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Sample records for binding site residues

  1. A tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins from PDB structures

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    Hu Jing

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the research on protein functional sites, researchers often need to identify binding-site residues on a protein. A commonly used strategy is to find a complex structure from the Protein Data Bank (PDB that consists of the protein of interest and its interacting partner(s and calculate binding-site residues based on the complex structure. However, since a protein may participate in multiple interactions, the binding-site residues calculated based on one complex structure usually do not reveal all binding sites on a protein. Thus, this requires researchers to find all PDB complexes that contain the protein of interest and combine the binding-site information gleaned from them. This process is very time-consuming. Especially, combing binding-site information obtained from different PDB structures requires tedious work to align protein sequences. The process becomes overwhelmingly difficult when researchers have a large set of proteins to analyze, which is usually the case in practice. Results In this study, we have developed a tool for calculating binding-site residues on proteins, TCBRP http://yanbioinformatics.cs.usu.edu:8080/ppbindingsubmit. For an input protein, TCBRP can quickly find all binding-site residues on the protein by automatically combining the information obtained from all PDB structures that consist of the protein of interest. Additionally, TCBRP presents the binding-site residues in different categories according to the interaction type. TCBRP also allows researchers to set the definition of binding-site residues. Conclusion The developed tool is very useful for the research on protein binding site analysis and prediction.

  2. Residue propensities, discrimination and binding site prediction of adenine and guanine phosphates

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    Ahmad Zulfiqar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenine and guanine phosphates are involved in a number of biological processes such as cell signaling, metabolism and enzymatic cofactor functions. Binding sites in proteins for these ligands are often detected by looking for a previously known motif by alignment based search. This is likely to miss those where a similar binding site has not been previously characterized and when the binding sites do not follow the rule described by predefined motif. Also, it is intriguing how proteins select between adenine and guanine derivative with high specificity. Results Residue preferences for AMP, GMP, ADP, GDP, ATP and GTP have been investigated in details with additional comparison with cyclic variants cAMP and cGMP. We also attempt to predict residues interacting with these nucleotides using information derived from local sequence and evolutionary profiles. Results indicate that subtle differences exist between single residue preferences for specific nucleotides and taking neighbor environment and evolutionary context into account, successful models of their binding site prediction can be developed. Conclusion In this work, we explore how single amino acid propensities for these nucleotides play a role in the affinity and specificity of this set of nucleotides. This is expected to be helpful in identifying novel binding sites for adenine and guanine phosphates, especially when a known binding motif is not detectable.

  3. Prediction of protein-protein binding site by using core interface residue and support vector machine

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    Sun Zhonghua

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of protein-protein binding site can provide structural annotation to the protein interaction data from proteomics studies. This is very important for the biological application of the protein interaction data that is increasing rapidly. Moreover, methods for predicting protein interaction sites can also provide crucial information for improving the speed and accuracy of protein docking methods. Results In this work, we describe a binding site prediction method by designing a new residue neighbour profile and by selecting only the core-interface residues for SVM training. The residue neighbour profile includes both the sequential and the spatial neighbour residues of an interface residue, which is a more complete description of the physical and chemical characteristics surrounding the interface residue. The concept of core interface is applied in selecting the interface residues for training the SVM models, which is shown to result in better discrimination between the core interface and other residues. The best SVM model trained was tested on a test set of 50 randomly selected proteins. The sensitivity, specificity, and MCC for the prediction of the core interface residues were 60.6%, 53.4%, and 0.243, respectively. Our prediction results on this test set were compared with other three binding site prediction methods and found to perform better. Furthermore, our method was tested on the 101 unbound proteins from the protein-protein interaction benchmark v2.0. The sensitivity, specificity, and MCC of this test were 57.5%, 32.5%, and 0.168, respectively. Conclusion By improving both the descriptions of the interface residues and their surrounding environment and the training strategy, better SVM models were obtained and shown to outperform previous methods. Our tests on the unbound protein structures suggest further improvement is possible.

  4. Role of residues in the adenosine binding site of NAD of the Ascaris suum malic enzyme.

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    Aktas, Deniz F; Cook, Paul F

    2008-12-01

    Ascaris suum mitochondrial malic enzyme catalyzes the divalent metal ion dependent conversion of l-malate to pyruvate and CO(2), with concomitant reduction of NAD(P) to NAD(P)H. In this study, some of the residues that form the adenosine binding site of NAD were mutated to determine their role in binding of the cofactor and/or catalysis. D361, which is completely conserved among species, is located in the dinucleotide-binding Rossmann fold and makes a salt bridge with R370, which is also highly conserved. D361 was mutated to E, A and N. R370 was mutated to K and A. D361E and A mutant enzymes were inactive, likely a result of the increase in the volume in the case of the D361E mutant enzyme that caused clashes with the surrounding residues, and loss of the ionic interaction between D361 and R370, for D361A. Although the K(m) for the substrates and isotope effect values did not show significant changes for the D361N mutant enzyme, V/E(t) decreased by 1400-fold. Data suggested the nonproductive binding of the cofactor, giving a low fraction of active enzyme. The R370K mutant enzyme did not show any significant changes in the kinetic parameters, while the R370A mutant enzyme gave a slight change in V/E(t), contrary to expectations. Overall, results suggest that the salt bridge between D361 and R370 is important for maintaining the productive conformation of the NAD binding site. Mutation of residues involved leads to nonproductive binding of NAD. The interaction stabilizes one of the Rossmann fold loops that NAD binds. Mutation of H377 to lysine, which is conserved in NADP-specific malic enzymes and proposed to be a cofactor specificity determinant, did not cause a shift in cofactor specificity of the Ascaris malic enzyme from NAD to NADP. However, it is confirmed that this residue is an important second layer residue that affects the packing of the first layer residues that directly interact with the cofactor.

  5. FunFOLDQA: a quality assessment tool for protein-ligand binding site residue predictions.

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    Daniel B Roche

    Full Text Available The estimation of prediction quality is important because without quality measures, it is difficult to determine the usefulness of a prediction. Currently, methods for ligand binding site residue predictions are assessed in the function prediction category of the biennial Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP experiment, utilizing the Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC and Binding-site Distance Test (BDT metrics. However, the assessment of ligand binding site predictions using such metrics requires the availability of solved structures with bound ligands. Thus, we have developed a ligand binding site quality assessment tool, FunFOLDQA, which utilizes protein feature analysis to predict ligand binding site quality prior to the experimental solution of the protein structures and their ligand interactions. The FunFOLDQA feature scores were combined using: simple linear combinations, multiple linear regression and a neural network. The neural network produced significantly better results for correlations to both the MCC and BDT scores, according to Kendall's τ, Spearman's ρ and Pearson's r correlation coefficients, when tested on both the CASP8 and CASP9 datasets. The neural network also produced the largest Area Under the Curve score (AUC when Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC analysis was undertaken for the CASP8 dataset. Furthermore, the FunFOLDQA algorithm incorporating the neural network, is shown to add value to FunFOLD, when both methods are employed in combination. This results in a statistically significant improvement over all of the best server methods, the FunFOLD method (6.43%, and one of the top manual groups (FN293 tested on the CASP8 dataset. The FunFOLDQA method was also found to be competitive with the top server methods when tested on the CASP9 dataset. To the best of our knowledge, FunFOLDQA is the first attempt to develop a method that can be used to assess ligand binding site

  6. Identification of critical residues in loop E in the 5-HT3ASR binding site

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    Muthalagi Mani

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin type 3 receptor (5-HT3R is a member of a superfamily of ligand gated ion channels. All members of this family share a large degree of sequence homology and presumably significant structural similarity. A large number of studies have explored the structure-function relationships of members of this family, particularly the nicotinic and GABA receptors. This information can be utilized to gain additional insights into specific structural and functional features of other receptors in this family. Results Thirteen amino acids in the mouse 5-HT3ASR that correspond to the putative E binding loop of the nicotinic α7 receptor were chosen for mutagenesis. Due to the presence of a highly conserved glycine in this region, it has been suggested that this binding loop is comprised of a hairpin turn and may form a portion of the ligand-binding site in this ion channel family. Mutation of the conserved glycine (G147 to alanine eliminated binding of the 5-HT3R antagonist [3H]granisetron. Three tyrosine residues (Y140, Y142 and Y152 also significantly altered the binding of 5-HT3R ligands. Mutations in neighboring residues had little or no effect on binding of these ligands to the 5-HT3ASR. Conclusion Our data supports a role for the putative E-loop region of the 5-HT3R in the binding of 5-HT, mCPBG, d-tc and lerisetron. 5-HT and mCPBG interact with Y142, d-tc with Y140 and lerisetron with both Y142 and Y152. Our data also provides support for the hypothesis that this region of the receptor is present in a loop structure.

  7. A cation-pi interaction in the binding site of the glycine receptor is mediated by a phenylalanine residue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Millen, Kat S; Hanek, Ariele P

    2008-01-01

    Cys-loop receptor binding sites characteristically contain many aromatic amino acids. In nicotinic ACh and 5-HT3 receptors, a Trp residue forms a cation-pi interaction with the agonist, whereas in GABA(A) receptors, a Tyr performs this role. The glycine receptor binding site, however, contains...... of fluorinated Phe derivatives using unnatural amino acid mutagenesis. The data reveal a clear correlation between the glycine EC(50) value and the cation-pi binding ability of the fluorinated Phe derivatives at position 159, but not at positions 207 or 63, indicating a single cation-pi interaction between...

  8. Computer modeling of the neurotoxin binding site of acetylcholine receptor spanning residues 185 through 196

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    Garduno-Juarez, R.; Shibata, M.; Zielinski, T. J.; Rein, R.

    1987-01-01

    A model of the complex between the acetylcholine receptor and the snake neurotoxin, cobratoxin, was built by molecular model building and energy optimization techniques. The experimentally identified functionally important residues of cobratoxin and the dodecapeptide corresponding to the residues 185-196 of acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were used to build the model. Both cis and trans conformers of cyclic L-cystine portion of the dodecapeptide were examined. Binding residues independently identified on cobratoxin are shown to interact with the dodecapeptide AChR model.

  9. Discovering key residues of dengue virus NS2b-NS3-protease: New binding sites for antiviral inhibitors design.

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    Aguilera-Pesantes, D; Robayo, L E; Méndez, P E; Mollocana, D; Marrero-Ponce, Y; Torres, F J; Méndez, M A

    2017-10-28

    The NS2B-NS3 protease is essential for the Dengue Virus (DENV) replication process. This complex constitutes a target for efficient antiviral discovery because a drug could inhibit the viral polyprotein processing. Furthermore, since the protease is highly conserved between the four Dengue virus serotypes, it is probable that a drug would be equally effective against all of them. In this article, a strategy is reported that allowed us to identify influential residues on the function of the Dengue NS2b-NS3 Protease. Moreover, this is a strategy that could be applied to virtually any protein for the search of alternative influential residues, and for non-competitive inhibitor development. First, we incorporated several features derived from computational alanine scanning mutagenesis, sequence, structure conservation, and other structure-based characteristics. Second, these features were used as variables to obtain a multilayer perceptron model to identify defined groups (clusters) of key residues as possible candidate pockets for binding sites of new leads on the DENV protease. The identified residues included: i) amino acids close to the beta sheet-loop-beta sheet known to be important in its closed conformation for NS2b ii) residues close to the active site, iii) several residues evenly spread on the NS2b-NS3 contact surface, and iv) some inner residues most likely related to the overall stability of the protease. In addition, we found concordance on our list of residues with previously identified amino acids part of a highly conserved peptide studied for vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of substrate binding site residue substitutions of xynA from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens on substrate specificity.

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    Prajapati, Anil S; Pawar, Vishakha A; Panchal, Ketankumar J; Sudhir, Ankit P; Dave, Bhaumik R; Patel, Darshan H; Subramanian, R B

    2018-02-13

    The aromatic residues of xylanase enzyme, W187, Y124, W144, Y128 and W63 of substrate binding pocket from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens were investigated for their role in substrate binding by homology modelling and sequence analysis. These residues are highly conserved and play an important role in substrate binding through steric hindrance. The substitution of these residues with alanine allows the enzyme to accommodate nonspecific substrates. Wild type and mutated genes were cloned and overexpressed in BL21. Optimum pH and temperature of rBAxn exhibited pH 9.0 and 50 °C respectively and it was stable up to 215 h. Along with the physical properties of rBAxn, kinetic parameters (K m 19.34 ± 0.72 mg/ml; k cat 6449.12 ± 155.37 min - 1 and k cat /K m 333.83 ± 6.78 ml min - 1  mg - 1 ) were also compared with engineered enzymes. Out of five mutations, W63A, Y128A and W144A lost almost 90% activity and Y124A and W187A retained almost 40-45% xylanase activity. The site-specific single mutation, led to alteration in substrate specificity from xylan to CMC while in case of double mutant the substrate specificity was altered from xylan to CMC, FP and avicel, indicating the role of aromatic residues on substrate binding, catalytic process and overall catalytic efficiency.

  11. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

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    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  12. TmiRUSite and TmiROSite scripts: searching for mRNA fragments with miRNA binding sites with encoded amino acid residues

    OpenAIRE

    Berillo, Olga; Régnier, Mireille; Ivashchenko, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs are small RNA molecules that inhibit the translation of target genes. microRNA binding sites are located in the untranslated regions as well as in the coding domains. We describe TmiRUSite and TmiROSite scripts developed using python as tools for the extraction of nucleotide sequences for miRNA binding sites with their encoded amino acid residue sequences. The scripts allow for retrieving a set of additional sequences at left and at right from the binding site. The scripts presents ...

  13. [Localization of lysine residues in the site of initiating substrate binding of E. coli RNA-polymerase].

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    Grachev, M A; Lukhtanov, E A; Mustaev, A A; Rikhter, V A; Rabinov, I V

    1987-04-01

    Superselective affinity labelling of E. coli RNA polymerase in a complex with the promoter-containing fragment of T7 DNA by treatment with orto-formylphenyl ester of GMP followed by addition of [alpha-33P]UTP resulted in covalent binding of the residue--pGpU (p-radioactive phosphate) with one of lysine residues of the beta-subunit, Lys1048, Lys1051, Lys1057, Lys1065. The amino acid sequence of this region of the beta-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase has a high extent of homology with that deduced for a region of tobacco chloroplast RNA polymerase on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast rpoB-like gene.

  14. Effects of mutagenesis of aspartic acid residues in the putative phosphoribosyl diphosphate binding site of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase on metal ion specificity and ribose-5-phosphate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Nilsson, Dan; Hove-Jensen, Bjarne

    1996-01-01

    The three conserved aspartic acid residues of the 5-phospho-d-ribosyl a-1-diphosphate binding site (213-GRDCVLVDDMIDTGGT-228) of Escherichia coli phosphoribosyl diphosphate synthetase were studied by analysis of the mutant enzymes D220E, D220F, D221A, D224A, and D224S. The mutant enzymes showed...... enzymes were dependent on the metal ion present, suggesting a function of the investigated aspartic acid residues both in the binding of ribose 5-phosphate, possibly via a divalent metal ion, and in the interaction with a divalent metal ion during catalysis....

  15. Predicting the functionally distinct residues in the heme, cation, and substrate-binding sites of peroxidase from stress-tolerant mangrove specie, Avicennia marina.

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    Jabeen, Uzma; Abbasi, Atiya; Salim, Asmat

    2011-11-01

    Recent work was conducted to predict the structure of functionally distinct regions of Avicennia marina peroxidase (AP) by using the structural coordinates of barley grains peroxidase as the template. This enzyme is utilized by all living organisms in many biosynthetic or degradable processes and in defense against oxidative stress. The homology model showed some distinct structural changes in the heme, calcium, and substrate-binding regions. Val53 was found to be an important coordinating residue between distal calcium ion and the distal heme site while Ser176 is coordinated to the proximal histidine through Ala174 and Leu172. Different ionic and hydrogen-bonded interactions were also observed in AP. Analyses of various substrate-enzyme interactions revealed that the substrate-binding pocket is provided by the residues, His41, Phe70, Gly71, Asp138, His139, and Lys176; the later three residues are not conserved in the peroxidase family. We have also performed structural comparison of the A. marina peroxidase with that of two class III salt-sensitive species, peanut and soybean. Four loop regions were found to have largest structural deviation. The overall protein sequence was also analyzed for the presence of probable post-translational modification sites and the functional significance of these sites were outlined.

  16. The Role of Active Site Residues in ATP Binding and Catalysis in the Methanosarcina thermophila Acetate Kinase

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    Cheryl Ingram-Smith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetate kinase (ACK, which catalyzes the reversible phosphorylation of acetate by ATP, is a member of the acetate and sugar kinase/heat shock cognate/actin (ASKHA superfamily. ASKHA family members share a common core fold that includes an ATPase domain with five structural motifs. The PHOSPHATE1 motif has previously been shown to be important for catalysis. We have investigated the role of two of these motifs in the Methanosarcina thermophila ACK (MtACK and have shown that residues projecting into the ACK active site from the PHOSPHATE2 and ADENOSINE loops and a third highly conserved loop designated here as LOOP3 play key roles in nucleotide triphosphate (NTP selection and utilization. Alteration of Asn211 of PHOSPHATE2, Gly239 of LOOP3, and Gly331 of ADENOSINE greatly reduced catalysis. In particular, Gly331, which is highly conserved throughout the ASKHA superfamily, has the greatest effect on substrate selection. Alteration at this site strongly skewed MtACK toward utilization of purines over pyrimidines, unlike the wild type enzyme that shows broad NTP utilization. Further investigation into differences between the ATPase domain in MtACK and other acetate kinases that show different substrate preferences will provide us with a better understanding of the diversity of phosphoryl donor selection in this enzyme family.

  17. Mechanism of the orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase-catalyzed reaction: importance of residues in the orotate binding site.

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    Iiams, Vanessa; Desai, Bijoy J; Fedorov, Alexander A; Fedorov, Elena V; Almo, Steven C; Gerlt, John A

    2011-10-04

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by exceptional values for rate enhancement (k(cat)/k(non) = 7.1 × 10(16)) and catalytic proficiency [(k(cat)/K(M))/k(non) = 4.8 × 10(22) M(-1)]. Although a stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate is located on the reaction coordinate, the structural strategies by which the reduction in the activation energy barrier is realized remain incompletely understood. This laboratory recently reported that "substrate destabilization" by Asp 70 in the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) lowers the activation energy barrier by ∼5 kcal/mol (contributing ~2.7 × 10(3) to the rate enhancement) [Chan, K. K., Wood, B. M., Fedorov, A. A., Fedorov, E. V., Imker, H. J., Amyes, T. L., Richard, J. P., Almo, S. C., and Gerlt, J. A. (2009) Biochemistry 48, 5518-5531]. We now report that substitutions of hydrophobic residues in a pocket proximal to the carboxylate group of the substrate (Ile 96, Leu 123, and Val 155) with neutral hydrophilic residues decrease the value of k(cat) by as much as 400-fold but have a minimal effect on the value of k(ex) for exchange of H6 of the FUMP product analogue with solvent deuterium; we hypothesize that this pocket destabilizes the substrate by preventing hydration of the substrate carboxylate group. We also report that substitutions of Ser 127 that is proximal to O4 of the orotate ring decrease the value of k(cat)/K(M), with the S127P substitution that eliminates hydrogen bonding interactions with O4 producing a 2.5 × 10(6)-fold reduction; this effect is consistent with delocalization of the negative charge of the carbanionic intermediate on O4 that produces an anionic carbene intermediate and thereby provides a structural strategy for stabilization of the intermediate. These observations provide additional information about the identities of the active site residues that contribute to the rate enhancement and, therefore

  18. Extended hormone binding site of the human thyroid stimulating hormone receptor: distinctive acidic residues in the hinge region are involved in bovine thyroid stimulating hormone binding and receptor activation.

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    Mueller, Sandra; Kleinau, Gunnar; Jaeschke, Holger; Paschke, Ralf; Krause, Gerd

    2008-06-27

    The human thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (hTSHR) belongs to the glycoprotein hormone receptors that bind the hormones at their large extracellular domain. The extracellular hinge region of the TSHR connects the N-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain with the membrane-spanning serpentine domain. From previous studies we reasoned that apart from hormone binding at the leucine-rich repeat domain, additional multiple hormone contacts might exist at the hinge region of the TSHR by complementary charge-charge recognition. Here we investigated highly conserved charged residues in the hinge region of the TSHR by site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acids interacting with bovine TSH (bTSH). Indeed, the residues Glu-297, Glu-303, and Asp-382 in the TSHR hinge region are essential for bTSH binding and partially for signal transduction. Side chain substitutions showed that the negative charge of Glu-297 and Asp-382 is necessary for recognition of bTSH by the hTSHR. Multiple combinations of alanine mutants of the identified positions revealed an increased negative effect on hormone binding. An assembled model suggests that the deciphered acidic residues form negatively charged patches at the hinge region resulting in an extended binding mode for bTSH on the hTSHR. Our data indicate that certain positively charged residues of bTSH might be involved in interaction with the identified negatively charged amino acids of the hTSHR hinge region. We demonstrate that the hinge region represents an extracellular intermediate connector for both hormone binding and signal transduction of the hTSHR.

  19. A cation-π interaction at a phenylalanine residue in the glycine receptor binding site is conserved for different agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Hanek, Ariele P; Price, Kerry L

    2011-01-01

    . In the current study, we investigated whether the lower efficacy agonists of the human GlyR β-alanine and taurine also form cation-π interactions with Phe159. By incorporating a series of unnatural amino acids, we found cation-π interactions between Phe159 and the amino groups of β-alanine and taurine....... The strengths of these interactions were significantly weaker than for glycine. Modeling studies suggest that β-alanine and taurine are orientated subtly differently in the binding pocket, with their amino groups further from Phe159 than that of glycine. These data therefore show that similar agonists can have...... similar but not identical orientations and interactions in the binding pocket and provide a possible explanation for the lower potencies of β-alanine and taurine....

  20. Contributions of the substrate-binding arginine residues to maleate-induced closure of the active site of Escherichia coli aspartate aminotransferase.

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    Matharu, A; Hayashi, H; Kagamiyama, H; Maras, B; John, R A

    2001-03-01

    Crystallography shows that aspartate aminotransferase binds dicarboxylate substrate analogues by bonds to Arg292 and Arg386, respectively [Jager, J, Moser, M. Sauder, U. & Jansonius, J. N. (1994) J. Mol. Biol., 239, 285-305]. The contribution of each interaction to the conformational change that the enzyme undergoes when it binds ligands via these residues, is assessed by probing mutant forms of the enzyme lacking either or both arginines. The probes used are NaH(3)BCN which reduces the cofactor imine, the reactive substrate analogue, cysteine sulfinate and proteolysis by trypsin. The unreactive substrate analogue, maleate, is used to induce closure. Each single mutant reacted only 2.5-fold more slowly with NaH(3)BCN than the wild-type indicating that charge repulsion by the arginines contributes little to maintaining the open conformation. Maleate lowered the rate of reduction of the wild-type enzyme more than 300-fold but had little effect on the reaction of the mutant enzymes indicating that the ability of this dicarboxylate analogue to bridge the arginines precisely makes the major contribution to closure. The R292L mutant reacted 20 times more rapidly with cysteine sulfinate than R386L but 5 x 10(4) times more slowly than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with the proposal that enzyme's catalytic abilities are not developed unless closure is induced by bridging of the arginines. Proteolysis of the mutants with trypsin showed that, in the wild-type enzyme, the bonds most susceptible to trypsin are those contributed by Arg292 and Arg386. Proteolysis of the next most susceptible bond, at Arg25 in the double mutant, was protected by maleate demonstrating the presence of an additional site on the enzyme for binding dicarboxylates.

  1. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

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    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Human xanthine oxidase changes its substrate specificity to aldehyde oxidase type upon mutation of amino acid residues in the active site: roles of active site residues in binding and activation of purine substrate.

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    Yamaguchi, Yuichiro; Matsumura, Tomohiro; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Okamoto, Ken; Nishino, Takeshi

    2007-04-01

    Xanthine oxidase (oxidoreductase; XOR) and aldehyde oxidase (AO) are similar in protein structure and prosthetic group composition, but differ in substrate preference. Here we show that mutation of two amino acid residues in the active site of human XOR for purine substrates results in conversion of the substrate preference to AO type. Human XOR and its Glu803-to-valine (E803V) and Arg881-to-methionine (R881M) mutants were expressed in an Escherichia coli system. The E803V mutation almost completely abrogated the activity towards hypoxanthine as a substrate, but very weak activity towards xanthine remained. On the other hand, the R881M mutant lacked activity towards xanthine, but retained slight activity towards hypoxanthine. Both mutants, however, exhibited significant aldehyde oxidase activity. The crystal structure of E803V mutant of human XOR was determined at 2.6 A resolution. The overall molybdopterin domain structure of this mutant closely resembles that of bovine milk XOR; amino acid residues in the active centre pocket are situated at very similar positions and in similar orientations, except that Glu803 was replaced by valine, indicating that the decrease in activity towards purine substrate is not due to large conformational change in the mutant enzyme. Unlike wild-type XOR, the mutants were not subject to time-dependent inhibition by allopurinol.

  3. Dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding amino acid residues in proteins.

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    Ponnuraj, Karthe; Saravanan, Konda Mani

    2017-04-01

    A protein can interact with DNA or RNA molecules to perform various cellular processes. Identifying or analyzing DNA/RNA binding site amino acid residues is important to understand molecular recognition process. It is quite possible to accurately model DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues in experimental protein-DNA/RNA complex by using the electron density map whereas, locating/modeling the binding site amino acid residues in the predicted three dimensional structures of DNA/RNA binding proteins is still a difficult task. Considering the above facts, in the present work, we have carried out a comprehensive analysis of dihedral angle preferences of DNA and RNA binding site amino acid residues by using a classical Ramachandran map. We have computed backbone dihedral angles of non-DNA/RNA binding residues and used as control dataset to make a comparative study. The dihedral angle preference of DNA and RNA binding site residues of twenty amino acid type is presented. Our analysis clearly revealed that the dihedral angles (φ, ψ) of DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues prefer to occupy (-89° to -60°, -59° to -30°) bins. The results presented in this paper will help to model/locate DNA/RNA binding amino acid residues with better accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  5. Phosphorus Binding Sites in Proteins: Structural Preorganization and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Greisen, Per Junior; Junker, Märta Caroline

    2014-01-01

    to individual structures that bind to phosphate groups; here, we investigate a total of 8307 structures obtained from the RCSB Protein Data Bank (PDB). An analysis of the binding site amino acid propensities reveals very characteristic first shell residue distributions, which are found to be influenced...... by the characteristics of the phosphorus compound and by the presence of cobound cations. The second shell, which supports the coordinating residues in the first shell, is found to consist mainly of protein backbone groups. Our results show how the second shell residue distribution is dictated mainly by the first shell...

  6. Comparative structural modeling of six old yellow enzymes (OYEs from the necrotrophic fungus Ascochyta rabiei: insight into novel OYE classes with differences in cofactor binding, organization of active site residues and stereopreferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Nizam

    Full Text Available Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE1 was the first flavin-dependent enzyme identified and characterized in detail by the entire range of physical techniques. Irrespective of this scrutiny, true physiological role of the enzyme remains a mystery. In a recent study, we systematically identified OYE proteins from various fungi and classified them into three classes viz. Class I, II and III. However, there is no information about the structural organization of Class III OYEs, eukaryotic Class II OYEs and Class I OYEs of filamentous fungi. Ascochyta rabiei, a filamentous phytopathogen which causes Ascochyta blight (AB in chickpea possesses six OYEs (ArOYE1-6 belonging to the three OYE classes. Here we carried out comparative homology modeling of six ArOYEs representing all the three classes to get an in depth idea of structural and functional aspects of fungal OYEs. The predicted 3D structures of A. rabiei OYEs were refined and evaluated using various validation tools for their structural integrity. Analysis of FMN binding environment of Class III OYE revealed novel residues involved in interaction. The ligand para-hydroxybenzaldehyde (PHB was docked into the active site of the enzymes and interacting residues were analyzed. We observed a unique active site organization of Class III OYE in comparison to Class I and II OYEs. Subsequently, analysis of stereopreference through structural features of ArOYEs was carried out, suggesting differences in R/S selectivity of these proteins. Therefore, our comparative modeling study provides insights into the FMN binding, active site organization and stereopreference of different classes of ArOYEs and indicates towards functional differences of these enzymes. This study provides the basis for future investigations towards the biochemical and functional characterization of these enigmatic enzymes.

  7. The 3.2 Å resolution structure of a receptor: CheA:CheW signaling complex defines overlapping binding sites and key residue interactions within bacterial chemosensory arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoxiao; Fleetwood, Aaron D; Bayas, Camille; Bilwes, Alexandrine M; Ortega, Davi R; Falke, Joseph J; Zhulin, Igor B; Crane, Brian R

    2013-06-04

    Bacterial chemosensory arrays are composed of extended networks of chemoreceptors (also known as methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, MCPs), the histidine kinase CheA, and the adaptor protein CheW. Models of these arrays have been developed from cryoelectron microscopy, crystal structures of binary and ternary complexes, NMR spectroscopy, mutational, data and biochemical studies. A new 3.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a Thermotoga maritima MCP protein interaction region in complex with the CheA kinase-regulatory module (P4-P5) and adaptor protein CheW provides sufficient detail to define residue contacts at the interfaces formed among the three proteins. As in a previous 4.5 Å resolution structure, CheA-P5 and CheW interact through conserved hydrophobic surfaces at the ends of their β-barrels to form pseudo 6-fold symmetric rings in which the two proteins alternate around the circumference. The interface between P5 subdomain 1 and CheW subdomain 2 was anticipated from previous studies, whereas the related interface between CheW subdomain 1 and P5 subdomain 2 has only been observed in these ring assemblies. The receptor forms an unexpected structure in that the helical hairpin tip of each subunit has "unzipped" into a continuous α-helix; four such helices associate into a bundle, and the tetramers bridge adjacent P5-CheW rings in the lattice through interactions with both P5 and CheW. P5 and CheW each bind a receptor helix with a groove of conserved hydrophobic residues between subdomains 1 and 2. P5 binds the receptor helix N-terminal to the tip region (lower site), whereas CheW binds the same helix with inverted polarity near the bundle end (upper site). Sequence comparisons among different evolutionary classes of chemotaxis proteins show that the binding partners undergo correlated changes at key residue positions that involve the lower site. Such evolutionary analyses argue that both CheW and P5 bind to the receptor tip at overlapping positions

  8. High-resolution X-ray and NMR structures of the SMN Tudor domain : conformational variation in the binding site for symmetrically dimethylated arginine residues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, Remco; Groves, Matthew R; Sinning, Irmgard; Sattler, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The SMN protein, which is linked to spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), plays an important role in the assembly of the spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes. This function requires binding of SMN to the arginine-glycine (RG) rich C-terminal tails of the Sm proteins, which contain

  9. Thioredoxin binding site of phosphoribulokinase overlaps the catalytic site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, M.A.; Hartman, F.C.

    1986-01-01

    The ATP-regulatory binding site of phosphoribulokinase was studied using bromoacetylethanolamine phosphate (BrAcNHEtOP). BrAcNHEtOP binds to the active-regulatory binding site of the protein. Following trypsin degradation of the labeled protein, fragments were separated by HPLC and sequenced. (DT)

  10. Binding matrix: a novel approach for binding site recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jan T; Gewehr, Jan E; Martinetz, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Recognition of protein-DNA binding sites in genomic sequences is a crucial step for discovering biological functions of genomic sequences. Explosive growth in availability of sequence information has resulted in a demand for binding site detection methods with high specificity. The motivation of the work presented here is to address this demand by a systematic approach based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation. A general framework is developed in which a large class of binding site detection methods can be described in a uniform and consistent way. Protein-DNA binding is determined by binding energy, which is an approximately linear function within the space of sequence words. All matrix based binding word detectors can be regarded as different linear classifiers which attempt to estimate the linear separation implied by the binding energy function. The standard approaches of consensus sequences and profile matrices are described using this framework. A maximum likelihood approach for determining this linear separation leads to a novel matrix type, called the binding matrix. The binding matrix is the most specific matrix based classifier which is consistent with the input set of known binding words. It achieves significant improvements in specificity compared to other matrices. This is demonstrated using 95 sets of experimentally determined binding words provided by the TRANSFAC database.

  11. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  12. Combining specificity determining and conserved residues improves functional site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Mikhail S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting the location of functionally important sites from protein sequence and/or structure is a long-standing problem in computational biology. Most current approaches make use of sequence conservation, assuming that amino acid residues conserved within a protein family are most likely to be functionally important. Most often these approaches do not consider many residues that act to define specific sub-functions within a family, or they make no distinction between residues important for function and those more relevant for maintaining structure (e.g. in the hydrophobic core. Many protein families bind and/or act on a variety of ligands, meaning that conserved residues often only bind a common ligand sub-structure or perform general catalytic activities. Results Here we present a novel method for functional site prediction based on identification of conserved positions, as well as those responsible for determining ligand specificity. We define Specificity-Determining Positions (SDPs, as those occupied by conserved residues within sub-groups of proteins in a family having a common specificity, but differ between groups, and are thus likely to account for specific recognition events. We benchmark the approach on enzyme families of known 3D structure with bound substrates, and find that in nearly all families residues predicted by SDPsite are in contact with the bound substrate, and that the addition of SDPs significantly improves functional site prediction accuracy. We apply SDPsite to various families of proteins containing known three-dimensional structures, but lacking clear functional annotations, and discusse several illustrative examples. Conclusion The results suggest a better means to predict functional details for the thousands of protein structures determined prior to a clear understanding of molecular function.

  13. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  14. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  15. HemeBIND: a novel method for heme binding residue prediction by combining structural and sequence information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jianjun

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate prediction of binding residues involved in the interactions between proteins and small ligands is one of the major challenges in structural bioinformatics. Heme is an essential and commonly used ligand that plays critical roles in electron transfer, catalysis, signal transduction and gene expression. Although much effort has been devoted to the development of various generic algorithms for ligand binding site prediction over the last decade, no algorithm has been specifically designed to complement experimental techniques for identification of heme binding residues. Consequently, an urgent need is to develop a computational method for recognizing these important residues. Results Here we introduced an efficient algorithm HemeBIND for predicting heme binding residues by integrating structural and sequence information. We systematically investigated the characteristics of binding interfaces based on a non-redundant dataset of heme-protein complexes. It was found that several sequence and structural attributes such as evolutionary conservation, solvent accessibility, depth and protrusion clearly illustrate the differences between heme binding and non-binding residues. These features can then be separately used or combined to build the structure-based classifiers using support vector machine (SVM. The results showed that the information contained in these features is largely complementary and their combination achieved the best performance. To further improve the performance, an attempt has been made to develop a post-processing procedure to reduce the number of false positives. In addition, we built a sequence-based classifier based on SVM and sequence profile as an alternative when only sequence information can be used. Finally, we employed a voting method to combine the outputs of structure-based and sequence-based classifiers, which demonstrated remarkably better performance than the individual classifier alone

  16. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  17. Mapping Protein Binding Sites and Conformational Epitopes Using Cysteine Labeling and Yeast Surface Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, Tariq Ahmad; Khare, Shruti; Pandey, Rajesh; Gupta, Satish K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2017-03-07

    We describe a facile method for mapping protein:ligand binding sites and conformational epitopes. The method uses a combination of Cys scanning mutagenesis, chemical labeling, and yeast surface display. While Ala scanning is widely used for similar purposes, often mutation to Ala (or other amino acids) has little effect on binding, except at hotspot residues. Many residues in physical contact with a binding partner are insensitive to substitution with Ala. In contrast, we show that labeling of Cys residues in a binding site consistently abrogates binding. We couple this methodology to yeast surface display and deep sequencing to map conformational epitopes targeted by both monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera as well as a protein:ligand binding site. The method does not require purified protein, can distinguish buried and exposed residues, and can be extended to other display formats, including mammalian cells and viruses, emphasizing its wide applicability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intraoperative neuromuscular monitoring site and residual paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilen, Stephan R; Hansen, Bradley E; Ramaiah, Ramesh; Kent, Christopher D; Treggiari, Miriam M; Bhananker, Sanjay M

    2012-11-01

    Residual paralysis is common after general anesthesia involving administration of neuromuscular blocking drugs (NMBDs). Management of NMBDs and reversal is frequently guided by train-of-four (TOF) monitoring. We hypothesized that monitoring of eye muscles is associated with more frequent residual paralysis than monitoring at the adductor pollicis. This prospective cohort study enrolled 180 patients scheduled for elective surgery with anticipated use of NMBDs. Collected variables included monitoring site, age, gender, weight, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class, type and duration of surgery, type of NMBDs, last and total dose administered, TOF count at time of reversal, dose of neostigmine, and time interval between last dose of NMBDs to quantitative measurement. Upon postanesthesia care unit admission, we measured TOF ratios by acceleromyography at the adductor pollicis. Residual paralysis was defined as a TOF ratio less than 90%. Multivariable logistic regression was used to account for unbalances between the two groups and to adjust for covariates. 150 patients received NMBDs and were included in the analysis. Patients with intraoperative TOF monitoring of eye muscles had significantly greater incidence of residual paralysis than patients monitored at the adductor pollicis (P paralysis was observed in 51/99 (52%) and 11/51 (22%) of patients, respectively. The crude odds ratio was 3.9 (95% CI: 1.8-8.4), and the adjusted odds ratio was 5.5 (95% CI: 2.1-14.5). Patients having qualitative TOF monitoring of eye muscles had a greater than 5-fold higher risk of postoperative residual paralysis than those monitored at the adductor pollicis.

  19. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  20. Fluorescence properties of porcine odorant binding protein Trp 16 residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albani, Jihad Rene, E-mail: Jihad-Rene.Albani@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Biophysique Moleculaire, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    Summary: The present work deals with fluorescence studies of adult porcine odorant binding protein at pH=7.5. At this pH, the protein is a dimer, each monomer contains one tryptophan residue. Our results show that tryptophan residue displays significant motions and emits with three fluorescence lifetimes. Decay associated spectra showed that the three lifetime's components emanate from sub-structures surrounded by the same microenvironment.

  1. Identification and analysis of key residues involved in folding and binding of protein-carbohydrate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, Michael; Shanmugam, N R Siva; Selvin, J Fermin Angelo; Veluraja, K

    2018-02-21

    Protein-carbohydrate interactions play vital roles in several biological processes in living organisms. The comparative analysis of binding site residues along with stabilizing residues in protein-carbohydrate complexes provides ample insights to understand the structure, function and recognition mechanism. In this work, we have identified 2.45% binding site residues in a non-redundant dataset of 1130 complexes using distance-based criteria and 7.07% stabilizing residues using the concepts of hydrophobicity, long-range interactions and conservation of residues. Further, 5.9% of binding and 2.04% of stabilizing residues are common to each other, which are termed as key residues. The key residues have been analyzed based on protein classes, carbohydrate types, gene ontology functional classifications, amino acid preference and structure-based parameters. We found that all-β, α+β and α/β have more key residues than other protein classes and most of the KRs are present in β-strands, which shows their importance in stability and binding of complexes. On the ligand side, L-saccharide has the highest number of key residues and it has a high percentage of KRs in SRs and BRs than other carbohydrate types. Further, polar and charged residues have a high tendency to serve as key residues. Classifications based on gene ontology terms revealed that Lys is preferred in all the three groups: molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components. Key residues have 6 to 9 contacts within the protein and make only one contact with the carbohydrate ligand. These contacts are dominant to form polar-nonpolar contacts followed by the contacts between charged atoms. Further, the influence of sequence and structural parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, solvent accessibility, secondary structure, long-range order and conservation score has been discussed. This analysis helps in understanding the interplay between stability and binding in protein

  2. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: location of the ligand binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulme, E.; Wheatley, M.; Curtis, C.; Birdsall, N.

    1987-01-01

    The key to understanding the pharmacological specificity of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChR's) is the location within the receptor sequence of the amino acid residues responsible for ligand binding. To approach this problem, they have purified mAChR's from rat brain to homogeneity by sequential ion-exchange chromatography, affinity chromatography and molecular weight fractionation. Following labelling of the binding site with an alkylating affinity label, 3 H-propylbenzilycholine mustard aziridinium ion ( 3 H-PrBCM), the mAChR was digested with a lysine-specific endoproteinase, and a ladder of peptides of increasing molecular weight, each containing the glycosylated N-terminus, isolated by chromatography on wheat-germ agglutinin sepharose. The pattern of labelling showed that a residue in the peptides containing transmembrane helices 2 and/or 3 of the mAChR was alkylated. The linkage was cleaved by 1 M hydroxylamine, showing that 3 H-PrBCM was attached to an acidic residue, whose properties strongly suggested it to be embedded in a hydrophobic intramembrane region of the mAChR. Examination of the cloned sequence of the mAChR reveals several candidate residues, the most likely of which is homologous to an aspartic acid residue thought to protonate the retinal Schiff's base in the congeneric protein rhodopsin

  3. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, I.F.; Goldstein, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, [ 3 H] dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for [ 3 H] [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and [3H]ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites

  4. Ribosome binding site recognition using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Ferreira da Silva Oliveira

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition is an important process for gene localization in genomes. The ribosome binding sites are signals that can help in the identification of a gene. It is difficult to find these signals in the genome through conventional methods because they are highly degenerated. Artificial Neural Networks is the approach used in this work to address this problem.

  5. LIGAND-BINDING SITES ON THE MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS UREASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisnyak Yu. V.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the causative agent of tuberculosis that remains a serious medical and social health problem. Despite intensive efforts have been made in the past decade, there are no new efficient anti-tuberculosis drugs today, and that need is growing due to the spread of drug-resistant strains of M.tuberculosis. M. tuberculosis urease (MTU, being an important factor of the bacterium viability and virulence, is an attractive target for anti-tuberculosis drugs acting by inhibition of urease activity. However, the commercially available urease inhibitors are toxic and unstable, that prevent their clinical use. Therefore, new more potent anti-tuberculosis drugs inhibiting new targets are urgently needed. A useful tool for the search of novel inhibitors is a computational drug design. The inhibitor design is significantly easier if binding sites on the enzyme are identified in advance. This paper aimed to determine the probable ligand binding sites on the surface of M. tuberculosis urease. Methods. To identify ligand binding sites on MTU surface, сomputational solvent mapping method FTSite was applied by the use of MTU homology model we have built earlier. The method places molecular probes (small organic molecules containing various functional groups on a dense grid defined around the enzyme, and for each probe finds favorable positions. The selected poses are refined by free energy minimization, the low energy conformations are clustered, and the clusters are ranked on the basis of the average free energy. FTSite server outputs the protein residues delineating a binding sites and the probe molecules representing each cluster. To predict allosteric pockets on MTU, AlloPred and AlloSite servers were applied. AlloPred uses the normal mode analysis (NMA and models how the dynamics of a protein would be altered in the presence of a modulator at a specific pocket. Pockets on the enzyme are predicted using the Fpocket

  6. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  7. Exploring the functional residues in a flavin-binding fluorescent protein using deep mutational scanning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyeonSeok Shin

    Full Text Available Flavin mononucleotide (FMN-based fluorescent proteins are versatile reporters that can monitor various cellular processes in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. However, the understanding of the role of individual amino acid residues on the protein function has been limited and has restricted the development of better functional variants. Here we examine the functional amino acid residues of Escherichia coli flavin mononucleotide binding fluorescent protein (EcFbFP using the application of high-throughput sequencing of functional variants, termed deep mutational scanning. The variants were classified into 329 function-retained (FR and 259 function-loss (FL mutations, and further the mutational enrichment in each amino acid residues was weighed to find the functionally important residues of EcFbFP. We show that the crucial amino acid residues of EcFbFP lie among the FMN-binding pocket, turns and loops of the protein where conformation changes occur, and spatially clustered residues near the E56-K97 salt bridges. In addition, the mutational sensitivity of the critical residues was confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. The deep mutational scanning of EcFbFP has demonstrated important implications for constructing better functioning protein variants.

  8. Crystal structure of equine serum albumin in complex with cetirizine reveals a novel drug binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handing, Katarzyna B; Shabalin, Ivan G; Szlachta, Karol; Majorek, Karolina A; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    Serum albumin (SA) is the main transporter of drugs in mammalian blood plasma. Here, we report the first crystal structure of equine serum albumin (ESA) in complex with antihistamine drug cetirizine at a resolution of 2.1Å. Cetirizine is bound in two sites--a novel drug binding site (CBS1) and the fatty acid binding site 6 (CBS2). Both sites differ from those that have been proposed in multiple reports based on equilibrium dialysis and fluorescence studies for mammalian albumins as cetirizine binding sites. We show that the residues forming the binding pockets in ESA are highly conserved in human serum albumin (HSA), and suggest that binding of cetirizine to HSA will be similar. In support of that hypothesis, we show that the dissociation constants for cetirizine binding to CBS2 in ESA and HSA are identical using tryptophan fluorescence quenching. Presence of lysine and arginine residues that have been previously reported to undergo nonenzymatic glycosylation in CBS1 and CBS2 suggests that cetirizine transport in patients with diabetes could be altered. A review of all available SA structures from the PDB shows that in addition to the novel drug binding site we present here (CBS1), there are two pockets on SA capable of binding drugs that do not overlap with fatty acid binding sites and have not been discussed in published reviews. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A web server for analysis, comparison and prediction of protein ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harinder; Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2016-03-25

    One of the major challenges in the field of system biology is to understand the interaction between a wide range of proteins and ligands. In the past, methods have been developed for predicting binding sites in a protein for a limited number of ligands. In order to address this problem, we developed a web server named 'LPIcom' to facilitate users in understanding protein-ligand interaction. Analysis, comparison and prediction modules are available in the "LPIcom' server to predict protein-ligand interacting residues for 824 ligands. Each ligand must have at least 30 protein binding sites in PDB. Analysis module of the server can identify residues preferred in interaction and binding motif for a given ligand; for example residues glycine, lysine and arginine are preferred in ATP binding sites. Comparison module of the server allows comparing protein-binding sites of multiple ligands to understand the similarity between ligands based on their binding site. This module indicates that ATP, ADP and GTP ligands are in the same cluster and thus their binding sites or interacting residues exhibit a high level of similarity. Propensity-based prediction module has been developed for predicting ligand-interacting residues in a protein for more than 800 ligands. In addition, a number of web-based tools have been integrated to facilitate users in creating web logo and two-sample between ligand interacting and non-interacting residues. In summary, this manuscript presents a web-server for analysis of ligand interacting residue. This server is available for public use from URL http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lpicom .

  10. Cardiolipin dynamics and binding to conserved residues in the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Anna L; Ruprecht, Jonathan J; Kunji, Edmund R S; Robinson, Alan J

    2018-01-31

    Cardiolipin in eukaryotes is found in the mitochondrial inner membrane, where it interacts with membrane proteins and, although not essential, is necessary for the optimal activity of a number of proteins. One of them is the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier, which imports ADP into the mitochondrion and exports ATP. In the crystal structures, cardiolipin is bound to three equivalent sites of the ADP/ATP carrier, but its role is unresolved. Conservation of residues at these cardiolipin binding sites across other members of the mitochondrial carrier superfamily indicates cardiolipin binding is likely to be important for the function of all mitochondrial carriers. Multiscale simulations were performed in a cardiolipin-containing membrane to investigate the dynamics of cardiolipin around the yeast and bovine ADP/ATP carriers in a lipid bilayer and the properties of the cardiolipin-binding sites. In coarse-grain simulations, cardiolipin molecules bound to the carriers for longer periods of time than phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipids-with timescales in the tens of microseconds. Three long-lived cardiolipin binding sites overlapped with those in the crystal structures of the carriers. Other shorter-lived cardiolipin interaction sites were identified in both membrane leaflets. However, the timescales of the interactions were of the same order as phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, suggesting that these sites are not specific for cardiolipin binding. The calculation of lipid binding times and the overlap of the cardiolipin binding sites between the structures and simulations demonstrate the potential of multiscale simulations to investigate the dynamics and behavior of lipids interacting with membrane proteins. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...... have a serine. The LeuT-E290S mutant displays chloride-dependent activity. We show that, in LeuT-E290S cocrystallized with bromide or chloride, the anion is coordinated by side chain hydroxyls from Tyr47, Ser290, and Thr254 and the side chain amide of Gln250. The bound anion and the nearby sodium ion...

  12. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of [ 125 I]iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis

  13. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  14. Consensus of sample-balanced classifiers for identifying ligand-binding residue by co-evolutionary physicochemical characteristics of amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is an important mechanism for some proteins to perform their functions, and those binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. So far, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. Due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we constructed several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier was trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers formed a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Experimental results on CASP9 targets demonstrated that our method compared favorably with the state-of-the-art. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  15. Binding sites analyser (BiSA: software for genomic binding sites archiving and overlap analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matloob Khushi

    Full Text Available Genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding and histone modification reveals complex patterns of interactions. Identifying overlaps in binding patterns by different factors is a major objective of genomic studies, but existing methods to archive large numbers of datasets in a personalised database lack sophistication and utility. Therefore we have developed transcription factor DNA binding site analyser software (BiSA, for archiving of binding regions and easy identification of overlap with or proximity to other regions of interest. Analysis results can be restricted by chromosome or base pair overlap between regions or maximum distance between binding peaks. BiSA is capable of reporting overlapping regions that share common base pairs; regions that are nearby; regions that are not overlapping; and average region sizes. BiSA can identify genes located near binding regions of interest, genomic features near a gene or locus of interest and statistical significance of overlapping regions can also be reported. Overlapping results can be visualized as Venn diagrams. A major strength of BiSA is that it is supported by a comprehensive database of publicly available transcription factor binding sites and histone modifications, which can be directly compared to user data. The documentation and source code are available on http://bisa.sourceforge.net.

  16. Binding site graphs: a new graph theoretical framework for prediction of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E Reddy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Computational prediction of nucleotide binding specificity for transcription factors remains a fundamental and largely unsolved problem. Determination of binding positions is a prerequisite for research in gene regulation, a major mechanism controlling phenotypic diversity. Furthermore, an accurate determination of binding specificities from high-throughput data sources is necessary to realize the full potential of systems biology. Unfortunately, recently performed independent evaluation showed that more than half the predictions from most widely used algorithms are false. We introduce a graph-theoretical framework to describe local sequence similarity as the pair-wise distances between nucleotides in promoter sequences, and hypothesize that densely connected subgraphs are indicative of transcription factor binding sites. Using a well-established sampling algorithm coupled with simple clustering and scoring schemes, we identify sets of closely related nucleotides and test those for known TF binding activity. Using an independent benchmark, we find our algorithm predicts yeast binding motifs considerably better than currently available techniques and without manual curation. Importantly, we reduce the number of false positive predictions in yeast to less than 30%. We also develop a framework to evaluate the statistical significance of our motif predictions. We show that our approach is robust to the choice of input promoters, and thus can be used in the context of predicting binding positions from noisy experimental data. We apply our method to identify binding sites using data from genome scale ChIP-chip experiments. Results from these experiments are publicly available at http://cagt10.bu.edu/BSG. The graphical framework developed here may be useful when combining predictions from numerous computational and experimental measures. Finally, we discuss how our algorithm can be used to improve the sensitivity of computational predictions of

  17. The balance of flexibility and rigidity in the active site residues of hen egg white lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi Jian-Xun; Jiang Fan

    2011-01-01

    The crystallographic temperature factors (B factor) of individual atoms contain important information about the thermal motion of the atoms in a macromolecule. Previously the theory of flexibility of active site has been established based on the observation that the enzyme activity is sensitive to low concentration denaturing agents. It has been found that the loss of enzyme activity occurs well before the disruption of the three-dimensional structural scaffold of the enzyme. To test the theory of conformational flexibility of enzyme active site, crystal structures were perturbed by soaking in low concentration guanidine hydrochloride solutions. It was found that many lysozyme crystals tested could still diffract until the concentration of guanidine hydrochloride reached 3 M. It was also found that the B factors averaged over individually collected data sets were more accurate. Thus it suggested that accurate measurement of crystal temperature factors could be achieved for medium-high or even medium resolution crystals by averaging over multiple data sets. Furthermore, we found that the correctly predicted active sites included not only the more flexible residues, but also some more rigid residues. Both the flexible and the rigid residues in the active site played an important role in forming the active site residue network, covering the majority of the substrate binding residues. Therefore, this experimental prediction method may be useful for characterizing the binding site and the function of a protein, such as drug targeting. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  18. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  19. Autoradiographic localization of benzomorphan binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crain, B.J.; Kwenjen Chang; McNamara, J.O.; Valdes, F.

    1985-07-17

    The benzomorphan subpopulation of opiate binding sites was labeled by (TH)diprenorphine in the presence of unlabeled ligands selected to quench and delta opiate binding sites. The distribution of benzomorphan binding sites was then localized autoradiographically. The distribution differs from the distributions of , delta and kappa opiate binding and is quite similar to the distribution of US -endorphin immunoreactivity. These observations support the hypothesis, based on biochemical studies in brain membranes, that benzomorphan binding sites may represent the ligand recognition sites of putative epsilon receptors. (Auth.). 34 refs.; 3 figs.

  20. An overview of the prediction of protein DNA-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Zhao, Rui; Wu, Rongling

    2015-03-06

    Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  1. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  2. Nitroxide 4-hydroxy-2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (Tempol) inhibits the reductase activity of protein disulfide isomerase via covalent binding to the Cys400residue on CXXC redox motif at the a'active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Gérsika Bitencourt; Gonzalez-Perilli, Lucia; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Aicardo, Adrián; Cerdeira, Cláudio Daniel; Trostchansky, Andrés; Brigagão, Maísa Ribeiro Pereira Lima

    2017-06-25

    Oxidative stress arising from inflammatory processes is a serious cause of cell and tissue damage. Tempol is an efficient antioxidant with superoxide dismutase-like activity. The purpose of this paper is to address the inhibition of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), an essential redox chaperone whose active sites contain the Cys-Gly-His-Cys (CXXC) motif, by the nitroxide Tempol. In the presence of Tempol (5-120 μM), the reductase activity of PDI was reversibly affected both in vitro and in activated mice neutrophils, with an IC 50 of 22.9 ± 10.8 μM. Inhibitory activity was confirmed by using both the insulin method and fluorescent formation of eosin-glutathione (E-GSH). The capacity of Tempol to bind the enzyme was determined by EPR and mass spectrometry. EPR Tempol signal decreased in the presence of PDI while remained unaffected when PDI thiols were previously blocked with NEM. When total protein was analyzed, 1 and 4 molecules of Tempol were bound to the protein. However, only one was found to be covalently bound to PDI at the a'active site. More specifically, Cys 400 was modified by Tempol. We have shown that the nitroxide Tempol acts as an inhibitor of PDI through covalent binding to the Cys400 of the protein structure. Since PDI is coupled with the assembly of the NADPH oxidase complex of phagocytes, these findings reveal a novel action of Tempol that presents potential clinical applications for therapeutic intervention to target PDI knockdown in pathological processes in which this protein is engaged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  4. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Kiso, Makoto [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ando, Hiromune, E-mail: hando@gifu-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Bioorganic Chemistry, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu-shi, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (WPI-iCeMS), Kyoto University, Yoshida Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kato, Ryuichi, E-mail: ryuichi.kato@kek.jp [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. - Highlights: • The six-bladed β-propeller structure of AOL was solved by seleno-sugar phasing. • The mode of fucose binding is essentially conserved at all six binding sites. • The seleno-fucosides exhibit slightly different interactions and electron densities. • These findings suggest that the affinity for fucose is not identical at each site.

  5. Disruption of key NADH-binding pocket residues of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis InhA affects DD-CoA binding ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel J; Robb, Kirsty; Vetter, Beatrice V; Tong, Madeline; Molle, Virginie; Hunt, Neil T; Hoskisson, Paul A

    2017-07-05

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health problem that affects over 10 million people. There is an urgent need to develop novel antimicrobial therapies to combat TB. To achieve this, a thorough understanding of key validated drug targets is required. The enoyl reductase InhA, responsible for synthesis of essential mycolic acids in the mycobacterial cell wall, is the target for the frontline anti-TB drug isoniazid. To better understand the activity of this protein a series of mutants, targeted to the NADH co-factor binding pocket were created. Residues P193 and W222 comprise a series of hydrophobic residues surrounding the cofactor binding site and mutation of both residues negatively affect InhA function. Construction of an M155A mutant of InhA results in increased affinity for NADH and DD-CoA turnover but with a reduction in V max for DD-CoA, impairing overall activity. This suggests that NADH-binding geometry of InhA likely permits long-range interactions between residues in the NADH-binding pocket to facilitate substrate turnover in the DD-CoA binding region of the protein. Understanding the precise details of substrate binding and turnover in InhA and how this may affect protein-protein interactions may facilitate the development of improved inhibitors enabling the development of novel anti-TB drugs.

  6. Hydrolysis at One of the Two Nucleotide-binding Sites Drives the Dissociation of ATP-binding Cassette Nucleotide-binding Domain Dimers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Maria E.; Altenberg, Guillermo A.

    2013-01-01

    The functional unit of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters consists of two transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). ATP binding elicits association of the two NBDs, forming a dimer in a head-to-tail arrangement, with two nucleotides “sandwiched” at the dimer interface. Each of the two nucleotide-binding sites is formed by residues from the two NBDs. We recently found that the prototypical NBD MJ0796 from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii dimerizes in response to ATP binding and dissociates completely following ATP hydrolysis. However, it is still unknown whether dissociation of NBD dimers follows ATP hydrolysis at one or both nucleotide-binding sites. Here, we used luminescence resonance energy transfer to study heterodimers formed by one active (donor-labeled) and one catalytically defective (acceptor-labeled) NBD. Rapid mixing experiments in a stop-flow chamber showed that NBD heterodimers with one functional and one inactive site dissociated at a rate indistinguishable from that of dimers with two hydrolysis-competent sites. Comparison of the rates of NBD dimer dissociation and ATP hydrolysis indicated that dissociation followed hydrolysis of one ATP. We conclude that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide-binding site drives NBD dimer dissociation. PMID:24129575

  7. Computational mapping identifies the binding sites of organic solvents on proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Sheldon; Kortvelyesi, Tamas; Vajda, Sandor

    2002-01-01

    Computational mapping places molecular probes—small molecules or functional groups—on a protein surface to identify the most favorable binding positions. Although x-ray crystallography and NMR show that organic solvents bind to a limited number of sites on a protein, current mapping methods result in hundreds of energy minima and do not reveal why some sites bind molecules with different sizes and polarities. We describe a mapping algorithm that explains the origin of this phenomenon. The algorithm has been applied to hen egg-white lysozyme and to thermolysin, interacting with eight and four different ligands, respectively. In both cases the search finds the consensus site to which all molecules bind, whereas other positions that bind only certain ligands are not necessarily found. The consensus sites are pockets of the active site, lined with partially exposed hydrophobic residues and with a number of polar residues toward the edge. These sites can accommodate each ligand in a number of rotational states, some with a hydrogen bond to one of the nearby donor/acceptor groups. Specific substrates and/or inhibitors of hen egg-white lysozyme and thermolysin interact with the same side chains identified by the mapping, but form several hydrogen bonds and bind in unique orientations. PMID:11904374

  8. Role of exposed aromatic residues in substrate-binding of CBM family 5 chitin-binding domain of alkaline chitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uni, Fumiya; Lee, Sunmi; Yatsunami, Rie; Fukui, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Chitinase J (ChiJ) from alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. strain J813 has a multidomain structure containing a catalytic domain (CatD), a fibronectin type III like domain (FnIIID) and a chitin-binding domain (ChBD). It has been shown that the ChBD binds to an insoluble chitin and enhances its degradation by the CatD. Further binding study of the ChBD was performed with a glutathione-S-transferase fusion protein. This fusion protein showed binding abilities to insoluble chitin and chitosan. Two surface-exposed aromatic residues (Trp541 and Trp542) were found in the tertiary-structure model of ChBD and targeted for mutational analysis. Single and double mutations of the two aromatic residues decreased the chitin- and chitosan-binding abilities. It was revealed that these residues would be important for substrate-binding of the ChBD.

  9. Inter-residue coupling contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective binding of α-bungarotoxin to nicotinic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sine, Steven M.; Huang, Sun; Li, Shu-Xing; daCosta, Corrie J. B.; Chen, Lin

    2013-09-01

    The crystal structure of a pentameric α7 ligand-binding domain chimaera with bound α-btx (α-bungarotoxin) showed that of the five conserved aromatic residues in α7, only Tyr184 in loop C of the ligand-binding site was required for high-affinity binding. To determine whether the contribution of Tyr184 depends on local residues, we generated mutations in an α7/5HT3A (5-hydroxytryptamine type 3A) receptor chimaera, individually and in pairs, and measured 125I-labelled α-btx binding. The results show that mutations of individual residues near Tyr184 do not affect α-btx affinity, but pairwise mutations decrease affinity in an energetically coupled manner. Kinetic measurements show that the affinity decreases arise through increases in the α-btx dissociation rate with little change in the association rate. Replacing loop C in α7 with loop C from the α-btx-insensitive α2 or α3 subunits abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding, but preserves acetylcholine-elicited single channel currents. However, in both the α2 and α3 construct, mutating either residue that flanks Tyr184 to its α7 counterpart restores high-affinity α-btx binding. Analogously, in α7, mutating both residues that flank Tyr184 to the α2 or α3 counterparts abolishes high-affinity α-btx binding. Thus interaction between Tyr184 and local residues contributes to high-affinity subtype-selective α-btx binding.

  10. Identification of Ubiquinol Binding Motifs at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Schulten, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    all atom molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations to reveal the binding modes of quinol at the Qo-site of the bc1 complex from Rhodobacter capsulatus. The calculations suggest a novel configuration of amino acid residues responsible for quinol binding and support a mechanism for proton......-coupled electron transfer from quinol to iron-sulfur cluster through a bridging hydrogen bond from histidine that stabilizes the reaction complex....

  11. Contaminated Sites by Residues from Romanian Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurelian, F.; Georgescu, D.; Vacariu, V.; Popescu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In Romania, the mining industries of ferrous ore, non-ferrous ore, bauxite, coal, chemical fertilisers, the extraction of natural gas and oil, etc. have a considerable weight in economy. The study lets us know that in these industries, in different by-products and waste from the process, some radionuclides come out. The preliminary data, which are determined in these industries, are compared with those data, which are published by the countries from EU. There were determined uranium, radium and thorium from ore and sterile (ferrous, non-ferrous, bauxite, talc, clay, asbestos, barytine, salt, coal and bituminous schist). Also, there have been determined the radium and the uranium content of waters from non-uraniferous mining sites. The level of radioactive noxa has been informative determined in each mine. The level of the concentrations requires a systematic research and an assessment of the risk and the impact against the environment, the workers, and the public. (author)

  12. Ubiquinone binding site of yeast NADH dehydrogenase revealed by structures binding novel competitive- and mixed-type inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Tetsuo; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Shiba, Tomoo; Oohashi, Takumi; Iwata, So; Yagi, Takao; Kosaka, Hiroaki; Miyoshi, Hideto; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2018-02-05

    Yeast Ndi1 is a monotopic alternative NADH dehydrogenase. Its crystal structure in complex with the electron acceptor, ubiquinone, has been determined. However, there has been controversy regarding the ubiquinone binding site. To address these points, we identified the first competitive inhibitor of Ndi1, stigmatellin, along with new mixed-type inhibitors, AC0-12 and myxothiazol, and thereby determined the crystal structures of Ndi1 in complexes with the inhibitors. Two separate binding sites of stigmatellin, STG-1 and STG-2, were observed. The electron density at STG-1, located at the vicinity of the FAD cofactor, further demonstrated two binding modes: STG-1a and STG-1b. AC0-12 and myxothiazol are also located at the vicinity of FAD. The comparison of the binding modes among stigmatellin at STG-1, AC0-12, and myxothiazol revealed a unique position for the aliphatic tail of stigmatellin at STG-1a. Mutations of amino acid residues that interact with this aliphatic tail at STG-1a reduced the affinity of Ndi1 for ubiquinone. In conclusion, the position of the aliphatic tail of stigmatellin at STG-1a provides a structural basis for its competitive inhibition of Ndi1. The inherent binding site of ubiquinone is suggested to overlap with STG-1a that is distinct from the binding site for NADH.

  13. Copper(II) Binding Sites in N-Terminally Acetylated α-Synuclein: A Theoretical Rationalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, Rafael; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Adrover, Miquel; Frau, Juan

    2017-08-03

    The interactions between N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein and Cu(II) at several binding sites have been studied with DFT calculations, specifically with the M06 hybrid functional and the ωB97X-D DFT-D functional. In previous experimental studies, Cu(II) was shown to bind several α-synuclein residues, including Met1-Asp2 and His50, forming square planar coordination complexes. Also, it was determined that a low-affinity binding site exists in the C-terminal domain, centered on Asp121. However, in the N-terminally acetylated protein, present in vivo, the Met1 site is blocked. In this work, we simplify the representation of the protein by modeling each experimentally found binding site as a complex between an N-terminally acetylated α-synuclein dipeptide (or several independent residues) and a Cu(II) cation, and compare the results with a number of additional, structurally analogous sites not experimentally found. This way of representing the binding sites, although extremely simple, allows us to reproduce experimental results and to provide a theoretical rationale to explain the preference of Cu(II) for certain sites, as well as explicit geometrical structures for the complexes formed. These results are important to understand the interactions between α-synuclein and Cu(II), one of the factors inducing structural changes in the protein and leading to aggregated forms of it which may play a role in neurodegeneration.

  14. A comprehensive comparative review of sequence-based predictors of DNA- and RNA-binding residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jing; Friedrich, Stefanie; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the pressing need to characterize protein-DNA and protein-RNA interactions on large scale, we review a comprehensive set of 30 computational methods for high-throughput prediction of RNA- or DNA-binding residues from protein sequences. We summarize these predictors from several significant perspectives including their design, outputs and availability. We perform empirical assessment of methods that offer web servers using a new benchmark data set characterized by a more complete annotation that includes binding residues transferred from the same or similar proteins. We show that predictors of DNA-binding (RNA-binding) residues offer relatively strong predictive performance but they are unable to properly separate DNA- from RNA-binding residues. We design and empirically assess several types of consensuses and demonstrate that machine learning (ML)-based approaches provide improved predictive performance when compared with the individual predictors of DNA-binding residues or RNA-binding residues. We also formulate and execute first-of-its-kind study that targets combined prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues. We design and test three types of consensuses for this prediction and conclude that this novel approach that relies on ML design provides better predictive quality than individual predictors when tested on prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues individually. It also substantially improves discrimination between these two types of nucleic acids. Our results suggest that development of a new generation of predictors would benefit from using training data sets that combine both RNA- and DNA-binding proteins, designing new inputs that specifically target either DNA- or RNA-binding residues and pursuing combined prediction of DNA- and RNA-binding residues. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Studies on ATP-diphosphohydrolase nucleotide-binding sites by intrinsic fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kettlun

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Potato apyrase, a soluble ATP-diphosphohydrolase, was purified to homogeneity from several clonal varieties of Solanum tuberosum. Depending on the source of the enzyme, differences in kinetic and physicochemical properties have been described, which cannot be explained by the amino acid residues present in the active site. In order to understand the different kinetic behavior of the Pimpernel (ATPase/ADPase = 10 and Desirée (ATPase/ADPase = 1 isoenzymes, the nucleotide-binding site of these apyrases was explored using the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan. The intrinsic fluorescence of the two apyrases was slightly different. The maximum emission wavelengths of the Desirée and Pimpernel enzymes were 336 and 340 nm, respectively, suggesting small differences in the microenvironment of Trp residues. The Pimpernel enzyme emitted more fluorescence than the Desirée apyrase at the same concentration although both enzymes have the same number of Trp residues. The binding of the nonhydrolyzable substrate analogs decreased the fluorescence emission of both apyrases, indicating the presence of conformational changes in the neighborhood of Trp residues. Experiments with quenchers of different polarities, such as acrylamide, Cs+ and I- indicated the existence of differences in the nucleotide-binding site, as further shown by quenching experiments in the presence of nonhydrolyzable substrate analogs. Differences in the nucleotide-binding site may explain, at least in part, the kinetic differences of the Pimpernel and Desirée isoapyrases.

  16. Characterisation of the zebrafish serotonin transporter functionally links TM10 to the ligand binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kasper; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wiborg, Ove

    2008-01-01

    and [(3)H]-escitalopram binding in transiently transfected human embryonic kidney cells; HEK-293-MSR. Residues responsible for altered affinities inhibitors were pinpointed by generating cross-species chimeras and subsequent point mutations by site directed mutagenesis. drSERT has a higher affinity...

  17. Substrate binding in the active site of cytochrome P450cam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, M.; Groenhof, A.R.; Ehlers, A.W.; Lammertsma, K.

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the binding of camphor in the active site of cytochrome P450cam with density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A strong hydrogen bond (>6 kcal/mol) to a tyrosine residue (Tyr96) is observed, that may account for the high specificity of the reaction taking place. The DFT

  18. Identification of substrate binding sites in enzymes by computational solvent mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Michael; Dennis, Sheldon; Brown, Lawrence; Kortvelyesi, Tamas; Clodfelter, Karl; Vajda, Sandor

    2003-10-03

    Enzyme structures determined in organic solvents show that most organic molecules cluster in the active site, delineating the binding pocket. We have developed algorithms to perform solvent mapping computationally, rather than experimentally, by placing molecular probes (small molecules or functional groups) on a protein surface, and finding the regions with the most favorable binding free energy. The method then finds the consensus site that binds the highest number of different probes. The probe-protein interactions at this site are compared to the intermolecular interactions seen in the known complexes of the enzyme with various ligands (substrate analogs, products, and inhibitors). We have mapped thermolysin, for which experimental mapping results are also available, and six further enzymes that have no experimental mapping data, but whose binding sites are well characterized. With the exception of haloalkane dehalogenase, which binds very small substrates in a narrow channel, the consensus site found by the mapping is always a major subsite of the substrate-binding site. Furthermore, the probes at this location form hydrogen bonds and non-bonded interactions with the same residues that interact with the specific ligands of the enzyme. Thus, once the structure of an enzyme is known, computational solvent mapping can provide detailed and reliable information on its substrate-binding site. Calculations on ligand-bound and apo structures of enzymes show that the mapping results are not very sensitive to moderate variations in the protein coordinates.

  19. Crystallographic study of novel transthyretin ligands exhibiting negative-cooperativity between two thyroxine binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Tomar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transthyretin (TTR is a homotetrameric serum and cerebrospinal fluid protein that transports thyroxine (T4 and retinol by binding to retinol binding protein. Rate-limiting tetramer dissociation and rapid monomer misfolding and disassembly of TTR lead to amyloid fibril formation in different tissues causing various amyloid diseases. Based on the current understanding of the pathogenesis of TTR amyloidosis, it is considered that the inhibition of amyloid fibril formation by stabilization of TTR in native tetrameric form is a viable approach for the treatment of TTR amyloidosis. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have examined interactions of the wtTTR with a series of compounds containing various substitutions at biphenyl ether skeleton and a novel compound, previously evaluated for binding and inhibiting tetramer dissociation, by x-ray crystallographic approach. High resolution crystal structures of five ligands in complex with wtTTR provided snapshots of negatively cooperative binding of ligands in two T4 binding sites besides characterizing their binding orientations, conformations, and interactions with binding site residues. In all complexes, the ligand has better fit and more potent interactions in first T4 site i.e. (AC site than the second T4 site (BD site. Together, these results suggest that AC site is a preferred ligand binding site and retention of ordered water molecules between the dimer interfaces further stabilizes the tetramer by bridging a hydrogen bond interaction between Ser117 and its symmetric copy. CONCLUSION: Novel biphenyl ether based compounds exhibit negative-cooperativity while binding to two T4 sites which suggests that binding of only single ligand molecule is sufficient to inhibit the TTR tetramer dissociation.

  20. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde

    1996-01-01

    Two residues of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA were identified and subjected to mutational analysis. Lys-89 and Asn-90 were each replaced by either Ala or Glu. The four single mutants were denoted K89A, K89E, N90A, and N90E, respectively. The mutants......-tRNA, which suggested an important role of Lys-89 and Asn-90 in tRNA binding. Furthermore, our results indicate helix B to be an important target site for nucleotide exchange factor EF-Ts. Also the mutants His-66 to Ala and His-118 to either Ala or Glu were characterized in an in vitro translation assay...

  1. Characterization of vanadium-binding sites of the vanadium-binding protein Vanabin2 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Tatsuya; Kawakami, Norifumi; Toshishige, Masaaki; Matsuo, Koichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Michibata, Hitoshi

    2009-10-01

    Vanabins are a unique protein family of vanadium-binding proteins with nine disulfide bonds. Possible binding sites for VO2+ in Vanabin2 from a vanadium-rich ascidian Ascidia sydneiensis samea have been detected by nuclear magnetic resonance study, but the metal selectivity and metal-binding ability of each site was not examined. In order to reveal functional contribution of each binding site, we prepared several mutants of Vanabin2 by in vitro site-directed mutagenesis and analyzed their metal selectivity and affinity by immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography and Hummel Dreyer method. Mutation at K10/R60 (site 1) markedly reduced the affinity for VO2+. Mutation at K24/K38/R41/R42 (site 2) decreased the maximum binding number, but only slightly increased the overall affinity for VO2+. Secondary structure of both mutants was the same as that of the wild type as assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Mutation in disulfide bonds near the site 1 did not affect its high affinity binding capacity, while those near the site 2 decreased the overall affinity for VO2+. These results suggested that the site 1 is a high affinity binding site for VO2+, while the site 2 composes a moderate affinity site for multiple VO2+.

  2. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments. 841. J. Biosci. 32(5), August 2007. 1. Introduction. A majority of computational approaches that aim to predict transcription factor binding sites employ cross- species comparison to focus on conserved locations. Such a comparison helps in ...

  3. Searching for the low affinity ubiquinone binding site in cytochrome bo3from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sylvia K; Lin, Myat T; Ouyang, Hanlin; Gennis, Robert B

    2017-05-01

    The cytochrome bo 3 ubiquinol oxidase is one of three respiratory oxygen reductases in the aerobic respiratory chain of Escherichia coli. The generally accepted model of catalysis assumes that cyt bo 3 contains two distinct ubiquinol binding sites: (i) a low affinity (Q L ) site which is the traditional substrate binding site; and (ii) a high affinity (Q H ) site where a "permanently" bound quinone acts as a cofactor, taking two electrons from the substrate quinol and passing them one-by-one to the heme b component of the enzyme which, in turn, transfers them to the heme o 3 /Cu B active site. Whereas the residues at the Q H site are well defined, the location of the Q L site remains unknown. The published X-ray structure does not contain quinone, and substantial amounts of the protein are missing as well. A recent bioinformatics study by Bossis et al. [Biochem J. (2014) 461, 305-314] identified a sequence motif G 163 EFX 3 GWX 2 Y 173 as the likely Q L site in the family of related quinol oxidases. In the current work, this was tested by site-directed mutagenesis. The results show that these residues are not important for catalytic function and do not define the Q L substrate binding site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of two heparan sulphate-binding sites in the mycobacterial adhesin Hlp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Previato Jose O

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone-like Hlp protein is emerging as a key component in mycobacterial pathogenesis, being involved in the initial events of host colonization by interacting with laminin and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs. In the present study, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR was used to map the binding site(s of Hlp to heparan sulfate and identify the nature of the amino acid residues directly involved in this interaction. Results The capacity of a panel of 30 mer synthetic peptides covering the full length of Hlp to bind to heparin/heparan sulfate was analyzed by solid phase assays, NMR, and affinity chromatography. An additional active region between the residues Gly46 and Ala60 was defined at the N-terminal domain of Hlp, expanding the previously defined heparin-binding site between Thr31 and Phe50. Additionally, the C-terminus, rich in Lys residues, was confirmed as another heparan sulfate binding region. The amino acids in Hlp identified as mediators in the interaction with heparan sulfate were Arg, Val, Ile, Lys, Phe, and Thr. Conclusion Our data indicate that Hlp interacts with heparan sulfate through two distinct regions of the protein. Both heparan sulfate-binding regions here defined are preserved in all mycobacterial Hlp homologues that have been sequenced, suggesting important but possibly divergent roles for this surface-exposed protein in both pathogenic and saprophic species.

  5. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  6. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  7. Combining modelling and mutagenesis studies of synaptic vesicle protein 2A to identify a series of residues involved in racetam binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiye; Anderson, Dina; Lynch, Berkley A; Castaigne, Jean-Gabriel; Foerch, Patrik; Lebon, Florence

    2011-10-01

    LEV (levetiracetam), an antiepileptic drug which possesses a unique profile in animal models of seizure and epilepsy, has as its unique binding site in brain, SV2A (synaptic vesicle protein 2A). Previous studies have used a chimaeric and site-specific mutagenesis approach to identify three residues in the putative tenth transmembrane helix of SV2A that, when mutated, alter binding of LEV and related racetam derivatives to SV2A. In the present paper, we report a combined modelling and mutagenesis study that successfully identifies another 11 residues in SV2A that appear to be involved in ligand binding. Sequence analysis and modelling of SV2A suggested residues equivalent to critical functional residues of other MFS (major facilitator superfamily) transporters. Alanine scanning of these and other SV2A residues resulted in the identification of residues affecting racetam binding, including Ile273 which differentiated between racetam analogues, when mutated to alanine. Integrating mutagenesis results with docking analysis led to the construction of a mutant in which six SV2A residues were replaced with corresponding SV2B residues. This mutant showed racetam ligand-binding affinity intermediate to the affinities observed for SV2A and SV2B.

  8. DNABP: Identification of DNA-Binding Proteins Based on Feature Selection Using a Random Forest and Predicting Binding Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xin; Guo, Jing; Sun, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins are fundamentally important in cellular processes. Several computational-based methods have been developed to improve the prediction of DNA-binding proteins in previous years. However, insufficient work has been done on the prediction of DNA-binding proteins from protein sequence information. In this paper, a novel predictor, DNABP (DNA-binding proteins), was designed to predict DNA-binding proteins using the random forest (RF) classifier with a hybrid feature. The hybrid feature contains two types of novel sequence features, which reflect information about the conservation of physicochemical properties of the amino acids, and the binding propensity of DNA-binding residues and non-binding propensities of non-binding residues. The comparisons with each feature demonstrated that these two novel features contributed most to the improvement in predictive ability. Furthermore, to improve the prediction performance of the DNABP model, feature selection using the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method combined with incremental feature selection (IFS) was carried out during the model construction. The results showed that the DNABP model could achieve 86.90% accuracy, 83.76% sensitivity, 90.03% specificity and a Matthews correlation coefficient of 0.727. High prediction accuracy and performance comparisons with previous research suggested that DNABP could be a useful approach to identify DNA-binding proteins from sequence information. The DNABP web server system is freely available at http://www.cbi.seu.edu.cn/DNABP/.

  9. Accurate prediction of peptide binding sites on protein surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Petsalaki

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important protein-protein interactions are mediated by the binding of a short peptide stretch in one protein to a large globular segment in another. Recent efforts have provided hundreds of examples of new peptides binding to proteins for which a three-dimensional structure is available (either known experimentally or readily modeled but where no structure of the protein-peptide complex is known. To address this gap, we present an approach that can accurately predict peptide binding sites on protein surfaces. For peptides known to bind a particular protein, the method predicts binding sites with great accuracy, and the specificity of the approach means that it can also be used to predict whether or not a putative or predicted peptide partner will bind. We used known protein-peptide complexes to derive preferences, in the form of spatial position specific scoring matrices, which describe the binding-site environment in globular proteins for each type of amino acid in bound peptides. We then scan the surface of a putative binding protein for sites for each of the amino acids present in a peptide partner and search for combinations of high-scoring amino acid sites that satisfy constraints deduced from the peptide sequence. The method performed well in a benchmark and largely agreed with experimental data mapping binding sites for several recently discovered interactions mediated by peptides, including RG-rich proteins with SMN domains, Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 with TRADD domains, DBC1 with Sir2, and the Ago hook with Argonaute PIWI domain. The method, and associated statistics, is an excellent tool for predicting and studying binding sites for newly discovered peptides mediating critical events in biology.

  10. Characterization of nicotine binding to the rat brain P2 preparation: the identification of multiple binding sites which include specific up-regulatory site(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sloan, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    These studies show that nicotine binds to the rat brain P 2 preparation by saturable and reversible processes. Multiple binding sites were revealed by the configuration of saturation, kinetic and Scatchard plots. A least squares best fit of Scatchard data using nonlinear curve fitting programs confirmed the presence of a very high affinity site, an up-regulatory site, a high affinity site and one or two low affinity sites. Stereospecificity was demonstrated for the up-regulatory site where (+)-nicotine was more effective and for the high affinity site where (-)-nicotine had a higher affinity. Drugs which selectively up-regulate nicotine binding site(s) have been identified. Further, separate very high and high affinity sites were identified for (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine, based on evidence that the site density for the (-)-isomer is 10 times greater than that for the (+)-isomer at these sites. Enhanced nicotine binding has been shown to be a statistically significant phenomenon which appears to be a consequence of drugs binding to specific site(s) which up-regulate binding at other site(s). Although Scatchard and Hill plots indicate positive cooperatively, up-regulation more adequately describes the function of these site(s). A separate up-regulatory site is suggested by the following: (1) Drugs vary markedly in their ability to up-regulate binding. (2) Both the affinity and the degree of up-regulation can be altered by structural changes in ligands. (3) Drugs with specificity for up-regulation have been identified. (4) Some drugs enhance binding in a dose-related manner. (5) Competition studies employing cold (-)- and (+)-nicotine against (-)- and (+)-[ 3 H]nicotine show that the isomers bind to separate sites which up-regulate binding at the (-)- and (+)-nicotine high affinity sites and in this regard (+)-nicotine is more specific and efficacious than (-)-nicotine

  11. Salt-mediated two-site ligand binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Miguel A D; Slavkovic, Sladjana; Churcher, Zachary R; Johnson, Philip E

    2017-02-17

    Multisite ligand binding by proteins is commonly utilized in the regulation of biological systems and exploited in a range of biochemical technologies. Aptamers, although widely utilized in many rationally designed biochemical systems, are rarely capable of multisite ligand binding. The cocaine-binding aptamer is often used for studying and developing sensor and aptamer-based technologies. Here, we use isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that the cocaine-binding aptamer switches from one-site to two-site ligand binding, dependent on NaCl concentration. The high-affinity site functions at all buffer conditions studied, the low-affinity site only at low NaCl concentrations. ITC experiments show the two ligand-binding sites operate independently of one another with different affinities and enthalpies. NMR spectroscopy shows the second binding site is located in stem 2 near the three-way junction. This ability to control ligand binding at the second site by adjusting the concentration of NaCl is rare among aptamers and may prove a useful in biotechnology applications. This work also demonstrates that in vitro selected biomolecules can have functions as complex as those found in nature. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Inventory of sites used to develop residual radioactivity criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronca-Battista, M.; Hardeman, J.C. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in conjunction with the National Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors (CRCPD), has compiled an inventory of never licensed or otherwise poorly documented sites that may be contaminated with radioactive materials. This effort is in support of the EPA's development of radiation protection criteria for residual radioactivity at decommissioned sites. The inventory will help to establish the range of circumstances for which criteria are needed, as well as the suitability of candidate criteria for actual situations. The information will also be used to develop model sites and facilities for analyzing technical and economic feasibility of residual radioactivity criteria and to assess costs and benefits of alternate criteria. Relevant information about each site, such as radionuclides, waste forms, and quantities present will be included in the inventory when such information is available. The CRCPD has requested that each State radiation control agency furnish the information for the inventory. The inventory supplements the relatively extensive documentation of sites regulated by Federal or State agencies with information on old or unlicensed sites, such as old waste storage sites or radium ore processing facilities

  13. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca 2+ -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms

  15. Oligomycin frames a common drug-binding site in the ATP synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Jindrich; Osowski, Daniel; Walters, D. Eric; Mueller, David M. (Rosalind)

    2015-12-01

    We report the high-resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) crystal structure of oligomycin bound to the subunit c10 ring of the yeast mitochondrial ATP synthase. Oligomycin binds to the surface of the c10 ring making contact with two neighboring molecules at a position that explains the inhibitory effect on ATP synthesis. The carboxyl side chain of Glu59, which is essential for proton translocation, forms an H-bond with oligomycin via a bridging water molecule but is otherwise shielded from the aqueous environment. The remaining contacts between oligomycin and subunit c are primarily hydrophobic. The amino acid residues that form the oligomycin-binding site are 100% conserved between human and yeast but are widely different from those in bacterial homologs, thus explaining the differential sensitivity to oligomycin. Prior genetics studies suggest that the oligomycin-binding site overlaps with the binding site of other antibiotics, including those effective against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thereby frames a common 'drug-binding site.' We anticipate that this drug-binding site will serve as an effective target for new antibiotics developed by rational design.

  16. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, V Joachim; Daminelli, Simone; Schroeder, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology) - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand flexibility to have a minor

  17. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  18. Comparison of metal-binding strength between methionine and cysteine residues: Implications for the design of metal-binding motifs in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Deepak, R N V; Chandrakar, Brijesh; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2017-05-01

    Metals play vital role in various physiological processes and are bound to biomolecules. Although cysteine sulfur is more frequently found as metal-binding ligand, methionine prefers to occur in copper-binding motifs of some proteins. To address methionine's lower preference in copper-binding sites in comparison to cysteine, we have considered copper-binding motifs (His-Cys-His-Met) from seven different high-resolution protein structures. We performed quantum chemical calculations to find out the strength of interactions between sulfur and metal ion in both Met and Cys residues. In the case of Cys, both neutral (CysH) and the deprotonated form (Cys - ) were considered. We used two different levels of theory (B3LYP and M06-2X) and the model compounds methyl propyl sulfide, ethanethiol and ethanethiolate were used to represent Met, CysH and Cys - respectively. To compare the metal-binding strength, we mutated Met in silico to CysH/Cys - and performed the calculations. We also carried out calculations with wild-type Cys present in the same metal-binding motif. On average, interactions of Met with copper ion are stronger by 13-35kcal/mol compared to CysH. However, Cys - interactions with copper is stronger than that of Met by ~250kcal/mol. We then considered the entire metal-binding motif with four residues and calculated the interaction energies with the copper ion. We also considered Met→Cys - mutation in the motif and repeated the calculations. Interaction of the wild-type motif with the copper ion is ~160kcal/mol weaker than that of mutated motif. Our studies suggest the factors that could explain why Met is not as frequently observed as Cys in the metal-binding motifs. Results of these studies will help in designing metal-binding motifs in proteins with varying interaction strengths. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney: Radioligand homogenate binding and autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissanayake, V.U.; Hughes, J.; Hunter, J.C. (Parke-Davis Research Unit, Addenbrookes Hospital Site, Cambridge (England))

    1991-07-01

    The specific binding of the selective {mu}-, {delta}-, and {kappa}-opioid ligands (3H)(D-Ala2,MePhe4,Gly-ol5)enkephalin ((3H) DAGOL), (3H)(D-Pen2,D-Pen5)enkephalin ((3H)DPDPE), and (3H)U69593, respectively, to crude membranes of the guinea pig and rat whole kidney, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla was investigated. In addition, the distribution of specific 3H-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig and rat kidney was visualized by autoradiography. Homogenate binding and autoradiography demonstrated the absence of {mu}- and {kappa}-opioid binding sites in the guinea pig kidney. No opioid binding sites were demonstrable in the rat kidney. In the guinea pig whole kidney, cortex, and medulla, saturation studies demonstrated that (3H)DPDPE bound with high affinity (KD = 2.6-3.5 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding sites (Bmax = 8.4-30 fmol/mg of protein). Competition studies using several opioid compounds confirmed the nature of the {delta}-opioid binding site. Autoradiography experiments demonstrated that specific (3H)DPDPE binding sites were distributed radially in regions of the inner and outer medulla and at the corticomedullary junction of the guinea pig kidney. Computer-assisted image analysis of saturation data yielded KD values (4.5-5.0 nM) that were in good agreement with those obtained from the homogenate binding studies. Further investigation of the {delta}-opioid binding site in medulla homogenates, using agonist ((3H)DPDPE) and antagonist ((3H)diprenorphine) binding in the presence of Na+, Mg2+, and nucleotides, suggested that the {delta}-opioid site is linked to a second messenger system via a GTP-binding protein. Further studies are required to establish the precise localization of the {delta} binding site in the guinea pig kidney and to determine the nature of the second messenger linked to the GTP-binding protein in the medulla.

  20. (-)PPAP: a new and selective ligand for sigma binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Battaglia, G; Smith, J D

    1990-11-01

    Most agents employed for the investigation of sigma (sigma) binding sites display relatively low affinity for these sites, bind both at sigma sites and at either phencyclidine (PCP) sites or dopamine receptors with similar affinity, and/or produce some dopaminergic activity in vivo. We describe a new agent, (-)PPAP or R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-n-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane hydrochloride, that binds with high affinity and selectivity at sigma (IC50 = 24 nM) versus either PCP sites (IC50 greater than 75,000 nM) or D1 and D2 dopamine receptors (IC50 greater than 5,000 nM). The sigma affinity of this agent is comparable to that of the standard ligands (+)-3-PPP and DTG. Furthermore, although (-)PPAP is structurally related to amphetamine, it neither produces nor antagonizes amphetamine-like stimulus effect in rats trained to discriminate 1 mg/kg of S(+)amphetamine from saline.

  1. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  2. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  3. Binding sites for gonadotropins in human postmenopausal ovaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, R.; Shima, K.; Yamoto, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Nishimori, K.; Hiraoka, J.

    1989-02-01

    The binding of human LH and human FSH to postmenopausal ovarian tissue from 21 patients with cervical carcinoma was analyzed. The binding sites for FSH and LH were demonstrated in postmenopausal ovarian tissue. The surface-binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the cells of cortical stroma of the postmenopausal ovary. In addition, diffuse cytoplasmic staining of endogenous estrogen and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity were detected immunohistochemically and histochemically in the cells of the cortical stroma. Electron microscopic study also suggested steroidogenic function in the cells of the cortical stroma. The results of the present study suggest that postmenopausal ovaries contain specific binding sites for pituitary gonadotropins and play a role in ovarian steroidogenesis.

  4. PocketMatch: a new algorithm to compare binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeturu, Kalidas; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2008-12-17

    Recognizing similarities and deriving relationships among protein molecules is a fundamental requirement in present-day biology. Similarities can be present at various levels which can be detected through comparison of protein sequences or their structural folds. In some cases similarities obscure at these levels could be present merely in the substructures at their binding sites. Inferring functional similarities between protein molecules by comparing their binding sites is still largely exploratory and not as yet a routine protocol. One of the main reasons for this is the limitation in the choice of appropriate analytical tools that can compare binding sites with high sensitivity. To benefit from the enormous amount of structural data that is being rapidly accumulated, it is essential to have high throughput tools that enable large scale binding site comparison. Here we present a new algorithm PocketMatch for comparison of binding sites in a frame invariant manner. Each binding site is represented by 90 lists of sorted distances capturing shape and chemical nature of the site. The sorted arrays are then aligned using an incremental alignment method and scored to obtain PMScores for pairs of sites. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis and an extensive validation of the algorithm have been carried out. A comparison with other site matching algorithms is also presented. Perturbation studies where the geometry of a given site was retained but the residue types were changed randomly, indicated that chance similarities were virtually non-existent. Our analysis also demonstrates that shape information alone is insufficient to discriminate between diverse binding sites, unless combined with chemical nature of amino acids. A new algorithm has been developed to compare binding sites in accurate, efficient and high-throughput manner. Though the representation used is conceptually simplistic, we demonstrate that along with the new alignment strategy used, it is sufficient to

  5. Pharmacophore screening of the protein data bank for specific binding site chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna-Slater, Valérie; Arrowsmith, Andrew G; Zhao, Yong; Schapira, Matthieu

    2010-03-22

    A simple computational approach was developed to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB) for putative pockets possessing a specific binding site chemistry and geometry. The method employs two commonly used 3D screening technologies, namely identification of cavities in protein structures and pharmacophore screening of chemical libraries. For each protein structure, a pocket finding algorithm is used to extract potential binding sites containing the correct types of residues, which are then stored in a large SDF-formatted virtual library; pharmacophore filters describing the desired binding site chemistry and geometry are then applied to screen this virtual library and identify pockets matching the specified structural chemistry. As an example, this approach was used to screen all human protein structures in the PDB and identify sites having chemistry similar to that of known methyl-lysine binding domains that recognize chromatin methylation marks. The selected genes include known readers of the histone code as well as novel binding pockets that may be involved in epigenetic signaling. Putative allosteric sites were identified on the structures of TP53BP1, L3MBTL3, CHEK1, KDM4A, and CREBBP.

  6. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Haldane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  7. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldane, Allan; Manhart, Michael; Morozov, Alexandre V

    2014-07-01

    Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  8. RBPmap: a web server for mapping binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Inbal; Kosti, Idit; Ares, Manuel; Cline, Melissa; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2014-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression is executed in many cases by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that bind to mRNAs as well as to non-coding RNAs. RBPs recognize their RNA target via specific binding sites on the RNA. Predicting the binding sites of RBPs is known to be a major challenge. We present a new webserver, RBPmap, freely accessible through the website http://rbpmap.technion.ac.il/ for accurate prediction and mapping of RBP binding sites. RBPmap has been developed specifically for mapping RBPs in human, mouse and Drosophila melanogaster genomes, though it supports other organisms too. RBPmap enables the users to select motifs from a large database of experimentally defined motifs. In addition, users can provide any motif of interest, given as either a consensus or a PSSM. The algorithm for mapping the motifs is based on a Weighted-Rank approach, which considers the clustering propensity of the binding sites and the overall tendency of regulatory regions to be conserved. In addition, RBPmap incorporates a position-specific background model, designed uniquely for different genomic regions, such as splice sites, 5' and 3' UTRs, non-coding RNA and intergenic regions. RBPmap was tested on high-throughput RNA-binding experiments and was proved to be highly accurate. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Deciphering common recognition principles of nucleoside mono/di and tri-phosphates binding in diverse proteins via structural matching of their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagavat, Raghu; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2017-09-01

    Nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) ligands are of high biological importance and are essential for all life forms. A pre-requisite for them to participate in diverse biochemical processes is their recognition by diverse proteins. It is thus of great interest to understand the basis for such recognition in different proteins. Towards this, we have used a structural bioinformatics approach and analyze structures of 4677 NTP complexes available in Protein Data Bank (PDB). Binding sites were extracted and compared exhaustively using PocketMatch, a sensitive in-house site comparison algorithm, which resulted in grouping the entire dataset into 27 site-types. Each of these site-types represent a structural motif comprised of two or more residue conservations, derived using another in-house tool for superposing binding sites, PocketAlign. The 27 site-types could be grouped further into 9 super-types by considering partial similarities in the sites, which indicated that the individual site-types comprise different combinations of one or more site features. A scan across PDB using the 27 structural motifs determined the motifs to be specific to NTP binding sites, and a computational alanine mutagenesis indicated that residues identified to be highly conserved in the motifs are also most contributing to binding. Alternate orientations of the ligand in several site-types were observed and rationalized, indicating the possibility of some residues serving as anchors for NTP recognition. The presence of multiple site-types and the grouping of multiple folds into each site-type is strongly suggestive of convergent evolution. Knowledge of determinants obtained from this study will be useful for detecting function in unknown proteins. Proteins 2017; 85:1699-1712. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Human chorionic ganodotropin binding sites in the human endometrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, J.; Sen, S.; Manna, P.R.

    1993-01-01

    The existence of high-affinity and low-capacity specific binding sites for luteinizing hormone/human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) has been reported in porcine, rabbit and rat uteri. The authors have identified the hCG binding sites in the human endometrium collected from 35-42-year-old ovulatory and anovulatory women. The binding characteristics of hCG to endometrial tissue preparations from ovulatory and anovulatory women showed saturability with high affinity and low capacity. Scatchard plot analysis showed the dissociation constant of specific binding sites in the ovulatory women to be 3.5x10 -10 mol/l and in anovulatory women to be 3.1x10 -10 mol/l. The maximum binding capacity varied considerably between ovulatory and anovulatory endometrium. Among the divalent metal ions tested Zn 2+ effected a remarkable increase in [ 125 I]hCG binding to the endometrium, whereas Mn 2+ showed a marginal increase and other metal ions did not have any effect. Data obtained with human endometrium indicate an influence of the functional state of the ovary on [ 125 I]hCG binding to endometrium. 14 refs., 3 figs

  11. Mapping of the vitronectin-binding site on the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Ploug, Michael

    2007-01-01

    a comprehensive alanine-scanning library of purified single-site uPAR mutants (244 positions tested). Interestingly, the five residues identified as "hot spots" for vitronectin binding form a contiguous epitope consisting of two exposed loops connecting the central fourstranded beta-sheet in uPAR domain I (Trp(32...... the intriguing possibility that the canonical receptor and inhibitor for uPA (uPAR and PAI-1) may have reached a convergent solution for binding to the somatomedin B domain of vitronectin....

  12. Transcription factor binding sites prediction based on modified nucleosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Talebzadeh

    Full Text Available In computational methods, position weight matrices (PWMs are commonly applied for transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction. Although these matrices are more accurate than simple consensus sequences to predict actual binding sites, they usually produce a large number of false positive (FP predictions and so are impoverished sources of information. Several studies have employed additional sources of information such as sequence conservation or the vicinity to transcription start sites to distinguish true binding regions from random ones. Recently, the spatial distribution of modified nucleosomes has been shown to be associated with different promoter architectures. These aligned patterns can facilitate DNA accessibility for transcription factors. We hypothesize that using data from these aligned and periodic patterns can improve the performance of binding region prediction. In this study, we propose two effective features, "modified nucleosomes neighboring" and "modified nucleosomes occupancy", to decrease FP in binding site discovery. Based on these features, we designed a logistic regression classifier which estimates the probability of a region as a TFBS. Our model learned each feature based on Sp1 binding sites on Chromosome 1 and was tested on the other chromosomes in human CD4+T cells. In this work, we investigated 21 histone modifications and found that only 8 out of 21 marks are strongly correlated with transcription factor binding regions. To prove that these features are not specific to Sp1, we combined the logistic regression classifier with the PWM, and created a new model to search TFBSs on the genome. We tested the model using transcription factors MAZ, PU.1 and ELF1 and compared the results to those using only the PWM. The results show that our model can predict Transcription factor binding regions more successfully. The relative simplicity of the model and capability of integrating other features make it a superior method

  13. Characterization of the S100A1 protein binding site on TRPC6 C-terminus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bily

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential (TRP protein superfamily consists of seven major groups, among them the "canonical TRP" family. The TRPC proteins are calcium-permeable nonselective cation channels activated after the emptying of intracellular calcium stores and appear to be gated by various types of messengers. The TRPC6 channel has been shown to be expressed in various tissues and cells, where it modulates the calcium level in response to external signals. Calcium binding proteins such as Calmodulin or the family of S100A proteins are regulators of TRPC channels. Here we characterized the overlapping integrative binding site for S100A1 at the C-tail of TRPC6, which is also able to accomodate various ligands such as Calmodulin and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5-bisphosphate. Several positively charged amino acid residues (Arg852, Lys856, Lys859, Arg860 and Arg864 were determined by fluorescence anisotropy measurements for their participation in the calcium-dependent binding of S100A1 to the C terminus of TRPC6. The triple mutation Arg852/Lys859/Arg860 exhibited significant disruption of the binding of S100A1 to TRPC6. This indicates a unique involvement of these three basic residues in the integrative overlapping binding site for S100A1 on the C tail of TRPC6.

  14. Characterization of the S100A1 protein binding site on TRPC6 C-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bily, Jan; Grycova, Lenka; Holendova, Blanka; Jirku, Michaela; Janouskova, Hana; Bousova, Kristyna; Teisinger, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) protein superfamily consists of seven major groups, among them the "canonical TRP" family. The TRPC proteins are calcium-permeable nonselective cation channels activated after the emptying of intracellular calcium stores and appear to be gated by various types of messengers. The TRPC6 channel has been shown to be expressed in various tissues and cells, where it modulates the calcium level in response to external signals. Calcium binding proteins such as Calmodulin or the family of S100A proteins are regulators of TRPC channels. Here we characterized the overlapping integrative binding site for S100A1 at the C-tail of TRPC6, which is also able to accomodate various ligands such as Calmodulin and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate. Several positively charged amino acid residues (Arg852, Lys856, Lys859, Arg860 and Arg864) were determined by fluorescence anisotropy measurements for their participation in the calcium-dependent binding of S100A1 to the C terminus of TRPC6. The triple mutation Arg852/Lys859/Arg860 exhibited significant disruption of the binding of S100A1 to TRPC6. This indicates a unique involvement of these three basic residues in the integrative overlapping binding site for S100A1 on the C tail of TRPC6.

  15. Predicting DNA-binding proteins and binding residues by complex structure prediction and application to human proteome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Zhao

    Full Text Available As more and more protein sequences are uncovered from increasingly inexpensive sequencing techniques, an urgent task is to find their functions. This work presents a highly reliable computational technique for predicting DNA-binding function at the level of protein-DNA complex structures, rather than low-resolution two-state prediction of DNA-binding as most existing techniques do. The method first predicts protein-DNA complex structure by utilizing the template-based structure prediction technique HHblits, followed by binding affinity prediction based on a knowledge-based energy function (Distance-scaled finite ideal-gas reference state for protein-DNA interactions. A leave-one-out cross validation of the method based on 179 DNA-binding and 3797 non-binding protein domains achieves a Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.77 with high precision (94% and high sensitivity (65%. We further found 51% sensitivity for 82 newly determined structures of DNA-binding proteins and 56% sensitivity for the human proteome. In addition, the method provides a reasonably accurate prediction of DNA-binding residues in proteins based on predicted DNA-binding complex structures. Its application to human proteome leads to more than 300 novel DNA-binding proteins; some of these predicted structures were validated by known structures of homologous proteins in APO forms. The method [SPOT-Seq (DNA] is available as an on-line server at http://sparks-lab.org.

  16. Importance of Residues Outside the Cation Binding Pocket for Na+ and K+ Binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Line; Toustrup-Jensen, Mads Schak; Einholm, Anja P.

    Mutagenesis studies have identified several oxygen-containing residues in the transmembrane region which are important for the coordination of Na+ and/or K+. These were later confirmed by the high-resolution crystal structures of the Na+/K+-ATPase with bound Na+ or K+. However, more information...... is needed to reveal the translocation pathway through the Na+/K+-ATPase. Mutagenesis studies have shown that several other transmembrane residues located outside the cation binding pocket, including Phe785 and Phe788, affect the ion binding properties of the Na+/K+-ATPase (1,2). It is well...... not significantly affect the Na+ binding properties of the Na+/K+-ATPase. 1. Vilsen, B. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 11389 2. Rodacker, V. et al (2006) JBC 281, 18539 3. Laursen M et al. (2013) PNAS 110, 10958...

  17. Identification of the molecular site of ivabradine binding to HCN4 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchi, Annalisa; Baruscotti, Mirko; Nardini, Marco; Barbuti, Andrea; Micheloni, Stefano; Bolognesi, Martino; DiFrancesco, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Ivabradine is a specific heart rate-reducing agent approved as a treatment of chronic stable angina. Its mode of action involves a selective and specific block of HCN channels, the molecular components of sinoatrial "funny" (f)-channels. Different studies suggest that the binding site of ivabradine is located in the inner vestibule of HCN channels, but the molecular details of ivabradine binding are unknown. We thus sought to investigate by mutagenesis and in silico analysis which residues of the HCN4 channel, the HCN isoform expressed in the sinoatrial node, are involved in the binding of ivabradine. Using homology modeling, we verified the presence of an inner cavity below the channel pore and identified residues lining the cavity; these residues were replaced with alanine (or valine) either alone or in combination, and WT and mutant channels were expressed in HEK293 cells. Comparison of the block efficiency of mutant vs WT channels, measured by patch-clamp, revealed that residues Y506, F509 and I510 are involved in ivabradine binding. For each mutant channel, docking simulations correctly explain the reduced block efficiency in terms of proportionally reduced affinity for ivabradine binding. In summary our study shows that ivabradine occupies a cavity below the channel pore, and identifies specific residues facing this cavity that interact and stabilize the ivabradine molecule. This study provides an interpretation of known properties of f/HCN4 channel block by ivabradine such as the "open channel block", the current-dependence of block and the property of "trapping" of drug molecules in the closed configuration.

  18. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  19. Mutation of lysine residues in the nucleotide binding segments of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, O C; Baker, S; Ehrenfeld, E

    1996-01-01

    The poliovirus 3D RNA-dependent RNA polymerase contains two peptide segments previously shown to cross-link to nucleotide substrates via lysine residues. To determine which lysine residue(s) might be implicated in catalytic function, we engineered mutations to generate proteins with leucine residues substituted individually for each of the lysine residues in the NTP binding regions. These proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were examined for their abilities to bind nucleotides and...

  20. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-01-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of 125 I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between 125 I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone

  1. Residual herbicide study on selected Hanford Site roadsides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.L.; Kemp, C.J.; Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1993-08-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company routinely treats roadsides with herbicides to control undesirable plant growth. An experiment was conducted to test perennial grass germination in soils adjacent to roadways of the Hanford Site. The primary variable was the distance from the roadside. A simple germination test was executed in a controlled-environment chamber to determine the residual effects of these applications. As expected, the greatest herbicide activity was found directly adjacent to the roadway, approximately 0 to 20 ft (0 to 6.3 m) from the roadway.

  2. Pactamycin binding site on archaebacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.G.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of a photoreactive acetophenone group in the protein synthesis inhibitor pactamycin and the possibility of obtaining active iodinated derivatives that retain full biological activity allow the antibiotic binding site on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus ribosomes to be photoaffinity labeled. Four major labeled proteins have been identified in the yeast ribosomes, i.e., YS10, YS18, YS21/24, and YS30, while proteins AL1a, AS10/L8, AS18/20, and AS21/22 appeared as radioactive spots in S. solfataricus. There seems to be a correlation between some of the proteins labeled in yeast and those previously reported in Escherichia coli indicating that the pactamycin binding sites of both species, which are in the small subunit close to the initiation factors and mRNA binding sites, must have similar characteristics

  3. Synthetic peptides mimicking the binding site of human acetylcholinesterase for its inhibitor fasciculin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafurke, Uwe; Erijman, Ariel; Aizner, Yonatan; Shifman, Julia M; Eichler, Jutta

    2015-09-01

    Molecules capable of mimicking protein binding and/or functional sites present useful tools for a range of biomedical applications, including the inhibition of protein-ligand interactions. Such mimics of protein binding sites can currently be generated through structure-based design and chemical synthesis. Computational protein design could be further used to optimize protein binding site mimetics through rationally designed mutations that improve intermolecular interactions or peptide stability. Here, as a model for the study, we chose an interaction between human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE) and its inhibitor fasciculin-2 (Fas) because the structure and function of this complex is well understood. Structure-based design of mimics of the hAChE binding site for Fas yielded a peptide that binds to Fas at micromolar concentrations. Replacement of hAChE residues known to be essential for its interaction with Fas with alanine, in this peptide, resulted in almost complete loss of binding to Fas. Computational optimization of the hAChE mimetic peptide yielded a variant with slightly improved affinity to Fas, indicating that more rounds of computational optimization will be required to obtain peptide variants with greatly improved affinity for Fas. CD spectra in the absence and presence of Fas point to conformational changes in the peptide upon binding to Fas. Furthermore, binding of the optimized hAChE mimetic peptide to Fas could be inhibited by hAChE, providing evidence for a hAChE-specific peptide-Fas interaction. Copyright © 2015 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Site-directed Mutagenesis of Cysteine Residues in Phi-class Glutathione S-transferase F3 from Oryza sativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hyunjoo; Lee, Juwon; Noh, Jinseok; Kong, Kwanghoon [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    To elucidate the roles of cysteine residues in rice Phi-class GST F3, in this study, all three cysteine residues were replaced with alanine by site-directed mutagenesis in order to obtain mutants C22A, C73A and C77A. Three mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography on immobilized GSH. The substitutions of Cys73 and Cys77 residues in OsGSTF3 with alanine did not affect the glutathione conjugation activities, showing non-essentiality of these residues. On the other hand, the substitution of Cys22 residue with alanine resulted in approximately a 60% loss of specific activity toward ethacrynic acid. Moreover, the K{sub m}{sup CDNB} value of the mutant C22A was approximately 2.2 fold larger than that of the wild type. From these results, the evolutionally conserved cysteine 22 residue seems to participate rather in the structural stability of the active site in OsGSTF3 by stabilizing the electrophilic substrates-binding site's conformation than in the substrate binding directly.

  5. Molecularly imprinted protein recognition cavities bearing exchangeable binding sites for postimprinting site-directed introduction of reporter molecules for readout of binding events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunayama, Hirobumi; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-11-26

    Protein-imprinted cavities bearing exchangeable domains to be used for postimprinting fluorophore introduction to transform binding events into fluorescence changes were constructed in molecularly imprinted polymer (MIPs) matrixes prepared on glass substrates. Copolymerization was performed with acrylamide, N,N'-methylenebisaclylamide, and a newly designed functional group-exchangeable monomer, ({[2-(2-methacrylamido)ethyldithio]ethylcarbamoyl}methoxy)acetic acid (MDTA), in the presence of a model basic protein, lysozyme (Lyso); MDTA can interact with Lyso and assemble close to Lyso in the resulting polymer. After removal of Lyso, followed by a disulfide reduction to cleave the (ethylcarbamoylmethoxy)acetic acid moiety from the MDTA residues, the exposed thiol groups within the imprinted cavities were modified by aminoethylpyridyldisulfide to be transformed into aminoethyl groups that function as active sites for amine-reactive fluorophores. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was then coupled with the aminoethyl groups, yielding site specifically FITC-modified signaling imprinted cavities for Lyso binding. Because the in-cavity fluorescent labeling was achieved via a disulfide linkage, it was easy to remove, exchange, and/or replace amine-reactive fluorophores. This facilitated the screening of fluorophores to select the highest readout for binding events, replace fluorophores when photobleaching occurred, and introduce other functions. The proposed molecular imprinting process, combined with postimprinting modifications, is expected to provide an affordable route to develop multifunctional MIPs for specific detection of protein binding events.

  6. A second tubulin binding site on the kinesin-13 motor head domain is important during mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Zhang

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13s are microtubule (MT depolymerases different from most other kinesins that move along MTs. Like other kinesins, they have a motor or head domain (HD containing a tubulin and an ATP binding site. Interestingly, kinesin-13s have an additional binding site (Kin-Tub-2 on the opposite side of the HD that contains several family conserved positively charged residues. The role of this site in kinesin-13 function is not clear. To address this issue, we investigated the in-vitro and in-vivo effects of mutating Kin-Tub-2 family conserved residues on the Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-13, KLP10A. We show that the Kin-Tub-2 site enhances tubulin cross-linking and MT bundling properties of KLP10A in-vitro. Disruption of the Kin-Tub-2 site, despite not having a deleterious effect on MT depolymerization, results in abnormal mitotic spindles and lagging chromosomes during mitosis in Drosophila S2 cells. The results suggest that the additional Kin-Tub-2 tubulin biding site plays a direct MT attachment role in-vivo.

  7. Studies on the digitalis binding site in Na, K-ATPase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, K.; McParland, R.; Becker, R.; From, A.; Schimerlik, M.; Fullerton, D.S.

    1986-01-01

    Na, K-ATPase is believed to be the receptor for digitalis glycosides. The authors have previously documented that C17 side group of the cardenolide molecule is crucial to α subunit receptor binding. They have attempted to identify the structure of this binding site by labelling the enzyme with a 3 H-labelled photoactive probe localized in the C17 side group of the genin molecule. 3 H-α-subunit was purified and subjected to tryptic digestion. The digest was fractionated by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Fractions containing 3 H-labelled peptide were pooled and rechromatographed. The central peak fractions of 3 H-peptide were pooled, analyzed by SDS-PAGE, and subjected to amino acid sequence analysis. The tryptic peptide containing the 3 H-probe showed considerable sequence heterogeneity. Comparison of the sequence data with the published cDNA-based α-subunit sequence revealed that this peptide material was indeed a mixture of two tryptic peptides of nearly identical size containing the sequences from residue 68 through residue 146, and residues 263 through 342. The latter peptide contains the sequence ... glu tyr thr try leu glu ... speculated by Shull et al. as a possible ouabain binding site

  8. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M

    2016-01-13

    Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The effects of the surface-exposed residues on the binding and hydrolytic activities of Vibrio carchariae chitinase A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suginta Wipa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio carchariae chitinase A (EC3.2.1.14 is a family-18 glycosyl hydrolase and comprises three distinct structural domains: i the amino terminal chitin binding domain (ChBD; ii the (α/β8 TIM barrel catalytic domain (CatD; and iii the α + β insertion domain. The predicted tertiary structure of V. carchariae chitinase A has located the residues Ser33 & Trp70 at the end of ChBD and Trp231 & Tyr245 at the exterior of the catalytic cleft. These residues are surface-exposed and presumably play an important role in chitin hydrolysis. Results Point mutations of the target residues of V. carchariae chitinase A were generated by site-directed mutagenesis. With respect to their binding activity towards crystalline α-chitin and colloidal chitin, chitin binding assays demonstrated a considerable decrease for mutants W70A and Y245W, and a notable increase for S33W and W231A. When the specific hydrolyzing activity was determined, mutant W231A displayed reduced hydrolytic activity, whilst Y245W showed enhanced activity. This suggested that an alteration in the hydrolytic activity was not correlated with a change in the ability of the enzyme to bind to chitin polymer. A mutation of Trp70 to Ala caused the most severe loss in both the binding and hydrolytic activities, which suggested that it is essential for crystalline chitin binding and hydrolysis. Mutations varied neither the specific hydrolyzing activity against pNP-[GlcNAc]2, nor the catalytic efficiency against chitohexaose, implying that the mutated residues are not important in oligosaccharide hydrolysis. Conclusion Our data provide direct evidence that the binding as well as hydrolytic activities of V. carchariae chitinase A to insoluble chitin are greatly influenced by Trp70 and less influenced by Ser33. Though Trp231 and Tyr245 are involved in chitin hydrolysis, they do not play a major role in the binding process of crystalline chitin and the guidance of the chitin chain

  10. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    to identify the amino acid residues important for binding of PEPHC1 to EGFRvIII. The results indicate that the amino acid residues at the N-terminus of PEPHC1 are essential for the binding to the mutated receptor. One analog, [Ala(12)]PEPHC1, showed higher selective binding to EGFRvIII than PEPHC1...

  11. Multiple [3H]-nemonapride binding sites in calf brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmeste, D M; Tang, S W; Li, M; Fang, H

    1997-07-01

    [3H]-Nemonapride has been the ligand of choice to label D4 dopamine receptors. Its specificity was questioned when it was discovered that sigma (sigma) sites were also labeled by [3H]-nemonapride. To further characterize the binding of [3H]-nemonapride, three areas of calf brain (striatum, frontal cortex and cerebellum) were examined. In all three areas, [3H]-nemonapride labeled multiple sites. Dopaminergic and sigma sites were the most prominent. The sigma binding profile was sigma-1 like with a Ki binding profile as follows (in order of decreasing potency): haloperidol, PPAP, pentazocine, DTG, U-50488, R(+)-3-PPP. Experiments using sulpiride and pentazocine to block striatal dopaminergic and sigma sites, respectively, revealed additional, not previously characterized binding sites for [3H]-nemonapride. One component which was present in striatum but not in frontal cortex or cerebellum, had affinity for some neuroleptics and WB-4101, but not for typical serotonergic agents. Thus, [3H]-nemonapride has no selectivity for dopamine receptors unless stringent experimental conditions are met.

  12. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  13. A new family of covalent inhibitors block nucleotide binding to the active site of pyruvate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Hugh P; Walsh, Martin J; Blackburn, Elizabeth A; Wear, Martin A; Boxer, Matthew B; Shen, Min; Veith, Henrike; McNae, Iain W; Nowicki, Matthew W; Michels, Paul A M; Auld, Douglas S; Fothergill-Gilmore, Linda A; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D

    2012-11-15

    PYK (pyruvate kinase) plays a central role in the metabolism of many organisms and cell types, but the elucidation of the details of its function in a systems biology context has been hampered by the lack of specific high-affinity small-molecule inhibitors. High-throughput screening has been used to identify a family of saccharin derivatives which inhibit LmPYK (Leishmania mexicana PYK) activity in a time- (and dose-) dependent manner, a characteristic of irreversible inhibition. The crystal structure of DBS {4-[(1,1-dioxo-1,2-benzothiazol-3-yl)sulfanyl]benzoic acid} complexed with LmPYK shows that the saccharin moiety reacts with an active-site lysine residue (Lys335), forming a covalent bond and sterically hindering the binding of ADP/ATP. Mutation of the lysine residue to an arginine residue eliminated the effect of the inhibitor molecule, providing confirmation of the proposed inhibitor mechanism. This lysine residue is conserved in the active sites of the four human PYK isoenzymes, which were also found to be irreversibly inhibited by DBS. X-ray structures of PYK isoforms show structural differences at the DBS-binding pocket, and this covalent inhibitor of PYK provides a chemical scaffold for the design of new families of potentially isoform-specific irreversible inhibitors.

  14. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of binding site for [ 125 I]-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing [ 125 I]-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain

  15. Signaling-sensitive amino acids surround the allosteric ligand binding site of the thyrotropin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinau, Gunnar; Haas, Ann-Karin; Neumann, Susanne; Worth, Catherine L; Hoyer, Inna; Furkert, Jens; Rutz, Claudia; Gershengorn, Marvin C; Schülein, Ralf; Krause, Gerd

    2010-07-01

    The thyrotropin receptor [thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR)], a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is endogenously activated by thyrotropin, which binds to the extracellular region of the receptor. We previously identified a low-molecular-weight (LMW) agonist of the TSHR and predicted its allosteric binding pocket within the receptor's transmembrane domain. Because binding of the LMW agonist probably disrupts interactions or leads to formation of new interactions among amino acid residues surrounding the pocket, we tested whether mutation of residues at these positions would lead to constitutive signaling activity. Guided by molecular modeling, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of 24 amino acids in this spatial region, followed by functional characterization of the mutant receptors in terms of expression and signaling, measured as cAMP accumulation. We found that mutations V421I, Y466A, T501A, L587V, M637C, M637W, S641A, Y643F, L645V, and Y667A located in several helices exhibit constitutive activity. Of note is mutation M637W at position 6.48 in transmembrane helix 6, which has a significant effect on the interaction of the receptor with the LMW agonist. In summary, we found that a high proportion of residues in several helices surrounding the allosteric binding site of LMW ligands in the TSHR when mutated lead to constitutively active receptors. Our findings of signaling-sensitive residues in this region of the transmembrane bundle may be of general importance as this domain appears to be evolutionarily retained among GPCRs.

  16. Predicting the binding modes and sites of metabolism of xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Goutam; Lal Gupta, Pancham; Jayaram, B

    2015-07-01

    Metabolism studies are an essential integral part of ADMET profiling of drug candidates to evaluate their safety and efficacy. Cytochrome P-450 (CYP) metabolizes a wide variety of xenobiotics/drugs. The binding modes of these compounds with CYP and their intrinsic reactivities decide the metabolic products. We report here a novel computational protocol, which comprises docking of ligands to heme-containing CYPs and prediction of binding energies through a newly developed scoring function, followed by analyses of the docked structures and molecular orbitals of the ligand molecules, for predicting the sites of metabolism (SOM) of ligands. The calculated binding free energies of 121 heme-containing protein-ligand docked complexes yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.84 against experiment. Molecular orbital analyses of the resultant top three unique poses of the docked complexes provided a success rate of 87% in identifying the experimentally known sites of metabolism of the xenobiotics. The SOM prediction methodology is freely accessible at .

  17. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step ap proach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the ... In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the ... We study how alignments and binding site predictions interplay at varying evolutionary distances ...

  18. Diversity and evolutionary relationship of nucleotide binding site ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Most plant disease-resistance genes (R-genes) isolated so far encode proteins with a nucleotide binding site (NBS) domain and belong to a superfamily. NBS domains related to R-genes show a highly conserved backbone of an amino acid motif, which makes it possible to isolate resistance gene analogues (RGAs) by ...

  19. Dangerous connections : on binding site models of infectious disease dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leung, Ka Yin; Diekmann, Odo

    2017-01-01

    We formulate models for the spread of infection on networks that are amenable to analysis in the large population limit. We distinguish three different levels: (1) binding sites, (2) individuals, and (3) the population. In the tradition of physiologically structured population models, the

  20. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  1. The quorum sensing transcriptional regulator TraR has separate binding sites for DNA and the anti-activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhida; Fuqua, Clay [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 212 S. Hawthorne Dr. Simon Hall 400A, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Chen, Lingling, E-mail: linchen@indiana.edu [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 212 S. Hawthorne Dr. Simon Hall 400A, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quorum sensing transcription factor TraR is inhibited by forming TraR-TraM complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer K213 is a key DNA binding residue, but not involved in interaction with TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraM-interacting TraR residues did not affect DNA-binding of TraR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutations of TraR residues reduced the TraR-TraM interaction more than those of TraM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR is driven by thermodynamics. -- Abstract: Quorum sensing represents a mechanism by which bacteria control their genetic behaviors via diffusible signals that reflect their population density. TraR, a quorum sensing transcriptional activator in the Rhizobiaceae family, is regulated negatively by the anti-activator TraM via formation of a TraR-TraM heterocomplex. Prior structural analysis suggests that TraM and DNA bind to TraR in distinct sites. Here we combined isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) to investigate roles of TraR residues from Rhizobium sp. NGR234 in binding of both TraM and DNA. We found that K213A mutation of TraR{sub NGR} abolished DNA binding, however, did not alter TraM binding. Mutations of TraM-interfacing TraR{sub NGR} residues decreased the TraR-TraM interaction, but did not affect the DNA-binding activity of TraR{sub NGR}. Thus, our biochemical studies support the independent binding sites on TraR for TraM and DNA. We also found that point mutations in TraR{sub NGR} appeared to decrease the TraR-TraM interaction more effectively than those in TraM{sub NGR}, consistent with structural observations that individual TraR{sub NGR} residues contact with more TraM{sub NGR} residues than each TraM{sub NGR} residues with TraR{sub NGR} residues. Finally, we showed that TraM inhibition on DNA-binding of TraR was driven thermodynamically. We discussed subtle mechanistic differences in Tra

  2. Alcohol-Binding Sites in Distinct Brain Proteins: The Quest for Atomic Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Slesinger, Paul A.; Davies, Daryl L.; Das, Joydip; Trudell, James R.; Harris, R. Adron

    2011-01-01

    Defining the sites of action of ethanol on brain proteins is a major prerequisite to understanding the molecular pharmacology of this drug. The main barrier to reaching an atomic-level understanding of alcohol action is the low potency of alcohols, ethanol in particular, which is a reflection of transient, low-affinity interactions with their targets. These mechanisms are difficult or impossible to study with traditional techniques such as radioligand binding or spectroscopy. However, there has been considerable recent progress in combining X-ray crystallography, structural modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis to define the sites and mechanisms of action of ethanol and related alcohols on key brain proteins. We review such insights for several diverse classes of proteins including inwardly rectifying potassium, transient receptor potential, and neurotransmit-ter-gated ion channels, as well as protein kinase C epsilon. Some common themes are beginning to emerge from these proteins, including hydrogen bonding of the hydroxyl group and van der Waals interactions of the methylene groups of ethanol with specific amino acid residues. The resulting binding energy is proposed to facilitate or stabilize low-energy state transitions in the bound proteins, allowing ethanol to act as a “molecular lubricant” for protein function. We discuss evidence for characteristic, discrete alcohol-binding sites on protein targets, as well as evidence that binding to some proteins is better characterized by an interaction region that can accommodate multiple molecules of ethanol. PMID:21676006

  3. Identification of steroid-binding and phosphorylated sites within the glucocorticoid receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of these studies was to localize the steroid-binding and phosphorylated sites of the glucocorticoid receptor. The synthetic steroid, dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) forms a covalent thioether bond via the sulfhydryl group of a cysteine residue in the receptor. To determine the covalent site of attachment of this ligand, receptors in WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells were labeled with ({sup 3}H)DM and purified with a monoclonal antibody. The receptor was completely digested with trypsin and a single peptide covalently labeled with steroid identified by reversed-phase HPLC. This peptide was analyzed by automated Edman degradation to determine the location of the steroid-labeled residue. A similar analysis was performed on an overlapping peptide produced by Staphylococcus aureus protease digestion. Analysis of tryptic peptides from receptors labeled with both ({sup 3}H)DM and L-({sup 35}S)methionine indicated that this peptide contained methionine. These analyses, coupled with the published amino acid sequence of the receptor, identified Cysteine-644 in the steroid-binding domain of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor as the residue involved in covalent steroid-binding. A synthetic peptide representing amino acids 640-650 of the mouse receptor was prepared and analyzed to confirm the identification. These biochemical studies represent a direct demonstration of an amino acid important in receptor function. It has been proposed that the receptor functions through a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle to explain the dependence of hormone binding capacity upon cellular ATP. The glucocorticoid receptor has been shown to be a phosphoprotein. As an initial step to identifying a role of phosphorylation in receptor action, phosphorylated sites within the functional domains of the protein were identified.

  4. Prediction of protein binding sites using physical and chemical descriptors and the support vector machine regression method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Zhong-Hua; Jiang Fan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper a new continuous variable called core-ratio is defined to describe the probability for a residue to be in a binding site, thereby replacing the previous binary description of the interface residue using 0 and 1. So we can use the support vector machine regression method to fit the core-ratio value and predict the protein binding sites. We also design a new group of physical and chemical descriptors to characterize the binding sites. The new descriptors are more effective, with an averaging procedure used. Our test shows that much better prediction results can be obtained by the support vector regression (SVR) method than by the support vector classification method. (rapid communication)

  5. Structural Fingerprints of Transcription Factor Binding Site Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Willett

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transforms are a powerful tool in the prediction of DNA sequence properties, such as the presence/absence of codons. We have previously compiled a database of the structural properties of all 32,896 unique DNA octamers. In this work we apply Fourier techniques to the analysis of the structural properties of human chromosomes 21 and 22 and also to three sets of transcription factor binding sites within these chromosomes. We find that, for a given structural property, the structural property power spectra of chromosomes 21 and 22 are strikingly similar. We find common peaks in their power spectra for both Sp1 and p53 transcription factor binding sites. We use the power spectra as a structural fingerprint and perform similarity searching in order to find transcription factor binding site regions. This approach provides a new strategy for searching the genome data for information. Although it is difficult to understand the relationship between specific functional properties and the set of structural parameters in our database, our structural fingerprints nevertheless provide a useful tool for searching for function information in sequence data. The power spectrum fingerprints provide a simple, fast method for comparing a set of functional sequences, in this case transcription factor binding site regions, with the sequences of whole chromosomes. On its own, the power spectrum fingerprint does not find all transcription factor binding sites in a chromosome, but the results presented here show that in combination with other approaches, this technique will improve the chances of identifying functional sequences hidden in genomic data.

  6. Kinetic Mechanism of Uracil Phosphoribosyltransferase from Escherichia coli and Catalytic Importance of the Conserved Proline in the PRPP Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1999-01-01

    Phosphoribosyltransferases catalyze the formation of nucleotides from a nitrogenous base and 5-phosphoribosyl-a-1-pyrophosphate (PRPP). These enzymes and the PRPP synthases resemble each other in a short homologous sequence of 13 amino acid residues which has been termed the PRPP binding site and...

  7. Identification of a highly reactive threonine residue at the active site of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stole, E.; Seddon, A.P.; Wellner, D.; Meister, A.

    1990-01-01

    γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase an enzyme of major importance in glutathione metabolism, was inactivated by treating it with L-(αS,5S)-α-amino-3-chloro-4,5-dihydro-5-[3- 14 C]isoxazoleacetic acid. This selective reagent binds stoichiometrically to the enzyme; more than 90% of the label was bound to its light subunit. Enzymatic digestion of the light subunit gave a 14 C-labeled peptide that corresponds to amino acid residues 517-527 of the enzyme and two incomplete digestion products that contain this labeled peptide moiety. The radioactivity associated with this peptide was released with threonine-523 during sequencing by the automated gas-phase Edman method. The light subunit contains 14 other threonine residues and a total of 19 serine residues; these were not labeled. Threonine-523 is situated in the enzyme in an environment that greatly increases its reactivity, indicating that other amino acid residues of the enzyme must also participate in the active-site chemistry of the enzyme

  8. Contribution of factor VIII light-chain residues 2007-2016 to an activated protein C-interactive site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeyama, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Fay, Philip J

    2013-02-01

    Although factor (F) VIIIa is inactivated by activated protein C (APC) through cleavages in the FVIII heavy chain-derived A1 (Arg(336)) and A2 subunits (Arg(562), the FVIII light chain (LC) contributes to catalysis by binding the enzyme. ELISA-based binding assays showed that FVIII and FVIII LC bound to immobilised active site-modified APC (DEGR-APC) (apparent K(d) ~270 nM and 1.0 μM, respectively). Fluid-phase binding studies using fluorescence indicated an estimated K(d) of ~590 nM for acrylodan-labelled LC binding to DEGR-APC. Furthermore, FVIII LC effectively competed with FVIIIa in blocking APC-catalysed cleavage at Arg(336) (K(i) = 709 nM). A binding site previously identified near the C-terminal end of the A3 domain (residues 2007-2016) of FVIII LC was subjected to Ala-scanning mutagenesis. FXa generation assays and western and dot blotting were employed to assess the contribution of these residues to FVIIIa interactions with APC. Virtually all variants tested showed reductions in the rates of APC-catalysed inactivation of the cofactor and cleavage at the primary inactivation site (Arg(336)), with maximal reductions in inactivation rates (~3-fold relative to WT) and cleavage rates (~3 to ~9-fold relative to WT) observed for the Met2010Ala, Ser2011Ala, and Leu2013Ala variants. Titration of FVIIIa substrate concentration monitoring cleavage by a dot blot assay indicated that these variants also showed ~3-fold increases relative to WT while a double mutant (Met2010Ala/Ser2011Ala) showed a >4-fold increase in K(m). These results show a contribution of a number of residues within the 2007-2016 sequence, and in particular residues Met2010, Ser2011, and Leu2013 to an APC-interactive site.

  9. Humanin binds MPP8: mapping interaction sites of the peptide and protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, Vadim V; Martynenko, Alina V; Arman, Inga P; Tarantul, Vyacheslav Z

    2013-05-01

    Humanin (HN), a 24-amino acid peptide encoded by the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene, was discovered by screening a cDNA library from the occipital cortex of a patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD) for a protection factor against AD-relevant insults. Earlier, using the yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified the M-phase phosphoprotein 8 (MPP8) as a binding partner for HN. In the present work, we further confirmed interaction of HN with MPP8 in co-immunoprecipitation experiments and localized an MPP8-binding site in the region between 5 and 12 aa. of HN. We have also shown that an MPP8 fragment (residues 431-560) is sufficient to bind HN. Further studies on functional consequences of the interaction between the potential oncopetide and the oncoprotein may elucidate some aspects of the molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Enhancement of transglutaminase activity by NMR identification of its flexible residues affecting the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimba, Nobuhisa; Shinohara, Mina; Yokoyama, Kei ichi; Kashiwagi, Tatsuki; Ishikawa, Kohki; Ejima, Daisuke; Suzuki, Ei ichiro

    2002-04-24

    Incorporation of inter- or intramolecular covalent cross-links into food proteins with microbial transglutaminase (MTG) improves the physical and textural properties of many food proteins, such as tofu, boiled fish paste, and sausage. By using nuclear magnetic resonance, we have shown that the residues exhibiting relatively high flexibility in MTG are localized in the N-terminal region; however, the N-terminal region influences the microenvironment of the active site. These results suggest that the N-terminal region is not of primary importance for the global fold, but influences the substrate binding. Therefore, in order to increase the transglutaminase activity, the N-terminal residues were chosen as candidates for site-directed replacement and deletion. We obtained several mutants with higher activity, del1-2, del1-3, and S2R. We propose a strategy for enzyme engineering targeted toward flexible regions involved in the enzymatic activity. In addition, we also briefly describe how the number of glutamine residues in a substrate protein can be increased by mixing more than two kinds of TGases with different substrate specificities.

  11. Explaining an Unusually Fast Parasitic Enzyme: Folate Tail-Binding Residues Dictate Substrate Positioning and Catalysis in Cryptosporidium hominis Thymidylate Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martucci,W.; Vargo, M.; Anderson, K.

    2008-01-01

    The essential enzyme TS-DHFR from Cryptosporidium hominis undergoes an unusually rapid rate of catalysis at the conserved TS domain, facilitated by two nonconserved residues, Ala287 and Ser290, in the folate tail-binding region. Mutation of these two residues to their conserved counterparts drastically affects multiple steps of the TS catalytic cycle. We have determined the crystal structures of all three mutants (A287F, S290G, and A287F/S290G) in complex with active site ligands dUMP and CB3717. The structural data show two effects of the mutations: an increased distance between the ligands in the active site and increased flexibility of the folate ligand in the partially open enzyme state that precedes conformational change to the active catalytic state. The latter effect is able to be rescued by the mutants containing the A287F mutation. In addition, the conserved water network of TS is altered in each of the mutants. The structural results point to a role of the folate tail-binding residues in closely positioning ChTS ligands and restricting ligand flexibility in the partially open state to allow for a rapid transition to the active closed state and enhanced rate of catalysis. These results provide an explanation on how folate tail-binding residues at one end of the active site affect long-range interactions throughout the TS active site and validate these residues as targets for species-specific drug design.

  12. Bifunctional avidin with covalently modifiable ligand binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenni Leppiniemi

    Full Text Available The extensive use of avidin and streptavidin in life sciences originates from the extraordinary tight biotin-binding affinity of these tetrameric proteins. Numerous studies have been performed to modify the biotin-binding affinity of (streptavidin to improve the existing applications. Even so, (streptavidin greatly favours its natural ligand, biotin. Here we engineered the biotin-binding pocket of avidin with a single point mutation S16C and thus introduced a chemically active thiol group, which could be covalently coupled with thiol-reactive molecules. This approach was applied to the previously reported bivalent dual chain avidin by modifying one binding site while preserving the other one intact. Maleimide was then coupled to the modified binding site resulting in a decrease in biotin affinity. Furthermore, we showed that this thiol could be covalently coupled to other maleimide derivatives, for instance fluorescent labels, allowing intratetrameric FRET. The bifunctional avidins described here provide improved and novel tools for applications such as the biofunctionalization of surfaces.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulations of ligand-induced backbone conformational changes in the binding site of the periplasmic lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ami Y.-C.; Mancera, Ricardo L.

    2008-11-01

    The periplasmic lysine-, arginine-, ornithine-binding protein (LAOBP) traps its ligands by a large hinge bending movement between two globular domains. The overall geometry of the binding site remains largely unchanged between the open (unliganded) and closed (liganded) forms, with only a small number of residues exhibiting limited movement of their side chains. However, in the case of the ornithine-bound structure, the backbone peptide bond between Asp11 and Thr12 undergoes a large rotation. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the origin and mechanism of this backbone movement. Simulations allowing flexibility of a limited region and of the whole binding site, with and without bound ligands, suggest that this conformational change is induced by the binding of ornithine, leading to the stabilisation of an energetically favourable alternative conformation.

  14. Mefloquine inhibits voltage dependent Nav1.4 channel by overlapping the local anaesthetic binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiz-Candia, Bertin; Islas, Angel A; Sánchez-Solano, Alfredo; Mancilla-Simbro, Claudia; Scior, Thomas; Millan-PerezPeña, Lourdes; Salinas-Stefanon, Eduardo M

    2017-02-05

    Mefloquine constitutes a multitarget antimalaric that inhibits cation currents. However, the effect and the binding site of this compound on Na + channels is unknown. To address the mechanism of action of mefloquine, we employed two-electrode voltage clamp recordings on Xenopus laevis oocytes, site-directed mutagenesis of the rat Na + channel, and a combined in silico approach using Molecular Dynamics and docking protocols. We found that mefloquine: i) inhibited Na v 1.4 currents (IC 50 =60μM), ii) significantly delayed fast inactivation but did not affect recovery from inactivation, iii) markedly the shifted steady-state inactivation curve to more hyperpolarized potentials. The presence of the β1 subunit significantly reduced mefloquine potency, but the drug induced a significant frequency-independent rundown upon repetitive depolarisations. Computational and experimental results indicate that mefloquine overlaps the local anaesthetic binding site by docking at a hydrophobic cavity between domains DIII and DIV that communicates the local anaesthetic binding site with the selectivity filter. This is supported by the fact that mefloquine potency significantly decreased on mutant Na v 1.4 channel F1579A and significantly increased on K1237S channels. In silico this compound docked above F1579 forming stable π-π interactions with this residue. We provide structure-activity insights into how cationic amphiphilic compounds may exert inhibitory effects by docking between the local anaesthetic binding site and the selectivity filter of a mammalian Na + channel. Our proposed synergistic cycle of experimental and computational studies may be useful for elucidating binding sites of other drugs, thereby saving in vitro and in silico resources. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comprehensive review and empirical analysis of hallmarks of DNA-, RNA- and protein-binding residues in protein chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Ma, Zhiqiang; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2017-12-15

    Proteins interact with a variety of molecules including proteins and nucleic acids. We review a comprehensive collection of over 50 studies that analyze and/or predict these interactions. While majority of these studies address either solely protein-DNA or protein-RNA binding, only a few have a wider scope that covers both protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid binding. Our analysis reveals that binding residues are typically characterized with three hallmarks: relative solvent accessibility (RSA), evolutionary conservation and propensity of amino acids (AAs) for binding. Motivated by drawbacks of the prior studies, we perform a large-scale analysis to quantify and contrast the three hallmarks for residues that bind DNA-, RNA-, protein- and (for the first time) multi-ligand-binding residues that interact with DNA and proteins, and with RNA and proteins. Results generated on a well-annotated data set of over 23 000 proteins show that conservation of binding residues is higher for nucleic acid- than protein-binding residues. Multi-ligand-binding residues are more conserved and have higher RSA than single-ligand-binding residues. We empirically show that each hallmark discriminates between binding and nonbinding residues, even predicted RSA, and that combining them improves discriminatory power for each of the five types of interactions. Linear scoring functions that combine these hallmarks offer good predictive performance of residue-level propensity for binding and provide intuitive interpretation of predictions. Better understanding of these residue-level interactions will facilitate development of methods that accurately predict binding in the exponentially growing databases of protein sequences. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Opioid binding site in EL-4 thymoma cell line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorica, E.; Spector, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using EL-4 thymoma cell-line we found a binding site similar to the k opioid receptor of the nervous system. The Scatchard analysis of the binding of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine indicated a single site with a K/sub D/ = 60 +/- 17 nM and Bmax = 2.7 +/- 0.8 pmols/10/sup 6/ cells. To characterize this binding site, competition studies were performed using selective compounds for the various opioid receptors. The k agonist U-50,488H was the most potent displacer of (/sup 3/H) bremazocine with an IC/sub 50/ value = 0.57..mu..M. The two steroisomers levorphanol and dextrorphan showed the same affinity for this site. While morphine, (D-Pen/sup 2/, D-Pen/sup 5/) enkephalin and ..beta..-endorphin failed to displace, except at very high concentrations, codeine demonstrated a IC/sub 50/ = 60..mu..M, that was similar to naloxone. 32 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Binding of dinitrogen to an iron-sulfur-carbon site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čorić, Ilija; Mercado, Brandon Q.; Bill, Eckhard; Vinyard, David J.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogenases are the enzymes by which certain microorganisms convert atmospheric dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia, thereby providing essential nitrogen atoms for higher organisms. The most common nitrogenases reduce atmospheric N2 at the FeMo cofactor, a sulfur-rich iron-molybdenum cluster (FeMoco). The central iron sites that are coordinated to sulfur and carbon atoms in FeMoco have been proposed to be the substrate binding sites, on the basis of kinetic and spectroscopic studies. In the resting state, the central iron sites each have bonds to three sulfur atoms and one carbon atom. Addition of electrons to the resting state causes the FeMoco to react with N2, but the geometry and bonding environment of N2-bound species remain unknown. Here we describe a synthetic complex with a sulfur-rich coordination sphere that, upon reduction, breaks an Fe-S bond and binds N2. The product is the first synthetic Fe-N2 complex in which iron has bonds to sulfur and carbon atoms, providing a model for N2 coordination in the FeMoco. Our results demonstrate that breaking an Fe-S bond is a chemically reasonable route to N2 binding in the FeMoco, and show structural and spectroscopic details for weakened N2 on a sulfur-rich iron site.

  18. Covalent binding of nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue in human serum albumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noort, D.; Hulst, A.G.; Jansen, R.

    2002-01-01

    Covalent binding of various clinically important nitrogen mustards to the cysteine-34 residue of human serum albumin, in vitro and in vivo, is demonstrated. A rapid method for detection of these adducts is presented, based on liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of the adducted

  19. Characterization of a viral phosphoprotein binding site on the surface of the respiratory syncytial nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloux, Marie; Tarus, Bogdan; Blazevic, Ilfad; Fix, Jenna; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Eléouët, Jean-François

    2012-08-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome is composed of a negative-sense single-stranded RNA that is tightly associated with the nucleoprotein (N). This ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex is the template for replication and transcription by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. RNP recognition by the viral polymerase involves a specific interaction between the C-terminal domain of the phosphoprotein (P) (P(CTD)) and N. However, the P binding region on N remains to be identified. In this study, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays were used to identify the N-terminal core domain of HRSV N (N(NTD)) as a P binding domain. A biochemical characterization of the P(CTD) and molecular modeling of the N(NTD) allowed us to define four potential candidate pockets on N (pocket I [PI] to PIV) as hydrophobic sites surrounded by positively charged regions, which could constitute sites complementary to the P(CTD) interaction domain. The role of selected amino acids in the recognition of the N-RNA complex by P was first screened for by site-directed mutagenesis using a polymerase activity assay, based on an HRSV minigenome containing a luciferase reporter gene. When changed to Ala, most of the residues of PI were found to be critical for viral RNA synthesis, with the R132A mutant having the strongest effect. These mutations also reduced or abolished in vitro and in vivo P-N interactions, as determined by GST pulldown and immunoprecipitation experiments. The pocket formed by these residues is critical for P binding to the N-RNA complex, is specific for pneumovirus N proteins, and is clearly distinct from the P binding sites identified so far for other nonsegmented negative-strand viruses.

  20. Identification of metal ion binding sites based on amino acid sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoyong; Zhang, Xiaojin; Gao, Sujuan; Ding, Changjiang; Feng, Yonge; Bao, Weihua

    2017-01-01

    The identification of metal ion binding sites is important for protein function annotation and the design of new drug molecules. This study presents an effective method of analyzing and identifying the binding residues of metal ions based solely on sequence information. Ten metal ions were extracted from the BioLip database: Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, Na+, K+ and Co2+. The analysis showed that Zn2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Co2+ were sensitive to the conservation of amino acids at binding sites, and promising results can be achieved using the Position Weight Scoring Matrix algorithm, with an accuracy of over 79.9% and a Matthews correlation coefficient of over 0.6. The binding sites of other metals can also be accurately identified using the Support Vector Machine algorithm with multifeature parameters as input. In addition, we found that Ca2+ was insensitive to hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity information and Mn2+ was insensitive to polarization charge information. An online server was constructed based on the framework of the proposed method and is freely available at http://60.31.198.140:8081/metal/HomePage/HomePage.html. PMID:28854211

  1. Involvement of batrachotoxin binding sites in ginsenoside-mediated voltage-gated Na+ channel regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Choi, Sun-Hye; Yoon, In-Soo; Shin, Tae-Joon; Pyo, Mi Kyung; Lee, Sang-Mok; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2008-04-08

    Recently, we showed that the 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3), an active ingredient of Panax ginseng, inhibits rat brain NaV1.2 channel peak currents (INa). Batrachotoxin (BTX) is a steroidal alkaloid neurotoxin and activates NaV channels through interacting with transmembrane domain-I-segment 6 (IS6) of channels. Recent report shows that ginsenoside inhibits BTX binding in rat brain membrane fractions. However, it needs to be confirmed whether biochemical mechanism is relevant physiologically and which residues of the BTX binding sites are important for ginsenoside regulations. Here, we demonstrate that mutations of BTX binding sites such as N418K and L421K of rat brain NaV1.2 and L437K of mouse skeletal muscle NaV1.4 channel reduce or abolish Rg3 inhibition of I(Na) and attenuate Rg3-mediated depolarizing shift of the activation voltage and use-dependent inhibition. These results indicate that BTX binding sites play an important role in modifying Rg3-mediated Na+ channel properties.

  2. A-site residues move independently from P-site residues in all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 70S bacterial ribosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relly Brandman

    Full Text Available The ribosome is a large macromolecular machine, and correlated motion between residues is necessary for coordinating function across multiple protein and RNA chains. We ran two all-atom, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations of the bacterial ribosome and calculated correlated motion between residue pairs by using mutual information. Because of the short timescales of our simulation (ns, we expect that dynamics are largely local fluctuations around the crystal structure. We hypothesize that residues that show coupled dynamics are functionally related, even on longer timescales. We validate our model by showing that crystallographic B-factors correlate well with the entropy calculated as part of our mutual information calculations. We reveal that A-site residues move relatively independently from P-site residues, effectively insulating A-site functions from P-site functions during translation.

  3. Binding Sites for Amyloid-β Oligomers and Synaptic Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Levi M.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), insoluble and fibrillary amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulates in plaques. However, soluble Aβ oligomers are most potent in creating synaptic dysfunction and loss. Therefore, receptors for Aβ oligomers are hypothesized to be the first step in a neuronal cascade leading to dementia. A number of cell-surface proteins have been described as Aβ binding proteins, and one or more are likely to mediate Aβ oligomer toxicity in AD. Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a high-affinity Aβ oligomer binding site, and a range of data delineates a signaling pathway leading from Aβ complexation with PrPC to neuronal impairment. Further study of Aβ binding proteins will define the molecular basis of this crucial step in AD pathogenesis. PMID:27940601

  4. The Pattern of microRNA Binding Site Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-RNA (miRNA or miR regulates at least 60% of the genes in the human genome through their target sites at mRNA 3’-untranslated regions (UTR, and defects in miRNA expression regulation and target sites are frequently observed in cancers. We report here a systematic analysis of the distribution of miRNA target sites. Using the evolutionarily conserved miRNA binding sites in the TargetScan database (release 7.1, we constructed a miRNA co-regulation network by connecting genes sharing common miRNA target sites. The network possesses characteristics of the ubiquitous small-world network. Non-hub genes in the network—those sharing miRNA target sites with small numbers of genes—tend to form small cliques with their neighboring genes, while hub genes exhibit high levels of promiscuousness in their neighboring genes. Additionally, miRNA target site distribution is extremely uneven. Among the miRNAs, the distribution concentrates on a small number of miRNAs, in that their target sites occur in an extraordinarily large number of genes, that is, they have large numbers of target genes. The distribution across the genes follows a similar pattern; the mRNAs of a small proportion of the genes contain extraordinarily large numbers of miRNA binding sites. Quantitatively, the patterns fit into the P(K ∝ K−α relationship (P(K: the number of miRNAs with K target genes or genes with K miRNA sites; α: a positive constant, the mathematical description of connection distribution among the nodes and a defining characteristic of the so-called scale-free networks—a subset of small-world networks. Notably, well-known tumor-suppressive miRNAs (Let-7, miR-15/16, 26, 29, 31, 34, 145, 200, 203–205, 223, and 375 collectively have more than expected target genes, and well-known cancer genes contain more than expected miRNA binding sites. In summary, miRNA target site distribution exhibits characteristics of the small-world network. The potential to use this

  5. Dissecting the role of the ϕ29 terminal protein DNA binding residues in viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguera, Isabel; Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Salas, Margarita

    2015-03-11

    Phage ϕ29 DNA replication takes place by a protein-priming mechanism in which the viral DNA polymerase catalyses the covalent linkage of the initiating nucleotide to a specific serine residue of the terminal protein (TP). The N-terminal domain of the ϕ29 TP has been shown to bind to the host DNA in a sequence-independent manner and this binding is essential for the TP nucleoid localisation and for an efficient viral DNA replication in vivo. In the present work we have studied the involvement of the TP N-terminal domain residues responsible for DNA binding in the different stages of viral DNA replication by assaying the in vitro activity of purified TP N-terminal mutant proteins. The results show that mutation of TP residues involved in DNA binding affects the catalytic activity of the DNA polymerase in initiation, as the Km for the initiating nucleotide is increased when these mutant proteins are used as primers. Importantly, this initiation defect was relieved by using the ϕ29 double-stranded DNA binding protein p6 in the reaction, which decreased the Km of the DNA polymerase for dATP about 130-190 fold. Furthermore, the TP N-terminal domain was shown to be required both for a proper interaction with the DNA polymerase and for an efficient viral DNA amplification. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Mutational Mapping and Modeling of the Binding Site for (S)-Citalopram in the Human Serotonin Transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Olsen, Lars; Hansen, Kasper B.

    2010-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) regulates extracellular levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) in the brain by facilitating uptake of released 5-hydroxytryptamine into neuronal cells. SERT is the target for widely used antidepressant drugs, including imipramine, fluoxetine......, and (S)-citalopram, which are competitive inhibitors of the transport function. Knowledge of the molecular details of the antidepressant binding sites in SERT has been limited due to lack of structural data on SERT. Here, we present a characterization of the (S)-citalopram binding pocket in human SERT (h...... is functionally relevant from studying the effects of 64 point mutations around the putative substrate binding site. The mutational mapping also identify novel hSERT residues that are crucial for (S)-citalopram binding. The model defines the molecular determinants for (S)-citalopram binding to h...

  7. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Archundia, Marlet; Cordomi, Arnau; Garriga, Pere; Perez, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS). Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand. PMID:22500107

  8. Molecular Modeling of the M3 Acetylcholine Muscarinic Receptor and Its Binding Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlet Martinez-Archundia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the results of a combined computational and site mutagenesis study designed to provide new insights into the orthosteric binding site of the human M3 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor. For this purpose a three-dimensional structure of the receptor at atomic resolution was built by homology modeling, using the crystallographic structure of bovine rhodopsin as a template. Then, the antagonist N-methylscopolamine was docked in the model and subsequently embedded in a lipid bilayer for its refinement using molecular dynamics simulations. Two different lipid bilayer compositions were studied: one component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC and two-component palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylcholine/palmitoyl-oleyl phosphatidylserine (POPC-POPS. Analysis of the results suggested that residues F222 and T235 may contribute to the ligand-receptor recognition. Accordingly, alanine mutants at positions 222 and 235 were constructed, expressed, and their binding properties determined. The results confirmed the role of these residues in modulating the binding affinity of the ligand.

  9. Single aromatic residue location alters nucleic acid binding and chaperone function of FIV nucleocapsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Wei; Naiyer, Nada; Fichtenbaum, Eric; Qualley, Dominic F.; McCauley, Micah J.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C.

    2014-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a retrovirus that infects domestic cats, and is an excellent animal model for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. The nucleocapsid (NC) protein is critical for replication in both retroviruses. FIV NC has several structural features that differ from HIV-1 NC. While both NC proteins have a single conserved aromatic residue in each of the two zinc fingers, the aromatic residue on the second finger of FIV NC is located on the opposite C-terminal side relative to its location in HIV-1 NC. In addition, whereas HIV-1 NC has a highly charged cationic N-terminal tail and a relatively short C-terminal extension, the opposite is true for FIV NC. To probe the impact of these differences on the nucleic acid (NA) binding and chaperone properties of FIV NC, we carried out ensemble and single-molecule assays with wild-type (WT) and mutant proteins. The ensemble studies show that FIV NC binding to DNA is strongly electrostatic, with a higher effective charge than that observed for HIV-1 NC. The C-terminal basic domain contributes significantly to the NA binding capability of FIV NC. In addition, the non-electrostatic component of DNA binding is much weaker for FIV NC than for HIV-1 NC. Mutation of both aromatic residues in the zinc fingers to Ala (F12A/W44A) further increases the effective charge of FIV NC and reduces its non-electrostatic binding affinity. Interestingly, switching the location of the C-terminal aromatic residue to mimic the HIV-1 NC sequence (N31W/W44A) reduces the effective charge of FIV NC and increases its non-electrostatic binding affinity to values similar to HIV-1 NC. Consistent with the results of these ensemble studies, single-molecule DNA stretching studies show that while WT FIV NC has reduced stacking capability relative to HIV-1 NC, the aromatic switch mutant recovers the ability to intercalate between the DNA bases. Our results demonstrate that altering the position of a single aromatic

  10. Visualization of specific binding sites of benzodiazepine in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotoh, H.; Yamasaki, T.; Inoue, O.; Itoh, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Tateno, Y.; Ikehira, H.

    1986-01-01

    Using 11C-labeled Ro15-1788 and positron emission tomography, studies of benzodiazepine binding sites in the human brain were performed on four normal volunteers. Rapid and high accumulation of 11C activity was observed in the brain after i.v. injection of [11C]Ro15-1788, the maximum of which was within 12 min. Initial distribution of 11C activity in the brain was similar to the distribution of the normal cerebral blood flow. Ten minutes after injection, however, a high uptake of 11C activity was observed in the cerebral cortex and moderate uptake was seen in the cerebellar cortex, the basal ganglia, and the thalamus. The accumulation of 11C activity was low in the brain stem. This distribution of 11C activity was approximately parallel to the known distribution of benzodiazepine receptors. Saturation experiments were performed on four volunteers with oral administration of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg of cold Ro15-1788 prior to injection. Initial distribution of 11C activity following injection peaked within 2 min and then the accumulation of 11C activity decreased rapidly and remarkably throughout the brain. The results indicated that [11C] Ro15-1788 associates and dissociates to specific and nonspecific binding sites rapidly and has a high ratio of specific receptor binding to nonspecific binding in vivo. Carbon-11 Ro15-1788 is a suitable radioligand for the study of benzodiazepine receptors in vivo in humans

  11. Scoring functions for transcription factor binding site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friberg Markus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction is a difficult problem, which requires a good scoring function to discriminate between real binding sites and background noise. Many scoring functions have been proposed in the literature, but it is difficult to assess their relative performance, because they are implemented in different software tools using different search methods and different TFBS representations. Results Here we compare how several scoring functions perform on both real and semi-simulated data sets in a common test environment. We have also developed two new scoring functions and included them in the comparison. The data sets are from the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome. Our new scoring function LLBG (least likely under the background model performs best in this study. It achieves the best average rank for the correct motifs. Scoring functions based on positional bias performed quite poorly in this study. Conclusion LLBG may provide an interesting alternative to current scoring functions for TFBS prediction.

  12. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was effici...... peptide-MHC complexes may have broad significance in the biology of T cell responses, including generation of the T cell repertoire, the specificity of mixed lymphocyte responses, and the immune surveillance of self and nonself antigens in peripheral lymphoid tissues.......Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...

  13. New binding site on common molecular scaffold provides HERG channel specificity of scorpion toxin BeKm-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korolkova, Yuliya V; Bocharov, Eduard V; Angelo, Kamilla

    2002-01-01

    The scorpion toxin BeKm-1 is unique among a variety of known short scorpion toxins affecting potassium channels in its selective action on ether-a-go-go-related gene (ERG)-type channels. BeKm-1 shares the common molecular scaffold with other short scorpion toxins. The toxin spatial structure...... resolved by NMR consists of a short alpha-helix and a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. By toxin mutagenesis study we identified the residues that are important for the binding of BeKm-1 to the human ERG K+ (HERG) channel. The most critical residues (Tyr-11, Lys-18, Arg-20, Lys-23) are located...... in the alpha-helix and following loop whereas the "traditional" functional site of other short scorpion toxins is formed by residues from the beta-sheet. Thus the unique location of the binding site of BeKm-1 provides its specificity toward the HERG channel....

  14. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen, E-mail: mohsenshahlaei@yahoo.com [Nano drug delivery research Center, Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi, Behnoosh [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Student research committee, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadrjavadi, Komail [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol{sup −1} and −25.52±11.52 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val{sub 216}, Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} and polar residues such as Glu{sub 354} play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu{sub 327}, Ala{sub 350} as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10{sup 4} M{sup −1} at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I.

  15. Probing of possible olanzapine binding site on human serum albumin: Combination of spectroscopic methods and molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Rahimi, Behnoosh; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Sadrjavadi, Komail; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA)-drug binding affinity is one of the major factors that determine the pharmacokinetics, halftime and bioavailability of drugs in various tissues. In the present study, the interaction of olanzapine (OLZ), a thienobenzodiazepine drug, administered for the treatment of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, with HSA has been studied using spectroscopic methods such as ultraviolet absorbance, fluorescence and FTIR combined with computational procedures. Analyzing of the Stern–Volmer quenching data showed only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10 4 M −1 at 298 K. Thermodynamic analyses showed enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°) were 28.03±3.42 kJ mol −1 and −25.52±11.52 J mol −1 K −1 , respectively. Molecular docking results suggested the hydrophobic residues such as Val 216 , Leu 327 , Ala 350 and polar residues such as Glu 354 play an important role in the drug binding. Decrement in α-helix content of the protein upon OLZ binding was also confirmed by evidences provided by molecular dynamics simulation as well as FTIR spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Leu 327 , Ala 350 as well as hydrophilic residues of HSA play an important role in the binding reaction. • The drug has only one primary binding site on HSA with a binding constant of 4.12×10 4 M −1 at 298 K. • The drug binds near to site I

  16. The next generation of transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Mathelier

    Full Text Available Finding where transcription factors (TFs bind to the DNA is of key importance to decipher gene regulation at a transcriptional level. Classically, computational prediction of TF binding sites (TFBSs is based on basic position weight matrices (PWMs which quantitatively score binding motifs based on the observed nucleotide patterns in a set of TFBSs for the corresponding TF. Such models make the strong assumption that each nucleotide participates independently in the corresponding DNA-protein interaction and do not account for flexible length motifs. We introduce transcription factor flexible models (TFFMs to represent TF binding properties. Based on hidden Markov models, TFFMs are flexible, and can model both position interdependence within TFBSs and variable length motifs within a single dedicated framework. The availability of thousands of experimentally validated DNA-TF interaction sequences from ChIP-seq allows for the generation of models that perform as well as PWMs for stereotypical TFs and can improve performance for TFs with flexible binding characteristics. We present a new graphical representation of the motifs that convey properties of position interdependence. TFFMs have been assessed on ChIP-seq data sets coming from the ENCODE project, revealing that they can perform better than both PWMs and the dinucleotide weight matrix extension in discriminating ChIP-seq from background sequences. Under the assumption that ChIP-seq signal values are correlated with the affinity of the TF-DNA binding, we find that TFFM scores correlate with ChIP-seq peak signals. Moreover, using available TF-DNA affinity measurements for the Max TF, we demonstrate that TFFMs constructed from ChIP-seq data correlate with published experimentally measured DNA-binding affinities. Finally, TFFMs allow for the straightforward computation of an integrated TF occupancy score across a sequence. These results demonstrate the capacity of TFFMs to accurately model DNA

  17. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates.We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data.Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct-interaction detection and TFBS-discovery accuracy. We estimated the accuracy

  18. Heterodimer Binding Scaffolds Recognition via the Analysis of Kinetically Hot Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perišić, Ognjen

    2018-03-16

    Physical interactions between proteins are often difficult to decipher. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm that is designed to recognize binding patches and supporting structural scaffolds of interacting heterodimer proteins using the Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The recognition is based on the (self) adjustable identification of kinetically hot residues and their connection to possible binding scaffolds. The kinetically hot residues are residues with the lowest entropy, i.e., the highest contribution to the weighted sum of the fastest modes per chain extracted via GNM. The algorithm adjusts the number of fast modes in the GNM's weighted sum calculation using the ratio of predicted and expected numbers of target residues (contact and the neighboring first-layer residues). This approach produces very good results when applied to dimers with high protein sequence length ratios. The protocol's ability to recognize near native decoys was compared to the ability of the residue-level statistical potential of Lu and Skolnick using the Sternberg and Vakser decoy dimers sets. The statistical potential produced better overall results, but in a number of cases its predicting ability was comparable, or even inferior, to the prediction ability of the adjustable GNM approach. The results presented in this paper suggest that in heterodimers at least one protein has interacting scaffold determined by the immovable, kinetically hot residues. In many cases, interacting proteins (especially if being of noticeably different sizes) either behave as a rigid lock and key or, presumably, exhibit the opposite dynamic behavior. While the binding surface of one protein is rigid and stable, its partner's interacting scaffold is more flexible and adaptable.

  19. Form, symmetry and packing of biomacromolecules. III. Antigenic, receptor and contact binding sites in picornaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, A

    2011-03-01

    The relation between serotype differentiation and crystallographic symmetry, revealed by the contact fingerprint diagrams investigated in Part II [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 312-326] for the human rhinovirus, is extended to the Picornaviridae family. The approach, outlined in Part I [Janner (2010). Acta Cryst. A66, 301-311] and Part II for biomacromolecules packed in a crystal and based on concepts such as packing lattice, kissing points and crystal-packing parameters, can directly be applied to the picornaviruses. In particular, the contact fingerprint diagrams of 20 different virus strains have been derived. In these cases, as for the rhinovirus, these diagrams are serotype/strain specific, justifying the name fingerprint. The molecular basis for the serotype variability, and the associated conservation requirements, is usually analysed by considering antigenic sites, where capsid residues bind with antibodies, and receptor sites, where other residues bind with molecular receptors of the host cell membrane. Both the antigenic variation and the receptor conservation allow repeated infection of the host cells of the given animals. The graphical description of these sites is usually done by footprints and roadmap diagrams, mapping properties of the capsid surface and using the icosahedral symmetry of the capsid. The alternative fingerprint diagrammatic description, based on the crystal symmetry, adopted in Part II for the contact sites, where a capsid is bound to the next one in the crystal packing, is extended to the antigenic and receptor binding sites. Again, the antigenic/receptor fingerprints are specific, at least for the nine picornaviruses investigated so far, despite the more than a factor of ten larger coarse graining with respect to the corresponding footprint and roadmap diagrams. The latter are based on a grid spacing of about 2 Å, whereas the spacing implied by the packing-lattice approximation adopted in fingerprints varies typically from 20 to

  20. Requirement for an A-tract structure at the binding site of phage phi 29 transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuez, B; Rojo, F; Salas, M

    1994-03-25

    The Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 transcriptional activator, protein p4, binds to the 5'-AACT-TTTT-15 base-pair spacer-AAAATGTT-3' inverted repeat. In this communication, we study the influence in protein p4 binding of the DNA helical structure within the protein p4 recognition sequences, 5'-AAAATAG-3'. Protein p4 could efficiently bind to a modified target in which the A-tracts had been changed into T-tracts (a different sequence with a similar structure). Binding was lost when the structure of the binding site was modified by an interrupting C residue. The results suggest that the DNA helical structure of the A-tracts is critical for p4 binding. Two models are described that would explain how protein p4 recognized its target sequences on the DNA.

  1. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of human serum albumin binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artali, Roberto; Bombieri, Gabriella; Calabi, Luisella; Del Pra, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    A 2.0 ns unrestrained Molecular Dynamics was used to elucidate the geometric and dynamic properties of the HSA binding sites. The structure is not stress affected and the rmsds calculated from the published crystallographic data are almost constant for all the simulation time, with an averaged value of 2.4A. The major variability is in the C-terminus region. The trajectory analysis of the IIA binding site put in evidence fast oscillations for the Cgamma@Leu203...Cgamma@Leu275 and Cgamma@Leu219...Cgamma@Leu260 distances, with fluctuations around 250 ps, 1000 ps and over for the first, while the second is smoothly increasing with the simulation time from 7 to 10A. These variations are consistent with a volume increase up to 20% confirmed by the inter-domain contacts analysis, in particular for the pair O@Pro148...Ogamma@Ser283, representing the change of distance between IB-h9 and IIA-h6, O@Glu149...Ogamma@Ser189 for sub-domains IB-h9/IIA-h1 and N@Val339...Odelta2@Asp447 sub-domains IIB-h9/IIIA-h1. These inter-domain motions confirm the flexibility of the unfatted HSA with possible binding site pre-formation.

  3. Engineering of specific uranyl-coordination sites in the calcium-binding motif of Calmodulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beccia, M.; Pardoux, R.; Sauge-Merle, S.; Bremond, N.; Lemaire, D.; Berthomieu, C.; Delangle, P.; Guilbaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Characterization of heavy metals interactions with proteins is fundamental for understanding the molecular factors and mechanisms governing ions toxicity and speciation in cells. This line of research will also help in developing new molecules able to selectively and efficiently bind toxic metal ions, which could find application for bio-detection or bioremediation purposes. We have used the regulatory calcium-binding protein Calmodulin (CaM) from A. thaliana as a structural model and, starting from it, we have designed various mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. We have analysed thermodynamics of uranyl ion binding to both sites I and II of CaM N-terminal domain and we have identified structural factors governing this interaction. Selectivity for uranyl ion has been tested by studying reactions of the investigated peptides with Ca 2+ , in the same conditions used for UO 2 2+ . Spectro-fluorimetric titrations and FTIR analysis have shown that the affinity for uranyl increases by phosphorylation of a threonine in site I, especially approaching the physiological pH, where the phospho-threonine side chain is deprotonated. Based on structural models obtained by Molecular Dynamics, we tested the effect of a two residues deletion on site I properties. We obtained an almost two orders of magnitude increase in affinity for uranyl, with a sub-nanomolar dissociation constant for the uranyl complex with the non phosphorylated peptide, and an improved uranyl/calcium selectivity. Allosteric effects depending on Ca 2+ and UO 2 2+ binding have been investigated by comparing thermodynamic parameters obtained for mutants having both sites I and II able to chelate metal ions with those of mutants consisting of just one active site

  4. Structural insights into substrate and inhibitor binding sites in human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis-Ballester, Ariel; Pham, Khoa N.; Batabyal, Dipanwita; Karkashon, Shay; Bonanno, Jeffrey B.; Poulos, Thomas L.; Yeh, Syun-Ru (Einstein); (UCI)

    2017-11-22

    Human indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (hIDO1) is an attractive cancer immunotherapeutic target owing to its role in promoting tumoral immune escape. However, drug development has been hindered by limited structural information. Here, we report the crystal structures of hIDO1 in complex with its substrate, Trp, an inhibitor, epacadostat, and/or an effector, indole ethanol (IDE). The data reveal structural features of the active site (Sa) critical for substrate activation; in addition, they disclose a new inhibitor-binding mode and a distinct small molecule binding site (Si). Structure-guided mutation of a critical residue, F270, to glycine perturbs the Si site, allowing structural determination of an inhibitory complex, where both the Sa and Si sites are occupied by Trp. The Si site offers a novel target site for allosteric inhibitors and a molecular explanation for the previously baffling substrate-inhibition behavior of the enzyme. Taken together, the data open exciting new avenues for structure-based drug design.

  5. Evidence that Asn542 of neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11) is involved in binding of the P2' residue of substrates and inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, N; Le Moual, H; Fournié-Zaluski, M C; Roques, B P; Crine, P; Boileau, G

    1995-01-01

    Neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11) is a Zn2+ metallopeptidase involved in the degradation of biologically active peptides, e.g. enkephalins and atrial natriuretic peptide. The substrate specificity and catalytic activity of neprilysin resemble those of thermolysin, a crystallized bacterial Zn2+ metalloprotease. Despite little overall homology between the primary structures of thermolysin and neprilysin, many of the amino acid residues involved in catalysis, as well as Zn2+ and substrate binding, are highly conserved. Most of the active-site residues of neprilysin have their homologues in thermolysin and have been characterized by site-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, hydrophobic cluster analysis has revealed some other analogies between the neprilysin and thermolysin sequences [Benchetrit, Bissery, Mornon, Devault, Crine and Roques (1988) Biochemistry 27, 592-596]. According to this analysis the role of Asn542 in the neprilysin active site is analogous to that of Asn112 of thermolysin, which is to bind the substrate. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to change Asn542 to Gly or Gln residues. The effect of these mutations on substrate catalysis and inhibitor binding was examined with a series of thiorphan-like compounds containing various degrees of methylation at the P2' residue. For both mutated enzymes, determination of kinetic parameters with [D-Ala2,Leu5]enkephalin as substrate showed that the large decrease in activity was attributable to an increase in Km (14-16-fold) whereas kcat values were only slightly affected (2-3-fold decrease). This is in agreement with Asn542 being involved in substrate binding rather than directly in catalysis. Finally, the IC50 values for thiorphan and substituted thiorphans strongly suggest that Asn542 of neprilysin binds the substrate on the amino side of the P2' residue by formation of a unique hydrogen bond. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7487905

  6. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  7. Chromatin immunoprecipitation to analyze DNA binding sites of HMGA2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Winter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HMGA2 is an architectonic transcription factor abundantly expressed during embryonic and fetal development and it is associated with the progression of malignant tumors. The protein harbours three basically charged DNA binding domains and an acidic protein binding C-terminal domain. DNA binding induces changes of DNA conformation and hence results in global overall change of gene expression patterns. Recently, using a PCR-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment procedure two consensus sequences for HMGA2 binding have been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this investigation chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments and bioinformatic methods were used to analyze if these binding sequences can be verified on chromatin of living cells as well. CONCLUSION: After quantification of HMGA2 protein in different cell lines the colon cancer derived cell line HCT116 was chosen for further ChIP experiments because of its 3.4-fold higher HMGA2 protein level. 49 DNA fragments were obtained by ChIP. These fragments containing HMGA2 binding sites have been analyzed for their AT-content, location in the human genome and similarities to sequences generated by a SELEX study. The sequences show a significantly higher AT-content than the average of the human genome. The artificially generated SELEX sequences and short BLAST alignments (11 and 12 bp of the ChIP fragments from living cells show similarities in their organization. The flanking regions are AT-rich, whereas a lower conservation is present in the center of the sequences.

  8. Phospholipid-binding Sites of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog (PTEN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yang; Stec, Boguslaw; Redfield, Alfred G.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Roberts, Mary F.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid phosphatase activity of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is enhanced by the presence of its biological product, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2). This enhancement is suggested to occur via the product binding to the N-terminal region of the protein. PTEN effects on short-chain phosphoinositide 31P linewidths and on the full field dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation rate (measured by high resolution field cycling 31P NMR using spin-labeled protein) are combined with enzyme kinetics with the same short-chain phospholipids to characterize where PI(4,5)P2 binds on the protein. The results are used to model a discrete site for a PI(4,5)P2 molecule close to, but distinct from, the active site of PTEN. This PI(4,5)P2 site uses Arg-47 and Lys-13 as phosphate ligands, explaining why PTEN R47G and K13E can no longer be activated by that phosphoinositide. Placing a PI(4,5)P2 near the substrate site allows for proper orientation of the enzyme on interfaces and should facilitate processive catalysis. PMID:25429968

  9. Identification of sugar residues involved in the binding of TGEV to porcine brush border membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Coronaviruses most often infect the respiratory or intestinal tract. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a group 1 coronavirus, infects the porcine small intestine. Piglets up to the age of 3 weeks die from diarrhea caused by the viral gastroenteritis unless they are protected by antibodies. In addition to the cellular receptor, porcine aminopeptidase N, the TGEV spike protein binds to sialic acid residues. We have shown that the sialic acid binding activity mediates the binding of TGEV to a mucin-like glycoprotein present in porcine brush border membranes. This was shown by performing a virus overlay binding assay with proteins obtained from brush border membranes by lectin precipitation. Because of the reactivity with specific lectins we assume that the recognized glycoprotein has the characteristics of a mucin.

  10. PiRaNhA: A server for the computational prediction of RNA-binding residues in protein sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yoichi; Spriggs, Ruth V; Nakamura, Haruki; Jones, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The PiRaNhA web server is a publicly available online resource that automatically predicts the location of RNA-binding residues (RBRs) in protein sequences. The goal of functional annotation of sequences in the field of RNA binding is to provide predictions of high accuracy that require only small numbers of targeted mutations for verification. The PiRaNhA server uses a support vector machine (SVM), with position-specific scoring matrices, residue interface propensity, predicted residue acces...

  11. Use of Functional Polymorphisms To Elucidate the Peptide Binding Site of TAP Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jie; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Raghavan, Malini

    2015-10-01

    TAP1/TAP2 complexes translocate peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen to enable immune surveillance by CD8(+) T cells. Peptide transport is preceded by peptide binding to a cytosol-accessible surface of TAP1/TAP2 complexes, but the location of the TAP peptide-binding pocket remains unknown. Guided by the known contributions of polymorphic TAP variants to peptide selection, we combined homology modeling of TAP with experimental measurements to identify several TAP residues that interact with peptides. Models for peptide-TAP complexes were generated, which indicate bent conformation for peptides. The peptide binding site of TAP is located at the hydrophobic boundary of the cytosolic membrane leaflet, with striking parallels to the glutathione binding site of NaAtm1, a transporter that functions in bacterial heavy metal detoxification. These studies illustrate the conservation of the ligand recognition modes of bacterial and mammalians transporters involved in peptide-guided cellular surveillance. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Batrachotoxin, Pyrethroids, and BTG 502 Share Overlapping Binding Sites on Insect Sodium ChannelsS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Garden, Daniel; Khambay, Bhupinder; Zhorov, Boris S.

    2011-01-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX), a steroidal alkaloid, and pyrethroid insecticides bind to distinct but allosterically coupled receptor sites on voltage-gated sodium channels and cause persistent channel activation. BTX presumably binds in the inner pore, whereas pyrethroids are predicted to bind at the lipid-exposed cavity formed by the short intracellular linker-helix IIS4-S5 and transmembrane helices IIS5 and IIIS6. The alkylamide insecticide (2E,4E)-N-(1,2-dimethylpropyl)-6-(5-bromo-2-naphthalenyl)-2,4-hexadienamide (BTG 502) reduces sodium currents and antagonizes the action of BTX on cockroach sodium channels, suggesting that it also binds inside the pore. However, a pyrethroid-sensing residue, Phe3i17 in IIIS6, which does not face the pore, is essential for the activity of BTG 502 but not for BTX. In this study, we found that three additional deltamethrin-sensing residues in IIIS6, Ile3i12, Gly3i14, and Phe3i16 (the latter two are also BTX-sensing), and three BTX-sensing residues, Ser3i15 and Leu3i19 in IIIS6 and Phe4i15 in IVS6, are all critical for BTG 502 action on cockroach sodium channels. Using these data as constraints, we constructed a BTG 502 binding model in which BTG 502 wraps around IIIS6, probably making direct contacts with all of the above residues on the opposite faces of the IIIS6 helix, except for the putative gating hinge Gly3i14. BTG 502 and its inactive analog DAP 1855 antagonize the action of deltamethrin. The antagonism was eliminated by mutations of Ser3i15, Phe3i17, Leu3i19, and Phe4i15 but not by mutations of Ile3i12, Gly3i14, and Phe3i16. Our analysis revealed a unique mode of action of BTG 502, its receptor site overlapping with those of both BTX and deltamethrin. PMID:21680776

  13. Batrachotoxin, pyrethroids, and BTG 502 share overlapping binding sites on insect sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yuzhe; Garden, Daniel; Khambay, Bhupinder; Zhorov, Boris S; Dong, Ke

    2011-09-01

    Batrachotoxin (BTX), a steroidal alkaloid, and pyrethroid insecticides bind to distinct but allosterically coupled receptor sites on voltage-gated sodium channels and cause persistent channel activation. BTX presumably binds in the inner pore, whereas pyrethroids are predicted to bind at the lipid-exposed cavity formed by the short intracellular linker-helix IIS4-S5 and transmembrane helices IIS5 and IIIS6. The alkylamide insecticide (2E,4E)-N-(1,2-dimethylpropyl)-6-(5-bromo-2-naphthalenyl)-2,4-hexadienamide (BTG 502) reduces sodium currents and antagonizes the action of BTX on cockroach sodium channels, suggesting that it also binds inside the pore. However, a pyrethroid-sensing residue, Phe(3i17) in IIIS6, which does not face the pore, is essential for the activity of BTG 502 but not for BTX. In this study, we found that three additional deltamethrin-sensing residues in IIIS6, Ile(3i12), Gly(3i14), and Phe(3i16) (the latter two are also BTX-sensing), and three BTX-sensing residues, Ser(3i15) and Leu(3i19) in IIIS6 and Phe(4i15) in IVS6, are all critical for BTG 502 action on cockroach sodium channels. Using these data as constraints, we constructed a BTG 502 binding model in which BTG 502 wraps around IIIS6, probably making direct contacts with all of the above residues on the opposite faces of the IIIS6 helix, except for the putative gating hinge Gly(3i14). BTG 502 and its inactive analog DAP 1855 antagonize the action of deltamethrin. The antagonism was eliminated by mutations of Ser(3i15), Phe(3i17), Leu(3i19), and Phe(4i15) but not by mutations of Ile(3i12), Gly(3i14), and Phe(3i16). Our analysis revealed a unique mode of action of BTG 502, its receptor site overlapping with those of both BTX and deltamethrin.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of zinc binding to cysteines in a peptide mimic of the alcohol dehydrogenase structural zinc site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Erik G; Hellgren, Mikko; Brinck, Tore; Bergman, Tomas; Edholm, Olle

    2009-02-14

    The binding of zinc (Zn) ions to proteins is important for many cellular events. The theoretical and computational description of this binding (as well as that of other transition metals) is a challenging task. In this paper the binding of the Zn ion to four cysteine residues in the structural site of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) is studied using a synthetic peptide mimic of this site. The study includes experimental measurements of binding constants, classical free energy calculations from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical (QM) electron structure calculations. The classical MD results account for interactions at the molecular level and reproduce the absolute binding energy and the hydration free energy of the Zn ion with an accuracy of about 10%. This is insufficient to obtain correct free energy differences. QM correction terms were calculated from density functional theory (DFT) on small clusters of atoms to include electronic polarisation of the closest waters and covalent contributions to the Zn-S coordination bond. This results in reasonably good agreement with the experimentally measured binding constants and Zn ion hydration free energies in agreement with published experimental values. The study also includes the replacement of one cysteine residue to an alanine. Simulations as well as experiments showed only a small effect of this upon the binding free energy. A detailed analysis indicate that the sulfur is replaced by three water molecules, thereby changing the coordination number of Zn from four (as in the original peptide) to six (as in water).

  15. Prediction of Carbohydrate Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces with 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Keng-Chang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Peng, Hung-Pin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chen, Jun-Bo; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate molecular targeting in many biological processes. Prediction of non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces not only provides insights into the functions of the query proteins; information on key carbohydrate-binding residues could suggest site-directed mutagenesis experiments, design therapeutics targeting carbohydrate-binding proteins, and provide guidance in engineering protein-carbohydrate interactions. In this work, we show that non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces can be predicted with relatively high accuracy when the query protein structures are known. The prediction capabilities were based on a novel encoding scheme of the three-dimensional probability density maps describing the distributions of 36 non-covalent interacting atom types around protein surfaces. One machine learning model was trained for each of the 30 protein atom types. The machine learning algorithms predicted tentative carbohydrate binding sites on query proteins by recognizing the characteristic interacting atom distribution patterns specific for carbohydrate binding sites from known protein structures. The prediction results for all protein atom types were integrated into surface patches as tentative carbohydrate binding sites based on normalized prediction confidence level. The prediction capabilities of the predictors were benchmarked by a 10-fold cross validation on 497 non-redundant proteins with known carbohydrate binding sites. The predictors were further tested on an independent test set with 108 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) for the independent test was 0.45, with prediction precision and sensitivity (or recall) of 0.45 and 0.49 respectively. In addition, 111 unbound carbohydrate-binding protein structures for which the structures were determined in the absence of the carbohydrate ligands were predicted with the trained predictors. The overall

  16. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  17. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. (Univ. of Sydney, New South Wales (Australia)); Nicoletti, G. (Royal Melbourne Inst. of Tech. (Australia)); Holan, G. (CSIRO, Melbourne (Australia))

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  18. Lack of conventional oxygen-linked proton and anion binding sites does not impair allosteric regulation of oxygen binding in dwarf caiman hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Storz, Jay F.; Gorr, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to other vertebrate hemoglobins (Hbs) whose high intrinsic O2 affinities are reduced by red cell allosteric effectors (mainly protons, CO2, organic phosphates, and chloride ions), crocodilian Hbs exhibit low sensitivity to organic phosphates and high sensitivity to bicarbonate (HCO3−), which is believed to augment Hb-O2 unloading during diving and postprandial alkaline tides when blood HCO3− levels and metabolic rates increase. Examination of α- and β-globin amino acid sequences of dwarf caiman (Paleosuchus palpebrosus) revealed a unique combination of substitutions at key effector binding sites compared with other vertebrate and crocodilian Hbs: β82Lys→Gln, β143His→Val, and β146His→Tyr. These substitutions delete positive charges and, along with other distinctive changes in residue charge and polarity, may be expected to disrupt allosteric regulation of Hb-O2 affinity. Strikingly, however, P. palpebrosus Hb shows a strong Bohr effect, and marked deoxygenation-linked binding of organic phosphates (ATP and DPG) and CO2 as carbamate (contrasting with HCO3− binding in other crocodilians). Unlike other Hbs, it polymerizes to large complexes in the oxygenated state. The highly unusual properties of P. palpebrosus Hb align with a high content of His residues (potential sites for oxygenation-linked proton binding) and distinctive surface Cys residues that may form intermolecular disulfide bridges upon polymerization. On the basis of its singular properties, P. palpebrosus Hb provides a unique opportunity for studies on structure-function coupling and the evolution of compensatory mechanisms for maintaining tissue O2 delivery in Hbs that lack conventional effector-binding residues. PMID:23720132

  19. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  20. Pocketome: an encyclopedia of small-molecule binding sites in 4D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The importance of binding site plasticity in protein-ligand interactions is well-recognized, and so are the difficulties in predicting the nature and the degree of this plasticity by computational means. To assist in understanding the flexible protein-ligand interactions, we constructed the Pocketome, an encyclopedia of about one thousand experimentally solved conformational ensembles of druggable binding sites in proteins, grouped by location and consistent chain/cofactor composition. The multiplicity of pockets within the ensembles adds an extra, fourth dimension to the Pocketome entry data. Within each ensemble, the pockets were carefully classified by the degree of their pairwise similarity and compatibility with different ligands. The core of the Pocketome is derived regularly and automatically from the current releases of the Protein Data Bank and the Uniprot Knowledgebase; this core is complemented by entries built from manually provided seed ligand locations. The Pocketome website (www.pocketome.org) allows searching for the sites of interest, analysis of conformational clusters, important residues, binding compatibility matrices and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web browser plugin. The Pocketome collection can be used to build multi-conformational docking and 3D activity models as well as to design cross-docking and virtual ligand screening benchmarks.

  1. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kratochwil Nicole A

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Results By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. Conclusion From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor

  2. The binding site for neohesperidin dihydrochalcone at the human sweet taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnig, Marcel; Bufe, Bernd; Kratochwil, Nicole A; Slack, Jay P; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2007-10-12

    Differences in sweet taste perception among species depend on structural variations of the sweet taste receptor. The commercially used isovanillyl sweetener neohesperidin dihydrochalcone activates the human but not the rat sweet receptor TAS1R2+TAS1R3. Analysis of interspecies combinations and chimeras of rat and human TAS1R2+TAS1R3 suggested that the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 is crucial for the activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. By mutational analysis combined with functional studies and molecular modeling we identified a set of different amino acid residues within the heptahelical domain of human TAS1R3 that forms the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding pocket. Sixteen amino acid residues in the transmembrane domains 2 to 7 and one in the extracellular loop 2 of hTAS1R3 influenced the receptor's response to neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Some of these seventeen residues are also part of the binding sites for the sweetener cyclamate or the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. In line with this observation, lactisole inhibited activation of the sweet receptor by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate competitively, whereas receptor activation by aspartame, a sweetener known to bind to the N-terminal domain of TAS1R2, was allosterically inhibited. Seven of the amino acid positions crucial for activation of hTAS1R2+hTAS1R3 by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone are thought to play a role in the binding of allosteric modulators of other class C GPCRs, further supporting our model of the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone pharmacophore. From our data we conclude that we identified the neohesperidin dihydrochalcone binding site at the human sweet taste receptor, which overlaps with those for the sweetener cyclamate and the sweet taste inhibitor lactisole. This readily delivers a molecular explanation of our finding that lactisole is a competitive inhibitor of the receptor activation by neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and cyclamate. Some

  3. An Aromatic Cap Seals the Substrate Binding Site in an ECF-Type S Subunit for Riboflavin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jinmei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2016-06-13

    ECF transporters are a family of active membrane transporters for essential micronutrients, such as vitamins and trace metals. Found exclusively in archaea and bacteria, these transporters are composed of four subunits: an integral membrane substrate-binding subunit (EcfS), a transmembrane coupling subunit (EcfT), and two ATP-binding cassette ATPases (EcfA and EcfA'). We have characterized the structural basis of substrate binding by the EcfS subunit for riboflavin from Thermotoga maritima, TmRibU. TmRibU binds riboflavin with high affinity, and the protein–substrate complex is exceptionally stable in solution. The crystal structure of riboflavin-bound TmRibU reveals an electronegative binding pocket at the extracellular surface in which the substrate is completely buried. Analysis of the intermolecular contacts indicates that nearly every available substrate hydrogen bond is satisfied. A conserved aromatic residue at the extracellular end of TM5, Tyr130, caps the binding site to generate a substrate-bound, occluded state, and non-conservative mutation of Tyr130 reduces the stability of this conformation. Using a novel fluorescence binding assay, we find that an aromatic residue at this position is essential for high-affinity substrate binding. Comparison with other S subunit structures suggests that TM5 and Loop5-6 contain a dynamic, conserved motif that plays a key role in gating substrate entry and release by S subunits of ECF transporters.

  4. The selectivity of the Na(+)/K(+)-pump is controlled by binding site protonation and self-correcting occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Huan; Artigas, Pablo; Roux, Benoît

    2016-08-04

    The Na(+)/K(+)-pump maintains the physiological K(+) and Na(+) electrochemical gradients across the cell membrane. It operates via an 'alternating-access' mechanism, making iterative transitions between inward-facing (E1) and outward-facing (E2) conformations. Although the general features of the transport cycle are known, the detailed physicochemical factors governing the binding site selectivity remain mysterious. Free energy molecular dynamics simulations show that the ion binding sites switch their binding specificity in E1 and E2. This is accompanied by small structural arrangements and changes in protonation states of the coordinating residues. Additional computations on structural models of the intermediate states along the conformational transition pathway reveal that the free energy barrier toward the occlusion step is considerably increased when the wrong type of ion is loaded into the binding pocket, prohibiting the pump cycle from proceeding forward. This self-correcting mechanism strengthens the overall transport selectivity and protects the stoichiometry of the pump cycle.

  5. On-site treatment and landfilling of MSWI air pollution control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundtorp, Kasper; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are difficult to landfill due to substantial leaching of trace metals. An on-site pretreatment prior to landfilling of APC-residues was investigated in terms of bench-scale experiments with a semidry APC-residue a......Air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) are difficult to landfill due to substantial leaching of trace metals. An on-site pretreatment prior to landfilling of APC-residues was investigated in terms of bench-scale experiments with a semidry APC...

  6. Photoaffinity labeling with cholesterol analogues precisely maps a cholesterol-binding site in voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelier, Melissa M; Cheng, Wayland W L; Bergdoll, Lucie; Chen, Zi-Wei; Janetka, James W; Abramson, Jeff; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F; Whitelegge, Julian P; Evers, Alex S

    2017-06-02

    Voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC1) is a highly regulated β-barrel membrane protein that mediates transport of ions and metabolites between the mitochondria and cytosol of the cell. VDAC1 co-purifies with cholesterol and is functionally regulated by cholesterol, among other endogenous lipids. Molecular modeling studies based on NMR observations have suggested five cholesterol-binding sites in VDAC1, but direct experimental evidence for these sites is lacking. Here, to determine the sites of cholesterol binding, we photolabeled purified mouse VDAC1 (mVDAC1) with photoactivatable cholesterol analogues and analyzed the photolabeled sites with both top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and bottom-up MS paired with a clickable, stable isotope-labeled tag, FLI -tag. Using cholesterol analogues with a diazirine in either the 7 position of the steroid ring (LKM38) or the aliphatic tail (KK174), we mapped a binding pocket in mVDAC1 localized to Thr 83 and Glu 73 , respectively. When Glu 73 was mutated to a glutamine, KK174 no longer photolabeled this residue, but instead labeled the nearby Tyr 62 within this same binding pocket. The combination of analytical strategies employed in this work permits detailed molecular mapping of a cholesterol-binding site in a protein, including an orientation of the sterol within the site. Our work raises the interesting possibility that cholesterol-mediated regulation of VDAC1 may be facilitated through a specific binding site at the functionally important Glu 73 residue. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The equivalent of a thallium binding residue from an archeal homolog controls cation interactions in brain glutamate transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichman, Shlomit; Qu, Shaogang; Kanner, Baruch I

    2009-08-25

    Glutamate transporters maintain low synaptic concentrations of neurotransmitter by coupling uptake to flux of other ions. Their transport cycle consists of two separate translocation steps, namely cotransport of glutamic acid with three Na(+) followed by countertransport of K(+). Two Tl(+) binding sites, presumed to serve as sodium sites, were observed in the crystal structure of a related archeal homolog and the side chain of a conserved aspartate residue contributed to one of these sites. We have mutated the corresponding residue of the eukaryotic glutamate transporters GLT-1 and EAAC1 to asparagine, serine, and cysteine. Remarkably, these mutants exhibited significant sodium-dependent radioactive acidic amino acid uptake when expressed in HeLa cells. Reconstitution experiments revealed that net uptake by the mutants in K(+)-loaded liposomes was impaired. However, with Na(+) and unlabeled L-aspartate inside the liposomes, exchange levels were around 50-90% of those by wild-type. In further contrast to wild-type, where either substrate or K(+) stimulated the anion conductance by the transporter, substrate but not K(+) modulated the anion conductance of the mutants expressed in oocytes. Both with wild-type EAAC1 and EAAC1-D455N, not only sodium but also lithium could support radioactive acidic amino acid uptake. In contrast, with D455S and D455C, radioactive uptake was only observed in the presence of sodium. Thus the conserved aspartate is required for transporter-cation interactions in each of the two separate translocation steps and likely participates in an overlapping sodium and potassium binding site.

  8. Identification in the mu-opioid receptor of cysteine residues responsible for inactivation of ligand binding by thiol alkylating and reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibelet, G; Capeyrou, R; Dietrich, G; Emorine, L J

    1997-05-19

    Inactivation by thiol reducing and alkylating agents of ligand binding to the human mu-opioid receptor was examined. Dithiothreitol reduced the number of [3H]diprenorphine binding sites. Replacement by seryl residues of either C142 or C219 in extracellular loops 1 and 2 of the mu receptor resulted in a complete loss of opioid binding. A disulfide bound linking C142 to C219 may thus be essential to maintain a functional conformation of the receptor. We also demonstrated that inactivation of ligand binding upon alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide occurred at two sites. Alteration of the more sensitive (IC50 = 20 microM) did not modify antagonists binding but decreased agonist affinity almost 10-fold. Modification of the less reactive site (IC50 = 2 mM) decreased the number of both agonist and antagonist binding sites. The alkylation site of higher sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide was shown by mutagenesis experiments to be constituted of both C81 and C332 in transmembrane domains 1 and 7 of the mu-opioid receptor.

  9. Mutational analysis of the high-affinity zinc binding site validates a refined human dopamine transporter homology model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stockner

    Full Text Available The high-resolution crystal structure of the leucine transporter (LeuT is frequently used as a template for homology models of the dopamine transporter (DAT. Although similar in structure, DAT differs considerably from LeuT in a number of ways: (i when compared to LeuT, DAT has very long intracellular amino and carboxyl termini; (ii LeuT and DAT share a rather low overall sequence identity (22% and (iii the extracellular loop 2 (EL2 of DAT is substantially longer than that of LeuT. Extracellular zinc binds to DAT and restricts the transporter's movement through the conformational cycle, thereby resulting in a decrease in substrate uptake. Residue H293 in EL2 praticipates in zinc binding and must be modelled correctly to allow for a full understanding of its effects. We exploited the high-affinity zinc binding site endogenously present in DAT to create a model of the complete transmemberane domain of DAT. The zinc binding site provided a DAT-specific molecular ruler for calibration of the model. Our DAT model places EL2 at the transporter lipid interface in the vicinity of the zinc binding site. Based on the model, D206 was predicted to represent a fourth co-ordinating residue, in addition to the three previously described zinc binding residues H193, H375 and E396. This prediction was confirmed by mutagenesis: substitution of D206 by lysine and cysteine affected the inhibitory potency of zinc and the maximum inhibition exerted by zinc, respectively. Conversely, the structural changes observed in the model allowed for rationalizing the zinc-dependent regulation of DAT: upon binding, zinc stabilizes the outward-facing state, because its first coordination shell can only be completed in this conformation. Thus, the model provides a validated solution to the long extracellular loop and may be useful to address other aspects of the transport cycle.

  10. Three complement-like repeats compose the complete alpha2-macroglobulin binding site in the second ligand binding cluster of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2006-11-10

    Given the importance of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) as an essential endocytosis and signaling receptor for many protein ligands, and of alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2M)-proteinase complexes as one such set of ligands, an understanding of the specificity of their interaction with LRP is an important goal. A starting point is the known role of the 138-residue receptor binding domain (RBD) in binding to LRP. Previous studies have localized high affinity alpha2M binding to the eight complement repeat (CR)-containing cluster 2 of LRP. In the present study we have identified the minimum CR domains that constitute the full binding site for RBD and, hence, for alpha2M on LRP. We report on the ability of the triple construct of CR3-4-5 to bind RBD with an affinity (Kd = 130 nM) the same as for isolated RBD to intact LRP. This Kd is 30-fold smaller than for RBD to CR5-6-7, demonstrating the specificity of the interaction with CR3-4-5. Binding requires previously identified critical lysine residues but is almost pH-independent within the range of pH values encountered between extracellular and internal compartments, consistent with an earlier proposed model of intracellular ligand displacement by intramolecular YWTD domains. The present findings suggest a model to explain the ability of LRP to bind a wide range of structurally unrelated ligands in which a nonspecific ligand interaction with the acidic region present in most CR domains is augmented by interactions with other CR surface residues that are unique to a particular CR cluster.

  11. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  12. Binding-site specificity of the radiolytically induced crosslinking of phenylalanine to glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Mee, L.K.; Adelstein, S.J.; Taub, I.A.

    1984-01-01

    The γ-radiation-induced crosslinking of phenylalanine to glucagon, mediated by OH, has been shown to involve a limited number of binding sites on the glucagon molecule. Glucagon-phenylalanine adducts were partially separated from other radiolysis products with Sephadex gel filtration; further isolation of adducts was achieved with reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HLPC). Amino acid analysis of the isolated adducts indicates that the aromatic residues (phenylalanine and tyrosine), basic residues (histidine and lysine), and sulfur-containing residue (methionine) of glucagon are predominantly involved in crosslinking; these are essentially the same residues implicated in glucagon-glucagon crosslinking. Acid hydrolysates and chymotryptic digests of glucagon-phenylalanine adducts were examined with HPLC. The number of amino acid-phenylalanine adducts and also chymotryptic peptides observed was much greater than would have been expected based on the amino acid analysis. This observation is best accounted for by the involvement in crosslinking of radicals formed on the glucagon with more than one possible phenylalanine-derived free radical

  13. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  14. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  15. RH421 binds into the ATP-binding site on the Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huličiak, Miroslav; Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Kubala, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The Na + /K + -ATPase plays a key role in ion transport across the plasma membrane of all animal cells. The voltage-sensitive styrylpyrimidium dye RH421 has been used in several laboratories for monitoring of Na + /K + -ATPase kinetics. It is known, that RH421 can interact with the enzyme and it can influence its activity at micromolar concentrations, but structural details of this interaction are only poorly understood. Experiments with isolated large cytoplasmic loop (C45) of Na + /K + -ATPase revealed that RH421 can interact with this part of the protein with dissociation constant 1μM. The Trp-to-RH421 FRET performed on six single-tryptophan mutants revealed that RH421 binds directly into the ATP-binding site. This conclusion was further supported by results from molecular docking, site-directed mutagenesis and by competitive experiments using ATP. Experiments with C45/DPPC mixture revealed that RH421 can bind to both C45 and lipids, but only the former interaction was influenced by the presence of ATP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  17. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme

  18. Structural model of a putrescine-cadaverine permease from Trypanosoma cruzi predicts residues vital for transport and ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soysa, Radika; Venselaar, Hanka; Poston, Jacqueline; Ullman, Buddy; Hasne, Marie-Pierre

    2013-06-15

    The TcPOT1.1 gene from Trypanosoma cruzi encodes a high affinity putrescine-cadaverine transporter belonging to the APC (amino acid/polyamine/organocation) transporter superfamily. No experimental three-dimensional structure exists for any eukaryotic member of the APC family, and thus the structural determinants critical for function of these permeases are unknown. To elucidate the key residues involved in putrescine translocation and recognition by this APC family member, a homology model of TcPOT1.1 was constructed on the basis of the atomic co-ordinates of the Escherichia coli AdiC arginine/agmatine antiporter crystal structure. The TcPOT1.1 homology model consisted of 12 transmembrane helices with the first ten helices organized in two V-shaped antiparallel domains with discontinuities in the helical structures of transmembrane spans 1 and 6. The model suggests that Trp241 and a Glu247-Arg403 salt bridge participate in a gating system and that Asn245, Tyr148 and Tyr400 contribute to the putrescine-binding pocket. To test the validity of the model, 26 site-directed mutants were created and tested for their ability to transport putrescine and to localize to the parasite cell surface. These results support the robustness of the TcPOT1.1 homology model and reveal the importance of specific aromatic residues in the TcPOT1.1 putrescine-binding pocket.

  19. Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Binding Sites in the Brain: Regulation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Rochelle D.; Kellar, Kenneth J.

    1983-04-01

    Tritiated acetylcholine was used to measure binding sites with characteristics of nicotinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain. Regulation of the binding sites in vivo was examined by administering two drugs that stimulate nicotinic receptors directly or indirectly. After 10 days of exposure to the cholinesterase inhibitor diisopropyl fluorophosphate, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cerebral cortex was decreased. However, after repeated administration of nicotine for 10 days, binding of tritiated acetylcholine in the cortex was increased. Saturation analysis of tritiated acetylcholine binding in the cortices of rats treated with diisopropyl fluorophosphate or nicotine indicated that the number of binding sites decreased and increased, respectively, while the affinity of the sites was unaltered.

  20. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara (UECE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  1. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T.; Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S.; Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  2. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  3. Multidrug ABC transporter Cdr1 of Candida albicans harbors specific and overlapping binding sites for human steroid hormones transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghel, Pratima; Rawal, Manpreet Kaur; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Chaptal, Vincent; Falson, Pierre; Prasad, Rajendra

    2017-10-01

    The present study examines the kinetics of steroids efflux mediated by the Candida drug resistance protein 1 (Cdr1p) and evaluates their interaction with the protein. We exploited our in-house mutant library for targeting the 252 residues forming the twelve transmembrane helices (TMHs) of Cdr1p. The screening revealed 65 and 58 residues critical for β-estradiol and corticosterone transport, respectively. Notably, up to 83% critical residues for corticosterone face the lipid interface compared to 54% for β-estradiol. Molecular docking identified a possible peripheral corticosterone-binding site made of 8/14 critical/non-critical residues between TMHs 3, 4 and 6. β-estradiol transport was severely hampered by alanine replacements of Cdr1p core residues involving TMHs 2, 5 and 8, in a binding site made of 10/14 critical residues mainly shared with rhodamine 6G with which it competes. By contrast, TMH11 was poorly impacted, although being part of the core domain. Finally, we observed the presence of several contiguous stretches of 3-5 critical residues in TMHs 2, 5 and 10 that points to a rotation motion of these helices during the substrate transport cycle. The selective structural arrangement of the steroid-binding pockets in the core region and at the lipid-TMD interface, which was never reported before, together with the possible rotation of some TMHs may be the structural basis of the drug-transport mechanism achieved by these type II ABC transporters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific ligand binding domain residues confer low dioxin responsiveness to AHR1β of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, Camila; Holzman, Sarah A; Denison, Michael S; Fraccalvieri, Domenico; Bonati, Laura; Franks, Diana G; Hahn, Mark E; Powell, Wade H

    2013-03-12

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) family protein that mediates the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in vertebrates. Frogs are remarkably insensitive to TCDD, and AHRs from Xenopus laevis bind TCDD with low affinity. We sought to identify structural features of X. laevis AHR1β associated with low TCDD sensitivity. Substitution of the entire ligand binding domain (LBD) with the corresponding sequence from mouse AHR(b-1) dramatically increased TCDD responsiveness in transactivation assays. To identify the amino acid residues responsible, we constructed a comparative model of the AHR1β LBD using homologous domains of PAS proteins HIF2α and ARNT. The model revealed an internal cavity with dimensions similar to those of the putative binding cavity of mouse AHR(b-1), suggesting the importance of side chain interactions over cavity size. Of residues with side chains clearly pointing into the cavity, only two differed from the mouse sequence. When A354, located within a conserved β-strand, was changed to serine, the corresponding mouse residue, the EC50 for TCDD decreased more than 15-fold. When N325 was changed to serine, the EC50 decreased 3-fold. When the mutations were combined, the EC50 decreased from 18.6 to 0.8 nM, the value nearly matching the TCDD sensitivity of mouse AHR. Velocity sedimentation analysis confirmed that mutant frog AHRs exhibited correspondingly increased levels of TCDD binding. We also assayed mutant AHRs for responsiveness to a candidate endogenous ligand, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ). Mutations that increased sensitivity to TCDD also increased sensitivity to FICZ. This comparative study represents a novel approach to discerning fundamental information about the structure of AHR and its interactions with biologically important agonists.

  5. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the selenium-binding and reducing site in Arabidopsis thaliana homologue to mammals selenium-binding protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Florie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Palencia, Andrés; Cobessi, David; Sarret, Géraldine; Zubieta, Chloé; Jourdain, Agnès; Dumas, Renaud; Forge, Vincent; Testemale, Denis; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2014-11-14

    The function of selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1), present in almost all organisms, has not yet been established. In mammals, SBP1 is known to bind the essential element selenium but the binding site has not been identified. In addition, the SBP family has numerous potential metal-binding sites that may play a role in detoxification pathways in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtSBP1 over-expression increases tolerance to two toxic compounds for plants, selenium and cadmium, often found as soil pollutants. For a better understanding of AtSBP1 function in detoxification mechanisms, we investigated the chelating properties of the protein toward different ligands with a focus on selenium using biochemical and biophysical techniques. Thermal shift assays together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that AtSBP1 binds selenium after incubation with selenite (SeO3(2-)) with a ligand to protein molar ratio of 1:1. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry and revealed an unexpectedly large value of binding enthalpy suggesting a covalent bond between selenium and AtSBP1. Titration of reduced Cys residues and comparative mass spectrometry on AtSBP1 and the purified selenium-AtSBP1 complex identified Cys(21) and Cys(22) as being responsible for the binding of one selenium. These results were validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Selenium K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy performed on the selenium-AtSBP1 complex demonstrated that AtSBP1 reduced SeO3(2-) to form a R-S-Se(II)-S-R-type complex. The capacity of AtSBP1 to bind different metals and selenium is discussed with respect to the potential function of AtSBP1 in detoxification mechanisms and selenium metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  7. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  8. Tentative identification of the second substrate binding site in Arabidopsis phytochelatin synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Chen Chia

    Full Text Available Phytochelatin synthase (PCS uses the substrates glutathione (GSH, γGlu-Cys-Gly and a cadmium (Cd-bound GSH (Cd∙GS2 to produce the shortest phytochelatin product (PC2, (γGlu-Cys2-Gly through a ping-pong mechanism. The binding of the 2 substrates to the active site, particularly the second substrate binding site, is not well-understood. In this study, we generated a structural model of the catalytic domain of Arabidopsis AtPCS1 (residues 12-218 by using the crystal structure of the γGlu-Cys acyl-enzyme complex of the PCS of the cyanobacterium Nostoc (NsPCS as a template. The modeled AtPCS1 revealed a cavity in proximity to the first substrate binding site, consisting of 3 loops containing several conserved amino acids including Arg152, Lys185, and Tyr55. Substitutions of these amino acids (R152K, K185R, or double mutation resulted in the abrogation of enzyme activity, indicating that the arrangement of these 2 positive charges is crucial for the binding of the second substrate. Recombinant AtPCS1s with mutations at Tyr55 showed lower catalytic activities because of reduced affinity (3-fold for Y55W for the Cd∙GS2, further suggesting the role of the cation-π interaction in recognition of the second substrate. Our study results indicate the mechanism for second substrate recognition in PCS. The integrated catalytic mechanism of PCS is further discussed.

  9. Vitamin B12 Inhibits Tau Fibrillization via Binding to Cysteine Residues of Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee, Saharnaz; Asadollahi, Kazem; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2017-12-20

    Two mechanisms underlie the inhibitory/acceleratory action of chemical compounds on tau aggregation including the regulation of cellular kinases and phosphatases activity and direct binding to tau protein. Vitamin B12 is one of the tau polymerization inhibitors, and its deficiency is linked to inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequently hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein. Regarding the structure and function of vitamin B12 and tau protein, we assumed that vitamin B12 is also able to directly bind to tau protein. Hence, we investigated the interaction of vitamin B12 with tau protein in vitro using fluorometry and circular dichrosim. Interaction studies was followed by investigation into the effect of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation using ThT fluorescence, circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and SDS-PAGE. The results indicated that vitamin B12 interacts with tau protein and prevents fibrillization of tau protein. Blocking the cysteine residues of tau confirmed the cysteine-mediated binding of vitamin B12 to tau and showed that binding to cysteine is essential for inhibitory effect of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that vitamin B12 inhibits tau aggregation and that tau oligomers formed in the presence of vitamin B12 are mostly SDS-soluble. We propose that direct binding of vitamin B12 is another mechanism underlying the inhibitory role of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation and neurodegeneration.

  10. A 31-residue peptide induces aggregation of tau's microtubule-binding region in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhr, Jan; Wu, Haifan; Nick, Mimi; Wu, Yibing; Bhate, Manasi; Condello, Carlo; Johnson, Noah; Rodgers, Jeffrey; Lemmin, Thomas; Acharya, Srabasti; Becker, Julia; Robinson, Kathleen; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Gai, Feng; Stubbs, Gerald; Prusiner, Stanley B.; Degrado, William F.

    2017-09-01

    The self-propagation of misfolded conformations of tau underlies neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's. There is considerable interest in discovering the minimal sequence and active conformational nucleus that defines this self-propagating event. The microtubule-binding region, spanning residues 244-372, reproduces much of the aggregation behaviour of tau in cells and animal models. Further dissection of the amyloid-forming region to a hexapeptide from the third microtubule-binding repeat resulted in a peptide that rapidly forms fibrils in vitro. We show that this peptide lacks the ability to seed aggregation of tau244-372 in cells. However, as the hexapeptide is gradually extended to 31 residues, the peptides aggregate more slowly and gain potent activity to induce aggregation of tau244-372 in cells. X-ray fibre diffraction, hydrogen-deuterium exchange and solid-state NMR studies map the beta-forming region to a 25-residue sequence. Thus, the nucleus for self-propagating aggregation of tau244-372 in cells is packaged in a remarkably small peptide.

  11. Spectroscopic study of interaction between osthole and human serum albumin: Identification of possible binding site of the compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijari, Nooshin; Shokoohinia, Yalda; Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Ranjbar, Samira; Parvaneh, Shahram; Moieni-Arya, Maryam; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    The studies on the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and drugs have been an interesting research field in life science, chemistry and clinical medicine. Osthole possesses a variety of pharmacological activities including anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, anti-seizure, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-osteoporosis effects. The interaction of osthole with HSA and its binding site in HSA by spectroscopic methods is the subject of this work. By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of the single Trp 214 residue and performing site markers displacement measurements, the specific binding of osthole in the vicinity of Sudlow's site I of HSA has been clarified. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA after its complexation with ligand were studied with CD spectroscopy, which indicate that osthole induced only a slight decrease in the helix structural content of the protein. In addition, the mean distance between osthole and HSA fluorophores is estimated to be 4.96 nm using Föster's equation on the basis of the fluorescence energy transfer. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Osthole can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by dynamic quenching, and analysis of the thermodynamic parameters of binding showed that hydrophobic interactions play an important role in the stabilizing of the complex. Increase of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also observed upon the osthole binding. -- Highlights: • Hydrophobic interactions play an important role in osthole–HSA interaction. • Sudlow's I site is possible binding site of osthole. • Osthole inhibits esterase activity of HSA. • Osthole binding induces no gross protein structural changes

  12. Spectroscopic study of interaction between osthole and human serum albumin: Identification of possible binding site of the compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijari, Nooshin [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokoohinia, Yalda [Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafi-Kooshk, Mohammad Reza; Ranjbar, Samira; Parvaneh, Shahram [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moieni-Arya, Maryam [Student Research Committee, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khodarahmi, Reza, E-mail: rkhodarahmi@mbrc.ac.ir [Medical Biology Research Center, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The studies on the interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and drugs have been an interesting research field in life science, chemistry and clinical medicine. Osthole possesses a variety of pharmacological activities including anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, anti-seizure, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-osteoporosis effects. The interaction of osthole with HSA and its binding site in HSA by spectroscopic methods is the subject of this work. By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of the single Trp{sub 214} residue and performing site markers displacement measurements, the specific binding of osthole in the vicinity of Sudlow's site I of HSA has been clarified. The changes in the secondary structure of HSA after its complexation with ligand were studied with CD spectroscopy, which indicate that osthole induced only a slight decrease in the helix structural content of the protein. In addition, the mean distance between osthole and HSA fluorophores is estimated to be 4.96 nm using Föster's equation on the basis of the fluorescence energy transfer. Furthermore, the synchronous fluorescence spectra show that the microenvironment of the tryptophan residues does not have obvious changes. Osthole can quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by dynamic quenching, and analysis of the thermodynamic parameters of binding showed that hydrophobic interactions play an important role in the stabilizing of the complex. Increase of protein surface hydrophobicity (PSH) was also observed upon the osthole binding. -- Highlights: • Hydrophobic interactions play an important role in osthole–HSA interaction. • Sudlow's I site is possible binding site of osthole. • Osthole inhibits esterase activity of HSA. • Osthole binding induces no gross protein structural changes.

  13. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for 125 I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells

  14. EL_PSSM-RT: DNA-binding residue prediction by integrating ensemble learning with PSSM Relation Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiyun; Lu, Qin; Xu, Ruifeng; He, Yulan; Wang, Hongpeng

    2017-08-29

    Prediction of DNA-binding residue is important for understanding the protein-DNA recognition mechanism. Many computational methods have been proposed for the prediction, but most of them do not consider the relationships of evolutionary information between residues. In this paper, we first propose a novel residue encoding method, referred to as the Position Specific Score Matrix (PSSM) Relation Transformation (PSSM-RT), to encode residues by utilizing the relationships of evolutionary information between residues. PDNA-62 and PDNA-224 are used to evaluate PSSM-RT and two existing PSSM encoding methods by five-fold cross-validation. Performance evaluations indicate that PSSM-RT is more effective than previous methods. This validates the point that the relationship of evolutionary information between residues is indeed useful in DNA-binding residue prediction. An ensemble learning classifier (EL_PSSM-RT) is also proposed by combining ensemble learning model and PSSM-RT to better handle the imbalance between binding and non-binding residues in datasets. EL_PSSM-RT is evaluated by five-fold cross-validation using PDNA-62 and PDNA-224 as well as two independent datasets TS-72 and TS-61. Performance comparisons with existing predictors on the four datasets demonstrate that EL_PSSM-RT is the best-performing method among all the predicting methods with improvement between 0.02-0.07 for MCC, 4.18-21.47% for ST and 0.013-0.131 for AUC. Furthermore, we analyze the importance of the pair-relationships extracted by PSSM-RT and the results validates the usefulness of PSSM-RT for encoding DNA-binding residues. We propose a novel prediction method for the prediction of DNA-binding residue with the inclusion of relationship of evolutionary information and ensemble learning. Performance evaluation shows that the relationship of evolutionary information between residues is indeed useful in DNA-binding residue prediction and ensemble learning can be used to address the data imbalance

  15. Demonstration of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (/sup 3/H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for /sup 3/H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane.

  16. Demonstration of specific binding sites for 3H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for 3 H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol ( 3 H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for 3 H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for 3 H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane

  17. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.

    2006-01-01

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner

  18. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  19. L-[3H]glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, Deborah; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    The anatomical distribution of L-[ 3 H]glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-[ 3 H]glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of Ca 2+ , Cl - and Na + ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-[ 3 H]2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-[ 3 H]AP5), [ 3 H]kainate ([ 3 H]KA) and [ 3 H]α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ([ 3 H]AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.)

  20. Genome-wide prediction, display and refinement of binding sites with information theory-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeder J Steven

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present Delila-genome, a software system for identification, visualization and analysis of protein binding sites in complete genome sequences. Binding sites are predicted by scanning genomic sequences with information theory-based (or user-defined weight matrices. Matrices are refined by adding experimentally-defined binding sites to published binding sites. Delila-Genome was used to examine the accuracy of individual information contents of binding sites detected with refined matrices as a measure of the strengths of the corresponding protein-nucleic acid interactions. The software can then be used to predict novel sites by rescanning the genome with the refined matrices. Results Parameters for genome scans are entered using a Java-based GUI interface and backend scripts in Perl. Multi-processor CPU load-sharing minimized the average response time for scans of different chromosomes. Scans of human genome assemblies required 4–6 hours for transcription factor binding sites and 10–19 hours for splice sites, respectively, on 24- and 3-node Mosix and Beowulf clusters. Individual binding sites are displayed either as high-resolution sequence walkers or in low-resolution custom tracks in the UCSC genome browser. For large datasets, we applied a data reduction strategy that limited displays of binding sites exceeding a threshold information content to specific chromosomal regions within or adjacent to genes. An HTML document is produced listing binding sites ranked by binding site strength or chromosomal location hyperlinked to the UCSC custom track, other annotation databases and binding site sequences. Post-genome scan tools parse binding site annotations of selected chromosome intervals and compare the results of genome scans using different weight matrices. Comparisons of multiple genome scans can display binding sites that are unique to each scan and identify sites with significantly altered binding strengths

  1. Protein kinase Calpha contains two activator binding sites that bind phorbol esters and diacylglycerols with opposite affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S J; Ho, C; Kelly, M B; Larkin, J D; Taddeo, F J; Yeager, M D; Stubbs, C D

    1996-03-01

    Based on marked differences in the enzymatic properties of diacylglycerols compared with phorbol ester-activated protein kinase C (PKC), we recently proposed that activation induced by these compounds may not be equivalent (Slater, S. J., Kelly, M. B., Taddeo, F. J., Rubin, E., and Stubbs, C. D. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 17160-17165). In the present study, direct evidence is provided showing that phorbol esters and diacylglycerols bind simultaneously to PKC alpha. Using a novel binding assay employing the fluorescent phorbol ester, sapintoxin-D (SAPD), evidence for two sites of high and low affinity was obtained. Thus, both binding and activation dose-response curves for SAPD were double sigmoidal, which was also observed for dose-dependent activation by the commonly used phorbol ester, 4beta-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). TPA removed high affinity SAPD binding and also competed for the low affinity site. By contrast with TPA, low affinity binding of SAPD was inhibited by sn-1,2-dioleoylglycerol (DAG), while binding to the high affinity site was markedly enhanced. Again contrasting with both TPA and DAG, the potent PKC activator, bryostatin-I (B-I), inhibited SAPD binding to its high affinity site, while low affinity binding was unaffected. Based on these findings, a model for PKC activation is proposed in which binding of one activator to the low affinity site allosterically promotes binding of a second activator to the high affinity site, resulting in an enhanced level of activity. Overall, the results provide direct evidence that PKCalpha contains two distinct binding sites, with affinities that differ for each activator in the order: DAG > phorbol ester > B-I and B-I > phorbol ester > DAG, respectively.

  2. A sialic acid binding site in a human picornavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Zocher

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The picornaviruses coxsackievirus A24 variant (CVA24v and enterovirus 70 (EV70 cause continued outbreaks and pandemics of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC, a highly contagious eye disease against which neither vaccines nor antiviral drugs are currently available. Moreover, these viruses can cause symptoms in the cornea, upper respiratory tract, and neurological impairments such as acute flaccid paralysis. EV70 and CVA24v are both known to use 5-N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac for cell attachment, thus providing a putative link between the glycan receptor specificity and cell tropism and disease. We report the structures of an intact human picornavirus in complex with a range of glycans terminating in Neu5Ac. We determined the structure of the CVA24v to 1.40 Å resolution, screened different glycans bearing Neu5Ac for CVA24v binding, and structurally characterized interactions with candidate glycan receptors. Biochemical studies verified the relevance of the binding site and demonstrated a preference of CVA24v for α2,6-linked glycans. This preference can be rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations that show that α2,6-linked glycans can establish more contacts with the viral capsid. Our results form an excellent platform for the design of antiviral compounds to prevent AHC.

  3. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  4. Enhancer transcripts mark active estrogen receptor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Nasun; Murakami, Shino; Nagari, Anusha; Danko, Charles G; Kraus, W Lee

    2013-08-01

    We have integrated and analyzed a large number of data sets from a variety of genomic assays using a novel computational pipeline to provide a global view of estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1; a.k.a. ERα) enhancers in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Using this approach, we have defined a class of primary transcripts (eRNAs) that are transcribed uni- or bidirectionally from estrogen receptor binding sites (ERBSs) with an average transcription unit length of ∼3-5 kb. The majority are up-regulated by short treatments with estradiol (i.e., 10, 25, or 40 min) with kinetics that precede or match the induction of the target genes. The production of eRNAs at ERBSs is strongly correlated with the enrichment of a number of genomic features that are associated with enhancers (e.g., H3K4me1, H3K27ac, EP300/CREBBP, RNA polymerase II, open chromatin architecture), as well as enhancer looping to target gene promoters. In the absence of eRNA production, strong enrichment of these features is not observed, even though ESR1 binding is evident. We find that flavopiridol, a CDK9 inhibitor that blocks transcription elongation, inhibits eRNA production but does not affect other molecular indicators of enhancer activity, suggesting that eRNA production occurs after the assembly of active enhancers. Finally, we show that an enhancer transcription "signature" based on GRO-seq data can be used for de novo enhancer prediction across cell types. Together, our studies shed new light on the activity of ESR1 at its enhancer sites and provide new insights about enhancer function.

  5. The active site of a carbohydrate esterase displays divergent catalytic and noncatalytic binding functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Montanier

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional proteins, which play a critical role in many biological processes, have typically evolved through the recruitment of different domains that have the required functional diversity. Thus the different activities displayed by these proteins are mediated by spatially distinct domains, consistent with the specific chemical requirements of each activity. Indeed, current evolutionary theory argues that the colocalization of diverse activities within an enzyme is likely to be a rare event, because it would compromise the existing activity of the protein. In contrast to this view, a potential example of multifunctional recruitment into a single protein domain is provided by CtCel5C-CE2, which contains an N-terminal module that displays cellulase activity and a C-terminal module, CtCE2, which exhibits a noncatalytic cellulose-binding function but also shares sequence identity with the CE2 family of esterases. Here we show that, unlike other CE2 members, the CtCE2 domain displays divergent catalytic esterase and noncatalytic carbohydrate binding functions. Intriguingly, these diverse activities are housed within the same site on the protein. Thus, a critical component of the active site of CtCE2, the catalytic Ser-His dyad, in harness with inserted aromatic residues, confers noncatalytic binding to cellulose whilst the active site of the domain retains its esterase activity. CtCE2 catalyses deacetylation of noncellulosic plant structural polysaccharides to deprotect these substrates for attack by other enzymes. Yet it also acts as a cellulose-binding domain, which promotes the activity of the appended cellulase on recalcitrant substrates. The CE2 family encapsulates the requirement for multiple activities by biocatalysts that attack challenging macromolecular substrates, including the grafting of a second, powerful and discrete noncatalytic binding functionality into the active site of an enzyme. This article provides a rare example of

  6. Molecular mechanism of AMD3100 antagonism in the CXCR4 receptor: transfer of binding site to the CXCR3 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M; Gerlach, Lars-Ole; Jakobsen, Janus S

    2004-01-01

    , respectively. Metal ion binding in the cyclam rings of AMD3100 increased its dependence on Asp(262) and provided a tighter molecular map of the binding site, where borderline mutational hits became clear hits for the Zn(II)-loaded analog. The proposed binding site for AMD3100 was confirmed by a gradual build......-up in the rather distinct CXCR3 receptor, for which the compound normally had no effect. Introduction of only a Glu at position VII:06 and the removal of a neutralizing Lys residue at position VII:02 resulted in a 1000-fold increase in affinity of AMD3100 to within 10-fold of its affinity in CXCR4. We conclude...

  7. Characterization of actin and poly-L-proline binding sites of Acanthamoeba profilin with monoclonal antibodies and by mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, D A; Pollard, T D

    1996-02-16

    We characterized several deletion and substitution mutations of Acanthamoeba profilin and nine monoclonal antibodies to Acanthamoeba profilin. The results provide two independent lines of evidence about the binding sites for actin and poly-L-proline on the profilin molecule. This new evidence is consistent with the main conclusions about these binding sites from previous structural and mutagenic studies. Mutagenesis also revealed that the native structure of profilin is very sensitive to substitutions and deletions at the C terminus. For example, profilin with a deletion of the eight C-terminal residues has many of the physical properties of a molten globule, yet remarkably still binds to actin. This instability may account for the lack of function of similar mutants in yeast.

  8. SNBRFinder: A Sequence-Based Hybrid Algorithm for Enhanced Prediction of Nucleic Acid-Binding Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Yang

    Full Text Available Protein-nucleic acid interactions are central to various fundamental biological processes. Automated methods capable of reliably identifying DNA- and RNA-binding residues in protein sequence are assuming ever-increasing importance. The majority of current algorithms rely on feature-based prediction, but their accuracy remains to be further improved. Here we propose a sequence-based hybrid algorithm SNBRFinder (Sequence-based Nucleic acid-Binding Residue Finder by merging a feature predictor SNBRFinderF and a template predictor SNBRFinderT. SNBRFinderF was established using the support vector machine whose inputs include sequence profile and other complementary sequence descriptors, while SNBRFinderT was implemented with the sequence alignment algorithm based on profile hidden Markov models to capture the weakly homologous template of query sequence. Experimental results show that SNBRFinderF was clearly superior to the commonly used sequence profile-based predictor and SNBRFinderT can achieve comparable performance to the structure-based template methods. Leveraging the complementary relationship between these two predictors, SNBRFinder reasonably improved the performance of both DNA- and RNA-binding residue predictions. More importantly, the sequence-based hybrid prediction reached competitive performance relative to our previous structure-based counterpart. Our extensive and stringent comparisons show that SNBRFinder has obvious advantages over the existing sequence-based prediction algorithms. The value of our algorithm is highlighted by establishing an easy-to-use web server that is freely accessible at http://ibi.hzau.edu.cn/SNBRFinder.

  9. H-bonding networks of the distal residues and water molecules in the active site of Thermobifida fusca hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoletti, Francesco P; Droghetti, Enrica; Howes, Barry D; Bustamante, Juan P; Bonamore, Alessandra; Sciamanna, Natascia; Estrin, Darío A; Feis, Alessandro; Boffi, Alberto; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2013-09-01

    The ferric form of truncated hemoglobin II from Thermobifida fusca (Tf-trHb) and its triple mutant WG8F-YB10F-YCD1F at neutral and alkaline pH, and in the presence of CN(-) have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Tf-trHb contains three polar residues in the distal site, namely TrpG8, TyrCD1 and TyrB10. Whereas TrpG8 can act as a potential hydrogen-bond donor, the tyrosines can act as donors or acceptors. Ligand binding in heme-containing proteins is determined by a number of factors, including the nature and conformation of the distal residues and their capability to stabilize the heme-bound ligand via hydrogen-bonding and electrostatic interactions. Since both the RR Fe-OH(-) and Fe-CN(-) frequencies are very sensitive to the distal environment, detailed information on structural variations has been obtained. The hydroxyl ligand binds only the WT protein giving rise to two different conformers. In form 1 the anion is stabilized by H-bonds with TrpG8, TyrCD1 and a water molecule, in turn H-bonded to TyrB10. In form 2, H-bonding with TyrCD1 is mediated by a water molecule. Unlike the OH(-) ligand, CN(-) binds both WT and the triple mutant giving rise to two forms with similar spectroscopic characteristics. The overall results clearly indicate that H-bonding interactions both with distal residues and water molecules are important structural determinants in the active site of Tf-trHb. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of the interactions between GMF and Arp2/3 complex in two binding sites by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popinako, A; Antonov, M; Dibrova, D; Chemeris, A; Sokolova, O S

    2018-02-05

    The Arp2/3 complex plays a key role in nucleating actin filaments branching. The glia maturation factor (GMF) competes with activators for interacting with the Arp2/3 complex and initiates the debranching of actin filaments. In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of interactions between GMF and the Arp2/3 complex and identified new amino acid residues involved in GMF binding to the Arp2/3 complex at two separate sites, revealed by X-ray and single particle EM techniques. Using molecular dynamics simulations we demonstrated the quantitative and qualitative changes in hydrogen bonds upon binding with GMF. We identified the specific amino acid residues in GMF and Arp2/3 complex that stabilize the interactions and estimated the mean force profile for the GMF using umbrella sampling. Phylogenetic and structural analyses of the recently defined GMF binding site on the Arp3 subunit indicate a new mechanism for Arp2/3 complex inactivation that involves interactions between the Arp2/3 complex and GMF at two binding sites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A conserved chloramphenicol binding site at the entrance to the ribosomal peptide exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Long, Katherine S; Porse, Bo T

    2003-01-01

    , of E.coli 23S rRNA and G2084 (2058 in E.coli numbering) in domain V of H.halobium 23S rRNA. The modification sites overlap with a portion of the macrolide binding site and cluster at the entrance to the peptide exit tunnel. The data correlate with the recently reported chloramphenicol binding site...... on an archaeal ribosome and suggest that a similar binding site is present on the E.coli ribosome....

  12. Cholinergic, opioid and glycine receptor binding sites localized in human spinal cord by in vitro autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillberg, P.-G.; Aquilonius, S.-M.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites for the receptor ligands 3 H-quinuclidinylbenzilate, 3 H-alpha-bungarotoxin ( 3 H-alpha-Btx), 3 H-etorphine and 3 H-strychnine were localized autoradiographically at cervical, thoracic and lumbar levels of spinal cords from post-mortem human control subjects and subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The highest densities of muscarinic binding sites were found in the motor neuron areas and in the substantia gelatinosa, while the grey matter binding was very low within Clarke's column. Both 3 H-alpha-Btx and opioid receptor binding sites were numerous within the substantia gelatinosa, while glycine receptor binding sites were more uniformly distribute within the spinal grey matter. In ALS cases, muscarinic receptor binding sites were markedly reduced in motor neuron areas and slightly reduced in the dorsal horn, while the other binding sites studied were relatively unchanged. (author)

  13. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  14. A conformational heparan sulfate binding site essential to infectivity overlaps with the conserved hepatitis B virus a-determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureau, Camille; Salisse, Jessica

    2013-03-01

    Two determinants of infectivity have been identified in the hepatitis B virus (HBV) envelope proteins: a pre-S1 receptor-binding site and an uncharacterized determinant in the antigenic loop (AGL), which is structurally related to the antigenic a-determinant. Infection would proceed through virus attachment to cell surface heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (HSPGs) before pre-S1 engages a specific receptor for uptake. Using heparin binding and in vitro infection assays with hepatitis D virus as a surrogate for HBV, we established that HS binding is mediated by the AGL. Electrostatic interaction was shown to depend upon AGL residues R122 and K141, because their substitution with alanine modified the virus net-charge and prevented binding to heparin, attachment to hepatocytes, and infection. In addition to R122 and K141, the HS binding determinant was mapped to cysteines and prolines, which also define the conformational a-determinant. The importance of AGL conformation was further demonstrated by the concomitant loss of a-determinant and heparin binding upon treatment of viral particles with membrane-impermeable reducing agent. Furthermore, envelope proteins extracted from the viral membrane with a nonionic detergent were shown to conserve the a-determinant but to lose heparin affinity/avidity. Our findings support a model in which attachment of HBV to HSPGs is mediated by the AGL HS binding site, including only two positively charged residues (R122 and K141) positioned precisely in a three-dimensional AGL structure that is stabilized by disulfide bonds. HBV envelope proteins would individually bind to HS with low affinity, but upon their clustering in the viral membrane, they would reach sufficient avidity for a stable interaction between virus and cell surface HSPGs. Our data provide new insight into the HBV entry pathway, including the opportunity to design antivirals directed to the AGL-HS interaction. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of

  15. The hydrogen bonds between Arg423 and Glu472 and other key residues, Asp443, Ser477, and Pro489, are responsible for the formation and a different positioning of TNP-ATP and ATP within the nucleotide-binding site of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lánský, Zdeněk; Kubala, Martin; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Kutý, Michal; Plášek, J.; Teisinger, Jan; Schoner, W.; Amler, Evžen

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 26 (2004), s. 8303-8311 ISSN 0006-2960 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A141; GA ČR GP206/03/D082; GA ČR GA309/02/1479; GA ČR GD305/03/H148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100001; CEZ:MSM 111300002 Keywords : sodium pump * ATP-binding site * TNP-ATP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.008, year: 2004

  16. Osteopontin: A uranium phosphorylated binding-site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safi, Samir; Jeanson, Aurelie; Roques, Jerome; Simoni, Eric; Creff, Gaelle; Qi, Lei; Basset, Christian; Vidaud, Claude; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe the structural investigation of one possible uranyl binding site inside a non structured protein. This approach couples spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and theoretical calculations (DFT) and studies the interaction of uranyl ions with a phospho-peptide, thus mimicking a possible osteopontin (OPN) hydroxyapatite growth-inhibition site. Although thermodynamical aspects were investigated by using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the U L(III)-edge combined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. From the vibrational and fluorescence spectra, several structural models of a UO 2 2+ /peptide complex were developed and subsequently refined by using theoretical calculations to fit the experimental EXAFS obtained. The structural effect of the pH value was also considered under acidic to moderately acidic conditions (pH 1.5-5.5). Most importantly, the uranyl/peptide coordination environment was similar to that of the native protein. (authors)

  17. Anchor residue motifs of HLA class-I-binding peptides analyzed by the direct binding of synthetic peptides to HLA class I alpha chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruci, D; Rovero, P; Falasca, G; Chersi, A; Sorrentino, R; Butler, R; Tanigaki, N; Tosi, R

    1993-11-01

    The binding characteristics of the primary anchor residue motifs reported for HLA-A2 (A*0201, A*0205) and HLA-B27 (B*2705) alleles were investigated by a direct binding assay of the pertinent synthetic peptides to HLA class I alpha chains derived from a panel of HLA homozygous B-cell lines of various HLA phenotypes, including four A2 subtypes. The assay is based on a serologic detection of the conformational change of HLA class I alpha chains induced by binding to specific peptides in the presence of beta 2m. It is applicable to test a large number of HLA allelic products and synthetic peptides. Assay data confirmed the high allele specificity of the anchor residue motifs tested, but also revealed the intra- and interlocus cross-reactivity of these motifs. In the case of A2 anchor motifs, not only a broad cross-reactivity within the A2 subgroup, but also cross-reactivities with A24, A26, A28, and A29 were observed. With B27 anchor motifs, an interlocus cross-reactivity with A3 and A31 was seen. Several peptides, even though they carried A2 or B27 major anchor residue motifs, failed to bind to the relevant alpha chains, suggesting that the presence of a primary anchor residue motif is necessary for HLA class-I-peptide binding but is not by itself sufficient to guarantee binding.

  18. Active-site residues of procarboxypeptidase Y are accessible to chemical modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, S O; Winther, Jakob R.

    1994-01-01

    The accessibility of the active-site cleft of procarboxypeptidase Y from Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been studied by chemical modifications of two specific amino-acid residues. Previous studies have shown that these residues, Cys-341 and Met-398 in the mature enzyme, are located in the S1 and S'1...

  19. Dissecting water binding sites at protein-protein interfaces: a lesson from the atomic structures in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sunandan; Nithin, Chandran; Divakaruni, Yasaswi; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2018-04-04

    We dissect the protein-protein interfaces into water preservation (WP), water hydration (WH) and water dehydration (WD) sites by comparing the water-mediated hydrogen bonds (H-bond) in the bound and unbound states of the interacting subunits. Upon subunit complexation, if a H-bond between an interface water and a protein polar group is retained, we assign it as WP site; if it is lost, we assign it as WD site and if a new H-bond is created, we assign it as WH site. We find that the density of WD sites is highest followed by WH and WP sites except in antigen and (or) antibody complexes, where the density of WH sites is highest followed by WD and WP sites. Furthermore, we find that WP sites are the most conserved followed by WD and WH sites in all class of complexes except in antigen and (or) antibody complexes, where WD sites are the most conserved followed by WH and WP sites. A significant number of WP and WH sites are involved in water bridges that stabilize the subunit interactions. At WH sites, the residues involved in water bridges are significantly better conserved than the other residues. However, no such difference is observed at WP sites. Interestingly, WD sites are generally replaced with direct H-bonds upon subunit complexation. Significantly, we observe many water-mediated H-bonds remain preserved in spite of large conformational changes upon subunit complexation. These findings have implications in predicting and engineering water binding sites at protein-protein interfaces.

  20. The peripheral binding of 14-3-3γ to membranes involves isoform-specific histidine residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene J Bustad

    Full Text Available Mammalian 14-3-3 protein scaffolds include seven conserved isoforms that bind numerous phosphorylated protein partners and regulate many cellular processes. Some 14-3-3-isoforms, notably γ, have elevated affinity for membranes, which might contribute to modulate the subcellular localization of the partners and substantiate the importance of investigating molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction. By applying surface plasmon resonance we here show that the binding to phospholipid bilayers is stimulated when 14-3-3γ is complexed with its partner, a peptide corresponding to the Ser19-phosphorylated N-terminal region of tyrosine hydroxylase. Moreover, membrane interaction is dependent on salts of kosmotropic ions, which also stabilize 14-3-3γ. Electrostatic analysis of available crystal structures of γ and of the non-membrane-binding ζ-isoform, complemented with molecular dynamics simulations, indicate that the electrostatic potential distribution of phosphopeptide-bound 14-3-3γ is optimal for interaction with the membrane through amphipathic helices at the N-terminal dimerization region. In addition, His158, and especially His195, both specific to 14-3-3γ and located at the convex lateral side, appeared to be pivotal for the ligand induced membrane interaction, as corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis. The participation of these histidine residues might be associated to their increased protonation upon membrane binding. Overall, these results reveal membrane-targeting motifs and give insights on mechanisms that furnish the 14-3-3γ scaffold with the capacity for tuned shuffling from soluble to membrane-bound states.

  1. Ligand-bound Structures and Site-directed Mutagenesis Identify the Acceptor and Secondary Binding Sites of Streptomyces coelicolor Maltosyltransferase GlgE*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syson, Karl; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Miah, Farzana; Barclay, J. Elaine; Tang, Minhong; Gorelik, Andrii; Rashid, Abdul M.; Lawson, David M.; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    GlgE is a maltosyltransferase involved in α-glucan biosynthesis in bacteria that has been genetically validated as a target for tuberculosis therapies. Crystals of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis enzyme diffract at low resolution so most structural studies have been with the very similar Streptomyces coelicolor GlgE isoform 1. Although the donor binding site for α-maltose 1-phosphate had been previously structurally defined, the acceptor site had not. Using mutagenesis, kinetics, and protein crystallography of the S. coelicolor enzyme, we have now identified the +1 to +6 subsites of the acceptor/product, which overlap with the known cyclodextrin binding site. The sugar residues in the acceptor subsites +1 to +5 are oriented such that they disfavor the binding of malto-oligosaccharides that bear branches at their 6-positions, consistent with the known acceptor chain specificity of GlgE. A secondary binding site remote from the catalytic center was identified that is distinct from one reported for the M. tuberculosis enzyme. This new site is capable of binding a branched α-glucan and is most likely involved in guiding acceptors toward the donor site because its disruption kinetically compromises the ability of GlgE to extend polymeric substrates. However, disruption of this site, which is conserved in the Streptomyces venezuelae GlgE enzyme, did not affect the growth of S. venezuelae or the structure of the polymeric product. The acceptor subsites +1 to +4 in the S. coelicolor enzyme are well conserved in the M. tuberculosis enzyme so their identification could help inform the design of inhibitors with therapeutic potential. PMID:27531751

  2. Classification of binding site conformations of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanchuk, Vsevolod Yu; Tanin, Volodymyr O; Vovk, Andriy I

    2012-07-01

    Hundred and two binding sites from 91 Protein Data Bank files for protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B with different ligands have been compared. It was found that they can be divided into five clusters. Additional clusters were formed by the unliganded and oxidized enzyme. The centroids of the clusters can be used as starting points for further studies of enzyme-inhibitor interaction by computer simulations. A special software tool has been created for the investigation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B and other enzymes. It performs multiple comparisons of selected parts of Protein Data Bank files, as well as further clustering, and determines mobility of separate residues. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Longer peptide can be accommodated in the MHC class I binding site by a protrusion mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Holm, A

    2000-01-01

    According to current consensus, CD8(+) T cell responses are focused upon short peptide sequences (8-11 amino acids) presented by MHC class I molecules. This size restriction is thought to operate mostly at the level of peptide-MHC class I interaction. Crystal structures have shown that the free N...... and C termini of a bound peptide interact through hydrogen bonding networks to conserved residues at either end of the class I binding site. Accordingly, it is thought that the termini are fixed and that only minor variations in peptide size are possible through a central bulging mechanism. We find...... that this consensus view is not always correct as some peptide-MHC class I interaction will accept significant extensions. Furthermore, our results indicate that in some cases protrusion, rather than bulging, may be the mechanism of extension. Depending upon the particular peptide-MHC combination in question...

  4. Analysis of Active-Site Amino-Acid Residues of Human Serum Paraoxonase Using Competitive Substrates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yeung, David T; Lenz, David E; Cerasoli, Douglas M

    2005-01-01

    ...(s) or its catalytic mechanism. Through site-directed mutagenesis studies, designed from a DFPase-like homology model, and from a crystal structure of a hybrid PONl molecule, amino-acid residues essential for enzyme function...

  5. LIGSITEcsc: predicting ligand binding sites using the Connolly surface and degree of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying pockets on protein surfaces is of great importance for many structure-based drug design applications and protein-ligand docking algorithms. Over the last ten years, many geometric methods for the prediction of ligand-binding sites have been developed. Results We present LIGSITEcsc, an extension and implementation of the LIGSITE algorithm. LIGSITEcsc is based on the notion of surface-solvent-surface events and the degree of conservation of the involved surface residues. We compare our algorithm to four other approaches, LIGSITE, CAST, PASS, and SURFNET, and evaluate all on a dataset of 48 unbound/bound structures and 210 bound-structures. LIGSITEcsc performs slightly better than the other tools and achieves a success rate of 71% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion The use of the Connolly surface leads to slight improvements, the prediction re-ranking by conservation to significant improvements of the binding site predictions. A web server for LIGSITEcsc and its source code is available at scoppi.biotec.tu-dresden.de/pocket.

  6. Chemical synthesis, 3D structure, and ASIC binding site of the toxin mambalgin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christina I; Rash, Lachlan D; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Rosengren, K Johan; Mobli, Mehdi; King, Glenn F; Alewood, Paul F; Craik, David J; Durek, Thomas

    2014-01-20

    Mambalgins are a novel class of snake venom components that exert potent analgesic effects mediated through the inhibition of acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs). The 57-residue polypeptide mambalgin-2 (Ma-2) was synthesized by using a combination of solid-phase peptide synthesis and native chemical ligation. The structure of the synthetic toxin, determined using homonuclear NMR, revealed an unusual three-finger toxin fold reminiscent of functionally unrelated snake toxins. Electrophysiological analysis of Ma-2 on wild-type and mutant ASIC1a receptors allowed us to identify α-helix 5, which borders on the functionally critical acidic pocket of the channel, as a major part of the Ma-2 binding site. This region is also crucial for the interaction of ASIC1a with the spider toxin PcTx1, thus suggesting that the binding sites for these toxins substantially overlap. This work lays the foundation for structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and further development of this promising analgesic peptide. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  8. Evidence by site-directed mutagenesis that arginine 203 of thermolysin and arginine 717 of neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase) play equivalent critical roles in substrate hydrolysis and inhibitor binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Claire, Cynthia; Ruffet, Emmanuel; Antonczak, Serge; Beaumont, Ann; O'Donohue, Michael; Roques, Bernard,; Fournié-Zaluski, Marie-Claude

    1997-01-01

    International audience; Neprilysin (neutral endopeptidase-24.11, EC 3.4.24.11) is a mammalian zinc-endopeptidase involved in the degradation of biologically active peptides. Although no atomic structure is available for this enzyme, site-directed mutagenesis studies have shown that its active site resembles closely that of the bacterial zinc-endopeptidase, thermolysin (EC 3.4.24.27). One active site residue of thermolysin, Arg-203, is involved in inhibitor binding by forming hydrogen bonds wi...

  9. Relationships between the catechol substrate binding site and amphetamine, cocaine, and mazindol binding sites in a kinetic model of the striatal transporter of dopamine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayment, H; Meiergerd, S M; Schenk, J O

    1998-05-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine how (-)-cocaine and S(+)-amphetamine binding sites relate to each other and to the catechol substrate site on the striatal dopamine transporter (sDAT). In controls, m-tyramine and S(+)-amphetamine caused release of dopamine from intracellular stores at concentrations > or = 12-fold those observed to inhibit inwardly directed sDAT activity for dopamine. In preparations from animals pretreated with reserpine, m-tyramine and S(+)-amphetamine caused release of preloaded dopamine at concentrations similar to those that inhibit inwardly directed sDAT activity. S(+)-Amphetamine and m-tyramine inhibited sDAT activity for dopamine by competing for a common binding site with dopamine and each other, suggesting that phenethylamines are substrate analogues at the plasmalemmal sDAT. (-)-Cocaine inhibited sDAT at a site separate from that for substrate analogues. This site is mutually interactive with the substrate site (K(int) = 583 nM). Mazindol competitively inhibited sDAT at the substrate analogue binding site. The results with (-)-cocaine suggest that the (-)-cocaine binding site on sDAT is distinct from that of hydroxyphenethylamine substrates, reinforcing the notion that an antagonist for (-)-cocaine binding may be developed to block (-)-cocaine binding with minimal effects on dopamine transporter activity. However, a strategy of how to antagonize drugs of abuse acting as substrate analogues is still elusive.

  10. Histochemical detection of sugar residues in lizard teeth (Liolaemus gravenhorsti: a lectin-binding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARCELA FUENZALIDA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The structural diversity of the many oligosaccharide chains of surface glycoconjugates renders them likely candidates for modulators of cell-interactions, cellular movements, differentiation, and cellular recognition. A selection of different lectins was used to investigate the appearance of cellular distribution and changes in sugar residues during tooth development in the polyphyodont lizard, Liolaemus gravenhorsti. Lectins from three groups were used: (1 N-acetylgalactosamine specificity: BS-1, PNA, RCA-120; (2 N-acetylglucosamine specificity: ECA; and (3 fucose specificity: UEA 1 and LTA.. Digital images were processed using Scion Image. Grayscale graphics in each image were obtained. The lectins used showed a strong, wide distribution of the L-fucose and N-acetylgalactosamine at the cell surface and in the cytoplasm of multinucleate odontoclast cell, while mononuclear odontoclast cells showed no binding, suggesting some roles that the residues sugar might play in the resorption of dentine or with multinucleation of odontoclast after the attachment to the dentine surface in this polyphyodont species. Further studies must be planned to determine the specific identities of these glycoconjugates,and to elucidate the roles played by these sugar residues in the complex processes related to odontogenesis in polyphyodont species.

  11. Mutation of lysine residues in the nucleotide binding segments of the poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, O C; Baker, S; Ehrenfeld, E

    1996-12-01

    The poliovirus 3D RNA-dependent RNA polymerase contains two peptide segments previously shown to cross-link to nucleotide substrates via lysine residues. To determine which lysine residue(s) might be implicated in catalytic function, we engineered mutations to generate proteins with leucine residues substituted individually for each of the lysine residues in the NTP binding regions. These proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and were examined for their abilities to bind nucleotides and to catalyze RNA chain elongation in vitro. Replacement of each lysine residue in the NTP binding segment located in the central portion of the 3D molecule (Lys-276, -278, or -283) with leucine produced no impairment of GTP binding or polymerase activity. Substitution of leucine for Lys-61 in the N-terminal portion of the protein, however, abolished the binding of protein to GTP-agarose and all detectable polymerase activity. A nearby lysine replacement with leucine at position 66 had no effect on enzyme activity. The three mutations in the central region of 3D were introduced into full-length viral cDNAs, and the infectivities of RNA transcripts were examined in transfected HeLa cells. Growth of virus containing 3D with a mutation at residue 278 (3Dmu278) or 3Dmu283 was indistinguishable from that of the wild type; however, 3Dmu276 generated extremely slow-growing, small-plaque virus. Polyprotein processing by 3CDmu276 was unaffected. Large-plaque variants, in which the Leu-276 codon had mutated again to an arginine codon, emerged at high frequency. The results suggest that a lysine residue at position 61 of 3Dpol is essential for polymerase catalytic function and that a basic (lysine or arginine) residue at position 276 is required for some other function of 3D important for virus growth but not for RNA chain elongation or polyprotein processing.

  12. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...... can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site....

  13. Site-selective solid-phase synthesis of a CCR5 sulfopeptide library to interrogate HIV binding and entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuyu; Malins, Lara R; Roche, Michael; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Duncan, Renee; Garcia, Mary L; Barnes, Nadine C; Anderson, David A; Stone, Martin J; Gorry, Paul R; Payne, Richard J

    2014-09-19

    Tyrosine (Tyr) sulfation is a common post-translational modification that is implicated in a variety of important biological processes, including the fusion and entry of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). A number of sulfated Tyr (sTyr) residues on the N-terminus of the CCR5 chemokine receptor are involved in a crucial binding interaction with the gp120 HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. Despite the established importance of these sTyr residues, the exact structural and functional role of this post-translational modification in HIV-1 infection is not fully understood. Detailed biological studies are hindered in part by the difficulty in accessing homogeneous sulfopeptides and sulfoproteins through biological expression and established synthetic techniques. Herein we describe an efficient approach to the synthesis of sulfopeptides bearing discrete sulfation patterns through the divergent, site-selective incorporation of sTyr residues on solid support. By employing three orthogonally protected Tyr building blocks and a solid-phase sulfation protocol, we demonstrate the synthesis of a library of target N-terminal CCR5(2-22) sulfoforms bearing discrete and differential sulfation at Tyr10, Tyr14, and Tyr15, from a single resin-bound intermediate. We demonstrate the importance of distinct sites of Tyr sulfation in binding gp120 through a competitive binding assay between the synthetic CCR5 sulfopeptides and an anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody. These studies revealed a critical role of sulfation at Tyr14 for binding and a possible additional role for sulfation at Tyr10. N-terminal CCR5 variants bearing a sTyr residue at position 14 were also found to complement viral entry into cells expressing an N-terminally truncated CCR5 receptor.

  14. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  15. Sodium-dependent reorganization of the sugar-binding site of SGLT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hirayama, Bruce A; Loo, Donald D F; Díez-Sampedro, Ana

    2007-01-01

    The sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter SGLT1 undergoes a series of voltage- and ligand-induced conformational changes that underlie the cotransport mechanism. In this study we describe how the binding of external Na changes the conformation of the sugar-binding domain, exposing residues that ...

  16. Identification of residues on human receptor DPP4 critical for MERS-CoV binding and entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Wenfei; Wang, Ying; Wang, Nianshuang; Wang, Dongli; Guo, Jianying; Fu, Lili; Shi, Xuanling

    2014-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infects host cells through binding the receptor binding domain (RBD) on its spike glycoprotein to human receptor dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4). Here, we report identification of critical residues on hDPP4 for RBD binding and virus entry through analysis of a panel of hDPP4 mutants. Based on the RBD–hDPP4 crystal structure we reported, the mutated residues were located at the interface between RBD and hDPP4, which potentially changed the polarity, hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of hDPP4, thereby interfering or disrupting their interaction with RBD. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis and pseudovirus infection assay, we showed that several residues in hDPP4–RBD binding interface were important on hDPP4–RBD binding and viral entry. These results provide atomic insights into the features of interactions between hDPP4 and MERS-CoV RBD, and also provide potential explanation for cellular and species tropism of MERS-CoV infection. - Highlights: • It has been demonstrated that MERS-CoV infects host cells through binding its envelope spike (S) glycoprotein to the host cellular receptor dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). • To identify the critical residues on hDPP4 for RBD binding and virus entry, we constructed a panel of hDPP4 mutants based on structure-guided mutagenesis. • Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis and pseudovirus infection assay, we showed that several residues on hDPP4 had significant impacts on virus/receptor interactions and viral entry. • Our study has provided new insights into the features of interactions between hDPP4 and MERS-CoV RBD, and provides potential explanation for cellular and species tropism of MERS-CoV infection

  17. Identification of residues on human receptor DPP4 critical for MERS-CoV binding and entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wenfei [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Ying [Comprehensive AIDS Research Center, Research Center for Public Health, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Nianshuang; Wang, Dongli [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Guo, Jianying; Fu, Lili [Comprehensive AIDS Research Center, Research Center for Public Health, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi, Xuanling, E-mail: shixuanlingsk@tsinghua.edu.cn [Comprehensive AIDS Research Center, Research Center for Public Health, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infects host cells through binding the receptor binding domain (RBD) on its spike glycoprotein to human receptor dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4). Here, we report identification of critical residues on hDPP4 for RBD binding and virus entry through analysis of a panel of hDPP4 mutants. Based on the RBD–hDPP4 crystal structure we reported, the mutated residues were located at the interface between RBD and hDPP4, which potentially changed the polarity, hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of hDPP4, thereby interfering or disrupting their interaction with RBD. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis and pseudovirus infection assay, we showed that several residues in hDPP4–RBD binding interface were important on hDPP4–RBD binding and viral entry. These results provide atomic insights into the features of interactions between hDPP4 and MERS-CoV RBD, and also provide potential explanation for cellular and species tropism of MERS-CoV infection. - Highlights: • It has been demonstrated that MERS-CoV infects host cells through binding its envelope spike (S) glycoprotein to the host cellular receptor dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). • To identify the critical residues on hDPP4 for RBD binding and virus entry, we constructed a panel of hDPP4 mutants based on structure-guided mutagenesis. • Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis and pseudovirus infection assay, we showed that several residues on hDPP4 had significant impacts on virus/receptor interactions and viral entry. • Our study has provided new insights into the features of interactions between hDPP4 and MERS-CoV RBD, and provides potential explanation for cellular and species tropism of MERS-CoV infection.

  18. Modeling Complex Equilibria in ITC Experiments: Thermodynamic Parameters Estimation for a Three Binding Site Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Vu H.; Buscaglia, Robert; Chaires, Jonathan B.; Lewis, Edwin A.

    2013-01-01

    Isothermal Titration Calorimetry, ITC, is a powerful technique that can be used to estimate a complete set of thermodynamic parameters (e.g. Keq (or ΔG), ΔH, ΔS, and n) for a ligand binding interaction described by a thermodynamic model. Thermodynamic models are constructed by combination of equilibrium constant, mass balance, and charge balance equations for the system under study. Commercial ITC instruments are supplied with software that includes a number of simple interaction models, for example one binding site, two binding sites, sequential sites, and n-independent binding sites. More complex models for example, three or more binding sites, one site with multiple binding mechanisms, linked equilibria, or equilibria involving macromolecular conformational selection through ligand binding need to be developed on a case by case basis by the ITC user. In this paper we provide an algorithm (and a link to our MATLAB program) for the non-linear regression analysis of a multiple binding site model with up to four overlapping binding equilibria. Error analysis demonstrates that fitting ITC data for multiple parameters (e.g. up to nine parameters in the three binding site model) yields thermodynamic parameters with acceptable accuracy. PMID:23262283

  19. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  20. Defining the Ail Ligand-Binding Surface: Hydrophobic Residues in Two Extracellular Loops Mediate Cell and Extracellular Matrix Binding To Facilitate Yop Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Tiffany M; Wiese, Jeffrey S; Alhabeil, Jamal A; Usselman, Lisa D; Thomson, Joshua J; Matti, Rafla; Kronshage, Malte; Maricic, Natalie; Williams, Shanedah; Sleiman, Naama H; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S

    2017-04-01

    Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of plague, binds host cells to deliver cytotoxic Yop proteins into the cytoplasm that prevent phagocytosis and generation of proinflammatory cytokines. Ail is an eight-stranded β-barrel outer membrane protein with four extracellular loops that mediates cell binding and resistance to human serum. Following the deletion of each of the four extracellular loops that potentially interact with host cells, the Ail-Δloop 2 and Ail-Δloop 3 mutant proteins had no cell-binding activity while Ail-Δloop 4 maintained cell binding (the Ail-Δloop 1 protein was unstable). Using the codon mutagenesis scheme SWIM (selection without isolation of mutants), we identified individual residues in loops 1, 2, and 3 that contribute to host cell binding. While several residues contributed to the binding of host cells and purified fibronectin and laminin, as well as Yop delivery, three mutations, F80A (loop 2), S128A (loop 3), and F130A (loop 3), produced particularly severe defects in cell binding. Combining these mutations led to an even greater reduction in cell binding and severely impaired Yop delivery with only a slight defect in serum resistance. These findings demonstrate that Y. pestis Ail uses multiple extracellular loops to interact with substrates important for adhesion via polyvalent hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Disruption of the coenzyme binding site and dimer interface revealed in the crystal structure of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase "Asian" variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Heather N; Weiner, Henry; Hurley, Thomas D

    2005-08-26

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is the major enzyme that oxidizes ethanol-derived acetaldehyde. A nearly inactive form of the enzyme, ALDH2*2, is found in about 40% of the East Asian population. This variant enzyme is defined by a glutamate to lysine substitution at residue 487 located within the oligomerization domain. ALDH2*2 has an increased Km for its coenzyme, NAD+, and a decreased kcat, which lead to low activity in vivo. Here we report the 2.1 A crystal structure of ALDH2*2. The structure shows a large disordered region located at the dimer interface that includes much of the coenzyme binding cleft and a loop of residues that form the base of the active site. As a consequence of these structural changes, the variant enzyme exhibits rigid body rotations of its catalytic and coenzyme-binding domains relative to the oligomerization domain. These structural perturbations are the direct result of the inability of lysine 487 to form important stabilizing hydrogen bonds with arginines 264 and 475. Thus, the elevated Km for coenzyme exhibited by this variant probably reflects the energetic penalty for reestablishing this site for productive coenzyme binding, whereas the structural alterations near the active site are consistent with the lowered Vmax.

  2. Conformational coupling between receptor and kinase binding sites through a conserved salt bridge in a signaling complex scaffold protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi R Ortega

    Full Text Available Bacterial chemotaxis is one of the best studied signal transduction pathways. CheW is a scaffold protein that mediates the association of the chemoreceptors and the CheA kinase in a ternary signaling complex. The effects of replacing conserved Arg62 of CheW with other residues suggested that the scaffold protein plays a more complex role than simply binding its partner proteins. Although R62A CheW had essentially the same affinity for chemoreceptors and CheA, cells expressing the mutant protein are impaired in chemotaxis. Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations (MD, NMR spectroscopy, and circular dichroism (CD, we addressed the role of Arg62. Here we show that Arg62 forms a salt bridge with another highly conserved residue, Glu38. Although this interaction is unimportant for overall protein stability, it is essential to maintain the correct alignment of the chemoreceptor and kinase binding sites of CheW. Computational and experimental data suggest that the role of the salt bridge in maintaining the alignment of the two partner binding sites is fundamental to the function of the signaling complex but not to its assembly. We conclude that a key feature of CheW is to maintain the specific geometry between the two interaction sites required for its function as a scaffold.

  3. Key residues involved in the interaction between Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 1 (CpomPBP1) and Codlemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Ya-Lin

    2016-10-06

    Codlemone exhibited high affinity to CpomPBP1, studying their binding mode can provide insights into the rational design of active semiochemicals. Our findings suggested that residues including Phe12, Phe36, Trp37, Ile52, Ile 94, Ala115 and Phe118 were favorable to the binding of Codlemone to CpomPBP1, whereas residues providing unfavorable contributions like Ser56 were negative to the binding. Van der waals energy and electrostatic energy, mainly derived from the sidechains of favorable residues, contributed most in the formation and stability keeping of CpomPBP1-Codlemone complex. Of the residues involved in the interaction between CpomPBP1 and Codlemone, Phe12 and Trp37, whose mutation into Ala caused significant decrease of CpomPBP1 binding ability, were two key residues in determining the binding affinity of Codlemone to CpomPBP1. This study shed lights on discovering novel active semiochemicals as well as facilitating chemical modification of lead semiochemicals.

  4. Prediction of Active Site and Distal Residues in E. coli DNA Polymerase III alpha Polymerase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasuram, Ramya; Coulther, Timothy A; Hollander, Judith M; Keston-Smith, Elise; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Beuning, Penny J

    2018-02-20

    The process of DNA replication is carried out with high efficiency and accuracy by DNA polymerases. The replicative polymerase in E. coli is DNA Pol III, which is a complex of 10 different subunits that coordinates simultaneous replication on the leading and lagging strands. The 1160-residue Pol III alpha subunit is responsible for the polymerase activity and copies DNA accurately, making one error per 10 5 nucleotide incorporations. The goal of this research is to determine the residues that contribute to the activity of the polymerase subunit. Homology modeling and the computational methods of THEMATICS and POOL were used to predict functionally important amino acid residues through their computed chemical properties. Site-directed mutagenesis and biochemical assays were used to validate these predictions. Primer extension, steady-state single-nucleotide incorporation kinetics, and thermal denaturation assays were performed to understand the contribution of these residues to the function of the polymerase. This work shows that the top 15 residues predicted by POOL, a set that includes the three previously known catalytic aspartate residues, seven remote residues, plus five previously unexplored first-layer residues, are important for function. Six previously unidentified residues, R362, D405, K553, Y686, E688, and H760, are each essential to Pol III activity; three additional residues, Y340, R390, and K758, play important roles in activity.

  5. Split tasks of asymmetric nucleotide-binding sites in the heterodimeric ABC exporter EfrCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hürlimann, Lea M; Hohl, Michael; Seeger, Markus A

    2017-06-01

    Many heterodimeric ATP-binding cassette (ABC) exporters evolved asymmetric ATP-binding sites containing a degenerate site incapable of ATP hydrolysis due to noncanonical substitutions in conserved sequence motifs. Recent studies revealed that nucleotide binding to the degenerate site stabilizes contacts between the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the inward-facing transporter and regulates ATP hydrolysis at the consensus site via allosteric coupling mediated by the D-loops. However, it is unclear whether nucleotide binding to the degenerate site is strictly required for substrate transport. In this study, we examined the functional consequences of a systematic set of mutations introduced at the degenerate and consensus site of the multidrug efflux pump EfrCD of Enterococcus faecalis. Mutating motifs which differ among the two ATP-binding sites (Walker B, switch loop, and ABC signature) or which are involved in interdomain communication (D-loop and Q-loop) led to asymmetric results in the functional assays and were better tolerated at the degenerate site. This highlights the importance of the degenerate site to allosterically regulate the events at the consensus site. Mutating invariant motifs involved in ATP binding and NBD closure (A-loop and Walker A) resulted in equally reduced transport activities, regardless at which ATP-binding site they were introduced. In contrast to previously investigated heterodimeric ABC exporters, mutation of the degenerate site Walker A lysine completely inactivated ATPase activity and substrate transport, indicating that ATP binding to the degenerate site is essential for EfrCD. This study provides novel insights into the split tasks of asymmetric ATP-binding sites of heterodimeric ABC exporters. © 2017 The Authors. The FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. The non-gastric H,K-ATPase as a tool to study the ouabain-binding site in Na,K-ATPase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pont, J.J.H.H.M. de; Swarts, H.G.P.; Karawajczyk, A.; Schaftenaar, G.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    Based on studies with chimeras between (non-)gastric H,K-ATPase and Na,K-ATPase, a model for the ouabain binding site has recently been presented (Qiu et al. J.Biol.Chem. 280 (2005) 32349). In this model, hydrogen bonds between specific amino acid residues of Na,K-ATPase and hydroxyl groups of

  7. Specificity of DNA-binding by the FAX-1 and NHR-67 nuclear receptors of Caenorhabditis elegans is partially mediated via a subclass-specific P-box residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Eric L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nuclear receptors of the NR2E class play important roles in pattern formation and nervous system development. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of DNA-binding domains, we define two conserved groups of orthologous NR2E genes: the NR2E1 subclass, which includes C. elegans nhr-67, Drosophila tailless and dissatisfaction, and vertebrate Tlx (NR2E2, NR2E4, NR2E1, and the NR2E3 subclass, which includes C. elegans fax-1 and vertebrate PNR (NR2E5, NR2E3. PNR and Tll nuclear receptors have been shown to bind the hexamer half-site AAGTCA, instead of the hexamer AGGTCA recognized by most other nuclear receptors, suggesting unique DNA-binding properties for NR2E class members. Results We show that NR2E3 subclass member FAX-1, unlike NHR-67 and other NR2E1 subclass members, binds to hexamer half-sites with relaxed specificity: it will bind hexamers with the sequence ANGTCA, although it prefers a purine to a pyrimidine at the second position. We use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the difference between FAX-1 and NHR-67 binding preference is partially mediated by a conserved subclass-specific asparagine or aspartate residue at position 19 of the DNA-binding domain. This amino acid position is part of the "P box" that plays a critical role in defining binding site specificity and has been shown to make hydrogen-bond contacts to the second position of the hexamer in co-crystal structures for other nuclear receptors. The relaxed specificity allows FAX-1 to bind a much larger repertoire of half-sites than NHR-67. While NR2E1 class proteins bind both monomeric and dimeric sites, the NR2E3 class proteins bind only dimeric sites. The presence of a single strong site adjacent to a very weak site allows dimeric FAX-1 binding, further increasing the number of dimeric binding sites to which FAX-1 may bind in vivo. Conclusion These findings identify subclass-specific DNA-binding specificities and dimerization properties for the NR2E1

  8. Mutations of human DNA topoisomerase I at poly(ADP-ribose) binding sites: modulation of camptothecin activity by ADP-ribose polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesauro, Cinzia; Graziani, Grazia; Arnò, Barbara; Zuccaro, Laura; Muzi, Alessia; D'Annessa, Ilda; Santori, Elettra; Tentori, Lucio; Leonetti, Carlo; Fiorani, Paola; Desideri, Alessandro

    2014-09-17

    DNA topoisomerases are key enzymes that modulate the topological state of DNA through the breaking and rejoining of DNA strands. Human topoisomerase I belongs to the family of poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins and is the target of camptothecin derived anticancer drugs. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation occurs at specific sites of the enzyme inhibiting the cleavage and enhancing the religation steps during the catalytic cycle. Thus, ADP-ribose polymers antagonize the activity of topoisomerase I poisons, whereas PARP inhibitors increase their antitumor effects. Using site-directed mutagenesis we have analyzed the interaction of human topoisomerase I and poly(ADP-ribose) through enzymatic activity and binding procedures. Mutations of the human topoisomerase I hydrophobic or charged residues, located on the putative polymer binding sites, are not sufficient to abolish or reduce the binding of the poly(ADP-ribose) to the protein. These results suggest either the presence of additional binding sites or that the mutations are not enough perturbative to destroy the poly(ADP-ribose) interaction, although in one mutant they fully abolish the enzyme activity. It can be concluded that mutations at the hydrophobic or charged residues of the putative polymer binding sites do not interfere with the ability of poly(ADP-ribose) to antagonize the antitumor activity of topoisomerase I poisons.

  9. Mannobiose Binding Induces Changes in Hydrogen Bonding and Protonation States of Acidic Residues in Concanavalin A As Revealed by Neutron Crystallography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerlits, Oksana O. [UT/ORNL; Coates, Leighton [Biology; Woods, Robert J. [Complex; Kovalevsky, Andrey [Biology

    2017-08-30

    Plant lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with various biomedical applications. Concanavalin A (Con A) holds promise in treating cancerous tumors. To better understand the Con A carbohydrate binding specificity, we obtained a room-temperature neutron structure of this legume lectin in complex with a disaccharide Manα1–2Man, mannobiose. The neutron structure afforded direct visualization of the hydrogen bonding between the protein and ligand, showing that the ligand is able to alter both protonation states and interactions for residues located close to and distant from the binding site. An unprecedented low-barrier hydrogen bond was observed forming between the carboxylic side chains of Asp28 and Glu8, with the D atom positioned equidistant from the oxygen atoms having an O···D···O angle of 101.5°.

  10. EasyMIFS and SiteHound: a toolkit for the identification of ligand-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghersi, Dario; Sanchez, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    SiteHound uses Molecular Interaction Fields (MIFs) produced by EasyMIFs to identify protein structure regions that show a high propensity for interaction with ligands. The type of binding site identified depends on the probe atom used in the MIF calculation. The input to EasyMIFs is a PDB file of a protein structure; the output MIF serves as input to SiteHound, which in turn produces a list of putative binding sites. Extensive testing of SiteHound for the detection of binding sites for drug-like molecules and phosphorylated ligands has been carried out. EasyMIFs and SiteHound executables for Linux, Mac OS X, and MS Windows operating systems are freely available for download from http://sitehound.sanchezlab.org/download.html. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Residues 28 to 39 of the Extracellular Loop 1 of Chicken Na+/H+ Exchanger Type I Mediate Cell Binding and Entry of Subgroup J Avian Leukosis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaolu; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Mengmeng; Ren, Chaoqi; Gao, Yanni; Yun, Bingling; Liu, Yongzhen; Wang, Yongqiang; Qi, Xiaole; Liu, Changjun; Cui, Hongyu; Zhang, Yanping; Gao, Li; Li, Kai; Pan, Qing; Zhang, Baoshan; Wang, Xiaomei; Gao, Yulong

    2018-01-01

    located in the membrane-proximal region of the N terminus of chECL1, suggesting that the binding site of ALV-J gp85 on chNHE1 is probably located on the apex of the molecule; the receptor-binding mode might be different from that of retroviruses. We also found that soluble chECL1, as well as huECL1 harboring chNHE1 residues 28 to 39, effectively blocked ALV-J infection. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the ALV-J infection mechanism and also provide new insights into the control strategies for ALV-J infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Modelling of the binding site of the human m1 muscarinic receptor: Experimental validation and refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, Hélène; Trumpp-Kallmeyer, Susanne; Schreuder, Herman; Hoflack, , Jan; Hibert, Marcel; Wermuth, Camille-Georges

    1997-07-01

    Our model of the human m1 muscarinic receptor has been refined on the basis of the recently published projection map of bovine rhodopsin. The refined model has a slightly different helix arrangement, which reveals the presence of an extra hydrophobic pocket located between helices 3, 4 and 5. The interaction of series of agonists and antagonists with the m1 muscarinic receptor has been studied experimentally by site-directed mutagenesis. In order to account for the observed results, three-dimensional models of m1 ligands docked in the target receptor are proposed. Qualitatively, the obtained models are in good agreement with the experimental observations. Agonists and partial agonists have a relatively small size. They can bind to the same region of the receptor using, however, different anchoring receptor residues. Antagonists are usually larger molecules, filling almost completely the same pocket as agonists. They can usually produce much stronger interactions with aromatic residues. Experimental data combined with molecular modelling studies highlight how subtle and diverse receptor-ligand interactions could be.

  13. Using TESS to predict transcription factor binding sites in DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schug, Jonathan

    2008-03-01

    This unit describes how to use the Transcription Element Search System (TESS). This Web site predicts transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in DNA sequence using two different kinds of models of sites, strings and positional weight matrices. The binding of transcription factors to DNA is a major part of the control of gene expression. Transcription factors exhibit sequence-specific binding; they form stronger bonds to some DNA sequences than to others. Identification of a good binding site in the promoter for a gene suggests the possibility that the corresponding factor may play a role in the regulation of that gene. However, the sequences transcription factors recognize are typically short and allow for some amount of mismatch. Because of this, binding sites for a factor can typically be found at random every few hundred to a thousand base pairs. TESS has features to help sort through and evaluate the significance of predicted sites.

  14. Derivation of uranium residual radioactive material guidelines for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmagadda, M.; Faillace, E.; Yu, C.

    1994-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for uranium were derived for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio. This site has been identified for remedial action under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Single nuclide and total uranium guidelines were derived on the basis of the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the former Alba Craft Laboratory site should not exceed a dose of 30 mrem/yr following remedial action for the current use and likely future use scenarios or a dose of 100 mrem/yr for less likely future use scenarios (Yu et al. 1993). The DOE residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD, which implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines, was used in this evaluation

  15. Characterization of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland and median eminence of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Calvo, J.R.; Rubio, A.; Goberna, R.; Guerrero, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization of specific melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland (HG) and median eminence (ME) of the rat was studied using [ 125 I]melatonin. Binding of melatonin to membrane crude preparations of both tissues was dependent on time and temperature. Thus, maximal binding was obtained at 37 degree C after 30-60 min incubation. Binding was also dependent on protein concentration. The specific binding of [ 125 I]melatonin was saturable, exhibiting only the class of binding sites in both tissues. The dissociation constants (Kd) were 170 and 190 pM for ME and HG, respectively. The concentration of the binding sites in ME was 8 fmol/mg protein, and in the HG 4 fmol/mg protein. In competition studies, binding of [ 125 I]melatonin to ME or HG was inhibited by increasing concentration of native melatonin; 50% inhibition was observed at about 702 and 422 nM for ME and HG, respectively. Additionally, the [ 125 I]melatonin binding to the crude membranes was not affected by the addition of different drugs such as norepinephrine, isoproterenol, phenylephrine, propranolol, or prazosin. The results confirm the presence of melatonin binding sites in median eminence and show, for the first time, the existence of melatonin binding sites in the Harderian gland

  16. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kaustubh; Sangani, Sahil S; Kehr, Andrew D; Rule, Gordon S; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2016-11-08

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein-DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein-DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg 2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu 3+ or two La 3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu 3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1 H- 15 N amide resonances, for 1 H- 13 C Ile-δ-CH 3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH 3 and Val-γ-CH 3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex.

  17. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein–DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein–DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein–DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu3+ or two La3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1H–15N amide resonances, for 1H–13C Ile-δ-CH3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH3 and Val-γ-CH3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex. PMID:27786446

  18. Gephyrin-binding peptides visualize postsynaptic sites and modulate neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maric, Hans Michael; Hausrat, Torben Johann; Neubert, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid type A and glycine receptors are the major mediators of fast synaptic inhibition in the human central nervous system and are established drug targets. However, all drugs targeting these receptors bind to the extracellular ligand-binding domain of the receptors, which inherentl...

  19. Characterization of Metal Binding in the Active Sites of acireductone dioxygenase Isoforms from Klebsiella ATCC 8724

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Chai; T Ju; M Dang; R Goldsmith; M Maroney; T Pochapsky

    2011-12-31

    The two acireductone dioxygenase (ARD) isozymes from the methionine salvage pathway of Klebsiella ATCC 8724 present an unusual case in which two enzymes with different structures and distinct activities toward their common substrates (1,2-dihydroxy-3-oxo-5-(methylthio)pent-1-ene and dioxygen) are derived from the same polypeptide chain. Structural and functional differences between the two isozymes are determined by the type of M{sup 2+} metal ion bound in the active site. The Ni{sup 2+}-bound NiARD catalyzes an off-pathway shunt from the methionine salvage pathway leading to the production of formate, methylthiopropionate, and carbon monoxide, while the Fe{sup 2+}-bound FeARD catalyzes the on-pathway formation of methionine precursor 2-keto-4-methylthiobutyrate and formate. Four potential protein-based metal ligands were identified by sequence homology and structural considerations. Based on the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), and isothermal calorimetry measurements, it is concluded that the same four residues, His96, His98, Glu102 and His140, provide the protein-based ligands for the metal in both the Ni- and Fe-containing forms of the enzyme, and subtle differences in the local backbone conformations trigger the observed structural and functional differences between the FeARD and NiARD isozymes. Furthermore, both forms of the enzyme bind their respective metals with pseudo-octahedral geometry, and both may lose a histidine ligand upon binding of substrate under anaerobic conditions. However, mutations at two conserved nonligand acidic residues, Glu95 and Glu100, result in low metal contents for the mutant proteins as isolated, suggesting that some of the conserved charged residues may aid in transfer of metal from in vivo sources or prevent the loss of metal to stronger chelators. The Glu100 mutant reconstitutes readily but has low activity. Mutation of Asp101 results in an active enzyme that incorporates

  20. Conserved lysin and arginin residues in the extracellular loop of P2X(3) receptors are involved in agonist binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Zadori, Zoltan; Kullnick, Yvonne; Gröger-Arndt, Helke; Franke, Heike; Wirkner, Kerstin; Illes, Peter; Mager, Peter P

    2007-12-08

    Wild-type human (h) P2X(3) receptors expressed in HEK293 cells responded to the prototypic agonist alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-meATP) with rapidly desensitizing inward currents and an increase in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. In contrast to electrophysiological recordings, Ca(2+) microfluorimetry showed a lower maximum of the concentration-response curve of alpha,beta-meATP in the transiently than in the permanently transfected HEK293 cells. However, the concentrations causing 50% of the maximum possible effect (EC(50) values) were identical, when measured with either method. In order to determine the role of certain conserved, positively charged amino acids in the nucleotide binding domains (NBD-1-4) of hP2X(3) receptors for agonist binding, the lysine-63, -65, -176 and -299 as well as the arginine-281 and -295 residues were substituted by the neutral amino acid alanine. We observed no effect of alpha,beta-meATP at the K63A, K176A, R295A, and K299A mutants, and a marked decrease of agonist potency at the K65A and R281A mutants. The P2X(3) receptor antagonist 2',3'-O-trinitrophenyl-ATP (TNP-ATP) blocked the effect of alpha,beta-meATP at the wild-type hP2X(3) receptor with lower affinity than at the mutant K65A, indicating an interference of this mutation with the docking of the antagonist with its binding sites. The use of confocal fluorescence microscopy in conjunction with an antibody raised against the extracellular loop of the hP2X(3) receptor documented the expression of all mutants in the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells. Eventually, we modelled the possible agonist and antagonist binding sites NBD-1-4 of the hP2X(3) subunit by using structural bioinformatics. This model is in complete agreement with the available data and integrates results from mutagenesis studies with geometry optimization of the tertiary structure predictions of the receptor.

  1. Post-translational modifications near the quinone binding site of mammalian complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Joe; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2013-08-23

    Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) in mammalian mitochondria is an L-shaped assembly of 44 protein subunits with one arm buried in the inner membrane of the mitochondrion and the orthogonal arm protruding about 100 Å into the matrix. The protruding arm contains the binding sites for NADH, the primary acceptor of electrons flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and a chain of seven iron-sulfur clusters that carries the electrons one at a time from FMN to a coenzyme Q molecule bound in the vicinity of the junction between the two arms. In the structure of the closely related bacterial enzyme from Thermus thermophilus, the quinone is thought to bind in a tunnel that spans the interface between the two arms, with the quinone head group close to the terminal iron-sulfur cluster, N2. The tail of the bound quinone is thought to extend from the tunnel into the lipid bilayer. In the mammalian enzyme, it is likely that this tunnel involves three of the subunits of the complex, ND1, PSST, and the 49-kDa subunit. An arginine residue in the 49-kDa subunit is symmetrically dimethylated on the ω-N(G) and ω-N(G') nitrogen atoms of the guanidino group and is likely to be close to cluster N2 and to influence its properties. Another arginine residue in the PSST subunit is hydroxylated and probably lies near to the quinone. Both modifications are conserved in mammalian enzymes, and the former is additionally conserved in Pichia pastoris and Paracoccus denitrificans, suggesting that they are functionally significant.

  2. Glutamates 78 and 122 in the active site of saccharopine dehydrogenase contribute to reactant binding and modulate the basicity of the acid-base catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekanayake, Devi K; Andi, Babak; Bobyk, Kostyantyn D; West, Ann H; Cook, Paul F

    2010-07-02

    Saccharopine dehydrogenase catalyzes the NAD-dependent oxidative deamination of saccharopine to give l-lysine and alpha-ketoglutarate. There are a number of conserved hydrophilic, ionizable residues in the active site, all of which must be important to the overall reaction. In an attempt to determine the contribution to binding and rate enhancement of each of the residues in the active site, mutations at each residue are being made, and double mutants are being made to estimate the interrelationship between residues. Here, we report the effects of mutations of active site glutamate residues, Glu(78) and Glu(122), on reactant binding and catalysis. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate E78Q, E122Q, E78Q/E122Q, E78A, E122A, and E78A/E122A mutant enzymes. Mutation of these residues increases the positive charge of the active site and is expected to affect the pK(a) values of the catalytic groups. Each mutant enzyme was completely characterized with respect to its kinetic and chemical mechanism. The kinetic mechanism remains the same as that of wild type enzymes for all of the mutant enzymes, with the exception of E78A, which exhibits binding of alpha-ketoglutarate to E and E.NADH. Large changes in V/K(Lys), but not V, suggest that Glu(78) and Glu(122) contribute binding energy for lysine. Shifts of more than a pH unit to higher and lower pH of the pK(a) values observed in the V/K(Lys) pH-rate profile of the mutant enzymes suggests that the presence of Glu(78) and Glu(122) modulates the basicity of the catalytic groups.

  3. Thermal Treatment of Iron Oxide Stabilized APC Residues from Waste Incineration and the Effect on Heavy Metal Binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Abildgaard; Stackpoole, M.; Bender-Koch, C.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide stabilized APC residues from MSWI were heat treated at 600°C and 900°C. The thermal treatments resulted in a change in product stability by forcing a transformation in the mineralogical structures of the products. The treatments, moreover, simulated somewhat the natural aging processes...... that would take place in a stabilized residue. Consequent changes in crystalline structure and heavy metal binding were examined....

  4. Biomimetic conformation-specific assembly of proteins at artificial binding sites nano-patterned on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rica, Roberto; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Biomolecules such as enzymes and antibodies possess binding sites where the molecular architecture and the physicochemical properties are optimum for their interaction with a particular target, in some cases even differentiating between stereoisomers. Here, we mimic this exquisite specificity via the creation of a suitable chemical environment by fabricating artificial binding sites for the protein calmodulin (CaM). By downscaling well-known surface chemical modification methodologies to the nanometer scale via silicon nanopatterning, the Ca2+-CaM conformer was found to selectively bind the biomimetic binding sites. The methodology could be adapted to mimic other protein-receptor interactions for sensing and catalysis. PMID:19757782

  5. MotifMap-RNA: a genome-wide map of RBP binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Sun, Sha; Bredy, Timothy; Wood, Marcelo; Spitale, Robert C; Baldi, Pierre

    2017-07-01

    RNA plays a critical role in gene expression and its regulation. RNA binding proteins (RBPs), in turn, are important regulators of RNA. Thanks to the availability of large scale data for RBP binding motifs and in vivo binding sites results in the form of eCLIP experiments, it is now possible to computationally predict RBP binding sites across the whole genome. We describe MotifMap-RNA, an extension of MotifMap which predicts binding sites for RBP motifs across human and mouse genomes and allows large scale querying of predicted binding sites. The data and corresponding web server are available from: http://motifmap-rna.ics.uci.edu/ as part of the MotifMap web portal. rspitale@uci.edu or pfbaldi@uci.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Decomposition of the factors that govern binding site preference in a multiple rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Joseph P; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-06-18

    A particularly interesting class of multiple rotaxanes consists of complexes where one long shaft threads two rings. If the shaft contains three or more potential binding sites for the rings, multiple co-conformations are possible. Such a complex is a molecular topological analogue to an abacus. Here we address the question, how does strength of ring binding to the shaft vary with respect to position on the shaft? Previous studies have found that a shaft with three binding sites exhibits strongest ring binding at the center site. Here a five-binding-site shaft is studied. We employ a novel method to partition the total energy of the system into contributions from intercomponent binding and intracomponent distortion. The method uses the output of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to determine fitting parameters in a set of coupled equations. The solution of the equations yields the energy partitioning and reveals the influence of long-range intercomponent interactions.

  7. Identification of the minimal functional unit in the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for binding the receptor-associated protein (RAP). A conserved acidic residue in the complement-type repeats is important for recognition of RAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O M; Christensen, L L; Christensen, P A; Sørensen, E S; Jacobsen, C; Moestrup, S K; Etzerodt, M; Thogersen, H C

    2000-07-14

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor family, mediates the internalization of a diverse set of ligands. The ligand binding sites are located in different regions of clusters consisting of approximately 40 residues, cysteine-rich complement-type repeats (CRs). The 39-40-kDa receptor-associated protein, a folding chaperone/escort protein required for efficient transport of functional LRP to the cell surface, is an antagonist of all identified ligands. To analyze the multisite inhibition by RAP in ligand binding of LRP, we have used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce fragments of the entire second ligand binding cluster of LRP (CR3-10). By ligand affinity chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analysis, we show that RAP binds to all two-repeat modules except CR910. CR10 differs from other repeats in cluster II by not containing a surface-exposed conserved acidic residue between Cys(IV) and Cys(V). By site-directed mutagenesis and ligand competition analysis, we provide evidence for a crucial importance of this conserved residue for RAP binding. We provide experimental evidence showing that two adjacent complement-type repeats, both containing a conserved acidic residue, represent a minimal unit required for efficient binding to RAP.

  8. Prediction of mono- and di-nucleotide-specific DNA-binding sites in proteins using neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizuguchi Kenji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA recognition by proteins is one of the most important processes in living systems. Therefore, understanding the recognition process in general, and identifying mutual recognition sites in proteins and DNA in particular, carries great significance. The sequence and structural dependence of DNA-binding sites in proteins has led to the development of successful machine learning methods for their prediction. However, all existing machine learning methods predict DNA-binding sites, irrespective of their target sequence and hence, none of them is helpful in identifying specific protein-DNA contacts. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting specific DNA-binding sites in terms of contacts between the residue environments of proteins and the identity of a mononucleotide or a dinucleotide step in DNA. The aim of this work is to take a protein sequence or structural features as inputs and predict for each amino acid residue if it binds to DNA at locations identified by one of the four possible mononucleotides or one of the 10 unique dinucleotide steps. Contact predictions are made at various levels of resolution viz. in terms of side chain, backbone and major or minor groove atoms of DNA. Results Significant differences in residue preferences for specific contacts are observed, which combined with other features, lead to promising levels of prediction. In general, PSSM-based predictions, supported by secondary structure and solvent accessibility, achieve a good predictability of ~70–80%, measured by the area under the curve (AUC of ROC graphs. The major and minor groove contact predictions stood out in terms of their poor predictability from sequences or PSSM, which was very strongly (>20 percentage points compensated by the addition of secondary structure and solvent accessibility information, revealing a predominant role of local protein structure in the major/minor groove DNA-recognition. Following a detailed

  9. Training increases the concentration of [3H]ouabain-binding sites in rat skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, K; Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    ]ouabain-binding-site concentration in the diaphragm, but in the heart ventricles, the K+-dependent 3-O-methylfluorescein phosphatase activity increased by 20% (P less than 0.001). Muscle inactivity induced by denervation, plaster immobilisation or tenotomy reduced the [3H]ouabain-binding-site concentration by 20-30% (P less than 0...

  10. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the synaptic vesicle protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa-Basurto, José; Cuevas-Hernández, Roberto I.; Phillips-Farfán, Bryan V.; Martínez-Archundia, Marlet; Romo-Mancillas, Antonio; Ramírez-Salinas, Gema L.; Pérez-González, Óscar A.; Trujillo-Ferrara, José; Mendoza-Torreblanca, Julieta G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam and its racetam analogs. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D) model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns) with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression. PMID:25914622

  11. Identification of the antiepileptic racetam binding site in the vesicle synaptic protein 2A by molecular dynamics and docking simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José eCorrea-Basurto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A is an integral membrane protein necessary for the proper function of the central nervous system (CNS and is associated to the physiopathology of epilepsy. SV2A is the molecular target of the anti-epileptic drug levetiracetam (LEV and its racetam analogues. The racetam binding site in SV2A and the non-covalent interactions between racetams and SV2A are currently unknown; therefore, an in silico study was performed to explore these issues. Since SV2A has not been structurally characterized with X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance, a three-dimensional (3D model was built. The model was refined by performing a molecular dynamics simulation (MDS and the interactions of SV2A with the racetams were determined by docking studies. A reliable 3D model of SV2A was obtained; it reached structural equilibrium during the last 15 ns of the MDS (50 ns with remaining structural motions in the N-terminus and long cytoplasmic loop. The docking studies revealed that hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds participate importantly in ligand recognition within the binding site. Residues T456, S665, W666, D670 and L689 were important for racetam binding within the trans-membrane hydrophilic core of SV2A. Identifying the racetam binding site within SV2A should facilitate the synthesis of suitable radio-ligands to study treatment response and possibly epilepsy progression.

  12. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  13. Localization of tachykinin binding sites (NK1, NK2, NK3 ligands) in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saffroy, M.; Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Besseyre, J.; Bergstroem, L.G.; Glowinski, J.

    1988-03-01

    A comparative autoradiographic analysis of the distribution of tachykinin binding sites was made on brain serial sections using several ligands. (1) /sup 3/H-SP, /sup 125/I-BHSP and /sup 3/H-physalaemin labeled identical binding sites (NK1 type). (2) /sup 3/H-NKB, /sup 125/I-BHE and /sup 3/H-eledoisin also labeled identical sites (NK3 type). (3) /sup 125/I-BHNKA preferentially labeled NK3 binding sites, the distribution of /sup 125/I-BHNKA binding sites being identical to that of /sup 3/H-NKB or /sup 125/I-BHE binding sites. (4) The distributions of /sup 3/H-SP and /sup 3/H-NKB binding sites were markedly different. (5) A very low density of labeling was found with /sup 3/H-NKA or /sup 125/I-NKA, and these binding sites were distributed only in areas rich in either /sup 3/H-SP or /sup 3/H-NKB binding sites. (6) Particular efforts were made to look for the presence of tachykinin binding sites in the substantia nigra, since this structure is particularly rich in SP and NKA and contains functional tachykinin receptors of the NK1 and NK2 types as suggested by physiological studies. Confirming previous reports, low or very low labeling was observed in the substantia nigra with /sup 3/H-SP or /sup 125/I-BHSP and /sup 3/H-NKB or /sup 125/I-BHE. Similar results were found with /sup 3/H-NKA, /sup 125/I-NKA or /sup 125/I-BHNKA. In conclusion, our data do not provide evidence yet for the existence of NK2 binding sites in the rat brain.

  14. Depleted uranium residual radiological risk assessment for Kosovo sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durante, Marco; Pugliese, Mariagabriella

    2003-01-01

    During the recent conflict in Yugoslavia, depleted uranium rounds were employed and were left in the battlefield. Health concern is related to the risk arising from contamination of areas in Kosovo with depleted uranium penetrators and dust. Although chemical toxicity is the most significant health risk related to uranium, radiation exposure has been allegedly related to cancers among veterans of the Balkan conflict. Uranium munitions are considered to be a source of radiological contamination of the environment. Based on measurements and estimates from the recent Balkan Task Force UNEP mission in Kosovo, we have estimated effective doses to resident populations using a well-established food-web mathematical model (RESRAD code). The UNEP mission did not find any evidence of widespread contamination in Kosovo. Rather than the actual measurements, we elected to use a desk assessment scenario (Reference Case) proposed by the UNEP group as the source term for computer simulations. Specific applications to two Kosovo sites (Planeja village and Vranovac hill) are described. Results of the simulations suggest that radiation doses from water-independent pathways are negligible (annual doses below 30 μSv). A small radiological risk is expected from contamination of the groundwater in conditions of effective leaching and low distribution coefficient of uranium metal. Under the assumptions of the Reference Case, significant radiological doses (>1 mSv/year) might be achieved after many years from the conflict through water-dependent pathways. Even in this worst-case scenario, DU radiological risk would be far overshadowed by its chemical toxicity

  15. New type of tachykinin binding site in the rat brain characterized by specific binding of a labeled eledoisin derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Viger, A.; Glowinski, J.

    1984-09-01

    A new ligand for investigating tachykinin-binding site subtypes was synthesized by coupling the /sup 125/I-Bolton and Hunter reagent to eledoisin (/sup 125/I-BHE). Using a synaptosomal preparation (P2 fraction) of rat cerebral cortex, /sup 125/I-BHE was shown to bind with apparent high affinity (apparent Kd . 15.3 nM). When concentrations of up to 30 nM /sup 125/I-BHE were used, /sup 125/I-BHE binding was specific, saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent. In contrast to (/sup 3/H)dopamine, /sup 125/I-BHE was not taken up within synaptosomes by an ouabain-sensitive process. Eledoisin, kassinin, and substance P were examined for their ability to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding to cortical synaptosomes. Eledoisin and kassinin were considerably more potent than substance P, in contrast to the order of potency observed for specific /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter substance P (/sup 125/I-BHSP) binding. Specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding was highest in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; intermediate in the hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus; low in the mesencephalon, septum, and substantia nigra; and absent in the cerebellum. Comparison of these data with those previously obtained for /sup 125/I-BHSP binding to synaptosomes indicated that /sup 125/I-BHE-labeled binding sites differ markedly from those of /sup 125/I-BHSP-labeled binding sites. Therefore, tachykinin receptors other than substance P receptors seem to be present in the central nervous system.

  16. Site-Specific Dual Functionalization of Cysteine Residue in Peptides and Proteins with 2-Azidoacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyasu, Shinya; Hayashi, Hirohito; Xing, Bengang; Chiba, Shunsuke

    2017-04-19

    Herein, we report use of 2-azidoacrylates to perform site-specific dual functionalization of the cysteine residue of peptides and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a native protein containing one free cysteine residue. The sulfhydryl group of the cysteine residue could be conjugated with 2-azidoacrylates bearing various functionalities, such as fluorescent dyes under physiological aqueous buffer conditions, to afford peptide and protein conjugates anchoring an azide moiety. Successive azide-alkyne cycloaddition enables installation of the second functionality, thus affording dual-functionalized peptide- and protein-based materials.

  17. Summary of the engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Lowman site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive sands and residues at Lowman, Idaho. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of radioactive sands and residues and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 191,000 tons of radioactive sands, residues, and contaminated soils at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown radioactive sands and external gamma radiation also are factors

  18. Stimulation of Tetrabromobisphenol A Binding to Soil Humic Substances by Birnessite and the Chemical Structure of the Bound Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fei; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng; Xie, Jinyu; Xie, Xianchuan; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Yongfeng; Ertunc, Tanya; Schäffer, Andreas; Ji, Rong

    2016-06-21

    Studies have shown the main fate of the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in soils is the formation of bound residues, and mechanisms on it are less-understood. This study investigated the effect of birnessite (δ-MnO2), a naturally occurring oxidant in soils, on the formation of bound residues. (14)C-labeled TBBPA was used to investigate the pH dependency of TBBPA bound-residue formation to two soil humic acids (HAs), Elliott soil HA and Steinkreuz soil HA, in the presence of δ-MnO2. The binding of TBBPA and its transformation products to both HAs was markedly increased (3- to 17-fold) at all pH values in the presence of δ-MnO2. More bound residues were formed with the more aromatic Elliott soil HA than with Steinkreuz soil HA. Gel-permeation chromatography revealed a uniform distribution of the bound residues within Steinkreuz soil HA and a nonuniform distribution within Elliott soil HA. (13)C NMR spectroscopy of (13)C-TBBPA residues bound to (13)C-depleted HA suggested that in the presence of δ-MnO2, binding occurred via ester and ether and other types of covalent bonds besides HA sequestration. The insights gained in this study contribute to an understanding of the formation of TBBPA bound residues facilitated by δ-MnO2.

  19. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium sand residues at the Lowman, Idaho, site. Services normally include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 90,000 tons of sand residues at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation is also a factor. The two alternative actions presented are dike construction, fencing, and maintenance (Option I); and consolidation of the piles, addition of a 2-ft-thick stabilization cover, and on-site cleanup (Option II). Both options include remedial action at off-site structures. Cost estimates for the two options are $393,000 and $590,000.

  20. Phase II, Title I engineering assessment of radioactive sands and residues, Lowman Site, Lowman Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    An engineering assessment was performed of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium sand residues at the Lowman, Idaho, site. Services normally include the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and other radium-contaminated materials, the evaluation of resulting investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas release from the 90,000 tons of sand residues at the Lowman site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although external gamma radiation is also a factor. The two alternative actions presented are dike construction, fencing, and maintenance (Option I); and consolidation of the piles, addition of a 2-ft-thick stabilization cover, and on-site cleanup (Option II). Both options include remedial action at off-site structures. Cost estimates for the two options are $393,000 and $590,000

  1. The peptide agonist-binding site of the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor based on site-directed mutagenesis and knowledge-based modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dods, Rachel L; Donnelly, Dan

    2015-11-23

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (7-36)amide (GLP-1) plays a central role in regulating blood sugar levels and its receptor, GLP-1R, is a target for anti-diabetic agents such as the peptide agonist drugs exenatide and liraglutide. In order to understand the molecular nature of the peptide-receptor interaction, we used site-directed mutagenesis and pharmacological profiling to highlight nine sites as being important for peptide agonist binding and/or activation. Using a knowledge-based approach, we constructed a 3D model of agonist-bound GLP-1R, basing the conformation of the N-terminal region on that of the receptor-bound NMR structure of the related peptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating protein (PACAP21). The relative position of the extracellular to the transmembrane (TM) domain, as well as the molecular details of the agonist-binding site itself, were found to be different from the model that was published alongside the crystal structure of the TM domain of the glucagon receptor, but were nevertheless more compatible with published mutagenesis data. Furthermore, the NMR-determined structure of a high-potency cyclic conformationally-constrained 11-residue analogue of GLP-1 was also docked into the receptor-binding site. Despite having a different main chain conformation to that seen in the PACAP21 structure, four conserved residues (equivalent to His-7, Glu-9, Ser-14 and Asp-15 in GLP-1) could be structurally aligned and made similar interactions with the receptor as their equivalents in the GLP-1-docked model, suggesting the basis of a pharmacophore for GLP-1R peptide agonists. In this way, the model not only explains current mutagenesis and molecular pharmacological data but also provides a basis for further experimental design. © 2016 Authors.

  2. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S.; Le Brun, Anton P.; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H.

    2016-01-01

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin–LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin–LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  3. Crystal structure of CotA laccase complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at a novel binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhongchuan; Xie, Tian [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Zhong, Qiuping [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of (China); Wang, Ganggang, E-mail: wanggg@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-03-24

    The crystal structure of CotA complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) in a hole motif has been solved; this novel binding site could be a potential structure-based target for protein engineering of CotA laccase. The CotA laccase from Bacillus subtilis is an abundant component of the spore outer coat and has been characterized as a typical laccase. The crystal structure of CotA complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) in a hole motif has been solved. The novel binding site was about 26 Å away from the T1 binding pocket. Comparison with known structures of other laccases revealed that the hole is a specific feature of CotA. The key residues Arg476 and Ser360 were directly bound to ABTS. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the residues Arg146, Arg429 and Arg476, which are located at the bottom of the novel binding site, are essential for the oxidation of ABTS and syringaldazine. Specially, a Thr480Phe variant was identified to be almost 3.5 times more specific for ABTS than for syringaldazine compared with the wild type. These results suggest this novel binding site for ABTS could be a potential target for protein engineering of CotA laccases.

  4. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  5. A screening system to identify transcription factors that induce binding site-directed DNA demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takahiro; Maeda, Shiori; Furuhata, Erina; Shimizu, Yuri; Nishimura, Hajime; Kishima, Mami; Suzuki, Harukazu

    2017-12-08

    DNA methylation is a fundamental epigenetic modification that is involved in many biological systems such as differentiation and disease. We and others recently showed that some transcription factors (TFs) are involved in the site-specific determination of DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner, although the reports of such TFs are limited. Here, we develop a screening system to identify TFs that induce binding site-directed DNA methylation changes. The system involves the ectopic expression of target TFs in model cells followed by DNA methylome analysis and overrepresentation analysis of the corresponding TF binding motif at differentially methylated regions. It successfully identified binding site-directed demethylation of SPI1, which is known to promote DNA demethylation in a binding site-directed manner. We extended our screening system to 15 master TFs involved in cellular differentiation and identified eight novel binding site-directed DNA demethylation-inducing TFs (RUNX3, GATA2, CEBPB, MAFB, NR4A2, MYOD1, CEBPA, and TBX5). Gene ontology and tissue enrichment analysis revealed that these TFs demethylate genomic regions associated with corresponding biological roles. We also describe the characteristics of binding site-directed DNA demethylation induced by these TFs, including the targeting of highly methylated CpGs, local DNA demethylation, and the overlap of demethylated regions between TFs of the same family. Our results show the usefulness of the developed screening system for the identification of TFs that induce DNA demethylation in a site-directed manner.

  6. GenProBiS: web server for mapping of sequence variants to protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Skrlj, Blaz; Erzen, Nika; Kunej, Tanja; Janezic, Dusanka

    2017-07-03

    Discovery of potentially deleterious sequence variants is important and has wide implications for research and generation of new hypotheses in human and veterinary medicine, and drug discovery. The GenProBiS web server maps sequence variants to protein structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and further to protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, protein-compound, and protein-metal ion binding sites. The concept of a protein-compound binding site is understood in the broadest sense, which includes glycosylation and other post-translational modification sites. Binding sites were defined by local structural comparisons of whole protein structures using the Protein Binding Sites (ProBiS) algorithm and transposition of ligands from the similar binding sites found to the query protein using the ProBiS-ligands approach with new improvements introduced in GenProBiS. Binding site surfaces were generated as three-dimensional grids encompassing the space occupied by predicted ligands. The server allows intuitive visual exploration of comprehensively mapped variants, such as human somatic mis-sense mutations related to cancer and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms from 21 species, within the predicted binding sites regions for about 80 000 PDB protein structures using fast WebGL graphics. The GenProBiS web server is open and free to all users at http://genprobis.insilab.org. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  8. Methodology for determining acceptable residual radioactive contamination levels at decommissioned nuclear facilities/sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, E.C.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hoenes, G.R.; Waite, D.A.

    1979-01-01

    The ultimate disposition of decommissioned nuclear facilities and their surrrounding sites depends upon the degree and type of residual contamination. Examination of existing guidelines and regulations has led to the conclusion that there is a need for a general method to derive residual radioactive contamination levels that are acceptable for public use of any decommissioned nuclear facility or site. This paper describes a methodology for determining acceptable residual radioactive contamination levels based on the concept of limiting the annual dose to members of the public. It is not the purpose of this paper to recommend or even propose dose limits for the exposure of the public to residual radioactive contamination left at decommissioned nuclear facilities or sites. Unrestricted release of facilities and/or land is based on the premise that the potential annual dose to any member of the public using this property from all possible exposure pathways will not exceed appropriate limits as may be defined by Federal regulatory agencies. For decommissioned land areas, consideration should be given to people living directly on previously contaminated areas, growing crops, grazing food animals and using well water. Mixtures of radionuclides in the residual contamination representative of fuel reprocessing plants, light water reactors and their respective sites are presented. These mixtures are then used to demonstrate the methodology. Example acceptable residual radioactive contamination levels, based on an assumed maximum annual dose of one millirem, are calculated for several selected times following shutdown of a facility. It is concluded that the methodology presented in this paper results in defensible acceptable residual contamination levels that are directly relatable to risk assessment with the proviso that an acceptable limit to the maximum annual dose will be established. (author)

  9. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Derivation of residual radioactive material guidelines for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-11-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines were derived for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) Environmental Restoration (ER) site in Davis, California. The guideline derivation was based on a dose limit of 100 mrem/yr. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code was used in this evaluation. This code implements the methodology described in the DOE manual for implementing residual radioactive material guidelines. Three potential site utilization scenarios were considered with the assumption that following ER action, the site will be used without radiological restrictions. The defined scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. The results of the evaluation indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded, provided that the soil concentrations of these radionuclides at the LEHR site do not exceed the scenario-specific values calculated by this study. Except for the extent of the contaminated zone (which is very conservative), assumptions used are as site-specific as possible, given available information. The derived guidelines are single- radionuclide guidelines and are linearly proportional to the dose limit used in the calculations. In setting the actual residual soil contamination guides for the LEHR site, DOE will apply the as low as reasonably achievable policy to the decision-making process, along with other factors such as whether a particular scenario is reasonable and appropriate, as well as using site-specific inputs to computer models based on data not yet fully determined

  11. Binding affinity of a small molecule to an amorphous polymer in a solvent. Part 1: free energy of binding to a binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunsrivirot, Surasak; Diao, Ying; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-10-18

    Crystallization is commonly used in a separation and purification process in the production of a wide range of materials in various industries. In industry, crystallization usually starts with heterogeneous nucleation on a foreign surface. The complicated mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood; however, we hypothesize that there might be a possible correlation between binding affinity to a surface and enhancement of nucleation. Recent studies show that amorphous polymers can be used to control crystallization, selectively produce pharmaceutical polymorphs, and discover novel pharmaceutical polymorphs. To investigate the possible correlation between the binding affinity of one molecule to key binding sites (local binding) and heterogeneous nucleation activity as well as the possibility of using this binding affinity to help guide the selection of polymers that promote heterogeneous nucleation, we computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to four nonporous cross-linked polymers in an ethanol-water 38 v% mixture. These cross-linked polymers are poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) (PAM), poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) (PCEA), poly(4-hydroxylbutyl acrylate) (PHBA), and polystyrene (PS); all of them were cross-linked with divinylbenzene (DVB). These systems were used because their heterogeneous nucleation activities are available in literature, and the ranking is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. We generated three independent surfaces for each polymer and computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to the best binding site that we found on each surface. The average free energies of binding to the best sites of PAM, PCEA, PHBA, and PS are -20.4 ± 1.0, -16.7 ± 1.0, -14.4 ± 1.1, and -13.6 ± 1.1 kcal/mol, respectively. We found that the trend of the magnitudes of the average free energies of binding to the best sites is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. This trend is very similar to that of heterogeneous nucleation activity. Our results suggest the importance of the

  12. Characterization and autoradiographic localization of multiple tachykinin binding sites in gastrointestinal tract and bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcher, E.; Buck, S.H.; Lovenberg, W.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Binding sites for the (125I)Bolton-Hunter-labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE) and substance P (BHSP) were investigated using crude membrane suspensions and autoradiography. In smooth muscle membranes from guinea-pig small intestine and rat duodenum, specific binding of BHSK was saturable and reversible, showing a single class of sites with a KD of 1 to 3 nM and maximum number of specific binding sites of 1 to 2 fmol/mg of wet weight tissue. Pharmacological characterization of this binding revealed a novel receptor site (K) with affinity for substance K greater than kassinin greater than or equal to eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin. Inhibition of the binding of BHSK in membranes from mouse urinary bladder exhibited a similar K-type pattern. In rat duodenum and mouse bladder membranes, the binding of BHE was inhibited by substance K greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin indicating the same receptor site as for BHSK. In rat cerebral cortex membranes BHE binding was inhibited by neuromedin K = kassinin = eledoisin greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than substance P indicating a definitive tachykinin E receptor site. The same displacement pattern of BHE binding was also detected in longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea-pig small intestine. In mouse bladder membranes and in rat and guinea-pig intestine, the binding of BHSP was inhibited by substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than or equal to eledoisin = kassinin greater than neuromedin K indicating a definitive tachykinin P receptor site. Autoradiographic binding sites for both BHSK and BHSP were seen in circular muscle of the rat stomach, small intestine and colon and in circular and longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig small intestine and colon.

  13. Cell adhesion to fibrillin-1: identification of an Arg-Gly-Asp-dependent synergy region and a heparin-binding site that regulates focal adhesion formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bax, Daniel V; Mahalingam, Yashithra; Cain, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    We have defined the molecular basis of cell adhesion to fibrillin-1, the major structural component of extracellular microfibrils that are associated with elastic fibres. Using human dermal fibroblasts, and recombinant domain swap fragments containing the Arg-Gly-Asp motif, we have demonstrated...... a requirement for upstream domains for integrin-alpha(5)beta(1)-mediated cell adhesion and migration. An adjacent heparin-binding site, which supports focal adhesion formation, was mapped to the fibrillin-1 TB5 motif. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed two arginine residues that are crucial for heparin binding...

  14. NMR assignments for the amino-terminal residues of trp repressor and their role in DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrowsmith, C.H.; Carey, J.; Treat-Clemons, L.; Jardetzky, O.

    1989-01-01

    The trp repressor of Escherichia coli specifically binds to operator DNAs in three operons involved in tryptophan metabolism. The NMR spectra of repressor and a chymotryptic fragment lacking the six amino-terminal residues are compared. Two-dimensional J-correlated spectra of the two forms of the protein are superimposable except for cross-peaks that are associated with the N-terminal region. The chemical shifts and relaxation behavior of the N-terminal resonances suggest mobile arms. Spin-echo experiments on a ternary complex of repressor with L-tryptophan and operator DNA indicate that the termini are also disordered in the complex, although removal of the arms reduces the DNA binding energy. Relaxation measurements on the armless protein show increased mobility for several residues, probably due to helix fraying in the newly exposed N-terminal region. DNA binding by the armless protein does not reduce the mobility of these residues. Thus, it appears that the arms serve to stabilize the N-terminal helix but that this structural role does not explain their contribution to the DNA binding energy. These results suggest that the promiscuous DNA binding by the arms seen in the X-ray crystal structure is found in solution as well

  15. Nucleos: a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parca, Luca; Ferré, Fabrizio; Ausiello, Gabriele; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2013-07-01

    Nucleos is a web server for the identification of nucleotide-binding sites in protein structures. Nucleos compares the structure of a query protein against a set of known template 3D binding sites representing nucleotide modules, namely the nucleobase, carbohydrate and phosphate. Structural features, clustering and conservation are used to filter and score the predictions. The predicted nucleotide modules are then joined to build whole nucleotide-binding sites, which are ranked by their score. The server takes as input either the PDB code of the query protein structure or a user-submitted structure in PDB format. The output of Nucleos is composed of ranked lists of predicted nucleotide-binding sites divided by nucleotide type (e.g. ATP-like). For each ranked prediction, Nucleos provides detailed information about the score, the template structure and the structural match for each nucleotide module composing the nucleotide-binding site. The predictions on the query structure and the template-binding sites can be viewed directly on the web through a graphical applet. In 98% of the cases, the modules composing correct predictions belong to proteins with no homology relationship between each other, meaning that the identification of brand-new nucleotide-binding sites is possible using information from non-homologous proteins. Nucleos is available at http://nucleos.bio.uniroma2.it/nucleos/.

  16. Location and nature of calcium-binding sites in salivary acidic proline-rich phosphoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennick, A.; McLaughlin, A.C.; Grey, A.A.; Madapallimattam, G.

    1981-01-01

    The location of the calcium-binding sites in the human acidic proline-rich proteins, salivary proteins A and C, was determined by equilibrium dialysis of the tryptic peptides with buffers containing 45 Ca. All the calcium-binding sites are located in the NH 2 -terminal tryptic peptide (TX peptide). The nature of the calcium binding sites in the TX peptide and native salivary proteins A and C, as well as dephosphorylated proteins was compared. Two types of sites can be distinguished in peptide TX. Type I sites have an apparent dissociation constant (K) of 38 μM and are responsible for the binding of 2.6 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. The corresponding figures for Type II sites are 780 μM and 5.3 mol of Ca/mol of peptide. In the native proteins, the amount of calcium bound at the type II sites decreases to 3.9 mol of Ca/mol of proteins A and C and K increases to 1100 μM. The amount of calcium bound at type I sites decreases to 1.5 mol/mol of protein A and 0.6 mol/mol of protein C, but there is no change in K. Dephosphorylation affects the calcium binding at both types of sites. The experiments indicate that the COOH-terminal parts of the native proteins affect the number and the nature of the protein calcium-binding sites. Proton and phosphorous NMR data demonstrate that β-COOH in aspartic acid, as well as phosphoserine, are part of the calcium-binding sites. The difference in calcium binding to salivary proteins A and C may be due at least partially to differences in the environment of one or more aspartic acids

  17. The selectivity of the Na+/K+-pump is controlled by binding site protonation and self-correcting occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Huan; Artigas, Pablo; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    The Na+/K+-pump maintains the physiological K+ and Na+ electrochemical gradients across the cell membrane. It operates via an 'alternating-access' mechanism, making iterative transitions between inward-facing (E1) and outward-facing (E2) conformations. Although the general features of the transport cycle are known, the detailed physicochemical factors governing the binding site selectivity remain mysterious. Free energy molecular dynamics simulations show that the ion binding sites switch their binding specificity in E1 and E2. This is accompanied by small structural arrangements and changes in protonation states of the coordinating residues. Additional computations on structural models of the intermediate states along the conformational transition pathway reveal that the free energy barrier toward the occlusion step is considerably increased when the wrong type of ion is loaded into the binding pocket, prohibiting the pump cycle from proceeding forward. This self-correcting mechanism strengthens the overall transport selectivity and protects the stoichiometry of the pump cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16616.001 PMID:27490484

  18. Defining the plasticity of transcription factor binding sites by Deconstructing DNA consensus sequences: the PhoP-binding sites among gamma/enterobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Harari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulators recognize specific DNA sequences. Because these sequences are embedded in the background of genomic DNA, it is hard to identify the key cis-regulatory elements that determine disparate patterns of gene expression. The detection of the intra- and inter-species differences among these sequences is crucial for understanding the molecular basis of both differential gene expression and evolution. Here, we address this problem by investigating the target promoters controlled by the DNA-binding PhoP protein, which governs virulence and Mg(2+ homeostasis in several bacterial species. PhoP is particularly interesting; it is highly conserved in different gamma/enterobacteria, regulating not only ancestral genes but also governing the expression of dozens of horizontally acquired genes that differ from species to species. Our approach consists of decomposing the DNA binding site sequences for a given regulator into families of motifs (i.e., termed submotifs using a machine learning method inspired by the "Divide & Conquer" strategy. By partitioning a motif into sub-patterns, computational advantages for classification were produced, resulting in the discovery of new members of a regulon, and alleviating the problem of distinguishing functional sites in chromatin immunoprecipitation and DNA microarray genome-wide analysis. Moreover, we found that certain partitions were useful in revealing biological properties of binding site sequences, including modular gains and losses of PhoP binding sites through evolutionary turnover events, as well as conservation in distant species. The high conservation of PhoP submotifs within gamma/enterobacteria, as well as the regulatory protein that recognizes them, suggests that the major cause of divergence between related species is not due to the binding sites, as was previously suggested for other regulators. Instead, the divergence may be attributed to the fast evolution of orthologous target

  19. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  20. Crucial Roles of Single Residues in Binding Affinity, Specificity, and Promiscuity in the Cellulosomal Cohesin-Dockerin Interface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutzki, Michal; Reshef, Dan; Barak, Yoav; Haimovitz, Rachel; Rotem-Bamberger, Shahar; Lamed, Raphael; Bayer, Edward A.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2015-01-01

    Interactions between cohesin and dockerin modules play a crucial role in the assembly of multienzyme cellulosome complexes. Although intraspecies cohesin and dockerin modules bind in general with high affinity but indiscriminately, cross-species binding is rare. Here, we combined ELISA-based experiments with Rosetta-based computational design to evaluate the contribution of distinct residues at the Clostridium thermocellum cohesin-dockerin interface to binding affinity, specificity, and promiscuity. We found that single mutations can show distinct and significant effects on binding affinity and specificity. In particular, mutations at cohesin position Asn37 show dramatic variability in their effect on dockerin binding affinity and specificity: the N37A mutant binds promiscuously both to cognate (C. thermocellum) as well as to non-cognate Clostridium cellulolyticum dockerin. N37L in turn switches binding specificity: compared with the wild-type C. thermocellum cohesin, this mutant shows significantly increased preference for C. cellulolyticum dockerin combined with strongly reduced binding to its cognate C. thermocellum dockerin. The observation that a single mutation can overcome the naturally observed specificity barrier provides insights into the evolutionary dynamics of this system that allows rapid modulation of binding specificity within a high affinity background. PMID:25833947

  1. Use of thallium to identify monovalent cation binding sites in GroEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Philip D.; Lorimer, George H.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    GroEL is a bacterial chaperone protein that assembles into a homotetra­decameric complex exhibiting D 7 symmetry and utilizes the co-chaperone protein GroES and ATP hydrolysis to assist in the proper folding of a variety of cytosolic proteins. GroEL utilizes two metal cofactors, Mg2+ and K+, to bind and hydrolyze ATP. A K+-binding site has been proposed to be located next to the nucleotide-binding site, but the available structural data do not firmly support this conclusion. Moreover, more than one functionally significant K+-binding site may exist within GroEL. Because K+ has important and complex effects on GroEL activity and is involved in both positive (intra-ring) and negative (inter-ring) cooperativity for ATP hydrolysis, it is important to determine the exact location of these cation-binding site(s) within GroEL. In this study, the K+ mimetic Tl+ was incorporated into GroEL crystals, a moderately redundant 3.94 Å resolution X-ray diffraction data set was collected from a single crystal and the strong anomalous scattering signal from the thallium ion was used to identify monovalent cation-binding sites. The results confirmed the previously proposed placement of K+ next to the nucleotide-binding site and also identified additional binding sites that may be important for GroEL function and cooperativity. These findings also demonstrate the general usefulness of Tl+ for the identification of monovalent cation-binding sites in protein crystal structures, even when the quality and resolution of the diffraction data are relatively low. PMID:19851000

  2. [3H]mazindol binding associated with neuronal dopamine and norepinephrine uptake sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javitch, J A; Blaustein, R O; Snyder, S H

    1984-07-01

    [3H]Mazindol labels neuronal dopamine uptake sites in corpus striatum membranes (KD = 18 nM) and neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex and submaxillary/sublingual gland membranes (KD = 4 nM). The potencies of various inhibitors of biogenic amine uptake in reducing [3H]mazindol binding in striatal membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal [3H]dopamine accumulation, whereas their potencies in reducing [3H]mazindol binding to cortical and salivary gland membranes correlate with their potencies for inhibition of neuronal [3H]norepinephrine accumulation. Similar to the dopamine and norepinephrine uptake systems, [3H]mazindol binding in all three tissues is dependent upon sodium (with potassium, lithium, rubidium, and Tris being ineffective substitutes) and chloride (with sulfate and phosphate being ineffective substitutes). In membranes of the cerebral cortex and salivary gland, half-maximal stimulation is observed at 50-80 mM NaCl, whereas in membranes of the corpus striatum half-maximal stimulation occurs at 240 mM NaCl. In striatal membranes NaCl increases the affinity of [3H]mazindol binding with no effect on the maximal number of sites. The enhancement of affinity is due to a selective slowing of the dissociation of the ligand from its binding site. The association of [3H]mazindol binding sites with neuronal dopamine uptake sites in the corpus striatum is further supported by the reduction of [3H]mazindol binding sites in striatal membranes following destruction of dopaminergic neurons by 6-hydroxydopamine. Similarly, the association of [3H]mazindol binding sites with neuronal norepinephrine uptake sites in cerebral cortex is supported by the reduction of [3H]mazindol binding to cortical membranes following destruction of noradrenergic neurons by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine.

  3. The nucleotide-binding site of the Escherichia coli DnaC protein: molecular topography of DnaC protein-nucleotide cofactor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletto, Roberto; Jezewska, Maria J; Maillard, Rodrigo; Bujalowski, Wlodzimierz

    2005-01-01

    The structure of the nucleotide-binding site of the Escherichia coli replication factor DnaC protein and the effect of the nucleotide cofactor on the protein structure have been examined using ultraviolet, steady-state, and time-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy. Emission spectra and quenching studies of the fluorescent nucleotide analogs, 3'-O-(N-methylantraniloyl)-5'-triphosphate (MANT-ATP) and 3'-O-(N-methylantraniloyl)-5'-diphosphate (MANT-ADP), bound to the DnaC protein indicate that the nucleotide-binding site forms a hydrophobic cleft on the surface of the protein. Fluorescence decays of free and bound MANT-ATP and MANT-ADP indicate that cofactors exist in two different conformations both, free and bound to the protein. However, the two conformations of the bound nucleotides differ in their solvent accessibilities. Moreover, there are significant differences in the solvent accessibility between ATP and ADP complexes. Specific binding of magnesium to the protein controls the structure of the binding site, particularly, in the case of the ATP complex, leading to additional opening of the binding site cleft. Both tyrosine and tryptophan residues are located on the surface of the protein. The tryptophans are clustered at a large distance from the nucleotide-binding site. However, in spite of a large spatial separation, binding of both cofactors induces significant and different changes in the structure of the environment of tryptophans, indicating long-range structural effects through the DnaC molecule. Moreover, only ATP induces changes in the distribution of the tyrosine residues on the surface of the protein. The data reveal that the nucleotide-DnaC protein complex is a sophisticated allosteric system, responding differently to the ATP and ADP binding.

  4. Exploring the binding sites and binding mechanism for hydrotrope encapsulated griseofulvin drug on γ-tubulin protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shubhadip; Paul, Sandip

    2018-01-01

    The protein γ-tubulin plays an important role in centrosomal clustering and this makes it an attractive therapeutic target for treating cancers. Griseofulvin, an antifungal drug, has recently been used to inhibit proliferation of various types of cancer cells. It can also affect the microtubule dynamics by targeting the γ-tubulin protein. So far, the binding pockets of γ-tubulin protein are not properly identified and the exact mechanism by which the drug binds to it is an area of intense speculation and research. The aim of the present study is to investigate the binding mechanism and binding affinity of griseofulvin on γ-tubulin protein using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Since the drug griseofulvin is sparingly soluble in water, here we also present a promising approach for formulating and achieving delivery of hydrophobic griseofulvin drug via hydrotrope sodium cumene sulfonate (SCS) cluster. We observe that the binding pockets of γ-tubulin protein are mainly formed by the H8, H9 helices and S7, S8, S14 strands and the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and γ-tubulin protein drive the binding process. The release of the drug griseofulvin from the SCS cluster is confirmed by the coordination number analysis. We also find hydrotrope-induced alteration of the binding sites of γ-tubulin protein and the weakening of the drug-protein interactions.

  5. Exploring the binding sites and binding mechanism for hydrotrope encapsulated griseofulvin drug on γ-tubulin protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhadip Das

    Full Text Available The protein γ-tubulin plays an important role in centrosomal clustering and this makes it an attractive therapeutic target for treating cancers. Griseofulvin, an antifungal drug, has recently been used to inhibit proliferation of various types of cancer cells. It can also affect the microtubule dynamics by targeting the γ-tubulin protein. So far, the binding pockets of γ-tubulin protein are not properly identified and the exact mechanism by which the drug binds to it is an area of intense speculation and research. The aim of the present study is to investigate the binding mechanism and binding affinity of griseofulvin on γ-tubulin protein using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Since the drug griseofulvin is sparingly soluble in water, here we also present a promising approach for formulating and achieving delivery of hydrophobic griseofulvin drug via hydrotrope sodium cumene sulfonate (SCS cluster. We observe that the binding pockets of γ-tubulin protein are mainly formed by the H8, H9 helices and S7, S8, S14 strands and the hydrophobic interactions between the drug and γ-tubulin protein drive the binding process. The release of the drug griseofulvin from the SCS cluster is confirmed by the coordination number analysis. We also find hydrotrope-induced alteration of the binding sites of γ-tubulin protein and the weakening of the drug-protein interactions.

  6. Quantitative autoradiography of (/sup 125/I) apamin binding sites in the central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janicki, P.K.; Horvath, E.; Habermann, E. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Rudolf-Buchheim-Institut fuer Pharmakologie); Seibold, G. (Giessen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Strahlenzentrum)

    1984-12-01

    The binding sites for (/sup 125/I) apamin in the central nervous system of rat, guinea-pig, chicken and frog were assessed by quantitative autoradiography on X-ray film. In rat and guinea-pig brain apamin labels preferentially the limbic-olfactory system, i.e. nucleus olfactorius, nuclei septi, habenula and hippocampus. In the rat spinal cord the peptide binds preferentially to the substantia gelatinosa. Tectum opticum and nuclei isthmi are labelled in chicken brain. In frog brain no preferentially 'apamin-stained' area was found. The role of the cerebral binding sites is still unknown, whereas the spinal sites may be involved in apamin poisoning.

  7. Nucleotide Binding Site Communication in Arabidopsis thaliana Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Kinase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravilious, Geoffrey E.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate kinase (APSK) catalyzes the ATP-dependent synthesis of adenosine 3′-phosphate 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS), which is an essential metabolite for sulfur assimilation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Using APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana, we examine the energetics of nucleotide binary and ternary complex formation and probe active site features that coordinate the order of ligand addition. Calorimetric analysis shows that binding can occur first at either nucleotide site, but that initial interaction at the ATP/ADP site was favored and enhanced affinity for APS in the second site by 50-fold. The thermodynamics of the two possible binding models (i.e. ATP first versus APS first) differs and implies that active site structural changes guide the order of nucleotide addition. The ligand binding analysis also supports an earlier suggestion of intermolecular interactions in the dimeric APSK structure. Crystallographic, site-directed mutagenesis, and energetic analyses of oxyanion recognition by the P-loop in the ATP/ADP binding site and the role of Asp136, which bridges the ATP/ADP and APS/PAPS binding sites, suggest how the ordered nucleotide binding sequence and structural changes are dynamically coordinated for catalysis. PMID:22810229

  8. Autoradiographic characterization of L-[3H]glutamate binding sites in the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenamyre, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    A quantitative autoradiographic technique was developed to study L-[ 3 H[glutamate binding in sections of central nervous system tissue. This technique circumvented some problems associated with conventional receptor binding methodologies and allowed direct assessment of regional distribution, numbers and affinities of glutamate binding sites. The sensitivity and high degree of anatomical resolution attainable by autoradiography obviated the need for pooled samples of microdissected specimens. Under assay conditions, [ 4 H]glutamate bound rapidly and reversibly to sections of rat brain and was not metabolized appreciably. The distribution of glutamate binding sites corresponded to the projection areas of putative glutamatergic pathways. Thus, there was heavy glutamate binding in regions where there is evidence for glutamatergic innervation and little binding in nuclei which apparently do not receive glutamatergic input. Scatchard and Hill plots suggested that glutamate was interacting with a single population of sites; however, competition studies revealed binding site heterogeneity. Anatomical and pharmacological evidence suggested that the NMDA-, high affinity quisqualate-, and kainate-sensitive glutamate binding sites may correspond to physiologically-defined NMDA, quisqualate and kainate receptors

  9. Investigation of the metal binding site in methionine aminopeptidase by density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne Techau; Norrby, Per-Ola; Liljefors, Tommy

    2002-01-01

    All methionine aminopeptidases exhibit the same conserved metal binding site. The structure of this site with either Co2+ ions or Zn2+ ions was investigated using density functional theory. The calculations showed that the structure of the site was not influenced by the identity of the metal ions...

  10. Quantitative autoradiographic distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenamyre, J.T.; Young, A.B.; Penney, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to determine the distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in the rat central nervous system. Autoradiography was carried out in the presence of Cl- and Ca2+ ions. Scatchard plots and Hill coefficients of glutamate binding suggested that glutamate was interacting with a single population of sites having a K-D of about 300 nM and a capacity of 14.5 pmol/mg of protein. In displacement studies, ibotenate also appeared to bind to a single class of non-interacting sites with a KI of 28 microM. However, quisqualate displacement of [3H]glutamate binding revealed two well-resolved sites with KIS of 12 nM and 114 microM in striatum. These sites were unevenly distributed, representing different proportions of specific glutamate binding in different brain regions. The distribution of glutamate-binding sites correlated very well with the projection areas of putative glutamatergic pathways. This technique provides an extremely sensitive assay which can be used to gather detailed pharmacological and anatomical information about L-[3H]glutamate binding in the central nervous system

  11. Influenza human monoclonal antibody 1F1 interacts with three major antigenic sites and residues mediating human receptor specificity in H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshidi Tsibane

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA head domain exhibit very limited breadth of inhibitory activity due to antigenic drift in field strains. However, mAb 1F1, isolated from a 1918 influenza pandemic survivor, inhibits select human H1 viruses (1918, 1943, 1947, and 1977 isolates. The crystal structure of 1F1 in complex with the 1918 HA shows that 1F1 contacts residues that are classically defined as belonging to three distinct antigenic sites, Sa, Sb and Ca(2. The 1F1 heavy chain also reaches into the receptor binding site (RBS and interacts with residues that contact sialoglycan receptors and determine HA receptor specificity. The 1F1 epitope is remarkably similar to the previously described murine HC63 H3 epitope, despite significant sequence differences between H1 and H3 HAs. Both antibodies potently inhibit receptor binding, but only HC63 can block the pH-induced conformational changes in HA that drive membrane fusion. Contacts within the RBS suggested that 1F1 may be sensitive to changes that alter HA receptor binding activity. Affinity assays confirmed that sequence changes that switch the HA to avian receptor specificity affect binding of 1F1 and a mAb possessing a closely related heavy chain, 1I20. To characterize 1F1 cross-reactivity, additional escape mutant selection and site-directed mutagenesis were performed. Residues 190 and 227 in the 1F1 epitope were found to be critical for 1F1 reactivity towards 1918, 1943 and 1977 HAs, as well as for 1I20 reactivity towards the 1918 HA. Therefore, 1F1 heavy-chain interactions with conserved RBS residues likely contribute to its ability to inhibit divergent HAs.

  12. On the catalytic role of the active site residue E121 of E. coli L-aspartate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriella; Nonnis, Simona; Strumbo, Bice; Cruciani, Gabriele; Carosati, Emanuele; Negri, Armando

    2010-10-01

    L-aspartate oxidase (LASPO) is a flavoenzyme catalyzing the first step in the de novo biosynthesis of NAD+. The enzyme oxidizes L-aspartate both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions using oxygen as well as fumarate as electron acceptor. In accordance with its catalytic activities, LASPO displays strong primary and tertiary structure similarity with the flavin containing subunit of the proteins belonging to the succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase family. The similarity extends to the active site residues, with LASPO differing from the other enzymes of the family only for the presence of a conserved glutamate (E121), which is substituted by apolar amino acids in the other enzymes. Three complementary approaches have been used to define the role of E121 in LASPO: characterization of mutants (E121A, E121Q, E121D and E121K), investigation of the catalytic activities of WT and mutants towards substrates and substrate analogues and molecular docking studies. All mutants retain fumarate reductase activity. On the contrary, all mutants lack L-aspartate oxidase activity, although retaining the ability to bind L-aspartate (except for E121K). These results and investigations on the oxidase activity towards substrate analogues suggest that the roles of E121 in catalysis include orienting L-aspartate in a productive binding mode and favouring proton abstraction from C2 by an active site base. Molecular docking studies of the substrate (L-aspartate), inhibitor (D-aspartate) and product (imino aspartate) in the active site of LASPO confirm that (a) the substrate/product energetically favoured orientation in the active site supports the conclusions reported above, (b) E121 interacts favourably with the charged amino group of the substrate and (c) different ligands might assume different orientations in the active site of the enzyme. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, S.H.; Burcher, E.

    1985-11-01

    The specific binding of the /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE), and substance P (BHSP) was examined in crude membrane suspensions and by autoradiography in rat submaxillary gland. All three ligands at 0.1 nM concentrations exhibited binding that was inhibited by tachykinins in a potency rank order of substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than eledoisin greater than kassinin greater than neuromedin K with slope factors essentially equal to unity. All tachykinins were 5 to 10 times more potent in inhibiting BHSK and BHE binding compared to BHSP binding. Autoradiographic visualization of BHSK and BHSP binding sites in the gland revealed extensive labeling of mucous and serous acini. The intensity of labeling was much less for BHSK than for BHSP. The results indicate that the rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites.

  14. Photoaffinity studies of the tubulin-colchicine binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A variety of colchicine derivatives were synthesized and coupled with 3,3,3-trifluoro-2-diazapropionyl chloride (TFDP-Cl) to produce colchicine photoaffinity analogs for use in tubulin labelling studies. Photoaffinity analogs of allocolchicine and podophylotoxin were also made using the same photoreactive moiety. Several labels were found to be effective inhibitors of tubulin polymerization. The approximate tubulin binding constants of the labels, calculated from polymerization inhibition data, varied between 2.2 x 10 5 to 2.5 x 10 3 M -1 . The labels chosen for use in tubulin labelling experiments were (N-TFDP) deacetyl-thiocolchicine 1, (O-TFDP)thiocolchifoline 2, and (O-TFDP)-2-demethylthiocolchicine 3. Compound 1 was found to bind tubulin reversibly and to competitively inhibit colchicine binding. Methods for the incorporation of tritium and 14 C in these labels were developed. Conditions were found which caused labels to insert into solvent without photorearrangement of the colchicine skeleton. Catalytic base caused the α-diazo amide of 1 to rearrange to a triazole

  15. Prolactin binding sites on human chorion-decidua tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWey, L.A.; Singhas, C.A.; Rogol, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    An effective procedure has been developed and utilized to demonstrate the presence of prolactin receptors on the plasma membranes of human chorion-decidua cells. Particulate fractions from human chorion-decidua sedimenting between 1,500 and 45,000 x g display optimal binding of 125 I-labeled ovine prolactin when incubated at a membrane protein concentration of 200 micrograms per assay tube for 2 hours at 22 degrees C. Specific binding was increased by pretreatment of the membrane particles with 5M magnesium chloride to remove endogenous prolactin. These receptors show binding parameters (affinity, 0.92 x 10(9) L/mode; capacity, approximately 80 fmoles/mg) similar to those of lactogenic receptors in the rabbit mammary gland and, the rabbit and rat liver. The presence of prolactin receptors in human chorion-decidua suggests that may play a role in mediating local action(s) of prolactin such as involvement in the decidualization reaction or in maintaining fetal osmoregulation

  16. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, Ana P.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Serra, Osvaldo A.; Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D.; Wong, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu 3+ /Na + or K + with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan

  17. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog Leu......T. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed...... mutagenesis and by trapping the radiolabeled cocaine analog [3H]CFT in the transporter, either by cross-linking engineered cysteines or with an engineered Zn2+-binding site that was situated extracellularly to the predicted common binding pocket. Our data demonstrate the molecular basis for the competitive...

  18. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR2 is a G protein-coupled receptor that is involved in many diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, and therefore a large variety of CCR2 small molecule antagonists has been developed. On the basis of their chemical structures these antagonists can roughly...... be divided into two groups with most likely two topographically distinct binding sites. The aim of the current study was to identify the binding site of one such group of ligands, exemplified by three allosteric antagonists, CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. We first used a chimeric CCR2/CCR5 receptor...... approach to obtain insight into the binding site of the allosteric antagonists and additionally introduced eight single point mutations in CCR2 to further characterize the putative binding pocket. All constructs were studied in radioligand binding and/or functional IP turnover assays, providing evidence...

  19. Identification of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 receptor binding site in botulinum neurotoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strotmeier, Jasmin; Mahrhold, Stefan; Krez, Nadja; Janzen, Constantin; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D; Binz, Thomas; Rummel, Andreas

    2014-04-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) inhibit neurotransmitter release by hydrolysing SNARE proteins. The most important serotype BoNT/A employs the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) isoforms A-C as neuronal receptors. Here, we identified their binding site by blocking SV2 interaction using monoclonal antibodies with characterised epitopes within the cell binding domain (HC). The site is located on the backside of the conserved ganglioside binding pocket at the interface of the HCC and HCN subdomains. The dimension of the binding pocket was characterised in detail by site directed mutagenesis allowing the development of potent inhibitors as well as modifying receptor binding properties. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An Accessory Agonist Binding Site Promotes Activation of α4β2* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyi; Kuryatov, Alexander; Sriram, Aarati; Jin, Zhuang; Kamenecka, Theodore M; Kenny, Paul J; Lindstrom, Jon

    2015-05-29

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing α4, β2, and sometimes other subunits (α4β2* nAChRs) regulate addictive and other behavioral effects of nicotine. These nAChRs exist in several stoichiometries, typically with two high affinity acetylcholine (ACh) binding sites at the interface of α4 and β2 subunits and a fifth accessory subunit. A third low affinity ACh binding site is formed when this accessory subunit is α4 but not if it is β2. Agonists selective for the accessory ACh site, such as 3-[3-(3-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzonitrile (NS9283), cannot alone activate a nAChR but can facilitate more efficient activation in combination with agonists at the canonical α4β2 sites. We therefore suggest categorizing agonists according to their site selectivity. NS9283 binds to the accessory ACh binding site; thus it is termed an accessory site-selective agonist. We expressed (α4β2)2 concatamers in Xenopus oocytes with free accessory subunits to obtain defined nAChR stoichiometries and α4/accessory subunit interfaces. We show that α2, α3, α4, and α6 accessory subunits can form binding sites for ACh and NS9283 at interfaces with α4 subunits, but β2 and β4 accessory subunits cannot. To permit selective blockage of the accessory site, α4 threonine 126 located on the minus side of α4 that contributes to the accessory site, but not the α4β2 sites, was mutated to cysteine. Alkylation of this cysteine with a thioreactive reagent blocked activity of ACh and NS9283 at the accessory site. Accessory agonist binding sites are promising drug targets. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. NMR WaterLOGSY Reveals Weak Binding of Bisphenol A with Amyloid Fibers of a Conserved 11 Residue Peptide from Androgen Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Asencio-Hernández

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that bisphenol A (BPA, a molecule largely released in the environment, has detrimental effects on ecosystems and on human health. It acts as an endocrine disruptor targeting steroid hormone receptors, such as the estrogen receptor (ER, estrogen-related receptor (ERR and androgen receptor (AR. BPA-derived molecules have recently been shown to interact with the AR N-terminal domain (AR-NTD, which is known to be largely intrinsically disordered. This N-terminal domain contains an 11 residue conserved domain that forms amyloid fibers upon oxidative dimerisation through its strictly conserved Cys240 residue. We investigate here the interaction of BPA, and other potential endocrine disruptors, with AR-NTD amyloid fibers using the WaterLOGSY NMR experiment. We observed a selective binding of these compounds to the amyloid fibers formed by the AR-NTD conserved region and glutamine homopolymers. This observation suggests that the high potency of endocrine disruptors may result, in part, from their ability to bind amyloid forms of nuclear receptors in addition to their cognate binding sites. This property may be exploited to design future therapeutic strategies targeting AR related diseases such as the spinal bulbar muscular atrophy or prostate cancer. The ability of NMR WaterLOGSY experiments to detect weak interactions between small ligands and amyloid fibers may prove to be of particular interest for identifying promising hit molecules.

  2. Localization of 125I-insulin binding sites in the rat hypothalamus by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corp, E.S.; Woods, S.C.; Figlewicz, D.P.; Porte, D. Jr.; Baskin, D.G.; Dorsa, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    In vitro autoradiography and computer video densitometry were used to localize and quantify binding of 125 I-insulin in the hypothalamus of the rat brain. Highest specific binding was found in the arculate, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and periventricular regions. Significantly lower binding was present in the ventromedial nucleus and median eminence. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin modulates the neural regulation of feeding by acting at sites in the hypothalamus. (author)

  3. Computational design of trimeric influenza-neutralizing proteins targeting the hemagglutinin receptor binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauch, Eva-Maria; Bernard, Steffen M.; La, David; Bohn, Alan J.; Lee, Peter S.; Anderson, Caitlin E.; Nieusma, Travis; Holstein, Carly A.; Garcia, Natalie K.; Hooper, Kathryn A.; Ravichandran, Rashmi; Nelson, Jorgen W.; Sheffler, William; Bloom, Jesse D.; Lee, Kelly K.; Ward, Andrew B.; Yager, Paul; Fuller, Deborah H.; Wilson, Ian A.; Baker , David (UWASH); (Scripps); (FHCRC)

    2017-06-12

    Many viral surface glycoproteins and cell surface receptors are homo-oligomers1, 2, 3, 4, and thus can potentially be targeted by geometrically matched homo-oligomers that engage all subunits simultaneously to attain high avidity and/or lock subunits together. The adaptive immune system cannot generally employ this strategy since the individual antibody binding sites are not arranged with appropriate geometry to simultaneously engage multiple sites in a single target homo-oligomer. We describe a general strategy for the computational design of homo-oligomeric protein assemblies with binding functionality precisely matched to homo-oligomeric target sites5, 6, 7, 8. In the first step, a small protein is designed that binds a single site on the target. In the second step, the designed protein is assembled into a homo-oligomer such that the designed binding sites are aligned with the target sites. We use this approach to design high-avidity trimeric proteins that bind influenza A hemagglutinin (HA) at its conserved receptor binding site. The designed trimers can both capture and detect HA in a paper-based diagnostic format, neutralizes influenza in cell culture, and completely protects mice when given as a single dose 24 h before or after challenge with influenza.

  4. Three amino acid residues bind corn odorants to McinOBP1 in the polyembryonic endoparasitoid of Macrocentrus cingulum Brischke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tofael Ahmed

    Full Text Available Odorant binding proteins (OBPs play a central role in transporting odorant molecules from the sensillum lymph to olfactory receptors to initiate behavioral responses. In this study, the OBP of Macrocentrus cingulum McinOBP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni ion affinity chromatography. Real-time PCR experiments indicate that the McinOBP1 is expressed mainly in adult antennae, with expression levels differing by sex. Ligand-binding experiments using N-phenyl-naphthylamine (1-NPN as a fluorescent probe demonstrated that the McinOBP1 can bind green-leaf volatiles, including aldehydes and terpenoids, but also can bind aliphatic alcohols with good affinity, in the order trans-2-nonenal>cis-3-hexen-1-ol>trans-caryophelle, suggesting a role of McinOBP1 in general odorant chemoreception. We chose those three odorants for further homology modeling and ligand docking based on their binding affinity. The Val58, Leu62 and Glu130 are the key amino acids in the binding pockets that bind with these three odorants. The three mutants, Val58, Leu62 and Glu130, where the valine, leucine and glutamic residues were replaced by alanine, proline and alanine, respectively; showed reduced affinity to these odorants. This information suggests, Val58, Leu62 and Glu130 are involved in the binding of these compounds, possibly through the specific recognition of ligands that forms hydrogen bonds with the ligands functional groups.

  5. Evolutionary mirages: selection on binding site composition creates the illusion of conserved grammars in Drosophila enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard W Lusk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The clustering of transcription factor binding sites in developmental enhancers and the apparent preferential conservation of clustered sites have been widely interpreted as proof that spatially constrained physical interactions between transcription factors are required for regulatory function. However, we show here that selection on the composition of enhancers alone, and not their internal structure, leads to the accumulation of clustered sites with evolutionary dynamics that suggest they are preferentially conserved. We simulated the evolution of idealized enhancers from Drosophila melanogaster constrained to contain only a minimum number of binding sites for one or more factors. Under this constraint, mutations that destroy an existing binding site are tolerated only if a compensating site has emerged elsewhere in the enhancer. Overlapping sites, such as those frequently observed for the activator Bicoid and repressor Krüppel, had significantly longer evolutionary half-lives than isolated sites for the same factors. This leads to a substantially higher density of overlapping sites than expected by chance and the appearance that such sites are preferentially conserved. Because D. melanogaster (like many other species has a bias for deletions over insertions, sites tended to become closer together over time, leading to an overall clustering of sites in the absence of any selection for clustered sites. Since this effect is strongest for the oldest sites, clustered sites also incorrectly appear to be preferentially conserved. Following speciation, sites tend to be closer together in all descendent species than in their common ancestors, violating the common assumption that shared features of species' genomes reflect their ancestral state. Finally, we show that selection on binding site composition alone recapitulates the observed number of overlapping and closely neighboring sites in real D. melanogaster enhancers. Thus, this study calls into

  6. Dual Role of φ29 DNA Polymerase Lys529 in Stabilisation of the DNA Priming-Terminus and the Terminal Protein-Priming Residue at the Polymerisation Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Prado, Alicia; Lázaro, José M.; Villar, Laurentino; Salas, Margarita; de Vega, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of the crystallographic structure of φ29 DNA polymerase binary and ternary complexes showed that residue Lys529, located at the C-terminus of the palm subdomain, establishes contacts with the 3′ terminal phosphodiester bond. In this paper, site-directed mutants at this Lys residue were used to analyse its functional importance for the synthetic activities of φ29 DNA polymerase, an enzyme that starts linear φ29 DNA replication using a terminal protein (TP) as primer. Our results show that single replacement of φ29 DNA polymerase residue Lys529 by Ala or Glu decreases the stabilisation of the primer-terminus at the polymerisation active site, impairing both the insertion of the incoming nucleotide when DNA and TP are used as primers and the translocation step required for the next incoming nucleotide incorporation. In addition, combination of the DNA polymerase mutants with a TP derivative at residue Glu233, neighbour to the priming residue Ser232, leads us to infer a direct contact between Lys529 and Glu233 for initiation of TP-DNA replication. Altogether, the results are compatible with a sequential binding of φ29 DNA polymerase residue Lys529 with TP and DNA during replication of TP-DNA. PMID:24023769

  7. Phocid seal leptin: tertiary structure and hydrophobic receptor binding site preservation during distinct leptin gene evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Hammond

    Full Text Available The cytokine hormone leptin is a key signalling molecule in many pathways that control physiological functions. Although leptin demonstrates structural conservation in mammals, there is evidence of positive selection in primates, lagomorphs and chiropterans. We previously reported that the leptin genes of the grey and harbour seals (phocids have significantly diverged from other mammals. Therefore we further investigated the diversification of leptin in phocids, other marine mammals and terrestrial taxa by sequencing the leptin genes of representative species. Phylogenetic reconstruction revealed that leptin diversification was pronounced within the phocid seals with a high dN/dS ratio of 2.8, indicating positive selection. We found significant evidence of positive selection along the branch leading to the phocids, within the phocid clade, but not over the dataset as a whole. Structural predictions indicate that the individual residues under selection are away from the leptin receptor (LEPR binding site. Predictions of the surface electrostatic potential indicate that phocid seal leptin is notably different to other mammalian leptins, including the otariids. Cloning the grey seal leptin binding domain of LEPR confirmed that this was structurally conserved. These data, viewed in toto, support a hypothesis that phocid leptin divergence is unlikely to have arisen by random mutation. Based upon these phylogenetic and structural assessments, and considering the comparative physiology and varying life histories among species, we postulate that the unique phocid diving behaviour has produced this selection pressure. The Phocidae includes some of the deepest diving species, yet have the least modified lung structure to cope with pressure and volume changes experienced at depth. Therefore, greater surfactant production is required to facilitate rapid lung re-inflation upon surfacing, while maintaining patent airways. We suggest that this additional

  8. Peptide microarrays to probe for competition for binding sites in a protein interaction network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinzinger, M.D.S.; Ruttekolk, I.R.R.; Gloerich, J.; Wessels, H.; Chung, Y.D.; Adjobo-Hermans, M.J.W.; Brock, R.E.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular protein interaction networks are a result of the binding preferences of a particular protein and the entirety of interactors that mutually compete for binding sites. Therefore, the reconstruction of interaction networks by the accumulation of interaction networks for individual proteins

  9. Probing and mapping the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duman, Memed

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is an effective technique for preparing recognition sites which act as synthetic receptors on polymeric surfaces. Herein, we synthesized MIP surfaces with specific binding sites for streptavidin and characterized them at nanoscale by using two different atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. While the single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) reveals the unbinding kinetics between streptavidin molecule and binding sites, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) was employed, for the first time, to directly map the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymers. Streptavidin modified AFM cantilever showed specific unbinding events with an unbinding force around 300 pN and the binding probability was calculated as 35.2% at a given loading rate. In order to prove the specificity of the interaction, free streptavidin molecules were added to AFM liquid cell and the binding probability was significantly decreased to 7.6%. Moreover, the recognition maps show that the smallest recognition site with a diameter of around ∼ 21 nm which corresponds to a single streptavidin molecule binding site. We believe that the potential of combining SMFS and TREC opens new possibilities for the characterization of MIP surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Graphical abstract: Simultaneous Topography and RECognition (TREC) imaging is a novel characterization technique to reveal binding sites on molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Highlights: • Highly specific streptavidin printed polymer surfaces were synthesized. • Unbinding kinetic rate of single streptavidin molecule was studied by SMFS. • The distribution of binding pockets was revealed for the first time by TREC imaging. • TREC showed that the binding pockets formed nano-domains on MIP surface. • SMFS and TREC are powerful AFM techniques for characterization of MIP surfaces

  10. Mathematical description of drug-target interactions: application to biologics that bind to targets with two binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibiansky, Leonid; Gibiansky, Ekaterina

    2018-02-01

    The emerging discipline of mathematical pharmacology occupies the space between advanced pharmacometrics and systems biology. A characteristic feature of the approach is application of advance mathematical methods to study the behavior of biological systems as described by mathematical (most often differential) equations. One of the early application of mathematical pharmacology (that was not called this name at the time) was formulation and investigation of the target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) model and its approximations. The model was shown to be remarkably successful, not only in describing the observed data for drug-target interactions, but also in advancing the qualitative and quantitative understanding of those interactions and their role in pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of biologics. The TMDD model in its original formulation describes the interaction of the drug that has one binding site with the target that also has only one binding site. Following the framework developed earlier for drugs with one-to-one binding, this work aims to describe a rigorous approach for working with similar systems and to apply it to drugs that bind to targets with two binding sites. The quasi-steady-state, quasi-equilibrium, irreversible binding, and Michaelis-Menten approximations of the model are also derived. These equations can be used, in particular, to predict concentrations of the partially bound target (RC). This could be clinically important if RC remains active and has slow internalization rate. In this case, introduction of the drug aimed to suppress target activity may lead to the opposite effect due to RC accumulation.

  11. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  12. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  13. Structural Insights into TMB-1 and the Role of Residues 119 and 228 in Substrate and Inhibitor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skagseth, Susann; Christopeit, Tony; Akhter, Sundus; Bayer, Annette; Samuelsen, Ørjan; Leiros, Hanna-Kirsti S

    2017-08-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) threaten the effectiveness of β-lactam antibiotics, including carbapenems, and are a concern for global public health. β-Lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations active against class A and class D carbapenemases are used, but no clinically useful MBL inhibitor is currently available. Tripoli metallo-β-lactamase-1 (TMB-1) and TMB-2 are members of MBL subclass B1a, where TMB-2 is an S228P variant of TMB-1. The role of S228P was studied by comparisons of TMB-1 and TMB-2, and E119 was investigated through the construction of site-directed mutants of TMB-1, E119Q, E119S, and E119A (E119Q/S/A). All TMB variants were characterized through enzyme kinetic studies. Thermostability and crystallization analyses of TMB-1 were performed. Thiol-based inhibitors were investigated by determining the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) and binding using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for analysis of TMB-1. Thermostability measurements found TMB-1 to be stabilized by high NaCl concentrations. Steady-state enzyme kinetics analyses found substitutions of E119, in particular, substitutions associated with the penicillins, to affect hydrolysis to some extent. TMB-2 with S228P showed slightly reduced catalytic efficiency compared to TMB-1. The IC 50 levels of the new thiol-based inhibitors were 0.66 μM (inhibitor 2a) and 0.62 μM (inhibitor 2b), and the equilibrium dissociation constant ( K D ) of inhibitor 2a was 1.6 μM; thus, both were more potent inhibitors than l-captopril (IC 50 = 47 μM; K D = 25 μM). The crystal structure of TMB-1 was resolved to 1.75 Å. Modeling of inhibitor 2b in the TMB-1 active site suggested that the presence of the W64 residue results in T-shaped π-π stacking and R224 cation-π interactions with the phenyl ring of the inhibitor. In sum, the results suggest that residues 119 and 228 affect the catalytic efficiency of TMB-1 and that inhibitors 2a and 2b are more potent inhibitors for TMB-1 than l-captopril. Copyright

  14. Radiolabeling of dopamine uptake sites in mouse striatum: comparison of binding sites for cocaine, mazindol, and GBR 12935.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reith, M E; Selmeci, G

    1992-03-01

    This study addressed the possibility of a unique binding interaction between cocaine and the dopamine transporter as compared with other blockers of dopamine uptake. Cocaine binding sites in a fresh P2 fraction of mouse striatum were labeled with [3H]CFT, a phenyltropane analog of cocaine also known as WIN 35,428, and compared with sites labeled with [3H]mazindol or [3H]GBR 12935. Under the conditions used, homogeneous binding was observed that was inhibited monophasically by cocaine, CFT, and mazindol; the same potencies were observed with the three radioligands. Saturation analysis in the presence and in the absence of unlabeled inhibitor (CFT, mazindol, cocaine) indicated a change in the Kd but not the Bmax, consonant with a competitive mechanisms. Tris-HCl reduced the affinity of each radioligand and unlabeled inhibitor without changing the Bmax. N-Ethylmaleimide reduced the binding of all radioligands equally and cocaine offered protection. The dissociation rate of [3H]CFT and [3H]mazindol binding was not affected by the presence of mazindol and CFT, respectively. The Bmax of [3H]CFT and [3H]mazindol binding was the same; the relatively higher value for [3H]GBR 12935 binding in analyses involving varying tritiated GBR 12935 only, was due primarily to an underestimation of the specific activity of [3H]GBR 12935. All results are in agreement with a one-site model in which cocaine, CFT, mazindol, and GBR 12935 share a common binding site in mouse striatum.

  15. Mutational analysis of the nucleotide binding site of Escherichia coli dCTP deaminase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thymark, Majbritt; Johansson, Eva; Larsen, Sine

    2007-01-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium about 80% of the dUMP used for dTMP synthesis is derived from deamination of dCTP. The dCTP deaminase produces dUTP that subsequently is hydrolyzed by dUTPase to dUMP and diphosphate. The dCTP deaminase is regulated by dTTP that inhibits the enzyme...... by binding to the active site and induces an inactive conformation of the trimeric enzyme. We have analyzed the role of residues previously suggested to play a role in catalysis. The mutant enzymes R115Q, S111C, S111T and E138D were all purified and analyzed for activity. Only S111T and E138D displayed...... detectable activity with a 30- and 140-fold reduction in k(cat), respectively. Furthermore, S111T and E138D both showed altered dTTP inhibition compared to wild-type enzyme. S111T was almost insensitive to the presence of dTTP. With the E138D enzyme the dTTP dependent increase in cooperativity of d...

  16. COMPARATIVE MODELLING AND LIGAND BINDING SITE PREDICTION OF A FAMILY 43 GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASE FROM Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 showed close evolutionary relation with carbohydrate binding family 6 proteins from C. cellulolyticum, C. papyrosolvens, C. cellulyticum, and A. cellulyticum. Comparative modeling of CtGH43 was performed based on crystal structures with PDB IDs 3C7F, 1YIF, 1YRZ, 2EXH and 1WL7. The structure having lowest MODELLER objective function was selected. The three-dimensional structure revealed typical 5-fold beta–propeller architecture. Energy minimization and validation of predicted model with VERIFY 3D indicated acceptability of the proposed atomic structure. The Ramachandran plot analysis by RAMPAGE confirmed that family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 contains little or negligible segments of helices. It also showed that out of 301 residues, 267 (89.3% were in most favoured region, 23 (7.7% were in allowed region and 9 (3.0% were in outlier region. IUPred analysis of CtGH43 showed no disordered region. Active site analysis showed presence of two Asp and one Glu, assumed to form a catalytic triad. This study gives us information about three-dimensional structure and reaffirms the fact that it has the similar core 5-fold beta–propeller architecture and so probably has the same inverting mechanism of action with the formation of above mentioned catalytic triad for catalysis of polysaccharides.

  17. Trp-999 of beta-galactosidase (Escherichia coli) is a key residue for binding, catalysis, and synthesis of allolactose, the natural lac operon inducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Reuben E; Hakda, Shamina; Cheng, Calvino; Cupples, Claire G; Edwards, Robert A

    2003-02-18

    Trp-999 is a key residue for the action of beta-galactosidases (Escherichia coli). Several site specific substitutions (Phe, Gly, Tyr, Leu) for Trp-999 were made. Each substitution caused greatly decreased affinities for substrates and inhibitors that bind in the "shallow" mode, while the affinities of inhibitors that bind in the "deep" mode were not decreased nearly as much. This shows that Trp-999 is important for binding in the shallow mode. The residue is also very important for binding glucose to galactosyl-beta-galactosidase (as a transgalactosidic acceptor). Substitution greatly diminished the affinity for glucose. Substitutions also changed the activation thermodynamics and, subsequently, the rates of the catalytic reactions. The enthalpies of activation of the glycolytic bond cleavage step (galactosylation, k(2)) became less favorable while the entropies of activation of that step became more favorable as a result of the substitutions. Differing magnitudes of these enthalpic and entropic effects with ONPG as compared to PNPG caused the k(2) values for ONPG to decrease but to increase for PNPG. The enthalpies of activation for the common hydrolytic step (degalactosylation, k(3)) increased while the entropies of activation for this step did not change much. As a result, k(3) became small and rate determining for each substituted enzyme. The substitutions caused the rate constant (k(4)) of the transgalactosidic acceptor reactions with glucose (for the formation of allolactose) to become much larger and of the same order of magnitude as the normally large rate constants for transgalactosidic acceptor reactions with small alcohols. This is probably because glucose can approach with less restriction in the absence of Trp-999. However, since glucose binds very poorly to the galactosyl-beta-galactosidases with substitutions for Trp-999, the proportion of lactose molecules converted to allolactose is small. Thus, Trp-999 is also important for ensuring that an

  18. An allosteric binding site at the human serotonin transporter mediates the inhibition of escitalopram by R-citalopram: kinetic binding studies with the ALI/VFL-SI/TT mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huailing; Hansen, Kasper B; Boyle, Noel J; Han, Kiho; Muske, Galina; Huang, Xinyan; Egebjerg, Jan; Sánchez, Connie

    2009-10-25

    The human serotonin transporter (hSERT) has primary and allosteric binding sites for escitalopram and R-citalopram. Previous studies have established that the interaction of these two compounds at a low affinity allosteric binding site of hSERT can affect the dissociation of [(3)H]escitalopram from hSERT. The allosteric binding site involves a series of residues in the 10th, 11th, and 12th trans-membrane domains of hSERT. The low affinity allosteric activities of escitalopram and R-citalopram are essentially eliminated in a mutant hSERT with changes in some of these residues, namely A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T, as measured in dissociation binding studies. We confirm that in association binding experiments, R-citalopram at clinically relevant concentrations reduces the association rate of [(3)H]escitalopram as a ligand to wild type hSERT. We demonstrate that the ability of R-citalopram to reduce the association rate of escitalopram is also abolished in the mutant hSERT (A505V, L506F, I507L, S574T, I575T), along with the expected disruption the low affinity allosteric function on dissociation binding. This suggests that the allosteric binding site mediates both the low affinity and higher affinity interactions between R-citalopram, escitalopram, and hSERT. Our data add an additional structural basis for the different efficacies of escitalopram compared to racemic citalopram reported in animal studies and clinical trials, and substantiate the hypothesis that hSERT has complex allosteric mechanisms underlying the unexplained in vivo activities of its inhibitors.

  19. Radiolabelling of phoneutria nigriventer spider toxin (Tx1): a tool to study its binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos; Diniz, Carlos Roberto; Nascimento, Marta Cordeiro; Lima, Maria Elena de

    1996-01-01

    The neurotoxin Tx1, isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer produces tail elevation and spastic paralysis of posterior limbs after intracerebral ventricular injection in mice. Tx1 also produces ileum contraction in bioassay. We have investigated the binding of radioiodinated-Tx1 ( 125 I-Tx1) on the preparation of myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membrane from guinea pig ileum (MPLM) as a tool to characterize the interaction of this neurotoxin with its site. The neurotoxin Tx1 was radioiodinated with Na 125 I by the lactoperoxidase method. 125 I-Tx1 specifically binds to a single class of noninteracting binding sites of high affinity (Kd= 3.5 x 10 -10 M) and low capacity (1.2 pmol/mg protein). The specific binding increased in parallel with the protein concentration. In competition experiments the ligands of ionic channels used (sodium, potassium and calcium) did not affect the binding of 125 I-Tx1 to MPLM neither did the cholinergic ligands (hemicholinium-3, hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine and atropine). Another neurotoxin (Tx2-6, one of the isoforms of Tx2 pool) decreased toxin with MPLM and showed that toxin has a specific and saturable binding site in guinea pig ileum and this binding site appears to be related to the Tx2 site. (author)

  20. TCR-contacting residues orientation and HLA-DRβ* binding preference determine long-lasting protective immunity against malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, Martha P.; Suarez, Carlos F.; Varela, Yahson; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Bermudez, Adriana; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2016-01-01

    Fully-protective, long-lasting, immunological (FPLLI) memory against Plasmodium falciparum malaria regarding immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) vaccinated into monkeys previously challenged and re-challenged 60 days later with a lethal Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum strain was found to be associated with preferential high binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1* allelic molecules of the major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II), rather than HLA-DRβ3*, β4*, β5* alleles. Complete PPII L 3D structure, a longer distance (26.5 Å ± 1.5 Å) between residues perfectly fitting into HLA-DRβ1*PBR pockets 1 and 9, a gauche − rotamer orientation in p8 TCR-contacting polar residue and a larger volume of polar p2 residues was also found. This data, in association with previously-described p3 and p7 apolar residues having gauche + orientation to form a perfect MHC-II-peptide-TCR complex, determines the stereo-electronic and topochemical characteristics associated with FPLLI immunological memory. - Highlights: • Stereo-electronic and topochemical rules associated with FPLLI immunological memory. • Presence of very high long-lasting antibody titres against Plasmodium falciparum Spz. • Protective memory induction associated with a binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1*. • gauche − rotamer orientation in p8 polar residue is related to is related to immunological memory.

  1. TCR-contacting residues orientation and HLA-DRβ* binding preference determine long-lasting protective immunity against malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alba, Martha P.; Suarez, Carlos F. [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad de Ciencias Aplicadas y Ambientales (UDCA), Bogotá (Colombia); Varela, Yahson [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad del Rosario, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundación Instituto de Inmunología de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogotá