of an activation tyrosine (Y416) of Src-family kinases in mouse splenocytes. Our observations highlight ISRAA as a novel Fyn binding protein that is likely to be involved in a signaling pathway driven by the nervous system.

  3. A Central Nervous System-Dependent Intron-Embedded Gene Encodes a Novel Murine Fyn Binding Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Ben Khalaf

    Full Text Available The interplay between the nervous and immune systems is gradually being unraveled. We previously reported in the mouse the novel soluble immune system factor ISRAA, whose activation in the spleen is central nervous system-dependent. We also showed that ISRAA plays a role in modulating anti-infection immunity. Herein, we report the genomic description of the israa locus, along with some insights into the structure-function relationship of the protein. Our findings revealed that israa is nested within intron 6 of the mouse zmiz1 gene. Protein sequence analysis revealed a typical SH2 binding motif (Y102TEV, with Fyn being the most likely binding partner. Docking simulation showed a favorable conformation for the ISRAA-Fyn complex, with a specific binding mode for the binding of the YTEV motif to the SH2 domain. Experimental studies showed that in vitro, recombinant ISRAA is phosphorylated by Fyn at tyrosine 102. Cell transfection and pull-down experiments revealed Fyn as a binding partner of ISRAA in the EL4 mouse T-cell line. Indeed, we demonstrated that ISRAA downregulates T-cell activation and the phosphorylation of an activation tyrosine (Y416 of Src-family kinases in mouse splenocytes. Our observations highlight ISRAA as a novel Fyn binding protein that is likely to be involved in a signaling pathway driven by the nervous system.

  4. Assessment of decorin-binding protein A to the infectivity of Borrelia burgdorferi in the murine models of needle and tick infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagman Kayla E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decorin-binding proteins (Dbps A and B of Borrelia burgdorferi, the agent of Lyme disease, are surface-exposed lipoproteins that presumably bind to the extracellular matrix proteoglycan, decorin. B. burgdorferi infects various tissues including the bladder, heart, joints, skin and the central nervous system, and the ability of B. burgdorferi to bind decorin has been hypothesized to be important for this disseminatory pathogenic strategy. Results To determine the role of DbpBA in the infectious lifecycle of B. burgdorferi, we created a DbpBA-deficient mutant of B. burgdorferi strain 297 and compared the infectious phenotype of the mutant to the wild-type strain in the experimental murine model of Lyme borreliosis. The mutant strain exhibited a 4-log decrease in infectivity, relative to the wild-type strain, when needle inoculated into mice. Upon complementation of the DbpBA-mutant strain with DbpA, the wild-type level of infectivity was restored. In addition, we demonstrated that the DbpBA-deficient mutant was able to colonize Ixodes scapularis larval ticks after feeding on infected mice and persist within the ticks during the molt to the nymphal state. Moreover, surprisingly, the DbpBA-mutant strain was capable of being transmitted to naïve mice via tick bite, giving rise to infected mice. Conclusion These results suggest that DbpBA is not required for the natural tick-transmission process to mammals, despite inferences from needle-inoculation experiments implying a requirement for DbpBA during mammalian infection. The combined findings also send a cautionary note regarding how results from needle-inoculation experiments with mice should be interpreted.

  5. Inactivation of the small GTP binding protein Rho induces multinucleate cell formation and apoptosis in murine T lymphoma EL4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, J P; Bobak, D A; Hahn, C S

    1996-06-01

    The small G-protein Rho regulates the actin microfilament-dependent cytoskeleton. Exoenzyme C3 of Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylates Rho at Asn41, a modification that functionally inactivates Rho. Using a Sindbis virus-based transient gene expression system, we studied the role of Rho in murine EL4 T lymphoma cells. We generated a double subgenomic infectious Sindbis virus (dsSIN:C3) recombinant which expressed C3 in >95% of EL4 cells. This intracellular C3 resulted in modification and inactivation of virtually all endogenous Rho. dsSIN:C3 infection led to the formation of multinucleate cells, likely by inhibiting the actin microfilament-dependent step of cytokinesis. Intriguingly, in spite of the inhibition of cytokinesis, karyokinesis continued, with the result that cells containing a nuclear DNA content as high as 16N (eight nuclei) were observed. In addition, dsSIN:C3-mediated inactivation of Rho was a potent activator of apoptosis in EL4 cells. To discern whether the formation of multinucleate cells was responsible for the activation of apoptosis, 5-fluorouracil (5-FUra) was used to induce cell cycle arrest. As expected, EL4 cells treated with 5-FUra were prevented from forming multinucleate cells upon infection with dsSIN:C3. dsSIN:C3 infection, however, still caused marked apoptosis in 5-FUra-treated cells, indicating that this activation of apoptosis was independent of multinucleate cell formation.

  6. Protection from inflammatory organ damage in a murine model of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis using treatment with IL-18 binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eChiossone

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH is a life-threatening condition due to the association of an infectious agent with lymphocyte cytotoxicity defects, either of congenital genetic origin in children or presumably acquired in adults. In HLH patients, an excess of lymphocyte or macrophage cytokines, such as IFN-γ and TNFα is present in serum. In animal models of the disease, IFN-γ and TNF-α have been shown to play a central pathogenic role. In humans, unusually high concentrations of IL-18, an inducer of IFN-γ and TNF-α have been reported, and are associated with an imbalance between IL-18 and its natural inhibitor IL-18 binding protein (IL-18BP resulting in an excess of free IL-18. Here we studied whether IL-18BP could reduce disease severity in an animal model of HLH. Mouse cytomegalovirus infection in perforin-1 knock-out mice induced a lethal condition similar to human HLH characterized by cytopenia with marked inflammatory lesions in the liver and spleen as well as the presence of hemophagocytosis in bone marrow. IL-18BP treatment decreased hemophagocytosis and reversed liver as well as spleen damage. IL-18BP treatment also reduced both IFN-γ and TNF-α production by CD8+ T and NK cells, as well as Fas ligand expression on NK cell surface. These data suggest that IL-18BP is beneficial in an animal model of HLH and in combination with anti-infectious therapy may be a promising strategy to treat HLH patients.

  7. Expression and localization of special AT-rich sequence binding protein 2 in murine molar development and the pulp-dentin complex of human healthy teeth and teeth with pulpitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lina; Liu, Huimei; Shi, Lei; Pan, Shuang; Yang, Xu; Zhang, Lin; Niu, Yumei

    2017-01-01

    Special AT-rich sequence binding protein 2 (SATB2) is a member of the special family of AT-rich binding transcription factors and has a critical role in osteoblast differentiation and craniofacial patterning. However, the expression and distribution of SATB2 in tooth development is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to detect the expression and distribution of SATB2 during murine molar development and, in human healthy teeth and teeth with pulpitis using immunohistochemistry. Molars were obtained from Kunming mice at embryonic day (E) 13.5, E14.5, E16.5 and E18.5, and postnatal day (P) 1, P5 and P7. In addition, 20 human teeth (10 healthy and 10 teeth with pulpitis) were obtained from young adult patients (age, 24.90±1.65 years) who were scheduled for routine extraction. Immunohistochemical analyses were performed to detect the expression and distribution of SATB2. The present results revealed that SATB2 exhibits a spatiotemporal expression pattern in murine molar development and was expressed in odontoblasts, predentin, dental pulp cells and the blood vessels in human teeth. These findings suggested that SATB2 may have an important role in odontoblast differentiation and dentin matrix mineralization during tooth development. PMID:29042940

  8. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual...

  9. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Jespersen, Thomas; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2003-01-01

    The envelope protein of retroviruses is responsible for viral entry into host cells. Here, we describe a mutational library approach to dissect functional domains of the envelope protein involving a retroviral vector, which expresses both the envelope protein of Akv murine leukemia virus (MLV) an...

  10. The NS1 polypeptide of the murine parvovirus minute virus of mice binds to DNA sequences containing the motif [ACCA]2-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotmore, S F; Christensen, J; Nüesch, J P; Tattersall, P

    1995-03-01

    A DNA fragment containing the minute virus of mice 3' replication origin was specifically coprecipitated in immune complexes containing the virally coded NS1, but not the NS2, polypeptide. Antibodies directed against the amino- or carboxy-terminal regions of NS1 precipitated the NS1-origin complexes, but antibodies directed against NS1 amino acids 284 to 459 blocked complex formation. Using affinity-purified histidine-tagged NS1 preparations, we have shown that the specific protein-DNA interaction is of moderate affinity, being stable in 0.1 M salt but rapidly lost at higher salt concentrations. In contrast, generalized (or nonspecific) DNA binding by NS1 could be demonstrated only in low salt. Addition of ATP or gamma S-ATP enhanced specific DNA binding by wild-type NS1 severalfold, but binding was lost under conditions which favored ATP hydrolysis. NS1 molecules with mutations in a critical lysine residue (amino acid 405) in the consensus ATP-binding site bound to the origin, but this binding could not be enhanced by ATP addition. DNase I protection assays carried out with wild-type NS1 in the presence of gamma S-ATP gave footprints which extended over 43 nucleotides on both DNA strands, from the middle of the origin bubble sequence to a position some 14 bp beyond the nick site. The DNA-binding site for NS1 was mapped to a 22-bp fragment from the middle of the 3' replication origin which contains the sequence ACCAACCA. This conforms to a reiterated motif (ACCA)2-3, which occurs, in more or less degenerate form, at many sites throughout the minute virus of mice genome (J. W. Bodner, Virus Genes 2:167-182, 1989). Insertion of a single copy of the sequence (ACCA)3 was shown to be sufficient to confer NS1 binding on an otherwise unrecognized plasmid fragment. The functions of NS1 in the viral life cycle are reevaluated in the light of this result.

  11. Absence of the calcium-binding protein calretinin, not of calbindin D-28k, causes a permanent impairment of murine adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran eTodkar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Calretinin (CR and calbindin D-28k (CB are cytosolic EF-hand Ca2+-binding proteins and function as Ca2+ buffers affecting the spatiotemporal aspects of Ca2+ transients and possibly also as Ca2+ sensors modulating signaling cascades. In the adult hippocampal circuitry, CR and CB are expressed in specific principal neurons and subsets of interneurons. In addition, CR is transiently expressed within the neurogenic dentate gyrus (DG niche. CR and CB expression during adult neurogenesis mark critical transition stages, onset of differentiation for CR and the switch to adult-like connectivity for CB. Absence of either protein during these stages in null-mutant mice may have functional consequences and contribute to some aspects of the identified phenotypes. We report the impact of CR- and CB-deficiency on the proliferation and differentiation of progenitor cells within the subgranular zone (SGZ neurogenic niche of the DG. Effects were evaluated I 2 and 4 weeks postnatally, during the transition period of the proliferative matrix to the adult state, and II in adult animals (3 months to trace possible permanent changes in adult neurogenesis. The absence of CB from differentiated DG granule cells has no retrograde effect on the proliferative activity of progenitor cells, nor affects survival or migration/differentiation of newborn neurons in the adult DG including the SGZ. On the contrary, lack of CR from immature early postmitotic granule cells causes an early loss in proliferative capacity of the SGZ that is maintained into adult age, when it has a further impact on the migration/survival of newborn granule cells. The transient CR expression at the onset of adult neurogenesis differentiation may thus have two functions: I to serve as a self-maintenance signal for the pool of cells at the same stage of neurogenesis contributing to their survival/differentiation, and II it may contribute to retrograde signaling required for maintenance of the progenitor

  12. Heparin-Binding EGF-like Growth Factor (HB-EGF) stimulates the proliferation of Müller glia-derived progenitor cells in avian and murine retinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Levi; Volkov, Leo I.; Zelinka, Chris; Squires, Natalie; Fischer, Andy J.

    2015-01-01

    Müller glia can be stimulated to de-differentiate, proliferate and form Müller glia-derived progenitor cells (MGPCs) that regenerate retinal neurons. In the zebrafish retina, Heparin-Binding EGF-like Growth Factor (HB-EGF) may be one of the key factors that stimulate the formation of proliferating MGPCs. Currently nothing is known about the influence of HB-EGF on the proliferative potential of Müller glia in retinas of birds and rodents. In the chick retina, we found that levels of both hb-egf and egf-receptor are rapidly and transiently up-regulated following NMDA-induced damage. Although intraocular injections of HB-EGF failed to stimulate cell-signaling or proliferation of Müller glia in normal retinas, HB-EGF stimulated proliferation of MGPCs in damaged retinas. By comparison, inhibition of the EGF-receptor (EGFR) decreased the proliferation of MGPCs in damaged retinas. HB-EGF failed to act synergistically with FGF2 to stimulate the formation of MGPCs in the undamaged retina and inhibition of EGF-receptor did not suppress FGF2-mediated formation of MGPCs. In the mouse retina, HB-EGF stimulated the proliferation of Müller glia following NMDA-induced damage. Furthermore, HB-EGF stimulated not only MAPK-signaling in Müller glia/MGPCs, but also activated mTor- and Jak/Stat-signaling. We propose that levels of expression of EGFR are rate-limiting to the responses of Müller glia to HB-EGF and the expression of EGFR can be induced by retinal damage, but not by FGF2-treatment. We conclude that HB-EGF is mitogenic to Müller glia in both chick and mouse retinas, and HB-EGF is an important player in the formation of MGPCs in damaged retinas. PMID:26500021

  13. MicroRNA 27a-3p Regulates Antimicrobial Responses of Murine Macrophages Infected by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis by Targeting Interleukin-10 and TGF-β-Activated Protein Kinase 1 Binding Protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Hussain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP persistently survive and replicate in mononuclear phagocytic cells by adopting various strategies to subvert host immune response. Interleukin-10 (IL-10 upregulation via inhibition of macrophage bactericidal activity is a critical step for MAP survival and pathogenesis within the host cell. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 signaling cascade plays a crucial role in the elevation of IL-10 and progression of MAP pathogenesis. The contribution of microRNAs (miRNAs and their influence on the activation of macrophages during MAP pathogenesis are still unclear. In the current study, we found that miRNA-27a-3p (miR-27a expression is downregulated during MAP infection both in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, miR-27a is also downregulated in toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2-stimulated murine macrophages (RAW264.7 and bone marrow-derived macrophage. ELISA and real-time qRT-PCR results confirm that overexpression of miR-27a inhibited MAP-induced IL-10 production in macrophages and upregulated pro-inflammatory cytokines, while miR-27a inhibitor counteracted these effects. Luciferase reporter assay results revealed that IL-10 and TGF-β-activated protein kinase 1 binding protein 2 (TAB 2 are potential targets of miR-27a. In addition, we demonstrated that miR-27a negatively regulates TAB 2 expression and diminishes TAB 2-dependent p38/JNK phosphorylation, ultimately downregulating IL-10 expression in MAP-infected macrophages. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-27a significantly inhibited the intracellular survival of MAP in infected macrophages. Our data show that miR-27a augments antimicrobial activities of macrophages and inhibits the expression of IL-10, demonstrating that miR-27a regulates protective innate immune responses during MAP infection and can be exploited as a novel therapeutic target in the control of intracellular pathogens, including paratuberculosis.

  14. Essential pathogenic role of endogenous IL-18 in murine diabetes induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin. Prevention of hyperglycemia and insulitis by a recombinant IL-18-binding protein: Fc construct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Di Marco, Roberto; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2003-01-01

    IL-18 is a cytokine structurally and functionally related to IL-1 that, in synergy with IL-12, stimulates the synthesis of IFN-gamma from T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Because IFN-gamma plays a key pathogenic role in the development of murine immunoinflammatory diabetes induced by multi...

  15. Binding of human beta 2-microglobulin to murine EL4 thymoma cells upregulates MHC class I heavy-chain epitopes, inhibits IL-2 secretion and induces resistance to killing by natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claësson, M H; Nissen, Mogens Holst

    1994-01-01

    line (ABLS-8), X63 B-lymphoma cells and YAC cells did not bind h beta 2m. In two of the T lymphomas, EL4 and BW5147, binding of h beta 2m led to an increase in major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) heavy-chain epitope expression as measured by anti-H-2K/D antibody binding and FACS analysis....... EL4 cells which had bound h beta 2m decreased their rate of constitutive IL-2 secretion and became resistant to activated natural killer (NK) cell killing. The present data suggest the binding of h beta 2m to mouse T cells leads to conformational changes of MHC-I heavy chains which influence both...

  16. Glycosaminoglycan interactions in murine gammaherpesvirus-68 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Gillet

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs commonly participate in herpesvirus entry. They are thought to provide a reversible attachment to cells that promotes subsequent receptor binding. Murine gamma-herpesvirus-68 (MHV-68 infection of fibroblasts and epithelial cells is highly GAG-dependent. This is a function of the viral gp150, in that gp150-deficient mutants are much less GAG-dependent than wild-type. Here we show that the major MHV-68 GAG-binding protein is not gp150 but gp70, a product of ORF4. Surprisingly, ORF4-deficient MHV-68 showed normal cell binding and was more sensitive than wild-type to inhibition by soluble heparin rather than less. Thus, the most obvious viral GAG interaction made little direct contribution to infection. Indeed, a large fraction of the virion gp70 had its GAG-binding domain removed by post-translational cleavage. ORF4 may therefore act mainly to absorb soluble GAGs and prevent them from engaging gp150 prematurely. In contrast to gp70, gp150 bound poorly to GAGs, implying that it provides little in the way of adhesion. We hypothesize that it acts instead as a GAG-sensitive switch that selectively activates MHV-68 entry at cell surfaces.

  17. Production of antibodies which recognize opiate receptors on murine leukocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, D.J.J.; Bost, K.L.; Blalock, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    An antibody has been developed which recognizes opiate receptors on cells of the immune system. This antibody blocks specific binding of the radiolabeled opiate receptor ligand, /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine, to receptors on murine splenocytes. Additionally, the anti-receptor antibody competes with ..beta..-endorphin, meta-enkephalin, and naloxone for the same binding site on the leukocytes. Moreover, the anti-receptor antibody possesses agonist activity similar to ..beta..-endorphin in suppressing cAMP production by lymphocytes. These results suggest the development of an antibody which recognizes classical opiate receptors on cells of the immune system.

  18. Activation of the polyomavirus enhancer by a murine activator protein 1 (AP1) homolog and two contiguous proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, M E; Piette, J; Yaniv, M; Tang, W J; Folk, W R

    1988-01-01

    The polyomavirus enhancer is composed of multiple DNA sequence elements serving as binding sites for proteins present in mouse nuclear extracts that activate transcription and DNA replication. We have identified three such proteins and their binding sites and correlate them with enhancer function. Mutation of nucleotide (nt) 5140 in the enhancer alters the binding site (TGACTAA, nt 5139-5145) for polyomavirus enhancer A binding protein 1 (PEA1), a murine homolog of the human transcription fac...

  19. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with [ 3 H]thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells

  20. Corn silk induced cyclooxygenase-2 in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung A; Shin, Hyun-Hee; Choi, Sang Kyu; Choi, Hye-Seon

    2005-10-01

    Stimulation of murine macrophages with corn silk induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 with secretion of PGE2. Expression of COX-2 was inhibited by pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), and increased DNA binding by nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), indicating that COX-2 induction proceeds also via the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. A specific inhibitor of COX-2 decreased the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) stimulated by corn silk. PGE2 elevated the expression level of iNOS, probably via EP2 and EP4 receptors on the surface of the macrophages.

  1. Molecular cloning and expression of the human homologue of the murine gene encoding myeloid leukemia-inhibitory factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gough, N.M.; Gearing, D.P.; King, J.A.; Willson, T.A.; Hilton, D.J.; Nicola, N.A.; Metcalf, D.

    1988-01-01

    A human homologue of the recently cloned murine leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF) gene was isolated from a genomic library by using the marine cDNA as a hybridization probe. The nucleotide sequence of the human gene indicated that human LIF has 78% amino acid sequence identity with murine LIF, with no insertions or deletions, and that the region of the human gene encoding the mature protein has one intervening sequence. After oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis, the mature protein-coding region of the LIF gene was introduced into the yeast expression vector YEpsec1. Yeast cells transformed with the resulting recombinant could be induced with galactose to produce high levels of a factor that induced the differentiation of murine M1 leukemic cells in a manner analogous to murine LIF. This factor competed with 125 I-labeled native murine LIF for binding to specific cellular receptors on murine cells, compatible with a high degree of structural similarity between the murine and human factors

  2. Application of murine monoclonal antibodies to the serodiagnosis of tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanyl, J.; Coates, A.R.M.; Krambovitis, E.

    1982-01-01

    The immune response during infectious diseases leads to a rise in antibody titre to the various different antigenic determinants of the causative organism. The response is further complicated by the fact that it is relatively unusual for one individual to respond to all antigenic components of an organism. Demonstration of the specific immune response of an infected host by serological tests is often hampered by the broad cross-reactivity between several bacterial antigens. The authors report on a serodiagnostic application of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAB), specific for a human pathogen, M. tuberculosis by a technique which is applicable in principle to the serodiagnosis of many other infectious diseases. The serum diagnostic test is based on the competitive inhibition by human sera of the binding of 125 I-labelled murine monoclonal antibodies to M. tuberculosis-coated polyvinyl plates. Five monoclonal antibodies binding to distinct antigenic determinants of the organism were used as structural probes which conferred their stringent combining site specificities to the polyclonal mixture of antibodies from patients' sera. When compared with healthy controls, increased titres of inhibitory antibodies were found in about 70% of patients with active tuberculosis. The diagnostic value of the individual monoclonal antibodies as well as the benefit from the use of multiple specificity probes has been qualified

  3. Proteolytically modified human beta 2-microglobulin augments the specific cytotoxic activity in murine mixed lymphocyte culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Claësson, M H

    1987-01-01

    the endogenous production of interleukin 2 in the MLC culture; monoclonal antibody which reacts with both the native beta 2-m and M-beta 2-m molecule blocks the augmentation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte production induced by M-beta 2-m; murine as well as human MLC responder cells can proteolytically modify native......A proteolytically modified form of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2-m) present in the serum of patients suffering from autoimmune, immunodeficient diseases and cancer has been reported in the literature. In the present study we show that human beta 2-m as well as the proteolytically modified human form...... (M-beta 2-m) bind to murine lymphocytes expressing H-2 class I antigens; M-beta 2-m, when added at day 0 and 1 of culture in nanomolar concentrations to a one-way murine allogeneic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) augments the generation of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes; M-beta 2-m increases...

  4. Antibody responses against xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus envelope in a murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Makarova

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was recently discovered to be the first human gammaretrovirus that is associated with chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer (PC. Although a mechanism for XMRV carcinogenesis is yet to be established, this virus belongs to the family of gammaretroviruses well known for their ability to induce cancer in the infected hosts. Since its original identification XMRV has been detected in several independent investigations; however, at this time significant controversy remains regarding reports of XMRV detection/prevalence in other cohorts and cell type/tissue distribution. The potential risk of human infection, coupled with the lack of knowledge about the basic biology of XMRV, warrants further research, including investigation of adaptive immune responses. To study immunogenicity in vivo, we vaccinated mice with a combination of recombinant vectors expressing codon-optimized sequences of XMRV gag and env genes and virus-like particles (VLP that had the size and morphology of live infectious XMRV.Immunization elicited Env-specific binding and neutralizing antibodies (NAb against XMRV in mice. The peak titers for ELISA-binding antibodies and NAb were 1:1024 and 1:464, respectively; however, high ELISA-binding and NAb titers were not sustained and persisted for less than three weeks after immunizations.Vaccine-induced XMRV Env antibody titers were transiently high, but their duration was short. The relatively rapid diminution in antibody levels may in part explain the differing prevalences reported for XMRV in various prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome cohorts. The low level of immunogenicity observed in the present study may be characteristic of a natural XMRV infection in humans.

  5. Imported rickettsioses : think of murine typhus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kleij, FGH; Gansevoort, RT; Kreeftenberg, HG

    Murine typhus is a disease still prevalent in many parts of the world. Because the incidence in the US and Europe has declined rapidly, physicians in these continents have become unfamiliar with the clinical picture. Murine typhus is associated with significant morbidity and fatalities do occur,

  6. MC148 encoded by human molluscum contagiosum poxvirus is an antagonist for human but not murine CCR8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüttichau, H R; Gerstoft, J; Schwartz, T W

    2001-01-01

    The viral CC chemokines MC148, encoded by the poxvirus molluscum contagiosum, and viral macrophage inflammatory protein (vMIP)-I and vMIP-II, encoded by human herpesvirus 8, were probed on the murine CC receptor (CCR) 8 in parallel with human CCR8. In calcium mobilization assays, vMIP-I acted...... as a high-affinity agonist, whereas vMIP-II acted as a low-affinity antagonist on the murine CCR8 as well as the human CCR8. MC148 was found to bind and block responses through the human CCR8 with high affinity, but surprisingly MC148 was unable to bind and block responses through the murine CCR8. Because...

  7. Atomic structure of the murine norovirus protruding domain and sCD300lf receptor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Turgay; Koromyslova, Anna; Malak, Virginie; Hansman, Grant S

    2018-03-21

    Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis in human. Noroviruses also infect animals such as cow, mice, cat, and dog. How noroviruses bind and enter host cells is still incompletely understood. Recently, the type I transmembrane protein CD300lf was recently identified as the murine norovirus receptor, yet it is unclear how the virus capsid and receptor interact at the molecular level. In this study, we determined the X-ray crystal structure of the soluble CD300lf (sCD300lf) and murine norovirus capsid-protruding domain complex at 2.05 Å resolution. We found that the sCD300lf binding site is located on the topside of the protruding domain and involves a network of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. The sCD300lf locked nicely into a complementary cavity on the protruding domain that is additionally coordinated with a positive surface charge on the sCD300lf and a negative surface charge on the protruding domain. Five of six protruding domain residues interacting with sCD300lf were maintained between different murine norovirus strains, suggesting that the sCD300lf was capable of binding to a highly conserved pocket. Moreover, a sequence alignment with other CD300 paralogs showed that the sCD300lf interacting residues were partially conserved in CD300ld, but variable in other CD300 family members, consistent with previously reported infection selectivity. Overall, these data provide insights into how a norovirus engages a protein receptor and will be important for a better understanding of selective recognition and norovirus attachment and entry mechanisms. IMPORTANCE Noroviruses exhibit exquisite host-range specificity due to species-specific interactions between the norovirus capsid protein and host molecules. Given this strict host-range restriction it has been unclear how the viruses are maintained within a species between relatively sporadic epidemics. While much data demonstrates that noroviruses can interact with carbohydrates

  8. Targeted detection of murine colonic dysplasia in vivo with flexible multispectral scanning fiber endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Miller, Sharon J.; Lee, Cameron; Gustad, Adam; Seibel, Eric J.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a multi-spectral scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) that collects fluorescence images in vivo from three target peptides that bind specifically to murine colonic adenomas. This ultrathin endoscope was demonstrated in a genetically engineered mouse model of spontaneous colorectal adenomas based on somatic Apc (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene inactivation. The SFE delivers excitation at 440, 532, 635 nm with human patients by simultaneously visualizing multiple over expressed molecular targets unique to dysplasia.

  9. Interleukin-2 treatment potentiates induction of oral tolerance in a murine model of autoimmunity.

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzo, L V; Miller-Rivero, N E; Chan, C C; Wiggert, B; Nussenblatt, R B; Caspi, R R

    1994-01-01

    The present study addresses the feasibility of potentiating oral tolerance by immunomanipulation, using the murine model of experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) induced by immunization with the retinal antigen interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP). Three feedings of 0.2 mg IRBP every other day before immunization did not protect against EAU, whereas a similar regimen of five doses was protective. However, supplementing the nonprotective 3x regimen with as little as one inj...

  10. Targeted destruction of murine macrophage cells with bioconjugated gold nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pissuwan, Dakrong [University of Technology Sydney, Institute for Nanoscale Technology (Australia); Valenzuela, Stella M. [University of Technology Sydney, Department of Medical and Molecular Biosciences (Australia)], E-mail: stella.valenzuela@uts.edu.au; Killingsworth, Murray C. [Sydney South West Pathology Service (Australia)], E-mail: murray.killingsworth@swsahs.nsw.gov.au; Xu, Xiaoda; Cortie, Michael B. [University of Technology Sydney, Institute for Nanoscale Technology (Australia)], E-mail: michael.cortie@uts.edu.au

    2007-12-15

    Gold nanorods manifest a readily tunable longitudinal plasmon resonance with light and consequently have potential for use in photothermal therapeutics. Recent work by others has shown how gold nanoshells and rods can be used to target cancer cells, which can then be destroyed using relatively high power laser radiation ({approx}1x10{sup 5} to 1x10{sup 10} W/m{sup 2}). Here we extend this concept to demonstrate how gold nanorods can be modified to bind to target macrophage cells, and show that high intensity laser radiation is not necessary, with even 5x10{sup 2} W/m{sup 2} being sufficient, provided that a total fluence of {approx}30 J/cm{sup 2} is delivered. We used the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and the monoclonal antibody CD11b, raised against murine macrophages, as our model system and a 5 mW solid state diode laser as our energy source. Exposure of the cells labeled with gold nanorods to a laser fluence of 30 J/cm{sup 2} resulted in 81% cell death compared to only 0.9% in the control, non-labeled cells.

  11. Targeted destruction of murine macrophage cells with bioconjugated gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pissuwan, Dakrong; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Killingsworth, Murray C.; Xu, Xiaoda; Cortie, Michael B.

    2007-12-01

    Gold nanorods manifest a readily tunable longitudinal plasmon resonance with light and consequently have potential for use in photothermal therapeutics. Recent work by others has shown how gold nanoshells and rods can be used to target cancer cells, which can then be destroyed using relatively high power laser radiation (˜1×105 to 1×1010 W/m2). Here we extend this concept to demonstrate how gold nanorods can be modified to bind to target macrophage cells, and show that high intensity laser radiation is not necessary, with even 5×102 W/m2 being sufficient, provided that a total fluence of ˜30 J/cm2 is delivered. We used the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and the monoclonal antibody CD11b, raised against murine macrophages, as our model system and a 5 mW solid state diode laser as our energy source. Exposure of the cells labeled with gold nanorods to a laser fluence of 30 J/cm2 resulted in 81% cell death compared to only 0.9% in the control, non-labeled cells.

  12. Targeted destruction of murine macrophage cells with bioconjugated gold nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissuwan, Dakrong; Valenzuela, Stella M.; Killingsworth, Murray C.; Xu, Xiaoda; Cortie, Michael B.

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanorods manifest a readily tunable longitudinal plasmon resonance with light and consequently have potential for use in photothermal therapeutics. Recent work by others has shown how gold nanoshells and rods can be used to target cancer cells, which can then be destroyed using relatively high power laser radiation (∼1x10 5 to 1x10 10 W/m 2 ). Here we extend this concept to demonstrate how gold nanorods can be modified to bind to target macrophage cells, and show that high intensity laser radiation is not necessary, with even 5x10 2 W/m 2 being sufficient, provided that a total fluence of ∼30 J/cm 2 is delivered. We used the murine cell line RAW 264.7 and the monoclonal antibody CD11b, raised against murine macrophages, as our model system and a 5 mW solid state diode laser as our energy source. Exposure of the cells labeled with gold nanorods to a laser fluence of 30 J/cm 2 resulted in 81% cell death compared to only 0.9% in the control, non-labeled cells

  13. The Murine Factor H-Related Protein FHR-B Promotes Complement Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcell Cserhalmi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H-related (FHR proteins consist of varying number of complement control protein domains that display various degrees of sequence identity to respective domains of the alternative pathway complement inhibitor factor H (FH. While such FHR proteins are described in several species, only human FHRs were functionally investigated. Their biological role is still poorly understood and in part controversial. Recent studies on some of the human FHRs strongly suggest a role for FHRs in enhancing complement activation via competing with FH for binding to certain ligands and surfaces. The aim of the current study was the functional characterization of a murine FHR, FHR-B. To this end, FHR-B was expressed in recombinant form. Recombinant FHR-B bound to human C3b and was able to compete with human FH for C3b binding. FHR-B supported the assembly of functionally active C3bBb alternative pathway C3 convertase via its interaction with C3b. This activity was confirmed by demonstrating C3 activation in murine serum. In addition, FHR-B bound to murine pentraxin 3 (PTX3, and this interaction resulted in murine C3 fragment deposition due to enhanced complement activation in mouse serum. FHR-B also induced C3 deposition on C-reactive protein, the extracellular matrix (ECM extract Matrigel, and endothelial cell-derived ECM when exposed to mouse serum. Moreover, mouse C3 deposition was strongly enhanced on necrotic Jurkat T cells and the mouse B cell line A20 by FHR-B. FHR-B also induced lysis of sheep erythrocytes when incubated in mouse serum with FHR-B added in excess. Altogether, these data demonstrate that, similar to human FHR-1 and FHR-5, mouse FHR-B modulates complement activity by promoting complement activation via interaction with C3b and via competition with murine FH.

  14. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1999-01-01

    Co-encapsidation of retroviral RNAs into virus particles allows for the generation of recombinant proviruses through events of template switching during reverse transcription. By use of a forced recombination system based on recombinational rescue of replication- defective primer binding site-imp....... We note that recombination-based rescue of primer binding site knock-out retroviral vectors may constitute a sensitive assay to register putative genetic interactions involving endogenous retroviral RNAs present in cells of various species.......-impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region...... harbouring the supposed RNA dimer-forming cis -elements and (ii) that copackaged retroviral RNAs can recombine despite pronounced sequence dissimilarity at the cross-over site(s) and within parts of the genome involved in RNA dimerization, encapsidation and strand transferring during reverse transcription...

  15. Identification and characterization of a silencer regulatory element in the 3'-flanking region of the murine CD46 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, M; Tsujimura, A; Begum, N A; Matsumoto, M; Wabiko, H; Toyoshima, K; Seya, T

    2000-01-01

    The murine membrane cofactor protein (CD46) gene is expressed exclusively in testis, in contrast to human CD46, which is expressed ubiquitously. To elucidate the mechanism of differential CD46 gene expression among species, we cloned entire murine CD46 genomic DNA and possible regulatory regions were placed in the flanking region of the luciferase reporter gene. The reporter gene assay revealed a silencing activity not in the promoter, but in the 3'-flanking region of the gene and the silencer-like element was identified within a 0.2-kb region between 0.6 and 0.8 kb downstream of the stop codon. This silencer-like element was highly similar to that of the pig MHC class-I gene. The introduction of a mutation into this putative silencer element of murine CD46 resulted in an abrogation of the silencing effect. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay indicated the presence of the binding molecule(s) for this silencer sequence in murine cell lines and tissues. A size difference of the protein-silencer-element complex was observed depending upon the solubilizers used for preparation of the nuclear extracts. A mutated silencer sequence failed to interact with the binding molecules. The level of the binding factor was lower in the testicular germ cells compared with other organs. Thus the silencer element and its binding factor may play a role in transcriptional regulation of murine CD46 gene expression. These results imply that the effects of the CD46 silencer element encompass the innate immune and reproductive systems, and in mice may determine the testicular germ-cell-dominant expression of CD46. PMID:11023821

  16. GPBAR1/TGR5 mediates bile acid-induced cytokine expression in murine Kupffer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiyu Lou

    Full Text Available GPBAR1/TGR5 is a novel plasma membrane-bound G protein-coupled bile acid (BA receptor. BAs are known to induce the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the liver with unknown mechanism. Here we show that without other external stimuli, TGR5 activation alone induced the expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7 or murine Kupffer cells. The TGR5-mediated increase of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression was suppressed by JNK inhibition. Moreover, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in mouse liver by 1% cholic acid (CA diet was blunted in JNK-/- mice. TGR5 activation by its ligands enhanced the phosphorylation levels, DNA-binding and trans-activities of c-Jun and ATF2 transcription factors. Finally, the induced pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in Kupffer cells by TGR5 activation correlated with the suppression of Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1 expression in murine hepatocytes. These results suggest that TGR5 mediates the BA-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine production in murine Kupffer cells through JNK-dependent pathway. This novel role of TGR5 may correlate to the suppression of Cyp7a1 expression in hepatocytes and contribute to the delicate BA feedback regulation.

  17. Receptors for Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus: characterization by using rabbit antiviral antiserum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubio, N.; Cuesta, A.

    1988-01-01

    An immunological assay was developed to characterize the binding of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus to BHK-21 cell receptors. After absorption of the virus and formaldehyde fixation, rabbit antibodies and Staphylococcus aureus protein A labeled with 125 I formed a specific complex on the surfaces of the cells. The optimal multiplicity of infection in this system was 10 PFU per cell. The virus was internalized at 33 and 37 0 C, but internalization did not take place at 25 or 4 0 C. The binding was proportional to the number of cells and was significant within 30 s. Cell surface receptors were still active after fixation, and only intact viruses were bound, as demonstrated by the lack of binding of the purified, isolated virion proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3

  18. Reemergence of Murine Typhus in the US

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-21

    Dr. Lucas Blanton discusses the Reemergence of Murine Typhus in Galveston Texas in 2013.  Created: 4/21/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2015.

  19. Assessment of the binding properties of granuloszint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubiger, P.A.; Hasler, P.H.; Novak-Hofer, I.; Blaeuenstein, P.

    1989-01-01

    123 I-granuloszint (a murine monoclonal antibody - called AK-47 - against NCA-95 glycoprotein of granulocytes) has been proved to be a very convenient and successful radiopharmaceutical for visualizing infectious diseases. For a broad introduction in routine nuclear medicine it was necessary to optimize the labelling method and to determine in vitro exactly those biological and binding parameters which are relevant for an effective application in vivo. Binding to granulocytes has been shown to be specific and saturable (nonspecific binding about 10%) and is not via the Fc part of the antibody. The investigation of the binding properties of 125 I-labelled AK-47 gave the following results: Affinity constant 5x10 8 , 20,000-100,000 epitopes per granulocyte and an immunoreactivity of more than 90%. Labelling with 123 I reduced the immunoreactivity to 40%. The Lindmo method and immunoblotting are used as quality control to check the likely in vivo behaviour of the labelled antibody. There is a good correspondence between the results from the two methods. With our special labelling method and the different in vitro checks we have found a reliable way to control the production and to assure an optimal binding behaviour of 123 I-granuloszint. (orig.)

  20. Assessment of the binding properties of granuloszint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubiger, P.A.; Hasler, P.H.; Novak-Hofer, I.; Blaeuenstein, P.

    1989-09-01

    /sup 123/I-granuloszint (a murine monoclonal antibody - called AK-47 - against NCA-95 glycoprotein of granulocytes) has been proved to be a very convenient and successful radiopharmaceutical for visualizing infectious diseases. For a broad introduction in routine nuclear medicine it was necessary to optimize the labelling method and to determine in vitro exactly those biological and binding parameters which are relevant for an effective application in vivo. Binding to granulocytes has been shown to be specific and saturable (nonspecific binding about 10%) and is not via the Fc part of the antibody. The investigation of the binding properties of /sup 125/I-labelled AK-47 gave the following results: Affinity constant 5x10/sup 8/, 20,000-100,000 epitopes per granulocyte and an immunoreactivity of more than 90%. Labelling with /sup 123/I reduced the immunoreactivity to 40%. The Lindmo method and immunoblotting are used as quality control to check the likely in vivo behaviour of the labelled antibody. There is a good correspondence between the results from the two methods. With our special labelling method and the different in vitro checks we have found a reliable way to control the production and to assure an optimal binding behaviour of /sup 123/I-granuloszint. (orig.).

  1. Essential role of the TFIID subunit TAF4 in murine embryogenesis and embryonic stem cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Langer, Diana; Martianov, Igor; Alpern, Daniel; Rhinn, Muriel; Keime, Celine; Dolle, Pascal; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    TAF4 (TATA-binding protein-associated factor 4) and its paralogue TAF4b are components of the TFIID core module. We inactivated the murine Taf4a gene to address Taf4 function during embryogenesis. Here we show that Taf4a(-/-) embryos survive until E9.5 where primary germ layers and many embryonic structures are identified showing Taf4 is dispensable for their specification. In contrast, Taf4 is required for correct patterning of the trunk and anterior structures, ventral morphogenesis and pro...

  2. Thrombin binding to human brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, M.; Snider, R.M.; Richelson, E.

    1983-01-01

    Thrombin, a serine protease that regulates hemostasis, has been shown to stimulate the formation of cGMP in murine neuroblastoma cells. The nervous system in vivo thus may be postulated to respond to this blood-borne factor after it breaches the blood-brain barrier, as in trauma. Human alpha-thrombin was radiolabeled with 125I and shown to bind rapidly, reversibly, and with high affinity to human brain and spinal cord. These findings indicate the presence of specific thrombin-binding sites in nervous tissue and may have important clinical implications

  3. Antigen-specific murine T cell clones produce soluble interleukin 2 receptor on stimulation with specific antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.K.; York-Jolley, J.; Malek, T.R.; Berzofsky, J.A.; Nelson, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, monoclonal antibodies were used to the murine IL 2 receptor (IL 2R) termed 3C7 and 7D4, which bind to different epitopes on the murine IL 2R, to develop an ELISA to measure soluble murine IL 2R. Surprisingly, stimulated murine spleen cells not only expressed cell-associated IL 2R, but also produced a considerable level of cellfree IL 2R in the culture supernatant fluid. To assess the fine specificity of this response, myoglobin-immune murine T cell clones were stimulated with appropriate or inappropriate antigen and syngeneic or allogeneic presenting cells. Proliferation, measured by [ 3 H] thymidine incorporation, and levels of soluble IL 2R were determined at day 4. The production of soluble IL2R displayed the same epitope fine specificity, genetic restriction, and antigen dose-response as the proliferative response. Indeed, in some cases there was sharper discrimination of epitope specificity and genetic restriction with the soluble IL 2R levels. There was also reproducible clone-to-clone variation in the amount of soluble receptor produced in response to antigen among 12 T cell clones and lines tested. In time course experiments, proliferation was greatest at day 3, whereas soluble IL 2R levels continued to rise in subsequent days. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first demonstration of release of secretion of soluble IL 2R by murine T cells, and the first demonstration of the fine specificity and genetic restriction of the induction of soluble IL 2R by specific antigen

  4. Humanized versus murine anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Alvarez-Ruiz, Daniel; Becquer-Viart, Maria de Los Angeles; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    2000-02-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized antibody h-R3 (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R, was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. Results are compared with its murine version ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intravenously with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs. The mAb ior C5 that recognizes an antigen expressed preferentially on the surface of malignant and cytoplasm of normal colorectal cells was used as negative control. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on A431 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions determined by Lindmo method. Among all organs significant accumulation was found in tumor (6.14{+-}2.50 %ID/g, 5.06{+-}2.61 %ID/g for murine and humanized mAbs, respectively) 4 h after injection. The immunoreactive fractions were found to be 0.88 and 0.81 for murine and humanized mAb, respectively. Thus, we expect better results using the humanized mAb h-R3 for diagnostic immunoscintigraphy.

  5. Humanized versus murine anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Alvarez-Ruiz, Daniel; Becquer-Viart, Maria de Los Angeles; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    2000-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized antibody h-R3 (IgG 1 ), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R, was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. Results are compared with its murine version ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intravenously with 10 μg/100 μCi of 99m Tc-labeled mAbs. The mAb ior C5 that recognizes an antigen expressed preferentially on the surface of malignant and cytoplasm of normal colorectal cells was used as negative control. Immunoreactivity of 99m Tc-labeled mAbs was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on A431 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions determined by Lindmo method. Among all organs significant accumulation was found in tumor (6.14±2.50 %ID/g, 5.06±2.61 %ID/g for murine and humanized mAbs, respectively) 4 h after injection. The immunoreactive fractions were found to be 0.88 and 0.81 for murine and humanized mAb, respectively. Thus, we expect better results using the humanized mAb h-R3 for diagnostic immunoscintigraphy

  6. Baicalein induces cell death in murine T cell lymphoma via inhibition of thioredoxin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Pal, Debojyoti; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Sandur, Santosh K

    2017-10-01

    We have earlier demonstrated the radioprotective potential of baicalein using murine splenic lymphocytes. Here, we have studied the effect of baicalein on murine T cell lymphoma EL4 cells and investigated the underlying mechanism of action. We observed that baicalein induced a dose dependent cell death in EL4 cells in vitro and significantly reduced the frequency of cancer stem cells. Previously, we have reported that murine and human T cell lymphoma cells have increased oxidative stress tolerance capacity due to active thioredoxin system. Hence, we monitored the effect of baicalein on thioredoxin system in EL4 cells. Docking studies revealed that baicalein could bind to the active site of thioredoxin reductase. Baicalein treatment led to significant reduction in the activity of thioredoxin reductase and nuclear levels of thioredoxin-1 thereby increasing ASK1 levels and caspase-3 activity. Interestingly, CRISPR-Cas9 based knock-out of ASK1 or over-expression of thioredoxin-1 abolished anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells. Further, baicalein administration significantly reduced intra-peritoneal tumor burden of EL4 cells in C57BL/6 mice. Thus, our study describes anti-tumor effects of baicalein in EL4 cells via inhibition of thioredoxin system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Signaling pathways regulating murine pancreatic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serup, Palle

    2012-01-01

    The recent decades have seen a huge expansion in our knowledge about pancreatic development. Numerous lineage-restricted transcription factor genes have been identified and much has been learned about their function. Similarly, numerous signaling pathways important for pancreas development have...... been identified and the specific roles have been investigated by genetic and cell biological methods. The present review presents an overview of the principal signaling pathways involved in regulating murine pancreatic growth, morphogenesis, and cell differentiation....

  8. Isolation and characterisation of Ebolavirus-specific recombinant antibody fragments from murine and shark immune libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Sarah A; Dooley, Helen; Schoepp, Randal J; Flajnik, Martin; Lonsdale, Stephen G

    2011-09-01

    Members of the genus Ebolavirus cause fulminating outbreaks of disease in human and non-human primate populations with a mortality rate up to 90%. To facilitate rapid detection of these pathogens in clinical and environmental samples, robust reagents capable of providing sensitive and specific detection are required. In this work recombinant antibody libraries were generated from murine (single chain variable domain fragment; scFv) and nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum (IgNAR V) hosts immunised with Zaire ebolavirus. This provides the first recorded IgNAR V response against a particulate antigen in the nurse shark. Both murine scFv and shark IgNAR V libraries were panned by phage display technology to identify useful antibodies for the generation of immunological detection reagents. Two murine scFv were shown to have specificity to the Zaire ebolavirus viral matrix protein VP40. Two isolated IgNAR V were shown to bind to the viral nucleoprotein (NP) and to capture viable Zaire ebolavirus with a high degree of sensitivity. Assays developed with IgNAR V cross-reacted to Reston ebolavirus, Sudan ebolavirus and Bundibugyo ebolavirus. Despite this broad reactivity, neither of IgNAR V showed reactivity to Côte d'Ivoire ebolavirus. IgNAR V was substantially more resistant to irreversible thermal denaturation than murine scFv and monoclonal IgG in a comparative test. The demonstrable robustness of the IgNAR V domains may offer enhanced utility as immunological detection reagents in fieldable biosensor applications for use in tropical or subtropical countries where outbreaks of Ebolavirus haemorrhagic fever occur. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Murine homeobox-containing gene, Msx-1: analysis of genomic organization, promoter structure, and potential autoregulatory cis-acting elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuoka, M; Takahashi, T; Guron, C; Raghow, R

    1994-05-01

    Detailed molecular organization of the coding and upstream regulatory regions of the murine homeodomain-containing gene, Msx-1, is reported. The protein-encoding portion of the gene is contained in two exons, 590 and 1214 bp in length, separated by a 2107-bp intron; the homeodomain is located in the second exon. The two-exon organization of the murine Msx-1 gene resembles a number of other homeodomain-containing genes. The 5'-(GTAAGT) and 3'-(CCCTAG) splicing junctions and the mRNA polyadenylation signal (UAUAA) of the murine Msx-1 gene are also characteristic of other vertebrate genes. By nuclease protection and primer extension assays, the start of transcription of the Msx-1 gene was located 256 bp upstream of the first AUG. Computer analysis of the promoter proximal 1280-bp sequence revealed a number of potentially important cis-regulatory sequences; these include the recognition elements for Ap-1, Ap-2, Ap-3, Sp-1, a possible binding site for RAR:RXR, and a number of TCF-1 consensus motifs. Importantly, a perfect reverse complement of (C/G)TTAATTG, which was recently shown to be an optimal binding sequence for the homeodomain of Msx-1 protein (K.M. Catron, N. Iler, and C. Abate (1993) Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2354-2365), was also located in the murine Msx-1 promoter. Binding of bacterially expressed Msx-1 homeodomain polypeptide to Msx-1-specific oligonucleotide was experimentally demonstrated, raising a distinct possibility of autoregulation of this developmentally regulated gene.

  10. DMPD: The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 10534106 The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. Sester DP, Stacey KJ, ... Show The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophages. PubmedID 10534106 Title The actions of bacterial DNA on murine macrophage

  11. Comparison of the fibronectin-binding ability and antitumor efficacy of various mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M A; Ritchey, J K; Catalona, W J; Brown, E J; Ratliff, T L

    1990-07-01

    Although the mechanism by which Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) exerts an antitumor effect on superficial bladder tumors is not fully understood, recent evidence has implicated binding of BCG organisms to fibronectin (FN) as requisite for this antitumor efficacy. Various substrains of BCG and other mycobacteria were tested in vitro for their relative capacities to bind both matrix and soluble FN. A substrain of Mycobacterium kansasii, designated the "high-binding strain," was found to bind FN more readily (P less than 0.05) in in vitro studies, when compared to commercially available substrains of BCG (Tice, Connaught, and Armand Frappier). The binding by the three commercial strains of BCG to FN in vitro appeared to be equivalent. The high-binding strain was further demonstrated to attach more readily in vivo to the acutely injured murine bladder (P less than 0.005) than the Armand Frappier substrain. Finally, using the MB49 murine bladder tumor model, an enhanced antitumor effect (P less than 0.05) was noted in mice treated with intravesical high-binding strain, in comparison to the Armand Frappier substrain, during five weekly treatments. It appears not only that the commercial substrains of BCG bind FN in an equivalent manner but also that the relative binding capacities of the substrains correlate directly with antitumor activity. A substrain of M. kansasii appears to have been identified which may prove more clinically effective than the currently available strains of BCG.

  12. Activation of farnesoid X receptor downregulates monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in murine macrophage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Liangpeng; Zhang, Qian; Peng, Jiahe; Jiang, Chanjui; Zhang, Yan; Shen, Lili; Dong, Jinyu; Wang, Yongchao; Jiang, Yu, E-mail: yujiang0207@163.com

    2015-11-27

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, which plays important roles in bile acids/lipid homeostasis and inflammation. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) contributes to macrophage infiltration into body tissues during inflammation. Here we investigated whether FXR can regulate MCP-1 expression in murine macrophage. FXR activation down regulate MCP-1 mRNA and protein levels in ANA-1 and Raw264.7 cells. Luciferase reporter assay, Gel shift and Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays have revealed that the activated FXR bind to the FXR element located in −738 bp ∼  −723 bp in MCP-1 promoter. These results suggested that FXR may serve as a novel target for regulating MCP-1 levels for the inflammation related diseases therapies. - Highlights: • FXR is expressed in murine macrophage cell line. • FXR down regulates MCP-1 expression. • FXR binds to the DR4 in MCP-1 promoter.

  13. Identification of distal silencing elements in the murine interferon-A11 gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffet, P; Lopez, S; Navarro, S; Bandu, M T; Coulombel, C; Vignal, M; Doly, J; Vodjdani, G

    1996-08-01

    The murine interferon-A11 (Mu IFN-A11) gene is a member of the IFN-A multigenic family. In mouse L929 cells, the weak response of the gene's promoter to viral induction is due to a combination of both a point mutation in the virus responsive element (VRE) and the presence of negatively regulating sequences surrounding the VRE. In the distal part of the promoter, the negatively acting E1E2 sequence was delimited. This sequence displays an inhibitory effect in either orientation or position on the inducibility of a virus-responsive heterologous promoter. It selectively represses VRE-dependent transcription but is not able to reduce the transcriptional activity of a VRE-lacking promoter. In a transient transfection assay, an E1E2-containing DNA competitor was able to derepress the native Mu IFN-A11 promoter. Specific nuclear factors bind to this sequence; thus the binding of trans-regulators participates in the repression of the Mu IFN-A11 gene. The E1E2 sequence contains an IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. Recombinant IRF2 binds this sequence and anti-IRF2 antibodies supershift a major complex formed with nuclear extracts. The protein composing the complex is 50 kDa in size, indicating the presence of IRF2 or antigenically related proteins in the complex. The Mu IFN-A11 gene is the first example within the murine IFN-A family, in which a distal promoter element has been identified that can negatively modulate the transcriptional response to viral induction.

  14. Alpha-crystallins are involved in specific interactions with the murine gamma D/E/F-crystallin-encoding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrowski, D; Durante, M J; Liebstein, A; Schmitt-John, T; Werner, T; Graw, J

    1994-07-08

    The promoter of the murine gamma E-crystallin (gamma E-Cry) encoding gene (gamma E-cry) was analyzed for specific interactions with lenticular proteins in a gel-retardation assay. A 21-bp fragment immediately downstream of the transcription initiation site (DOTIS) is demonstrated to be responsible for specific interactions with lens extracts. The DOTIS-binding protein(s) accept only the sense DNA strand as target; anti-sense or double-stranded DNA do not interact with these proteins. The DOTIS sequence element is highly conserved among the murine gamma D-, gamma E- and gamma F-cry and is present at comparable positions in the orthologous rat genes. Only a weak or even no protein-binding activity is observed if a few particular bases are changed, as in the rat gamma A-, gamma C- and gamma E-cry elements. DOTIS-binding proteins were found in commercially available bovine alpha-Cry preparations. The essential participation of alpha-Cry in the DNA-binding protein complex was confirmed using alpha-Cry-specific monoclonal antibody. The results reported here point to a novel function of alpha-Cry besides the structural properties in the lens.

  15. Azithromycin prophylaxis and treatment of murine toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbara, Khalid F; Hammouda, Ehab; Tawfik, Abdulkader; Al-Omar, Othman M; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the azithromycin effects alone and in combination with other agents in the prophylaxis and treatment of murine toxoplasmosis. A total of 280 BALB/c mice were included, and 2 x 103 Toxoplasma organisms of the RH strain Toxoplasma gondii strain ATCC50174 were given intraperitoneally to each mouse. In experiment one, 40 animals were given azithromycin 200 milligram/kilogram/daily for 3 days starting the day of inoculation, 40 mice were control. In experiment 2, the treatment was started 48 hours after inoculation and given daily for 3 days: one group received azithromycin 200 milligram/kilogram/day, the second group received pyrimethamine 25 milligram/kilogram/day, and the sulfadiazine 100 milligram/kilogram/day. The third group was control. In experiment 3, 7 groups of animals received one of the following (1) none, (2) azithromycin 200 milligram/kilogram/day, (3) pyrimethamine 25 milligram/kilogram/day and sulfadiazine 100 milligram/kilogram/day, (4) azithromycin and sulfadiazine, (5) azithromycin and pyrimethamine, (6) azithromycin with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine, (7) sulfadiazine alone. Treatment was initiated 72 hours after inoculation for 3 days. The study was conducted at the Animal Care Facility of King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Animals that received azithromycin simultaneously with inoculation survived, and all control animals died. All animals died in groups receiving single drug therapy. Animals treated with azithromycin and sulfadiazine showed a survival rate of 40%, sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine 40%, or azithromycin with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine 95% (p<0.0001). Azithromycin alone was found to be effective in the prophylaxis of murine toxoplasmosis. Combination therapy was effective in the treatment of murine toxoplasmosis.

  16. Efficacy of posaconazole in murine experimental sporotrichosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Silva, Fabiola; Capilla, Javier; Mayayo, Emilio; Guarro, Josep

    2012-05-01

    We developed a murine model of systemic sporotrichosis by using three strains of each of the two commonest species causing sporotrichosis, i.e., Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto and Sporothrix brasiliensis, in order to evaluate the efficacy of posaconazole (PSC). The drug was administered at a dose of 2.5 or 5 mg/kg of body weight twice a day by gavage, and one group was treated with amphotericin B (AMB) as a control treatment. Posaconazole, especially at 5 mg/kg, showed good efficacy against all the strains tested, regardless of their MICs, as measured by prolonged survival, tissue burden reduction, and histopathology.

  17. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-01-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  18. Thrombopoietin inhibits murine mast cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Fabrizio; Ghinassi, Barbara; Lorenzini, Rodolfo; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Rana, Rosa Alba; Nishikawa, Mitsuo; Partamian, Sandra; Migliaccio, Giovanni; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that Mpl, the thrombopoietin receptor, is expressed on murine mast cells and on their precursors and that targeted deletion of the Mpl gene increases mast cell differentiation in mice. Here we report that treatment of mice with thrombopoietin, or addition of this growth factor to bone marrow-derived mast cell cultures, severely hampers the generation of mature cells from their precursors by inducing apoptosis. Analysis of the expression profiling of mast cells obtained in the presence of thrombopoietin suggests that thrombopoietin induces apoptosis of mast cells by reducing expression of the transcription factor Mitf and its target anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2. PMID:18276801

  19. Lin28b is sufficient to drive liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance in murine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Liem H.; Robinton, Daisy A.; Seligson, Marc; Wu, Linwei; Li, Lin; Rakheja, Dinesh; Comerford, Sarah; Ramezani, Saleh; Sun, Xiankai; Parikh, Monisha; Yang, Erin; Powers, John T.; Shinoda, Gen; Shah, Samar; Hammer, Robert; Daley, George Q.; Zhu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Lin28a/b are RNA-binding proteins that influence stem cell maintenance, metabolism, and oncogenesis. Poorly differentiated, aggressive cancers often overexpress Lin28, but its role in tumor initiation or maintenance has not been definitively addressed. We report that LIN28B overexpression is sufficient to initiate hepatoblastoma and hepatocellular carcinoma in murine models. We also detected Lin28b overexpression in MYC-driven hepatoblastomas, and liver-specific deletion of Lin28a/b reduced tumor burden, extended latency, and prolonged survival. Both intravenous siRNA against Lin28b and conditional Lin28b deletion reduced tumor burden and prolonged survival. Igf2bp proteins are upregulated and Igf2bp3 is required in the context of LIN28B overexpression to promote growth. Thus, multiple murine models demonstrate that Lin28b is both sufficient to initiate liver cancer and necessary for its maintenance. PMID:25117712

  20. Mutations of the kissing-loop dimerization sequence influence the site specificity of murine leukemia virus recombination in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    2000-01-01

    synthesis in newly infected cells. We have previously shown that template shifts within the 5' leader of murine leukemia viruses occur preferentially within the kissing stem-loop motif, a cis element crucial for in vitro RNA dimer formation. By use of a forced recombination approach based on single......-cycle transfer of Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors harboring defective primer binding site sequences, we now report that modifications of the kissing-loop structure, ranging from a deletion of the entire sequence to introduction of a single point mutation in the loop motif, significantly disturb site...... specificity of recombination within the highly structured 5' leader region. In addition, we find that an intact kissing-loop sequence favors optimal RNA encapsidation and vector transduction. Our data are consistent with the kissing-loop dimerization model and suggest that a direct intermolecular RNA...

  1. [Virulence of Sporothrix globosa in murine models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz Choappa, Rodrigo; Pérez Gaete, Salomón; Rodríguez Badilla, Valentina; Vieille Oyarzo, Peggy; Opazo Sanchez, Héctor

    The sporothricosis disease is an infection caused by species included in Sporothrix schenkii complex. Verify the virulence of a strain of S. globosa using two different concentrations of inoculum by intraperitoneally and subcutaneously, into a mouse model. Nonrandomized pilot study, in murine inoculated with a strain of S. globosa (CBS 14.076M) by intraperitoneally and subcutaneously with inoculum concentrations of 0.5 and 4 McFarland. For this purpose 18 rodents CF-1 (ISP, Santiago, Chile) were used. The studied strain did not induce illness or injury on animals, they all survived and neither the tissue culture nor the histopathological analysis showed fungal growth or suggestive infection by organ abnormalities. The S. globosa strain did not present any virulence enough to cause disease at 0.5 and 4.0 McFarland concentration inoculum when inoculated in both intraperitoneally and subcutaneously, in murine models. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Clearance of 131I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody from patients' blood by intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.S.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hird, V.; Davies, K.A.; Walport, M.; Ritter, M.A.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Five patients treated with intraperitoneal 131I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody for ovarian cancer also received i.v. exogenous polyclonal human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. The pharmacokinetics of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in these patients were compared with those of 28 other patients receiving i.p.-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody for the first time without exogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin, and who had no preexisting endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Patients receiving i.v. human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody demonstrated a rapid clearance of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody from their circulation. The (mean) maximum 131I blood content was 11.4% of the injected activity in patients receiving human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody compared to 23.3% in patients not given human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody decreased the radiation dose to bone marrow (from 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in the vascular compartment) 4-fold. Following the injection of human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody, 131I-monoclonal/human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody immune complexes were rapidly transported to the liver. Antibody dehalogenation in the liver was rapid, with 87% of the injected 131I excreted in 5 days. Despite the efficient hepatic uptake of immune complexes, dehalogenation of monoclonal antibody was so rapid that the radiation dose to liver parenchyma from circulating 131I was decreased 4-fold rather than increased. All patients developed endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody 2 to 3 weeks after treatment

  3. Ribosomopathy-like properties of murine and human cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucheta Kulkarni

    Full Text Available Ribosomopathies comprise a heterogeneous group of hematologic and developmental disorders, often characterized by bone marrow failure, skeletal and other developmental abnormalities and cancer predisposition. They are associated with mutations and/or haplo-insufficiencies of ribosomal proteins (RPs and inefficient ribosomal RNA (rRNA processing. The resulting ribosomal stress induces the canonical p19ARF/Mdm2/p53 tumor suppressor pathway leading to proliferative arrest and/or apoptosis. It has been proposed that this pathway is then inactivated during subsequent neoplastic evolution. We show here that two murine models of hepatoblastoma (HB and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC unexpectedly possess features that mimic the ribosomopathies. These include loss of the normal stoichiometry of RP transcripts and proteins and the accumulation of unprocessed rRNA precursors. Silencing of p19ARF, cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, binding to and inactivation of Mdm2 by free RPs, and up-regulation of the pro-survival protein Bcl-2 may further cooperate to drive tumor growth and survival. Consistent with this notion, re-instatement of constitutive p19ARF expression in the HB model completely suppressed tumorigenesis. In >2000 cases of human HCC, colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer, RP transcript deregulation was a frequent finding. In HCC and breast cancer, the severity of this dysregulation was associated with inferior survival. In HCC, the presence of RP gene mutations, some of which were identical to those previously reported in ribosomopathies, were similarly negatively correlated with long-term survival. Taken together, our results indicate that many if not all cancers possess ribosomopathy-like features that may affect their biological behaviors.

  4. Induction and regulation of murine emphysema by elastin peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellami, Mehdi; Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Terryn, Christine; Fichel, Caroline; Bouland, Nicole; Diebold, Marie-Daniele; Guenounou, Moncef; Héry-Huynh, Stéphanie; Le Naour, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Emphysema is the major component of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During emphysema, elastin breakdown in the lung tissue originates from the release of large amounts of elastase by inflammatory cells. Elevated levels of elastin-derived peptides (EP) reflect massive pulmonary elastin breakdown in COPD patients. Only the EP containing the GXXPG conformational motif with a type VIII β-turn are elastin receptor ligands inducing biological activities. In addition, the COOH-terminal glycine residue of the GXXPG motif seems a prerequisite to the biological activity. In this study, we endotracheally instilled C57BL/6J mice with GXXPG EP and/or COOH-terminal glycine deleted-EP whose sequences were designed by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. We investigated their effect on all criteria associated with the progression of murine emphysema. Bronchoalveolar lavages were recovered to analyze cell profiles by flow cytometry and lungs were prepared to allow morphological and histological analysis by immunostaining and confocal microscopy. We observed that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema with inflammatory cell accumulation associated with increased matrix metalloproteinases and desmosine expression and of remodeling of parenchymal tissue. We also identified an inactive COOH-terminal glycine deleted-EP that retains its binding-activity to EBP and that is able to inhibit the in vitro and in vivo activities of emphysema-inducing EP. This study demonstrates that EP are key actors in the development of emphysema and that they represent pharmacological targets for an alternative treatment of emphysema based on the identification of EP analogous antagonists by molecular modeling studies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  6. A potent complement factor C3 specific nanobody inhibiting multiple functions in the alternative pathway of human and murine complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus K; Pihl, Rasmus; Gadeberg, Trine A F; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Kasper R; Thiel, Steffen; Laursen, Nick S; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2018-03-01

    The complement system is a complex, carefully regulated proteolytic cascade for which suppression of aberrant activation is of increasing clinical relevance and inhibition of the complement alternative pathway is a subject of intense research. Here, we describe the nanobody hC3Nb1 that binds to multiple functional states of C3 with sub-nanomolar affinity. The nanobody causes a complete shutdown of alternative pathway activity in human and murine serum when present in concentrations comparable to C3, and hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent both proconvertase assembly as well as binding of the C3 substrate to C3 convertases. Our crystal structure of the C3b-hC3Nb1 complex and functional experiments demonstrate that proconvertase formation is blocked by steric hindrance between the nanobody and an Asn-linked glycan on complement factor B. In addition, hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent factor H binding to C3b rationalizing its inhibition of factor I activity. Our results identify hC3Nb1 as a versatile, inexpensive, and powerful inhibitor of the alternative pathway in both human and murine in vitro model systems of complement activation. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Anatomy and Histology of the Human and Murine Prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ittmann, Michael

    2018-05-01

    The human and murine prostate glands have similar functional roles in the generation of seminal fluid to assist in reproduction. There are significant differences in the anatomy and histology of murine and human prostate and knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the murine prostate is essential to interpreting changes in genetically engineered mouse models. In this review, the normal anatomy and histology of both human and mouse prostate will be described. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  8. Potent and reversible lentiviral vector restriction in murine induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geis, Franziska K; Galla, Melanie; Hoffmann, Dirk; Kuehle, Johannes; Zychlinski, Daniela; Maetzig, Tobias; Schott, Juliane W; Schwarzer, Adrian; Goffinet, Christine; Goff, Stephen P; Schambach, Axel

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral vectors are derived from wild-type retroviruses, can be used to study retrovirus-host interactions and are effective tools in gene and cell therapy. However, numerous cell types are resistant or less permissive to retrovirus infection due to the presence of active defense mechanisms, or the absence of important cellular host co-factors. In contrast to multipotent stem cells, pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. Much remains to be elucidated in the field of anti-viral immunity in stem cells, especially in PSC. In this study, we report that transduction with HIV-1-based, lentiviral vectors (LV) is impaired in murine PSC. Analyses of early retroviral events in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) revealed that the restriction is independent of envelope choice and does not affect reverse transcription, but perturbs nuclear entry and proviral integration. Proteasomal inhibition by MG132 could not circumvent the restriction. However, prevention of cyclophilin A (CypA) binding to the HIV-1 capsid via use of either a CypA inhibitor (cyclosporine A) or CypA-independent capsid mutants improved transduction. In addition, application of higher vector doses also increased transduction. Our data revealed a CypA mediated restriction in iPSC, which was acquired during reprogramming, associated with pluripotency and relieved upon subsequent differentiation. We showed that murine PSC and iPSC are less susceptible to LV. The block observed in iPSC was CypA-dependent and resulted in reduced nuclear entry of viral DNA and proviral integration. Our study helps to improve transduction of murine pluripotent cells with HIV-1-based vectors and contributes to our understanding of retrovirus-host interactions in PSC.

  9. Murine leukemia viruses: objects and organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) are among the simplest retroviruses. Prototypical gammaretroviruses encode only the three polyproteins that will be used in the assembly of progeny virus particles. These are the Gag polyprotein, which is the structural protein of a retrovirus particle, the Pol protein, comprising the three retroviral enzymes-protease, which catalyzes the maturation of the particle, reverse transcriptase, which copies the viral RNA into DNA upon infection of a new host cell, and integrase, which inserts the DNA into the chromosomal DNA of the host cell, and the Env polyprotein, which induces the fusion of the viral membrane with that of the new host cell, initiating infection. In general, a productive MLV infection has no obvious effect upon host cells. Although gammaretroviral structure and replication follow the same broad outlines as those of other retroviruses, we point out a number of significant differences between different retroviral genera.

  10. Proliferative capacity of murine hematopoietic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, S.; Botnick, L.E.; Hannon, E.C.; Vigneulle, R.M.

    1978-01-01

    The present study demonstrates a decrease in self-renewal capacity with serial transfer of murine hematopoietic stem cells. Production of differentiated cell progeny is maintained longer than stem cell self-renewal. In normal animals the capacity for self-renewal is not decreased with increasing donor age. The stem cell compartment in normal animals, both young and old, appears to be proliferatively quiescent. After apparent recovery from the alkylating agent busulfan, the probability of stem cell self-renewal is decreased, there is a permanent defect in the capacity of the bone marrow for serial transplantation, and the stem cells are proliferatively active. These findings support a model of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as a continuum of cells with decreasing capacities for self-renewal, increasing likelihood for differentiation, and increasing proliferative activity. Cells progress in the continuum in one direction and such progression is not reversible

  11. Murine model of long term obstructive jaundice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A.; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-01-01

    Background With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of 3 murine models of obstructive jaundice. Methods C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Results 70% (7/10) of tCL mice died by Day 7, whereas majority 67% (10/15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. 19% (3/16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond Day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 days after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by Day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension as well as severe fibrosis by Day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. Conclusion The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice but long term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. PMID:27916350

  12. Formation and maturation of the murine meniscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamer, Laura W; Xiang, Lin; Rosen, Vicki

    2017-08-01

    Meniscal injuries are commonplace, but current surgical repair procedures do not prevent degenerative joint changes that occur after meniscal injury and often lead to osteoarthritis. Successful tissue regeneration in adults often recapitulates events that occur during embryogenesis, suggesting that understanding the regulatory pathways controlling these early processes may provide clues for developing strategies for tissue repair. While the mouse is now widely used to study joint diseases, detailed knowledge of the basic biology of murine meniscus is not readily available. Here, we examine meniscal morphogenesis in mice from embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5) to 6 months of age using histology, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. We find that the meniscus is a morphologically distinct structure at E16 when it begins to regionalize. At birth, the meniscus has a distinguishable inner, avascular, round chondrocyte cell region, an outer, vascularized, fibroblast cell region, and a surface superficial zone. Maturation begins at 2 weeks of age when the meniscus expresses type I collagen, type II collagen, type X collagen, and MMP-13 in specific patterns. By 4 weeks of age, small areas of ossification are detected in the anterior meniscal horn, a common feature seen in rodents. Maturation appears complete at 8 weeks of age, when the meniscus resembles the adult structure complete with ossifying tissue that contains bone marrow like areas. Our results provide, the first systematic study of mouse meniscal development and will be a valuable tool for analyzing murine models of knee joint formation and disease. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1683-1689, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Immunohistochemical Characterization of S100A6 in the Murine Ovary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanaue, Mayu; Miwa, Naofumi; Takamatsu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    S100 proteins comprise a large family of Ca 2+ -binding proteins and exhibit a variety of intra- and extracellular functions. Despite our growing knowledge about the biology of S100 proteins in some tissues such as brain and smooth muscle, little is known about S100 proteins in the normal mammalian reproductive tissue. In the present study, we investigated the distribution pattern of S100A6 (alternatively named calcyclin) in the murine ovary by immunohistochemical study using specific antibody. S100A6 was localized substantially in the cytoplasm of luteal cells, with concomitant expression of S100A11, another S100 protein, but not in the other type of cells such as oocytes, follicle epithelial cells (granulosa cells), and cells of stroma including theca interna cells in the murine ovary. S100A6-immunoreactive corpora lutea (CLs) were divided into two types: homogeneously and heterogeneously stained CLs, and possibly they may represent differentiating and mature CL, respectively. Our regression analysis revealed that expression level of S100A6 positively correlated with that of cytochrome P450 11A, a steroidogenic enzyme in the heterogeously stained CL. These results suggested that S100A6 may contribute to differentiation of steroidogenic activity of luteal cells in a synergistic manner with S100A11 by facilitating some shared functions

  14. Characterization of Human and Murine T-Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domain 4 (TIM-4) IgV Domain Residues Critical for Ebola Virus Entry

    OpenAIRE

    Rhein, Bethany A.; Brouillette, Rachel B.; Schaack, Grace A.; Chiorini, John A.; Maury, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors that are responsible for the clearance of dying cells have recently been found to mediate enveloped virus entry. Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family of viruses, utilizes PtdSer receptors for entry into target cells. The PtdSer receptors human and murine T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins TIM-1 and TIM-4 mediate filovirus entry by binding to PtdSer on the virion surface via a conserved PtdSer binding pocket within the amin...

  15. Deletion of the calmodulin-binding domain of Grb7 impairs cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and migration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Palmero, Irene; Villalobo, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.villalobo@iib.uam.es

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein. •Deleting the CaM-binding site impairs cell attachment and migration. •CaM antagonists inhibit Grb7-mediated cell migration. •We conclude that CaM controls Grb7-mediated cell migration. -- Abstract: The adaptor Grb7 is a calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein that participates in signaling pathways involved in cell migration, proliferation and the control of angiogenesis, and plays a significant role in tumor growth, its metastatic spread and tumor-associated neo-vasculature formation. In this report we show that deletion of the CaM-binding site of Grb7, located in the proximal region of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain, impairs cell migration, cell attachment to the extracellular matrix, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton occurring during this process. Moreover, we show that the cell-permeable CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-7) and N-(4-aminobutyl)-5-chloro-2-naphthalenesulfonamide (W-13) both retard the migration of cells expressing wild type Grb7, but not the migration of cells expressing the mutant protein lacking the CaM-binding site (Grb7Δ), underscoring the proactive role of CaM binding to Grb7 during this process.

  16. CD40-mediated apoptosis in murine B-lymphoma lines containing mutated p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, Annette C; Gong, Qiaoke; Owens, Trevor

    2002-01-01

    Crosslinking CD40 induces normal B-cells to proliferate and differentiate but causes many tumor cell lines to undergo apoptosis. As p53 is required for many apoptotic pathways, we analyzed the effects of CD40 ligation and their correlation with p53 function in four murine B-lymphoma lines. A20...... of detectable p21 mRNA in A20 and M12 cells. P21 mRNA was increased to detectable levels in M12 cells upon CD40 ligation; however, blocking this effect with the p53 inhibitor pifithrin had no effect on CD40-mediated apoptosis. Sequencing showed that p53 in A20 and M12 cells contained point mutations leading...... to amino acid substitutions in DNA binding regions, but was unmutated in WEHI231 and WEHI 279. These results suggest that CD40-mediated apoptosis can occur in the absence of functional p53....

  17. Binding of /sup 125/I alpha-bungarotoxin to the thymus of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, F.; Kondo, K.; Tsubaki, T.

    1978-01-01

    Alpha-bungarotoxin is known to bind with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of skeletal muscle. Binding of iodine 125-labeled alpha bungarotoxin to the murine thymus, muscle, and liver was estimated. The toxin was bound to the muscle. The thymus was also capable of binding a considerable amount of the toxin, and the binding was obviously blocked by tubocurarine chloride. Binding to the liver, an organ containing no nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was very slight. These results may indicate the presence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the thymus, which could have implications in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Degenerating myoid cells and their receptors may represent autoantigens that induce an immunological cross-reaction with the receptors of skeletal muscles, giving rise to myasthenia gravis.

  18. Binding of 125I alpha-bungarotoxin to the thymus of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohshima, F.; Kondo, K.; Tsubaki, T.

    1978-01-01

    Alpha-bungarotoxin is known to bind with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of skeletal muscle. Binding of iodine 125-labeled alpha bungarotoxin to the murine thymus, muscle, and liver was estimated. The toxin was bound to the muscle. The thymus was also capable of binding a considerable amount of the toxin, and the binding was obviously blocked by tubocurarine chloride. Binding to the liver, an organ containing no nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, was very slight. These results may indicate the presence of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the thymus, which could have implications in the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. Degenerating myoid cells and their receptors may represent autoantigens that induce an immunological cross-reaction with the receptors of skeletal muscles, giving rise to myasthenia gravis

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marr, Eric; Tardie, Mark; Carty, Maynard; Brown Phillips, Tracy; Wang, Ing-Kae; Soeller, Walt; Qiu, Xiayang; Karam, George

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) with a bound palmitate is reported at 1.5 Å resolution. Human adipocyte lipid-binding protein (aP2) belongs to a family of intracellular lipid-binding proteins involved in the transport and storage of lipids. Here, the crystal structure of human aP2 with a bound palmitate is described at 1.5 Å resolution. Unlike the known crystal structure of murine aP2 in complex with palmitate, this structure shows that the fatty acid is in a folded conformation and that the loop containing Phe57 acts as a lid to regulate ligand binding by excluding solvent exposure to the central binding cavity

  20. The murine gammaherpesvirus-68 chemokine-binding protein M3 inhibits experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millward, Jason M; Holst, Peter J; Høgh-Petersen, Mette

    2010-01-01

    M3 (AdM3) directly to the CNS to evaluate the capacity of this protein to inhibit neuroinflammation using the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. Treatment with the AdM3 vector significantly reduced the clinical severity of EAE, attenuated CNS histopathology, and reduced numbers......Chemokines are critical mediators of immune cell entry into the central nervous system (CNS), as occurs in neuroinflammatory disease such as multiple sclerosis. Chemokines are also implicated in the immune response to viral infections. Many viruses encode proteins that mimic or block chemokine...... of immune cells infiltrating the CNS. These results suggest that M3 may represent a novel therapeutic approach to neuroinflammatory disease....

  1. New insight into the binding modes of TNP-AMP to human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xinya; Huang, Yunyuan; Zhang, Rui; Xiao, San; Zhu, Shuaihuan; Qin, Nian; Hong, Zongqin; Wei, Lin; Feng, Jiangtao; Ren, Yanliang; Feng, Lingling; Wan, Jian

    2016-08-05

    Human liver fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase) contains two binding sites, a substrate fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) active site and an adenosine monophosphate (AMP) allosteric site. The FBP active site works by stabilizing the FBPase, and the allosteric site impairs the activity of FBPase through its binding of a nonsubstrate molecule. The fluorescent AMP analogue, 2',3'-O-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)adenosine 5'-monophosphate (TNP-AMP) has been used as a fluorescent probe as it is able to competitively inhibit AMP binding to the AMP allosteric site and, therefore, could be used for exploring the binding modes of inhibitors targeted on the allosteric site. In this study, we have re-examined the binding modes of TNP-AMP to FBPase. However, our present enzyme kinetic assays show that AMP and FBP both can reduce the fluorescence from the bound TNP-AMP through competition for FBPase, suggesting that TNP-AMP binds not only to the AMP allosteric site but also to the FBP active site. Mutagenesis assays of K274L (located in the FBP active site) show that the residue K274 is very important for TNP-AMP to bind to the active site of FBPase. The results further prove that TNP-AMP is able to bind individually to the both sites. Our present study provides a new insight into the binding mechanism of TNP-AMP to the FBPase. The TNP-AMP fluorescent probe can be used to exam the binding site of an inhibitor (the active site or the allosteric site) using FBPase saturated by AMP and FBP, respectively, or the K247L mutant FBPase. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  3. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  4. The use of 125I-labelled protein A for the detection of humoral immunity of gross murine leukaemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, H.C.; Tuffrey, M.; Barnes, R.D.; Steuden, J.; Hilgers, J.

    1980-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay utilising binding of 125 I-labelled protein A to antibodies bound to virus adsorbed onto microtitre plates was shown to be suitable for detection of humoral immunity to Gross murine leukaemia virus (MuLV). The specificity of the reaction was shown by the fact that only homologous or closely related viruses effectively inhibited binding of antibodies to adsorbed virus. With this method a low level of spontaneous humoral immunity was demonstrated in sera from AKR/Crc mice, a strain with high concentrations of endogenous virus, whereas little or no anti-viral activity was found in CBA/H-T6Crc, a subline that does not appear to express MuLV. (Auth.)

  5. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na(+) binding to thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Binding of Na(+) to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na(+) is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the K(d)=80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na(+) in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na(+) binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na(+) with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na(+) affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na(+) binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na+ binding to thrombin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    Binding of Na+ to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na+ is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the Kd=80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na+ in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na+ binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na+ with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na+ affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na+ binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes. PMID:21536369

  7. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  8. Competitive protein binding assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Toshio; Oka, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    The measurement of cyclic GMP (cGMP) by competitive protein binding assay was described and discussed. The principle of binding assay was represented briefly. Procedures of our method by binding protein consisted of preparation of cGMP binding protein, selection of 3 H-cyclic GMP on market, and measurement procedures. In our method, binding protein was isolated from the chrysalis of silk worm. This method was discussed from the points of incubation medium, specificity of binding protein, the separation of bound cGMP from free cGMP, and treatment of tissue from which cGMP was extracted. cGMP existing in the tissue was only one tenth or one scores of cGMP, and in addition, cGMP competed with cGMP in binding with binding protein. Therefore, Murad's technique was applied to the isolation of cGMP. This method provided the measurement with sufficient accuracy; the contamination by cAMP was within several per cent. (Kanao, N.)

  9. Biological activity of cloned mammary tumor virus DNA fragments that bind purified glucocorticoid receptor protein in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, K.R.; Payvar, F.; Firestone, G.L.; Maler, B.A.; Wrange, O.; Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Chandler, V.L.; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden)

    1983-01-01

    To test whether high-affinity receptor:DNA interactions can be correlated with receptor effects on promoter function in vivo, we have mapped in greater detail the receptor-binding regions on murine mammary tumor virus DNA, using both nitrocellulose-filter binding and electron microscopy. Recombinant plasmids bearing these receptor-binding domains have been transfected into cultured cells, and the expression of the plasmid sequences has been monitored for hormonal regulation. The results are considered in terms of a speculative proposal that the glucocorticoid receptor may effect changes in promoter activity via specific alteration of chromatin and/or DNA structure. 37 references, 6 figures, 2 tables

  10. Analysis of cardiomyocyte movement in the developing murine heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Hisayuki [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yuasa, Shinsuke, E-mail: yuasa@a8.keio.jp [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tabata, Hidenori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Tohyama, Shugo; Seki, Tomohisa; Egashira, Toru; Hayashiji, Nozomi; Hattori, Fumiyuki; Kusumoto, Dai; Kunitomi, Akira; Takei, Makoto; Kashimura, Shin; Yozu, Gakuto; Shimojima, Masaya; Motoda, Chikaaki; Muraoka, Naoto [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakajima, Kazunori [Department of Anatomy, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako; Miyawaki, Atsushi [Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Laboratory for Cell Function and Dynamics, Advanced Technology Development Group, Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukuda, Keiichi [Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-09-04

    The precise assemblage of several types of cardiac precursors controls heart organogenesis. The cardiac precursors show dynamic movement during early development and then form the complicated heart structure. However, cardiomyocyte movements inside the newly organized mammalian heart remain unclear. We previously established the method of ex vivo time-lapse imaging of the murine heart to study cardiomyocyte behavior by using the Fucci (fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) system, which can effectively label individual G1, S/G2/M, and G1/S-transition phase nuclei in living cardiomyocytes as red, green, and yellow, respectively. Global analysis of gene expression in Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes confirmed that cell cycle regulatory genes expressed in G1/S, S, G2/M, and M phase transitions were upregulated. Interestingly, pathway analysis revealed that many genes related to the cell cycle were significantly upregulated in the Fucci green positive ventricular cardiomyocytes, while only a small number of genes related to cell motility were upregulated. Time-lapse imaging showed that murine proliferating cardiomyocytes did not exhibit dynamic movement inside the heart, but stayed on site after entering the cell cycle. - Highlights: • We directly visualized cardiomyocyte movement inside the developing murine heart. • Cell cycle related genes were upregulated in the proliferating cardiomyocytes. • Time-lapse imaging revealed that proliferating murine cardiomyocytes stayed in place. • Murine ventricular cardiomyocytes proliferate on site during development.

  11. Murine Typhus: An Important Consideration for the Nonspecific Febrile Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjot Basra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine typhus is a widely distributed flea-borne infection caused by Rickettsia typhi. Symptoms of murine typhus are nonspecific and mimic a variety of other infectious diseases. We herein report a case of murine typhus in an area where the broad use of DDT in the mid-20th century has now made it a rare disease. The patient described presented with headache, fever, and a faint macular rash. Initial laboratory studies revealed a slight transaminase elevation. Further questioning revealed exposure to opossums, prompting the consideration of murine typhus as a diagnosis. Although typhus group antibodies were not present during the patient’s acute illness, empiric therapy with doxycycline was initiated, and the patient defervesced. One month after convalescence, the patient returned to clinic with serum that contained typhus group antibodies with an IgG titer of 1 : 1024. Murine typhus is an important consideration during the workup of a patient with a nonspecific febrile illness. Exposure to reservoir hosts and the flea vector place humans at risk for this disease. Clinician recognition of this entity is required for diagnosis and effective therapy.

  12. The mechanical fingerprint of murine excisional wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensalfini, Marco; Haertel, Eric; Hopf, Raoul; Wietecha, Mateusz; Werner, Sabine; Mazza, Edoardo

    2018-01-01

    A multiscale mechanics approach to the characterization of murine excisional wounds subjected to uniaxial tensile loading is presented. Local strain analysis at a physiological level of tension uncovers the presence of two distinct regions within the wound: i) a very compliant peripheral cushion and ii) a core area undergoing modest deformation. Microstructural visualizations of stretched wound specimens show negligible engagement of the collagen located in the center of a 7-day old wound; fibers remain coiled despite the applied tension, confirming the existence of a mechanically isolated wound core. The compliant cushion located at the wound periphery appears to protect the newly-formed tissue from excessive deformation during the phase of new tissue formation. The early remodeling phase (day 14) is characterized by a restored mechanical connection between far field and wound center. The latter remains less deformable, a characteristic possibly required for cell activities during tissue remodeling. The distribution of fibrillary collagens at these two time points corresponds well to the identified heterogeneity of mechanical properties of the wound region. This novel approach provides new insight into the mechanical properties of wounded skin and will be applicable to the analysis of compound-treated wounds or wounds in genetically modified tissue. Biophysical characterization of healing wounds is crucial to assess the recovery of the skin barrier function and the associated mechanobiological processes. For the first time, we performed highly resolved local deformation analysis to identify mechanical characteristics of the wound and its periphery. Our results reveal the presence of a compliant cushion surrounding a stiffer wound core; we refer to this heterogeneous mechanical behavior as "mechanical fingerprint" of the wound. The mechanical response is shown to progress towards that of the intact skin as healing takes place. Histology and multiphoton microscopy

  13. Preclinical Murine Models for Lung Cancer: Clinical Trial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Kellar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Murine models for the study of lung cancer have historically been the backbone of preliminary preclinical data to support early human clinical trials. However, the availability of multiple experimental systems leads to debate concerning which model, if any, is best suited for a particular therapeutic strategy. It is imperative that these models accurately predict clinical benefit of therapy. This review provides an overview of the current murine models used to study lung cancer and the advantages and limitations of each model, as well as a retrospective evaluation of the uses of each model with respect to accuracy in predicting clinical benefit of therapy. A better understanding of murine models and their uses, as well as their limitations may aid future research concerning the development and implementation of new targeted therapies and chemotherapeutic agents for lung cancer.

  14. Murine Models of Gastric Corpus PreneoplasiaSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P. Petersen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma evolves in a field of pre-existing metaplasia. Over the past 20 years, a number of murine models have been developed to address aspects of the physiology and pathophysiology of metaplasia induction. Although none of these models has achieved true recapitulation of the induction of adenocarcinoma, they have led to important insights into the factors that influence the induction and progression of metaplasia. Here, we review the pathologic definitions relevant to alterations in gastric corpus lineages and classification of metaplasia by specific lineage markers. In addition, we review present murine models of the induction and progression of spasmolytic polypeptide (TFF2–expressing metaplasia, the predominant metaplastic lineage observed in murine models. These models provide a basis for the development of a broader understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of metaplasia in the stomach. Keywords: SPEM, Intestinal Metaplasia, Gastric Cancer, TFF2, Chief Cell, Hyperplasia

  15. Relationship between laminin binding capacity and laminin expression on tumor cells sensitive or resistant to natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laybourn, K.A.; Varani, J.; Fligiel, S.E.G.; Hiserodt, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies have identified the presence of laminin binding sites on murine NK and NC sensitive tumor cells by 125 I-laminin binding and laminin induced cell-cell aggregation. The finding that the addition of exogenous laminin inhibits NK/NC binding to sensitive tumor cells suggests laminin binding sites may serve as target antigens for NK cells. The present study extends earlier reports by analyzing a large panel of tumor cells for laminin binding capacity, laminin expression and sensitivity to NK/NC killing. The data indicate that all tumor cells which bind to NK/NC cells (8 lines tested) express laminin binding sites. All of these tumor cells were capable of competing for NK lysis of YAC-1 cells in cold target competition assays, and all bound enriched NK cells in direct single cell binding assays. In contrast, tumor cells expressing high levels of surface laminin (B16 melanomas, C57B1/6 fibrosarcomas, and RAS transfected 3T3 fibroblasts) but low levels of laminin binding capacity did not bind NK/NC cells and were resistant to lysis. These data support the hypothesis that expression of laminin/laminin binding sites may contribute to tumor cell sensitivity to NK/NC binding and/or killing

  16. Studies of a murine monoclonal antibody directed against DARC: reappraisal of its specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Smolarek

    Full Text Available Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC plays multiple roles in human health as a blood group antigen, a receptor for chemokines and the only known receptor for Plasmodium vivax merozoites. It is the target of the murine anti-Fy6 monoclonal antibody 2C3 which binds to the first extracellular domain (ECD1, but exact nature of the recognized epitope was a subject of contradictory reports. Here, using a set of complex experiments which include expression of DARC with amino acid substitutions within the Fy6 epitope in E. coli and K562 cells, ELISA, surface plasmon resonance (SPR and flow cytometry, we have resolved discrepancies between previously published reports and show that the basic epitope recognized by 2C3 antibody is 22FEDVW26, with 22F and 26W being the most important residues. In addition, we demonstrated that 30Y plays an auxiliary role in binding, particularly when the residue is sulfated. The STD-NMR studies performed using 2C3-derived Fab and synthetic peptide corroborated most of these results, and together with the molecular modelling suggested that 25V is not involved in direct interactions with the antibody, but determines folding of the epitope backbone.

  17. Cytotoxicity of Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Aluminum in Murine Thymocytes and Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Kamalov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of low concentrations of aluminum chloride on thymocytes and lymphocytes acutely dissociated from young mice were studied using flow cytometry with a DNA-binding dye. We demonstrate a rapid and dose-dependent injury in murine thymocytes and lymphocytes resulting from exposure to aluminum, as indicated by an increase in the entry into the cell of the DNA-binding dye, propidium iodine. A 60-minute exposure to 10 μM AlCl3 caused damage of about 5% of thymocytes, while 50% were injured after 10 minutes at 20 μM. Nearly all thymocytes showed evidence of damage at 30 μM AlCl3 after only 5 minutes of incubation. In lymphocytes, injury was observed at 15 μM AlCl3 and less than 50% of cells were injured after a 60-minute exposure to 20 μM. Injury only rarely proceeded to rapid cell death and was associated with cell swelling. These results suggest that aluminum has cytotoxic effects on cells of the immune system.

  18. A rapid murine coma and behavior scale for quantitative assessment of murine cerebral malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan W Carroll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cerebral malaria (CM is a neurological syndrome that includes coma and seizures following malaria parasite infection. The pathophysiology is not fully understood and cannot be accounted for by infection alone: patients still succumb to CM, even if the underlying parasite infection has resolved. To that effect, there is no known adjuvant therapy for CM. Current murine CM (MCM models do not allow for rapid clinical identification of affected animals following infection. An animal model that more closely mimics the clinical features of human CM would be helpful in elucidating potential mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and evaluating new adjuvant therapies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A quantitative, rapid murine coma and behavior scale (RMCBS comprised of 10 parameters was developed to assess MCM manifested in C57BL/6 mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA. Using this method a single mouse can be completely assessed within 3 minutes. The RMCBS enables the operator to follow the evolution of the clinical syndrome, validated here by correlations with intracerebral hemorrhages. It provides a tool by which subjects can be identified as symptomatic prior to the initiation of trial treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since the RMCBS enables an operator to rapidly follow the course of disease, label a subject as affected or not, and correlate the level of illness with neuropathologic injury, it can ultimately be used to guide the initiation of treatment after the onset of cerebral disease (thus emulating the situation in the field. The RMCBS is a tool by which an adjuvant therapy can be objectively assessed.

  19. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Send Us Your Feedback ... As Testosterone-estrogen Binding Globulin TeBG Formal Name Sex Hormone Binding Globulin This article was last reviewed ...

  20. Nanoelectroablation therapy for murine basal cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuccitelli, Richard, E-mail: rich@bioelectromed.com [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Tran, Kevin; Athos, Brian; Kreis, Mark; Nuccitelli, Pamela [BioElectroMed Corp., 849 Mitten Rd., Suite 104, Burlingame, CA 94010 (United States); Chang, Kris S.; Epstein, Ervin H. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Tang, Jean Y. [The Children' s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA 94609 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation is a new, non-thermal therapy that triggers apoptosis in tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low energy, ultrashort, high voltage pulses ablate the tumor with little or no scar. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanoelectroablation eliminates 99.8% of the BCC but may leave a few remnants behind. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pilot clinical trials on human BCCs are ongoing and leave no remnants in most cases. -- Abstract: When skin tumors are exposed to non-thermal, low energy, nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF), apoptosis is initiated both in vitro and in vivo. This nanoelectroablation therapy has already been proven effective in treating subdermal murine allograft tumors. We wanted to determine if this therapy would be equally effective in the treatment of autochthonous BCC tumors in Ptch1{sup +/-}K14-Cre-ER p53 fl/fl mice. These tumors are similar to human BCCs in histology and in response to drug therapy . We have treated 27 BCCs across 8 mice with either 300 pulses of 300 ns duration or 2700 pulses of 100 ns duration, all at 30 kV/cm and 5-7 pulses per second. Every nsPEF-treated BCC began to shrink within a day after treatment and their initial mean volume of 36 {+-} 5 (SEM) mm{sup 3} shrunk by 76 {+-} 3% over the ensuing two weeks. After four weeks, they were 99.8% ablated if the size of the treatment electrode matched the tumor size. If the tumor was larger than the 4 mm wide electrode, multiple treatments were needed for complete ablation. Treated tumors were harvested for histological analysis at various times after treatment and exhibited apoptosis markers. Specifically, pyknosis of nuclei was evident as soon as 2 days after nsPEF treatment, and DNA fragmentation as detected via TUNEL staining was also evident post treatment. Nanoelectroablation is effective in triggering apoptosis and remission of radiation-induced BCCs with a single 6 min-long treatment of 2700 pulses.

  1. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes Internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-12-13

    Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26), multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlA m*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlA m* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced entry into human

  2. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Colin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internalin A (InlA is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells. Results We have created a surface display library of randomly mutated InlA in a non-invasive heterologous host Lactococcus lactis in order to create and screen novel variants of this invasion factor. After sequential passage through a murine cell line (CT-26, multiple clones with enhanced invasion characteristics were identified. Competitive index experiments were conducted in mice using selected mutations introduced into L. monocytogenes EGD-e background. A novel single amino acid change was identified which enhanced virulence by the oral route in the murine model and will form the basis of further engineering approaches. As a control a previously described EGD-InlAm murinized strain was also re-created as part of this study with minor modifications and designated EGD-e InlAm*. The strain was created using a procedure that minimizes the likelihood of secondary mutations and incorporates Listeria-optimized codons encoding the altered amino acids. L. monocytogenes EGD-e InlAm* yielded consistently higher level murine infections by the oral route when compared to EGD-e, but did not display the two-fold increased invasion into a human cell line that was previously described for the EGD-InlAm strain. Conclusions We have used both site-directed mutagenesis and directed evolution to create variants of InlA which may inform future structure-function analyses of this protein. During the course of the study we engineered a murinized strain of L. monocytogenes EGD-e which shows reproducibly higher infectivity in the intragastric murine infection model than the wild type, but does not display enhanced

  3. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium lacking hfq gene confers protective immunity against murine typhoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uday Shankar Allam

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica is an important enteric pathogen and its various serovars are involved in causing both systemic and intestinal diseases in humans and domestic animals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Salmonella leading to increased morbidity and mortality has further complicated its management. Live attenuated vaccines have been proven superior over killed or subunit vaccines due to their ability to induce protective immunity. Of the various strategies used for the generation of live attenuated vaccine strains, focus has gradually shifted towards manipulation of virulence regulator genes. Hfq is a RNA chaperon which mediates the binding of small RNAs to the mRNA and assists in post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacteria. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the Salmonella Typhimurium Δhfq strain as a candidate for live oral vaccine in murine model of typhoid fever. Salmonella hfq deletion mutant is highly attenuated in cell culture and animal model implying a significant role of Hfq in bacterial virulence. Oral immunization with the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant efficiently protects mice against subsequent oral challenge with virulent strain of Salmonella Typhimurium. Moreover, protection was induced upon both multiple as well as single dose of immunizations. The vaccine strain appears to be safe for use in pregnant mice and the protection is mediated by the increase in the number of CD4(+ T lymphocytes upon vaccination. The levels of serum IgG and secretory-IgA in intestinal washes specific to lipopolysaccharide and outer membrane protein were significantly increased upon vaccination. Furthermore, hfq deletion mutant showed enhanced antigen presentation by dendritic cells compared to the wild type strain. Taken together, the studies in murine immunization model suggest that the Salmonella hfq deletion mutant can be a novel live oral vaccine candidate.

  5. Differential immune microenvironments and response to immune checkpoint blockade amongst molecular subtypes of murine medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D.; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Yearley, Jennifer H.; Sayour, Elias J.; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E.; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma (MB), the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and Group 3 MB for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. METHODS AND RESULTS Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid derived suppressor cells and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with Group 3 tumors. However, murine Group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8+ PD-1+ T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial Group 3 tumors compared to SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1+ peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3+ T cells within the tumor microenvironment. CONCLUSIONS This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of MB and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. PMID:26405194

  6. Increased Cerebral Tff1 Expression in Two Murine Models of Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva B Znalesniak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The trefoil factor family (TFF peptide TFF1 is a typical secretory product of the gastric mucosa and a very low level of expression occurs in nearly all regions of the murine brain. TFF1 possesses a lectin activity and binding to a plethora of transmembrane glycoproteins could explain the diverse biological effects of TFF1 (e.g., anti-apoptotic effect. It was the aim to test whether TFF expression is changed during neuroinflammation. Methods: Expression profiling was performed using semi-quantitative RT-PCR analyses in two murine models of neuroinflammation, i.e. Toxoplasma gondii-induced encephalitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the latter being the most common animal model of multiple sclerosis. Tff1 expression was also localized using RNA in situ hybridization histochemistry. Results: We report for the first time on a significant transcriptional induction in cerebral Tff1 expression in both T. gondii-induced encephalitis and EAE. In contrast, Tff2 and Tff3 expression were not altered. Tff1 transcripts were predominantly localized in the internal granular layer of the cerebellum indicating neuronal expression. Furthermore, also glial cells are expected to express Tff1. Characterization of both experimental models by expression profiling (e.g., inflammasome sensors, inflammatory cytokines, microglial marker Iba1, ependymin related protein 1 revealed differences concerning the expression of the inflammasome sensor Nlrp1 and interleukin 17a. Conclusion: The up-regulated expression of Tff1 is probably the result of a complex inflammatory process as its expression is induced by tumor necrosis factor α as well as interleukins 1β and 17. However on the transcript level, Tff1KO mice did not show any significant signs of an altered immune response after infection with T. gondii in comparison with the wild type animals.

  7. Effect of azithromycin on Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2014-04-15

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a key proinflammatory cytokine which plays a central role in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease. Host modulatory agents targeting at inhibiting IL-6, therefore, appear to be beneficial in slowing the progression of periodontal disease and potentially reducing destructive aspects of the host response. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin on IL-6 generation in murine macrophages treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. Azithromycin significantly suppressed IL-6 production as well as its mRNA expression in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. LPS-induced activation of JNK and p38 was not affected by azithromycin treatment. Azithromycin failed to prevent P. intermedia LPS from degrading IκB-α. Instead, azithromycin significantly diminished nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit induced with LPS. Azithromycin inhibited P. intermedia LPS-induced STAT1 and STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, azithromycin up-regulated the mRNA level of SOCS1 in cells treated with LPS. In conclusion, azithromycin significantly attenuated P. intermedia LPS-induced production of IL-6 in murine macrophages via inhibition of NF-κB, STAT1 and STAT3 activation, which is possibly related to the activation of SOCS1 signaling. Further in vivo studies are required to better evaluate the potential of azithromycin in the treatment of periodontal disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Differential Immune Microenvironments and Response to Immune Checkpoint Blockade among Molecular Subtypes of Murine Medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Christina D; Flores, Catherine; Yang, Changlin; Pinheiro, Elaine M; Yearley, Jennifer H; Sayour, Elias J; Pei, Yanxin; Moore, Colin; McLendon, Roger E; Huang, Jianping; Sampson, John H; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Mitchell, Duane A

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant strides in the identification and characterization of potential therapeutic targets for medulloblastoma, the role of the immune system and its interplay with the tumor microenvironment within these tumors are poorly understood. To address this, we adapted two syngeneic animal models of human Sonic Hedgehog (SHH)-driven and group 3 medulloblastoma for preclinical evaluation in immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were used to phenotype and characterize immune infiltrating cells within established cerebellar tumors. We observed significantly higher percentages of dendritic cells, infiltrating lymphocytes, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages in murine SHH model tumors compared with group 3 tumors. However, murine group 3 tumors had higher percentages of CD8(+) PD-1(+) T cells within the CD3 population. PD-1 blockade conferred superior antitumor efficacy in animals bearing intracranial group 3 tumors compared with SHH group tumors, indicating that immunologic differences within the tumor microenvironment can be leveraged as potential targets to mediate antitumor efficacy. Further analysis of anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody localization revealed binding to PD-1(+) peripheral T cells, but not tumor infiltrating lymphocytes within the brain tumor microenvironment. Peripheral PD-1 blockade additionally resulted in a marked increase in CD3(+) T cells within the tumor microenvironment. This is the first immunologic characterization of preclinical models of molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma and demonstration that response to immune checkpoint blockade differs across subtype classification. Our findings also suggest that effective anti-PD-1 blockade does not require that systemically administered antibodies penetrate the brain tumor microenvironment. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. CpG oligodeoxynucleotides are potent enhancers of radio- and chemoresponses of murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, Kathryn A.; Neal, Robert; Hunter, Nancy; Ariga, Hisanori; Ang, Kian; Milas, Luka

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: Synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated cytosine-guanine (CpG) motifs bind to Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and stimulate both innate and adaptive immune reactions and possess anti-tumor activity. We recently reported that CpG ODN 1826 strongly enhances radioresponse of both immunogenic [Milas L, Mason K, Ariga H, et al. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide enhances tumor response to radiation. Cancer Res 2004;64:5074-7] and non-immunogenic [Mason KA, Ariga H, Neal R, et al. Targeting toll-like receptor-9 with CpG oligodeoxynucleotides enhances tumor response to fractionated radiotherapy. Clin Cancer Res 2005;11:361-9] murine tumors. Using two immunogenic murine tumors, a fibrosarcoma (FSa) and a mammary carcinoma (MCa-K), the present study explored whether CpG ODN 1826 also improves the response of murine tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent docetaxel (DOC). Materials and methods: CpG ODN 1826 (100 μg) was given sc three times: when leg tumors were 6 mm, when they grew to 8 mm and again 1 week later. DOC (33 mg/kg iv) and local tumor radiation (10 Gy) were given when tumors were 8 mm. Effects of the treatments were assayed by tumor growth delay, defined as days for tumors to grow from 8 to 12 mm in diameter. Results: Treatment with CpG ODN 1826 resulted in strongly enhanced response of FSa tumors to radiation and MCa-K tumors to the chemotherapeutic agent DOC. Enhancement of tumor treatment response was demonstrated by a strong prolongation in the primary tumor treatment endpoint, tumor growth delay. Coincidentally, this treatment also resulted in a higher rate of tumor cure than that observed after tumor radiotherapy or chemotherapy alone. When all three agents were combined the effect was comparable to that of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with radiation in the case of FSa or of the combination of CpG ODN 1826 with DOC in the case of MCa-K. Conclusion: Overall results show that CpG ODN 1826 can markedly improve tumor response

  10. Roles of Chaperone/Usher Pathways of Yersinia pestis in a Murine Model of Plague and Adhesion to Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatkoff, Matthew; Runco, Lisa M.; Pujol, Celine; Jayatilaka, Indralatha; Furie, Martha B.; Bliska, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia pestis and many other Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria use the chaperone/usher (CU) pathway to assemble virulence-associated surface fibers termed pili or fimbriae. Y. pestis has two well-characterized CU pathways: the caf genes coding for the F1 capsule and the psa genes coding for the pH 6 antigen. The Y. pestis genome contains additional CU pathways that are capable of assembling pilus fibers, but the roles of these pathways in the pathogenesis of plague are not understood. We constructed deletion mutations in the usher genes for six of the additional Y. pestis CU pathways. The wild-type (WT) and usher deletion strains were compared in the murine bubonic (subcutaneous) and pneumonic (intranasal) plague infection models. Y. pestis strains containing deletions in CU pathways y0348-0352, y1858-1862, and y1869-1873 were attenuated for virulence compared to the WT strain by the intranasal, but not subcutaneous, routes of infection, suggesting specific roles for these pathways during pneumonic plague. We examined binding of the Y. pestis WT and usher deletion strains to A549 human lung epithelial cells, HEp-2 human cervical epithelial cells, and primary human and murine macrophages. Y. pestis CU pathways y0348-0352 and y1858-1862 were found to contribute to adhesion to all host cells tested, whereas pathway y1869-1873 was specific for binding to macrophages. The correlation between the virulence attenuation and host cell binding phenotypes of the usher deletion mutants identifies three of the additional CU pathways of Y. pestis as mediating interactions with host cells that are important for the pathogenesis of plague. PMID:22851745

  11. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  12. Transgene stability for three replication competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, M.; Carrasco, M.L.; Jespersen, T.

    2004-01-01

    cassette consisting of an internal ribosome entry site followed by the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding sequence inserted in different configurations into murine leukemia virus genomes. In two of the constructs, the insert was located in the upstream part of the U3 region while in the third...

  13. Reversal of Liver Fibrosis in Chronic Murine Schistosomiasis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NO Al-Harbi, SA Bahashwan, MS Aboonq, MA Ramadan, AA Bahashwan. Abstract. Purpose: To evaluate the safety, pharmacological effect and mechanism of action of an antifibrotic compound, safironil (SAF)/praziquantel (PZQ) combination on reversal of liver fibrogenesis in chronic murine Schistosomiasis mansoni.

  14. Protective antitumor activity induced by a fusion vaccine with murine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting angiogenesis is an effective strategy for anticancer therapy. The vascular endothelialcadherin (VE-cad) regulated angiogenesis is a potential target for anti-angiogenesis. Here, we develop a fusion vaccine plasmid DNA pSec-MBD2-VE-cad from VE-cad and murine beta defensin2 (MBD2) to induce immunity for ...

  15. Topical Apigenin Alleviates Cutaneous Inflammation in Murine Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Qiang Man

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbal medicines have been used in preventing and treating skin disorders for centuries. It has been demonstrated that systemic administration of chrysanthemum extract exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether topical applications of apigenin, a constituent of chrysanthemum extract, influence cutaneous inflammation is still unclear. In the present study, we first tested whether topical applications of apigenin alleviate cutaneous inflammation in murine models of acute dermatitis. The murine models of acute allergic contact dermatitis and acute irritant contact dermatitis were established by topical application of oxazolone and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA, respectively. Inflammation was assessed in both dermatitis models by measuring ear thickness. Additionally, the effect of apigenin on stratum corneum function in a murine subacute allergic contact dermatitis model was assessed with an MPA5 physiology monitor. Our results demonstrate that topical applications of apigenin exhibit therapeutic effects in both acute irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis models. Moreover, in comparison with the vehicle treatment, topical apigenin treatment significantly reduced transepidermal water loss, lowered skin surface pH, and increased stratum corneum hydration in a subacute murine allergic contact dermatitis model. Together, these results suggest that topical application of apigenin could provide an alternative regimen for the treatment of dermatitis.

  16. Turnover of T cells in murine gammaherpesvirus 68-infected mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamilton-Easton, A M; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Doherty, P C

    1999-01-01

    Respiratory challenge of C57BL/6 mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 induces proliferation of T lymphocytes early after infection, as evidenced by incorporation of the DNA precursor bromodeoxyuridine. Using pulse-chase analysis, splenic and peripheral blood activated T lymphocytes were found...

  17. Expression of biologically active murine interleukin-18 in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feizollahzadeh, Sadegh; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rahimmanesh, Ilnaz; Ganjalikhani-Hakemi, Mazdak; Andalib, Alireza; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Rezaei, Abbas

    2016-11-01

    The food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis is increasingly used for heterologous protein expression in therapeutic and industrial applications. The ability of L. lactis to secrete biologically active cytokines may be used for the generation of therapeutic cytokines. Interleukin (IL)-18 enhances the immune response, especially on mucosal surfaces, emphasizing its therapeutic potential. However, it is produced as an inactive precursor and has to be enzymatically cleaved for maturation. We genetically manipulated L. lactis to secrete murine IL-18. The mature murine IL-18 gene was inserted downstream of a nisin promoter in pNZ8149 plasmid and the construct was used to transform L. lactis NZ3900. The transformants were selected on Elliker agar and confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and sequencing. The expression and secretion of IL-18 protein was verified by SDS-PAGE, western blotting and ELISA. The biological activity of recombinant IL-18 was determined by its ability to induce interferon (IFN)-γ production in L. lactis co-cultured with murine splenic T cells. The amounts of IL-18 in bacterial lysates and supernatants were 3-4 μg mL -1 and 0.6-0.7 ng mL -1 , respectively. The successfully generated L. lactis strain that expressed biologically active murine IL-18 can be used to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of IL-18 on mucosal surfaces. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Current Translational Research and Murine Models For Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Merryl; Echigoya, Yusuke; Fukada, So-ichiro; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked genetic disorder characterized by progressive muscle degeneration. Mutations in the DMD gene result in the absence of dystrophin, a protein required for muscle strength and stability. Currently, there is no cure for DMD. Since murine models are relatively easy to genetically manipulate, cost effective, and easily reproducible due to their short generation time, they have helped to elucidate the pathobiology of dystrophin deficiency and to assess therapies for treating DMD. Recently, several murine models have been developed by our group and others to be more representative of the human DMD mutation types and phenotypes. For instance, mdx mice on a DBA/2 genetic background, developed by Fukada et al., have lower regenerative capacity and exhibit very severe phenotype. Cmah-deficient mdx mice display an accelerated disease onset and severe cardiac phenotype due to differences in glycosylation between humans and mice. Other novel murine models include mdx52, which harbors a deletion mutation in exon 52, a hot spot region in humans, and dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), which displays a severe dystrophic phenotype due the absence of utrophin, a dystrophin homolog. This paper reviews the pathological manifestations and recent therapeutic developments in murine models of DMD such as standard mdx (C57BL/10), mdx on C57BL/6 background (C57BL/6-mdx), mdx52, dystrophin/utrophin double-deficient (dko), mdxβgeo, Dmd-null, humanized DMD (hDMD), mdx on DBA/2 background (DBA/2-mdx), Cmah-mdx, and mdx/mTRKO murine models. PMID:27854202

  19. Structural Basis for Species Selectivity in the HIV-1 gp120-CD4 Interaction: Restoring Affinity to gp120 in Murine CD4 Mimetic Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Kassler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first step of HIV-1 infection involves interaction between the viral glycoprotein gp120 and the human cellular receptor CD4. Inhibition of the gp120-CD4 interaction represents an attractive strategy to block HIV-1 infection. In an attempt to explore the known lack of affinity of murine CD4 to gp120, we have investigated peptides presenting the putative gp120-binding site of murine CD4 (mCD4. Molecular modeling indicates that mCD4 protein cannot bind gp120 due to steric clashes, while the larger conformational flexibility of mCD4 peptides allows an interaction. This finding is confirmed by experimental binding assays, which also evidenced specificity of the peptide-gp120 interaction. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the mCD4-peptide stably interacts with gp120 via an intermolecular β-sheet, while an important salt-bridge formed by a C-terminal lysine is lost. Fixation of the C-terminus by introducing a disulfide bridge between the N- and C-termini of the peptide significantly enhanced the affinity to gp120.

  20. Directed evolution and targeted mutagenesis to murinize Listeria monocytogenes internalin A for enhanced infectivity in the murine oral infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Monk, Ian R

    2010-01-01

    Internalin A (InlA) is a critical virulence factor which mediates the initiation of Listeria monocytogenes infection by the oral route in permissive hosts. The interaction of InlA with the host cell ligand E-cadherin efficiently stimulates L. monocytogenes entry into human enterocytes, but has only a limited interaction with murine cells.

  1. Single Amino Acid Insertion in Loop 4 Confers Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus Receptor Function upon Murine Pit1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorf, Mikkel D.; Pedersen, Finn Skou; O'Hara, Bryan

    1998-01-01

    Pit1 is the human receptor for gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and feline leukemia virus subgroup B (FeLV-B), while the related human protein Pit2 is a receptor for amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV). The A-MuLV-related isolate 10A1 can utilize both Pit1 and Pit2 as receptors. A stretch...

  2. Complement-mediated bactericidal activity of anti-factor H binding protein monoclonal antibodies against the meningococcus relies upon blocking factor H binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Reason, Donald C; Granoff, Dan M

    2011-09-01

    Binding of the complement-downregulating protein factor H (fH) to the surface of the meningococcus is important for survival of the organism in human serum. The meningococcal vaccine candidate factor H binding protein (fHbp) is an important ligand for human fH. While some fHbp-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) block binding of fH to fHbp, the stoichiometry of blocking in the presence of high serum concentrations of fH and its effect on complement-mediated bactericidal activity are unknown. To investigate this question, we constructed chimeric antibodies in which the human IgG1 constant region was paired with three murine fHbp-specific binding domains designated JAR 3, JAR 5, and MAb502. By surface plasmon resonance, the association rates for binding of all three MAbs to immobilized fHbp were >50-fold higher than that for binding of fH to fHbp, and the MAb dissociation rates were >500-fold lower than that for fH. While all three MAbs elicited similar C1q-dependent C4b deposition on live bacteria (classical complement pathway), only those antibodies that inhibited binding of fH to fHbp (JAR 3 and JAR 5) had bactericidal activity with human complement. MAb502, which did not inhibit fH binding, had complement-mediated bactericidal activity only when tested with fH-depleted human complement. When an IgG1 anti-fHbp MAb binds to sparsely exposed fHbp on the bacterial surface, there appears to be insufficient complement activation for bacteriolysis unless fH binding also is inhibited. The ability of fHbp vaccines to elicit protective antibodies, therefore, is likely to be enhanced if the antibody repertoire is of high avidity and includes fH-blocking activity.

  3. Characterization of immortalized MARCO and SR-AI/II-deficient murine alveolar macrophage cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imrich Amy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar macrophages (AM avidly bind and ingest unopsonized inhaled particles and bacteria through class A scavenger receptors (SRAs MARCO and SR-AI/II. Studies to characterize the function of these SRAs have used AMs from MARCO or SR-AI/II null mice, but this approach is limited by the relatively low yield of AMs. Moreover, studies using both MARCO and SR-AI/II-deficient (MS-/- mice have not been reported yet. Hence, we sought to develop continuous cell lines from primary alveolar macrophages from MS-/- mice. Results We used in vitro infection of the primary AMs with the J2 retrovirus carrying the v-raf and v-myc oncogenes. Following initial isolation in media supplemented with murine macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, we subcloned three AM cell lines, designated ZK-1, ZK-2 and ZK-6. These cell lines grow well in RPMI-1640-10% FBS in the absence of M-CSF. These adherent but trypsin-sensitive cell lines have a doubling time of approximately 14 hours, exhibit typical macrophage morphology, and express macrophage-associated cell surface Mac-1 (CD11b and F4/80 antigens. The cell lines show robust Fc-receptor dependent phagocytosis of opsonized red blood cells. Similar to freshly isolated AMs from MS-/- mice, the cell lines exhibit decreased phagocytosis of unopsonized titanium dioxide (TiO2, fluorescent latex beads and bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus compared with the primary AMs from wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Our results indicated that three contiguous murine alveolar macrophage cell lines with MS-/- (ZK1, ZK2 and ZK6 were established successfully. These cell lines demonstrated macrophage morphology and functional activity. Interestingly, similar to freshly isolated AMs from MS-/- mice, the cell lines have a reduced, but not absent, ability to bind and ingest particles, with an altered pattern of blockade by scavenger receptor inhibitors. These cell lines will facilitate in vitro studies to further define

  4. Parental influenza virion nucleocapsids are efficiently transported into the nuclei of murine cells expressing the nuclear interferon-induced Mx protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broni, B; Julkunen, I; Condra, J H; Davies, M E; Berry, M J; Krug, R M

    1990-12-01

    The interferon-induced murine Mx1 protein, which is localized in the nucleus, most likely specifically blocks influenza virus replication by inhibiting nuclear viral mRNA synthesis, including the mRNA synthesis catalyzed by inoculum (parental) virion nucleocapsids (R. M. Krug, M. Shaw, B. Broni, G. Shapiro, and O. Haller, J. Virol. 56:201-206, 1985). We tested two possible mechanisms for this inhibition. First, we determined whether the transport of parental nucleocapsids into the nucleus was inhibited in murine cells expressing the nuclear Mx1 protein. To detect the Mx1 protein, we prepared rabbit antibodies against the Mx1 protein with a CheY-Mx fusion protein expressed in bacteria. The fate of parental nucleocapsids was monitored by immunofluorescence with an appropriate dilution of monoclonal antibody to the nucleocapsid protein. The protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin was added to the cells 30 min prior to infection, so that the only nucleocapsids protein molecules in the cells were those associated with nucleocapsids of the parental virus. These nucleocapsids were efficiently transported into the nuclei of murine cells expressing the Mx1 protein, indicating that this protein most likely acts after the parental nucleocapsids enter the nucleus. The second possibility was that the murine Mx1 protein might act in the nucleus to inhibit viral mRNA synthesis indirectly via new cap-binding activities that sequestered cellular capped RNAs away from the viral RNA transcriptase. We show that the same array of nuclear cap-binding proteins was present in Mx-positive and Mx-negative cells treated with interferon. Interestingly, a large amount of a 43-kDa cap-binding activity appeared after interferon treatment of both Mx-positive and Mx-negative cells. Hence, the appearance of new cap-binding activities was unlikely to account for the Mx-specific inhibition of viral mRNA synthesis. These results are most consistent with the possibility that the Mx1 protein acts

  5. Immunotherapy of Alzheimer's disease (AD): from murine models to anti-amyloid beta (Abeta) human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geylis, Valeria; Steinitz, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The deposition of amyloid beta (Abeta) protein is a key pathological feature in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In murine models of AD, both active and passive immunization against Abeta induce a marked reduction in amyloid brain burden and an improvement in cognitive functions. Preliminary results of a prematurely terminated clinical trial where AD patients were actively vaccinated with aggregated Abeta bear resemblance to those documented in murine models. Passive immunization of AD patients with anti-Abeta antibodies, in particular human antibodies, is a strategy that provides a more cautious management and control of any undesired side effects. Sera of all healthy adults contain anti-Abeta IgG autoimmune antibodies. Hence antigen-committed human B-cells are easily immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) into anti-Abeta secreting cell lines. Two anti-Abeta human monoclonal antibodies which we recently prepared bind to the N-terminus of Abeta peptide and were shown to stain amyloid plaques in non-fixed brain sections from an AD patient. It is anticipated that specifically selected anti-Abeta human monoclonal antibodies could reduce and inhibit deposits of amyloid in brain while avoiding the cognitive decline that characterizes AD. In the future, this type of antibody may prove to be a promising immune therapy for the disease.

  6. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  7. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. Binding and Bulgarian

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schürcks-Grozeva, Lilia Lubomirova

    2003-01-01

    In haar proefschrift analyseert Lilia Schürcks de anaforische verschijnselen in de Bulgaarse taal. Het gaat dan om wederkerende aspecten, uitgedrukt bij woorden als ‘zich’ en ‘elkaar’. De situatie in het Bulgaars blijkt moeilijk in te passen in de klassieke Binding Theory van Noam Chomsky. Bron: RUG

  9. Lactobacillus acidophilus induces virus immune defence genes in murine dendritic cells by a Toll-like receptor-2-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiss, Gudrun Margarethe; Rasmussen, Simon; Hjerrild Zeuthen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Lactobacilli are probiotics that, among other health-promoting effects, have been ascribed immunostimulating and virus-preventive properties. Certain Lactobacillus spp. have been shown to possess strong interleukin-12 (IL-12) -inducing properties. As IL-12 production depends on the up......-regulation of type I interferons (IFNs), we hypothesized that the strong IL-12-inducing capacity of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM in murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is caused by an up-regulation of IFN-beta, which subsequently induces IL-12 and the double-stranded RNA binding Toll-like receptor-3...... detected in another L. acidophilus strain (X37), but was not a property of other probiotic strains tested, i.e. Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9 and Escherichia coli Nissle 1917. The IFN-beta expression was markedly reduced in TLR-2(-/-) DCs, dependent on endocytosis, and the major cause of the induction of Il...

  10. A potent complement factor C3 specific nanobody inhibiting multiple functions in the alternative pathway of human and murine complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus K; Pihl, Rasmus; Gadeberg, Trine A F

    2018-01-01

    The complement system is a complex, carefully regulated proteolytic cascade for which suppression of aberrant activation is of increasing clinical relevance and inhibition of the complement alternative pathway is a subject of intense research. Here, we describe the nanobody hC3Nb1 that binds...... to multiple functional states of C3 with sub-nanomolar affinity. The nanobody causes a complete shutdown of alternative pathway activity in human and murine serum when present in concentrations comparable to C3, and hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent both proconvertase assembly as well as binding of the C3 substrate...... to C3 convertases. Our crystal structure of the C3b-hC3Nb1 complex and functional experiments demonstrate that proconvertase formation is blocked by steric hindrance between the nanobody and an Asn-linked glycan on complement factor B. In addition, hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent factor H binding to C3b...

  11. Elastin receptor (S-gal) occupancy by elastin peptides modulates T-cell response during murine emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Pierre, Alexandre; Sellami, Mehdi; Audonnet, Sandra; Lemaire, Flora; Le Naour, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema are associated with increased elastin peptides (EP) production because of excessive breakdown of lung connective tissue. We recently reported that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema. EP effects are largely mediated through a receptor complex that includes the elastin-binding protein spliced-galactosidase (S-gal). In previous studies, we established a correlation between cytokine production and S-gal protein expression in EP-treated immune cells. In this study, we investigated the S-gal-dependent EP effects on T-helper (Th) and T-cytotoxic (Tc) responses during murine EP-triggered pulmonary inflammation. C57BL/6J mice were endotracheally instilled with the valine-glycine-valine-alanine-proline-glycine (VGVAPG) elastin peptide, and, 21 days after treatment, local and systemic T-lymphocyte phenotypes were analyzed at cytokine and transcription factor expression levels by multicolor flow cytometry. Exposure of mice to the VGVAPG peptide resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of the CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing the cytokines IFN-γ or IL-17a and the transcription factors T-box expressed in T cells or retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt) without effects on IL-4 and Gata-binding protein 3 to DNA sequence [A/T]GATA[A/G] expression. These effects were maximized when each T-cell subpopulation was challenged ex vivo with EP, and they were inhibited in vivo when an analogous peptide antagonizing the EP/S-gal interactions was instilled together with the VGVAPG peptide. This study demonstrates that, during murine emphysema, EP-S-gal interactions contribute to a Th-1 and Th-17 proinflammatory T-cell response combined with a Tc-1 response. Our study also highlights the S-gal receptor as a putative pharmacological target to modulate such an immune response. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Three-dimensional alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Nishimura, Akinobu; Satonaka, Haruhiko; Shintani, Ken; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Matsumine, Akihiko; Kasai, Yuichi; Masuda, Koichi; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2009-11-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the bone and often forms pulmonary metastases, which are the most important prognostic factor. For further elucidation of the mechanism underlying the progression and metastasis of human OS, a culture system mimicking the microenvironment of the tumor in vivo is needed. We report a novel three-dimensional (3D) alginate spheroid culture system of murine osteosarcoma. Two different metastatic clones, the parental Dunn and its derivative line LM8, which has a higher metastatic potential to the lungs, were encapsulated in alginate beads to develop the 3D culture system. The beads containing murine OS cells were also transplanted into mice to determine their metastatic potential in vivo. In this culture system, murine OS cells encapsulated in alginate beads were able to grow in a 3D structure with cells detaching from the alginate environment. The number of detaching cells was higher in the LM8 cell line than the Dunn cell line. In the in vivo alginate bead transplantation model, the rate of pulmonary metastasis was higher with LM8 cells compared with that of Dunn cells. The cell characteristics and kinetics in this culture system closely reflect the original malignant potential of the cells in vivo.

  13. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 WAF1/CIP1 . Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21 WAF1/CIP1

  14. Enhancement of tumor radioresponse by combined chemotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify drugs that can enhance radioresponse of murine hepatocarcinoma. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 8 mm tumors of murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l, were treated with 25 Gy radiation and one of the following drugs: 5-Fu, 150 mg/kg; adriamycin, 8 mg/kg; cisplatin, 6 mg/kg; paclitaxel, 40 mg/kg; and gemcitabine, 50 mg/kg. Tumor response to the treatment was determined by tumor growth delay assay and by enhancement factor. Apoptotic level was assessed in tissue sections. Expression of regulating molecules was analyzed by western blotting for p53, 8c1-2, Sax, Bel-XL, Bd-XS, and p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}. Among the drugs tested, only gemcitabine enhanced the antitumor effect of radiation, with enhancement factor of 1.6. Induction of apoptosis by a combination of gerncitabine and radiation was shown as only additive level. In analysis of radiation-induced expression of regulating molecules, the most significant change by combining gemcitabine was activation of p21 {sup WAF1/CIP1}. Gemcitabine is the first drug showing an enhancement of radioresponse in murine hepatocarcinoma, when combined with radiation. The key element of enhancement is thought to be p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}.

  15. Modulation of fibronectin-mediated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin attachment to murine bladder mucosa by drugs influencing the coagulation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, M A; Brown, E J; Ritchey, J K; Ratliff, T L

    1991-07-15

    Adjuvant intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has proved to be an effective treatment for superficial bladder cancer. Intraluminal attachment of BCG organisms via binding to the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin (FN), appears to be required for expression of the antitumor efficacy of BCG against a murine bladder tumor. Initial studies demonstrated that radiolabeled FN localized to the acutely injured urothelium but not to intact urothelium. These studies also demonstrated that exogenous administration of FN enhanced BCG attachment to the injured but not to the intact urothelium. Because FN has been shown to be an integral part of clot formation at sites of urothelial injury, drugs known to affect fibrin clot formation were tested for their effects on BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model. A stabilizer of fibrin clot formation was shown to enhance both BCG attachment and antitumor efficacy in the same model. An increased number of BCG organisms were also retained in the lymph nodes and spleens of mice receiving fibrin clot stabilizers, suggesting indirectly that immunological mechanisms are involved in the antitumor efficacy of BCG. The data presented herein provide further support for the hypothesis that BCG attachment to the injured bladder is mediated by FN. Furthermore, modulation of BCG-FN attachment is demonstrated to be possible with drugs influencing the coagulation pathway. This attachment is shown to be required for the antitumor efficacy in a murine bladder tumor model, and thus modulation of BCG-FN attachment appears to have significant influence on the antitumor efficacy of BCG in the murine bladder tumor model.

  16. Pacific ciguatoxin 1B-induced modulation of inflammatory mediators in a murine macrophage cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Kumar-Roine, Shilpa; Darius, H Taiana; Chinain, Mireille; Laurent, Dominique; Pauillac, Serge

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatoxins, potent marine neurotoxins responsible for ciguatera, exert their numerous damaging effects through primary binding to the voltage-sensitive sodium channels of excitable cells. Using RAW 264.7 murine macrophages, we report the first experimental study presenting evidence that P-CTX-1B (the most potent congener from the Pacific) could modulate mRNA expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines as well as of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). P-CTX-1B, unlike other less potent marine polyether toxins, P-CTX-3C and PbTx-3, induced the overexpression of interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and iNOS with different magnitude and kinetic profiles, as compared to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Unlike LPS, P-CTX-1B did not modulate IL-11 expression. In this report, we provide new evidence of the P-CTX-1B iNOS- and cytokines-inducing ability and shed new light on host response to potent neurotoxins. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Essential role of the TFIID subunit TAF4 in murine embryogenesis and embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Diana; Martianov, Igor; Alpern, Daniel; Rhinn, Muriel; Keime, Céline; Dollé, Pascal; Mengus, Gabrielle; Davidson, Irwin

    2016-03-30

    TAF4 (TATA-binding protein-associated factor 4) and its paralogue TAF4b are components of the TFIID core module. We inactivated the murine Taf4a gene to address Taf4 function during embryogenesis. Here we show that Taf4a(-/-) embryos survive until E9.5 where primary germ layers and many embryonic structures are identified showing Taf4 is dispensable for their specification. In contrast, Taf4 is required for correct patterning of the trunk and anterior structures, ventral morphogenesis and proper heart positioning. Overlapping expression of Taf4a and Taf4b during embryogenesis suggests their redundancy at early stages. In agreement with this, Taf4a(-/-) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are viable and comprise Taf4b-containing TFIID. Nevertheless, Taf4a(-/-) ESCs do not complete differentiation into glutamatergic neurons and cardiomyocytes in vitro due to impaired preinitiation complex formation at the promoters of critical differentiation genes. We define an essential role of a core TFIID TAF in differentiation events during mammalian embryogenesis.

  18. Caveolin-1 interacts with the Gag precursor of murine leukaemia virus and modulates virus production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koester Mario

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral Gag determines virus assembly at the plasma membrane and the formation of virus-like particles in intracellular multivesicular bodies. Thereby, retroviruses exploit by interaction with cellular partners the cellular machineries for vesicular transport in various ways. Results The retroviral Gag precursor protein drives assembly of murine leukaemia viruses (MLV at the plasma membrane (PM and the formation of virus like particles in multivesicular bodies (MVBs. In our study we show that caveolin-1 (Cav-1, a multifunctional membrane-associated protein, co-localizes with Gag in a punctate pattern at the PM of infected NIH 3T3 cells. We provide evidence that Cav-1 interacts with the matrix protein (MA of the Gag precursor. This interaction is mediated by a Cav-1 binding domain (CBD within the N-terminus of MA. Interestingly, the CBD motif identified within MA is highly conserved among most other γ-retroviruses. Furthermore, Cav-1 is incorporated into MLV released from NIH 3T3 cells. Overexpression of a GFP fusion protein containing the putative CBD of the retroviral MA resulted in a considerable decrease in production of infectious retrovirus. Moreover, expression of a dominant-negative Cav-1 mutant affected retroviral titres significantly. Conclusion This study demonstrates that Cav-1 interacts with MLV Gag, co-localizes with Gag at the PM and affects the production of infectious virus. The results strongly suggest a role for Cav-1 in the process of virus assembly.

  19. Endophilins interact with Moloney murine leukemia virus Gag and modulate virion production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Camilli Pietro

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The retroviral Gag protein is the central player in the process of virion assembly at the plasma membrane, and is sufficient to induce the formation and release of virus-like particles. Recent evidence suggests that Gag may co-opt the host cell's endocytic machinery to facilitate retroviral assembly and release. Results A search for novel partners interacting with the Gag protein of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV via the yeast two-hybrid protein-protein interaction assay resulted in the identification of endophilin 2, a component of the machinery involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We demonstrate that endophilin interacts with the matrix or MA domain of the Gag protein of Mo-MuLV, but not of human immunodeficiency virus, HIV. Both exogenously expressed and endogenous endophilin are incorporated into Mo-MuLV viral particles. Titration experiments suggest that the binding sites for inclusion of endophilin into viral particles are limited and saturable. Knock-down of endophilin with small interfering RNA (siRNA had no effect on virion production, but overexpression of endophilin and, to a lesser extent, of several fragments of the protein, result in inhibition of Mo-MuLV virion production, but not of HIV virion production. Conclusions This study shows that endophilins interact with Mo-MuLV Gag and affect virion production. The findings imply that endophilin is another component of the large complex that is hijacked by retroviruses to promote virion production.

  20. DHA suppresses Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jin, Ji-Young; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2014-04-14

    Several reports have indicated that dietary intake of DHA is associated with lower prevalence of periodontitis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of DHA on the production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in inflammatory periodontal disease, and its mechanisms of action. LPS was isolated from lyophilised P. intermedia ATCC 25,611 cells using the standard hot-phenol-water protocol. Culture supernatants were collected and assayed for NO, IL-1β and IL-6. Real-time PCR analysis was carried out to detect the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), IL-1β, IL-6 and haeme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA. Immunoblot analysis was carried out to quantify the expression of iNOS and HO-1 protein and concentrations of signalling proteins. DNA-binding activities of NF-κB subunits were determined using an ELISA-based assay kit. DHA significantly attenuated the production of NO, IL-1β and IL-6 at both gene transcription and translation levels in P. intermedia LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells. DHA induced the expression of HO-1 in cells treated with P. intermedia LPS. Selective inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin IX significantly mitigated the inhibitory effects of DHA on LPS-induced NO production. DHA significantly attenuated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase induced by LPS. In addition, DHA suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-κB by regulating the nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB p50 subunit and inhibited the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1. Further in vivo studies are needed to better evaluate the potential of DHA in humans as a therapeutic agent to treat periodontal disease.

  1. The Role of the MHV Receptor and Related Glycoproteins in Murine Hepatitis Virus Infection of Murine Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-04-13

    vaccinia virus-T7 RNA polymerase s y stem for e xpression of target genes . Mol . Cell . BioI . 7 : 2538-2544 . Gagneten , S ., Gout , 0 ., Dubois-Dalcq...glycoprotein. These results showed f or the first time that two murine CEA- related genes can be co-expressed in some cell lines from inbred mice...49 Southern Hybridization ................ . ............ 50 Subcloning of PCR Products and Gene Cloning ........ 51 Growth

  2. ICAM-1-based rabies virus vaccine shows increased infection and activation of primary murine B cells in vitro and enhanced antibody titers in-vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E Norton

    Full Text Available We have previously shown that live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines infect and directly activate murine and human primary B cells in-vitro, which we propose can be exploited to help develop a single-dose RABV-based vaccine. Here we report on a novel approach to utilize the binding of Intracellular Adhesion Molecule-1 (ICAM-1 to its binding partner, Lymphocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1, on B cells to enhance B cell activation and RABV-specific antibody responses. We used a reverse genetics approach to clone, recover, and characterize a live-attenuated recombinant RABV-based vaccine expressing the murine Icam1 gene (rRABV-mICAM-1. We show that the murine ICAM-1 gene product is incorporated into virus particles, potentially exposing ICAM-1 to extracellular binding partners. While rRABV-mICAM-1 showed 10-100-fold decrease in viral titers on baby hamster kidney cells compared to the parental virus (rRABV, rRABV-mICAM-1 infected and activated primary murine B cells in-vitro more efficiently than rRABV, as indicated by significant upregulation of CD69, CD40, and MHCII on the surface of infected B cells. ICAM-1 expression on the virus surface was responsible for enhanced B cell infection since pre-treating rRABV-mICAM-1 with a neutralizing anti-ICAM-1 antibody reduced B cell infection to levels observed with rRABV alone. Furthermore, 100-fold less rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce antibody titers in immunized mice equivalent to antibody titers observed in rRABV-immunized mice. Of note, only 10(3 focus forming units (ffu/mouse of rRABV-mICAM-1 was needed to induce significant anti-RABV antibody titers as early as five days post-immunization. As both speed and potency of antibody responses are important in controlling human RABV infection in a post-exposure setting, these data show that expression of Icam1 from the RABV genome, which is then incorporated into the virus particle, is a promising strategy for the development of a

  3. Murine Adseverin (D5), a Novel Member of the Gelsolin Family, and Murine Adseverin Are Induced by Interleukin-9 in T-Helper Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbens, Johan; Louahed, Jamila; De Pestel, Kathleen; Van Colen, Inge; Ampe, Christophe; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Renauld, Jean-Christophe

    1998-01-01

    We identified a number of upregulated genes by differential screening of interleukin-9-stimulated T-helper lymphocytes. Interestingly, two of these messengers encode proteins that are similar to proteins of the gelsolin family. The first displays a typical structure of six homologous domains and shows a high level of identity (90%) with bovine adseverin (or scinderin) and may therefore be considered the murine adseverin homolog. The second encodes a protein with only five segments. Sequence comparison shows that most of the fifth segment and a short amino-terminal part of the sixth segment (amino acids 528 to 628 of adseverin) are missing, and thus, this form may represent an alternatively spliced product derived from the same gene. The corresponding protein is called mouse adseverin (D5). We expressed both proteins in Escherichia coli and show that mouse adseverin displays the typical characteristics of all members of the gelsolin family with respect to actin binding (capping, severing, and nucleation) and its regulation by Ca2+. In contrast, mouse adseverin (D5) fails to nucleate actin polymerization, although like mouse adseverin and gelsolin, it severs and caps actin filaments in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Adseverin is present in all of the tissues and most of the cell lines tested, although at low concentrations. Mouse adseverin (D5) was found only in blood cells and in cell lines derived from T-helper lymphocytes and mast cells, where it is weakly expressed. In a gel filtration experiment, we demonstrated that mouse adseverin forms a 1:2 complex with G actin which is stable only in the presence of Ca2+, while no stable complex was observed for mouse adseverin (D5). PMID:9671468

  4. Insulin radioreceptor assay on murine splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, F.; Kahn, R.

    1982-01-01

    Insulin radioreceptor assays were developed using splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes from individual mice. Splenic leukocytes were prepared using an NH 4 Cl buffer which did not alter insulin binding, but gave much higher yields than density gradient methods. Mouse erythrocytes were isolated from heparinized blood by three passages over a Boyum gradient, and a similar buffer was used to separate cells from free [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at the end of the binding incubation. Insulin binding to both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes had typical pH, temperature, and time dependencies, and increased linearly with an increased number of cells. Optimal conditions for the splenic leukocytes (6 x 10 7 /ml) consisted of incubation with [ 125 I]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.0. In cells from 20 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 2.6 +/- 0.1% (SEM), and nonspecific binding was 0.3 +/- 0.04% (10.6% of total binding). Erythrocytes (2.8 x 10 9 /ml) were incubated with [ 125 ]iodoinsulin at 15 C for 2 h in Hepes buffer, pH 8.2. In cells from 25 individual mice, the specific [ 125 I]iodoinsulin binding was 4.5 +/- 0.2%, and nonspecific binding was 0.7 +/- 0.03% (13.6% of total binding). In both splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes, analysis of equilibrium binding data produced curvilinear Scatchard plots with approximately 3500 binding sites/leukocyte and 20 binding sites/erythrocyte. These data demonstrate that adequate numbers of splenic leukocytes and peripheral erythrocytes can be obtained from individual mice to study insulin binding in a precise and reproducible manner

  5. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  6. Identification of cysteine-644 as the covalent site of attachment of dexamethasone 21-mesylate to murine glucocorticoid receptors in WEHI-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.I.; Bodwell, J.E.; Mendel, D.B.; Ciardelli, T.; North, W.G.; Munck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Dexamethasone 21-mesylate is a highly specific synthetic glucocorticoid derivative that binds covalently to glucocorticoid receptors via sulfhydryl groups. The authors have identified the amino acid that reacts with the dexamethasone 21-mesylate by using enzymatic digestion and microsequencing for radiolabel. Nonactivated glucocorticoid receptors obtained from labeling intact WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells with [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate were immunopurified and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Trypsin digestion followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (reversed-phase HPLC) produced a single [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled peptide. Automated Edman degradation of this peptide revealed that the [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate was located at position 5 from the amino terminus. Dual-isotope labeling studies with [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate and [ 35 S]methionine demonstrated that this peptide contained methionine. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled steroid-binding subunits generated a different radiolabeled peptide containing label at position 7 from the amino terminus. On the basis of the published amino acid sequence of the murine glucocorticoid receptor, their data clearly identify cysteine-644 as the single residue in the steroid-binding domain that covalently binds dexamethasone 21-mesylate. They have confirmed this finding by demonstrating that a synthetic peptide representing the amino acid sequence 640-650 of the murine glucocorticoid receptor behaves in an identical manner on reversed-phase HPLC as the trypsin-generated peptide from intact cells

  7. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self-organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  8. Crystal structure and DNA binding of the homeodomain of the stem cell transcription factor Nanog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C; Kolatkar, Prasanna R

    2008-02-22

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  9. Crystal Structure and DNA Binding of the Homeodomain of the Stem Cell Transcription Factor Nanog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauch, Ralf; Ng, Calista Keow Leng; Saikatendu, Kumar Singh; Stevens, Raymond C.; Kolatkar, Prasanna R. (GI-Singapore); (Scripps)

    2010-02-08

    The transcription factor Nanog is an upstream regulator in early mammalian development and a key determinant of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Nanog binds to promoter elements of hundreds of target genes and regulates their expression by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, we report the crystal structure of the murine Nanog homeodomain (HD) and analysis of its interaction with a DNA element derived from the Tcf3 promoter. Two Nanog amino acid pairs, unique among HD sequences, appear to affect the mechanism of nonspecific DNA recognition as well as maintain the integrity of the structural scaffold. To assess selective DNA recognition by Nanog, we performed electrophoretic mobility shift assays using a panel of modified DNA binding sites and found that Nanog HD preferentially binds the TAAT(G/T)(G/T) motif. A series of rational mutagenesis experiments probing the role of six variant residues of Nanog on its DNA binding function establish their role in affecting binding affinity but not binding specificity. Together, the structural and functional evidence establish Nanog as a distant member of a Q50-type HD despite having considerable variation at the sequence level.

  10. IGF binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2017-12-18

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 bind IGFs but not insulin with high affinity. They were initially identified as serum carriers and passive inhibitors of IGF actions. However, subsequent studies showed that, although IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions in many circumstances, they may also potentiate these actions. IGFBPs are widely expressed in most tissues, and they are flexible endocrine and autocrine/paracrine regulators of IGF activity, which is essential for this important physiological system. More recently, individual IGFBPs have been shown to have IGF-independent actions. Mechanisms underlying these actions include (i) interaction with non-IGF proteins in compartments including the extracellular space and matrix, the cell surface and intracellularly; (ii) interaction with and modulation of other growth factor pathways including EGF, TGF- and VEGF; and (iii) direct or indirect transcriptional effects following nuclear entry of IGFBPs. Through these IGF-dependent and IGF-independent actions, IGFBPs modulate essential cellular processes including proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy and angiogenesis. They have been implicated in a range of disorders including malignant, metabolic, neurological and immune diseases. A more complete understanding of their cellular roles may lead to the development of novel IGFBP-based therapeutic opportunities.

  11. [Evaluation of Fusarium spp. pathogenicity in plant and murine models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Reyes, Consuelo M; Alvarado-Fernández, Angela M; Ceballos-Rojas, Ana M; González-Carmona, Lady C; Linares-Linares, Melva Y; Castañeda-Salazar, Rubiela; Pulido-Villamarín, Adriana; Góngora-Medina, Manuel E; Cortés-Vecino, Jesús A; Rodríguez-Bocanegra, María X

    The genus Fusarium is widely recognized for its phytopathogenic capacity. However, it has been reported as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Thus, it can be considered a microorganism of interest in pathogenicity studies on different hosts. Therefore, this work evaluated the pathogenicity of Fusarium spp. isolates from different origins in plants and animals (murine hosts). Twelve isolates of Fusarium spp. from plants, animal superficial mycoses, and human superficial and systemic mycoses were inoculated in tomato, passion fruit and carnation plants, and in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed BALB/c mice. Pathogenicity tests in plants did not show all the symptoms associated with vascular wilt in the three plant models; however, colonization and necrosis of the vascular bundles, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates, showed the infective potential of Fusarium spp. in different plant species. Moreover, the pathogenicity tests in the murine model revealed behavioral changes. It was noteworthy that only five isolates (different origin and species) caused mortality. Additionally, it was observed that all isolates infected and colonized different organs, regardless of the species and origin of the isolates or host immune status. In contrast, the superficial inoculation test showed no evidence of epidermal injury or colonization. The observed results in plant and murine models suggest the pathogenic potential of Fusarium spp. isolates in different types of hosts. However, further studies on pathogenicity are needed to confirm the multihost capacity of this genus. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Shannan L; Tesh, Robert B; Azar, Sasha R; Muruato, Antonio E; Hanley, Kathryn A; Auguste, Albert J; Langsjoen, Rose M; Paessler, Slobodan; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2016-06-01

    The mosquito-borne Zika virus (ZIKV) is responsible for an explosive ongoing outbreak of febrile illness across the Americas. ZIKV was previously thought to cause only a mild, flu-like illness, but during the current outbreak, an association with Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly in neonates has been detected. A previous study showed that ZIKV requires murine adaptation to generate reproducible murine disease. In our study, a low-passage Cambodian isolate caused disease and mortality in mice lacking the interferon (IFN) alpha receptor (A129 mice) in an age-dependent manner, but not in similarly aged immunocompetent mice. In A129 mice, viremia peaked at ∼10(7) plaque-forming units/mL by day 2 postinfection (PI) and reached high titers in the spleen by day 1. ZIKV was detected in the brain on day 3 PI and caused signs of neurologic disease, including tremors, by day 6. Robust replication was also noted in the testis. In this model, all mice infected at the youngest age (3 weeks) succumbed to illness by day 7 PI. Older mice (11 weeks) showed signs of illness, viremia, and weight loss but recovered starting on day 8. In addition, AG129 mice, which lack both type I and II IFN responses, supported similar infection kinetics to A129 mice, but with exaggerated disease signs. This characterization of an Asian lineage ZIKV strain in a murine model, and one of the few studies reporting a model of Zika disease and demonstrating age-dependent morbidity and mortality, could provide a platform for testing the efficacy of antivirals and vaccines. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  13. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Pietrosimone, K. M.; Jin, M.; Poston, B.; Liu, P.

    2015-01-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund’s adjuvant (IFA) 21 days aft...

  14. Murine nephrotoxic nephritis as a model of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, M. K.E.; Kvist, P. H.; Jensen, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Using the nonaccelerated murine nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) as a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could provide an easily inducible model that enables a rapid test of treatments. Originally, the NTN model was developed as an acute model of glomerulonephritis, but in this study we evaluate...... progressive mesangial expansion and significant renal fibrosis within three weeks suggesting CKD development. CD1 and C57BL/6 females showed a similar disease progression, but female mice seemed more susceptible to NTS compared to male mice. The presence of albuminuria, GFR decline, mesangial expansion...

  15. Biological markers as predictors of radiosensitivity in syngeneic murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sei Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo; Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee

    2006-01-01

    We investigated whether a relationship exists between tumor control dose 50 (TCD 50 ) or tumor growth delay (TGD) and radiation induced apoptosis (RIA) in syngeneic murine tumors. Also we investigated the biological markers that can predict radiosensitivity in murine tumor system through analysis of relationship between TCD 50 , TGD, RIA and constitutive expression levels of the genetic products regulating RIA. Syngeneic murine tumors such as ovarian adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma, hepatocarcinoma were used in this study. C3H/HeJ mice were bred and maintained in our specific pathogen free mouse colony and were 8 ∼ 12 weeks old when used for the experiments. The tumors, growing in the right hind legs of mice, were analyzed for TCD 50 , TGD, and RIA at 8 mm in diameter. The tumors were also analyzed for the constitutive expression levels of p53, p21 WAF1/CIP1 , BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-x L , Bcl-x S , and p34. Correlation analysis was performed whether the level of RIA were correlated with TCD 50 or TGD, and the constitutive expression levels of genetic products regulating RIA were correlated with TCD 50 , TGD, RIA. The level of RIA showed a significant positive correlation (R = 0.922, ρ = 0.026) with TGD, and showed a trend to correlation (R = -0.848), marginally significant correlation with TCD 50 (ρ = 0.070). It indicates that tumors that respond to radiation with high percentage of apoptosis were more radiosensitive. The constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 and p34 showed a significant correlation either with TCD 50 (R = 0.893, ρ = 0.041 and R = 0.904, ρ = 0.035) or with TGD (R = -0.922, ρ 0.026 and R = -0.890, ρ = 0.043). The tumors with high constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 or p34 were less radiosensitive than those with low expression. Radiosensitivity may be predicted with the level of RIA in murine tumors. The constitutive expression levels of p21 WAF1/CIP1 or p34 can be used as biological

  16. Anticonvulsive evaluation of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole kindling model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Charlotte; Boddum, Kim; von Schoubye, Nadia L

    2017-01-01

    . Evaluation of THIP as a potential anticonvulsant has given contradictory results in different animal models and for this reason, we reevaluated the anticonvulsive properties of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. As loss of δ-GABAA R in the dentate gyrus has been associated...... the observed upregulation of δ-GABAA Rs. Even in the demonstrated presence of functional δ-GABAA Rs, THIP (0.5-4 mg/kg) showed no anticonvulsive effect in the PTZ kindling model using a comprehensive in vivo evaluation of the anticonvulsive properties....

  17. Murine cell glycolipids customization by modular expression of glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Emili; Yamamoto, Miyako; Buschbeck, Marcus; Yamamoto, Fumiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Functional analysis of glycolipids has been hampered by their complex nature and combinatorial expression in cells and tissues. We report an efficient and easy method to generate cells with specific glycolipids. In our proof of principle experiments we have demonstrated the customized expression of two relevant glycosphingolipids on murine fibroblasts, stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA-3), a marker for stem cells, and Forssman glycolipid, a xenoantigen. Sets of genes encoding glycosyltansferases were transduced by viral infection followed by multi-color cell sorting based on coupled expression of fluorescent proteins.

  18. Studies on murine plasmocytoma treatment with mistletoe lectin I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raabe, F.; Storch, H.

    1987-01-01

    Mistletoe lectin I was tested in vivo and in vitro for its cytotoxic activity against murine plasmacytoma cells P3/X63-Ag8. As a result of this treatment, 30 to 60% of the BALB/c mice developed complete tumor regressions. 83% of the mice treated with mistletoe lectin I were resistant to viable tumor cell challenge after 100 days. The cytotoxic activity in vitro tested by 3 H-thymidine incorporation into P3/X63-Ag8 cells was very high. The rate was markedly reduced at concentrations up to 0.07 ng/ml. (author)

  19. Adrenaline influences the release of interleukin-6 from murine pituicytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J D; Hansen, E W; Frederiksen, C

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we examined the effect of adrenaline and interleukin-1beta on interleukin-6 secretion from cultured murine neurohypophyseal cells. Cells were cultured from neurohypophyses of 3- to 5-week-old mice and experiments were performed after 13 days in culture. Interleukin-6 was measured...... in 24-h samples using a sandwich fluoroimmunoassay. Unstimulated cells released 19+/-3 fmol interleukin-6/neurohypophysis/24 h (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 42). Adrenaline and interleukin-1beta increased the release of interleukin-6 from the cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation with adrenaline...

  20. Biological markers as predictors of radiosensitivity in syngeneic murine tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sei Kyung; Shin, Hyun Soo [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Jin Sil; Kim, Sung Hee [Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    We investigated whether a relationship exists between tumor control dose 50 (TCD{sub 50}) or tumor growth delay (TGD) and radiation induced apoptosis (RIA) in syngeneic murine tumors. Also we investigated the biological markers that can predict radiosensitivity in murine tumor system through analysis of relationship between TCD{sub 50}, TGD, RIA and constitutive expression levels of the genetic products regulating RIA. Syngeneic murine tumors such as ovarian adenocarcinoma, mammary carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, fibrosarcoma, hepatocarcinoma were used in this study. C3H/HeJ mice were bred and maintained in our specific pathogen free mouse colony and were 8 {approx} 12 weeks old when used for the experiments. The tumors, growing in the right hind legs of mice, were analyzed for TCD{sub 50}, TGD, and RIA at 8 mm in diameter. The tumors were also analyzed for the constitutive expression levels of p53, p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}, BAX, Bcl-2, Bcl-x{sub L}, Bcl-x{sub S}, and p34. Correlation analysis was performed whether the level of RIA were correlated with TCD{sub 50} or TGD, and the constitutive expression levels of genetic products regulating RIA were correlated with TCD{sub 50}, TGD, RIA. The level of RIA showed a significant positive correlation (R = 0.922, {rho} = 0.026) with TGD, and showed a trend to correlation (R = -0.848), marginally significant correlation with TCD{sub 50} ({rho} = 0.070). It indicates that tumors that respond to radiation with high percentage of apoptosis were more radiosensitive. The constitutive expression levels of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} and p34 showed a significant correlation either with TCD{sub 50} (R = 0.893, {rho} = 0.041 and R = 0.904, {rho} = 0.035) or with TGD (R = -0.922, {rho} 0.026 and R = -0.890, {rho} = 0.043). The tumors with high constitutive expression levels of p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} or p34 were less radiosensitive than those with low expression. Radiosensitivity may be predicted with the level of RIA in murine tumors. The

  1. Analysis of the capacity to produce IL-3 in murine AIDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neuenschwander, A U; Marker, O; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1994-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukaemia virus represent a model of murine AIDS (MAIDS). In this study we have analysed the capacity of CD4+ T cells from infected mice to produce IL-3 following stimulation with ConA for 24-72 h. In contrast to the position with IL-2, the production...

  2. Murine typhus in two travelers returning from Bali, Indonesia: an underdiagnosed disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Nozomi; Imoto, Kazuya; Ando, Shuji; Yanagisawa, Kunio; Ohji, Goh; Kato, Yasuyuki; Sakata, Akiko; Hosokawa, Naoto; Kishimoto, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Two Japanese travelers from Bali were diagnosed with murine typhus in Japan during the same period. Although one had only mild illness, the other experienced liver and kidney dysfunction. Murine typhus may be missed not only in endemic areas around the world, but also in travelers, especially those returning from marine resorts in these areas. © 2010 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  3. Novel heparan sulfate-binding peptides for blocking herpesvirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Dogra

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection can lead to congenital hearing loss and mental retardation. Upon immune suppression, reactivation of latent HCMV or primary infection increases morbidity in cancer, transplantation, and late stage AIDS patients. Current treatments include nucleoside analogues, which have significant toxicities limiting their usefulness. In this study we screened a panel of synthetic heparin-binding peptides for their ability to prevent CMV infection in vitro. A peptide designated, p5+14 exhibited ~ 90% reduction in murine CMV (MCMV infection. Because negatively charged, cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs, serve as the attachment receptor during the adsorption phase of the CMV infection cycle, we hypothesized that p5+14 effectively competes for CMV adsorption to the cell surface resulting in the reduction in infection. Positively charged Lys residues were required for peptide binding to cell-surface HSPGs and reducing viral infection. We show that this inhibition was not due to a direct neutralizing effect on the virus itself and that the peptide blocked adsorption of the virus. The peptide also inhibited infection of other herpesviruses: HCMV and herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 in vitro, demonstrating it has broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Therefore, this peptide may offer an adjunct therapy for the treatment of herpes viral infections and other viruses that use HSPGs for entry.

  4. The receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus and amphotropic murine leukemia virus are not downregulated in productively infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Maribeth V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last several decades it has been noted, using a variety of different methods, that cells infected by a specific gammaretrovirus are resistant to infection by other retroviruses that employ the same receptor; a phenomenon termed receptor interference. Receptor masking is thought to provide an earlier means of blocking superinfection, whereas receptor down regulation is generally considered to occur in chronically infected cells. Results We used replication-competent GFP-expressing viruses containing either an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV envelope. We also constructed similar viruses containing fluorescence-labeled Gag proteins for the detection of viral particles. Using this repertoire of reagents together with a wide range of antibodies, we were able to determine the presence and availability of viral receptors, and detect viral envelope proteins and particles presence on the cell surface of chronically infected cells. Conclusions A-MLV or GALV receptors remain on the surface of chronically infected cells and are detectable by respective antibodies, indicating that these receptors are not downregulated in these infected cells as previously proposed. We were also able to detect viral envelope proteins on the infected cell surface and infected cells are unable to bind soluble A-MLV or GALV envelopes indicating that receptor binding sites are masked by endogenously expressed A-MLV or GALV viral envelope. However, receptor masking does not completely prevent A-MLV or GALV superinfection.

  5. A method for the isolation and characterization of functional murine monoclonal antibodies by single B cell cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonetti, Sara; Oliver, Brian G; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Sack, Brandon; Bergl, Emilee; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody technologies have enabled dramatic advances in immunology, the study of infectious disease, and modern medicine over the past 40years. However, many monoclonal antibody discovery procedures are labor- and time-intensive, low efficiency, and expensive. Here we describe an optimized mAb discovery platform for the rapid and efficient isolation, cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies in murine systems. In this platform, antigen-binding splenic B cells from immunized mice are isolated by FACS and cocultured with CD40L positive cells to induce proliferation and mAb production. After 12days of coculture, cell culture supernatants are screened for antigen, and IgG positivity and RNA is isolated for reverse-transcription. Positive-well cDNA is then amplified by PCR and the resulting amplicons can be cloned into ligation-independent expression vectors, which are then used directly to transfect HEK293 cells for recombinant antibody production. After 4days of growth, conditioned medium can be screened using biolayer interferometry for antigen binding and affinity measurements. Using this method, we were able to isolate six unique, functional monoclonal antibodies against an antigen of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Importantly, this method incorporates several important advances that circumvent the need for single-cell PCR, restriction cloning, and large scale protein production, and can be applied to a wide array of protein antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the potential toxicity of unmodified and modified cyclodextrins on murine blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shityakov, Sergey; Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Salvador, Ellaine; Roewer, Norbert; Broscheit, Jens; Förster, Carola

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of unmodified α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and modified cyclodextrins, including trimethyl-β-cyclodextrin (TRIMEB) and hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD), on immortalized murine microvascular endothelial (cEND) cells of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A CellTiter-Glo viability test, performed on the cEND cells showed significant differences among the different cyclodextrins. After 24 hr of incubation, TRIMEB was the most cytotoxic, and HPβCD was non-toxic. α-CD and TRIMEB exhibited greater cytotoxicity in the Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium than in heat-inactivated human serum indicating protective properties of the human serum. The predicted dynamic toxicity profiles (Td) for α-CD and TRIMEB indicated higher cytotoxicity for these cyclodextrins compared to the reference compound (dimethylsulfoxide). Molecular dynamics simulation of cholesterol binding to the CDs suggested that not just cholesterol but phospholipids extraction might be involved in the cytotoxicity. Overall, the results demonstrate that HPβCD has the potential to be used as a candidate for drug delivery vector development and signify a correlation between the in vitro cytotoxic effect and cholesterol binding of cyclodextrins.

  7. The M1 muscarinic receptor and its second messenger coupling in human neuroblastoma cells and transfected murine fibroblast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Lin.

    1989-01-01

    The data of this study indicate that pirenzepine (PZ)-high affinity muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) are coupled to the hydrolysis of inositol lipids and not to the adenylate cyclase system in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The maximal carbachol(CCh)-stimulated [ 3 H]IP 1 accumulation in the SH-SY5Y cells was decreased in the presence of 1μg/ml pertussis toxin, suggesting that a pertussis toxin sensitive G-protein may be involved in the coupling. Several cell clones which express only M 1 mAChR were generated by transfecting the murine fibroblast B82 cells with the cloned rat genomic m 1 gene. The transfected B82 cells (cTB10) showed specific [ 3 H](-)QNB binding activity. The mAChRs in these cells are of the M 1 type defined by their high affinity for PZ and low affinity for AF-DX 116 and coupled to hydrolysis of inositol lipids, possibly via a pertussis toxin sensitive G protein. The relationship between the M 1 mAChR density and the receptor-mediated hydrolysis of inositol lipids was studied in 7 clones. The M 1 mAChR densities in these cells characterized by [ 3 H](-)MQNB binding ranged from 12 fmol/10 6 cells in LK3-1 cells to 260 fmol/10 6 cells in the LK3-8 cells

  8. β-Arrestin2 mediates progression of murine primary myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Lindsay Am; Wisler, James W; Kim, Jihee; Theriot, Barbara; Huang, LiYin; Price, Trevor; Yang, Haeyoon; Chen, Minyong; Chen, Wei; Sipkins, Dorothy; Fedoriw, Yuri; Walker, Julia Kl; Premont, Richard T; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2017-12-21

    Primary myelofibrosis is a myeloproliferative neoplasm associated with significant morbidity and mortality, for which effective therapies are lacking. β-Arrestins are multifunctional adaptor proteins involved in developmental signaling pathways. One isoform, β-arrestin2 (βarr2), has been implicated in initiation and progression of chronic myeloid leukemia, another myeloproliferative neoplasm closely related to primary myelofibrosis. Accordingly, we investigated the relationship between βarr2 and primary myelofibrosis. In a murine model of MPLW515L-mutant primary myelofibrosis, mice transplanted with donor βarr2-knockout (βarr2-/-) hematopoietic stem cells infected with MPL-mutant retrovirus did not develop myelofibrosis, whereas controls uniformly succumbed to disease. Although transplanted βarr2-/- cells homed properly to marrow, they did not repopulate long-term due to increased apoptosis and decreased self-renewal of βarr2-/- cells. In order to assess the effect of acute loss of βarr2 in established primary myelofibrosis in vivo, we utilized a tamoxifen-induced Cre-conditional βarr2-knockout mouse. Mice that received Cre (+) donor cells and developed myelofibrosis had significantly improved survival compared with controls. These data indicate that lack of antiapoptotic βarr2 mediates marrow failure of murine hematopoietic stem cells overexpressing MPLW515L. They also indicate that βarr2 is necessary for progression of primary myelofibrosis, suggesting that it may serve as a novel therapeutic target in this disease.

  9. Scanning electron microscopy of the neuropathology of murine cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Christian

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms leading to death and functional impairments due to cerebral malaria (CM are yet not fully understood. Most of the knowledge about the pathomechanisms of CM originates from studies in animal models. Though extensive histopathological studies of the murine brain during CM are existing, alterations have not been visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM so far. The present study investigates the neuropathological features of murine CM by applying SEM. Methods C57BL/6J mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA blood stages. When typical symptoms of CM developed perfused brains were processed for SEM or light microscopy, respectively. Results Ultrastructural hallmarks were disruption of vessel walls, parenchymal haemorrhage, leukocyte sequestration to the endothelium, and diapedesis of macrophages and lymphocytes into the Virchow-Robin space. Villous appearance of observed lymphocytes were indicative of activated state. Cerebral oedema was evidenced by enlargement of perivascular spaces. Conclusion The results of the present study corroborate the current understanding of CM pathophysiology, further support the prominent role of the local immune system in the neuropathology of CM and might expose new perspectives for further interventional studies.

  10. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways by murine polyomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, Katie; Nicholas, Catherine; Garcea, Robert L., E-mail: Robert.Garcea@Colorado.edu

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear replication of DNA viruses activates DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways, which are thought to detect and inhibit viral replication. However, many DNA viruses also depend on these pathways in order to optimally replicate their genomes. We investigated the relationship between murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) and components of DDR signaling pathways including CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, ATR, and DNAPK. We found that recruitment and retention of DDR proteins at viral replication centers was independent of H2AX, as well as the viral small and middle T-antigens. Additionally, infectious virus production required ATR kinase activity, but was independent of CHK1, CHK2, or DNAPK signaling. ATR inhibition did not reduce the total amount of viral DNA accumulated, but affected the amount of virus produced, indicating a defect in virus assembly. These results suggest that MuPyV may utilize a subset of DDR proteins or non-canonical DDR signaling pathways in order to efficiently replicate and assemble. -- Highlights: •Murine polyomavirus activates and recruits DNA damage repair (DDR) proteins to replication centers. •Large T-antigen mediates recruitment of DDR proteins to viral replication centers. •Inhibition or knockout of CHK1, CHK2, DNA-PK or H2AX do not affect viral titers. •Inhibition of ATR activity reduces viral titers, but not viral DNA accumulation.

  11. Murine models of osteosarcoma: A piece of the translational puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Mannu K; Castillo-Tandazo, Wilson; Mutsaers, Anthony J; Martin, Thomas John; Walkley, Carl R

    2018-06-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common cancer of bone in children and young adults. Despite extensive research efforts, there has been no significant improvement in patient outcome for many years. An improved understanding of the biology of this cancer and how genes frequently mutated contribute to OS may help improve outcomes for patients. While our knowledge of the mutational burden of OS is approaching saturation, our understanding of how these mutations contribute to OS initiation and maintenance is less clear. Murine models of OS have now been demonstrated to be highly valid recapitulations of human OS. These models were originally based on the frequent disruption of p53 and Rb in familial OS syndromes, which are also common mutations in sporadic OS. They have been applied to significantly improve our understanding about the functions of recurrently mutated genes in disease. The murine models can be used as a platform for preclinical testing and identifying new therapeutic targets, in addition to testing the role of additional mutations in vivo. Most recently these models have begun to be used for discovery based approaches and screens, which hold significant promise in furthering our understanding of the genetic and therapeutic sensitivities of OS. In this review, we discuss the mouse models of OS that have been reported in the last 3-5 years and newly identified pathways from these studies. Finally, we discuss the preclinical utilization of the mouse models of OS for identifying and validating actionable targets to improve patient outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Neurological Disorders in a Murine Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Chillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF. However, data on the impact of CRF on the cerebral circulatory system are scarce—despite the fact that stroke is the third most common cause of cardiovascular death in people with CRF. In the present study, we examined the impact of CRF on behavior (anxiety, recognition and ischemic stroke severity in a well-defined murine model of CRF. We did not observe any significant increases between CRF mice and non-CRF mice in terms of anxiety. In contrast, CRF mice showed lower levels of anxiety in some tests. Recognition was not impaired (vs. controls after 6 weeks of CRF but was impaired after 10 weeks of CRF. Chronic renal failure enhances the severity of ischemic stroke, as evaluated by the infarct volume size in CRF mice after 34 weeks of CRF. Furthermore, neurological test results in non-CRF mice tended to improve in the days following ischemic stroke, whereas the results in CRF mice tended to worsen. In conclusion, we showed that a murine model of CRF is suitable for evaluating uremic toxicity and the associated neurological disorders. Our data confirm the role of uremic toxicity in the genesis of neurological abnormalities (other than anxiety.

  13. Differential chemokine responses in the murine brain following lyssavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, D J; Núñez, A; Banyard, A C; Williams, A; Ortiz-Pelaez, A; Fooks, A R; Johnson, N

    2013-11-01

    The hallmark of lyssavirus infection is lethal encephalomyelitis. Previous studies have reported distinct lyssavirus isolate-related differences in severity of cellular recruitment into the encephalon in a murine model of infection following peripheral inoculation with rabies virus (RABV) and European bat lyssavirus (EBLV)-1 and -2. In order to understand the role of chemokines in this process, comparative studies of the chemokine pattern, distribution and production in response to infection with these lyssaviruses were undertaken. Expression of CCL2, CCL5 and CXCL10 was observed throughout the murine brain with a distinct caudal bias in distribution, similar to both inflammatory changes and virus antigen distribution. CCL2 immunolabelling was localized to neuronal and astroglial populations. CCL5 immunolabelling was only detected in the astroglia, while CXCL10 labelling, although present in the astroglia, was more prominent in neurons. Isolate-dependent differences in the amount of chemokine immunolabelling in specific brain regions and chemokine production by neurons in vitro were observed, with a greater expression of CCL5 in vivo and CXCL10 production in vitro after EBLV infection. Additionally, strong positive associations between chemokine immunolabelling and perivascular cuffing and, to a lesser extent, virus antigen score were also observed. These differences in chemokine expression may explain the variation in severity of encephalitic changes observed in animals infected with different lyssavirus isolates. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yigang; Tang Yamei; Liu Jun; Sun Ying

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy. Methods: A total of 40 rats were subjected to local γ-irradiation to the brain with the dosage of 7 Gy/d for 6 consecutive days. The amount of food intake, hairs and skin of irradiated field, body weight, general activities, CNS symptoms and signs were examined and recorded after irradiation. On day 3, 7, 14 and 30, the brain tissue was removed to observe histopathologic changes. Results: During the first two days after irradiation, the irradiated rats were agitated, and the amount of food intake decreased from day 2 onwards. No serious skin reaction to irradiation was observed. Survived rats had normal activities without any abnormal nervous signs. Histopathologic changes showed slight neuronal degeneration, smaller cell body, red-colored cytoplasm, disappearance of Nissl body, vacuolation, typical cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and nuclear divergence. On the 14th and 30th days, hypochromatism, loose and reticular necrotic foci were found in some samples. Conclusion: The murine model of acute radiation encephalopathy is useful and practical in radiobiological studies

  15. [Nuclear matrix organization of the chromocenters in cultured murine fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheval', E V; Poliakov, V Iu

    2010-01-01

    In the current work, the structural organization of nuclear matrix of pericentromeric heterochromatin blocks (chromocenters) inside cultured murine fibroblasts was investigated. After 2 M NaCl extraction without DNase I treatment, chromocenters were extremely swelled, and it was impossible to detect them using conventional electron microscopy. Using immunogolding with anti-topoisomerase IIalpha antibody, we demonstrated that residual chromocenters were subdivided into numerous discrete aggregates. After 2 M NaCl extraction with DNase I treatment, the residual chromocenters appeared as a dense meshwork of thin fibers, and using this feature, the residual chromocenters were easily distinguished from the rest of nuclear matrix. After extraction with dextran sulfate and heparin, the chromocenters were decondensed, and chromatin complexes having rosette organization (central core from which numerous DNA fibers radiated) were seen. Probably, the appearance of these rosettes was a consequence of incomplete chromatin extraction. Thus, the nuclear matrix of pericentromeric chromosome regions in cultured murine fibroblasts differs morphologically from the rest of nuclear matrix.

  16. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Characterization of Human and Murine T-Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domain 4 (TIM-4) IgV Domain Residues Critical for Ebola Virus Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, Bethany A; Brouillette, Rachel B; Schaack, Grace A; Chiorini, John A; Maury, Wendy

    2016-07-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) receptors that are responsible for the clearance of dying cells have recently been found to mediate enveloped virus entry. Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family of viruses, utilizes PtdSer receptors for entry into target cells. The PtdSer receptors human and murine T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins TIM-1 and TIM-4 mediate filovirus entry by binding to PtdSer on the virion surface via a conserved PtdSer binding pocket within the amino-terminal IgV domain. While the residues within the TIM-1 IgV domain that are important for EBOV entry are characterized, the molecular details of virion-TIM-4 interactions have yet to be investigated. As sequences and structural alignments of the TIM proteins suggest distinct differences in the TIM-1 and TIM-4 IgV domain structures, we sought to characterize TIM-4 IgV domain residues required for EBOV entry. Using vesicular stomatitis virus pseudovirions bearing EBOV glycoprotein (EBOV GP/VSVΔG), we evaluated virus binding and entry into cells expressing TIM-4 molecules mutated within the IgV domain, allowing us to identify residues important for entry. Similar to TIM-1, residues in the PtdSer binding pocket of murine and human TIM-4 (mTIM-4 and hTIM-4) were found to be important for EBOV entry. However, additional TIM-4-specific residues were also found to impact EBOV entry, with a total of 8 mTIM-4 and 14 hTIM-4 IgV domain residues being critical for virion binding and internalization. Together, these findings provide a greater understanding of the interaction of TIM-4 with EBOV virions. With more than 28,000 cases and over 11,000 deaths during the largest and most recent Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak, there has been increased emphasis on the development of therapeutics against filoviruses. Many therapies under investigation target EBOV cell entry. T-cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM) domain proteins are cell surface factors important for the entry of many enveloped viruses

  18. Feline leukemia virus infection requires a post-receptor binding envelope-dependent cellular component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S

    2011-12-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (10(1) to 10(2) CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (10(4) to 10(6) CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells.

  19. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  20. Expression, refolding and crystallization of murine MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2-microglobulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandalova, Tatyana; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Harris, Robert A.; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Kärre, Klas; Schneider, Gunter; Achour, Adnane

    2005-01-01

    Mouse MHC class I H-2Db in complex with human β2m and the LCMV-derived peptide gp33 has been produced and crystallized. Resolution of the structure of this complex combined with the structural comparison with the previously solved crystal structure of H-2Db/mβ2m/gp33 should lead to a better understanding of how the β2m subunit affects the overall conformation of MHC complexes as well as the stability of the presented peptides. β 2 -Microglobulin (β 2 m) is non-covalently linked to the major histocompatibility (MHC) class I heavy chain and interacts with CD8 and Ly49 receptors. Murine MHC class I can bind human β 2 m (hβ 2 m) and such hybrid molecules are often used in structural and functional studies. The replacement of mouse β 2 m (mβ 2 m) by hβ 2 m has important functional consequences for MHC class I complex stability and specificity, but the structural basis for this is unknown. To investigate the impact of species-specific β 2 m subunits on MHC class I conformation, murine MHC class I H-2D b in complex with hβ 2 m and the peptide gp33 derived from lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) has been expressed, refolded in vitro and crystallized. Crystals containing two complexes per asymmetric unit and belonging to the space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 68.1, b = 65.2, c = 101.9 Å, β = 102.4°, were obtained

  1. Rigidification of the autolysis loop enhances Na[superscript +] binding to thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Raymond; Chen, Zhiwei; Bah, Alaji; Di Cera, Enrico (St. Louis-MED)

    2011-09-20

    Binding of Na{sup +} to thrombin ensures high activity toward physiological substrates and optimizes the procoagulant and prothrombotic roles of the enzyme in vivo. Under physiological conditions of pH and temperature, the binding affinity of Na{sup +} is weak due to large heat capacity and enthalpy changes associated with binding, and the K{sub d} = 80 mM ensures only 64% saturation of the site at the concentration of Na{sup +} in the blood (140 mM). Residues controlling Na{sup +} binding and activation have been identified. Yet, attempts to improve the interaction of Na{sup +} with thrombin and possibly increase catalytic activity under physiological conditions have so far been unsuccessful. Here we report how replacement of the flexible autolysis loop of human thrombin with the homologous rigid domain of the murine enzyme results in a drastic (up to 10-fold) increase in Na{sup +} affinity and a significant improvement in the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Rigidification of the autolysis loop abolishes the heat capacity change associated with Na{sup +} binding observed in the wild-type and also increases the stability of thrombin. These findings have general relevance to protein engineering studies of clotting proteases and trypsin-like enzymes.

  2. Pictorial binding: endeavor to classify

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the classification of bindings of the 1-19th centuries with a unique and untypical book binding decoration technique (encaustic, tempera and oil paintings. Analysis of design features, materials and techniques of art decoration made it possible to identify them as a separate type - pictorial bindings and divide them into four groups. The first group consists of Coptic bindings, decorated with icon-painting images in encaustic technique. The second group is made up of leather Western bindings of the 13-14th centuries, which have the decoration and technique of ornamentation close to iconography. The third group involves parchment bindings, ornamentation technique of which is closer to the miniature. The last group comprises bindings of East Slavic origin of the 15-19th centuries, decorated with icon-painting pictures made in the technique of tempera or oil painting. The proposed classification requires further basic research as several specific kinds of bindings have not yet been investigated

  3. Changes in 5-HT4 receptor and 5-HT transporter binding in olfactory bulbectomized and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, Cecilie L; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Zueger, Maha

    2010-01-01

    . The olfactory bulbectomized mice displayed increased activity in the open field test, a characteristic depression-like feature of this model. After bulbectomy, 5-HT(4) receptor binding was increased in the ventral hippocampus (12%) but unchanged in the dorsal hippocampus, frontal and caudal caudate putamen......]citalopram in two murine models of depression-related states, olfactory bulbectomy and glucocorticoid receptor heterozygous (GR(+/-)) mice. The olfactory bulbectomy model is characterized by 5-HT system changes, while the GR(+/-) mice have a deficit in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) system control....... Among post hoc analyzed regions, there was a 14% decrease in 5-HT(4) receptor binding in the olfactory tubercles. The 5-HTT binding was unchanged in the hippocampus and caudate putamen of bulbectomized mice but post hoc analysis showed small decreases in lateral septum and lateral globus pallidus...

  4. Prolonged exposure of resveratrol induces reactive superoxide species-independent apoptosis in murine prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Stokes, James; Singh, Udai P; Scissum-Gunn, Karyn; Singh, Rajesh; Manne, Upender; Mishra, Manoj K

    2017-10-01

    Nitric oxide, a signaling molecule, inhibits mitochondrial respiration by binding with cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in elevated production of reactive superoxide species (reactive oxygen and nitrogen) in the mitochondria and increased susceptibility to cell death. Generation of mitochondrial superoxide species can be suppressed by natural compounds such as resveratrol, a dietary polyphenol found in the skin of red fruits. In various cancer cells, resveratrol shows anti-oxidant and cancer preventive properties. Since, the effect of resveratrol on reactive superoxide species-independent apoptosis in prostate cancer cells is not well illustrated; therefore, we investigated this phenomenon in TRAMP murine prostate cancer cells. To accomplish this, TRAMP cells were incubated with resveratrol, resveratrol + DETA-NONOate, DETA-NONOate (nitric oxide donor), resveratrol + L-NMMA, or L-NMMA (nitric oxide inhibitor) for 48 h, and reactive superoxide species in the mitochondria and culture supernatant were measured. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, expression of apoptotic markers (Bax and Bcl2), γ-H2A.x, p53, and caspase-3 was determined. We found that resveratrol suppressed reactive superoxide species such as reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria and nitric oxide in culture supernatant when compared to the DETA-NONOate treatment and disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential. Resveratrol also reduced cell viability, altered the expression of apoptotic markers (Bax and Bcl2), and increased expression of γ-H2A.x (indicative marker of DNA fragmentation) and p53 (a critical DNA damage response protein). However, there was no appreciable modulation of the caspase-3. Therefore, our data suggest that resveratrol induces superoxide species-independent apoptosis and may act as a therapeutic agent against prostate cancer.

  5. Analgesic effect of the neuropeptide cortistatin in murine models of arthritic inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Maria; Souza-Moreira, Luciana; Caro, Marta; O'Valle, Francisco; Forte-Lago, Irene; de Lecea, Luis; Gonzalez-Rey, Elena; Delgado, Mario

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the role of the antiinflammatory neuropeptide cortistatin in chronic pain evoked by joint inflammation. Thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia was evoked in mouse knee joints by intraplantar injection of tumor necrosis factor α and intraarticular infusion of Freund's complete adjuvant, and the analgesic effects of cortistatin, administered centrally, peripherally, and systemically, were assessed. In addition, the effects of cortistatin on the production of nociceptive peptides and the activation of pain signaling were assayed in dorsal root ganglion cultures and in inflammatory pain models. The role of endogenous cortistatin in pain sensitization and perpetuation of chronic inflammatory states was evaluated in cortistatin-deficient mice. Finally, the effect of noxious/inflammatory stimuli in the production of cortistatin by the peripheral nociceptive system was assayed in vitro and in vivo. Expression of cortistatin was observed in peptidergic nociceptors of the peripheral nociceptive system, and endogenous cortistatin was found to participate in the tuning of pain sensitization, especially in pathologic inflammatory conditions. Results showed that cortistatin acted both peripherally and centrally to reduce the tactile allodynia and heat hyperalgesia evoked by arthritis and peripheral tissue inflammation in mice, via mechanisms that were independent of its antiinflammatory action. These mechanisms involved direct action on nociceptive neurons and regulation of central sensitization. The analgesic effects of cortistatin in murine arthritic pain were linked to binding of the neuropeptide to somatostatin and ghrelin receptors, activation of the G protein subunit Gαi , impairment of ERK signaling, and decreased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide in primary nociceptors. These findings indicate that cortistatin is an antiinflammatory factor with potent analgesic effects that may offer a new approach to pain therapy in pathologic inflammatory

  6. Effects of protein-energy malnutrition on NF-kappaB signalling in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, Ricardo Ambrósio; Rogero, Marcelo Macedo; Vinolo, Marco Aurélio Ramirez; Curi, Rui; Borges, Maria Carolina; Borelli, Primavera

    2010-04-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is an important public health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. PEM decreases resistance to infection, impairing a number of physiological processes. In unstimulated cells, NF-kappaB is kept from binding to its consensus sequence by the inhibitor I kappaB alpha, which retains NF-kappaB in the cytoplasm. Upon various signals, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), I kappaB alpha is rapidly degraded and NF-kappaB is induced to translocate into the nucleus, where it activates expression of various genes that participate in the inflammatory response, including those involved in the synthesis of TNF-alpha. TRAF-6 is a cytoplasmic adapter protein that links the stimulatory signal from Toll like receptor-4 to NF-kappaB. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of malnutrition on induction of TNF-alpha by LPS in murine peritoneal macrophages. We evaluated peritoneal cellularity, the expression of MyD88, TRAF-6, IKK, I kappaB alpha and NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB activation and TNF-alpha mRNA and protein synthesis in macrophages. Two-month-old male BALB/C mice were submitted to PEM with a low-protein diet that contained 2% protein, compared to 12% protein in the control diet. When the experimental group had lost about 20% of the original body weight, it was used in the subsequent experiments. Malnourished animals presented anemia, leucopenia and severe reduction in peritoneal cavity cellularity. TNF-alpha mRNA and protein levels of macrophages stimulated with LPS were significantly lower in malnourished animals. PEM also decreased TRAF-6 expression and NF-kappaB activation after LPS stimulation. These results led us to conclude that PEM changes NF-kB signalling pathway in macrophages to LPS stimulus.

  7. Influence of maternal gestational treatment with mycobacterial antigens on postnatal immunity in an experimental murine model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jubayer Rahman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been proposed that the immune system could be primed as early as during the fetal life and this might have an impact on postnatal vaccination. Therefore, we addressed in murine models whether gestational treatment with mycobacterial antigens could induce better immune responses in the postnatal life. METHODS/FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were treated subcutaneously (s.c. at the second week of gestation with antigen (Ag85A or heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA in the absence of adjuvant. Following birth, offspring mice were immunized intranasally (i.n. with the same antigens formulated with the adjuvant cholera toxin (CT at week 1 and week 4. One week after the last immunization, we assessed antigen-specific recall interferon gamma (IFN-gamma responses by in vitro restimulation of lung-derived lymphocytes. Protection against infection was assessed by challenge with high dose Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG given i.n. We found that recall IFN-gamma responses were higher in the offspring born to the treated mother compared to the untreated-mother. More importantly, we observed that the offspring born to the treated mother controlled infection better than the offspring born to the untreated mother. Since the gestational treatment was done in absence of adjuvant, essentially there was no antibody production observed in the pregnant mice and therefore no influence of maternal antibodies was expected. We hypothesized that the effect of maternal treatment with antigen on the offspring occurred due to antigen transportation through placenta. To trace the antigens, we conjugated fluorescent nanocrystals with Ag85A (Qdot-ITK-Ag85A. After inoculation in the pregnant mice, Qdot-ITK-Ag85A conjugates were detected in the liver, spleen of pregnant females and in all the fetuses and placentas examined. CONCLUSION: The fetal immune system could be primed in utero by mycobacterial antigens transported through the placenta.

  8. Systemic effects induced by the venom of the snake Bothrops caribbaeus in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristina; Rucavado, Alexandra; Warrell, David A; Gutiérrez, José María

    2013-03-01

    Snakebite envenoming by Bothrops caribbaeus, an endemic viperid from the Lesser Antillean island of Saint Lucia, is clinically characterized by local tissue damage and systemic thrombosis that can lead to cerebral, myocardial or pulmonary infarctions and venous thromboses. Systemic effects (lethality, pulmonary hemorrhage, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy) induced by intravenous (i.v.) administration of B. caribbaeus venom were studied in mice. The role of snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) in these systemic alterations was assessed by inhibition with the chelating agent calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CaNa(2)EDTA). A snake C-type lectin-like (snaclec) and a type P-III hemorrhagic SVMP were isolated and characterized from this venom, and the effect of venom and the isolated snaclec on human platelet aggregation was studied in vitro. Results indicate that SVMPs play an important role in the overall toxicity of B. caribbaeus venom, being responsible for systemic hemorrhage and lethality, but not thrombocytopenia, whereas the isolated snaclec is involved in the thrombocytopenic effect. Both venom and snaclec induce platelet aggregation/agglutination. Moreover, the snaclec binds directly to glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and induces agglutination in washed fixed platelets. On the other hand, B. caribbaeus venom hydrolyzed fibrinogen in vitro and induced a partial drop of fibrinogen levels with an increase in fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDP) levels in vivo. The negative result for D-dimer (DD) in plasma is consistent with the lack of microscopic evidence of pulmonary thrombosis and endothelial cell damage. Likewise, no increments in plasma sE-selectin levels were detected. The absence of thrombosis in this murine model suggests that this effect may be species-specific. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Murine liver damage caused by exposure to nano-titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Jie; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Due to its unique physiochemical properties, nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO_2) is widely used in all aspects of people’s daily lives, bringing it into increasing contact with humans. Thus, this material’s security issues for humans have become a heavily researched subject. Nano-TiO_2 can enter the body through the mouth, skin, respiratory tract or in other ways, after which it enters the blood circulation and is deposited in the liver, changing biochemical indicators and causing liver inflammation. Meanwhile, the light sensitivity of these nanoparticles allows them to become media-generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), causing an imbalance between oxidation and anti-oxidation that leads to oxidative stress and liver damage. Nano-TiO_2 can be transported into cells via phagocytosis, where the nanoparticles bind to the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in the disintegration of the membrane and the electron transport chain within the mitochondria. Thus, more ROS are produced. Nano-TiO_2 can also enter the nucleus, where it can directly embed into or indirectly affect DNA, thereby causing DNA breakage or affecting gene expression. These effects include increased mRNA and protein expression levels of inflammation-related factors and decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of IκB and IL-2, resulting in inflammation. Long-term inflammation of the liver causes HSC cell activation, and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition is promoted by multiple signalling pathways, resulting in liver fibrosis. In this paper, the latest progress on murine liver injury induced by environmental TiO_2 is systematically described. The toxicity of nano-TiO_2 also depends on size, exposure time, surface properties, dosage, administration route, and its surface modification. Therefore, its toxic effects in humans should be studied in greater depth. This paper also provides useful reference information regarding the safe use of nano-TiO_2 in the future. (topical review)

  10. Rediscovering peritoneal macrophages in a murine endometriosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ming; Li, Dong; An, Min; Li, Qiuju; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Guoyun

    2017-01-01

    What are the features of peritoneal macrophage subgroups and T helper cells in the development of murine endometriosis? During the development of endometriosis in a murine model, large peritoneal macrophages (LPMs) and small peritoneal macrophages (SPMs) are polarized into M1 and M2 cells, respectively, and the proportions of T helper (Th) 1, Th17 and T regulatory (T reg ) cells are increased. Numerous studies investigating the etiology and pathogenesis of endometriosis have focused on the polarization states of peritoneal macrophages in endometriosis models and patients, but the results are inconclusive. Further studies indicate that peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs, although their roles in endometriosis are unknown. This study involves a prospective and randomized experiment. Fifty C57BL/6 female mice were randomly allocated to five control and five experimental groups (n = 5/group) according to the presence or absence of transplantation. The transplant periods are 0.25, 3, 14, 28 and 42 days. C57BL/6 mice were utilized to establish an endometriosis model by i.p. injection of allogeneic endometrial segments. Dynamic changes of peritoneal macrophage subsets and polarization profiles were evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). Macrophage morphology and density were assessed by cell counting under a microscope. Dynamic changes of Th1, Th2, Th17 and T reg cells were estimated by FCM. Peritoneal macrophages are composed of two distinct subsets: LPMs and SPMs. The proportion of SPMs increased immediately after peritoneal injection of endometrial tissues, whereas LPMs showed an opposite trend. Peritoneal macrophages differentiated into both M1 and M2 macrophages. The bidirectional polarization of macrophages was caused by the inverse trends of polarization of LPMs and SPMs. Consistently, the proportions of Th1, Th17 and T reg cells were all increased in mice with endometriosis. N/A. In this study, detection was only performed in a

  11. Nanoliposomal artemisinin for the treatment of murine visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Want MY

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Muzamil Y Want,1 Mohammad Islammudin,1 Garima Chouhan,1 Hani A Ozbak,2 Hassan A Hemeg,2 Asoke P Chattopadhyay,3 Farhat Afrin2 1Parasite Immunology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, Jamia Hamdard, Hamdard University, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Taibah University, Medina, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Chemistry, University of Kalyani, Kalyani, India Abstract: Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a fatal, vector-borne disease caused by the intracellular protozoa of the genus Leishmania. Most of the therapeutics for VL are toxic, expensive, or ineffective. Sesquiterpenes are a new class of drugs with proven antimicrobial and antiviral activities. Artemisinin is a sesquiterpene lactone with potent antileishmanial activity, but with limited access to infected cells, being a highly lipophilic molecule. Association of artemisinin with liposome is a desirable strategy to circumvent the problem of poor accessibility, thereby improving its efficacy, as demonstrated in a murine model of experimental VL. Nanoliposomal artemisinin (NLA was prepared by thin-film hydration method and optimized using Box–Behnken design with a mean particle diameter of 83±16 nm, polydispersity index of 0.2±0.03, zeta potential of -27.4±5.7 mV, and drug loading of 33.2%±2.1%. Morphological study of these nanoliposomes by microscopy showed a smooth and spherical surface. The mechanism of release of artemisinin from the liposomes followed the Higuchi model in vitro. NLA was free from concomitant signs of toxicity, both ex vivo in murine macrophages and in vivo in healthy BALB/c mice. NLA significantly denigrated the intracellular infection of Leishmania donovani amastigotes and the number of infected macrophages ex vivo with an IC50 of 6.0±1.4 µg/mL and 5.1±0.9 µg/mL, respectively. Following treatment in a murine model of VL, NLA demonstrated superior efficacy compared to artemisinin with a

  12. A SNP in the HTT promoter alters NF-κB binding and is a bidirectional genetic modifier of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bečanović, Kristina; Nørremølle, Anne; Neal, Scott J; Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Arenillas, David; Lilja, Tobias; Gaudenzi, Giulia; Manoharan, Shiana; Doty, Crystal N; Beck, Jessalyn; Lahiri, Nayana; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Warby, Simon C; Connolly, Colúm; De Souza, Rebecca A G; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Hermanson, Ola; Langbehn, Douglas R; Hayden, Michael R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Leavitt, Blair R

    2015-06-01

    Cis-regulatory variants that alter gene expression can modify disease expressivity, but none have previously been identified in Huntington disease (HD). Here we provide in vivo evidence in HD patients that cis-regulatory variants in the HTT promoter are bidirectional modifiers of HD age of onset. HTT promoter analysis identified a NF-κB binding site that regulates HTT promoter transcriptional activity. A non-coding SNP, rs13102260:G > A, in this binding site impaired NF-κB binding and reduced HTT transcriptional activity and HTT protein expression. The presence of the rs13102260 minor (A) variant on the HD disease allele was associated with delayed age of onset in familial cases, whereas the presence of the rs13102260 (A) variant on the wild-type HTT allele was associated with earlier age of onset in HD patients in an extreme case-based cohort. Our findings suggest a previously unknown mechanism linking allele-specific effects of rs13102260 on HTT expression to HD age of onset and have implications for HTT silencing treatments that are currently in development.

  13. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...

  14. In silico investigation into the interactions between murine 5-HT3 receptor and the principle active compounds of ginger (Zingiber officinale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohning, Anna E; Marx, Wolfgang; Isenring, Liz

    2016-11-01

    Gingerols and shogaols are the primary non-volatile actives within ginger (Zingiber officinale). These compounds have demonstrated in vitro to exert 5-HT 3 receptor antagonism which could benefit chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). The site and mechanism of action by which these compounds interact with the 5-HT 3 receptor is not fully understood although research indicates they may bind to a currently unidentified allosteric binding site. Using in silico techniques, such as molecular docking and GRID analysis, we have characterized the recently available murine 5-HT 3 receptor by identifying sites of strong interaction with particular functional groups at both the orthogonal (serotonin) site and a proposed allosteric binding site situated at the interface between the transmembrane region and the extracellular domain. These were assessed concurrently with the top-scoring poses of the docked ligands and included key active gingerols, shogaols and dehydroshogaols as well as competitive antagonists (e.g. setron class of pharmacologically active drugs), serotonin and its structural analogues, curcumin and capsaicin, non-competitive antagonists and decoys. Unexpectedly, we found that the ginger compounds and their structural analogs generally outscored other ligands at both sites. Our results correlated well with previous site-directed mutagenesis studies in identifying key binding site residues. We have identified new residues important for binding the ginger compounds. Overall, the results suggest that the ginger compounds and their structural analogues possess a high binding affinity to both sites. Notwithstanding the limitations of such theoretical analyses, these results suggest that the ginger compounds could act both competitively or non-competitively as has been shown for palonosetron and other modulators of CYS loop receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The murine Cd48 gene: allelic polymorphism in the IgV-like region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrero, J G; Freeman, G J; Reiser, H

    1998-12-01

    The murine CD48 molecule is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily which regulates the activation of T lymphocytes. prior cloning experiments using mRNA from two different mouse strains had yielded discrepant sequences within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48. To resolve this issue, we have directly sequenced genomic DNA of 10 laboratory strains and two inbred strains of wild origin. The results of our analysis reveal an allelic polymorphism within the IgV-like domain of murine CD48.

  16. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in murine epididymis: secretion of splice variants in the luminal fluid and a role in sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ramkrishna; Al-Dossary, Amal A; Stabley, Deborah L; Barone, Carol; Galileo, Deni S; Strehler, Emanuel E; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2013-07-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 4 (PMCA4) is the primary Ca(2+) efflux pump in murine sperm, where it regulates motility. In Pmca4 null sperm, motility loss results in infertility. We have shown that murine sperm PMCA4b interacts with Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent serine kinase (CASK) in regulating Ca(2+) homeostasis and motility. However, recent work indicated that the bovine PMCA4a splice variant (missing in testis) is epididymally expressed, along with 4b, and may be transferred to sperm. Here we show, via conventional and in situ RT-PCR, that both the splice variants of Pmca4 mRNA are expressed in murine testis and throughout the epididymis. Immunofluorescence localized PMCA4a to the apical membrane of the epididymal epithelium, and Western analysis not only confirmed its presence but showed for the first time that PMCA4a and PMCA4b are secreted in the epididymal luminal fluid (ELF), from which epididymosomes containing PMCA4a were isolated. Flow cytometry indicated the presence of PMCA4a on mature caudal sperm where it was increased ~5-fold compared to caput sperm (detected by Western blotting) and ~2-fold after incubation in ELF, revealing in vitro uptake and implicating PMCA4a in epididymal sperm maturation. Coimmunoprecipitation using pan-PMCA4 antibodies, revealed that both variants associate with CASK, suggesting their presence in a complex. Because they have different kinetic properties for Ca(2+) transport and different abilities to bind to CASK, our study suggests a mechanism for combining the functional attributes of both PMCA4 variants, leading to heightened efficiency of the pump in the maintenance of Ca(2+) homeostasis, which is crucial for normal motility and male fertility.

  17. Characterization of a 105-kDa plasma membrane associated glycoprotein that is involved in West Nile virus binding and infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, J.J.H.; Ng, M.L.

    2003-01-01

    This study attempts to isolate and characterize West Nile virus-binding molecules on the plasma membrane of Vero and murine neuroblastoma cells that is responsible for virus entry. Pretreatment of Vero cells with proteases, glycosidases (endoglycosidase H, α-mannosidase), and sodium periodate strongly inhibited West Nile virus infection, whereas treatments with phospholipases and heparinases had no effect. The virus overlay protein blot detected a 105-kDa molecule on the plasma membrane extract of Vero and murine neuroblastoma cells that bind to WN virus. Treatment of the 105-kDa molecules with β-mercaptoethanol resulted in the virus binding to a series of lower molecular weight bands ranging from 30 to 40 kDa. The disruption of disulfide-linked subunits did not affect virus binding. N-linked sugars with mannose residues on the 105-kDa membrane proteins were found to be important in virus binding. Specific antibodies against the 105-kDa glycoprotein were highly effective in blocking virus entry. These results strongly supported the possibility that the 105-kDa protease-sensitive glycoprotein with complex N-linked sugars could be the putative receptor for WN virus

  18. Preparation of Murine Submandibular Salivary Gland for Upright Intravital Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ficht, Xenia; Thelen, Flavian; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V

    2018-05-07

    The submandibular salivary gland (SMG) is one of the three major salivary glands, and is of interest for many different fields of biological research, including cell biology, oncology, dentistry, and immunology. The SMG is an exocrine gland comprised of secretory epithelial cells, myofibroblasts, endothelial cells, nerves, and extracellular matrix. Dynamic cellular processes in the rat and mouse SMG have previously been imaged, mostly using inverted multi-photon microscope systems. Here, we describe a straightforward protocol for the surgical preparation and stabilization of the murine SMG in anesthetized mice for in vivo imaging with upright multi-photon microscope systems. We present representative intravital image sets of endogenous and adoptively transferred fluorescent cells, including the labeling of blood vessels or salivary ducts and second harmonic generation to visualize fibrillar collagen. In sum, our protocol allows for surgical preparation of mouse salivary glands in upright microscopy systems, which are commonly used for intravital imaging in the field of immunology.

  19. Corn silk induces nitric oxide synthase in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung A; Choi, Sang Kyu; Choi, Hye Seon

    2004-12-31

    Corn silk has been purified as an anticoagulant previously and the active component is a polysaccharide with a molecular mass of 135 kDa. It activates murine macrophages to induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and generate substantial amounts of NO in time and dose-dependent manners. It was detectable first at 15 h after stimulation by corn silk, peaked at 24 h, and undetectable by 48 h. Induction of NOS is inhibited by pyrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) and genistein, an inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and tyrosine kinase, respectively, indicating that iNOS stimulated by corn silk is associated with tyrosine kinase and NF-kappaB signaling pathways. IkappaB-alpha degradation was detectible at 10 min, and the level was restored at 120 min after treatment of corn silk. Corn silk induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB by phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB-alpha.

  20. Flow cytometric quantification of radiation responses of murine peritoneal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokita, N.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods have been developed to distinguish subpopulations of murine peritoneal cells, and these were applied to the measurement of early changes in peritoneal cells after irradiation. The ratio of the two major subpopulations in the peritoneal fluid, lymphocytes and macrophages, was measured rapidly by means of cell volume distribution analysis as well as by hypotonic propidium iodide (PI) staining. After irradiation, dose and time dependent changes were noted in the cell volume distributions: a rapid loss of peritoneal lymphocytes, and an increase in the mean cell volume of macrophages. The hypotonic PI staining characteristics of the peritoneal cells showed two or three distinctive G 1 peaks. The ratio of the areas of these peaks was also found to be dependent of the radiation dose and the time after irradiation. These results demonstrate that these two parameters may be used to monitor changes induced by irradiation (biological dosimetry), and to sort different peritoneal subpopulations

  1. A novel inexpensive murine model of oral chronic digitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helber, Izo; Kanashiro, Rosemeire M; Alarcon, Ernesto A; Antonio, Ednei L; Tucci, Paulo J F

    2004-01-01

    A novel inexpensive murine model of oral administration of digitoxin (100 micro g/kg per day) added to routine chow is described. Serum digitoxin levels achieved after oral (n = 5; 116 +/- 14 ng/mL) and subcutaneous (n = 5; 124 +/- 11 ng/mL) administration were similar. A significant increase in the maximal left ventricular pressure rise of treated (n = 9) compared with control (n = 6) rats (dP/dt: 8956 +/- 233 vs 7980 +/- 234 mmHg/s, respectively; P = 0.01) characterized the positive inotropic action of digitoxin. In addition, no differences were observed in treated compared with control rats with regard to the electrocardiogram and systolic and diastolic left ventricular pressures.

  2. The kin17 Protein in Murine Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelise C. Ramos

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available kin17 has been described as a protein involved in the processes of DNA replication initiation, DNA recombination, and DNA repair. kin17 has been studied as a potential molecular marker of breast cancer. This work reports the detection and localization of this protein in the murine melanoma cell line B16F10-Nex2 and in two derived subclones with different metastatic potential, B16-8HR and B16-10CR. Nuclear and chromatin-associated protein fractions were analyzed, and kin17 was detected in all fractions, with an elevated concentration observed in the chromatin-associated fraction of the clone with low metastatic potential, suggesting that the kin17 expression level could be a marker of melanoma.

  3. Haemopedia: An Expression Atlas of Murine Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. de Graaf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoiesis is a multistage process involving the differentiation of stem and progenitor cells into distinct mature cell lineages. Here we present Haemopedia, an atlas of murine gene-expression data containing 54 hematopoietic cell types, covering all the mature lineages in hematopoiesis. We include rare cell populations such as eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and megakaryocytes, and a broad collection of progenitor and stem cells. We show that lineage branching and maturation during hematopoiesis can be reconstructed using the expression patterns of small sets of genes. We also have identified genes with enriched expression in each of the mature blood cell lineages, many of which show conserved lineage-enriched expression in human hematopoiesis. We have created an online web portal called Haemosphere to make analyses of Haemopedia and other blood cell transcriptional datasets easier. This resource provides simple tools to interrogate gene-expression-based relationships between hematopoietic cell types and genes of interest.

  4. Macropinocytosis is the Entry Mechanism of Amphotropic Murine Leukemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Izabela; Vilhardt, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    of infection. Understanding how pathogens and toxins exploit or divert endocytosis pathways has advanced our understanding of membrane trafficking pathways, which benefits development of new therapeutical schemes and methods of drug delivery. We show here that Murine Leukemia Virus (A-MLV) pseudotyped......, or NIH-3T3 cells knocked-down for caveolin expression, was unaffected. Conversely, A-MLV infection of NIH-3T3 and HeLa cells was sensitive to amiloride analogues and actin-depolymerizing drugs that interfere with macropinocytosis. Further manipulation of the actin cytoskeleton through conditional...... with the amphotropic (expands the host range to many mammalian cells) envelope protein gains entry into host cells by macropinocytosis. Macropinosomes form as large, fluid-filled vacuoles (up to 10 μm) following collapse of cell surface protrusions and membrane scission. We use drugs or introduction of mutant proteins...

  5. Effects of trichostatins on differentiation of murine erythroleukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Nomura, S.; Beppu, T.

    1987-01-01

    The fungistatic antibiotics trichostatins (TS) A and C were isolated from culture broth of Streptomyces platensis No. 145 and were found to be potent inducers of differentiation in murine erythroleukemia (Friend and RV133) cells at concentrations of 1.5 X 10(-8) M for TSA and 5 X 10(-7) M for TSC. Differentiation induced by TS was cooperatively enhanced by UV irradiation but not by treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide. This enhanced activity was completely inhibited by adding cycloheximide to the culture medium 2 h after exposure to TS, suggesting that TS are dimethyl sulfoxide-type inducers of erythroid differentiation. No inhibitory effect of TS was observed on macromolecular synthesis in cultured cells

  6. First transplantation of isolated murine follicles in alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Julie; Dolmans, Marie-Madeleine; Luyckx, Valérie; Donnez, Jacques; Amorim, Christiani A

    2014-01-01

    Our aim is to develop an artificial ovary allowing survival and growth of isolated follicles and ovarian cells, to restore fertility in women diagnosed with pathologies at high risk of ovarian involvement. For this, alginate beads containing isolated preantral follicles and ovarian cells were autografted to immunocompetent mice. One week after grafting, the beads were invaded by proliferating murine cells (12.1%) and capillaries. The recovery rate of follicles per graft ranged from 0% to 35.5%. Of the analyzed follicles, 77% were Ki67-positive and 81%, TUNEL-negative. Three antral follicles were also identified, evidencing their ability to grow in the matrix. Our results suggest that an artificial ovary is now conceivable, opening new perspectives to restore fertility in women.

  7. Murine model of long-term obstructive jaundice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Yang, Jing; Katsuta, Eriko; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Woelfel, Ingrid A; Wang, Xuan; Spiegel, Sarah; Zhou, Huiping; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-11-01

    With the recent emergence of conjugated bile acids as signaling molecules in cancer, a murine model of obstructive jaundice by cholestasis with long-term survival is in need. Here, we investigated the characteristics of three murine models of obstructive jaundice. C57BL/6J mice were used for total ligation of the common bile duct (tCL), partial common bile duct ligation (pCL), and ligation of left and median hepatic bile duct with gallbladder removal (LMHL) models. Survival was assessed by Kaplan-Meier method. Fibrotic change was determined by Masson-Trichrome staining and Collagen expression. Overall, 70% (7 of 10) of tCL mice died by day 7, whereas majority 67% (10 of 15) of pCL mice survived with loss of jaundice. A total of 19% (3 of 16) of LMHL mice died; however, jaundice continued beyond day 14, with survival of more than a month. Compensatory enlargement of the right lobe was observed in both pCL and LMHL models. The pCL model demonstrated acute inflammation due to obstructive jaundice 3 d after ligation but jaundice rapidly decreased by day 7. The LHML group developed portal hypertension and severe fibrosis by day 14 in addition to prolonged jaundice. The standard tCL model is too unstable with high mortality for long-term studies. pCL may be an appropriate model for acute inflammation with obstructive jaundice, but long-term survivors are no longer jaundiced. The LHML model was identified to be the most feasible model to study the effect of long-term obstructive jaundice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene expression in IFN-g-activated murine macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critical for natural immunity and play a central role in specific acquired immunity. The IFN-gamma activation of macrophages derived from A/J or BALB/c mice yielded two different patterns of antiviral state in murine hepatitis virus 3 infection, which were related to a down-regulation of the main virus receptor. Using cDNA hybridization to evaluate mRNA accumulation in the cells, we were able to identify several genes that are differently up- or down-regulated by IFN-gamma in A/J (267 and 266 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated or BALB/c (297 and 58 genes, respectively, up- and down-regulated mouse macrophages. Macrophages from mice with different genetic backgrounds behave differently at the molecular level and comparison of the patterns of non-activated and IFN-gamma-activated A/J or BALB/c mouse macrophages revealed, for instance, an up-regulation and a down-regulation of genes coding for biological functions such as enzymatic reactions, nucleic acid synthesis and transport, protein synthesis, transport and metabolism, cytoskeleton arrangement and extracellular matrix, phagocytosis, resistance and susceptibility to infection and tumors, inflammation, and cell differentiation or activation. The present data are reported in order to facilitate future correlation of proteomic/transcriptomic findings as well as of results obtained from a classical approach for the understanding of biological phenomena. The possible implication of the role of some of the gene products relevant to macrophage biology can now be further scrutinized. In this respect, a down-regulation of the main murine hepatitis virus 3 receptor gene was detected only in IFN-gamma-activated macrophages of resistant mice.

  9. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, D.A.; Taylor, D.P.; Enna, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [ 3 ]tetrahydrotrazodone ([ 3 ] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [ 3 ]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [ 3 ] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [ 3 ]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  10. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  11. Murine T cell activation is regulated by surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warford, Jordan, E-mail: jordan.warford@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Doucette, Carolyn D., E-mail: carolyn.doucette@dal.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Hoskin, David W., E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Easton, Alexander S., E-mail: alexander.easton@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Surfen is the first inhibitor of glycosaminoglycan function to be studied in murine T cells. •Surfen reduces T cell proliferation stimulated in vitro and in vivo. •Surfen reduces CD25 expression in T cells activated in vivo but not in vitro. •Surfen increases T cell proliferation when T cell receptor activation is bypassed. •Surfen’s effects are blocked by co-administration of heparin sulfate. -- Abstract: Surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide) binds to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and has been shown to influence their function, and the function of proteoglycans (complexes of GAGs linked to a core protein). T cells synthesize, secrete and express GAGs and proteoglycans which are involved in several aspects of T cell function. However, there are as yet no studies on the effect of GAG-binding agents such as surfen on T cell function. In this study, surfen was found to influence murine T cell activation. Doses between 2.5 and 20 μM produced a graduated reduction in the proliferation of T cells activated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibody-coated T cell expander beads. Surfen (20 mg/kg) was also administered to mice treated with anti-CD3 antibody to activate T cells in vivo. Lymphocytes from surfen-treated mice also showed reduced proliferation and lymph node cell counts were reduced. Surfen reduced labeling with a cell viability marker (7-ADD) but to a much lower extent than its effect on proliferation. Surfen also reduced CD25 (the α-subunit of the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor) expression with no effect on CD69 expression in T cells treated in vivo but not in vitro. When receptor activation was bypassed by treating T cells in vitro with phorbyl myristate acetate (10 ng/ml) and ionomycin (100 ng/ml), surfen treatment either increased proliferation (10 μM) or had no effect (2.5, 5 and 20 μM). In vitro treatment of T cells with surfen had no effect on IL-2 or interferon-γ synthesis and did not alter proliferation of the IL-2 dependent cell

  12. Genetic deletion of the bacterial sensor NOD2 improves murine Crohn’s disease-like ileitis independent of functional dysbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corridoni, D.; Rodriguez-Palacios, A.; Di Stefano, G.; Di Martino, L.; Antonopoulos, D. A.; Chang, E. B.; Arseneau, K. O.; Pizarro, T. T.; Cominelli, F.

    2016-11-16

    Although genetic polymorphisms in NOD2 (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2) have been associated with the pathogenesis of Crohn’s disease (CD), little is known regarding the role of wild-type (WT) NOD2 in the gut. To date, most murine studies addressing the role of WT Nod2 have been conducted using healthy (ileitis/colitis-free) mouse strains. Here, we evaluated the effects of Nod2 deletion in a murine model of spontaneous ileitis, i.e., the SAMP1Yit/Fc (SAMP) strain, which closely resembles CD. Remarkably, Nod2 deletion improved both chronic cobblestone ileitis (by 50% assessed, as the % of abnormal mucosa at 24 wks of age), as well as acute dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis. Mechanistically, Th2 cytokine production and Th2-transcription factor activation (i.e., STAT6 phosphorylation) were reduced. Microbiologically, the effects of Nod2 deletion appeared independent of fecal microbiota composition and function, assessed by 16S rRNA and metatranscriptomics. Our findings indicate that pharmacological blockade of NOD2 signaling in humans could improve health in Th2-driven chronic intestinal inflammation.

  13. Superresolution microscopy with transient binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Julia; Raab, Mario; Holzmeister, Susanne; Schmitt-Monreal, Daniel; Grohmann, Dina; He, Zhike; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2016-06-01

    For single-molecule localization based superresolution, the concentration of fluorescent labels has to be thinned out. This is commonly achieved by photophysically or photochemically deactivating subsets of molecules. Alternatively, apparent switching of molecules can be achieved by transient binding of fluorescent labels. Here, a diffusing dye yields bright fluorescent spots when binding to the structure of interest. As the binding interaction is weak, the labeling is reversible and the dye ligand construct diffuses back into solution. This approach of achieving superresolution by transient binding (STB) is reviewed in this manuscript. Different realizations of STB are discussed and compared to other localization-based superresolution modalities. We propose the development of labeling strategies that will make STB a highly versatile tool for superresolution microscopy at highest resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Chimeric anti-tenascin antibody 81C6: Increased tumor localization compared with its murine parent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, Michael R.; Archer, Gary E.; Garg, Pradeep K.; Batra, Surinder K.; Bigner, Darell D.

    1996-01-01

    When labeled using the Iodogen method, a chimeric antibody composed of the human IgG 2 constant region and the variable regions of murine anti-tenascin 81C6 exhibited superior uptake in human glioma xenografts compared with its murine parent. In the current study, three paired-label experiments were performed in athymic mice with subcutaneous D-54 MG human glioma xenografts to evaluate further the properties of radioiodinated chimeric 81C6. These studies demonstrated that (a) the enhanced tumor uptake of chimeric 81C6 is specific; (b) when labeling was performed using N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate, chimeric 81C6 again showed preferential accumulation in tumor compared with murine 81C6; and (c) the tumor uptake advantage observed previously with murine 81C6 for N-succinimidyl 3-iodobenzoate compared with Iodogen labeling did not occur with chimeric 81C6

  15. Responses of the Murine Myeloid Colony-Forming Cell to Ansamycin Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horoszewicz, Julius S.; Carter, William A.

    1974-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of murine myeloid colony-forming cells to the antiproliferative activities of three ansamycin antibiotics was determined. These cells were found to be 10- to 40-fold more susceptible than the corresponding human ones. PMID:4151701

  16. Diagnosing hypoxia in murine models of rheumatoid arthritis from reflectance multispectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinton, Sophie; Naylor, Amy J.; Claridge, Ela

    2017-07-01

    Spectra computed from multispectral images of murine models of Rheumatoid Arthritis show a characteristic decrease in reflectance within the 600-800nm region which is indicative of the reduction in blood oxygenation and is consistent with hypoxia.

  17. Acute Febrile Illness and Complications Due to Murine Typhus, Texas, USA1,2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Zeeshan; Kallumadanda, Sunand; Wang, Feng; Hemmige, Vagish; Musher, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    Murine typhus occurs relatively commonly in southern Texas, as well as in California. We reviewed records of 90 adults and children in whom murine typhus was diagnosed during a 3-year period in 2 hospitals in southern Texas, USA. Most patients lacked notable comorbidities; all were immunocompetent. Initial signs and symptoms included fever (99%), malaise (82%), headache (77%), fatigue (70%), myalgias (68%), and rash (39%). Complications, often severe, in 28% of patients included bronchiolitis, pneumonia, meningitis, septic shock, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, myositis, and rhabdomyolysis; the last 3 are previously unreported in murine typhus. Low serum albumin and elevated procalcitonin, consistent with bacterial sepsis, were observed in >70% of cases. Rash was more common in children; thrombocytopenia, hyponatremia, elevated hepatic transaminases, and complications were more frequent in adults. Murine typhus should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in cases of acute febrile illness in southern and even in more northern US states.

  18. A fluorescence model of the murine lung for optical detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Madeleine S.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2017-07-01

    We present a computer model of intravital excitation and external fluorescence detection in the murine lungs validated with a three-dimensional lung tissue phantom. The model is applied to optical detection of pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  19. Radiobiological studies on target cell populations in murine bone marrow transplantation recipients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, Ronald Peter

    1994-01-01

    The experiments presented in this thesis were designed to investigate the role of total body irradiation (TBI) in conditioning murine recipients of syngeneic and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). ... Zie: Summary

  20. Filtration assay for quantitation of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) specific binding to whole cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dold, K.M.; Greenlee, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive filtration assay for quantitating the specific binding of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to whole cells in culture is described. Cell monolayers are incubated with [3H]TCDD in the presence or absence of excess unlabeled ligand, detached from the culture dish with trypsin, filtered, and washed with cold (-78 degrees C) acetone to separate free and nonspecifically bound TCDD from specifically bound TCDD. TCDD receptor binding parameters were characterized in the murine hepatoma cell line Hepa1c1c7. The lower limit of detection of TCDD specific binding was in a sample equivalent to 10 micrograms of total cell protein. The equilibrium dissociation constant and stereospecificity for binding to the TCDD receptor were the same as those previously reported with other TCDD receptor assays on broken cell preparations. Analysis of binding in the murine hepatoma TCDD receptor variants TAO-c1BPrc1 and BPrc1 indicated that this assay will detect receptor number or affinity variants, but will not detect nuclear transfer deficient variants. The major advantage of the whole cell binding assay is that it provides the means to rapidly and reproducibly quantitate TCDD specific binding in small samples of whole cells in culture. In addition, this method eliminates loss or degradation of the receptor protein during the fractionation of cells required in previously reported methods. This method should prove useful in screening clonal cell populations for TCDD receptor number and affinity variants, and in screening for TCDD receptor binding activity in complementation studies of receptor deficient cells

  1. Sequence-specific interaction between the disintegrin domain of mouse ADAM 3 and murine eggs: role of beta1 integrin-associated proteins CD9, CD81, and CD98.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Bigler, D; Ito, Y; White, J M

    2001-04-01

    ADAM 3 is a sperm surface glycoprotein that has been implicated in sperm-egg adhesion. Because little is known about the adhesive activity of ADAMs, we investigated the interaction of ADAM 3 disintegrin domains, made in bacteria and in insect cells, with murine eggs. Both recombinant proteins inhibited sperm-egg binding and fusion with potencies similar to that which we recently reported for the ADAM 2 disintegrin domain. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed a critical importance for the glutamine at position 7 of the disintegrin loop. Fluorescent beads coated with the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain bound to the egg surface. Bead binding was inhibited by an authentic, but not by a scrambled, peptide analog of the disintegrin loop. Bead binding was also inhibited by the function-blocking anti-alpha6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) GoH3, but not by a nonfunction blocking anti-alpha6 mAb, or by mAbs against either the alphav or beta3 integrin subunits. We also present evidence that in addition to the tetraspanin CD9, two other beta1-integrin-associated proteins, the tetraspanin CD81 as well as the single pass transmembrane protein CD98 are expressed on murine eggs. Antibodies to CD9 and CD98 inhibited in vitro fertilization and binding of the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain. Our findings are discussed in terms of the involvement of multiple sperm ADAMs and multiple egg beta1 integrin-associated proteins in sperm-egg binding and fusion. We propose that an egg surface "tetraspan web" facilitates fertilization and that it may do so by fostering ADAM-integrin interactions.

  2. Sequence-Specific Interaction between the Disintegrin Domain of Mouse ADAM 3 and Murine Eggs: Role of β1 Integrin-associated Proteins CD9, CD81, and CD98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yuji; Bigler, Dora; Ito, Yasuhiko; White, Judith M.

    2001-01-01

    ADAM 3 is a sperm surface glycoprotein that has been implicated in sperm-egg adhesion. Because little is known about the adhesive activity of ADAMs, we investigated the interaction of ADAM 3 disintegrin domains, made in bacteria and in insect cells, with murine eggs. Both recombinant proteins inhibited sperm-egg binding and fusion with potencies similar to that which we recently reported for the ADAM 2 disintegrin domain. Alanine scanning mutagenesis revealed a critical importance for the glutamine at position 7 of the disintegrin loop. Fluorescent beads coated with the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain bound to the egg surface. Bead binding was inhibited by an authentic, but not by a scrambled, peptide analog of the disintegrin loop. Bead binding was also inhibited by the function-blocking anti-α6 monoclonal antibody (mAb) GoH3, but not by a nonfunction blocking anti-α6 mAb, or by mAbs against either the αv or β3 integrin subunits. We also present evidence that in addition to the tetraspanin CD9, two other β1-integrin-associated proteins, the tetraspanin CD81 as well as the single pass transmembrane protein CD98 are expressed on murine eggs. Antibodies to CD9 and CD98 inhibited in vitro fertilization and binding of the ADAM 3 disintegrin domain. Our findings are discussed in terms of the involvement of multiple sperm ADAMs and multiple egg β1 integrin-associated proteins in sperm-egg binding and fusion. We propose that an egg surface “tetraspan web” facilitates fertilization and that it may do so by fostering ADAM–integrin interactions. PMID:11294888

  3. Acute lethal toxicity following passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Savoy, A C; Lupan, D M; Manalo, P B; Roberts, J S; Schlageter, A M; Weinhold, L C; Kozel, T R

    1997-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the major capsular polysaccharide of Cryptococcus neoformans alters the course of murine cryptococcosis. During studies of passive immunization for treatment of murine cryptococcosis, we noted the occurrence of an acute, lethal toxicity. Toxicity was characterized by scratching, lethargy, respiratory distress, collapse, and death within 20 to 60 min after injection of antibody. The toxic effect was observed only in mice with ...

  4. Tumor necrosis factor: specific binding and internalization in sensitive and resistant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, M.; Yip, Y.K.; Vilcek, J.

    1985-01-01

    Highly purified, Escherichia coli-derived recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) was labeled with 125 I and employed to determine receptor binding, internalization, and intracellular degradation in murine L929 cells (highly sensitive to the cytotoxic action of TNF) and in diploid human FS-4 cells (resistant to TNF cytotoxicity). 125 I-labeled TNF bound specifically to high-affinity receptors on both L929 and FS-4 cells. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated the presence of 2200 binding sites per L929 cell and 7500 binding sites per FS-4 cell. The calculated dissociation constants are 6.1 x 10 -10 M and 3.2 x 10 -10 M for L929 and FS-4 cells, respectively. In both L929 and FS-4 cells, incubation at 37 0 C resulted in a rapid internalization of the bulk of the cell-bound TNF, followed by the appearance of trichloroacetic acid-soluble 125 I radioactivity in the tissue culture medium, due to degradation of TNF. Degradation but not cellular uptake of TNF was inhibited in the presence of chloroquine (an inhibitor of lysosomal proteases) in both L929 and FS-4 cells, suggesting that degradation occurs intracellularly, probably within lysosomes. These results show that resistance of FS-4 cells to TNF cytotoxicity is not due to a lack of receptors or their inability to internalize and degrade TNF

  5. Chondroitin sulfate addition to CD44H negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffell, Brian; Johnson, Pauline

    2005-01-01

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell adhesion molecule that binds hyaluronan, an extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan, in a tightly regulated manner. This regulated interaction has been implicated in inflammation and tumor metastasis. CD44 exists in the standard form, CD44H, or as higher molecular mass isoforms due to alternative splicing. Here, we identify serine 180 in human CD44H as the site of chondroitin sulfate addition and show that lack of chondroitin sulfate addition at this site enhances hyaluronan binding by CD44. A CD44H-immunoglobulin fusion protein expressed in HEK293 cells, and CD44H expressed in murine L fibroblast cells were modified by chondroitin sulfate, as determined by reduced sulfate incorporation after chondroitinase ABC treatment. Mutation of serine 180 or glycine 181 in CD44H reduced chondroitin sulfate addition and increased hyaluronan binding, indicating that serine 180 is the site for chondroitin sulfate addition in CD44H and that this negatively regulates hyaluronan binding

  6. Behavior of a cloned murine interferon alpha/beta receptor expressed in homospecific or heterospecific background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzé, G; Lutfalla, G; Bandu, M T; Proudhon, D; Mogensen, K E

    1992-05-15

    A murine interferon (IFN) alpha/beta receptor was cloned from the IFN-sensitive L1210 cell line on the basis of its homology with the human receptor. A combination of methods that includes the screening of random-primed and oligo(dT)-primed cDNA libraries and polymerase chain reactions with a single-side specificity was used. At the amino acid level, the murine IFN-alpha/beta shows 46% identity with its human counterpart. Both human WISH cells presenting a low sensitivity to mouse IFN and a murine L1210 mutant subline that does not express the receptor have been stably transfected with the murine IFN-alpha/beta receptor. Whereas transfected human cells became sensitive to a limited number of mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes, the transfected murine L1210 mutant was found to be fully complemented and became sensitive to all mouse IFN-alpha/beta subtypes tested, including those that were not active on transfected human cells. These results strongly suggest that the receptor described here is implicated in the mediation of the activities of all murine IFN-alpha/beta subtypes.

  7. Analysis of the diversity of murine antibodies to dextran B1355. II. Demonstration of multiple idiotypes with variable expression in several strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansburg, D.; Briles, D.E.; Davie, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    We have developed radioimmunoassays that detect idiotypic (variable region) differences among the α(1 → 3) dextran-binding myeloma proteins U102, J558, and M104 as well as an assay that detects variable region determinants common to all three proteins. Using these assays, we have examined 7S and 19S anti-α(1 → 3) dextran antibodies induced in five murine strains of the a 1 I/sub g/C/sub H/ linkage group and the recombinant strain BAB/14. All idiotypes were expressed in both 19S and 7S antibodies from all strains, but with considerable strain-specific variability in penetrance. In two strains, one additional type of antibody, which lacked all four idiotypic determinants, generally constituted the bulk of total anti-α(1 → 3) dextran antibodies

  8. Transcriptional autorepression of Msx1 gene is mediated by interactions of Msx1 protein with a multi-protein transcriptional complex containing TATA-binding protein, Sp1 and cAMP-response-element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP/p300).

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, S; Takahashi, T; Matsui, H; Ayengar, R; Raghow, R

    1999-01-01

    The TATA-less murine Msx1 promoter contains two Msx1-binding motifs, located at -568 to -573 and +25 to +30, and is subject to potent autorepression [Takahashi, Guron, Shetty, Matsui and Raghow (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 22667-22678]. To investigate the molecular mechanism by which Msx1 represses the activity of its own promoter, we transfected C2C12 myoblasts with Msx1-promoter-luciferase constructs and assessed reporter gene activity, with and without the exogenous expression of Msx1. We de...

  9. The conserved His8 of the Moloney murine leukemia virus Env SU subunit directs the activity of the SU-TM disulphide bond isomerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Ekstroem, Maria; Wallin, Michael; Garoff, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) fusion is controlled by isomerization of the disulphide bond between the receptor-binding surface (SU) and fusion-active transmembrane subunits of the Env-complex. The bond is in SU linked to a CXXC motif. This carries a free thiol that upon receptor binding can be activated (ionized) to attack the disulphide and rearrange it into a disulphide isomer within the motif. To find out whether His8 in the conserved SPHQ sequence of Env directs thiol activation, we analyzed its ionization in MLV vectors with wtEnv and Env with His8 deleted or substituted for Tyr or Arg, which partially or completely arrests fusion. The ionization was monitored by following the pH effect on isomerization in vitro by Ca 2+ depletion or in vivo by receptor binding. We found that wtEnv isomerized optimally at slightly basic pH whereas the partially active mutant required higher and the inactive mutants still higher pH. This suggests that His8 directs the ionization of the CXXC thiol

  10. Porcine, murine and human sialoadhesin (Sn/Siglec-1/CD169): portals for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus entry into target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Breedam, Wander; Verbeeck, Mieke; Christiaens, Isaura; Van Gorp, Hanne; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2013-09-01

    Porcine sialoadhesin (pSn; a sialic acid-binding lectin) and porcine CD163 (pCD163) are molecules that facilitate infectious entry of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) into alveolar macrophages. In this study, it was shown that murine Sn (mSn) and human Sn (hSn), like pSn, can promote PRRSV infection of pCD163-expressing cells. Intact sialic acid-binding domains are crucial, since non-sialic acid-binding mutants of pSn, mSn and hSn did not promote infection. Endodomain-deletion mutants of pSn, mSn and hSn promoted PRRSV infection less efficiently, but also showed markedly reduced expression levels, making further research into the potential role of the Sn endodomain in PRRSV receptor activity necessary. These data further complement our knowledge on Sn as an important PRRSV receptor, and suggest - in combination with other published data - that species differences in the main PRRSV entry mediators Sn and CD163 do not account for the strict host species specificity displayed by the virus.

  11. To bind or not to bind? Different temporal binding effects from voluntary pressing and releasing actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ke; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Wen-Jing; Fu, Xiaolan

    2013-01-01

    Binding effect refers to the perceptual attraction between an action and an outcome leading to a subjective compression of time. Most studies investigating binding effects exclusively employ the "pressing" action without exploring other types of actions. The present study addresses this issue by introducing another action, releasing action or the voluntary lifting of the finger/wrist, to investigate the differences between voluntary pressing and releasing actions. Results reveal that releasing actions led to robust yet short-lived temporal binding effects, whereas pressing condition had steady temporal binding effects up to super-seconds. The two actions also differ in sensitivity to changes in temporal contiguity and contingency, which could be attributed to the difference in awareness of action. Extending upon current models of "willed action," our results provide insights from a temporal point of view and support the concept of a dual system consisting of predictive motor control and top-down mechanisms.

  12. Effects of vitamin D(3)-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) on angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Shigeru; Mochizuki, Yasushi; Miyata, Yasuyoshi; Kanetake, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Nobuto

    2002-09-04

    The vitamin D(3)-binding protein (Gc protein)-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF) activates tumoricidal macrophages against a variety of cancers indiscriminately. We investigated whether GcMAF also acts as an antiangiogenic factor on endothelial cells. The effects of GcMAF on angiogenic growth factor-induced cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and tube formation were examined in vitro by using cultured endothelial cells (murine IBE cells, porcine PAE cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]) and in vivo by using a mouse cornea micropocket assay. Blocking monoclonal antibodies to CD36, a receptor for the antiangiogenic factor thrombospondin-1, which is also a possible receptor for GcMAF, were used to investigate the mechanism of GcMAF action. GcMAF inhibited the endothelial cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and tube formation that were all stimulated by fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), vascular endothelial growth factor-A, or angiopoietin 2. FGF-2-induced neovascularization in murine cornea was also inhibited by GcMAF. Monoclonal antibodies against murine and human CD36 receptor blocked the antiangiogenic action of GcMAF on the angiogenic factor stimulation of endothelial cell chemotaxis. In addition to its ability to activate tumoricidal macrophages, GcMAF has direct antiangiogenic effects on endothelial cells independent of tissue origin. The antiangiogenic effects of GcMAF may be mediated through the CD36 receptor.

  13. In vivo targeting of dead tumor cells in a murine tumor model using a monoclonal antibody specific for the La autoantigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ejeh, Fares; Darby, Jocelyn M; Pensa, Katherine; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Hayball, John D; Brown, Michael P

    2007-09-15

    To investigate the potential of the La-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 3B9 as an in vivo tumor-targeting agent. The murine EL4 lymphoma cell line was used for in vitro studies and the EL4 model in which apoptosis was induced with cyclophosphamide and etoposide was used for in vivo studies. In vitro studies compared 3B9 binding in the EL4 cell with that in its counterpart primary cell type of the thymocyte. For in vivo studies, 3B9 was intrinsically or extrinsically labeled with carbon-14 or 1,4,7,10-tetra-azacylododecane-N,N',N'',N''''-tetraacetic acid-indium-111, respectively, and biodistribution of the radiotracers was investigated in EL4 tumor-bearing mice, which were treated or not with chemotherapy. La-specific 3B9 mAb bound EL4 cells rather than thymocytes, and binding was detergent resistant. 3B9 binding to dead EL4 cells in vitro was specific, rapid, and saturable. Significantly, more 3B9 bound dead EL4 tumor explant cells after host mice were treated with chemotherapy, which suggested that DNA damage induced 3B9 binding. Tumor binding of 3B9 in vivo was antigen specific and increased significantly after chemotherapy. Tumor accumulation of 3B9 peaked at approximately 50% of the injected dose per gram of tumor 72 h after chemotherapy and correlated with increased tumor cell death. Tumor/organ ratios of 3B9 biodistribution, which included the tumor/blood ratio, exceeded unity 48 or more hours after chemotherapy. La-specific mAb selectively targeted dead tumor cells in vivo, and targeting was augmented by cytotoxic chemotherapy. This novel cell death radioligand may be useful both for radioimmunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy.

  14. A novel Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled arginine-arginine-leucine-containing peptide as a multimodal tumor imaging agent in a murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2018-06-15

    We developed a Tc-99m and TAMRA-labeled peptide, Tc-99m arginine-arginine-leucine (RRL) peptide (TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL), to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was synthesized using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with PC-3 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL determined by saturation binding was 41.7 ± 7.8 nM. Confocal microscopy images of PC-3 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of RRL. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In conclusion, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL in tumors. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-RRL has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled elastin-derived peptide, VAPG for multimodal tumor imaging in murine tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Chang Guhn; Kim, Seul-Gi; Kim, Dae-Weung

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Tc-99m and fluorescence-labeled peptide, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG to target tumor cells and evaluated the diagnostic performance as a dual-modality imaging agent for tumor in a murine model. TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was synthesized by using Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Radiolabeling of TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG with Tc-99m was done by using ligand exchange via tartrate. Binding affinity and in vitro cellular uptake studies were performed. Gamma camera imaging, biodistribution, and ex vivo imaging studies were performed in murine models with SW620 tumors. Tumor tissue slides were prepared and analyzed with immunohistochemistry by using confocal microscopy. After radiolabeling procedures with Tc-99m, Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG complexes were prepared in high yield (>96%). The K d of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG determined by saturation binding was 16.8 ± 3.6 nM. Confocal microscopy images of SW620 cells incubated with TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG showed strong fluorescence in the cytoplasm. Gamma camera imaging revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumors. Tumor uptake was effectively blocked by the coinjection of an excess concentration of VAPG. Specific uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG was confirmed by biodistribution, ex vivo imaging, and immunohistochemistry stain studies. In vivo and in vitro studies revealed substantial uptake of Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG in tumor cells. Tc-99m TAMRA-GHEG-ECG-VAPG has potential as a dual-modality tumor imaging agent. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Characterization of the methotrexate transport pathway in murine L1210 leukemia cells: Involvement of a membrane receptor and a cytosolic protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, E.M.; Ratnam, M.; Rodeman, K.M.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    A radioiodinated photoaffinity analogue of methotrexate, N α -(4-amino-4-deoxy-10-methyl-pteroyl)-N ε -(4-azidosalicylyl)-L-lysine (APA-ASA-Lys), was recently used to identify the plasma membrane derived binding protein involved in the transport of this folate antagonist into murine L1210 cells. The labeled protein has an apparent molecular weight of 46K-48K when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but no such labeling occurs in a methotrexate transport-defective cell line (L1210/R81). Labeling of the total cytosolic protein from disrupted cells, followed by electrophoresis and autoradiography, showed, among other proteins, a 21K band, corresponding to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), in both the parent and R81 cells and a 38K band only in the parent cells. However, when whole cells were UV irradiated at various times at 37 degree C following addition of radiolabeled APA-ASA-Lys, the 38K protein and DHFR were the only cytosolic proteins labeled in the parent cells, while the intact R81 cells showed no labeled cytosolic protein, since the photoprobe is not transported. Further, when the parent cells were treated with a pulse of radiolabeled photoprobe, followed by UV irradiation at different times at 37 degree C, the probe appeared sequentially on the 48K membrane protein and both the 38K cytosolic protein and dihydrofolate reductase. A 48K protein could be detected in both parent L1210 cells and the R81 cells on Western blots using antisera to a membrane folate binding protein from human placenta. These results suggest a vectorial transport of APA-ASA-Lys or methotrexate and reduced folate coenzymes into murine L1210 cells mediated by a 48K integral membrane protein and a 38K cytosolic or peripheral membrane protein. The 38K protein may help in the trafficking of reduced folate coenzymes, shuttling them to various cytosolic targets

  17. A role for smoothened during murine lens and cornea development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Y Choi

    Full Text Available Various studies suggest that Hedgehog (Hh signalling plays roles in human and zebrafish ocular development. Recent studies (Kerr et al., Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2012; 53, 3316-30 showed that conditionally activating Hh signals promotes murine lens epithelial cell proliferation and disrupts fibre differentiation. In this study we examined the expression of the Hh pathway and the requirement for the Smoothened gene in murine lens development. Expression of Hh pathway components in developing lens was examined by RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and in situ hybridisation. The requirement of Smo in lens development was determined by conditional loss-of-function mutations, using LeCre and MLR10 Cre transgenic mice. The phenotype of mutant mice was examined by immunofluorescence for various markers of cell cycle, lens and cornea differentiation. Hh pathway components (Ptch1, Smo, Gli2, Gli3 were detected in lens epithelium from E12.5. Gli2 was particularly localised to mitotic nuclei and, at E13.5, Gli3 exhibited a shift from cytosol to nucleus, suggesting distinct roles for these transcription factors. Conditional deletion of Smo, from ∼E12.5 (MLR10 Cre did not affect ocular development, whereas deletion from ∼E9.5 (LeCre resulted in lens and corneal defects from E14.5. Mutant lenses were smaller and showed normal expression of p57Kip2, c-Maf, E-cadherin and Pax6, reduced expression of FoxE3 and Ptch1 and decreased nuclear Hes1. There was normal G1-S phase but decreased G2-M phase transition at E16.5 and epithelial cell death from E14.5-E16.5. Mutant corneas were thicker due to aberrant migration of Nrp2+ cells from the extraocular mesenchyme, resulting in delayed corneal endothelial but normal epithelial differentiation. These results indicate the Hh pathway is required during a discrete period (E9.5-E12.5 in lens development to regulate lens epithelial cell proliferation, survival and FoxE3 expression. Defective corneal development occurs

  18. Handling stress may confound murine gut microbiota studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cary R. Allen-Blevins

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accumulating evidence indicates interactions between human milk composition, particularly sugars (human milk oligosaccharides or HMO, the gut microbiota of human infants, and behavioral effects. Some HMO secreted in human milk are unable to be endogenously digested by the human infant but are able to be metabolized by certain species of gut microbiota, including Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis, a species sensitive to host stress (Bailey & Coe, 2004. Exposure to gut bacteria like B. infantisduring critical neurodevelopment windows in early life appears to have behavioral consequences; however, environmental, physical, and social stress during this period can also have behavioral and microbial consequences. While rodent models are a useful method for determining causal relationships between HMO, gut microbiota, and behavior, murine studies of gut microbiota usually employ oral gavage, a technique stressful to the mouse. Our aim was to develop a less-invasive technique for HMO administration to remove the potential confound of gavage stress. Under the hypothesis that stress affects gut microbiota, particularly B. infantis, we predicted the pups receiving a prebiotic solution in a less-invasive manner would have the highest amount of Bifidobacteria in their gut. Methods This study was designed to test two methods, active and passive, of solution administration to mice and the effects on their gut microbiome. Neonatal C57BL/6J mice housed in a specific-pathogen free facility received increasing doses of fructooligosaccharide (FOS solution or deionized, distilled water. Gastrointestinal (GI tracts were collected from five dams, six sires, and 41 pups over four time points. Seven fecal pellets from unhandled pups and two pellets from unhandled dams were also collected. Qualitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR was used to quantify and compare the amount of Bifidobacterium, Bacteroides, Bacteroidetes, and

  19. Assessment of carbon nanoparticle exposure on murine macrophage function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suro-Maldonado, Raquel M.

    There is growing concern about the potential cytotoxicity of nanoparticles. Exposure to respirable ultrafine particles (2.5uM) can adversely affect human health and have been implicated with episodes of increased respiratory diseases such as asthma and allergies. Nanoparticles are of particular interest because of their ability to penetrate into the lung and potentially elicit health effects triggering immune responses. Nanoparticles are structures and devises with length scales in the 1 to 100-nanometer range. Black carbon (BC) nanoparticles have been observed to be products of combustion, especially flame combustion and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to be found in both indoor and outdoor air. Furthermore, asbestos, which have been known to cause mesothelioma as well as lung cancer, have been shown to be structurally identical to MWCNTs. The aims of these studies were to examine the effects of carbon nanoparticles on murine macrophage function and clearance mechanisms. Macrophages are immune cells that function as the first line of defense against invading pathogens and are likely to be amongst the first cells affected by nanoparticles. Our research focused on two manufactured nanoparticles, MWCNT and BC. The two were tested against murine-derived macrophages in a chronic contact model. We hypothesized that long-term chronic exposure to carbon nanoparticles would decrease macrophages ability to effectively respond to immunological challenge. Production of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), cell surface macrophage; activation markers, reactive oxygen species formation (ROS), and antigen processing and presentation were examined in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) following a 144hr exposure to the particulates. Data demonstrated an increase in TNF-alpha, and NO production; a decrease in phagocytosis and antigen processing and presentation; and a decrease in the expression levels of cell surface macrophage

  20. Characterization of the Pathogenicity of Streptococcus intermedius TYG1620 Isolated from a Human Brain Abscess Based on the Complete Genome Sequence with Transcriptome Analysis and Transposon Mutagenesis in a Murine Subcutaneous Abscess Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Noriko; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Sugi, Yutaka; Kawakami, Nobuhiro; Ogasawara, Yumiko; Kato, Kengo; Yamashita, Akifumi; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Makoto

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is known to cause periodontitis and pyogenic infections in the brain and liver. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain TYG1620 (genome size, 2,006,877 bp; GC content, 37.6%; 2,020 predicted open reading frames [ORFs]) isolated from a brain abscess in an infant. Comparative analysis of S. intermedius genome sequences suggested that TYG1620 carries a notable type VII secretion system (T7SS), two long repeat regions, and 19 ORFs for cell wall-anchored proteins (CWAPs). To elucidate the genes responsible for the pathogenicity of TYG1620, transcriptome analysis was performed in a murine subcutaneous abscess model. The results suggest that the levels of expression of small hypothetical proteins similar to phenol-soluble modulin β1 (PSMβ1), a staphylococcal virulence factor, significantly increased in the abscess model. In addition, an experiment in a murine subcutaneous abscess model with random transposon (Tn) mutant attenuation suggested that Tn mutants with mutations in 212 ORFs in the Tn mutant library were attenuated in the murine abscess model (629 ORFs were disrupted in total); the 212 ORFs are putatively essential for abscess formation. Transcriptome analysis identified 37 ORFs, including paralogs of the T7SS and a putative glucan-binding CWAP in long repeat regions, to be upregulated and attenuated in vivo This study provides a comprehensive characterization of S. intermedius pathogenicity based on the complete genome sequence and a murine subcutaneous abscess model with transcriptome and Tn mutagenesis, leading to the identification of pivotal targets for vaccines or antimicrobial agents for the control of S. intermedius infections. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Genome-wide analysis of murine renal distal convoluted tubular cells for the target genes of mineralocorticoid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Kohei [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiki, Katsunori; Shirahige, Katsuhiko [Research Center for Epigenetic Disease, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E. [Endocrine Section, G.V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center, MS (United States); Endocrinology, University of Mississippi Medical Center, MS (United States); Fujita, Toshiro [Division of Clinical Epigenetics, Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nangaku, Masaomi [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Nagase, Miki, E-mail: mnagase-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Nephrology and Endocrinology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Department of Anatomy and Life Structure, School of Medicine Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • We define a target gene of MR as that with MR-binding to the adjacent region of DNA. • We use ChIP-seq analysis in combination with microarray. • We, for the first time, explore the genome-wide binding profile of MR. • We reveal 5 genes as the direct target genes of MR in the renal epithelial cell-line. - Abstract: Background and objective: Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) is a member of nuclear receptor family proteins and contributes to fluid homeostasis in the kidney. Although aldosterone-MR pathway induces several gene expressions in the kidney, it is often unclear whether the gene expressions are accompanied by direct regulations of MR through its binding to the regulatory region of each gene. The purpose of this study is to identify the direct target genes of MR in a murine distal convoluted tubular epithelial cell-line (mDCT). Methods: We analyzed the DNA samples of mDCT cells overexpressing 3xFLAG-hMR after treatment with 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 1 h by chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep-sequence (ChIP-seq) and mRNA of the cell-line with treatment of 10{sup −7} M aldosterone for 3 h by microarray. Results: 3xFLAG-hMR overexpressed in mDCT cells accumulated in the nucleus in response to 10{sup −9} M aldosterone. Twenty-five genes were indicated as the candidate target genes of MR by ChIP-seq and microarray analyses. Five genes, Sgk1, Fkbp5, Rasl12, Tns1 and Tsc22d3 (Gilz), were validated as the direct target genes of MR by quantitative RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR. MR binding regions adjacent to Ctgf and Serpine1 were also validated. Conclusions: We, for the first time, captured the genome-wide distribution of MR in mDCT cells and, furthermore, identified five MR target genes in the cell-line. These results will contribute to further studies on the mechanisms of kidney diseases.

  2. DMPD: Toll-like receptor 9 in murine lupus: more friend than foe! [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18241699 Toll-like receptor 9 in murine lupus: more friend than foe! Yu P, Musette ...us: more friend than foe! PubmedID 18241699 Title Toll-like receptor 9 in murine lupus...P, Peng SL. Immunobiology. 2008;213(2):151-7. Epub 2007 Sep 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptor 9 in murine lup

  3. Transcription factors ETF, E2F, and SP-1 are involved in cytokine-independent proliferation of murine hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellmer, Sebastian; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Godoy, Patricio; Weng, Honglei; Meyer, Christoph; Lehmann, Thomas; Sparna, Titus; Schormann, Wiebke; Hammad, Seddik; Kreutz, Clemens; Timmer, Jens; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Thürmann, Petra A; Merfort, Irmgard; Guthke, Reinhard; Dooley, Steven; Hengstler, Jan G; Gebhardt, Rolf

    2010-12-01

    The cellular basis of liver regeneration has been intensely investigated for many years. However, the mechanisms initiating hepatocyte "plasticity" and priming for proliferation are not yet fully clear. We investigated alterations in gene expression patterns during the first 72 hours of C57BL/6N mouse hepatocyte culture on collagen monolayers (CM), which display a high basal frequency of proliferation in the absence of cytokines. Although many metabolic genes were down-regulated, genes related to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and cell cycle were up-regulated. The latter genes showed an overrepresentation of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) for ETF (TEA domain family member 2), E2F1 (E2F transcription factor 1), and SP-1 (Sp1 transcription factor) (P ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 and displayed increased expression of E2F1. Cultivation of murine hepatocytes on CM primes cells for proliferation through cytokine-independent activation of MAPK signaling. The transcription factors ETF, E2F1, and SP-1 seem to play a pronounced role in mediating proliferation-dependent differential gene expression. Similar events, but on a shorter time-scale, occur very early after liver damage in vivo. Copyright © 2010 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  4. The POZ-ZF transcription factor Kaiso (ZBTB33 induces inflammation and progenitor cell differentiation in the murine intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopali Chaudhary

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, several studies have implicated the POZ-ZF protein Kaiso in both developmental and tumorigenic processes. However, most of the information regarding Kaiso's function to date has been gleaned from studies in Xenopus laevis embryos and mammalian cultured cells. To examine Kaiso's role in a relevant, mammalian organ-specific context, we generated and characterized a Kaiso transgenic mouse expressing a murine Kaiso transgene under the control of the intestine-specific villin promoter. Kaiso transgenic mice were viable and fertile but pathological examination of the small intestine revealed distinct morphological changes. Kaiso transgenics (Kaiso(Tg/+ exhibited a crypt expansion phenotype that was accompanied by increased differentiation of epithelial progenitor cells into secretory cell lineages; this was evidenced by increased cell populations expressing Goblet, Paneth and enteroendocrine markers. Paradoxically however, enhanced differentiation in Kaiso(Tg/+ was accompanied by reduced proliferation, a phenotype reminiscent of Notch inhibition. Indeed, expression of the Notch signalling target HES-1 was decreased in Kaiso(Tg/+ animals. Finally, our Kaiso transgenics exhibited several hallmarks of inflammation, including increased neutrophil infiltration and activation, villi fusion and crypt hyperplasia. Interestingly, the Kaiso binding partner and emerging anti-inflammatory mediator p120(ctn is recruited to the nucleus in Kaiso(Tg/+ mice intestinal cells suggesting that Kaiso may elicit inflammation by antagonizing p120(ctn function.

  5. Functional interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of murine leukemia virus surface envelope protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-W.; Roth, Monica J.

    2003-01-01

    A series of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with chimeric envelope proteins (Env) was generated to map functional interactions between the N- and the C-terminal domains of surface proteins (SU). All these chimeras have the 4070A amphotropic receptor-binding region flanked by various lengths of Moloney ecotropic N- and C-terminal Env. A charged residue, E49 (E16 on the mature protein), was identified at the N-terminals of Moloney MuLV SU that is important for the interaction with the C-terminal domain of the SU. The region that interacts with E49 was localized between junction 4 (R265 of M-MuLV Env) and junction 6 (L374 of M-MuLV Env) of SU. Sequencing the viable chimeric Env virus populations identified residues within the SU protein that improved the replication kinetics of the input chimeric Env viruses. Mutations in the C-domain of SU (G387E/R, L435I, L442P) were found to improve chimera IV4, which displayed a delayed onset of replication. The replication of AE6, containing a chimeric junction in the SU C-terminus, was improved by mutations in the N-domain (N40H, E80K), the proline-rich region (Q252R), or the transmembrane protein (L538N). Altogether, these observations provide insights into the structural elements required for Env function

  6. Human Leucocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G and Its Murine Functional Homolog Qa2 in the Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Fabrício C. Dias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic susceptibility factors, parasite strain, and an adequate modulation of the immune system seem to be crucial for disease progression after Trypanosoma cruzi infection. HLA-G and its murine functional homolog Qa2 have well-recognized immunomodulatory properties. We evaluated the HLA-G 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR polymorphic sites (associated with mRNA stability and target for microRNA binding and HLA-G tissue expression (heart, colon, and esophagus in patients presenting Chagas disease, stratified according to the major clinical variants. Further, we investigated the transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other pro- and anti-inflammatory genes in affected mouse tissues during T. cruzi experimental acute and early chronic infection induced by the CL strain. Chagas disease patients exhibited differential HLA-G 3′UTR susceptibility allele/genotype/haplotype patterns, according to the major clinical variant (digestive/cardiac/mixed/indeterminate. HLA-G constitutive expression on cardiac muscle and colonic cells was decreased in Chagasic tissues; however, no difference was observed for Chagasic and non-Chagasic esophagus tissues. The transcriptional levels of Qa2 and other anti and proinflammatory (CTLA-4, PDCD1, IL-10, INF-γ, and NOS-2 genes were induced only during the acute T. cruzi infection in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. We present several lines of evidence indicating the role of immunomodulatory genes and molecules in human and experimental T. cruzi infection.

  7. Delayed Mesoderm and Erythroid Differentiation of Murine Embryonic Stem Cells in the Absence of the Transcriptional Regulator FUBP1

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    Josephine Wesely

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional regulator far upstream binding protein 1 (FUBP1 is essential for fetal and adult hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal, and the constitutive absence of FUBP1 activity during early development leads to embryonic lethality in homozygous mutant mice. To investigate the role of FUBP1 in murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs and in particular during differentiation into hematopoietic lineages, we generated Fubp1 knockout (KO ESC clones using CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Although FUBP1 is expressed in undifferentiated ESCs and during spontaneous differentiation following aggregation into embryoid bodies (EBs, absence of FUBP1 did not affect ESC maintenance. Interestingly, we observed a delayed differentiation of FUBP1-deficient ESCs into the mesoderm germ layer, as indicated by impaired expression of several mesoderm markers including Brachyury at an early time point of ESC differentiation upon aggregation to EBs. Coculture experiments with OP9 cells in the presence of erythropoietin revealed a diminished differentiation capacity of Fubp1 KO ESCs into the erythroid lineage. Our data showed that FUBP1 is important for the onset of mesoderm differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic progenitor cells into the erythroid lineage, a finding that is supported by the phenotype of FUBP1-deficient mice.

  8. C/EBPβ LIP and c-Jun synergize to regulate expression of the murine progesterone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizhong; Do, Han Ngoc; Aupperlee, Mark D; Durairaj, Srinivasan; Flynn, Emily E; Miksicek, Richard J; Haslam, Sandra Z; Schwartz, Richard C

    2018-06-02

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) is required for murine mammary ductal morphogenesis and alveologenesis. Progesterone is critical for proliferation and alveologenesis in adult mammary glands, and there is a similar requirement for progesterone receptor isoform B (PRB) in alveologenesis. We examined C/EBPβ regulation of PR expression. All three C/EBPβ isoforms, including typically inhibitory LIP, transactivated the PR promoter. LIP, particularly, strongly synergized with c-Jun to drive PR transcription. Endogenous C/EBPβ and c-Jun stimulated a PR promoter-reporter and these two factors showed promoter occupancy on the endogenous PR gene. Additionally, LIP overexpression elevated endogenous PR protein expression. In pregnancy, both PRB and the relative abundance of LIP among C/EBPβ isoforms increase. Consistent with a role in PRB expression, in vivo C/EBPβ and PR isoform A expression showed mutually exclusive localization in mammary epithelium, while C/EBPβ and PRB largely co-localized. We suggest a critical role for C/EBPβ, particularly LIP, in PRB expression. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Murine Models of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

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    Maria Valero-Muñoz, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF is characterized by signs and symptoms of heart failure in the presence of a normal left ventricular ejection fraction. Despite accounting for up to 50% of all clinical presentations of heart failure, the mechanisms implicated in HFpEF are poorly understood, thus precluding effective therapy. The pathophysiological heterogeneity in the HFpEF phenotype also contributes to this disease and likely to the absence of evidence-based therapies. Limited access to human samples and imperfect animal models that completely recapitulate the human HFpEF phenotype have impeded our understanding of the mechanistic underpinnings that exist in this disease. Aging and comorbidities such as atrial fibrillation, hypertension, diabetes and obesity, pulmonary hypertension, and renal dysfunction are highly associated with HFpEF, yet the relationship and contribution between them remains ill-defined. This review discusses some of the distinctive clinical features of HFpEF in association with these comorbidities and highlights the advantages and disadvantage of commonly used murine models used to study the HFpEF phenotype.

  10. Murine colon proteome and characterization of the protein pathways

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    Magdeldin Sameh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most of the current proteomic researches focus on proteome alteration due to pathological disorders (i.e.: colorectal cancer rather than normal healthy state when mentioning colon. As a result, there are lacks of information regarding normal whole tissue- colon proteome. Results We report here a detailed murine (mouse whole tissue- colon protein reference dataset composed of 1237 confident protein (FDR I and Mw ranged from 3–12 and 4–600 KDa, respectively. Gravy index scoring predicted 19.5% membranous and 80.5% globularly located proteins. GO hierarchies and functional network analysis illustrated proteins function together with their relevance and implication of several candidates in malignancy such as Mitogen- activated protein kinase (Mapk8, 9 in colorectal cancer, Fibroblast growth factor receptor (Fgfr 2, Glutathione S-transferase (Gstp1 in prostate cancer, and Cell division control protein (Cdc42, Ras-related protein (Rac1,2 in pancreatic cancer. Protein abundances calculated with 3 different algorithms (NSAF, PAF and emPAI provide a relative quantification under normal condition as guidance. Conclusions This highly confidence colon proteome catalogue will not only serve as a useful reference for further experiments characterizing differentially expressed proteins induced from diseased conditions, but also will aid in better understanding the ontology and functional absorptive mechanism of the colon as well.

  11. A murine model of targeted infusion for intracranial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minhyung; Barone, Tara A; Fedtsova, Natalia; Gleiberman, Anatoli; Wilfong, Chandler D; Alosi, Julie A; Plunkett, Robert J; Gudkov, Andrei; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, intra-arterial (IA) drug administration for malignant brain tumors including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) was performed as an attempt to improve drug delivery. With the advent of percutaneous neuorovascular techniques and modern microcatheters, intracranial drug delivery is readily feasible; however, the question remains whether IA administration is safe and more effective compared to other delivery modalities such as intravenous (IV) or oral administrations. Preclinical large animal models allow for comparisons between treatment routes and to test novel agents, but can be expensive and difficult to generate large numbers and rapid results. Accordingly, we developed a murine model of IA drug delivery for GBM that is reproducible with clear readouts of tumor response and neurotoxicities. Herein, we describe a novel mouse model of IA drug delivery accessing the internal carotid artery to treat ipsilateral implanted GBM tumors that is consistent and reproducible with minimal experience. The intent of establishing this unique platform is to efficiently interrogate targeted anti-tumor agents that may be designed to take advantage of a directed, regional therapy approach for brain tumors.

  12. Antinociception induced by rosuvastatin in murine neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Sierralta, Fernando; Aranda, Nicolas; Poblete, Paula; Castillo, Rodrigo L; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan Carlos

    2018-06-01

    Neuropathic pain, and subsequent hypernociception, can be induced in mice by paclitaxel (PTX) administration and partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL). Its pharmacotherapy has been a clinical challenge, due to a lack of effective treatment. In two models of mouse neuropathic pain (PTX and PSNL) the antinociception induced by rosuvastatin and the participation of proinflammatory biomarkers, interleukin (IL)- 1β, TBARS and glutathione were evaluated. A dose-response curve for rosuvastatin ip was obtained on cold plate, hot plate and Von Frey assays. Changes on spinal cord levels of IL-1β, glutathione and lipid peroxidation were measured at 7 and 14days in PTX and PSNL murine models. PTX or PSNL were able to induce in mice peripheral neuropathy with hypernociception, either to 7 and 14days. Rosuvastatin induced a dose dependent antinociception in hot plate, cold plate and Von Frey assays. The increased levels of IL-1β or TBARS induced by pretreatment with PTX or PSNL were reduced by rosuvastatin. The reduction of spinal cord glutathione, by PTX or PSNL, expressed as the ratio GSH/GSSG, were increased significantly in animals pretreated with rosuvastatin. The anti-inflammatory properties of statins could underlie their beneficial effects on neuropathic pain by reduction of proinflammatory biomarkers and activation of glia. The findings of this study suggest a potential usefulness of rosuvastatin in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2018 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  14. Collagen-Induced Arthritis: A model for Murine Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrosimone, K M; Jin, M; Poston, B; Liu, P

    2015-10-20

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is a common autoimmune animal model used to study rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The development of CIA involves infiltration of macrophages and neutrophils into the joint, as well as T and B cell responses to type II collagen. In murine CIA, genetically susceptible mice (DBA/1J) are immunized with a type II bovine collagen emulsion in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), and receive a boost of type II bovine collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) 21 days after the first injection. These mice typically develop disease 26 to 35 days after the initial injection. C57BL/6J mice are resistant to arthritis induced by type II bovine collagen, but can develop arthritis when immunized with type II chicken collagen in CFA, and receive a boost of type II chicken collagen in IFA 21 days after the first injection. The concentration of heat-killed Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RA (MT) in CFA also differs for each strain. DBA/1J mice develop arthritis with 1 mg/ml MT, while C57BL/6J mice require and 3-4 mg/ml MT in order to develop arthritis. CIA develops slowly in C57BL/6J mice and cases of arthritis are mild when compared to DBA/1J mice. This protocol describes immunization of DBA/1J mice with type II bovine collagen and the immunization of C57BL/6J mice with type II chicken collagen.

  15. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Apoorva; Akram, Khondoker M; Williams, Debbie; Armes, Hannah; Russell, Catherine; Hood, Derek; Armstrong, Stuart; Stewart, James P; Brown, Steve D M; Bingle, Lynne; Bingle, Colin D

    2016-11-01

    Otitis media (OM), or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME) epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs) at an air-liquid interface (ALI) that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host-pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  16. Hamster and Murine Models of Severe Destructive Lyme Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Erik; Nardelli, Dean T.; Du Chateau, Brian K.; Callister, Steven M.; Schell, Ronald F.

    2012-01-01

    Arthritis is a frequent complication of infection in humans with Borrelia burgdorferi. Weeks to months following the onset of Lyme borreliosis, a histopathological reaction characteristic of synovitis including bone, joint, muscle, or tendon pain may occur. A subpopulation of patients may progress to a chronic, debilitating arthritis months to years after infection which has been classified as severe destructive Lyme arthritis. This arthritis involves focal bone erosion and destruction of articular cartilage. Hamsters and mice are animal models that have been utilized to study articular manifestations of Lyme borreliosis. Infection of immunocompetent LSH hamsters or C3H mice results in a transient synovitis. However, severe destructive Lyme arthritis can be induced by infecting irradiated hamsters or mice and immunocompetent Borrelia-vaccinated hamsters, mice, and interferon-gamma- (IFN-γ-) deficient mice with viable B. burgdorferi. The hamster model of severe destructive Lyme arthritis facilitates easy assessment of Lyme borreliosis vaccine preparations for deleterious effects while murine models of severe destructive Lyme arthritis allow for investigation of mechanisms of immunopathology. PMID:22461836

  17. Mechanism of immunotoxicological effects of tributyltin chloride on murine thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Neelima; Kumar, Anoop

    2014-04-01

    Tributyltin-chloride, a well-known organotin compound, is a widespread environmental toxicant. The immunotoxic effects of tributyltin-chloride on mammalian system and its mechanism is still unclear. This study is designed to explore the mode of action of tributyltin-induced apoptosis and other parallel apoptotic pathways in murine thymocytes. The earliest response in oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspase-3 activation has been observed. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine and buthionine sulfoximine effectively inhibited the tributyltin-induced apoptotic DNA and elevated the sub G1 population, respectively. Caspase inhibitors pretreatment prevent tributyltin-induced apoptosis. Western blot and flow cytometry indicate no translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and endonuclease G in the nuclear fraction from mitochondria. Intracellular Ca(2+) levels are significantly raised by tributyltin chloride. These results clearly demonstrate caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway and support the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase-3 activation, and calcium during tributyltin-chloride (TBTC)-induced thymic apoptosis.

  18. Genomic rearrangement in radiation-induced murine myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    After whole body irradiation of 3Gy X ray to C3H/He male mice, acute myeloid leukemia is induced at an incidence of 20 to 30% within 2 years. We have studied the mechanism of occurrence of this radiation-induced murine myeloid leukemia. Detection and isolation of genomic structural aberration which may be accumulated accompanied with leukemogenesis are helpful in analyzing the complicated molecular process from radiation damage to leukemogenesis. So, our research work was done in three phases. First, structures of previously characterized oncogenes and cytokine-related genes were analyzed, and abnormal structures of fms(protooncogene encoding M-CSF receptor gene)-related and myc-related genes were found in several leukemia cells. Additionally, genomic structural aberration of IL-3 gene was observed in some leukemia cells, so that construction of genomic libraries and cloning of the abnormal IL-3 genomic DNAs were performed to characterize the structure. Secondly, because the breakage of chromosome 2 that is frequently observed in myeloid leukemia locates in proximal position of IL-1 gene cluster in some cases, the copy number of IL-1 gene was determined and the gene was cloned. Lastly, the abnormal genome of leukemia cell was cloned by in-gel competence reassociation method. We discussed these findings and evaluated the analysis of the molecular process of leukemogenesis using these cloned genomic fragments. (author)

  19. Effect of SPG (Sonifilan) immunotherapy and PDT on murine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korbelik, M.; Krosl, G.; Dougherty, G.J.; Chaplin, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    PhotoDynamic Therapy of solid tumors is unique in eliciting a strong host immune response unparalleled in other cancer therapies. This immune response is manifested as an acute inflammatory reaction, and can be readily seen as redness and edema around the treated area. Destruction of typical solid tumor cannot be accomplished solely by direct phototoxic action. This was shown to be the case even with drugs more potent in this direct killing effect than Photofrin, the photosensitizer presently used in clinical PDT. Limiting factors seem to be regional insufficiencies in supply of molecular oxygen, needed for generation of phototoxic species. They can be ascribed to the existence of chronically and acute hypoxic tumor regions, oxygen consumption by the photodynamic process, and vascular shutdown induced during PDT. The remaining tumor mass is eradicated by an indirect effect, necrosis induced by destruction of tumor vasculature. Since most events in PDT treated tumor that lead to vascular collapse are, in fact, typical inflammatory manifestations, it was suggested that PDT-induced acute inflammatory reaction actually leads to vascular damage. In a related report characteristics are shown of cellular inflammatory infiltrate in PDT-treated murine tumor. This work examines the effect of combining PDT with immunotherapy, in an attempt to investigate a possibility of amplification of immune reaction to PDT and its direction towards more pervasive destruction of treated tumors. (authors). 6 refs

  20. Reduction in DNA repair capacity following differentiation of murine proadipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofilon, P.J.; Meyn, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that terminally differentiated mammalian cells have a decreased DNA repair capacity, compared with proliferating stem cells. To investigate this hypothesis, we have examined γ-ray-induced DNA strand breaks and their repair in the murine proadipocyte stem cell line 3T3-T. By exposure to human plasma, 3T3-T cells can be induced to undergo nonterminal and then terminal differentiation. DNA strand breaks were evaluated using the technique of alkaline elution. No difference was detected among stem, nonterminally differentiated, and terminally differentiated cells in the initial levels of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks. Each of the strand break dose responses increased as a linear function of γ-ray dose. The strand breaks induced by 4 Gy rejoined following biphasic kinetics for each cell type. At each time point examined after irradiation, however, the percentage of strand breaks that had not rejoined in terminally differentiated cells was three to six times greater than in stem cells. The rate of strand break rejoining in nonterminally differentiated cells was of an intermediate value between that of the stem and of the terminally differentiated cells. These results indicate that, at least for 3T3-T cells, differentiated cells have a reduced capacity for DNA repair

  1. Enterocin CRL35 inhibits Listeria monocytogenes in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Emiliano; Saavedra, Lucila; Hebert, Elvira Maria; Haro, Cecilia; Sesma, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen causative of opportunistic infections. Listeriosis is associated with severe infections in pregnant women causing abortion or neonatal listeriosis. An alternative to antibiotics are safe novel bacteriocins peptides such as enterocin CRL35 with strong antilisterial activity produced by Enterococcus mundtii CRL35. In the present paper, our goal is to study the effectiveness of this peptide and the producer strain in a murine model of pregnancy-associated listeriosis. A single dose of 5×10(9) colony-forming unit of L. monocytogenes FBUNT (Faculty of Biochemistry-University of Tucumán) resulted in translocation of pathogen to liver and spleen of BALB/c pregnant mice. The maximum level of Listeria was observed on day 3 postinfection. Interestingly, the intragastric administration of enterocin CRL35 significantly reduced the translocation of the pathogen to vital organs. On the other hand, the preadministration of E. mundtii CRL35 slightly inhibited this translocation. Listeria infection caused a significant increase in polymorphonuclear leukocytes at day 3 postinfection compared to the noninfected group. This value was reduced after the administration of enterocin CRL35. No significant changes were observed in either white blood cells or lymphocytes counts. Based on the data presented in the present work enterocin CRL35 would be a promising alternative for the prevention of Listeria infections.

  2. Effects of spaceflight on the muscles of the murine shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; Lim, Chanteak; Schwartz, Andrea G; Andreev-Andrievskiy, Alexander; Deymier, Alix C; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2017-12-01

    Mechanical loading is necessary for the development and maintenance of the musculoskeletal system. Removal of loading via microgravity, paralysis, or bed rest leads to rapid loss of muscle mass and function; however, the molecular mechanisms that lead to these changes are largely unknown, particularly for the spaceflight (SF) microgravity environment. Furthermore, few studies have explored these effects on the shoulder, a dynamically stabilized joint with a large range of motion; therefore, we examined the effects of microgravity on mouse shoulder muscles for the 15-d Space Transportation System (STS)-131, 13-d STS-135, and 30-d Bion-M1 missions. Mice from STS missions were euthanized within 4 h after landing, whereas mice from the Bion-M1 mission were euthanized within 14 h after landing. The motion-generating deltoid muscle was more sensitive to microgravity than the joint-stabilizing rotator cuff muscles. Mice from the STS-131 mission exhibited reduced myogenic ( Myf5 and -6 ) and adipogenic ( Pparg , Cebpa , and Lep ) gene expression, whereas either no change or an increased expression of these genes was observed in mice from the Bion-M1 mission. In summary, muscle responses to microgravity were muscle-type specific, short-duration SF caused dramatic molecular changes to shoulder muscles and responses to reloading upon landing were rapid.-Shen, H., Lim, C., Schwartz, A. G., Andreev-Andrievskiy, A., Deymier, A. C., Thomopoulos, S. Effects of spaceflight on the muscles of the murine shoulder. © FASEB.

  3. Megakaryocytes compensate for Kit insufficiency in murine arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunin, Pierre; Penke, Loka R; Thon, Jonathan N; Monach, Paul A; Jones, Tatiana; Chang, Margaret H; Chen, Mary M; Melki, Imene; Lacroix, Steve; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Ware, Jerry; Gurish, Michael F; Italiano, Joseph E; Boilard, Eric; Nigrovic, Peter A

    2017-05-01

    The growth factor receptor Kit is involved in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic development. Mice bearing Kit defects lack mast cells; however, strains bearing different Kit alleles exhibit diverse phenotypes. Herein, we investigated factors underlying differential sensitivity to IgG-mediated arthritis in 2 mast cell-deficient murine lines: KitWsh/Wsh, which develops robust arthritis, and KitW/Wv, which does not. Reciprocal bone marrow transplantation between KitW/Wv and KitWsh/Wsh mice revealed that arthritis resistance reflects a hematopoietic defect in addition to mast cell deficiency. In KitW/Wv mice, restoration of susceptibility to IgG-mediated arthritis was neutrophil independent but required IL-1 and the platelet/megakaryocyte markers NF-E2 and glycoprotein VI. In KitW/Wv mice, platelets were present in numbers similar to those in WT animals and functionally intact, and transfer of WT platelets did not restore arthritis susceptibility. These data implicated a platelet-independent role for the megakaryocyte, a Kit-dependent lineage that is selectively deficient in KitW/Wv mice. Megakaryocytes secreted IL-1 directly and as a component of circulating microparticles, which activated synovial fibroblasts in an IL-1-dependent manner. Transfer of WT but not IL-1-deficient megakaryocytes restored arthritis susceptibility to KitW/Wv mice. These findings identify functional redundancy among Kit-dependent hematopoietic lineages and establish an unanticipated capacity of megakaryocytes to mediate IL-1-driven systemic inflammatory disease.

  4. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouffler, S.D.; Breckon, G.; Cox, R.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author)

  5. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanuel eMuindi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages.

  6. Tofacitinib Ameliorates Murine Lupus and Its Associated Vascular Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Smith, Carolyne K; Blanco, Luz; Zhao, Wenpu; Brooks, Stephen R; Thacker, Seth G; Abdalrahman, Zarzour; Sciumè, Giuseppe; Tsai, Wanxia L; Trier, Anna M; Nunez, Leti; Mast, Laurel; Hoffmann, Victoria; Remaley, Alan T; O'Shea, John J; Kaplan, Mariana J; Gadina, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Dysregulation of innate and adaptive immune responses contributes to the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and its associated premature vascular damage. No drug to date targets both systemic inflammatory disease and the cardiovascular complications of SLE. Tofacitinib is a JAK inhibitor that blocks signaling downstream of multiple cytokines implicated in lupus pathogenesis. While clinical trials have shown that tofacitinib exhibits significant clinical efficacy in various autoimmune diseases, its role in SLE and the associated vascular pathology remains to be characterized. MRL/lpr lupus-prone mice were administered tofacitinib or vehicle by gavage for 6 weeks (therapeutic arm) or 8 weeks (preventive arm). Nephritis, skin inflammation, serum levels of autoantibodies and cytokines, mononuclear cell phenotype and gene expression, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) release, endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and endothelial differentiation were compared in treated and untreated mice. Treatment with tofacitinib led to significant improvement in measures of disease activity, including nephritis, skin inflammation, and autoantibody production. In addition, tofacitinib treatment reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and interferon responses in splenocytes and kidney tissue. Tofacitinib also modulated the formation of NETs and significantly increased endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation and endothelial differentiation. The drug was effective in both preventive and therapeutic strategies. Tofacitinib modulates the innate and adaptive immune responses, ameliorates murine lupus, and improves vascular function. These results indicate that JAK inhibitors have the potential to be beneficial in SLE and its associated vascular damage. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Combination effect of cisplatin and radiation in murine solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Shin; Lee, Kan-ei; Ishibashi, Akira; Komiyama, Hiroki; Umezawa, Iwao.

    1986-01-01

    The combination effect of cisplatin and radiation was studied using the two different murine systems of sarcoma 180 and Ehrlich solid tumors. In sarcoma 180 solid tumor the minimal effective doses (MED) of cisplatin and radiation were 19.5 mg/kg and 10375 rad respectively whereas these doses did not show any effective antitumor activity practically. Administration of cisplatin with a doses of 9 mg/kg given 24 hours before radiation (1000 rad), however, showed synergistic antitumor activity. In Ehrlich solid tumor the MED of cisplatin and radiation were 13.8 mg/kg and 2892 rad respectively. Treatment with cisplatin, 3, 6 or 9 mg/kg, given 24 hours before radiation (1000 rad) showed also synergistic antitumor activity also. Sodium thiosulfate (STS) rescue was effective in reducing toxicity of cisplatin on combined use of the drug with radiation. Cell kinetics of sarcoma 180 solid tumor in vivo after the combined treatment was analyzed by computer aided flowcytometry. Accumulation of cells in the radiosensitive G 2 + M phase was observed 18 to 42 hours after a single intraperitoneal administration of 9 mg/kg of cisplatin. It is strongly suggested that this synchronization is one of the mechanisms of the synergism in the combination therapy. (author)

  8. High salt intake does not exacerbate murine autoimmune thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolypetri, P; Randell, E; Van Vliet, B N; Carayanniotis, G

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that high salt (HS) intake exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and have raised the possibility that a HS diet may comprise a risk factor for autoimmune diseases in general. In this report, we have examined whether a HS diet regimen could exacerbate murine autoimmune thyroiditis, including spontaneous autoimmune thyroiditis (SAT) in non-obese diabetic (NOD.H2h4) mice, experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT) in C57BL/6J mice challenged with thyroglobulin (Tg) and EAT in CBA/J mice challenged with the Tg peptide (2549–2560). The physiological impact of HS intake was confirmed by enhanced water consumption and suppressed aldosterone levels in all strains. However, the HS treatment failed to significantly affect the incidence and severity of SAT or EAT or Tg-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, relative to control mice maintained on a normal salt diet. In three experimental models, these data demonstrate that HS intake does not exacerbate autoimmune thyroiditis, indicating that a HS diet is not a risk factor for all autoimmune diseases. PMID:24528002

  9. An in vitro model of murine middle ear epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Mulay

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Otitis media (OM, or middle ear inflammation, is the most common paediatric disease and leads to significant morbidity. Although understanding of underlying disease mechanisms is hampered by complex pathophysiology it is clear that epithelial abnormalities underpin the disease. There is currently a lack of a well-characterised in vitro model of the middle ear (ME epithelium that replicates the complex cellular composition of the middle ear. Here, we report the development of a novel in vitro model of mouse middle ear epithelial cells (mMECs at an air–liquid interface (ALI that recapitulates the characteristics of the native murine ME epithelium. We demonstrate that mMECs undergo differentiation into the varied cell populations seen within the native middle ear. Proteomic analysis confirmed that the cultures secrete a multitude of innate defence proteins from their apical surface. We showed that the mMECs supported the growth of the otopathogen, nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi, suggesting that the model can be successfully utilised to study host–pathogen interactions in the middle ear. Overall, our mMEC culture system can help to better understand the cell biology of the middle ear and improve our understanding of the pathophysiology of OM. The model also has the potential to serve as a platform for validation of treatments designed to reverse aspects of epithelial remodelling that underpin OM development.

  10. Snake venoms components with antitumor activity in murine melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz, Rodrigo Guimaraes

    2012-01-01

    Despite the constant advances in the treatment of cancer, this disease remains one of the main causes of mortality worldwide. So, the development of new treatment modalities is imperative. Snake venom causes a variety of biological effects because they constitute a complex mixture of substances as disintegrins, proteases (serine and metalo), phospholipases A2, L-amino acid oxidases and others. The goal of the present work is to evaluate a anti-tumor activity of some snake venoms fractions. There are several studies of components derived from snake venoms with this kind of activity. After fractionation of snake venoms of the families Viperidae and Elapidae, the fractions were assayed towards murine melanoma cell line B16-F10 and fibroblasts L929. The results showed that the fractions of venom of the snake Notechis ater niger had higher specificity and potential antitumor activity on B16-F10 cell line than the other studied venoms. Since the components of this venom are not explored yet coupled with the potential activity showed in this work, we decided to choose this venom to develop further studies. The cytotoxic fractions were evaluated to identify and characterize the components that showed antitumoral activity. Western blot assays and zymography suggests that these proteins do not belong to the class of metallo and serine proteinases. (author)

  11. Electrocautery effect on intestinal vascularisation in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jean-François; Sideris, Lucas; Leblond, François A; Trépanier, Jean-Sébastien; Badrudin, David; Drolet, Pierre; Mitchell, Andrew; Dubé, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The use of electrocautery devices is associated with complications such as perforation or fistulisation when used near intestinal structures. This is likely due to its effect on vascularisation of the bowel wall. To test this hypothesis we established a murine model to quantify the effect of electrocautery injury on the intestinal microvascularisation. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to five electrocautery injuries on the small bowel in coagulation mode (30 W intensity) and in cut mode (40 W, 80 W and 200 W intensities) for durations of 1, 2 and 5 s. 5 mg/kg of fluorescein was injected intravenously, the injured bowel segments harvested and the rat sacrificed. The segments were analysed to measure the fluorescence of injured bowel compared to adjacent unharmed tissue. A significant decrease in bowel wall microvascularisation occurred with increasing intensity (coag 30 W/cut 40 W versus cut 200 W 1 s: p electrocautery injury (cut 40 W 1/2 s versus 5 s: p electrocautery injury, a significantly greater microvascularisation decrease was observed in jejunum compared to ileum (p electrocautery use. Unsurprisingly, the decrease in microvascularisation is greater with higher intensity and duration of electrocautery and is associated with more perforations in the experimental model. The jejunum seems more vulnerable to electrocautery injury than the ileum. These observations support caution when using electrocautery devices near intestinal structures.

  12. Melatonin modulates adiponectin expression on murine colitis with sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyun; Park, Young Sook; Baik, Haing-Woon; Jun, Jin Hyun; Kim, Eun Kyung; Sull, Jae Woong; Sung, Ho Joong; Choi, Jin Woo; Chung, Sook Hee; Gye, Myung Chan; Lim, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jun Bong; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-09-07

    To determine adiponectin expression in colonic tissue of murine colitis and systemic cytokine expression after melatonin treatments and sleep deprivation. The following five groups of C57BL/6 mice were used in this study: (1) group I, control; (2) group II, 2% DSS induced colitis for 7 d; (3) group III, 2% DSS induced colitis and melatonin treatment; (4) group IV, 2% DSS induced colitis with sleep deprivation (SD) using specially designed and modified multiple platform water baths; and (5) group V, 2% DSS induced colitis with SD and melatonin treatment. Melatonin (10 mg/kg) or saline was intraperitoneally injected daily to mice for 4 d. The body weight was monitored daily. The degree of colitis was evaluated histologically after sacrificing the mice. Immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis was performed using anti-adiponectin antibody. After sampling by intracardiac punctures, levels of serum cytokines were measured by ELISA. Sleep deprivation in water bath exacerbated DSS induced colitis and worsened weight loss. Melatonin injection not only alleviated the severity of mucosal injury, but also helped survival during stressful condition. The expression level of adiponectin in mucosa was decreased in colitis, with the lowest level observed in colitis combined with sleep deprivation. Melatonin injection significantly (P sleep deprivation.

  13. Concepts for treatment of micrometastases developed in murine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabel, F.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Current knowledge of tumor cell population growth kinetics indicates that the growth fraction (viable tumor cells undergoing active cell replication) is inversely related to population size. Tumor cells in micrometastases should, therefore, be more sensitive to anticancer drugs active against anabolizing cells than are tumor cells in the larger, grossly apparent primary tumor from which they were derived. This indicates the probability that micrometastases will be effectively responsive to more drugs than is the primary and clinically apparent tumor from which they came. Studies with at least four metastatic and uniformly fatal murine solid tumors (lung, breast, colon, and melanoma) have demonstrated significantly improved cure rates with drug treatment following surgical removal of the grossly apparent primary tumor than can be obtained with either surgery or drug treatment when used alone. Further, both disease staging and drug dosage have been shown to influence cure rates of combined-modality treatment. With several mouse tumors, a significantly smaller number of viable tumor cells can establish lethal tumors in the presence of radiation-inactivated tumor cells than in their absence. This suggests that small numbers of residual viable tumor cells in radiation-treated tumor sites may be a greater threat to clinical cure than smaller tumor cell populations remaining in situ after surgery

  14. Binding energies of cluster ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parajuli, R.; Matt, S.; Scheier, P.; Echt, O.; Stamatovic, A.; Maerk, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    The binding energy of charged clusters may be measured by analyzing the kinetic energy released in the metastable decay of mass selected parent ions. Using finite heat bath theory to determine the binding energies of argon, neon, krypton, oxygen and nitrogen from their respective average kinetic energy released were carried out. A high-resolution double focussing two-sector mass spectrometer of reversed Nier-Johnson type geometry was used. MIKE ( mass-analysed ion kinetic energy) were measured to investigate decay reactions of mass-selected ions. For the inert gases neon (Ne n + ), argon (Ar n + ) and krypton (Kr n + ), it is found that the binding energies initially decrease with increasing size n and then level off at a value above the enthalpy of vaporization of the condensed phase. Oxygen cluster ions shown a characteristic dependence on cluster size (U-shape) indicating a change in the metastable fragmentation mechanism when going from the dimer to the decamer ion. (nevyjel)

  15. Metal binding by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning

    for zinc binding by the investigated amino acids, peptides and proteins. The thiol group or imidazole group containing amino acids, peptides and proteins which exhibited strong zinc binding ability were further selected for interacting with zinc salts in relation to zinc absorption. The interactions...... between the above selected food components and zinc citrate or zinc phytate will lead to the enhanced solubility of zinc citrate or zinc phytate. The main driving force for this observed solubility enhancement is the complex formation between zinc and investigated food components as revealed by isothermal...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  16. Potential of Murine IgG1 and Human IgG4 to Inhibit the Classical Complement and Fcγ Receptor Activation Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina-Maria Lilienthal

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available IgG antibodies (Abs mediate their effector functions through the interaction with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs and the complement factors. The main IgG-mediated complement activation pathway is induced through the binding of complement C1q to IgG Abs. This interaction is dependent on antigen-dependent hexamer formation of human IgG1 and IgG3 to increase the affinity for the six-headed C1q molecule. By contrast, human IgG4 fails to bind to C1q. Instead, it has been suggested that human IgG4 can block IgG1 and IgG3 hexamerization required for their binding to C1q and activating the complement. Here, we show that murine IgG1, which functionally resembles human IgG4 by not interacting with C1q, inhibits the binding of IgG2a, IgG2b, and IgG3 to C1q in vitro, and suppresses IgG2a-mediated complement activation in a hemolytic assay in an antigen-dependent and IgG subclass-specific manner. From this perspective, we discuss the potential of murine IgG1 and human IgG4 to block the complement activation as well as suppressive effects of sialylated IgG subclass Abs on FcγR-mediated immune cell activation. Accumulating evidence suggests that both mechanisms seem to be responsible for preventing uncontrolled IgG (autoAb-induced inflammation in mice and humans. Distinct IgG subclass distributions and functionally opposite IgG Fc glycosylation patterns might explain different outcomes of IgG-mediated immune responses and provide new therapeutic options through the induction, enrichment, or application of antigen-specific sialylated human IgG4 to prevent complement and FcγR activation as well.

  17. Serial passaging of Candida albicans in systemic murine infection suggests that the wild type strain SC5314 is well adapted to the murine kidney.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Lüttich

    Full Text Available The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans has a remarkable ability to adapt to unfavorable environments by different mechanisms, including microevolution. For example, a previous study has shown that passaging through the murine spleen can cause new phenotypic characteristics. Since the murine kidney is the main target organ in murine Candida sepsis and infection of the spleen differs from the kidney in several aspects, we tested whether C. albicans SC5314 could evolve to further adapt to infection and persistence within the kidney. Therefore, we performed a long-term serial passage experiment through the murine kidney of using a low infectious dose. We found that the overall virulence of the commonly used wild type strain SC5314 did not change after eight passages and that the isolated pools showed only very moderate changes of phenotypic traits on the population level. Nevertheless, the last passage showed a higher phenotypic variability and a few individual strains exhibited phenotypic alterations suggesting that microevolution has occurred. However, the majority of the tested single strains were phenotypically indistinguishable from SC5314. Thus, our findings indicate that characteristics of SC5314 which are important to establish and maintain kidney infection over a prolonged time are already well developed.

  18. Differential activation of murine herpesvirus 68- and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus-encoded ORF74 G protein-coupled receptors by human and murine chemokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, D.; Fitzsimons, C.P.; Van Dijk, M.; Stewart, J.P.; Timmerman, H.; Smit, M.J.; Leurs, R.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) is a well-characterized small animal model for the study of gammaherpesvirus infection. MHV-68 belongs to the same herpesvirus family as herpesvirus saimiri (HVS) of New World squirrel monkeys and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) (also referred

  19. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillard, Mike, E-mail: m.n.gillard@leeds.ac.uk; Harland, Derek, E-mail: d.g.harland@leeds.ac.uk; Speight, Martin, E-mail: speight@maths.leeds.ac.uk

    2015-06-15

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  20. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillard, Mike; Harland, Derek; Speight, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values

  1. Skyrmions with low binding energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Gillard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear binding energies are investigated in two variants of the Skyrme model: the first replaces the usual Skyrme term with a term that is sixth order in derivatives, and the second includes a potential that is quartic in the pion fields. Solitons in the first model are shown to deviate significantly from ansätze previously assumed in the literature. The binding energies obtained in both models are lower than those obtained from the standard Skyrme model, and those obtained in the second model are close to the experimental values.

  2. Discovery of a Prefusion Respiratory Syncytial Virus F-Specific Monoclonal Antibody That Provides Greater In Vivo Protection than the Murine Precursor of Palivizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Zhang, Wei; Zhan, Lu-Ting; Cao, Jian-Li; Sun, Yong-Peng; McLellan, Jason S; Graham, Barney S; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2017-08-01

    Palivizumab, a humanized murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes antigenic site II on both the prefusion (pre-F) and postfusion (post-F) conformations of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F glycoprotein, is the only prophylactic agent approved for use for the treatment of RSV infection. However, its relatively low neutralizing potency and high cost have limited its use to a restricted population of infants at high risk of severe disease. Previously, we isolated a high-potency neutralizing antibody, 5C4, that specifically recognizes antigenic site Ø at the apex of the pre-F protein trimer. We compared in vitro and in vivo the potency and protective efficacy of 5C4 and the murine precursor of palivizumab, antibody 1129. Both antibodies were synthesized on identical murine backbones as either an IgG1 or IgG2a subclass and evaluated for binding to multiple F protein conformations, in vitro inhibition of RSV infection and propagation, and protective efficacy in mice. Although 1129 and 5C4 had similar pre-F protein binding affinities, the 5C4 neutralizing activity was nearly 50-fold greater than that of 1129 in vitro In BALB/c mice, 5C4 reduced the peak titers of RSV 1,000-fold more than 1129 did in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. These data indicate that antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø are more efficacious at preventing RSV infection than antibodies specific for antigenic site II. Our data also suggest that site Ø-specific antibodies may be useful for the prevention or treatment of RSV infection and support the use of the pre-F protein as a vaccine antigen. IMPORTANCE There is no vaccine yet available to prevent RSV infection. The use of the licensed antibody palivizumab, which recognizes site II on both the pre-F and post-F proteins, is restricted to prophylaxis in neonates at high risk of severe RSV disease. Recommendations for using passive immunization in the general population or for therapy in immunocompromised persons with

  3. Antibody blockade of IL-17 family cytokines in immunity to acute murine oral mucosal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whibley, Natasha; Tritto, Elaine; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Kolbinger, Frank; Moulin, Pierre; Brees, Dominique; Coleman, Bianca M; Mamo, Anna J; Garg, Abhishek V; Jaycox, Jillian R; Siebenlist, Ulrich; Kammüller, Michael; Gaffen, Sarah L

    2016-06-01

    Antibodies targeting IL-17A or its receptor, IL-17RA, are approved to treat psoriasis and are being evaluated for other autoimmune conditions. Conversely, IL-17 signaling is critical for immunity to opportunistic mucosal infections caused by the commensal fungus Candida albicans, as mice and humans lacking the IL-17R experience chronic mucosal candidiasis. IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-17AF bind the IL-17RA-IL-17RC heterodimeric complex and deliver qualitatively similar signals through the adaptor Act1. Here, we used a mouse model of acute oropharyngeal candidiasis to assess the impact of blocking IL-17 family cytokines compared with specific IL-17 cytokine gene knockout mice. Anti-IL-17A antibodies, which neutralize IL-17A and IL-17AF, caused elevated oral fungal loads, whereas anti-IL-17AF and anti-IL-17F antibodies did not. Notably, there was a cooperative effect of blocking IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F together. Termination of anti-IL-17A treatment was associated with rapid C. albicans clearance. IL-17F-deficient mice were fully resistant to oropharyngeal candidiasis, consistent with antibody blockade. However, IL-17A-deficient mice had lower fungal burdens than anti-IL-17A-treated mice. Act1-deficient mice were much more susceptible to oropharyngeal candidiasis than anti-IL-17A antibody-treated mice, yet anti-IL-17A and anti-IL-17RA treatment caused equivalent susceptibilities. Based on microarray analyses of the oral mucosa during infection, only a limited number of genes were associated with oropharyngeal candidiasis susceptibility. In sum, we conclude that IL-17A is the main cytokine mediator of immunity in murine oropharyngeal candidiasis, but a cooperative relationship among IL-17A, IL-17AF, and IL-17F exists in vivo. Susceptibility displays the following hierarchy: IL-17RA- or Act1-deficiency > anti-IL-17A + anti-IL-17F antibodies > anti-IL-17A or anti-IL-17RA antibodies > IL-17A deficiency. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  4. The effect of BW12C on radiosensitivity and necrosis of murine tissues and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.; Hill, S.A.; Joiner, M.C.; Joiner, B.; Johns, H.; Williams, K.; Denekamp, J.

    1994-01-01

    BW12C is a drug that has the potential to induce normal tissue and tumour hypoxia by binding to haemoglobin, increasing its affinity for oxygen and thereby reducing oxygen availability to tissues. Initial results suggested that BW12C administration caused significant radioprotection of normal tissues and induced tumour necrosis, but variable results have been reported subsequently. This work was carried to extend the range of observations concerning the ability of BW12C to radioprotect normal tissues and tumours and to induce necrosis of tumours of the mouse. BW12C was administered as 70 mg/kg intravenous 15 min before irradiation of jejunum in CBA mice and of foot skin in WHT mice with single doses of 240 kVp X-rays while mice breathed gases of varying oxygen tensions. The radiosensitivities of these tissues were assessed by the crypt survival assay and the acute skin reaction, respectively. The radiosensitivity of CaNT tumours to single fraction irradiation was assessed by the regrowth delay assay following administration of single or multiple does of BW12C at varying times to air-breathing CBA mice. The radiation response was compared to the radiosensitivity of clamped tumours. The effect of BW12C alone on tumours was assessed by regrowth delay and histological examination for necrosis. Single or multiple doses of BW12C did not influence the radiosensitivity of CaNT tumours, although marked radioprotection could be induced by clamping the tumours during irradiation. Multiple doses of BW12C alone led to a slight increase in necrosis of the CaNT tumour but did not alter its growth rate. BW12C alone did not induce necrosis of the murine JT lymphoma. The results shown that BW12C did not have a significant effect as a radioprotective or necrotizing agent in these experimental systems. The reported differences in the radiomodifying effects of BW12C are probably tissue-specific and relate to complex biochemical and physiological interactions. 18 refs., 4 figs

  5. Detection of hypoxic fractions in murine tumors by comet assay: Comparison with other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Q.; Kavanagh, M.C.; Newcombe, D.

    1995-01-01

    The alkaline comet assay was used to detect the hypoxic fractions of murine tumors. A total of four tumor types were tested using needle aspiration biopsies taken immediately after a radiation dose of 15 Gy. Initial studies confirmed that the normalized tail moment, a parameter reflecting single-strand DNA breaks induced by the radiation, was linearly related to radiation dose. Further, it was shown that for a mixed population (1:1) of cells irradiated under air-breathing or hypoxic conditions, the histogram of normal tail moment values obtained from analyzing 400 cells in the population had a double peak which, when fitted with two Gaussian distributions, gave a good estimate of the proportion of the two subpopulations. For the four tumor types, the means of the calculated hypoxic fractions from four or five individual tumors were 0.15 ± 0.04 for B16F1, 0.08 ± 0.04 for KHT-LP1, 0.17 ± 0.04 for RIF-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 for SCCVII. Analysis of variance showed that the hypoxic fraction in KHT-LP1 tumors is significantly lower than those of the other three tumors (P = 0.026) but that there is no significant difference in hypoxic fraction between B16F1, RIF-1 and SCCVII tumors (P = 0.574). Results from multiple samples taken from each of five RIF-1 tumors showed that the intertumor heterogeneity of hypoxic fractions was greater than that within the same tumor. The mean hypoxic fraction obtained using the comet assay for the four tumor types was compared with the hypoxic fraction determined by the clonogenic assay, or median pO 2 values, or [ 3 H]misonidazole binding in the same tumor types. The values of hypoxic fraction obtained with the comet assay were two to four times lower than those measured by the paired survival method. Preliminary results obtained with a dose of 5 Gy were consistent with those obtained using 15 Gy. These results suggest the further development of the comet assay for clinical studies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Upregulation of cellular glutathione levels in human ABCB5- and murine Abcb5-transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shingo; Hongama, Keita; Hanaya, Kengo; Yoshida, Ryota; Kawanobe, Takaaki; Katayama, Kazuhiro; Noguchi, Kohji; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu

    2015-12-15

    Previously, we have demonstrated that human ABCB5 is a full-sized ATP-binding cassette transporter that shares strong homology with ABCB1/P-glycoprotein. ABCB5-transfected cells showed resistance to taxanes and anthracyclines. Herein, we further screened ABCB5 substrates, and explored the mechanism of resistance. Sensitivity of the cells to test compounds was evaluated using cell growth inhibition assay. Cellular levels of buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), glutathione and amino acids were measured using HPLC and an enzyme-based assay. Cellular and vesicular transport of glutathione was evaluated by a radiolabeled substrate. Expression levels of glutathione-metabolizing enzymes were assessed by RT-PCR. Human ABCB5-transfected 293/B5-11 cells and murine Abcb5-transfected 293/mb5-8 cells showed 6.5- and 14-fold higher resistance to BSO than the mock-transfected 293/mock cells, respectively. BSO is an inhibitor of gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCL), which is a key enzyme of glutathione synthesis. 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells also showed resistance to methionine sulfoximine, another GCL inhibitor. A cellular uptake experiment revealed that BSO accumulation in 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells was similar to that in 293/mock cells, suggesting that BSO is not an ABCB5 substrate. The cellular glutathione content in 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells was significantly higher than that in 293/mock cells. Evaluation of the BSO effect on the cellular glutathione content showed that compared with 293/mock cells the BSO concentration required for a 50 % reduction in glutathione content in 293/B5-11 and 293/mb5-8 cells was approximately 2- to 3-fold higher. This result suggests that the BSO resistance of the ABCB5- and Abcb5-transfected cells can be attributed to the reduced effect of BSO on the transfectants. Cellular and vesicular transport assays showed that the transport of radiolabeled glutathione in 293/B5-11 cells was similar to that in 293/mock cells. The mRNA expression of genes

  7. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  8. When is protein binding important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Chest radiographic findings of tsutsugamushi disease and murine typhus in Chunchon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heung Chul; Han, Tae Giun; Jang, Won Ho; Hwang, Woo Chul; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Myoung Gu; Kim, Yoon Won [School of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate the chest radiographic findings of rickettsial disease including murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease in Chunchon. Chest radiographic films of 81 cases diagnosed as rickettsial disease(55 cases of tsutsugamushi disease, 26 cases of murine typhus) by immunofluorescence test were retrospectively analyzed. Main serotypes of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were Gilliam and Karp. Incidence rate of tsutsugamushi disease was 2.1 times greater than that of murine typhus. Chest radiographs were abnormal in 63.6% of tsutsugamushi disease, and in 30.8% of murine typhus. Radiographic findings were Kerly's B line, reticulonodular densities, hilar enlargement, pleural effusion, and splenomegaly in both entities, but pulmonary consolidation was only found in tsutsugamushi disease. The patients with the abnormal radiographic findings were statistically well correlated with cardiomegaly ({rho} < 0.01) and azygos engorgement ({rho} < 0.05), as compared to the patients with normal radiographic findings. Radiographic findings of both murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease were interstitial pattern. But the chest radiographs in patients with tsutsugamushi disease showed more severe pattern with higher rate of abnormality.

  10. Enhanced detection and study of murine norovirus-1 using a more efficient microglial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yuanan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Noroviruses are the predominant cause of non-bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. To facilitate prevention and control, a norovirus isolated from mice can provide a model to understand human noroviruses. To establish optimal viral infectivity conditions for murine noroviruses, several cell lines of hematopoietic lineage, including murine BV-2, RAW 264.7, and TIB, as well as human CHME-5, were tested comparatively for their sensitivity to murine norovirus-1. Results Except for CHME-5, all three murine-derived cell lines were susceptible to MNV infection. Viral infection of these cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. Using both viral plaque and replication assays, BV-2 and RAW 264.7 cells were determined to have comparable sensitivities to MNV-1 infection. Comparisons of cell growth characteristics, general laboratory handling and potential in-field applications suggest the use of BV-2 to be more advantageous. Conclusion Results obtained from these studies demonstrate that an immortalized microglial cell line can support MNV-1 replication and provides a more efficient method to detect and study murine noroviruses, facilitating future investigations using MNV-1 as a model to study, detect, and control Human Norovirus.

  11. Chest radiographic findings of tsutsugamushi disease and murine typhus in Chunchon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Heung Chul; Han, Tae Giun; Jang, Won Ho; Hwang, Woo Chul; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Myoung Gu; Kim, Yoon Won; Park, Choong Ki

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the chest radiographic findings of rickettsial disease including murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease in Chunchon. Chest radiographic films of 81 cases diagnosed as rickettsial disease(55 cases of tsutsugamushi disease, 26 cases of murine typhus) by immunofluorescence test were retrospectively analyzed. Main serotypes of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were Gilliam and Karp. Incidence rate of tsutsugamushi disease was 2.1 times greater than that of murine typhus. Chest radiographs were abnormal in 63.6% of tsutsugamushi disease, and in 30.8% of murine typhus. Radiographic findings were Kerly's B line, reticulonodular densities, hilar enlargement, pleural effusion, and splenomegaly in both entities, but pulmonary consolidation was only found in tsutsugamushi disease. The patients with the abnormal radiographic findings were statistically well correlated with cardiomegaly (ρ < 0.01) and azygos engorgement (ρ < 0.05), as compared to the patients with normal radiographic findings. Radiographic findings of both murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease were interstitial pattern. But the chest radiographs in patients with tsutsugamushi disease showed more severe pattern with higher rate of abnormality

  12. Chest radiographic findings of tsutsugamushi disease and murine typhus in Chunchon

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    Kim, Heung Chul; Han, Tae Giun; Jang, Won Ho; Hwang, Woo Chul; Park, Man Soo; Lee, Myoung Gu; Kim, Yoon Won [School of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Choong Ki [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Guri (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-06-15

    To evaluate the chest radiographic findings of rickettsial disease including murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease in Chunchon. Chest radiographic films of 81 cases diagnosed as rickettsial disease(55 cases of tsutsugamushi disease, 26 cases of murine typhus) by immunofluorescence test were retrospectively analyzed. Main serotypes of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi were Gilliam and Karp. Incidence rate of tsutsugamushi disease was 2.1 times greater than that of murine typhus. Chest radiographs were abnormal in 63.6% of tsutsugamushi disease, and in 30.8% of murine typhus. Radiographic findings were Kerly's B line, reticulonodular densities, hilar enlargement, pleural effusion, and splenomegaly in both entities, but pulmonary consolidation was only found in tsutsugamushi disease. The patients with the abnormal radiographic findings were statistically well correlated with cardiomegaly ({rho} < 0.01) and azygos engorgement ({rho} < 0.05), as compared to the patients with normal radiographic findings. Radiographic findings of both murine typhus and tsutsugamushi disease were interstitial pattern. But the chest radiographs in patients with tsutsugamushi disease showed more severe pattern with higher rate of abnormality.

  13. Temporal Regulation of fim Genes in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli during Infection of the Murine Urinary Tract

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    William R. Schwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC adhere to cells in the human urinary tract via type 1 pili that undergo phase variation where a 314-bp fimS DNA element flips between Phase-ON and Phase-OFF orientations through two site-specific recombinases, FimB and FimE. Three fim-lux operon transcriptional fusions were created and moved into the clinical UPEC isolate NU149 to determine their temporal regulation in UPEC growing in the urinary tract. Within murine urinary tracts, the UPEC strains demonstrated elevated transcription of fimA and fimB early in the infection, but lower transcription by the fifth day in murine kidneys. In contrast, fimE transcription was much lower than either fimA or fimB early, increased markedly at 24 h after inoculation, and then dropped five days after inoculation. Positioning of fimS was primarily in the Phase-ON position over the time span in UPEC infected bladders, whereas in UPEC infected murine kidneys the Phase-OFF orientation was favored by the fifth day after inoculation. Hemagglutination titers with guinea pig erythrocytes remained constant in UPEC growing in infected murine bladders but fell substantially in UPEC infected kidneys over time. Our results show temporal in vivo regulation of fim gene expression in different environmental niches when UPEC infects the murine urinary tract.

  14. Intrapulmonary Versus Nasal Transduction of Murine Airways With GP64-pseudotyped Viral Vectors

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    Mayumi Oakland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral vector-mediated transgene expression in the airways requires delivery to cells with progenitor capacity and avoidance of immune responses. Previously, we observed that GP64-pseudotyped feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-mediated gene transfer was more efficient in the nasal airways than the large airways of the murine lung. We hypothesized that in vivo gene transfer was limited by immunological and physiological barriers in the murine intrapulmonary airways. Here, we systematically investigate multiple potential barriers to lentiviral gene transfer in the airways of mice. We show that GP64-FIV vector transduced primary cultures of well-differentiated murine nasal epithelia with greater efficiency than primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelia. We further demonstrate that neutrophils, type I interferon (IFN responses, as well as T and B lymphocytes are not the major factors limiting the transduction of murine conducting airways. In addition, we observed better transduction of GP64-pseudotyped vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV in the nasal epithelia compared with the intrapulmonary airways in mice. VSVG glycoprotein pseudotyped VSV transduced intrapulmonary epithelia with similar efficiency as nasal epithelia. Our results suggest that the differential transduction efficiency of nasal versus intrapulmonary airways by FIV vector is not a result of immunological barriers or surface area, but rather differential expression of cellular factors specific for FIV vector transduction.

  15. Crystal structure of the gamma-2 herpesvirus LANA DNA binding domain identifies charged surface residues which impact viral latency.

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    Bruno Correia

    Full Text Available Latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA mediates γ2-herpesvirus genome persistence and regulates transcription. We describe the crystal structure of the murine gammaherpesvirus-68 LANA C-terminal domain at 2.2 Å resolution. The structure reveals an alpha-beta fold that assembles as a dimer, reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1. A predicted DNA binding surface is present and opposite this interface is a positive electrostatic patch. Targeted DNA recognition substitutions eliminated DNA binding, while certain charged patch mutations reduced bromodomain protein, BRD4, binding. Virus containing LANA abolished for DNA binding was incapable of viable latent infection in mice. Virus with mutations at the charged patch periphery exhibited substantial deficiency in expansion of latent infection, while central region substitutions had little effect. This deficiency was independent of BRD4. These results elucidate the LANA DNA binding domain structure and reveal a unique charged region that exerts a critical role in viral latent infection, likely acting through a host cell protein(s.

  16. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium Std fimbriae bind terminal α (1,2)fucose residues in the cecal mucosa

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    Chessa, Daniela; Winter, Maria G.; Jakomin, Marcello; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The std operon encodes a fimbrial adhesin of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium that is required for attachment to intestinal epithelial cells and for cecal colonization in the mouse. To study the mechanism by which this virulence factor contributes to colonization we characterized its binding specificity. Std-mediated binding to human colonic epithelial (Caco-2) cells could be abrogated by removing N-linked glycans. Adherence of Std fimbriated S. Typhimurium to Caco-2 cells could be blocked by co-incubation with H type 2 oligosaccharide (Fucα1-2Galβ1-4GlcNAc) or by pretreatment of cells with α1-2 fucosidase. In contrast, pretreatment of Caco-2 cells with neuraminidase or co-incubation with the type 2 disaccharide precursor (Galβ1-4GlcNAc) did not reduce adherence of Std fimbriated S. Typhimurium. Binding of purified Std fimbriae to Fucα1-2Galβ1-4GlcNAc in a solid phase binding assay was competitively inhibited by Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), a lectin specific for Fucα1-2 moieties. Purified Std fimbriae and UEA both bound to a receptor localized in the mucus layer of the murine cecum. These data suggest that the std operon encodes an adhesin that binds an α1-2 fucosylated receptor(s) present in the cecal mucosa. PMID:19183274

  17. Anti-tumor activity of a novel HS-mimetic-vascular endothelial growth factor binding small molecule.

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    Kazuyuki Sugahara

    Full Text Available The angiogenic process is controlled by variety of factors of which the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF pathway plays a major role. A series of heparan sulfate mimetic small molecules targeting VEGF/VEGFR pathway has been synthesized. Among them, compound 8 (2-butyl-5-chloro-3-(4-nitro-benzyl-3H-imidazole-4-carbaldehyde was identified as a significant binding molecule for the heparin-binding domain of VEGF, determined by high-throughput-surface plasmon resonance assay. The data predicted strong binding of compound 8 with VEGF which may prevent the binding of VEGF to its receptor. We compared the structure of compound 8 with heparan sulfate (HS, which have in common the functional ionic groups such as sulfate, nitro and carbaldehyde that can be located in similar positions of the disaccharide structure of HS. Molecular docking studies predicted that compound 8 binds at the heparin binding domain of VEGF through strong hydrogen bonding with Lys-30 and Gln-20 amino acid residues, and consistent with the prediction, compound 8 inhibited binding of VEGF to immobilized heparin. In vitro studies showed that compound 8 inhibits the VEGF-induced proliferation migration and tube formation of mouse vascular endothelial cells, and finally the invasion of a murine osteosarcoma cell line (LM8G7 which secrets high levels of VEGF. In vivo, these effects produce significant decrease of tumor burden in an experimental model of liver metastasis. Collectively, these data indicate that compound 8 may prevent tumor growth through a direct effect on tumor cell proliferation and by inhibition of endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis mediated by VEGF. In conclusion, compound 8 may normalize the tumor vasculature and microenvironment in tumors probably by inhibiting the binding of VEGF to its receptor.

  18. Ascorbyl stearate and ionizing radiation potentiate apoptosis through intracellular thiols and oxidative stress in murine T lymphoma cells.

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    Mane, Shirish D; Kamatham, Akhilender Naidu

    2018-02-01

    Ascorbyl stearate (Asc-s) is a derivative of ascorbic acid with better anti-tumour efficacy compared to its parent compound ascorbic acid. In this study, we have examined radio-sensitizing effect of Asc-s in murine T cell lymphoma (EL4) cells at 4 Gy. Asc-s and radiation treatment reduced cell proliferation, induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner by arresting the cells at S/G2-M phase of cell cycle. It also decreased the frequency of cancer stem cells per se, with significantly higher decrease in combination with radiation treatment./Further, Asc-s and radiation treatment increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), drop in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and increased caspase-3 activity resulting in apoptosis of EL4 cells. Further it also significantly decreased GSH/GSSG ratio due to binding of Asc-s with thiols. The increase in oxidative stress induced by Asc-s and radiation treatment was abrogated by thiol antioxidants in EL4 cells. Interestingly, this redox modulation triggered significant increase in protein glutathionylation in a time dependent manner. Asc-s treatment resulted in glutathionylation of IKK, p50-NF-kB and mutated p53, thereby inhibiting cancer progression during oxidative stress. Asc-s quenches GSH ensuing Asc-s + GSH adduct thereby further modulating GSH/GSSG ratio as evident from HPLC and docking studies. The anti-tumour effect of Asc-s along with radiation was studied by injecting EL4 cells in synegenicC57/BL6 male mice. Intraperitoneal injection of Asc-s followed by radiation exposure at 4 Gy to the tumour bearing mice resulted in radio-sensitization which is evident from significant regression of tumour as evident from tumour burden index. The survival study supports the data that Asc-s pre-treatment enhances radio-sensitization in murine lymphoma. Our data, suggest that Asc-s and ionizing radiation induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by perturbing redox balance through irreversible complexes of thiols with Asc

  19. Two distinct affinity binding sites for IL-1 on human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensimon, C.; Wakasugi, N.; Tagaya, Y.; Takakura, K.; Yodoi, J.; Tursz, T.; Wakasugi, H.

    1989-01-01

    We used two human cell lines, NK-like YT-C3 and an EBV-containing B cell line, 3B6, as models to study the receptor(s) for IL-1. Two distinct types of saturable binding sites were found on both cell lines at 37 degrees C. Between 1 pM and 100 pM of 125I-IL-1-alpha concentration, saturable binding sites were detected on the YT-C3 cells with a K of 4 x 10(-11) M. The K found for the IL-1-alpha binding sites on 3B6 cells was 7.5 x 10(-11) M. An additional binding curve was detected above 100 pM on YT-C3 cells with a K of 7 x 10(-9) M and on 3B6 cells with a K of 5 x 10(-9) M. Scatchard plot analysis revealed 600 sites/cell with high affinity binding and 7000 sites/cell with low affinity for YT-C3 cells and 300 sites/cell with high affinity binding and 6000 sites/cell with low affinity for 3B6 cells. At 37 degrees C, the internalization of 125I-labeled IL-1 occurred via both high and low affinity IL-1R on both YT-C3 and 3B6 cells, whereas the rates of internalization for high affinity binding sites on YT-C3 cells were predominant in comparison to that of low affinity binding sites. In chemical cross-linking studies of 125 I-IL-1-alpha to 3B6 and YT-C3 cells, two protein bands were immunoprecipitated with Mr around 85 to 90 kDa leading to an estimation of the Mr of the IL-1R around 68 to 72 kDa. In similar experiments, the Mr found for the IL-1R expressed on the murine T cell line EL4 was slightly higher (around 80 kDa). Whether these distinct affinity binding sites are shared by a single molecule or by various chains remains to be elucidated

  20. Critical transition in tissue homeostasis accompanies murine lung senescence.

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    Carla L Calvi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory dysfunction is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in aged populations. The susceptibility to pulmonary insults is attributed to "low pulmonary reserve", ostensibly reflecting a combination of age-related musculoskeletal, immunologic and intrinsic pulmonary dysfunction. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a murine model of the aging lung, senescent DBA/2 mice, we correlated a longitudinal survey of airspace size and injury measures with a transcriptome from the aging lung at 2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 months of age. Morphometric analysis demonstrated a nonlinear pattern of airspace caliber enlargement with a critical transition occurring between 8 and 12 months of age marked by an initial increase in oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation which is soon followed by inflammatory cell infiltration, immune complex deposition and the onset of airspace enlargement. The temporally correlative transcriptome showed exuberant induction of immunoglobulin genes coincident with airspace enlargement. Immunohistochemistry, ELISA analysis and flow cytometry demonstrated increased immunoglobulin deposition in the lung associated with a contemporaneous increase in activated B-cells expressing high levels of TLR4 (toll receptor 4 and CD86 and macrophages during midlife. These midlife changes culminate in progressive airspace enlargement during late life stages. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings establish that a tissue-specific aging program is evident during a presenescent interval which involves early oxidative stress, cell death and elastase activation, followed by B lymphocyte and macrophage expansion/activation. This sequence heralds the progression to overt airspace enlargement in the aged lung. These signature events, during middle age, indicate that early stages of the aging immune system may have important correlates in the maintenance of tissue morphology. We further show that time-course analyses of aging

  1. Helicobacter pylori impairs murine dendritic cell responses to infection.

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    Ya-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric malignancies, is generally viewed as an extracellular microorganism. Here, we show that H. pylori replicates in murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDCs within autophagosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 10-fold increase of CFU is found between 2 h and 6 h p.i. in H. pylori-infected BMDCs. Autophagy is induced around the bacterium and participates at late time points of infection for the clearance of intracellular H. pylori. As a consequence of infection, LC3, LAMP1 and MHC class II molecules are retained within the H. pylori-containing vacuoles and export of MHC class II molecules to cell surface is blocked. However, formalin-fixed H. pylori still maintain this inhibitory activity in BMDC derived from wild type mice, but not in from either TLR4 or TLR2-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of H. pylori-LPS in this process. TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 expression was also modulated upon infection showing a TLR2-specific dependent IL-10 secretion. No IL-12 was detected favoring the hypothesis of a down modulation of DC functions during H. pylori infection. Furthermore, antigen-specific T cells proliferation was also impaired upon infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori can infect and replicate in BMDCs and thereby affects DC-mediated immune responses. The implication of this new finding is discussed for the biological life cycle of H. pylori in the host.

  2. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Human norovirus (NoV) causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV) as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA) or glutaraldehyde (GDA) for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v)] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v)] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA) on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes). Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces. PMID:19583832

  3. Inactivation of murine norovirus by chemical biocides on stainless steel

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    Steinmann Jörg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human norovirus (NoV causes more than 80% of nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Europe and the United States. NoV transmission via contaminated surfaces may be significant for the spread of viruses. Therefore, measures for prevention and control, such as surface disinfection, are necessary to interrupt the dissemination of human NoV. Murine norovirus (MNV as a surrogate for human NoV was used to study the efficacy of active ingredients of chemical disinfectants for virus inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Methods The inactivating properties of different chemical biocides were tested in a quantitative carrier test with stainless steel discs without mechanical action. Vacuum-dried MNV was exposed to different concentrations of alcohols, peracetic acid (PAA or glutaraldehyde (GDA for 5 minutes exposure time. Detection of residual virus was determined by endpoint-titration on RAW 264.7 cells. Results PAA [1000 ppm], GDA [2500 ppm], ethanol [50% (v/v] and 1-propanol [30% (v/v] were able to inactivate MNV under clean conditions (0.03% BSA on the carriers by ≥ 4 log10 within 5 minutes exposure time, whereas 2-propanol showed a reduced effectiveness even at 60% (v/v. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in virus reduction whatever interfering substances were used. When testing with ethanol, 1- and 2-propanol, results under clean conditions were nearly the same as in the presence of dirty conditions (0.3% BSA plus 0.3% erythrocytes. Conclusion Products based upon PAA, GDA, ethanol and 1-propanol should be used for NoV inactivation on inanimate surfaces. Our data provide valuable information for the development of strategies to control NoV transmission via surfaces.

  4. Effect of bleaching agent extracts on murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Aletéia M M; Vilela, Polyana G F; Valera, Marcia C; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and the influence of bleaching agents on immunologically cell surface antigens of murine macrophages in vitro. RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to bleaching gel extracts (40% hydrogen peroxide or 20% carbamide peroxide) and different H 2 O 2 concentrations after 1 and 24-h exposure periods and 1-h exposure and 23-h recovery. Tests were performed with and without N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The expression of surface markers CD14, CD40, and CD54 with and without LPS stimulation was detected by flow cytometry, while the production of TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test (α = 0.05). Extracts of bleaching agents were cytotoxic for cells after a 1-h exposure; cells could not recover after 24 h. This effect can be mitigated by the antioxidant NAC and increased by BSO, an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis. LPS stimulated expression of all surface markers and TNF-α production. Exposure to bleaching agent extracts and H 2 O 2 leads to a reduction of TNF-α, CD14, and CD40 expression, while the expression of CD54 was upregulated at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Whereas NAC reduced this effect, it was increased in the presence of BSO. Extracts of bleaching agents were irreversibly cytotoxic to macrophages after a 1-h exposure. Only the expression of CD54 was upregulated. The reactions are mediated by the non-enzymatic antioxidant GSH. The addition of an antioxidant can downregulate unfavorable effects of dental bleaching.

  5. In vitro assessment of curcumin against murine neuroblastoma cells.

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    Vanisree, Arambakkam Janardhanam; Ramanan, Ramya

    2007-04-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a well-known malignant disease in infants, which comprises 10% of childhood malignancies. Despite recent advances in understanding the neuro-oncology, NB still accounts for more death in childhood than any other cancer. Research in childhood tumors should not only be focused on the malignant signatures of cancer cells but also novel drug prototypes using phytochemicals. The present study was aimed to determine the role of curcumin against murine neuroblastoma cell line (N2a). The in vitro assessment of curcumin against was made in N2a cell line in a dose-dependent manner (group I (control) and group II - IX (10 microM-80 microM). The efficacy of the drug was evaluated by estimating the levels of protein bound carbohydrates, glycoprotein, genomic DNA, total RNA levels, and inhibition of MMP-9 were studied. The gap junctional communication in the cells was also assessed. The levels of protein bound carbohydrates, DNA, RNA levels, glycoprotein were found to be altered on drug supplementation in NB cells. Inhibition of MMP-9 in curcumin-supplemented N2a cells was revealed by zymographic analysis. Assessment of Lucifer yellow dye uptake in curcumin-supplemented N2a cells showed the up-regulation of GJIC. These observations suggest that the curcumin, the active principle of curcuma longa, could be developed into an effective chemo preventive and chemotherapeutic agent. This selected concentration range needs further studies at molecular level, for conforming its role and its action against uncontrolled proliferation of NB.

  6. Murine model for congenital CMV infection and hearing impairment

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    Tao Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV infection is the leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, and SNHL is the most frequent sequela of congenital CMV infection. But the pathogenic mechanism remains unknown, and there is no ideal CMV intrauterine infection animal model to study the mechanisms by which SNHL develops. Methods We established the congenital murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection model by directly injecting the virus into the placenta on day 12.5 of gestation. Then, we observed the development and the MCMV congenital infection rate of the fetuses on the day they were born. Furthermore, we detected the auditory functions, the conditions of the MCMV infection, and the histological change of the inner ears of 28-day-old and 70-day-old offspring. Results Both the fetal loss rate and the teratism rate of offspring whose placentas were inoculated with MCMV increased, and their body length, head circumference, and weight decreased. The hearing level of offspring both decreased at both 28- and 70-days post birth; the 70-day-old mice developed lower hearing levels than did the 28-day old mice. No significant inflammatory changes in the cochleae of the mice were observed. MCMV DNA signals were mainly detected in the spiral ganglion neurons and the endolymph area, but not in the perilymph area. The number of neurons decreased, and their ultrastructures changed. Moreover, with age, the number of neurons dramatically decreased, and the ultrastructural lesions of neurons became much more severe. Conclusions The results suggest that the direct injection of MCMV into the placenta may efficiently cause fetal infection and disturb the intrauterine development of the fetus, and placental inoculation itself has no obvious adverse effects on offspring. The reduction in the number of spiral ganglion neurons and the ultrastructural lesions of the neurons may be the major cause of congenital CMV infection-induced progressive SNHL.

  7. Murine macrophage heparanase: inhibition and comparison with metastatic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savion, N.; Disatnik, M.H.; Nevo, Z.

    1987-01-01

    Circulating macrophages and metastatic tumor cells can penetrate the vascular endothelium and migrate from the circulatory system to extravascular compartments. Both activated murine macrophages and different metastatic tumor cells attach, invade, and penetrate confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro, by degrading heparan sulfate proteoglycans in the subendothelial extracellular matrix. The sensitivity of the enzymes from the various sources degrading the heparan sulfate proteoglycan was challenged and compared by a series of inhibitors. Activated macrophages demonstrate a heparanase with an endoglycosidase activity that cleaves from the [ 35 S]O 4 - -labeled heparan sulfate proteoglycans of the extracellular matrix 10 kDa glycosaminoglycan fragments. The degradation of [ 35 S]O 4 - -labeled extracellular matrix proteoglycans by the macrophages' heparanase is significantly inhibited in the presence of heparan sulfate (10μg/ml), arteparon (10μg/ml), and heparin at a concentration of 3 μg/ml. Degradation of this heparan sulfate proteoglycan is a two-step sequential process involving protease activity followed by heparanase activity. B16-BL6 metastatic melanoma cell heparanase, which is also a cell-associated enzyme, was inhibited by heparin to the same extent as the macrophage haparanase. On the other hand, heparanase of the highly metastatic variant (ESb) of a methylcholanthrene-induced T lymphoma, which is an extracellular enzyme released by the cells to the incubation medium, was more sensitive to heparin and arteparon than the macrophages' heparanase. These results may indicate the potential use of heparin or other glycosaminoglycans as specific and differential inhibitors for the formation in certain cases of blood-borne tumor metastasis

  8. Radiobiologic effect of intermittent radiation exposure in murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugie, Chikao; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ito, Masato; Ogino, Hiroyuki; Miyamoto, Akihiko; Fukaya, Nobuyuki; Niimi, Hiroshige; Hashizume, Takuya

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In stereotactic irradiation using a linear accelerator, the effect of radiation may be reduced during intermittent exposures owing to recovery from sublethal damage in tumor cells. After our previous in vitro study suggesting this phenomenon, we investigated the issue in murine tumors. Methods and Materials: We used EMT6 and SCCVII tumors approximately 1 cm in diameter growing in the hind legs of syngeneic mice. Three schedules of intermittent radiation were investigated. First, 2 fractions of 10 Gy were given at an interval of 15-360 min to investigate the pattern of recovery from sublethal damage. Second, 5 fractions of 4 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 2.5-15 min each. Third, 10 fractions of 2 Gy were given with interfraction intervals of 1-7 min each. Doses of 15-20 Gy were also given without interruption to estimate the dose-modifying factors. Tumors were excised 20 h later, and tumor cell survival was determined by an in vivo-in vitro assay. Results: In the 2-fraction experiment, the increase in cell survival with elongation of the interval was much less than that observed in our previous in vitro study. In the 5- and 10-fraction experiments, no significant increase in cell survival was observed after the intermittent exposures. Moreover, cell survival decreased at most points of the 5-fraction experiments by interruption of radiation in both EMT6 and SCCVII tumors. In the 10-fraction experiment, cell survival also decreased when the interruption was 3 or 7 min in EMT6 tumors. Conclusion: The results of the present in vivo studies were different from those of our in vitro studies in which cell survival increased significantly when a few minutes or longer intervals were posed between fractions. This suggests that recovery from sublethal damage in vivo may be counterbalanced by other phenomena such as reoxygenation that sensitizes tumor cells to subsequent irradiation

  9. Nuclear localization of Annexin A7 during murine brain development

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    Noegel Angelika A

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annexin A7 is a member of the annexin protein family, which is characterized by its ability to interact with phospholipids in the presence of Ca2+-ions and which is thought to function in Ca2+-homeostasis. Results from mutant mice showed altered Ca2+-wave propagation in astrocytes. As the appearance and distribution of Annexin A7 during brain development has not been investigated so far, we focused on the distribution of Annexin A7 protein during mouse embryogenesis in the developing central nervous system and in the adult mouse brain. Results Annexin A7 is expressed in cells of the developing brain where a change in its subcellular localization from cytoplasm to nucleus was observed. In the adult CNS, the subcellular distribution of Annexin A7 depends on the cell type. By immunohistochemistry analysis Annexin A7 was detected in the cytosol of undifferentiated cells at embryonic days E5–E8. At E11–E15 the protein is still present in the cytosol of cells predominantly located in the ventricular germinative zone surrounding the lateral ventricle. Later on, at embryonic day E16, Annexin A7 in cells of the intermediate and marginal zone of the neopallium translocates to the nucleus. Neuronal cells of all areas in the adult brain present Annexin A7 in the nucleus, whereas glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP-positive astrocytes exhibit both, a cytoplasmic and nuclear staining. The presence of nuclear Annexin A7 was confirmed by extraction of the nucleoplasm from isolated nuclei obtained from neuronal and astroglial cell lines. Conclusion We have demonstrated a translocation of Annexin A7 to nuclei of cells in early murine brain development and the presence of Annexin A7 in nuclei of neuronal cells in the adult animal. The role of Annexin A7 in nuclei of differentiating and mature neuronal cells remains elusive.

  10. Development of a murine model of blunt hepatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A; Hwang, Haejin; Hampel, Joseph A; Yu, Bi; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2013-10-01

    Despite the prevalence of blunt hepatic trauma in humans, there are few rodent models of blunt trauma that can be used to study the associated inflammatory responses. We present a mouse model of blunt hepatic trauma that was created by using a cortical contusion device. Male mice were anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine-buprenorphine and placed in left lateral recumbency. A position of 2 mm ventral to the posterior axillary line and 5 mm caudal to the costal margin on the right side was targeted for impact. An impact velocity of 6 m/s and a piston depth of 12 mm produced a consistent pattern of hepatic injury with low mortality. All mice that recovered from anesthesia survived without complication for the length of the study. Mice were euthanized at various time points (n = 5 per group) until 7 d after injury for gross examination and collection of blood and peritoneal lavage fluids. Some mice were reanesthetized for serial monitoring of hepatic lesions via MRI. At 2 h after trauma, mice consistently displayed laceration, hematoma, and discoloration of the right lateral and caudate liver lobes, with intraabdominal hemorrhage but no other gross injuries. Blood and peritoneal lavage fluid were collected from all mice for cytokine analysis. At 2 h after trauma, there were significant increases in plasma IL10 as well as peritoneal lavage fluid IL6 and CXCL1/KC; however, these levels decreased within 24 h. At 7 d after trauma, the mice had regained body weight, and the hepatic lesions, which initially had increased in size during the first 48 h, had returned to their original size. In summary, this technique produced a reliable, low mortality, murine model that recreates features of blunt abdominal liver injury in human subjects with similar acute inflammatory response.

  11. Ureaplasma parvum causes hyperammonemia in a pharmacologically immunocompromised murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Greenwood-Quaintance, K E; Karau, M J; Block, D R; Mandrekar, J N; Cunningham, S A; Mallea, J M; Patel, R

    2017-03-01

    A relationship between hyperammonemia and Ureaplasma infection has been shown in lung transplant recipients. We have demonstrated that Ureaplasma urealyticum causes hyperammonemia in a novel immunocompromised murine model. Herein, we determined whether Ureaplasma parvum can do the same. Male C3H mice were given mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and prednisone for 7 days, and then challenged with U. parvum intratracheally (IT) and/or intraperitoneally (IP), while continuing immunosuppression over 6 days. Plasma ammonia concentrations were determined and compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Plasma ammonia concentrations of immunosuppressed mice challenged IT/IP with spent broth (median, 188 μmol/L; range, 102-340 μmol/L) were similar to those of normal (median, 226 μmol/L; range, 154-284 μmol/L, p > 0.05), uninfected immunosuppressed (median, 231 μmol/L; range, 122-340 μmol/L, p > 0.05), and U. parvum IT/IP challenged immunocompetent (median, 226 μmol/L; range, 130-330 μmol/L, p > 0.05) mice. Immunosuppressed mice challenged with U. parvum IT/IP (median 343 μmol/L; range 136-1,000 μmol/L) or IP (median 307 μmol/L; range 132-692 μmol/L) had higher plasma ammonia concentrations than those challenged IT/IP with spent broth (p < 0.001). U. parvum can cause hyperammonemia in pharmacologically immunocompromised mice.

  12. Discrete innervation of murine taste buds by peripheral taste neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Faisal N; Whitehead, Mark C

    2006-08-09

    The peripheral taste system likely maintains a specific relationship between ganglion cells that signal a particular taste quality and taste bud cells responsive to that quality. We have explored a measure of the receptoneural relationship in the mouse. By injecting single fungiform taste buds with lipophilic retrograde neuroanatomical markers, the number of labeled geniculate ganglion cells innervating single buds on the tongue were identified. We found that three to five ganglion cells innervate a single bud. Injecting neighboring buds with different color markers showed that the buds are primarily innervated by separate populations of geniculate cells (i.e., multiply labeled ganglion cells are rare). In other words, each taste bud is innervated by a population of neurons that only connects with that bud. Palate bud injections revealed a similar, relatively exclusive receptoneural relationship. Injecting buds in different regions of the tongue did not reveal a topographic representation of buds in the geniculate ganglion, despite a stereotyped patterned arrangement of fungiform buds as rows and columns on the tongue. However, ganglion cells innervating the tongue and palate were differentially concentrated in lateral and rostral regions of the ganglion, respectively. The principal finding that small groups of ganglion cells send sensory fibers that converge selectively on a single bud is a new-found measure of specific matching between the two principal cellular elements of the mouse peripheral taste system. Repetition of the experiments in the hamster showed a more divergent innervation of buds in this species. The results indicate that whatever taste quality is signaled by a murine geniculate ganglion neuron, that signal reflects the activity of cells in a single taste bud.

  13. Enhancers Are Major Targets for Murine Leukemia Virus Vector Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ravin, Suk See; Su, Ling; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Macpherson, Janet L.; Poidinger, Michael; Symonds, Geoff; Pond, Susan M.; Ferris, Andrea L.; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviral vectors have been used in successful gene therapies. However, in some patients, insertional mutagenesis led to leukemia or myelodysplasia. Both the strong promoter/enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors and the vector-specific integration site preferences played an important role in these adverse clinical events. MLV integration is known to prefer regions in or near transcription start sites (TSS). Recently, BET family proteins were shown to be the major cellular proteins responsible for targeting MLV integration. Although MLV integration sites are significantly enriched at TSS, only a small fraction of the MLV integration sites (integration map of more than one million integration sites from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a clinically relevant MLV-based vector. The integration sites form ∼60,000 tight clusters. These clusters comprise ∼1.9% of the genome. The vast majority (87%) of the integration sites are located within histone H3K4me1 islands, a hallmark of enhancers. The majority of these clusters also have H3K27ac histone modifications, which mark active enhancers. The enhancers of some oncogenes, including LMO2, are highly preferred targets for integration without in vivo selection. IMPORTANCE We show that active enhancer regions are the major targets for MLV integration; this means that MLV preferentially integrates in regions that are favorable for viral gene expression in a variety of cell types. The results provide insights for MLV integration target site selection and also explain the high risk of insertional mutagenesis that is associated with gene therapy trials using MLV vectors. PMID:24501411

  14. Therapeutic Potential of Shark Anti-ICOSL VNAR Domains is Exemplified in a Murine Model of Autoimmune Non-Infectious Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Marina; Johnson, Katherine; Steven, John; Barelle, Caroline J; Porter, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Induced costimulatory ligand (ICOSL) plays an important role in the activation of T cells through its interaction with the inducible costimulator, ICOS. Suppression of full T cell activation can be achieved by blocking this interaction and has been shown to be an effective means of ameliorating disease in models of autoimmunity and inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of a novel class of anti-ICOSL antigen-binding single domains derived from sharks (VNARs) to effectively reduce inflammation in a murine model of non-infectious uveitis. In initial selections, specific VNARs that recognized human ICOSL were isolated from an immunized nurse shark phage display library and lead domains were identified following their performance in a series of antigen selectivity and in vitro bioassay screens. High potency in cell-based blocking assays suggested their potential as novel binders suitable for further therapeutic development. To test this hypothesis, surrogate anti-mouse ICOSL VNAR domains were isolated from the same phage display library and the lead VNAR clone selected via screening in binding and ICOS/ICOSL blocking experiments. The VNAR domain with the highest potency in cell-based blocking of ICOS/ICOSL interaction was fused to the Fc portion of human IgG1 and was tested in vivo in a mouse model of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein-induced uveitis. The anti-mICOSL VNAR Fc, injected systemically, resulted in a marked reduction of inflammation in treated mice when compared with untreated control animals. This approach inhibited disease progression to an equivalent extent to that seen for the positive corticosteroid control, cyclosporin A, reducing both clinical and histopathological scores. These results represent the first demonstration of efficacy of a VNAR binding domain in a relevant clinical model of disease and highlight the potential of VNARs for the treatment of auto-inflammatory conditions.

  15. Therapeutic Potential of Shark Anti-ICOSL VNAR Domains is Exemplified in a Murine Model of Autoimmune Non-Infectious Uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kovaleva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Induced costimulatory ligand (ICOSL plays an important role in the activation of T cells through its interaction with the inducible costimulator, ICOS. Suppression of full T cell activation can be achieved by blocking this interaction and has been shown to be an effective means of ameliorating disease in models of autoimmunity and inflammation. In this study, we demonstrated the ability of a novel class of anti-ICOSL antigen-binding single domains derived from sharks (VNARs to effectively reduce inflammation in a murine model of non-infectious uveitis. In initial selections, specific VNARs that recognized human ICOSL were isolated from an immunized nurse shark phage display library and lead domains were identified following their performance in a series of antigen selectivity and in vitro bioassay screens. High potency in cell-based blocking assays suggested their potential as novel binders suitable for further therapeutic development. To test this hypothesis, surrogate anti-mouse ICOSL VNAR domains were isolated from the same phage display library and the lead VNAR clone selected via screening in binding and ICOS/ICOSL blocking experiments. The VNAR domain with the highest potency in cell-based blocking of ICOS/ICOSL interaction was fused to the Fc portion of human IgG1 and was tested in vivo in a mouse model of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein-induced uveitis. The anti-mICOSL VNAR Fc, injected systemically, resulted in a marked reduction of inflammation in treated mice when compared with untreated control animals. This approach inhibited disease progression to an equivalent extent to that seen for the positive corticosteroid control, cyclosporin A, reducing both clinical and histopathological scores. These results represent the first demonstration of efficacy of a VNAR binding domain in a relevant clinical model of disease and highlight the potential of VNARs for the treatment of auto-inflammatory conditions.

  16. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase-mediated signal transduction and interleukin 2 (IL-2) expression in the murine T-cell line, EL4.IL-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, R; Herring, A; Koh, W S; Lee, M; Kaminski, N E

    1996-05-31

    Cannabinoid receptors negatively regulate adenylate cyclase through a pertussis toxin-sensitive GTP-binding protein. In the present studies, signaling via the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway was investigated in the murine thymoma-derived T-cell line, EL4.IL-2. Northern analysis of EL4.IL-2 cells identified the presence of 4-kilobase CB2 but not CB1 receptor-subtype mRNA transcripts. Southern analysis of genomic DNA digests for the CB2 receptor demonstrated identical banding patterns for EL4.IL-2 cells and mouse-derived DNA, both of which were dissimilar to DNA isolated from rat. Treatment of EL4.IL-2 cells with either cannabinol or Delta9-THC disrupted the adenylate cyclase signaling cascade by inhibiting forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation which consequently led to a decrease in protein kinase A activity and the binding of transcription factors to a CRE consensus sequence. Likewise, an inhibition of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)/ionomycin-induced interleukin 2 (IL-2) protein secretion, which correlated to decreased IL-2 gene transcription, was induced by both cannabinol and Delta9-THC. Further, cannabinoid treatment also decreased PMA/ionomycin-induced nuclear factor binding to the AP-1 proximal site of the IL-2 promoter. Conversely, forskolin enhanced PMA/ionomycin-induced AP-1 binding. These findings suggest that inhibition of signal transduction via the adenylate cyclase/cAMP pathway induces T-cell dysfunction which leads to a diminution in IL-2 gene transcription.

  17. Effects of membrane properties on the binding activities of the HN and HC heavy-chain domains of botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2016-12-01

    Binding behaviors of the H N and the H C domains of BoNT/A were investigated individually to identify if there exist any differences in their interaction with the cell membrane. Recombinant fragments corresponding to both BoNT/A H N and H C regions were prepared (H N 519-845 and H C 967-1296) and their binding to synaptic proteins was verified. The binding behaviors of these heavy-chain domains were analyzed by treating the Neuro 2a, a murine neuroblastoma cell line, with compounds known to alter membrane properties. Cholesterol depletion and lipid raft inhibition increased the binding of H N 519-845 to Neuro 2a cells without affecting H C 967-1296-cell interaction. Sphingolipid depletion decreased the binding of cells to both H C 967-1296 and H N 519-845 whereas, loading exogenous GD1a, on to the Neuro 2a cells, increased the binding of both the peptides to cells. Microtubule disruption of the Neuro 2a cells by nocodazole decreased the binding of both H C 967-1296 and H N 519-845 to the treated cells. Inhibition of the clathrin-mediated endocytosis using dynasore, chlorpromazine or potassium (K + ) depletion buffer lowered the binding of both H C 967-1296 and H N 519-845 to the cells, but seemed to exert a more pronounced effect on the binding of H C 967-1296 than on the binding of H N 519-845. Results indicate that while both the H N and H C domains are involved in the binding of the toxin to neuronal cells there are differences in their behavior which probably stem from their respective amino acid composition and structural location in the toxin three-dimensional structure along with their intended role in translocation and internalization into the cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Foreign or Domestic CARs: Receptor Ligands as Antigen-Binding Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Shaffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are increasingly being used in clinical trials to treat a variety of malignant conditions and recent results with CD19-specific CARs showing complete tumor regressions has sparked the interest of researchers and the public alike. Traditional CARs have been generated using single-chain variable fragments (scFv, often derived from murine monoclonal antibodies, for antigen specificity. As the clinical experience with CAR T cells grows, so does the potential for unwanted immune responses against the foreign transgene. Strategies that may reduce the immunogenicity of CAR T cells are humanization of the scFv and the use of naturally occurring receptor ligands as antigen-binding domains. Herein, we review the experience with alternatively designed CARs that contain receptor ligands rather than scFv. While most of the experiences have been in the pre-clinical setting, clinical data is also emerging.

  19. Viral interference with DNA repair by targeting of the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pubali; DeJesus, Rowena; Gjoerup, Ole; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2013-10-01

    Correct repair of damaged DNA is critical for genomic integrity. Deficiencies in DNA repair are linked with human cancer. Here we report a novel mechanism by which a virus manipulates DNA damage responses. Infection with murine polyomavirus sensitizes cells to DNA damage by UV and etoposide. Polyomavirus large T antigen (LT) alone is sufficient to sensitize cells 100 fold to UV and other kinds of DNA damage. This results in activated stress responses and apoptosis. Genetic analysis shows that LT sensitizes via the binding of its origin-binding domain (OBD) to the single-stranded DNA binding protein replication protein A (RPA). Overexpression of RPA protects cells expressing OBD from damage, and knockdown of RPA mimics the LT phenotype. LT prevents recruitment of RPA to nuclear foci after DNA damage. This leads to failure to recruit repair proteins such as Rad51 or Rad9, explaining why LT prevents repair of double strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. A targeted intervention directed at RPA based on this viral mechanism could be useful in circumventing the resistance of cancer cells to therapy.

  20. Design of a potent CD1d-binding NKT cell ligand as a vaccine adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangming; Fujio, Masakazu; Imamura, Masakazu; Wu, Douglass; Vasan, Sandhya; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ho, David D; Tsuji, Moriya

    2010-07-20

    The glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (alpha-GalCer) has been shown to bind CD1d molecules to activate invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, and subsequently induce activation of various immune-competent cells, including dendritic cells, thereby providing a significant adjuvant effect for various vaccines. However, in phase I clinical trials, alpha-GalCer was shown to display only marginal biological activity. In our search for a glycolipid that can exert more potent stimulatory activity against iNKT cells and dendritic cells and produce an adjuvant effect superior to alpha-GalCer, we performed step-wise screening assays on a focused library of 25 alpha-GalCer analogues. Assays included quantification of the magnitude of stimulatory activity against human iNKT cells in vitro, binding affinity to human and murine CD1d molecules, and binding affinity to the invariant t cell receptor of human iNKT cells. Through this rigorous and iterative screening process, we have identified a lead candidate glycolipid, 7DW8-5, that exhibits a superior adjuvant effect than alpha-GalCer on HIV and malaria vaccines in mice.

  1. Hydrodynamic properties of the gonadotropin receptor from a murine Leydig tumor cell line are altered by desensitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebois, R.V.; Bradley, R.M.; Titlow, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    The murine Leydig tumor cell line 1 (MLTC-1) contains gonadotropin receptors (GR) that are coupled to adenylate cyclase through the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein (G/sub s/). The binding of human choriogonadotropin (hGC) causes MLTC-1 cells to accumulate cAMP. With time, the ability of MLTC-1 cells to respond to hCG is attenuated by a process called desensitization. The hydrodynamic properties of GR from control and desensitized MLTC-1 cells were studied. Sucrose density gradient sedimentation in H 2 O and D 2 O and gel filtration chromatography were used to estimate the Stokes radius (a), partial specific volume (v/sub c/), sedimentation coefficient (s/sub 20,w/), and molecular weight (M/sub r/) of the detergent-solubilized hormone-receptor complex (hCG-GR). [ 125 I]hCG was bound to MLTC-1 cells under conditions that allow (37 0 C) or prevent (0 0 C) desensitization, and hCG-GR was solubilized in Triton X-100. In the absence of desensitization, control hCG-GR had a M/sub r/ of 213,000, whereas desensitized hCG-GR had a M/sub r/ of 158,000. Deglycosylated hCG (DG-HCG) is an antagonist that binds to GR with high affinity but fails to stimulate adenylate cyclase or cause desensitization. [ 125 I]DG-hCG was bound to MLTC-1 cells and DG-hCG-GR solubilized in Triton X-100. The hydrodynamic properties of DG-hCG-GR were the same as that for control hCG-GR. There was no evidence for the association of adenylate cyclase or G/sub s/ with GR in Triton X-100 solubilized preparations. When hCG was cross-linked to GR and solubilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the M/sub r/ was found to be 116,000, which was similar to that determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and less than that of the Triton X-100 solubilized control hCG-GR

  2. Local IL-23 expression in murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Tan, Zhijian; Liu, Zhixiang; Xia, Dechao; Li, Jiawen

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the expression of vaginal IL-23 and its role in experimental murine vaginal candidiasis and its relationship with infection and immune status, immuno-competent (group A) and immuno-suppressed (group B) murine models of vaginal candidiasis were established in estrogen-treated mice. Non-estrogen-treated mice were used as controls (group C). The level of IL-23 p19 mRNA in murine vaginal tissue was determined by RT-PCR. Significantly increased levels of IL-23p19mRNA were observed on the 4th, the 7th and 14th day after inoculation in immuno-competent group when compared with that in control group (Pvaginal candidiasis and has a protective function during infection. Low vaginal IL-23 level may correlate with the increased susceptibility to Candida albicans in immuno-suppressed group.

  3. Characterization of an immunodominant cancer-specific O-glycopeptide epitope in murine podoplanin (OTS8)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Catharina; Schjoldager, Katrine T; Cló, Emiliano

    2010-01-01

    antibody 237, developed to a spontaneous murine fibrosarcoma, was shown to be directed to murine podoplanin (OTS8) with truncated Tn O-glycans. Our understanding of such cancer-specific auto-antibodies to truncated glycoforms of glycoproteins is limited. Here we have investigated immunogenicity...... of a chemoenzymatically produced Tn-glycopeptide derived from the putative murine podoplanin O-glycopeptide epitope. We found that the Tn O-glycopeptide was highly immunogenic in mice and produced a Tn-glycoform specific response with no reactivity against unglycosylated peptides or the O-glycopeptide with extended O......-glycan (STn and T glycoforms). The immunodominant epitope was strictly dependent on the peptide sequence, required Tn at a specific single Thr residue (Thr(77)), and antibodies to the epitope were not found in naive mice. We further tested a Tn O-glycopeptide library derived from human podoplanin...

  4. Murine models of H. pylori-induced gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Sabine; Roessner, Albert; Kuester, Doerthe

    2011-10-15

    Laboratory mice have become one of the best animal species for mechanistic studies in gastrointestinal research. Their abundant genetic information, the way of causing carcinogenesis easily by transgenic and gene knockout techniques, limited effort in time and costs, and their practicability provide advantages over other animal models. Meanwhile, several murine practical models have been established for the investigation of the initiation, expansion, and progression of gastritis and gastric carcinoma, for assessing the effects of bacterial, genetic and environmental factors, and for evaluating therapeutic and preventive strategies in gastric diseases. This article gives a review of murine models of gastritis and gastric cancer, placing emphasis on the models associated with Helicobacter pylori infection and techniques used in our laboratory. We discuss matters of murine gastric anatomy, as well as techniques of infection, tissue preparation, and histology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay-Marie Lamar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  6. Overexpression of Latent TGFβ Binding Protein 4 in Muscle Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy through Myostatin and TGFβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamar, Kay-Marie; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon B; Gao, Quan Q; Miller, Tamari; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Vo, Andy H; Wren, Lisa; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2016-05-01

    Latent TGFβ binding proteins (LTBPs) regulate the extracellular availability of latent TGFβ. LTBP4 was identified as a genetic modifier of muscular dystrophy in mice and humans. An in-frame insertion polymorphism in the murine Ltbp4 gene associates with partial protection against muscular dystrophy. In humans, nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in LTBP4 associate with prolonged ambulation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To better understand LTBP4 and its role in modifying muscular dystrophy, we created transgenic mice overexpressing the protective murine allele of LTBP4 specifically in mature myofibers using the human skeletal actin promoter. Overexpression of LTBP4 protein was associated with increased muscle mass and proportionally increased strength compared to age-matched controls. In order to assess the effects of LTBP4 in muscular dystrophy, LTBP4 overexpressing mice were bred to mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In this model, increased LTBP4 led to greater muscle mass with proportionally increased strength, and decreased fibrosis. The increase in muscle mass and reduction in fibrosis were similar to what occurs when myostatin, a related TGFβ family member and negative regulator of muscle mass, was deleted in mdx mice. Supporting this, we found that myostatin forms a complex with LTBP4 and that overexpression of LTBP4 led to a decrease in myostatin levels. LTBP4 also interacted with TGFβ and GDF11, a protein highly related to myostatin. These data identify LTBP4 as a multi-TGFβ family ligand binding protein with the capacity to modify muscle disease through overexpression.

  7. Haematopoietic malignancies caused by dysregulation of a chromatin-binding PHD finger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang G; Song, Jikui; Wang, Zhanxin; Dormann, Holger L; Casadio, Fabio; Li, Haitao; Luo, Jun-Li; Patel, Dinshaw J; Allis, C David

    2009-06-11

    Histone H3 lysine 4 methylation (H3K4me) has been proposed as a critical component in regulating gene expression, epigenetic states, and cellular identities1. The biological meaning of H3K4me is interpreted by conserved modules including plant homeodomain (PHD) fingers that recognize varied H3K4me states. The dysregulation of PHD fingers has been implicated in several human diseases, including cancers and immune or neurological disorders. Here we report that fusing an H3K4-trimethylation (H3K4me3)-binding PHD finger, such as the carboxy-terminal PHD finger of PHF23 or JARID1A (also known as KDM5A or RBBP2), to a common fusion partner nucleoporin-98 (NUP98) as identified in human leukaemias, generated potent oncoproteins that arrested haematopoietic differentiation and induced acute myeloid leukaemia in murine models. In these processes, a PHD finger that specifically recognizes H3K4me3/2 marks was essential for leukaemogenesis. Mutations in PHD fingers that abrogated H3K4me3 binding also abolished leukaemic transformation. NUP98-PHD fusion prevented the differentiation-associated removal of H3K4me3 at many loci encoding lineage-specific transcription factors (Hox(s), Gata3, Meis1, Eya1 and Pbx1), and enforced their active gene transcription in murine haematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Mechanistically, NUP98-PHD fusions act as 'chromatin boundary factors', dominating over polycomb-mediated gene silencing to 'lock' developmentally critical loci into an active chromatin state (H3K4me3 with induced histone acetylation), a state that defined leukaemia stem cells. Collectively, our studies represent, to our knowledge, the first report that deregulation of the PHD finger, an 'effector' of specific histone modification, perturbs the epigenetic dynamics on developmentally critical loci, catastrophizes cellular fate decision-making, and even causes oncogenesis during mammalian development.

  8. Lipoprotein(A) with An Intact Lysine Binding Site Protects the Retina From an Age-Related Macular Degeneration Phenotype in Mice (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, James T.; Tagami, Mizuki; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Leibundgut, Gregor; Janiak, Anna; Witztum, Joseph L.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that the accumulation of oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) in the macula is toxic to the retina unless neutralized by a variety of mechanisms, including binding by lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], which is composed of apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] and apolipoprotein B-100 (apoB). Methods: Human maculas and eyes from two Lp(a) transgenic murine models were subjected to morphologic, ultrastructural, and immunohistochemical analysis. “Wild-type Lp(a)” mice, which express human apoB-100 and apo(a) that contains oxidized phospholipid, and “mutant LBS− Lp(a)” mice with a defective apo(a) lysine binding site (LBS) for oxidized phospholipid binding, were fed a chow or high-fat diet for 2 to 12 months. Oxidized phospholipid–containing lipoproteins were detected by immunoreactivity to E06, a murine monoclonal antibody binding to the phosphocholine headgroup of oxidized, but not native, phospholipids. Results: Oxidized phospholipids, apo(a), and apoB accumulate in maculas, including drusen, of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) samples and age-matched controls. Lp(a) mice fed a high-fat diet developed age-related changes. However, mutant LBS− Lp(a) mice fed a high-fat diet developed retinal pigment epithelial cell degeneration and drusen. These changes were associated with increased OxPL, decreased antioxidant defenses, increased complement, and decreased complement regulators. Conclusions: Human maculas accumulate Lp(a) and OxPL. Mutant LBS− Lp(a) mice, lacking the ability to bind E06-detectable oxidized phospholipid, develop AMD-like changes. The ability of Lp(a) to bind E06-detectable OxPL may play a protective role in AMD. PMID:26538774

  9. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides......, without the need for phosphopeptide mimics or phosphatase inhibitors. As no proven ILKAP substrates were available, we selected phosphopeptide substrates among known PP2Cδ substrates including the protein kinases: p38, ATM, Chk1, Chk2 and RSK2 and synthesized directly on PEGA solid supports through a BAL...

  10. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  11. Adherence of murine lymphocytes to high endothelial venules in vitro and its radiation effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lixin, Liu; Zijun, Mao; Zhiwei, Yin [Suzhou Medical Coll., JS (China). Dept. of Pathophysiology

    1991-02-01

    Using the assay of specific adhesion of lymphocytes to high endothelial venules (HEV) on cryostat sections of mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), the effects of different doses (0, 1, 2, 4, 8 Gy) of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray irradiation of murine MLN lymphocytes in vitro on adhesion to normal HEV was observed. The results showed that in the irradiated murine MLN lymphocytes the ability to adhere to HEV of normal MLN was reduced. Statistical significance was revealed at 2, 4, 8 Gy irradiations. This results suggests that irradiation can inhibit the specific recognition and adhesion of lymphocytes to HEV to a certain extent.

  12. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    , for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  13. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  14. The regulation of CD5 expression in murine T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herzenberg Leonard A

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD5 is a pan-T cell surface marker that is also present on a subset of B cells, B-1a cells.Functional and developmental subsets of T cells express characteristic CD5 levels that vary over roughly a 30-fold range. Previous investigators have cloned a 1.7 Kb fragment containing the CD5 promoter and showed that it can confer similar lymphocyte-specific expression pattern as observed for endogenous CD5 expression. Results We further characterize the CD5 promoter and identify minimal and regulatory regions on the CD5 promoter. Using a luciferase reporter system, we show that a 43 bp region on the CD5 promoter regulates CD5 expression in resting mouse thymoma EL4 T cells and that an Ets binding site within the 43 bp region mediates the CD5 expression. In addition, we show that Ets-1, a member of the Ets family of transcription factors, recognizes the Ets binding site in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. This Ets binding site is directly responsible for the increase in reporter activity when co-transfected with increasing amounts of Ets-1 expression plasmid. We also identify two additional evolutionarily-conserved regions in the CD5 promoter (CD5X and CD5Y and demonstrate the respective roles of the each region in the regulation of CD5 transcription. Conclusion Our studies define a minimal and regulatory promoter for CD5 and show that the CD5 expression level in T cells is at least partially dependent on the level of Ets-1 protein. Based on the findings in this report, we propose a model of CD5 transcriptional regulation in T cells.

  15. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  16. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  17. Anion binding in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Kuepper, Frithjof C; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P; Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-01-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L 3 (2p 3/2 ) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  18. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  19. Molecular basis of a high affinity murine interleukin-5 receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Devos, R; Plaetinck, G; Van der Heyden, J; Cornelis, S; Vandekerckhove, J; Fiers, W; Tavernier, J

    1991-01-01

    The mouse interleukin-5 receptor (mIL-5R) consists of two components one of which, the mIL-5R alpha-chain, binds mIL-5 with low affinity. Recently we demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) recognizing the second mIL-5R beta-chain, immunoprecipitate a p130-140 protein doublet which corresponds to the mIL-3R and the mIL-3R-like protein, the latter chain for which so far no ligand has been identified. In this study we show that a high affinity mIL-5R can be reconstituted on COS1 cells by...

  20. Tick-Borne Transmission of Murine Gammaherpesvirus 68

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Hajnická

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Herpesviruses are a large group of DNA viruses infecting mainly vertebrates. Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 is often used as a model in studies of the pathogenesis of clinically important human gammaherpesviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. This rodent virus appears to be geographically widespread; however, its natural transmission cycle is unknown. Following detection of MHV68 in field-collected ticks, including isolation of the virus from tick salivary glands and ovaries, we investigated whether MHV68 is a tick-borne virus. Uninfected Ixodes ricinus ticks were shown to acquire the virus by feeding on experimentally infected laboratory mice. The virus survived tick molting, and the molted ticks transmitted the virus to uninfected laboratory mice on which they subsequently fed. MHV68 was isolated from the tick salivary glands, consistent with transmission via tick saliva. The virus survived in ticks without loss of infectivity for at least 120 days, and subsequently was transmitted vertically from one tick generation to the next, surviving more than 500 days. Furthermore, the F1 generation (derived from F0 infected females transmitted MHV68 to uninfected mice on which they fed, with MHV68 M3 gene transcripts detected in blood, lung, and spleen tissue of mice on which F1 nymphs and F1 adults engorged. These experimental data fulfill the transmission criteria that define an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus, the largest biological group of viruses. Currently, African swine fever virus (ASFV is the only DNA virus recognized as an arbovirus. Like ASFV, MHV68 showed evidence of pathogenesis in ticks. Previous studies have reported MHV68 in free-living ticks and in mammals commonly infested with I. ricinus, and neutralizing antibodies to MHV68 have been detected in large mammals (e.g., deer including humans. Further studies are needed to determine if these reports are the result of tick-borne transmission

  1. Transcriptome analysis of the ependymal barrier during murine neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Pramod

    2012-06-01

    to be upregulated at the protein level using immunofluorescence microcopy. This is important, because these molecules are members of the most significant pathways by IPA analyses. Conclusion Thus, our study indicates that ependymal cells actively express immune mediators and likely contribute to the observed immunopathogenesis during infection. Of particular interest is the major upregulation of antigen presentation pathway-related genes and chemokines/cytokines. This could explain how the ependyma is a prominent source of leukocyte infiltration into ventricles through the disrupted ependymal lining by way of pial vessels present in the internal leptomeninges in murine NCC.

  2. Accumulation of murine amyloid-β mimics early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Markus; Bracke, Alexander; Avchalumov, Yosef; Schumacher, Toni; Hofrichter, Jacqueline; Paarmann, Kristin; Fröhlich, Christina; Lange, Cathleen; Brüning, Thomas; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Pahnke, Jens

    2015-08-01

    Amyloidosis mouse models of Alzheimer's disease are generally established by transgenic approaches leading to an overexpression of mutated human genes that are known to be involved in the generation of amyloid-β in Alzheimer's families. Although these models made substantial contributions to the current knowledge about the 'amyloid hypothesis' of Alzheimer's disease, the overproduction of amyloid-β peptides mimics only inherited (familiar) Alzheimer's disease, which accounts for patients with Alzheimer's disease. The inherited form is even regarded a 'rare' disease according to the regulations for funding of the European Union (www.erare.eu). Here, we show that mice that are double-deficient for neprilysin (encoded by Mme), one major amyloid-β-degrading enzyme, and the ABC transporter ABCC1, a major contributor to amyloid-β clearance from the brain, develop various aspects of sporadic Alzheimer's disease mimicking the clinical stage of mild cognitive impairment. Using behavioural tests, electrophysiology and morphological analyses, we compared different ABC transporter-deficient animals and found that alterations are most prominent in neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice. We show that these mice have a reduced probability to survive, show increased anxiety in new environments, and have a reduced working memory performance. Furthermore, we detected morphological changes in the hippocampus and amygdala, e.g. astrogliosis and reduced numbers of synapses, leading to defective long-term potentiation in functional measurements. Compared to human, murine amyloid-β is poorly aggregating, due to changes in three amino acids at N-terminal positions 5, 10, and 13. Interestingly, our findings account for the action of early occurring amyloid-β species/aggregates, i.e. monomers and small amyloid-β oligomers. Thus, neprilysin × ABCC1 double-deficient mice present a new model for early effects of amyloid-β-related mild cognitive impairment that allows investigations

  3. Botulinum Toxin Confers Radioprotection in Murine Salivary Glands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidan, Youssef H., E-mail: zeidan@miami.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Xiao, Nan; Cao, Hongbin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Kong, Christina [Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Pathology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu; Sirjani, Davud [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: Xerostomia is a common radiation sequela, which has a negative impact on the quality of life of patients with head and neck cancer. Current treatment strategies offer only partial relief. Botulinum toxins (BTX) have been successfully used in treating a variety of radiation sequelae such as cystitis, proctitis, fibrosis, and facial pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of BTX on radiation-induced salivary gland damage. Methods and Materials: We used a previously established model for murine salivary gland irradiation (IR). The submandibular glands (SMGs) of C5BL/6 mice (n=6/group) were injected with saline or BTX 72 hours before receiving 15 Gy of focal irradiation. Saliva flow was measured 3, 7, and 28 days after treatment. The SMGs were collected for immunohistochemistry, confocal microscopy, and Western blotting. A cytokine array consisting of 40 different mouse cytokines was used to evaluate cytokine profiles after radiation treatment. Results: Irradiated mice showed a 50% reduction in saliva flow after 3 days, whereas mice preinjected with BTX had 25% reduction in saliva flow (P<.05). Cell death detected by TUNEL staining was similar in SMG sections of both groups. However, neutrophil infiltrate, detected by myeloperoxidase staining, was 3-fold lower for the BTX treated mice. A cytokine array showed a 2-fold upregulation of LPS-induced chemokine (LIX/CXCL5) 3 days after IR. BTX pretreatment reduced LIX levels by 40%. At 4 weeks after IR, the saline (control) group showed a 40% reduction in basal SMG weight, compared with 20% in the BTX group. Histologically, BTX-pretreated glands showed relative preservation of acinar structures after radiation. Conclusions: These data suggest that BTX pretreatment ameliorates radiation-induced saliva dysfunction. Moreover, we demonstrate a novel role for CXCL5 in the acute phase of salivary gland damage after radiation. These results carry important clinical implications for the treatment of

  4. Solute-vacancy binding in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolverton, C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous efforts to understand solute-vacancy binding in aluminum alloys have been hampered by a scarcity of reliable, quantitative experimental measurements. Here, we report a large database of solute-vacancy binding energies determined from first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated binding energies agree well with accurate measurements where available, and provide an accurate predictor of solute-vacancy binding in other systems. We find: (i) some common solutes in commercial Al alloys (e.g., Cu and Mg) possess either very weak (Cu), or even repulsive (Mg), binding energies. Hence, we assert that some previously reported large binding energies for these solutes are erroneous. (ii) Large binding energies are found for Sn, Cd and In, confirming the proposed mechanism for the reduced natural aging in Al-Cu alloys containing microalloying additions of these solutes. (iii) In addition, we predict that similar reduction in natural aging should occur with additions of Si, Ge and Au. (iv) Even larger binding energies are found for other solutes (e.g., Pb, Bi, Sr, Ba), but these solutes possess essentially no solubility in Al. (v) We have explored the physical effects controlling solute-vacancy binding in Al. We find that there is a strong correlation between binding energy and solute size, with larger solute atoms possessing a stronger binding with vacancies. (vi) Most transition-metal 3d solutes do not bind strongly with vacancies, and some are even energetically strongly repelled from vacancies, particularly for the early 3d solutes, Ti and V

  5. Polymeric competitive protein binding adsorbents for radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Serum protein comprising specific binding proteins such as antibodies, B 12 intrinsic factor, thyroxin binding globulin and the like may be copolymerized with globulin constituents of serum by the action of ethylchloroformate to form readily packed insoluble precipitates which, following purification as by washing, are eminently suited for employment as competitive binding protein absorbents in radioassay procedures. 10 claims, no drawings

  6. Murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector has differential integration patterns in human cell lines used to produce recombinant factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cristina Correa de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nowadays recombinant factor VIII is produced in murine cells including in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO and baby hamster kidney cells (BHK. Previous studies, using the murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K, modified two recombinant human cell lines, HepG2 and Hek293 to produce recombinant factor VIII. In order to characterize these cells, the present study aimed to analyze the integration pattern of retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K.METHODS: This study used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction to locate the site of viral vector integration by sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The sequences were compared to genomic databases to characterize respective clones.RESULTS: The retroviral vector presented different and non-random profiles of integration between cells lines. A preference of integration for chromosomes 19, 17 and 11 was observed for HepG2FVIIIdB/P140K and chromosome 9 for Hek293FVIIIdB/P140K. In genomic regions such as CpG islands and transcription factor binding sites, there was no difference in the integration profiles for both cell lines. Integration in intronic regions of encoding protein genes (RefSeq genes was also observed in both cell lines. Twenty percent of integrations occurred at fragile sites in the genome of the HepG2 cell line and 17% in Hek293.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the cell type can affect the profile of chromosomal integration of the retroviral vector used; these differences may interfere in the level of expression of recombinant proteins.

  7. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara triggers type I IFN production in murine conventional dendritic cells via a cGAS/STING-mediated cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peihong Dai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA is an attenuated poxvirus that has been engineered as a vaccine against infectious agents and cancers. Our goal is to understand how MVA modulates innate immunity in dendritic cells (DCs, which can provide insights to vaccine design. In this study, using murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, we assessed type I interferon (IFN gene induction and protein secretion in response to MVA infection. We report that MVA infection elicits the production of type I IFN in murine conventional dendritic cells (cDCs, but not in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs. Transcription factors IRF3 (IFN regulatory factor 3 and IRF7, and the positive feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1 (IFN alpha/beta receptor 1, are required for the induction. MVA induction of type I IFN is fully dependent on STING (stimulator of IFN genes and the newly discovered cytosolic DNA sensor cGAS (cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate synthase. MVA infection of cDCs triggers phosphorylation of TBK1 (Tank-binding kinase 1 and IRF3, which is abolished in the absence of cGAS and STING. Furthermore, intravenous delivery of MVA induces type I IFN in wild-type mice, but not in mice lacking STING or IRF3. Treatment of cDCs with inhibitors of endosomal and lysosomal acidification or the lysosomal enzyme Cathepsin B attenuated MVA-induced type I IFN production, indicating that lysosomal enzymatic processing of virions is important for MVA sensing. Taken together, our results demonstrate a critical role of the cGAS/STING-mediated cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway for type I IFN induction in cDCs by MVA. We present evidence that vaccinia virulence factors E3 and N1 inhibit the activation of IRF3 and the induction of IFNB gene in MVA-infected cDCs.

  8. Effect of nitric oxide-releasing derivative of indomethacin on Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, So-Hui; Choi, Eun-Young; Hyeon, Jin-Yi; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2017-10-14

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of NCX 2121, a nitric oxide (NO)-releasing derivative of indomethacin, upon the generation of proinflammatory mediators using murine macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) isolated from Prevotella intermedia, which is one of the pathogens implicated in periodontal diseases. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-derived NO, IL-1β and IL-6 as well as their relevant mRNA were significantly attenuated by NCX 2121 in RAW264.7 cells activated by P. intermedia LPS. NCX 2121 was much more effective than the parental compound indomethacin in reducing these proinflammatory mediators. NCX 2121 triggered induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cells exposed to P. intermedia LPS, and its inhibitory influence upon P. intermedia LPS-elicited NO generation was notably blocked by SnPP treatment. NCX 2121 attenuated NF-κB-dependent SEAP release induced by P. intermedia LPS. NCX 2121 did not display inhibitory action towards IκB-α degradation triggered by LPS. Instead, it significantly diminished nuclear translocation as well as DNA-binding action of NF-κB p50 subunit elicited by P. intermedia LPS. Further, NCX 2121 significantly up-regulated SOCS1 mRNA expression in cells challenged with P. intermedia LPS. In summary, NCX 2121 down-regulates P. intermedia LPS-elicited generation of NO, IL-1β and IL-6 in murine macrophages in a mechanism that involves anti-inflammatory HO-1 induction as well as decrement of NF-κB activation, which may be associated with SOCS1 expression. NCX 2121 may have potential benefits as a host immunomodulatory agent for the therapy of periodontal disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. NCX 4040, a nitric oxide-donating aspirin derivative, inhibits Prevotella intermedia lipopolysaccharide-induced production of proinflammatory mediators in murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Choe, So-Hui; Hyeon, Jin-Yi; Park, Hae Ryoun; Choi, Jeom-Il; Choi, In Soon; Kim, Sung-Jo

    2015-12-05

    In this study, the effects and underlying mechanisms of NCX 4040, a nitric oxide (NO)-donating aspirin derivative, on the production of proinflammatory mediators were examined using murine macrophages exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Prevotella intermedia, a pathogen implicated in the etiology of periodontal disease. NCX 4040 significantly reduced P. intermedia LPS-induced production of inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-derived NO, IL-1β and IL-6 as well as their mRNA expression in RAW264.7 cells. Notably, NCX 4040 was much more effective than the parental compound aspirin in reducing LPS-induced production of inflammatory mediators. NCX 4040 induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in cells treated with P. intermedia LPS, and the suppressive effect of NCX 4040 on LPS-induced NO production was significantly reversed by SnPP, a competitive HO-1 inhibitor. NCX 4040 did not influence LPS-induced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. IκB-α degradation as well as nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activities of NF-κB p65 and p50 subunits induced by P. intermedia LPS were significantly reduced by NCX 4040. Besides, LPS-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT3 was significantly down-regulated by NCX 4040. Further, NCX 4040 elevated the SOCS1 mRNA in cells stimulated with LPS. This study indicates that NCX 4040 inhibits P. intermedia LPS-induced production of NO, IL-1β and IL-6 in murine macrophages through anti-inflammatory HO-1 induction and suppression of NF-κB, STAT1 and STAT3 activation, which is associated with the activation of SOCS1 signaling. NCX 4040 could potentially be a promising tool in the treatment of periodontal disease, although further studies are required to verify this. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Murine CMV Expressing the High Affinity NKG2D Ligand MULT-1: A Model for the Development of Cytomegalovirus-Based Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Hiršl

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of a vaccine against human cytomegalovirus (CMV has been a subject of long-term medical interest. The research during recent years identified CMV as an attractive vaccine vector against infectious diseases and tumors. The immune response to CMV persists over a lifetime and its unique feature is the inflationary T cell response to certain viral epitopes. CMV encodes numerous genes involved in immunoevasion, which are non-essential for virus growth in vitro. The deletion of those genes results in virus attenuation in vivo, which enables us to dramatically manipulate its virulence and the immune response. We have previously shown that the murine CMV (MCMV expressing RAE-1γ, one of the cellular ligands for the NKG2D receptor, is highly attenuated in vivo but retains the ability to induce a strong CD8+ T cell response. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant MCMV expressing high affinity NKG2D ligand murine UL16 binding protein-like transcript (MULT-1 (MULT-1MCMV inserted in the place of its viral inhibitor is dramatically attenuated in vivo in a NK cell-dependent manner, both in immunocompetent adult mice and in immunologically immature newborns. MULT-1MCMV was more attenuated than the recombinant virus expressing RAE-1γ. Despite the drastic sensitivity to innate immune control, MULT-1MCMV induced an efficient CD8+ T cell response to viral and vectored antigens. By using in vitro assay, we showed that similar to RAE-1γMCMV, MULT-1 expressing virus provided strong priming of CD8+ T cells. Moreover, MULT-1MCMV was able to induce anti-viral antibodies, which after passing the transplacental barrier protect offspring of immunized mothers from challenge infection. Altogether, this study further supports the concept that CMV expressing NKG2D ligand possesses excellent characteristics to serve as a vaccine or vaccine vector.

  11. Modified cytokeratins expressed on the surface of carcinoma cells undergo endocytosis upon binding of human monoclonal antibody and its recombinant Fab fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, H J; Garrigues, U; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    display selection and the human Fab fragment was expressed in bacteria. Analysis by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that COU-1 bound in a uniform punctate pattern to the surface of viable carcinoma cells stained at 4 degrees C, and binding increased significantly when cells were cultured...... was significantly reduced. Similar results were obtained using intact IgM COU-1 and the recombinant Fab fragment. Immunohistological studies indicated that COU-1, in contrast to murine monoclonal antibodies against normal cytokeratin 8 and 18, could differentiate between malignant and normal colon epithelia...

  12. Phage-display libraries of murine and human antibody Fab fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, J; Andersen, P S; Nielsen, L K

    1996-01-01

    We provide efficient and detailed procedures for construction, expression, and screening of comprehensive libraries of murine or human antibody Fab fragments displayed on the surface of filamentous phage. In addition, protocols for producing and using ultra-electrocompetent cells, for producing Fab...

  13. Coagulation and inflammation in scrub typhus and murine typhusu-a prospective comparative study from Laos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paris, D. H.; Chansamouth, V.; Nawtaisong, P.; Löwenberg, E. C.; Phetsouvanh, R.; Blacksell, S. D.; Lee, S. J.; Dondorp, A. M.; van der Poll, T.; Newton, P. N.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Day, N. P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Scrub typhus (caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi) and murine typhus (caused by Rickettsia typhi) cause up to 28% of febrile episodes in Thailand and Laos. The current understanding of coagulation and inflammation in the pathogenesis of these clinically very similar vasculotropic diseases is limited.

  14. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo (Jose); L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human

  15. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Motaal, Abdallah G.; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L.; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M. J.; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously

  16. P2X7 receptor activation induces cell death and microparticle release in murine erythroleukemia cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinescu, P.; Wang, B.; Kovacevic, K.; Jalilian, I.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Wiley, J.S.; Sluyter, R.

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular ATP induces cation fluxes in and impairs the growth of murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells in a manner characteristic of the purinergic P2X7 receptor, however the presence of P2X7 in these cells is unknown. This study investigated whether MEL cells express functional P2X7. RT-PCR,

  17. Characterization of murine melanocortin receptors mediating adipocyte lipolysis and examination of signalling pathways involved

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Cathrine Laustrup; Raun, Kirsten; Jacobsen, Marianne Lambert

    2011-01-01

    hormone (a-MSH) generated from proopiomelanocortin (POMC), as well as synthetic MSH analogues to stimulate lipolysis in murine 3T3-L1 adipocytes it is shown that MC2R and MC5R are lipolytic mediators in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Involvement of cAMP, phosphorylated extracellular signal...

  18. Characterization, expression and complex formation of the murine Fanconi anaemia gene product Fancg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vrugt, Henri J; Koomen, Mireille; Berns, Mariska A D; de Vries, Yne; Rooimans, Martin A; van der Weel, Laura; Blom, Eric; de Groot, Jan; Schepers, Rik J; Stone, Stacie; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Joenje, Hans; Arwert, Fré

    2002-03-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive chromosomal instability disorder. Six distinct FA disease genes have been identified, the products of which function in an integrated pathway that is thought to support a nuclear caretaker function. Comparison of FA gene characteristics in different species may help to unravel the molecular function of the FA pathway. We have cloned the murine homologue of the Fanconi anaemia complementation group G gene, FANCG/XRCC9. The murine Fancg protein shows an 83% similarity to the human protein sequence, and has a predicted molecular weight of 68.5 kDa. Expression of mouse Fancg in human FA-G lymphoblasts fully corrects their cross-linker hypersensitivity. At mRNA and protein levels we detected the co-expression of Fancg and Fanca in murine tissues. In addition, mouse Fancg and Fanca proteins co-purify by immunoprecipitation. Upon transfection into Fanca-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts EGFP-Fancg chimeric protein was detectable in the nucleus. We identified a murine cDNA, Fancg, which cross-complements the cellular defect of human FA-G cells and thus represents a true homologue of human FANCG. Spleen, thymus and testis showed the highest Fancg expression levels. Although Fancg and Fanca are able to form a complex, this interaction is not required for Fancg to accumulate in the nuclear compartment.

  19. Effect of fucoidan on B16 murine melanoma cell melanin formation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:Fucoidan is a complex sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweed and has a wide variety of biological activities. It not only inhibits cancer cell growth but also inhibits tyrosinase in vitro. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate the effect of fucoidan on B16 murine melanoma cells as the findings may ...

  20. In vitro activation of murine DRG neurons by CGRP-mediated mucosal mast cell degranulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jonge, F; De Laet, A; Van Nassauw, L; Miller, HRP; van Bogaert, PP; Timmermans, JP; Kroese, ABA

    Upregulation of CGRP-immunoreactive (IR) primary afferent nerve fibers accompanied by mastocytosis is characteristic for the Schistosoma mansoni-infected murine ileum. These mucosal mast cells (MMC) and CGRP-IR fibers, which originate from dorsal root (DRG) and nodose ganglia, are found in close

  1. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv7 K+ channel in murine gastrointestinal smooth muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepps, Thomas Andrew; Greenwood, Iain A; Moffatt, James D

    2009-01-01

    that K(v)7.x especially K(v)7.4 and K(v)7.5 are expressed in different regions of the murine gastrointestinal tract and blockers of K(v)7 channels augment inherent contractile activity. Drugs that selectively block K(v)7.4/7.5 might be promising therapeutics for the treatment of motility disorders...

  2. Adipocytes enhance murine pancreatic cancer growth via a hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Kathryn M; Considine, Robert V; True, Eben; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Pitt, Henry A; Zyromski, Nicholas J

    2016-04-01

    Obesity accelerates the development and progression of pancreatic cancer, though the mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Adipocytes are biologically active, producing factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) that may influence tumor progression. We therefore sought to test the hypothesis that adipocyte-secreted factors including HGF accelerate pancreatic cancer cell proliferation. Murine pancreatic cancer cells (Pan02 and TGP-47) were grown in a) conditioned medium (CM) from murine F442A preadipocytes, b) HGF-knockdown preadipocyte CM, c) recombinant murine HGF at increasing doses, and d) CM plus HGF-receptor (c-met) inhibitor. Cell proliferation was measured using the MTT assay. ANOVA and t-test were applied; p TGP-47 cell proliferation relative to control (59 ± 12% and 34 ± 12%, p TGP-47 cells remained unchanged. Recombinant HGF dose-dependently increased Pan02, but not TGP-47, proliferation (p TGP-47 cells. These experiments demonstrate that adipocyte-derived factors accelerate murine pancreatic cancer proliferation. In the case of Pan02 cells, HGF is responsible, in part, for this proliferation. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Gastrointestinal expression and partial cDNA cloning of murine Muc2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klinken, B. J.; Einerhand, A. W.; Duits, L. A.; Makkink, M. K.; Tytgat, K. M.; Renes, I. B.; Verburg, M.; Büller, H. A.; Dekker, J.

    1999-01-01

    To help us investigate the role of mucin in the protection of the colonic epithelium in the mouse, we aimed to identify the murine colonic mucin (MCM) and its encoding gene. We isolated MCM, raised an anti-MCM antiserum, and studied the biosynthesis of MCM in the gastrointestinal tract. Isolated MCM

  4. Erythropoietin treatment alleviates ultrastructural myelin changes induced by murine cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Hyttel, Poul; Staalsø, Trine

    2012-01-01

    the effects of EPO treatment in this context. METHODS: The study consisted of two groups of Plasmodium berghei-infected mice and two groups of uninfected controls that were either treated with EPO or placebo (n = 4 mice/group). In the terminal phase of murine CM the brains were removed and processed...

  5. Development of an ex vivo BrdU labeling procedure for the murine LLNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) is widely used to identify chemicals that may cause allergic contact dermatitis. Exposure to a dermal sensitizer results in proliferation of local lymph node T cells, which has traditionally been measured by in vivo incorporation of [3H]m...

  6. Modeling of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia : An Overview of In Vivo Murine and Human Xenograft Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Jaques, Jenny; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Over the past years, a wide variety of in vivo mouse models have been generated in order to unravel the molecular pathology of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) and to develop and improve therapeutic approaches. These models range from (conditional) transgenic models, knock-in models, and murine bone

  7. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  8. Dual Role of Host Par2 in a Murine Model of Spontaneous Metastatic B16 Melanoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Olejár, Tomáš; Větvička, D.; Zadinová, M.; Poučková, P.; Kukal, J.; Ježek, Petr; Matěj, R.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 7 (2014), s. 3511-3515 ISSN 0250-7005 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/10/0346 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : PAR2 * melanoma * metastasis * murine model Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.826, year: 2014

  9. The murine retinoblastoma homolog maps to chromosome 14 near Es-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stone, J.C.; Crosby, J.J.; Kozak, C.A.; Schievella, A.R.; Bernards, R.A.; Nadeau, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    Restriction fragment length variants have been exploited to map genetically Rb-1, the murine homolog of the human retinoblastoma gene. Rb-1 localized to mouse chromosome 14 on the basis of results from analysis of somatic cell hybrids. In an interspecific backcross involving Mus spretus, Rb-1 and

  10. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  11. Coinfection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia garinii alters the course of murine Lyme borreliosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovius, Joppe W. R.; Li, Xin; Ramamoorthi, Nandhini; van Dam, Alje P.; Barthold, Stephen W.; van der Poll, Tom; Speelman, Peter; Fikrig, Erol

    2007-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus ticks and mice can be infected with both Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto and Borrelia garinii. The effect of coinfection with these two Borrelia species on the development of murine Lyme borreliosis is unknown. Therefore, we investigated whether coinfection with the

  12. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    , and a comparison of these models with the human AD transcriptomic fingerprint is lacking. We sought to evaluate the transcriptomic profiles of six common murine models and determine how they relate to human AD skin. Transcriptomic profiling was performed using microarrays and qRT-PCR on biopsies from NC/Nga, flaky...

  13. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  14. Gender and dose dependent ovalbumin induced hypersensitivity responses in murine model of food allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    While federal regulations mandate the labeling of major food allergens, allowable food allergen thresholds have yet to be determined. Therefore the aim of this project was to identify the lowest egg allergen ovalbumin (OVA) dose causing hypersensitization using a validated murine model. Mice were or...

  15. Integrin-mediated signal transduction linked to Ras pathway by GRB2 binding to focal adhesion kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaepfer, D D; Hanks, S K; Hunter, T; van der Geer, P

    The cytoplasmic focal adhesion protein-tyrosine kinase (FAK) localizes with surface integrin receptors at sites where cells attach to the extracellular matrix. Increased FAK tyrosine phosphorylation occurs upon integrin engagement with fibronectin. Here we show that adhesion of murine NIH3T3 fibroblasts to fibronectin promotes SH2-domain-mediated association of the GRB2 adaptor protein and the c-Src protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) with FAK in vivo, and also results in activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). In v-Src-transformed NIH3T3, the association of v-Src, GRB2 and Sos with FAK is independent of cell adhesion to fibronectin. The GRB2 SH2 domain binds directly to tyrosine-phosphorylated FAK. Mutation of tyrosine residue 925 of FAK (YENV motif) to phenylalanine blocks GRB2 SH2-domain binding to FAK in vitro. Our results show that fibronectin binding to integrins on NIH3T3 fibroblasts promotes c-Src and FAK association and formation of an integrin-activated signalling complex. Phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr 925 upon fibronectin stimulation creates an SH2-binding site for GRB2 which may link integrin engagement to the activation of the Ras/MAPK signal transduction pathway.

  16. Novel Application of Micro-Computerized Tomography for Morphologic Characterization of the Murine Penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Marisol; Huang, Gene O; Lamb, Dolores J

    2017-12-01

    The murine penis model has enriched our understanding of anomalous penile development. The morphologic characterization of the murine penis using conventional serial sectioning methods is labor intensive and prone to errors. To develop a novel application of micro-computerized tomography (micro-CT) with iodine staining for rapid, non-destructive morphologic study of murine penis structure. Penises were dissected from 10 adult wild-type mice and imaged using micro-CT with iodine staining. Images were acquired at 5-μm spatial resolution on a Bruker SkyScan 1272 micro-CT system. After images were acquired, the specimens were washed of any remaining iodine and embedded in paraffin for conventional histologic examination. Histologic and micro-CT measurements for all specimens were made by 2 independent observers. Measurements of penile structures were made on virtual micro-CT sections and histologic slides. The Lin concordance correlation coefficient demonstrated almost perfect strength of agreement for interobserver variability for histologic section (0.9995, 95% CI = 0.9990-0.9997) and micro-CT section (0.9982, 95% CI = 0.9963-0.9991) measurements. Bland-Altman analysis for agreement between the 2 modalities of measurement demonstrated mean differences of -0.029, 0.022, and -0.068 mm for male urogenital mating protuberance, baculum, and penile glans length, respectively. There did not appear to be a bias for overestimation or underestimation of measured lengths and limits of agreement were narrow. The enhanced ability offered by micro-CT to phenotype the murine penis has the potential to improve translational studies examining the molecular pathways contributing to anomalous penile development. The present study describes the first reported use of micro-CT with iodine staining for imaging the murine penis. Producing repeated histologic sections of identical orientation was limited by inherent imperfections in mounting and tissue sectioning, but this was

  17. Positron emission tomography imaging of angiogenesis in a murine hindlimb ischemia model with 64Cu-labeled TRC105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbay, Hakan; Zhang, Yin; Hong, Hao; Hacker, Timothy A; Valdovinos, Hector F; Zagzebski, James A; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to assess ischemia-induced angiogenesis with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 positron emission tomography (PET) in a murine hindlimb ischemia model of peripheral artery disease (PAD). CD105 binding affinity/specificity of NOTA-conjugated TRC105 (an anti-CD105 antibody) was evaluated by flow cytometry, which exhibited no difference from unconjugated TRC105. BALB/c mice were anesthetized, and the right femoral artery was ligated to induce hindlimb ischemia, with the left hindlimb serving as an internal control. Laser Doppler imaging showed that perfusion in the ischemic hindlimb plummeted to ∼ 20% of the normal level after surgery and gradually recovered to near normal level on day 24. Ischemia-induced angiogenesis was noninvasively monitored and quantified with (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET on postoperative days 1, 3, 10, 17, and 24. (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 uptake in the ischemic hindlimb increased significantly from the control level of 1.6 ± 0.2 %ID/g to 14.1 ± 1.9 %ID/g at day 3 (n = 3) and gradually decreased with time (3.4 ± 1.9 %ID/g at day 24), which correlated well with biodistribution studies performed on days 3 and 24. Blocking studies confirmed the CD105 specificity of tracer uptake in the ischemic hindlimb. Increased CD105 expression on days 3 and 10 following ischemia was confirmed by histology and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). This is the first report of PET imaging of CD105 expression during ischemia-induced angiogenesis. (64)Cu-NOTA-TRC105 PET may play multiple roles in future PAD-related research and improve PAD patient management by identifying the optimal timing of treatment and monitoring the efficacy of therapy.

  18. All-trans retinoic acid directs urothelial specification of murine embryonic stem cells via GATA4/6 signaling mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Mauney

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The urinary bladder and associated tract are lined by the urothelium, a transitional epithelium that acts as a specialized permeability barrier that protects the underlying tissue from urine via expression of a highly specific group of proteins known as the uroplakins (UP. To date, our understanding of the developmental processes responsible for urothelial differentiation has been hampered due to the lack of suitable models. In this study, we describe a novel in vitro cell culture system for derivation of urothelial cells from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs following cultivation on collagen matrices in the presence all trans retinoic acid (RA. Upon stimulation with micromolar concentrations of RA, ESCs significantly downregulated the pluripotency factor OCT-4 but markedly upregulated UP1A, UP1B, UP2, UP3A, and UP3B mRNA levels in comparison to naïve ESCs and spontaneously differentiating controls. Pan-UP protein expression was associated with both p63- and cytokeratin 20-positive cells in discrete aggregating populations of ESCs following 9 and 14 days of RA stimulation. Analysis of endodermal transcription factors such as GATA4 and GATA6 revealed significant upregulation and nuclear enrichment in RA-treated UP2-GFP+ populations. GATA4-/- and GATA6-/- transgenic ESC lines revealed substantial attenuation of RA-mediated UP expression in comparison to wild type controls. In addition, EMSA analysis revealed that RA treatment induced formation of transcriptional complexes containing GATA4/6 on both UP1B and UP2 promoter fragments containing putative GATA factor binding sites. Collectively, these data suggest that RA mediates ESC specification toward a urothelial lineage via GATA4/6-dependent processes.

  19. Murine macrophage response from peritoneal cavity requires signals mediated by chemokine receptor CCR-2 during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Ajeya; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2016-02-01

    C-C chemokine receptor-2 (CCR-2) is a cognate receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and recent studies revealed that MCP-1-CCR-2 signaling is involved in several inflammatory diseases characterized by macrophage infiltration. Currently, there is no study on the involvement of CCR-2 in the killing of S. aureus by macrophages of Swiss albino mice, and its substantial role in host defense against S. aureus infection in murine macrophages is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was aimed to investigate the functional and interactive role of CCR-2 and MCP-1 in regulating peritoneal macrophage responses with respect to acute S. aureus infection. We found that phagocytosis of S. aureus can serve as an important stimulus for MCP-1 production by peritoneal macrophages, which is dependent directly or indirectly on cytokines, reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Neutralization of CCR-2 in macrophages leads to increased production of IL-10 and decreased production of IFN-γ and IL-6. In CCR-2 blocked macrophages, pretreatment with specific blocker of NF-κB or p38-MAPK causes elevation in MCP-1 level and subsequent downregulation of CCR-2 itself. We speculate that CCR-2 is involved in S. aureus-induced MCP-1 production via NF-κB or p38-MAPK signaling. We also hypothesized that unnaturally high level of MCP-1 that build up upon CCR-2 neutralization might allow promiscuous binding to one or more other chemokine receptors, a situation that would not occur in CCR-2 non-neutralized condition. This may be the plausible explanation for such observed Th-2 response in CCR-2 blocked macrophages infected with S. aureus in the present study.

  20. Design of glycopeptides used to investigate class II MHC binding and T-cell responses associated with autoimmune arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida E Andersson

    Full Text Available The glycopeptide fragment CII259-273 from type II collagen (CII binds to the murine A(q and human DR4 class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC II proteins, which are associated with development of murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA and rheumatoid arthritis (RA, respectively. It has been shown that CII259-273 can be used in therapeutic vaccination of CIA. This glycopeptide also elicits responses from T-cells obtained from RA patients, which indicates that it has an important role in RA as well. We now present a methodology for studies of (glycopeptide-receptor interactions based on a combination of structure-based virtual screening, ligand-based statistical molecular design and biological evaluations. This methodology included the design of a CII259-273 glycopeptide library in which two anchor positions crucial for binding in pockets of A(q and DR4 were varied. Synthesis and biological evaluation of the designed glycopeptides provided novel structure-activity relationship (SAR understanding of binding to A(q and DR4. Glycopeptides that retained high affinities for these MHC II proteins and induced strong responses in panels of T-cell hybridomas were also identified. An analysis of all the responses revealed groups of glycopeptides with different response patterns that are of high interest for vaccination studies in CIA. Moreover, the SAR understanding obtained in this study provides a platform for the design of second-generation glycopeptides with tuned MHC affinities and T-cell responses.

  1. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  2. Dose-effect relationship of apoptosis induced by fission-neutron in murine thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Bin; Li Liang; Xue Wencheng; Sun Jianmin; Wang Baoqin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effectiveness of high LET fission-neutron to induce apoptosis in murine thymocytes and to compare it with that of low LET 60 Co γ-ray. Methods: Apoptosis induction was studied qualitatively by light and transmission electron microscopy and DNA gel electrophoresis,also quantitatively by flow cytometry(FCM) and diphenylamine (DPA)methods. Results: DNA ladders of murine thymocytes were detectable, the typical apoptosis of thymocytes could be observed morphologically by means of light and electron microscopy at 6 h after fission-neutron irradiation with doses ranging from 0.5 to 5.0 Gy, meanwhile the percentages of apoptosis increased with increasing doses. After exposure to γ-rays with doses ranging from 1.0 to 30 Gy, the experimental results were similar to those from neutron radiation. The incidence of apoptosis peaked at about 20 Gy, the percentages did not increase further when doses increased. Conclusion: Apoptosis of murine thymocytes can be induced when mice are exposed to either fission-neutron (0.5-5.0 Gy) or to γ-ray (1-30 Gy). Although the relationship between apoptosis and radiation doses is similar, the percentage of apoptosis induced by neutron irradiation is higher than that induced by γ-irradiation. The RBE values of fission-neutron for inducing apoptosis murine thymocytes are 2.09 (by FCM method) and 2.37 (by DPA method), respectively. These results also suggest that fission-neutron-induced murine immune tissue is more severe than that induced by γ-rays at several hours post-irradiation and this might be the basis for heavy damage to immune tissues induced by fission-neutron-irradiation in later period

  3. Europium-labeled epidermal growth factor and neurotensin: novel probes for receptor-binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Ohad; Hillairet de Boisferon, Marc; Lombet, Alain; Gruaz-Guyon, Anne; Gayer, Batya; Skrzydelsky, Delphine; Kohen, Fortune; Forgez, Patricia; Scherz, Avigdor; Rostene, William; Salomon, Yoram

    2002-02-01

    We investigated the possibility of labeling two biologically active peptides, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and neurotensin (NT), with europium (Eu)-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. More specifically, we tested them as probes in studying receptor binding using time-resolved fluorescence of Eu3+. The relatively simple synthesis yields ligands with acceptable binding characteristics similar to isotopically labeled derivatives. The binding affinity (Kd) of labeled Eu-EGF to human A431 epidermal carcinoid cells was 3.6 +/- 1.2 nM, similar to the reported Kd values of EGF, whereas the Kd of Eu-NT to human HT29 colon cancer cells (7.4 +/- 0.5 nM) or to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the high-affinity NT receptor (CHO-NT1) were about 10-fold higher than the Kd values of NT. The bioactivity of the Eu-labeled EGF as determined by stimulation of cultured murine D1 hematopoietic cell proliferation was nearly the same as that obtained with native EGF. The maximal stimulation of Ca2+ influx with NT and Eu-NT in CHO-NT1 cells was similar, but the respective K0.5 values were 20 pM and 1 nM, corresponding to differences in the binding affinities previously described. The results of these studies indicate that Eu labeling of peptide hormones and growth factor molecules ranging from 10(3) to 10(5) Da can be conveniently accomplished. Importantly, the Eu-labeled products are stable for approximately 2 years and are completely safe for laboratory use compared to the biohazardous radioligands. Thus, Eu-labeled peptides present an attractive alternative for commonly used radiolabeled ligands in biological studies in general and in receptor assays in particular.

  4. Molecular characterization of two sub-family specific monoclonal antibodies to meningococcal Factor H binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lo Passo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (FHbp is a component of two licensed vaccines for prevention of sepsis and meningitis caused by serogroup B meningococci. FHbp binds human Factor H (FH, which contributes to evasion of host immunity and FHbp sequence variants can be classified into two sub-families. Antibodies against FHbp elicit complement-mediated killing and can inhibit recruitment of FH to the bacterial surface. We report epitope mapping studies of two murine IgG mAbs, designated JAR 31 and JAR 36, isolated from a mouse immunized with FHbp in sub-family A, which is present in ∼30–40% of invasive isolates. In the present study, we tested the reactivity of mAbs JAR 31 and JAR 36 with seven natural FHbp sequence variants from different phylogenic groups. We screened bacteriophage-displayed peptide libraries to identify amino acid residues contributing to the JAR 36 epitope. Based on the reactivities of mAbs JAR 31 and JAR 36 with the seven FHbp variants, and the frequent occurrences of aspartate (D and lysine (K residues in the JAR 36-bound phage peptides, we selected six residues in the carboxyl-terminal region of FHbp for replacement with alanine (A. The D201A and K203A substitutions respectively eliminated and decreased binding of mAbs JAR 31 and JAR 36 to FHbp. These substitutions did not affect binding of the control mAb JAR 33 or of human FH. JAR 31 or JAR 36 mediated cooperative complement-mediated bactericidal activity with other anti-FHbp mAbs. The identification of two amino acid residues involved in the epitopes recognized by these anti-FHbp mAbs may contribute to a more complete understanding of the spatial requirements for cooperative anti-FHbp mAb bactericidal activity. Keywords: Biochemistry, Immunology, Microbiology, Molecular biology

  5. Kinetics of leptin binding to the Q223R leptin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Verkerke

    Full Text Available Studies in human populations and mouse models of disease have linked the common leptin receptor Q223R mutation to obesity, multiple forms of cancer, adverse drug reactions, and susceptibility to enteric and respiratory infections. Contradictory results cast doubt on the phenotypic consequences of this variant. We set out to determine whether the Q223R substitution affects leptin binding kinetics using surface plasmon resonance (SPR, a technique that allows sensitive real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions. We measured the binding and dissociation rate constants for leptin to the extracellular domain of WT and Q223R murine leptin receptors expressed as Fc-fusion proteins and found that the mutant receptor does not significantly differ in kinetics of leptin binding from the WT leptin receptor. (WT: ka 1.76×106±0.193×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.21×10-4±0.707×10-4 s-1, KD 6.47×10-11±3.30×10-11 M; Q223R: ka 1.75×106±0.0245×106 M-1 s-1, kd 1.47×10-4±0.0505×10-4 s-1, KD 8.43×10-11±0.407×10-11 M. Our results support earlier findings that differences in affinity and kinetics of leptin binding are unlikely to explain mechanistically the phenotypes that have been linked to this common genetic variant. Future studies will seek to elucidate the mechanism by which this mutation influences susceptibility to metabolic, infectious, and malignant pathologies.

  6. Specificity of interaction between carcinogenic polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and nuclear proteins: widespread occurrence of a restricted pattern of histone-binding in intact cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLeod, M.C.; Pelling, J.C.; Slaga, T.J.; Nikbakht-Noghrei, P.A.; Mansfield, B.K.; Selkirk, J.K.

    1982-01-01

    Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] produces a number of potentially reactive metabolites. The endproducts of one metabolic pathway, 7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-B(a)P (BPDE) are responsible for essentially all DNA adduct formation in animal cells treated with B(a)P, and a particular stereoisomer, designated (+)-anti-BPDE is thought to be the ultimate carcinogenic derivative of B(a)P. In hamster embryo cell nuclei treated with (+)-anti-BPDE, two of the histones of the nucleosomal core, H3 and H2A, are covalently modified, while the remaining core histones, H4 and H2B, are essentially unmodified. All four purified core histones, however, serve as targets. 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene and 3-methylcholanthrene show the same pattern of histone binding in hamster embryo cells. Treatment of mouse embryo cells with [ 3 H]-BPDE results in covalent binding of the hydrocarbon to histones H3 and H2A among the many cellular targets, while histones H2B and H4 are not bound. Similar binding patterns are seen in mouse embryo cells, a permanent murine, fibroblastic cell line, and a human mammary epithelial cell line, T47D, treated with [ 3 H]B(a)P. Again, the histones are unevenly labeled, displaying the H3 and H2A pattern. Histone-binding in the human cells may also be mediated by BPDE. Similar BPDE binding patterns were observed in other murine and human cell lines and in primary cultures of murine epidermal epithelial cells. The restriction of histone H2B and H4 binding appears to be general when intact cultured cells are studied. This specificity was not observed in a mixed reconstituted system in which rat liver microsomes were used to activate B(a)P. This finding reinforces reservations concerning the use of microsomal systems to probe the interactions of carcinogens with macromolecules and the relationships of adduct formation with the processes of carcinogenesis

  7. Identification of Fc Gamma Receptor Glycoforms That Produce Differential Binding Kinetics for Rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jerrard M; Frostell, Asa; Karlsson, Robert; Müller, Steffen; Martín, Silvia Míllan; Pauers, Martin; Reuss, Franziska; Cosgrave, Eoin F; Anneren, Cecilia; Davey, Gavin P; Rudd, Pauline M

    2017-10-01

    Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) bind the Fc region of antibodies and therefore play a prominent role in antibody-dependent cell-based immune responses such as ADCC, CDC and ADCP. The immune effector cell activity is directly linked to a productive molecular engagement of FcγRs where both the protein and glycan moiety of antibody and receptor can affect the interaction and in the present study we focus on the role of the FcγR glycans in this interaction. We provide a complete description of the glycan composition of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expressed human Fcγ receptors RI (CD64), RIIa Arg131/His131 (CD32a), RIIb (CD32b) and RIIIa Phe158/Val158 (CD16a) and analyze the role of the glycans in the binding mechanism with IgG. The interactions of the monoclonal antibody rituximab with each FcγR were characterized and we discuss the CHO-FcγRIIIa Phe158/Val158 and CHO-FcγRI interactions and compare them to the equivalent interactions with human (HEK293) and murine (NS0) produced receptors. Our results reveal clear differences in the binding profiles of rituximab, which we attribute in each case to the differences in host cell-dependent FcγR glycosylation. The glycan profiles of CHO expressed FcγRI and FcγRIIIa Phe158/Val158 were compared with the glycan profiles of the receptors expressed in NS0 and HEK293 cells and we show that the glycan type and abundance differs significantly between the receptors and that these glycan differences lead to the observed differences in the respective FcγR binding patterns with rituximab. Oligomannose structures are prevalent on FcγRI from each source and likely contribute to the high affinity rituximab interaction through a stabilization effect. On FcγRI and FcγRIIIa large and sialylated glycans have a negative impact on rituximab binding, likely through destabilization of the interaction. In conclusion, the data show that the IgG1-FcγR binding kinetics differ depending on the glycosylation of the FcγR and further support a

  8. Peracetylated hydroxytyrosol, a new hydroxytyrosol derivate, attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory response in murine peritoneal macrophages via regulation of non-canonical inflammasome, Nrf2/HO1 and JAK/STAT signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Tatiana; Aparicio-Soto, Marina; Castejón, María Luisa; Rosillo, María Ángeles; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Begines, Paloma; Fernández-Bolaños, José G; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, Catalina

    2018-03-18

    The present study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of a new derivative of hydroxytyrosol (HTy), peracetylated hydroxytyrosol (Per-HTy), compared with its parent, HTy, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages as well as potential signaling pathways involved. In particular, we attempted to characterize the role of the inflammasome underlying Per-HTy possible anti-inflammatory effects. Isolated murine peritoneal macrophages were treated with HTy or its derivative in the presence or absence of LPS (5 μg/ml) for 18 h. Cell viability was determined using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Nitric oxide (NO) production was analyzed by Griess method. Production of pro-inflammatory cytokines was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway (STAT3), haem oxigenase 1 (HO1), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) expression and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation was determined by Western blot. Per-HTy significantly reduced the levels of NO and pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as both COX-2 and iNOS expressions. Furthermore, Per-HTy treatment inhibited STAT3 and increased Nrf2 and HO1 protein levels in murine macrophages exposed to LPS. In addition, Per-HTy anti-inflammatory activity was related with an inhibition of non-canonical nucleotide binding domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLRP3) inflammasome pathways by decreasing pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 cytokine levels as consequence of regulation of cleaved caspase-11 enzyme. These results support that this new HTy derivative may offer a new promising nutraceutical therapeutic strategy in the management of inflammatory-related pathologies. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Murine Efficacy and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Flaviviral NS5 Capping Enzyme 2-Thioxothiazolidin-4-One Inhibitor BG-323.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Kristen M; Gullberg, Rebekah C; Soltani, Elnaz; Steel, J Jordan; Geiss, Brian J; Keenan, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne flavivirus infection continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identification of drug targets and novel antiflaviviral compounds to treat these diseases has become a global health imperative. A previous screen of 235,456 commercially available small molecules identified the 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one family of compounds as inhibitors of the flaviviral NS5 capping enzyme, a promising target for antiviral drug development. Rational drug design methodologies enabled identification of lead compound BG-323 from this series. We have shown previously that BG-323 potently inhibits NS5 capping enzyme activity, displays antiviral effects in dengue virus replicon assays and inhibits growth of West Nile and yellow fever viruses with low cytotoxicity in vitro. In this study we further characterized BG-323's antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that BG-323 was able to reduce replication of WNV (NY99) and Powassan viruses in culture, and we were unable to force resistance into WNV (Kunjin) in long-term culture experiments. We then evaluated the antiviral activity of BG-323 in a murine model. Mice were challenged with WNV NY99 and administered BG-323 or mock by IP inoculation immediately post challenge and twice daily thereafter. Mice were bled and viremia was quantified on day three. No significant differences in viremia were observed between BG-323-treated and control groups and clinical scores indicated both BG-323-treated and control mice developed signs of illness on approximately the same day post challenge. To determine whether differences in in vitro and in vivo efficacy were due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties of BG-323, we conducted a pharmacokinetic evaluation of this small molecule. Insights from pharmacokinetic studies indicate that BG-323 is cell permeable, has a low efflux ratio and does not significantly inhibit two common cytochrome P450 (CYP P450) isoforms thus suggesting this molecule may be less

  10. Murine Efficacy and Pharmacokinetic Evaluation of the Flaviviral NS5 Capping Enzyme 2-Thioxothiazolidin-4-One Inhibitor BG-323.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M Bullard

    Full Text Available Arthropod-borne flavivirus infection continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Identification of drug targets and novel antiflaviviral compounds to treat these diseases has become a global health imperative. A previous screen of 235,456 commercially available small molecules identified the 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one family of compounds as inhibitors of the flaviviral NS5 capping enzyme, a promising target for antiviral drug development. Rational drug design methodologies enabled identification of lead compound BG-323 from this series. We have shown previously that BG-323 potently inhibits NS5 capping enzyme activity, displays antiviral effects in dengue virus replicon assays and inhibits growth of West Nile and yellow fever viruses with low cytotoxicity in vitro. In this study we further characterized BG-323's antiviral activity in vitro and in vivo. We found that BG-323 was able to reduce replication of WNV (NY99 and Powassan viruses in culture, and we were unable to force resistance into WNV (Kunjin in long-term culture experiments. We then evaluated the antiviral activity of BG-323 in a murine model. Mice were challenged with WNV NY99 and administered BG-323 or mock by IP inoculation immediately post challenge and twice daily thereafter. Mice were bled and viremia was quantified on day three. No significant differences in viremia were observed between BG-323-treated and control groups and clinical scores indicated both BG-323-treated and control mice developed signs of illness on approximately the same day post challenge. To determine whether differences in in vitro and in vivo efficacy were due to unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties of BG-323, we conducted a pharmacokinetic evaluation of this small molecule. Insights from pharmacokinetic studies indicate that BG-323 is cell permeable, has a low efflux ratio and does not significantly inhibit two common cytochrome P450 (CYP P450 isoforms thus suggesting this molecule

  11. TWEAK activates the non-canonical NFkappaB pathway in murine renal tubular cells: modulation of CCL21.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B Sanz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available TWEAK is a member of the TNF superfamily of cytokines that contribute to kidney tubulointerstitial injury. It has previously been reported that TWEAK induces transient nuclear translocation of RelA and expression of RelA-dependent cytokines in renal tubular cells. Additionally, TWEAK induced long-lasting NFkappaB activation suggestive of engagement of the non-canonical NFkappaB pathway. We now explore TWEAK-induced activation of NFkappaB2 and RelB, as well as expression of CCL21, a T-cell chemotactic factor, in cultured murine tubular epithelial cells and in healthy kidneys in vivo. In cultured tubular cells, TWEAK and TNFalpha activated different DNA-binding NFkappaB complexes. TWEAK-induced sustained NFkappaB activation was associated with NFkappaB2 p100 processing to p52 via proteasome and nuclear translocation and DNA-binding of p52 and RelB. TWEAK, but not TNFalpha used as control, induced a delayed increase in CCL21a mRNA (3.5+/-1.22-fold over control and CCL21 protein (2.5+/-0.8-fold over control, which was prevented by inhibition of the proteasome, or siRNA targeting of NIK or RelB, but not by RelA inhibition with parthenolide. A second NFkappaB2-dependent chemokine, CCL19, was upregulates by TWEAK, but not by TNFalpha. However, both cytokines promoted chemokine RANTES expression (3-fold mRNA at 24 h. In vivo, TWEAK induced nuclear NFkappaB2 and RelB translocation and CCL21a mRNA (1.5+/-0.3-fold over control and CCL21 protein (1.6+/-0.5-fold over control expression in normal kidney. Increased tubular nuclear RelB and tubular CCL21 expression in acute kidney injury were decreased by neutralization (2+/-0.9 vs 1.3+/-0.6-fold over healthy control or deficiency of TWEAK (2+/-0.9 vs 0.8+/-0.6-fold over healthy control. Moreover, anti-TWEAK treatment prevented the recruitment of T cells to the kidney in this model (4.1+/-1.4 vs 1.8+/-1-fold over healthy control. Our results thus identify TWEAK as a regulator of non-canonical NFkappa

  12. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  13. A minimal murine Msx-1 gene promoter. Organization of its cis-regulatory motifs and their role in transcriptional activation in cells in culture and in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, T; Guron, C; Shetty, S; Matsui, H; Raghow, R

    1997-09-05

    To dissect the cis-regulatory elements of the murine Msx-1 promoter, which lacks a conventional TATA element, a putative Msx-1 promoter DNA fragment (from -1282 to +106 base pairs (bp)) or its congeners containing site-specific alterations were fused to luciferase reporter and introduced into NIH3T3 and C2C12 cells, and the expression of luciferase was assessed in transient expression assays. The functional consequences of the sequential 5' deletions of the promotor revealed that multiple positive and negative regulatory elements participate in regulating transcription of the Msx-1 gene. Surprisingly, however, the optimal expression of Msx-1 promoter in either NIH3T3 or C2C12 cells required only 165 bp of the upstream sequence to warrant detailed examination of its structure. Therefore, the functional consequences of site-specific deletions and point mutations of the cis-acting elements of the minimal Msx-1 promoter were systematically examined. Concomitantly, potential transcriptional factor(s) interacting with the cis-acting elements of the minimal promoter were also studied by gel electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNase I footprinting. Combined analyses of the minimal promoter by DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and super shift assays with specific antibodies revealed that 5'-flanking regions from -161 to -154 and from -26 to -13 of the Msx-1 promoter contains an authentic E box (proximal E box), capable of binding a protein immunologically related to the upstream stimulating factor 1 (USF-1) and a GC-rich sequence motif which can bind to Sp1 (proximal Sp1), respectively. Additionally, we observed that the promoter activation was seriously hampered if the proximal E box was removed or mutated, and the promoter activity was eliminated completely if the proximal Sp1 site was similarly altered. Absolute dependence of the Msx-1 minimal promoter on Sp1 could be demonstrated by transient expression assays in the Sp1-deficient

  14. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tian

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), one of the principal components of most gram-negative bacteria's outer membrane, is a type of contaminant that can be frequently found in recombinant DNA products. Because of its strong and even lethal biological effects, selective LPS removal from bioproducts solution is of particular importance in the pharmaceutical and health care industries. In this thesis, for the first time, a proof-of-concept study on preparing LPS-binding hydrogel-like NPs through facile one-step free-radical polymerization was presented. With the incorporation of various hydrophobic (TBAm), cationic (APM, GUA) monomers and cross-linkers (BIS, PEG), a small library of NPs was constructed. Their FITC-LPS binding behaviors were investigated and compared with those of commercially available LPS-binding products. Moreover, the LPS binding selectivity of the NPs was also explored by studying the NPs-BSA interactions. The results showed that all NPs obtained generally presented higher FITC-LPS binding capacity in lower ionic strength buffer than higher ionic strength. However, unlike commercial poly-lysine cellulose and polymyxin B agarose beads' nearly linear increase of FITC-LPS binding with particle concentration, NPs exhibited serious aggregation and the binding quickly saturated or even decreased at high particle concentration. Among various types of NPs, higher FITC-LPS binding capacity was observed for those containing more hydrophobic monomers (TBAm). However, surprisingly, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM exhibited decreased FITC-LPS binding in high ionic strength conditions. Additionally, when new cationic monomer and cross-linker, GUA and PEG, were applied to replace APM and BIS, the obtained NPs showed improved FITC-LPS binding capacity at low NP concentration. But compared with APM- and BIS-containing NPs, the FITC-LPS binding capacity of GUA- and PEG-containing NPs saturated earlier. To investigate the NPs' binding to proteins, we tested the NPs

  15. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  16. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2012-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA.

  17. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    The employment of metal salts is quite limited in asymmetric catalysis, although it would provide an additional arsenal of safe and inexpensive reagents to create molecular functions with high optical purity. Cation chelation by polyethers increases the salts' solubility in conventional organic...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... highly enantioselective silylation reactions in polyether-generated chiral environments, and leading to a record-high turnover in asymmetric organocatalysis. This can lead to further applications by the asymmetric use of other inorganic salts in various organic transformations....

  18. Preliminary structural characterization of human SOUL, a haem-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, Filipe; Romão, Maria João; Macedo, Anjos L.; Aveiro, Susana S.; Goodfellow, Brian J.; Carvalho, Ana Luísa

    2009-01-01

    This manuscript describes the overexpression, purification and crystallization of human SOUL protein (hSOUL). hSOUL is a 23 kDa haem-binding protein that was first identified as the PP23 protein isolated from human full-term placenta. Human SOUL (hSOUL) is a 23 kDa haem-binding protein that was first identified as the PP 23 protein isolated from human full-term placentas. Here, the overexpression, purification and crystallization of hSOUL are reported. The crystals belonged to space group P6 4 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145, c = 60 Å and one protein molecule in the asymmetric unit. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 3.5 Å resolution at the ESRF. A preliminary model of the three-dimensional structure of hSOUL was obtained by molecular replacement using the structures of murine p22HBP, obtained by solution NMR, as search models

  19. Fatty-acid binding proteins modulate sleep and enhance long-term memory consolidation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Gerstner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is thought to be important for memory consolidation, since sleep deprivation has been shown to interfere with memory processing. However, the effects of augmenting sleep on memory formation are not well known, and testing the role of sleep in memory enhancement has been limited to pharmacological and behavioral approaches. Here we test the effect of overexpressing the brain-type fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7 on sleep and long-term memory (LTM formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Transgenic flies carrying the murine Fabp7 or the Drosophila homologue dFabp had reduced baseline sleep but normal LTM, while Fabp induction produced increases in both net sleep and LTM. We also define a post-training consolidation "window" that is sufficient for the observed Fabp-mediated memory enhancement. Since Fabp overexpression increases consolidated daytime sleep bouts, these data support a role for longer naps in improving memory and provide a novel role for lipid-binding proteins in regulating memory consolidation concurrently with changes in behavioral state.

  20. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Otto G; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-01-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction–diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general. (paper)

  1. Efficacy of paracetamol on patent ductus arteriosus closure may be dose dependent: evidence from human and murine studies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    El-Khuffash, Afif

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical effectiveness of variable courses of paracetamol on patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) closure and examined its effect on the in vitro term and preterm murine ductus arteriosus (DA).

  2. DNA cytosine methylation in the bovine leukemia virus promoter is associated with latency in a lymphoma-derived B-cell line: potential involvement of direct inhibition of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein/CRE modulator/activation transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Valérie; Guiguen, Allan; Colin, Laurence; Wijmeersch, Gaëlle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoît; Dekoninck, Ann; Blazkova, Jana; Cardona, Christelle; Merimi, Makram; Vierendeel, Valérie; Calomme, Claire; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Nuttinck, Michèle; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Kettmann, Richard; Portetelle, Daniel; Burny, Arsène; Hirsch, Ivan; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2010-06-18

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral latency represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and allow tumor development. Besides the previously demonstrated role of histone deacetylation in the epigenetic repression of BLV expression, we showed here that BLV promoter activity was induced by several DNA methylation inhibitors (such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and that overexpressed DNMT1 and DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, down-regulated BLV promoter activity. Importantly, cytosine hypermethylation in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and R regions was associated with true latency in the lymphoma-derived B-cell line L267 but not with defective latency in YR2 cells. Moreover, the virus-encoded transactivator Tax(BLV) decreased DNA methyltransferase expression levels, which could explain the lower level of cytosine methylation observed in the L267(LTaxSN) 5'-LTR compared with the L267 5'-LTR. Interestingly, DNA methylation inhibitors and Tax(BLV) synergistically activated BLV promoter transcriptional activity in a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-dependent manner. Mechanistically, methylation at the -154 or -129 CpG position (relative to the transcription start site) impaired in vitro binding of CRE-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors to their respective CRE sites. Methylation at -129 CpG alone was sufficient to decrease BLV promoter-driven reporter gene expression by 2-fold. We demonstrated in vivo the recruitment of CREB/CRE modulator (CREM) and to a lesser extent activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) to the hypomethylated CRE region of the YR2 5'-LTR, whereas we detected no CREB/CREM/ATF recruitment to the hypermethylated corresponding region in the L267 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that site-specific DNA methylation of the BLV promoter represses viral transcription by directly inhibiting transcription factor binding, thereby contributing to true proviral latency.

  3. Fundamental considerations in ski binding analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mote, C D; Hull, M L

    1976-01-01

    1. The static adjustment of a ski binding by hand or by available machines is only an adjustment and is neither a static nor a dynamic evaluation of the binding design. Bindings of different design with identical static adjustments will perform differently in environments in which the forces are static or dynamic. 2. The concept of binding release force is a useful measure of binding adjustment, but it is inappropriate as a criterion for binding evaluation. First, it does not direct attention toward the injury causing mechanism, strain, or displacement in the leg. Second, it is only part of the evaluation in dynamic problems. 3. The binding release decision in present bindings is displacement controlled. The relative displacement of the boot and ski is the system variable. For any specified relative displacement the binding force can be any of an infinite number of possibilities determined by the loading path. 4. The response of the leg-ski system to external impulses applied to the ski is independent of the boot-ski relative motion as long as the boot recenters quickly in the binding. Response is dependent upon the external impulse plus system inertia, damping and stiffness. 5. When tested under half sinusoidal forces applied to a test ski, all bindings will demonstrate static and impulse loading regions. In the static region the force drives the binding to a relative release displacement. In the impulse region the initial velocity of the ski drives the binding to a release displacement. 6. The transition between the static and impulse loading regions is determined by the binding's capacity to store and dissipate energy along the principal loading path. Increased energy capacity necessitates larger external impulses to produce release. 7. In all bindings examined to date, the transmitted leg displacement or strain at release under static loading exceeds leg strain under dynamic or impact loading. Because static loading is responsible for many injuries, a skier

  4. Lead-Binding Proteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey C. Gonick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-binding proteins are a series of low molecular weight proteins, analogous to metallothionein, which segregate lead in a nontoxic form in several organs (kidney, brain, lung, liver, erythrocyte. Whether the lead-binding proteins in every organ are identical or different remains to be determined. In the erythrocyte, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD isoforms have commanded the greatest attention as proteins and enzymes that are both inhibitable and inducible by lead. ALAD-2, although it binds lead to a greater degree than ALAD-1, appears to bind lead in a less toxic form. What may be of greater significance is that a low molecular weight lead-binding protein, approximately 10 kDa, appears in the erythrocyte once blood lead exceeds 39 μg/dL and eventually surpasses the lead-binding capacity of ALAD. In brain and kidney of environmentally exposed humans and animals, a cytoplasmic lead-binding protein has been identified as thymosin β4, a 5 kDa protein. In kidney, but not brain, another lead-binding protein has been identified as acyl-CoA binding protein, a 9 kDa protein. Each of these proteins, when coincubated with liver ALAD and titrated with lead, diminishes the inhibition of ALAD by lead, verifying their ability to segregate lead in a nontoxic form.

  5. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug is bound...

  6. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  7. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  8. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: murine leukemia virus [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term murine leukemia virus 名詞 一般 * * *... * マウス白血病ウイルス マウスハッケツビョウウイルス マウスハッケツビョーウイルス Thesaurus2015 200906060491156251 C LS07 UNKNOWN_2 murine leukemia virus

  9. JST Thesaurus Headwords and Synonyms: murine hepatitis virus [MeCab user dictionary for science technology term[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MeCab user dictionary for science technology term murine hepatitis virus 名詞 一般 * * * * マウス肝炎...ウイルス マウスカンエンウイルス マウスカンエンウイルス Thesaurus2015 200906024862381907 C LS07 UNKNOWN_2 murine hepatitis virus

  10. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  11. A monoclonal antibody interferes with TIMP-2 binding and incapacitates the MMP-2-activating function of multifunctional, pro-tumorigenic MMP-14/MT1-MMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiryaev, S A; Remacle, A G; Golubkov, V S

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and, especially membrane type 1 (MT1)-MMP/MMP-14, are promising drug targets in malignancies. In contrast with multiple small-molecule and protein pan-inhibitors of MT1-MMP cleavage activity, the murine 9E8 monoclonal antibody targets the MMP-2-activating function...... of cellular MT1-MMP alone, rather than the general proteolytic activity and the pro-migratory function of MT1-MMP. Furthermore, the antibody does not interact in any detectable manner with other members of the membrane type (MT)-MMP family. The mechanism of this selectivity remained unknown. Using mutagenesis......, binding and activity assays, and modeling in silico, we have demonstrated that the 9E8 antibody recognizes the MT-loop structure, an eight residue insertion that is specific for MT-MMPs and that is distant from the MT1-MMP active site. The binding of the 9E8 antibody to the MT-loop, however, prevents...

  12. Three-dimensional in vivo imaging of the murine liver: a micro-computed tomography-based anatomical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Various murine models are currently used to study acute and chronic pathological processes of the liver, and the efficacy of novel therapeutic regimens. The increasing availability of high-resolution small animal imaging modalities presents researchers with the opportunity to precisely identify and describe pathological processes of the liver. To meet the demands, the objective of this study was to provide a three-dimensional illustration of the macroscopic anatomical location of the murine liver lobes and hepatic vessels using small animal imaging modalities. We analysed micro-CT images of the murine liver by integrating additional information from the published literature to develop comprehensive illustrations of the macroscopic anatomical features of the murine liver and hepatic vasculature. As a result, we provide updated three-dimensional illustrations of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver and hepatic vessels using micro-CT. The information presented here provides researchers working in the field of experimental liver disease with a comprehensive, easily accessable overview of the macroscopic anatomy of the murine liver.

  13. A murine model of graft-versus-host disease induced by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Jiangwei; Jin Jiangang; Ning Hongmei; Yu Liquan; Feng Kai; Chen Hu; Wang Lisha

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish the model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in mice with allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Methods: Bone marrow cells were combined with spleen cells of male donor C57BL/6 mice according to different proportions, then were transfused into female postradiation recipient BALB/c mice. General state, life span and histopathology of the recipient mice and detected chimera were observed. Results and Conclusion:The recipient mice groups which accepted above 5 x 10 6 donor spleen cells developed acute GVHD after different peroids of time. The GVHD model in mice after allo-BMT was successfully established. The transfusion of 5 x 10 6 -5 x 10 7 spleen cells may be adequate to establish the murine model of GVHD for the prevention and treatment of GVHD. The number of murine spleen cells can be chosen according to the experimental requirement. (authors)

  14. NetH2pan: A Computational Tool to Guide MHC peptide prediction on Murine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVette, Christa I; Andreatta, Massimo; Bardet, Wilfried

    2018-01-01

    With the advancement of personalized cancer immunotherapies, new tools are needed to identify tumor antigens and evaluate T-cell responses in model systems, specifically those that exhibit clinically relevant tumor progression. Key transgenic mouse models of breast cancer are generated and mainta......With the advancement of personalized cancer immunotherapies, new tools are needed to identify tumor antigens and evaluate T-cell responses in model systems, specifically those that exhibit clinically relevant tumor progression. Key transgenic mouse models of breast cancer are generated...... for evaluating antigen specificity in the murine FVB strain. Our study provides the first detailed molecular and immunoproteomic characterization of the FVB H-2q MHC Class I alleles, including >8500 unique peptide ligands, a multi-allele murine MHC peptide prediction tool, and in vivo validation of these data...

  15. Murine protein H is comprised of 20 repeating units, 61 amino acids in length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Tack, B F

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA library constructed from size-selected (greater than 28 S) poly(A)+ RNA isolated from the livers of C57B10. WR mice was screened by using a 249-base-pair (bp) cDNA fragment encoding 83 amino acid residues of human protein H as a probe. Of 120,000 transformants screened, 30 hybridized......, 448 bp of 3'-untranslated sequence, and a polyadenylylated tail of undetermined length. Murine pre-protein H was deduced to consist of an 18-amino acid signal peptide and 1216 residues of H-protein sequence. Murine H was composed of 20 repetitive units, each about 61 amino acid residues in length...

  16. Absence of hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in murine Dunn osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abelson, H.T.; Gorka, C.

    1983-01-01

    The transplantable murine Dunn osteosarcoma has no detectable hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.8) activity. This was established from the tumors directly and from tissue culture cell lines derived from the tumor using a variety of assays: e.g., no [3H]hypoxanthine uptake into tumor or tissue culture cells, no conversion of [3H]hypoxanthine to [3H]IMP by cell extracts from tumors or tissue culture cells, no growth of tissue culture cells in hypoxanthine:aminopterin:thymidine medium, and normal growth of these cells in 10 microM 6-mercaptopurine. Ten human osteosarcomas have been assayed, and two have no apparent hypoxanthine:guanine phosphoribosyltransferase enzyme activity. After high-dose methotrexate treatment in vivo, murine tumors could be selectively killed and normal tissues could be spared by using a rescue regimen of hypoxanthine-thymidine-allopurinol

  17. Role of P2X7 on steroid synthesis in murine luteal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunping Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP regulates different cellular functions through activating purinergic receptors as a signalling molecule or neurotransmitter. P2X7 is highly expressed in murine small luteal cells. In this study, murine luteal cells were cultured in vitro and treated with P2X7 agonists – ATP and 2′(3′-O-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl-adenosine 50-triphosphate (BzATP and with P2X7 antagonist – brilliant blue G (BBG. We found that ATP and BzATP increased the production of progesterone and had no influence on the production of estradiol. BBG reversed the effect of BzATP and ATP. Further studies demonstrated that ATP and BzATP promoted the expression of CYP11A. These results revealed that P2X7 receptor activation is involved in the steroid synthesis in corpus luteum.

  18. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  19. Computer and Statistical Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding and Chromatin Modifications by ChIP-seq data in Embryonic Stem Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Yuriy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Advances in high throughput sequencing technology have enabled the identification of transcription factor (TF binding sites in genome scale. TF binding studies are important for medical applications and stem cell research. Somatic cells can be reprogrammed to a pluripotent state by the combined introduction of factors such as Oct4, Sox2, c-Myc, Klf4. These reprogrammed cells share many characteristics with embryonic stem cells (ESCs and are known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. The signaling requirements for maintenance of human and murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs differ considerably. Genome wide ChIP-seq TF binding maps in mouse stem cells include Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, Tbx3, Smad2 as well as group of other factors. ChIP-seq allows study of new candidate transcription factors for reprogramming. It was shown that Nr5a2 could replace Oct4 for reprogramming. Epigenetic modifications play important role in regulation of gene expression adding additional complexity to transcription network functioning. We have studied associations between different histone modification using published data together with RNA Pol II sites. We found strong associations between activation marks and TF binding sites and present it qualitatively. To meet issues of statistical analysis of genome ChIP-sequencing maps we developed computer program to filter out noise signals and find significant association between binding site affinity and number of sequence reads. The data provide new insights into the function of chromatin organization and regulation in stem cells.

  20. Mutations in type 3 reovirus that determine binding to sialic acid are contained in the fibrous tail domain of viral attachment protein sigma1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, J D; Gunn, V L; Wetzel, J D; Baer, G S; Dermody, T S

    1997-03-01

    The reovirus attachment protein, sigma1, determines numerous aspects of reovirus-induced disease, including viral virulence, pathways of spread, and tropism for certain types of cells in the central nervous system. The sigma1 protein projects from the virion surface and consists of two distinct morphologic domains, a virion-distal globular domain known as the head and an elongated fibrous domain, termed the tail, which is anchored into the virion capsid. To better understand structure-function relationships of sigma1 protein, we conducted experiments to identify sequences in sigma1 important for viral binding to sialic acid, a component of the receptor for type 3 reovirus. Three serotype 3 reovirus strains incapable of binding sialylated receptors were adapted to growth in murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells, in which sialic acid is essential for reovirus infectivity. MEL-adapted (MA) mutant viruses isolated by serial passage in MEL cells acquired the capacity to bind sialic acid-containing receptors and demonstrated a dependence on sialic acid for infection of MEL cells. Analysis of reassortant viruses isolated from crosses of an MA mutant virus and a reovirus strain that does not bind sialic acid indicated that the sigma1 protein is solely responsible for efficient growth of MA mutant viruses in MEL cells. The deduced sigma1 amino acid sequences of the MA mutant viruses revealed that each strain contains a substitution within a short region of sequence in the sigma1 tail predicted to form beta-sheet. These studies identify specific sequences that determine the capacity of reovirus to bind sialylated receptors and suggest a location for a sialic acid-binding domain. Furthermore, the results support a model in which type 3 sigma1 protein contains discrete receptor binding domains, one in the head and another in the tail that binds sialic acid.

  1. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  2. Role of sphingolipids in murine radiation-induced lung injury: protection by sphingosine 1-phosphate analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Biji; Jacobson, Jeffrey R.; Berdyshev, Evgeny; Huang, Yong; Sun, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Yutong; Gerhold, Lynnette M.; Siegler, Jessica; Evenoski, Carrie; Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Zaidi, Rafe; Moreno-Vinasco, Liliana; Bittman, Robert; Chen, Chin Tu

    2011-01-01

    Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components...

  3. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2012-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  4. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of lumiracoxib in chimeric humanized and murinized FRG mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, A P; Wilson, C E; Schreiter, K; Wehr, R; Wilson, E M; Bial, J; Scheer, N; Wilson, I D; Riley, R J

    2017-07-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of lumiracoxib were studied, after administration of single 10mg/kg oral doses to chimeric liver-humanized and murinized FRG mice. In the chimeric humanized mice, lumiracoxib reached peak observed concentrations in the blood of 1.10±0.08μg/mL at 0.25-0.5h post-dose with an AUC inf of 1.74±0.52μgh/mL and an effective half-life for the drug of 1.42±0.72h (n=3). In the case of the murinized animals peak observed concentrations in the blood were determined as 1.15±0.08μg/mL at 0.25h post-dose with an AUC inf of 1.94±0.22μgh/mL and an effective half-life of 1.28±0.02h (n=3). Analysis of blood indicated only the presence of unchanged lumiracoxib. Metabolic profiling of urine, bile and faecal extracts revealed a complex pattern of metabolites for both humanized and murinized animals with, in addition to unchanged parent drug, a variety of hydroxylated and conjugated metabolites detected. The profiles obtained in humanized mice were different compared to murinized animals with e.g., a higher proportion of the dose detected in the form of acyl glucuronide metabolites and much reduced amounts of taurine conjugates. Comparison of the metabolic profiles obtained from the present study with previously published data from C57bl/6J mice and humans, revealed a greater though not complete match between chimeric humanized mice and humans, such that the liver-humanized FRG model may represent a useful approach to assessing the biotransformation of such compounds in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sequential Expression of the Neuropeptides Substance P and Somatostatin in Granulomas Associated with Murine Cysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Prema; White, A. Clinton; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Thornby, John; David, Elliott; Weinstock, Joel

    2002-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis, a parasitic infection of the human central nervous system caused by Taenia solium, is a leading cause of seizures. Seizures associated with neurocysticercosis are caused mainly by the host inflammatory responses to dying parasites in the brain parenchyma. We previously demonstrated sequential expression of Th1 cytokines in early-stage granulomas, followed by expression of Th2 cytokines in later-stage granulomas in murine cysticercosis. However, the mechanism leading to thi...

  6. Murine Double Minute 2 SNP T309G Polymorphism and Urinary Tract Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Hui; Dai, Yu; Ning, Zhongyun; Fan, Ning; Wang, Zhiping; Li, Pei; Zhang, Liyuan; Tao, Yan; Wang, Hanzhang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Urinary tract cancer is a common cause of cancer-related death. The etiology and pathogenesis of urinary tract cancer remain unclear, with genetic and epigenetic factors playing an important role. Studies of the polymorphism of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) have shown inconclusive trends in the risk of urinary tract cancer. To clarify this inconsistency, we conducted updated meta-analyses to evaluate the role of MDM2 T309G polymorphism in urinary tract cancer susceptibility. Data sou...

  7. Homocysteine enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages via ERK and Akt signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Jin; Lee, Yi Sle; Seo, Kyo Won; Bae, Jin Ung; Kim, Gyu Hee; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae, E-mail: chidkim@pusan.ac.kr

    2012-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) at elevated levels is an independent risk factor of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of Hcy on the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in murine macrophages. Among the MMP known to regulate the activities of collagenase and gelatinase, Hcy exclusively increased the gelatinolytic activity of MMP-9 in J774A.1 cells as well as in mouse peritoneal macrophages. Furthermore, this activity was found to be correlated with Western blot findings in J774A.1 cells, which showed that MMP-9 expression was concentration- and time-dependently increased by Hcy. Inhibition of the ERK and Akt pathways led to a significant decrease in Hcy-induced MMP-9 expression, and combined treatment with inhibitors of the ERK and Akt pathways showed an additive effects. Activity assays for ERK and Akt showed that Hcy increased the phosphorylation of both, but these phosphorylation were not affected by inhibitors of the Akt and ERK pathways. In line with these findings, the molecular inhibition of ERK and Akt using siRNA did not affect the Hcy-induced phosphorylation of Akt and ERK, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in murine macrophages by separately activating the ERK and Akt signaling pathways. -- Highlights: ► Homocysteine (Hcy) induced MMP-9 production in murine macrophages. ► Hcy induced MMP-9 production through ERK and Akt signaling pathways. ► ERK and Akt signaling pathways were activated by Hcy in murine macrophages. ► ERK and Akt pathways were additively act on Hcy-induced MMP-9 production. ► Hcy enhances MMP-9 production in macrophages via activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways in an independent manner.

  8. CD44 antibodies and immune thrombocytopenia in the amelioration of murine inflammatory arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Mott

    Full Text Available Antibodies to CD44 have been used to successfully ameliorate murine models of autoimmune disease. The most often studied disease model has been murine inflammatory arthritis, where a clear mechanism for the efficacy of CD44 antibodies has not been established. We have recently shown in a murine passive-model of the autoimmune disease immune thrombocytopenia (ITP that some CD44 antibodies themselves can induce thrombocytopenia in mice, and the CD44 antibody causing the most severe thrombocytopenia (IM7, also is known to be highly effective in ameliorating murine models of arthritis. Recent work in the K/BxN serum-induced model of arthritis demonstrated that antibody-induced thrombocytopenia reduced arthritis, causing us to question whether CD44 antibodies might primarily ameliorate arthritis through their thrombocytopenic effect. We evaluated IM7, IRAWB14.4, 5035-41.1D, KM201, KM114, and KM81, and found that while all could induce thrombocytopenia, the degree of protection against serum-induced arthritis was not closely related to the length or severity of the thrombocytopenia. CD44 antibody treatment was also able to reverse established inflammation, while thrombocytopenia induced by an anti-platelet antibody targeting the GPIIbIIIa platelet antigen, could not mediate this effect. While CD44 antibody-induced thrombocytopenia may contribute to some of its therapeutic effect against the initiation of arthritis, for established disease there are likely other mechanisms contributing to its efficacy. Humans are not known to express CD44 on platelets, and are therefore unlikely to develop thrombocytopenia after CD44 antibody treatment. An understanding of the relationship between arthritis, thrombocytopenia, and CD44 antibody treatment remains critical for continued development of CD44 antibody therapeutics.

  9. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in lytic infection of murine gammaherpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68. In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs. Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68.

  10. Efficacy and immunological actions of FAHF-2 in a murine model of multiple food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Kamal D; Bardina, Ludmilla; Sampson, Hugh A; Li, Xiu-Min

    2012-05-01

    Food Allergy Herbal Formula-2 (FAHF-2) prevents anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy. Multiple food allergies (MFA) are common and associated with a higher risk of anaphylaxis. No well-characterized murine model of sensitization to multiple food allergens exists, and no satisfactory therapy for MFA is currently available. To determine the effect of FAHF-2 in a murine model of MFA. C3H/HeJ mice were orally sensitized to peanut, codfish, and egg concurrently. Oral FAHF-2 treatment commenced 1 day after completing sensitization and continued daily for 7 weeks. Mice were subsequently orally challenged with each allergen. Antibodies in sera from mice simultaneously sensitized with peanut, codfish, and egg recognized major allergens of all 3 foods, demonstrating sensitization to multiple unrelated food allergens (MFA mice). Sham-treated MFA mice exhibited anaphylactic symptoms accompanied by elevation of plasma histamine and hypothermia. In contrast, FAHF-2-treated MFA mice showed no anaphylactic symptoms, normal body temperature, and histamine levels after challenge with each allergen. Protection was accompanied by reduction in allergen-specific immunoglobulin E levels. Allergen-stimulated Th2 cytokine interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 production levels decreased, whereas the Th1 cytokine interferon-γ levels were elevated in cultured splenocytes and mesenteric lymph node cells in FAHF-2-treated mice. We established the first murine model of MFA. FAHF-2 prevents peanut, egg, and fish-induced anaphylactic reactions in this model, suggesting that FAHF-2 may have potential for treating human MFA. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Proliferation and Differentiation of Murine Myeloid Precursor 32D/G-CSF-R Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zjablovskaja, Polina; Daněk, Petr; Kardošová, Miroslava; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell

    č. 132 (2018), č. článku e57033. ISSN 1940-087X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-03796S Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : 32D/G-CSF-R cells * murine myeloid precursor cells * liquid culture * differentiation * neutrophils * proliferation * cytokines * IL-3 * G-CSF Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.232, year: 2016

  12. Biomechanical Properties of Murine Meniscus Surface via AFM-based Nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Doyran, Basak; Gamer, Laura W.; Lu, X. Lucas; Qin, Ling; Ortiz, Christine; Grodzinsky, Alan J.; Rosen, Vicki; Han, Lin

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to quantify the biomechanical properties of murine meniscus surface. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based nanoindentation was performed on the central region, proximal side of menisci from 6- to 24-week old male C57BL/6 mice using microspherical tips (Rtip ≈ 5 μm) in PBS. A unique, linear correlation between indentation depth, D, and response force, F, was found on menisci from all age groups. This non-Hertzian behavior is likely due to the dominance of tensile resistance by the collagen fibril bundles on meniscus surface that are mostly aligned along the circumferential direction observed on 12-week old menisci. The indentation resistance was calculated as both the effective stiffness, Sind = dF/dD, and the effective modulus, Eind, via the isotropic Hertz model. Values of Sind and Eind were found to depend on indentation rate, suggesting the existence of poro-viscoelasticity. These values do not significantly vary with anatomical sites, lateral versus medial compartments, or mouse age. In addition, Eind of meniscus surface (e.g., 6.1 ± 0.8 MPa for 12 weeks of age, mean ± SEM, n = 13) was found to be significantly higher than those of meniscus surfaces in other species, and of murine articular cartilage surface (1.4 ± 0.1 MPa, n = 6). In summary, these results provided the first direct mechanical knowledge of murine knee meniscus tissues. We expect this understanding to serve as a mechanics-based benchmark for further probing the developmental biology and osteoarthritis symptoms of meniscus in various murine models. PMID:25817332

  13. Bacterial Clearance and Cytokine Profiles in a Murine Model of Postsurgical Nosocomial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Manderscheid, Patricia A.; Bodkin, Ryan P.; Davidson, Bruce A.; Jensen, Erik; Russo, Thomas A.; Knight, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The development of a nosocomial pneumonia is facilitated by alterations in host innate pulmonary antibacterial defenses following surgical trauma, which can result in decreased pulmonary bacterial clearance and increased morbidity and mortality. In a murine model of postoperative nosocomial infection, surgical stress (laparotomy) decreased Escherichia coli clearance from the lungs of animals that underwent surgery. Consistent with previous studies, (i) pulmonary levels of tumor necrosis facto...

  14. Identification of carbohydrate-binding domains in the attachment proteins of type 1 and type 3 reoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, J D; Duong, J L; Wright, B W; Dermody, T S

    2000-09-01

    The reovirus attachment protein, sigma1, is responsible for strain-specific patterns of viral tropism in the murine central nervous system and receptor binding on cultured cells. The sigma1 protein consists of a fibrous tail domain proximal to the virion surface and a virion-distal globular head domain. To better understand mechanisms of reovirus attachment to cells, we conducted studies to identify the region of sigma1 that binds cell surface carbohydrate. Chimeric and truncated sigma1 proteins derived from prototype reovirus strains type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D) were expressed in insect cells by using a baculovirus vector. Assessment of expressed protein susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage, binding to anti-sigma1 antibodies, and oligomerization indicates that the chimeric and truncated sigma1 proteins are properly folded. To assess carbohydrate binding, recombinant sigma1 proteins were tested for the capacity to agglutinate mammalian erythrocytes and to bind sialic acid presented on glycophorin, the cell surface molecule bound by type 3 reovirus on human erythrocytes. Using a panel of two wild-type and ten chimeric and truncated sigma1 proteins, the sialic acid-binding domain of type 3 sigma1 was mapped to a region of sequence proposed to form the more amino terminal of two predicted beta-sheet structures in the tail. This unit corresponds to morphologic region T(iii) observed in computer-processed electron micrographs of sigma1 protein purified from virions. In contrast, the homologous region of T1L sigma1 sequence was not implicated in carbohydrate binding; rather, sequences in the distal portion of the tail known as the neck were required. Results of these studies demonstrate that a functional receptor-binding domain, which uses sialic acid as its ligand, is contained within morphologic region T(iii) of the type 3 sigma1 tail. Furthermore, our findings indicate that T1L and T3D sigma1 proteins contain different arrangements of receptor-binding

  15. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  16. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  17. Identification of Glossina morsitans morsitans odorant binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsetse flies are vectors of trypanosome parasites, causative agents of Trypanosomiasis in humans and animals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBPs) are critical in insect olfaction as they bind volatile odours from the environment and transport them to receptors within olfactory receptor neurons for processing providing critical ...

  18. Triazatriangulene as binding group for molecular electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Zhongming; Wang, Xintai; Borges, Anders

    2014-01-01

    The triazatriangulene (TATA) ring system was investigated as a binding group for tunnel junctions of molecular wires on gold surfaces. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of TATA platforms with three different lengths of phenylene wires were fabricated, and their electrical conductance was recorded ...... with its high stability and directionality make this binding group very attractive for molecular electronic measurements and devices. (Figure Presented)....

  19. Localization-enhanced biexciton binding in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    The influence of excitonic localization on the binding energy of biexcitons is investigated for quasi-three-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional AlxGa1-xAs structures. An increase of the biexciton binding energy is observed for localization energies comparable to or larger than the free biexcito...

  20. Binding of corroded ions to human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H J

    1985-05-01

    Employing equilibrium dialysis, the binding abilities of Cu, Al, Co and Cr ions from corroded Cu-Al and Co-Cr dental casting alloys towards human saliva and two of its gel chromatographic fractions were determined. Results indicate that both Cu and Co bind to human saliva i.e. 0.045 and 0.027 mg/mg protein, respectively. Besides possessing the largest binding ability, Cu also possessed the largest binding capacity. The saturation of Cu binding was not reached up to the limit of 0.35 mg protein/ml employed in the tests, while Co reached full saturation at about 0.2 mg protein/ml. Chromium showed absolutely no binding to human saliva while Al ions did not pass through the dialysis membranes. Compared to the binding with solutions that were synthetically made up to contain added salivary-type proteins, it is shown that the binding to human saliva is about 1 order of magnitude larger, at least for Cu ions.

  1. Intentional binding of visual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Miriam; Thomaschke, Roland; Kiesel, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    When an action produces an effect, the effect is perceived earlier in time compared to a stimulus without preceding action. This temporal bias is called intentional binding (IB) and serves as an implicit measure of sense of agency. Typically, IB is investigated by presenting a rotating clock hand while participants execute an action and perceive a resulting tone. Participants are asked to estimate the time point of tone onset by referring to the clock hand position. This time point estimate is compared to a time point estimate of a tone in a condition in which the tone occurs without preceding action. Studies employing this classic clock paradigm employed auditory action effects. We modified this paradigm to investigate potential IB of visual action effects, and, additionally, to investigate how IB differs for visual action effects (Experiment 1) in comparison to auditory action effects (Experiment 2). Our results show that, like the IB of an auditory effect, the time point of a visual action effect is shifted toward the causing action, and that the size of the IB depends on the delay duration of the effect. Comparable to auditory action effects, earlier action effects showed stronger IB compared to later action effects. Yet overall IB of the visual effects was weaker than IB of the auditory effects. As IB is seen as an indicator of sense of agency, this may have important implications for the design of human-machine interfaces.

  2. Puerarin Facilitates T-Tubule Development of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (ES-CM is one of the promising cell sources for repopulation of damaged myocardium. However, ES-CMs present immature structure, which impairs their integration with host tissue and functional regeneration. This study used murine ES-CMs as an in vitro model of cardiomyogenesis to elucidate the effect of puerarin, the main compound found in the traditional Chinese medicine the herb Radix puerariae, on t-tubule development of murine ES-CMs. Methods: Electron microscope was employed to examine the ultrastructure. The investigation of transverse-tubules (t-tubules was performed by Di-8-ANEPPS staining. Quantitative real-time PCR was utilized to study the transcript level of genes related to t-tubule development. Results: We found that long-term application of puerarin throughout cardiac differentiation improved myofibril array and sarcomeres formation, and significantly facilitated t-tubules development of ES-CMs. The transcript levels of caveolin-3, amphiphysin-2 and junctophinlin-2, which are crucial for the formation and development of t-tubules, were significantly upregulated by puerarin treatment. Furthermore, puerarin repressed the expression of miR-22, which targets to caveolin-3. Conclusion: Our data showed that puerarin facilitates t-tubule development of murine ES-CMs. This might be related to the repression of miR-22 by puerarin and upregulation of Cav3, Bin1 and JP2 transcripts.

  3. Establishment of a method of murine obestatin RIA and its primary application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Guangtao Lin Ji; Hao Xiuhua; Xue Hui; Den Zihui; Di Dongdong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To develop a method of murine obestatin RIA and study the role obestatin played in traumatic stress responses. Methods: New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with synthetic murine obestatin to obtain anti-serum, while chloramines-T method was used to iodinate obestatin antigen and a method of RIA for obestatin was established. A mouse sepsis model made with cecal ligation and puncture was established. Serum obestatin levels in the sacrificed models were determined with this method of RIA at 3h, 6h, 9h after the cecum puncture respectively (5 animals each time) as well as in 5 animals after sham operation. Results: Both the shape of standard curve and metrical results of the obestatin RIA were satisfactory. Serum obstatin levels at 6h after injury were significantly higher than those in animals with sham operation out the levels at 3h and 9h were not much different from those in sham operation animals. Meanwhile, the levels at 6h after injury expressed a trend to be significantly higher than that at 3h or 9h after injury. Conclusion: The established method for murine obestatin RIA is highly sensitive, simple and reliable, and it can be used to detect samples from rats and mice. Obestatin may be a traumatic stress factor participating in the modulation of homeostasis after sepsis. (authors)

  4. Generation of a conditional knockout of murine glucocerebrosidase: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Graham B; Jevon, Gareth; Colobong, Karen E; Randall, Derrick R; Choy, Francis Y M; Clarke, Lorne A

    2007-02-01

    Gaucher disease is a disorder of sphingolipid metabolism resulting from an inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase glucocerebrosidase. Affected individuals present with a spectrum of clinical symptoms ranging from hepatosplenomegaly, haematological abnormalities, and bone pain in type 1 disease, to severe neurodegeneration and premature death in types 2 and 3 disease. Although the basic biochemical defect is well characterized, there remains a poor understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of disease. In vitro studies suggest that macrophage glucocerebroside storage leads to tissue dysfunction through complex mechanisms involving altered intracellular calcium homeostasis and apoptosis. In order to study the pathogenic roles of these complex interactions, a viable animal model for Gaucher disease is needed. The complexity of this single gene disorder has been emphasized by the varied results of previous murine Gaucher models, ranging from perinatal lethality to phenotypically and biochemically asymptomatic animals. Recognizing the need to modulate the biochemical phenotype in mice to produce a relevant model, we have created a murine strain with key exons of the glucocerebrosidase gene flanked by loxP sites. We show that expression of Cre-recombinase in cells of hematopoietic and endothelial origin results in deficiency of glucocerebrosidase in the liver, spleen, bone marrow, and peripheral white cells. Glucocerebroside storage in this model leads to progressive splenomegaly with Gaucher cell infiltration and modest storage in the liver by 26 weeks of age. These results indicate the utility of this loxP GBA targeted murine strain for understanding the complex pathophysiology of Gaucher disease.

  5. Differential gene expression in the murine gastric fundus lacking interstitial cells of Cajal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Sean M

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The muscle layers of murine gastric fundus have no interstitial cells of Cajal at the level of the myenteric plexus and only possess intramuscular interstitial cells and this tissue does not generate electric slow waves. The absence of intramuscular interstitial cells in W/WV mutants provides a unique opportunity to study the molecular changes that are associated with the loss of these intercalating cells. Method The gene expression profile of the gastric fundus of wild type and W/WV mice was assayed by murine microarray analysis displaying a total of 8734 elements. Queried genes from the microarray analysis were confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results Twenty-one genes were differentially expressed in wild type and W/WV mice. Eleven transcripts had 2.0–2.5 fold higher mRNA expression in W/WV gastric fundus when compared to wild type tissues. Ten transcripts had 2.1–3.9 fold lower expression in W/WV mutants in comparison with wild type animals. None of these genes have ever been implicated in any bowel motility function. Conclusions These data provides evidence that several important genes have significantly changed in the murine fundus of W/WV mutants that lack intramuscular interstitial cells of Cajal and have reduced enteric motor neurotransmission.

  6. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN - ) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10 -6 M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied

  7. Endogenous murine tau promotes neurofibrillary tangles in 3xTg-AD mice without affecting cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglietto-Vargas, David; Kitazawa, Masashi; Le, Elaine J; Estrada-Hernandez, Tatiana; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Carlos J; Medeiros, Rodrigo; Green, Kim N; LaFerla, Frank M

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies on tauopathy animal models suggest that the concomitant expression of the endogenous murine tau delays the pathological accumulation of human tau, and interferes with the disease progression. To elucidate the role of endogenous murine tau in a model with both plaques and tangles, we developed a novel transgenic mouse model by crossing 3xTg-AD with mtauKO mice (referred to as 3xTg-AD/mtauKO mice). Therefore, this new model allows us to determine the pathological consequences of the murine tau. Here, we show that 3xTg-AD/mtauKO mice have lower tau loads in both soluble and insoluble fractions, and lower tau hyperphosphorylation level in the soluble fraction relative to 3xTg-AD mice. In the 3xTg-AD model endogenous mouse tau is hyperphosphorylated and significantly co-aggregates with human tau. Despite the deletion of the endogenous tau gene in 3xTg-AD/mtauKO mice, cognitive dysfunction was equivalent to 3xTg-AD mice, as there was no additional impairment on a spatial memory task, and thus despite increased tau phosphorylation, accumulation and NFTs in 3xTg-AD mice no further effects on cognition are seen. These findings provide better understanding about the role of endogenous tau to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology and for developing new AD models. © 2013.

  8. Development and characterization of antiserum to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, D.Y.; Eisenman, J.R.; Conlon, P.J.; Park, L.S.; Urdal, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The expression in yeast of a cDNA clone encoding murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has made possible the purification of large quantities of this recombinant protein. Rabbits immunized with pure recombinant GM-CSF generated antibodies that were shown to be specific for both recombinant GM-CSF and GM-CSF isolated from natural sources. Other lymphokines, including IL 1β, IL 2, IL 3, and recombinant human GM-CSF did not react with the antiserum. The antiserum together with recombinant GM-CSF that had been radiolabeled with 125 I to high specific activity, formed the foundation for a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative radioimmunoassay specific for murine GM-CSF. Furthermore, the antiserum was found to inhibit the biologic activities of GM-CSF as measured in both a bone marrow proliferation assay and a colony assay, and thus should prove to be a useful reagent for dissecting the complex growth factor activities involved in murine hematopoiesis

  9. Trp53 activity is repressed in radio-adapted cultured murine limb bud cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Shang, Yi; Fujita, Kazuko; Hayata, Isamu; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) at low dose in fetal models is of great importance, because the fetus is considered to be at the most radiosensitive stage of the development and prenatal radiation might influence subsequent development. We previously demonstrated the existence of an adaptive response (AR) in murine fetuses after pre-exposure to low doses of X-rays. Trp53-dependent apoptosis was suggested to be responsible for the teratogenic effects of IR; decreased apoptosis was observed in adapted animals. In this study, in order to investigate the role of Trp53 in AR, we developed a new model of irradiated micromass culture of fetal limb bud cells, which replicated proliferation, differentiation and response to IR in murine embryos. Murine fetuses were exposed to whole-body priming irradiation of 0.3 Gy or 0.5 Gy at embryonic day 11 (E11). Limb bud cells (collected from digital ray areas exhibiting radiation-induced apoptosis) were cultured and exposed to a challenging dose of 4 Gy at E12 equivalent. The levels of Trp53 protein and its phosphorylated form at Ser18 were investigated. Our results suggested that the induction of AR in mouse embryos was correlated with a repression of Trp53 activity. (author)

  10. Correction of murine mucopolysaccharidosis VII by a human. beta. -glucuronidase transgene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, J.W.; Vogler, C.; Hoffmann, J.W.; Sly, W.S. (St. Louis Univ. School of Medicine, MO (USA)); Birkenmeier, E.H.; Gwynn, B. (Jackson Laboratory, Bar Harbor, ME (USA))

    1990-05-01

    The authors recently described a murine model for mucopolysaccharidosis VII in mice that have an inherited deficiency of {beta}-glucuronidase. Affected mice, of genotype gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps}, present clinical manifestations similar to those of humans with mucopolysaccharidosis VII (Sly syndrome) and are shown here to have secondary elevations of other lysosomal enzymes. The mucopolysaccharidosis VII phenotype in both species includes dwarfism, skeletal deformities, and premature death. Lysosome storage is visualized within enlarged vesicles and correlates biochemically with accumulation of undegraded and partially degraded glycosaminoglycans. In this report they describe the consequences of introducing the human {beta}-glucuronidase gene, GUSB, into gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice that produce virtually no murine {beta}-glucuronidase. Transgenic mice homozygous for the mucopolysaccharidosis VII mutation expressed high levels of human {beta}-glucuronidase activity in all tissues examined and were phenotypically normal. Biochemically, both the intralysosomal storage of glycosaminoglycans and the secondary elevation of other acid hydrolases were corrected. These findings demonstrate that the GUSB transgene is expressed in gus{sup mps}/gus{sup mps} mice and that human {beta}-glucuronidase corrects the murine mucopolysaccharidosis storage disease.

  11. L1-mediated retrotransposition of murine B1 and B2 SINEs recapitulated in cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewannieux, Marie; Heidmann, Thierry

    2005-06-03

    SINEs are short interspersed nucleotide elements with transpositional activity, present at a high copy number (up to a million) in mammalian genomes. They are 80-400 bp long, non-coding sequences which derive either from the 7SL RNA (e.g. human Alus, murine B1s) or tRNA (e.g. murine B2s) polymerase III-driven genes. We have previously demonstrated that Alus very efficiently divert the enzymatic machinery of the autonomous L1 LINE (long interspersed nucleotide element) retrotransposons to transpose at a high rate. Here we show, using an ex vivo assay for transposition, that both B1 and B2 SINEs can be mobilized by murine LINEs, with the hallmarks of a bona fide retrotransposition process, including target site duplications of varying lengths and integrations into A-rich sequences. Despite different phylogenetic origins, transposition of the tRNA-derived B2 sequences is as efficient as that of the human Alus, whereas that of B1s is 20-100-fold lower despite a similar high copy number of these elements in the mouse genome. We provide evidence, via an appropriate nucleotide substitution within the B1 sequence in a domain essential for its intracellular targeting, that the current B1 SINEs are not optimal for transposition, a feature most probably selected for the host sake in the course of evolution.

  12. Effect of small dose of radiation on induction of apoptosis in murine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seong, Jin Sil; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Chung, Eun Ji; Kim, Sung Hee; Suh, Chang Ok

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the presence of adaptive response by low dose radiation in murine tumors in relation to radiation induced apoptosis as well as related mechanism. Syngeneic murine tumors, OCa-1 and HCa-l, were given 0.05 Gy pretreatment followed by therapeutic dose of 25 Gy radiation. Induction of apoptosis was analyzed for each treatment group. Regulating molecules of apoptosis. p53, Bcl-2, Sax, Bel-X, were also analyzed by Western blotting. In 0.05 Gy pretreatment group of OCa-l, 25 Gy-induced apoptosis per 1000 cells was 229, which was estimated at 30% lower level than the expected (p<0.05). In contrast, this reduction in radiation induced apoptosis was not seen in HCa-1. In the expression of apoptosis regulating molecules, p53 increased in both tumors in response to radiation. Bcl-2 and Bax did not show significant change in both tumors however, the expression of Bcl-2 surpassed that of Bax in 0.05 Gy pretreatment group of OCa-1. Bcl-X was not expressed in OCa-1. In HCa-l, ScI-X showed increased expression even with 0.05 Gy. Adaptive response by low dose radiation is shown in one murine tumor, OCa-I, in relation to radiation induced apoptosis. Apoptosis regulating molecules including Bcl-2/Bax and Bcl-X, appear to related. This study shows an evidence that adaptive response is present, but not a generalized phenomenon in vivo

  13. Improved Murine Blastocyst Quality and Development in a Single Culture Medium Compared to Sequential Culture Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Justin M; Zimmer, Randall L; Nabli, Henda; Davis, J Wade; Sutovsky, Peter; Sutovsky, Miriam; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L

    2016-03-01

    Validate single versus sequential culture media for murine embryo development. Prospective laboratory experiment. Assisted Reproduction Laboratory. Murine embryos. Thawed murine zygotes cultured for 3 or 5 days (d3 or d5) in single or sequential embryo culture media developed for human in vitro fertilization. On d3, zygotes developing to the 8 cell (8C) stage or greater were quantified using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), and quality was assessed by morphological analysis. On d5, the number of embryos reaching the blastocyst stage was counted. DAPI was used to quantify total nuclei and inner cell mass nuclei. Localization of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCHL3) was reference points for evaluating cell quality. Comparing outcomes in single versus to sequential media, the odds of embryos developing to the 8C stage on d3 were 2.34 time greater (P = .06). On d5, more embryos reached the blastocyst stage (P = culture. Human embryo studies are needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Sex differences in the MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Gilbertson, Shai; Davis, Megan; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Kasman, Laura M

    The MB49 syngeneic, murine model of bladder cancer has been widely used for more than 35 years. In humans, bladder cancer is one third as prevalent in women as in men, with a trend toward lower prevalence in parous compared to nulliparous women. Our objective was to determine if the MB49 bladder cancer model reproduces the sex differences observed in humans, and to determine its sensitivity to testosterone and the pregnancy hormone, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Male and female C57BL/6 mice were implanted with MB49 murine bladder cancer cells, and observed for tumor growth. MB49 dose responses to hCG and dihydrotestosterone were determined in vitro . MB49 tumor growth was significantly greater in male mice than female mice. Pregnancy did not affect MB49 tumor growth in female mice. MB49 cells did not proliferate in response to hCG in vitro and the functional receptor for gonadotropins was absent. Dihydrotestosterone strongly stimulated growth of MB49 cells in vitro . The MB49 murine model of bladder cancer reproduced some aspects of the sex differences observed in humans. Our results suggest that testosterone may stimulate MB49 cell proliferation, which may explain the more rapid MB49 tumor growth observed in male mice.

  15. Antioxidative effects in vivo and colonization of Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 in the murine intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Xing, Zhuqing; Hu, Wei; Li, Chao; Wang, Jinju; Wang, Yanping

    2016-08-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum MA2 was isolated from traditional Chinese Tibet kefir grains, which possess several excellent properties and functions. We previously demonstrated the antioxidant activities of this bacterium in vitro. However, the maintenance and survival of L. plantarum MA2 inside the murine intestinal tract, where it exerts its probiotic properties, and whether its effects are elicited directly on the host remain unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the mechanisms of L. plantarum MA2 in aging mice following D-galactose administration. The levels of malondialdehyde decreased significantly in the L. plantarum MA2 groups after oral ingestion compared to the D-galactose model group, and total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities increased significantly in the serum and liver. We combined fluorescein isothiocyanate labeling and green fluorescent protein expression to dynamically monitor the colonization and distribution of L. plantarum MA2 in the murine intestinal tract. The results indicated that L. plantarum MA2 was detected in the ileum, colon, and feces after single and continuous oral administration at day 21 and was maintained at 10(4)-10(5) CFU/g. These results suggest that L. plantarum MA2 colonizes and survives in the murine intestinal tract to exert its antioxidative effects.

  16. Ribonucleases 6 and 7 have antimicrobial function in the human and murine urinary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becknell, Brian; Eichler, Tad; Beceiro, Susana; Li, Birong; Easterling, Robert; Carpenter, Ashley R.; James, Cindy; McHugh, Kirk M.; Hains, David S.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Spencer, John David

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests antimicrobial peptides protect the urinary tract from infection. Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7), a member of the RNase A superfamily, is a potent epithelial-derived protein that maintains human urinary tract sterility. RNase 7 expression is restricted to primates, limiting evaluation of its antimicrobial activity in vivo. Here we identified Ribonuclease 6 (RNase 6) as the RNase A Superfamily member present in humans and mice that is most conserved at the amino acid level relative to RNase 7. Like RNase 7, recombinant human and murine RNase 6 has potent antimicrobial activity against uropathogens. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analysis indicate that RNase 6 mRNA and protein are up-regulated in the human and murine urinary tract during infection. Immunostaining located RNase 6 to resident and infiltrating monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils. Uropathogenic E. coli induces RNase 6 peptide expression in human CD14+ monocytes and murine bone marrow derived macrophages. Thus, RNase 6 is an inducible, myeloid-derived protein with markedly different expression from the epithelial-derived RNase 7 but with equally potent antimicrobial activity. Our studies suggest RNase 6 serves as an evolutionarily conserved antimicrobial peptide that participates in the maintenance of urinary tract sterility. PMID:25075772

  17. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) stimulates murine macrophages infected with Citrobacter rodentium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo, Ayelén A; Rolny, Ivanna S; Romanin, David; Pérez, Pablo F

    2017-03-01

    Citrobacter rodentium is a specific murine enteropathogen which causes diarrheal disease characterized by colonic hyperplasia and intestinal inflammation. Recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages constitute a key step to control the infection. Since modulation of the activity of professional phagocytic cells could contribute to improve host´s defences against C. rodentium, we investigated the effect of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) on the interaction between murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and C. rodentium. Phagocytosis, surface molecules and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOs) expression were determined by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by fluorescence microscopy. The presence of lactobacilli increased phagocytosis of C. rodentium whereas C. rodentium had no effect on lactobacilli internalization. Survival of internalized C. rodentium diminished when strain CIDCA 133 was present. CD-86, MHCII, iNOs expression and nitrite production were increased when C. rodentium and lactobacilli were present even though strain CIDCA 133 alone had no effect. Strain CIDCA 133 led to a strong induction of ROS activity which was not modified by C. rodentium. Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis (strain CIDCA 133) is able to increase the activation of murine macrophages infected with C. rodentium. The sole presence of lactobacilli is enough to modify some stimulation markers (e.g. ROS induction) whereas other markers require the presence of both bacteria; thus, indicating a synergistic effect.

  18. Protective effects of astaxanthin from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on murine gastric ulcer models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenta; Oyagi, Atsushi; Takahira, Dai; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishibashi, Takashi; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of astaxanthin extracted from Paracoccus carotinifaciens on gastric mucosal damage in murine gastric ulcer models. Mice were pretreated with astaxanthin for 1 h before ulcer induction. Gastric ulcers were induced in mice by oral administration of hydrochloride (HCl)/ethanol or acidified aspirin. The effect of astaxanthin on lipid peroxidation in murine stomach homogenates was also evaluated by measuring the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). The free radical scavenging activities of astaxanthin were also measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements. Astaxanthin significantly decreased the extent of HCl/ethanol- and acidified aspirin-induced gastric ulcers. Astaxanthin also decreased the level of TBARS. The ESR measurement showed that astaxanthin had radical scavenging activities against the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and the superoxide anion radical. These results suggest that astaxanthin has antioxidant properties and exerts a protective effect against ulcer formation in murine models. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Characterization of chlorophyll binding to LIL3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mork-Jansson, Astrid Elisabeth; Eichacker, Lutz Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The light harvesting like protein 3 (LIL 3) from higher plants, has been linked to functions in chlorophyll and tocopherol biosynthesis, photo-protection and chlorophyll transfer. However, the binding of chlorophyll to LIL3 is unclear. We present a reconstitution protocol for chlorophyll binding to LIL3 in DDM micelles. It is shown in the absence of lipids and carotenoids that reconstitution of chlorophyll binding to in vitro expressed LIL3 requires pre-incubation of reaction partners at room temperature. We show chlorophyll a but not chlorophyll b binding to LIL3 at a molar ratio of 1:1. Neither dynamic light scattering nor native PAGE, enabled a discrimination between binding of chlorophyll a and/or b to LIL3.

  20. (TH) diazepam binding to human granulocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, P.A.; Cundall, R.L.; Rolfe, B.

    1985-07-08

    (TH)-diazepam binds to sites on human granulocyte membranes, with little or no binding to platelets or lymphocytes. These (TH)-diazepam binding sites are of the peripheral type, being strongly inhibited by R05-4864 (Ki=6.23nM) but only weakly by clonazepam (Ki=14 M). Binding of (TH) diazepam at 0 is saturable, specific and stereoselective. Scatchard analysis indicates a single class of sites with Bmax of 109 +/- 17f moles per mg of protein and K/sub D/ of 3.07 +/- 0.53nM. Hill plots of saturation experiments gave straight lines with a mean Hill coefficient of 1.03 +/- 0.014. Binding is time dependent and reversible and it varies linearly with granulocyte protein concentration over the range 0.025-0.300 mg of protein. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  1. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... no effect. HEPG2 cells internalized FVIIa with a rate of 10 fmol 10(-5) cells h(-1). In contrast to HEPG2 cells, FVIIa binding to primary rat hepatocytes was completely independent of TF, and excess unlabeled FVIIa partly reduced the binding of 125I-FVIIa to rat hepatocytes. Further, compared with HEPG2...... cells, three- to fourfold more FVIIa bound to rat primary hepatocytes, and the bound FVIIa was internalized at a faster rate. Similar FVIIa binding and internalization profiles were observed in primary human hepatocytes. Plasma inhibitors had no effect on FVIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes...

  2. Genome-wide binding and transcriptome analysis of human farnesoid X receptor in primary human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Zhan

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NR1H4 is a ligand-activated transcription factor, belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR is highly expressed in the liver and is essential in regulating bile acid homeostasis. FXR deficiency is implicated in numerous liver diseases and mice with modulation of FXR have been used as animal models to study liver physiology and pathology. We have reported genome-wide binding of FXR in mice by chromatin immunoprecipitation - deep sequencing (ChIP-seq, with results indicating that FXR may be involved in regulating diverse pathways in liver. However, limited information exists for the functions of human FXR and the suitability of using murine models to study human FXR functions.In the current study, we performed ChIP-seq in primary human hepatocytes (PHHs treated with a synthetic FXR agonist, GW4064 or DMSO control. In parallel, RNA deep sequencing (RNA-seq and RNA microarray were performed for GW4064 or control treated PHHs and wild type mouse livers, respectively.ChIP-seq showed similar profiles of genome-wide FXR binding in humans and mice in terms of motif analysis and pathway prediction. However, RNA-seq and microarray showed more different transcriptome profiles between PHHs and mouse livers upon GW4064 treatment.In summary, we have established genome-wide human FXR binding and transcriptome profiles. These results will aid in determining the human FXR functions, as well as judging to what level the mouse models could be used to study human FXR functions.

  3. An interspecies comparison of mercury inhibition on muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Niladri; Stamler, Christopher J.; Loua, Kovana Marcel; Chan, H.M.

    2005-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous pollutant that can disrupt neurochemical signaling pathways in mammals. It is well documented that inorganic Hg (HgCl 2 ) and methyl Hg (MeHg) can inhibit the binding of radioligands to the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor in rat brains. However, little is known concerning this relationship in specific anatomical regions of the brain or in other species, including humans. The purpose of this study was to explore the inhibitory effects of HgCl 2 and MeHg on [ 3 H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([ 3 H]-QNB) binding to the mACh receptor in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex regions from human, rat, mouse, mink, and river otter brain tissues. Saturation binding curves were obtained from each sample to calculate receptor density (B max ) and ligand affinity (K d ). Subsequently, samples were exposed to HgCl 2 or MeHg to derive IC50 values and inhibition constants (K i ). Results demonstrate that HgCl 2 is a more potent inhibitor of mACh receptor binding than MeHg, and the receptors in the cerebellum are more sensitive to Hg-mediated mACh receptor inhibition than those in the cerebral cortex. Species sensitivities, irrespective of Hg type and brain region, can be ranked from most to least sensitive: river otter > rat > mink > mouse > humans. In summary, our data demonstrate that Hg can inhibit the binding [ 3 H]-QNB to the mACh receptor in a range of mammalian species. This comparative study provides data on interspecies differences and a framework for interpreting results from human, murine, and wildlife studies

  4. DNA binding-independent transcriptional activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor gene (VEGF) by the Myb oncoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutwyche, Jodi K.; Keough, Rebecca A.; Hunter, Julie; Coles, Leeanne S.; Gonda, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Myb is a key transcription factor that can regulate proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, predominantly in the haemopoietic system. Abnormal expression of Myb is associated with a number of cancers, both haemopoietic and non-haemopoietic. In order to better understand the role of Myb in normal and tumorigenic processes, we undertook a cDNA array screen to identify genes that are regulated by this factor. In this way, we identified the gene encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as being potentially regulated by the Myb oncoprotein in myeloid cells. To determine whether this was a direct effect on VEGF gene transcription, we examined the activity of the murine VEGF promoter in the presence of either wild-type (WT) or mutant forms of Myb. It was found that WT Myb was able to activate the VEGF promoter and that a minimal promoter region of 120 bp was sufficient to confer Myb responsiveness. Surprisingly, activation of the VEGF promoter was independent of DNA binding by Myb. This was shown by the use of DNA binding-defective Myb mutants and by mutagenesis of a potential Myb-binding site in the minimal promoter. Mutation of Sp1 sites within this region abolished Myb-mediated regulation of a reporter construct, suggesting that Myb DNA binding-independent activation of VEGF expression occurs via these Sp1 binding elements. Regulation of VEGF production by Myb has implications for the potential role of Myb in myeloid leukaemias and in solid tumours where VEGF may be functioning as an autocrine growth factor

  5. Structural changes of eIF4E upon binding to the mRNA 5' monomethylguanosine and trimethylguanosine Cap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Stepinski, Janusz; Dadlez, Michal; Darzynkiewicz, Edward; Stolarski, Ryszard; Niedzwiecka, Anna

    2008-03-04

    Recognition of the 5' cap by the eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is the rate-limiting step in the ribosome recruitment to mRNAs. The regular cap consists of 7-monomethylguanosine (MMG) linked by a 5'-5' triphosphate bridge to the first transcribed nucleoside, while some primitive eukaryotes possess a N (2), N (2),7-trimethylguanosine (TMG) cap structure as a result of trans splicing. Mammalian eIF4E is highly specific to the MMG form of the cap in terms of association constants and thermodynamic driving force. We have investigated conformational changes of eIF4E induced by interaction with two cap analogues, 7-methyl-GTP and N (2), N (2),7-trimethyl-GTP. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and electrospray mass spectrometry were applied to probe local dynamics of murine eIF4E in the apo and cap-bound forms. The data show that the cap binding induces long-range conformational changes in the protein, not only in the cap-binding pocket but also in a distant region of the 4E-BP/eIF4G binding site. Formation of the complex with 7-methyl-GTP makes the eIF4E structure more compact, while binding of N (2), N (2),7-trimethyl-GTP leads to higher solvent accessibility of the protein backbone in comparison with the apo form. The results suggest that the additional double methylation at the N (2)-amino group of the cap causes sterical effects upon binding to mammalian eIF4E which influence the overall solution dynamics of the protein, thus precluding formation of a tight complex.

  6. Comparison of vectorial ion transport in primary murine airway and human sinonasal air-liquid interface cultures, models for studies of cystic fibrosis, and other airway diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoyan; Fortenberry, James A; Cohen, Noam A; Sorscher, Eric J; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare vectorial ion transport within murine trachea, murine nasal septa, and human sinonasal cultured epithelium. Our hypothesis is that murine septal epithelium, rather than trachea, will more closely mimic the electrophysiology properties of human sinonasal epithelium. Epithelium from murine trachea, murine septa, and human sinonasal tissue were cultured at an air-liquid interface to confluence and full differentiation. A limited number of homozygous dF508 epithelia were also cultured. Monolayers were mounted in modified Ussing chambers to investigate pharmacologic manipulation of ion transport. The change in forskolin-stimulated current (delta-I(SC), expressed as micro-A/cm(2)) in murine septal (n = 19; 16.84 +/- 2.09) and human sinonasal (n = 18; 12.15 +/- 1.93) cultures was significantly increased over murine tracheal cultures (n = 15; 6.75 +/- 1.35; p = 0.035 and 0.0005, respectively). Forskolin-stimulated I(SC) was inhibited by the specific cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) inhibitor INH-172 (5 microM). No forskolin-stimulated I(SC) was shown in cultures of dF508 homozygous murine septal epithelium (n = 3). Murine septal I(SC) was largely inhibited by amiloride (12.03 +/- 0.66), whereas human sinonasal cultures had a very limited response (0.70 +/- 0.47; p < 0.0001). The contribution of CFTR to stimulated chloride current as measured by INH-172 was highly significantly different between all groups (murine septa, 19.51 +/- 1.28; human sinonasal, 11.12 +/- 1.58; murine trachea, 4.85 +/- 0.49; p < 0.0001). Human sinonasal and murine septal epithelial cultures represent a useful model for studying CFTR activity and may provide significant advantages over lower airway tissues for investigating upper and lower respiratory pathophysiology.

  7. The Icsbp locus is a common proviral insertion site in mature B-cell lymphomas/plasmacytomas induced by exogenous murine leukemia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Shiliang; Sorensen, Annette Balle; Kunder, Sandra; Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Morris, David W.; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2006-01-01

    ICSBP (interferon consensus sequence binding protein)/IRF8 (interferon regulatory factor 8) is an interferon gamma-inducible transcription factor expressed predominantly in hematopoietic cells, and down-regulation of this factor has been observed in chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia in man. By screening about 1200 murine leukemia virus (MLV)-induced lymphomas, we found proviral insertions at the Icsbp locus in 14 tumors, 13 of which were mature B-cell lymphomas or plasmacytomas. Only one was a T-cell lymphoma, although such tumors constituted about half of the samples screened. This indicates that the Icsbp locus can play a specific role in the development of mature B-lineage malignancies. Two proviral insertions in the last Icsbp exon were found to act by a poly(A)-insertion mechanism. The remaining insertions were found within or outside Icsbp. Since our results showed expression of Icsbp RNA and protein in all end-stage tumor samples, a simple tumor suppressor function of ICSBP is not likely. Interestingly, proviral insertions at Icsbp have not been reported from previous extensive screenings of mature B-cell lymphomas induced by endogenous MLVs. We propose that ICSBP might be involved in an early modulation of an immune response to exogenous MLVs that might also play a role in proliferation of the mature B-cell lymphomas

  8. [Protective activity of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus, against oral and gastric candidiasis in an experimental murine model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Ishijima, Sanae; Ono, Yoshiko; Izumo, Takayuki; Ida, Masayuki; Shibata, Hiroshi; Abe, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of S-PT84, a heat-killed preparation of Lactobacillus pentosus on growth of Candida albicans was examined in vitro and in vivo. The mycelial growth was effectively inhibited by S-PT84 and seemed to bind to the hyphae. We assessed the potential of S-PT84 for treatment of oral and gastric candidiasis using a murine model. When 2 mg of S-PT84 was administered three times into the oral cavity of orally Candida infected mice, the score of lesions on the tongue was improved on day 2. When 50 μl and 200 μl of S-PT84 (10 mg/ml) were administered three times into the oral cavity (0.5 mg × 3) and the stomach (2 mg × 3) of the same mouse model, the number of viable Candida cells in the stomach was reduced significantly on day 2. These findings suggest the possibility that S-PT84 has potential as a food ingredient supporting anti-Candida treatment, especially for Candida infection in the gastrointestinal tract.

  9. Noncanonical Expression of a Murine Cytomegalovirus Early Protein CD8 T-Cell Epitope as an Immediate Early Epitope Based on Transcription from an Upstream Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Fink

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral CD8 T-cell epitopes, represented by viral peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex class-I (MHC-I glycoproteins, are often identified by “reverse immunology”, a strategy not requiring biochemical and structural knowledge of the actual viral protein from which they are derived by antigen processing. Instead, bioinformatic algorithms predicting the probability of C-terminal cleavage in the proteasome, as well as binding affinity to the presenting MHC-I molecules, are applied to amino acid sequences deduced from predicted open reading frames (ORFs based on the genomic sequence. If the protein corresponding to an antigenic ORF is known, it is usually inferred that the kinetic class of the protein also defines the phase in the viral replicative cycle during which the respective antigenic peptide is presented for recognition by CD8 T cells. We have previously identified a nonapeptide from the predicted ORFm164 of murine cytomegalovirus that is presented by the MHC-I allomorph H-2 Dd and that is immunodominant in BALB/c (H-2d haplotype mice. Surprisingly, although the ORFm164 protein gp36.5 is expressed as an Early (E phase protein, the m164 epitope is presented already during the Immediate Early (IE phase, based on the expression of an upstream mRNA starting within ORFm167 and encompassing ORFm164.

  10. Pure Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin and a Cannabis sativa extract with high content in Δ9-tetrahydrocannabivarin inhibit nitrite production in murine peritoneal macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Barbara; Pagano, Ester; Orlando, Pierangelo; Capasso, Raffaele; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Pertwee, Roger; Marzo, Vincenzo Di; Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca

    2016-11-01

    Historical and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. We have here investigated the effect of the non-psychotropic phytocannabinoid Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) and of a Cannabis sativa extract with high (64.8%) content in THCV (THCV-BDS) on nitric oxide (NO) production, and on cannabinoid and transient receptor potential (TRP) channel expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. THCV-BDS and THCV exhibited similar affinity in radioligand binding assays for CB 1 and CB 2 receptors, and inhibited, via CB 2 but not CB 1 cannabinoid receptors, nitrite production evoked by LPS in peritoneal macrophages. THCV down-regulated the over-expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) proteins induced by LPS. Furthermore, THCV counteracted LPS-induced up-regulation of CB 1 receptors, without affecting the changes in CB 2 , TRPV2 or TRPV4 mRNA expression caused by LPS. Other TRP channels, namely, TRPA1, TRPV1, TRPV3 and TRPM8 were poorly expressed or undetectable in both unstimulated and LPS-challenged macrophages. It is concluded that THCV - via CB 2 receptor activation - inhibits nitrite production in macrophages. The effect of this phytocannabinoid was associated with a down-regulation of CB 1 , but not CB 2 or TRP channel mRNA expression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiopharmacological evaluation of 18F-labeled phosphatidylserine-binding peptides for molecular imaging of apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, Melinda; Perreault, Amanda; Kapty, Janice; Richter, Susan; Foerster, Christian; Bergman, Cody; Way, Jenilee; Mercer, John; Wuest, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Radiolabeled phosphatidylserine (PS)-binding peptides represent an innovative strategy for molecular imaging of apoptosis with positron emission tomography (PET). The goal of this study was the radiopharmacological evaluation of radiolabeled peptides for their binding to PS on apoptotic cancer cells, involving metabolic stability, cellular uptake, biodistribution, and dynamic PET imaging experiments. Methods: Binding of peptides LIKKPF, PGDLSR, FBz-LIKKPF, FBz-PGDLSR, FBAM-CLIKKPF and FBAM-CPGDLSR to PS was analyzed in a newly developed radiometric binding assay using 64 Cu-labeled wild-type annexin-V as radiotracer. Radiolabeling of most potent peptides with fluorine-18 was carried out with thiol-selective prosthetic group [ 18 F]FBAM to give [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF and [ 18 F]FBAM-CPGDLSR. [ 18 F]FBAM-labeled peptides were studied in camptothecin-induced apoptotic human T lymphocyte Jurkat cells, and in a murine EL4 tumor model of apoptosis using dynamic PET imaging and biodistribution. Results: Peptides LIKKPF and PGDLSR inhibited binding of 64 Cu-labeled annexin-V to immobilized PS in the millimolar range (IC 50 10–15 mM) compared to annexin-V (45 nM). Introduction of FBAM prosthetic group slightly increased inhibitory potencies (FBAM-CLIKKPF: IC 50 = 1 mM; FBAM-CPGDLSR: IC 50 = 6 mM). Radiolabeling succeeded in good radiochemical yields of 50–54% using a chemoselective alkylation reaction of peptides CLIKKPF and CPGDLSR with [ 18 F]FBAM. In vivo metabolic stability studies in mice revealed 40–60% of intact peptides at 5 min p.i. decreasing to 25% for [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF and less than 5% for [ 18 F]FBAM-CPGDLSR at 15 min p.i.. Cell binding of [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF in drug-treated Jurkat cells was significantly higher compared to untreated cells, but this was not observed for [ 18 F]FBAM-CPGDLSR. Dynamic PET imaging experiments showed that baseline uptake of [ 18 F]FBAM-CLIKKPF in EL4 tumors was higher (SUV 5min 0.46, SUV 60min 0.13) compared to

  12. {sup 89}Zr-labeled nivolumab for imaging of T-cell infiltration in a humanized murine model of lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    England, Christopher G.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Ellison, Paul A.; Hernandez, Reinier; Barnhart, Todd E. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Jiang, Dawei [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Rekoske, Brian T. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); McNeel, Douglas G. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States); Huang, Peng [Health Science Center, Shenzhen University, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Biomedical Measurements and Ultrasound Imaging, School of Biomedical Engineering, Guangzhou (China); Cai, Weibo [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin - Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI (United States)

    2018-01-15

    Nivolumab is a human monoclonal antibody specific for programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), a negative regulator of T-cell activation and response. Acting as an immune checkpoint inhibitor, nivolumab binds to PD-1 expressed on the surface of many immune cells and prevents ligation by its natural ligands. Nivolumab is only effective in a subset of patients, and there is limited evidence supporting its use for diagnostic, monitoring, or stratification purposes. {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab was synthesized to map the biodistribution of PD-1-expressing tumor infiltrating T-cells in vivo using a humanized murine model of lung cancer. The tracer was developed by radiolabeling the antibody with the positron emitter zirconium-89 ({sup 89}Zr). Imaging results were validated by ex vivo biodistribution studies, and PD-1 expression was validated by immunohistochemistry. Data obtained from PET imaging were used to determine human dosimetry estimations. The tracer showed elevated binding to stimulated PD-1 expressing T-cells in vitro and in vivo. PET imaging of {sup 89}Zr-Df-nivolumab allowed for clear delineation of subcutaneous tumors through targeting of localized activated T-cells expressing PD-1 in the tumors and salivary glands of humanized A549 tumor-bearing mice. In addition to tumor uptake, salivary and lacrimal gland infiltration of T-cells was noticeably visible and confirmed via histological analysis. These data support our claim that PD-1-targeted agents allow for tumor imaging in vivo, which may assist in the design and development of new immunotherapies. In the future, noninvasive imaging of immunotherapy biomarkers may assist in disease diagnostics, disease monitoring, and patient stratification. (orig.)

  13. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  14. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding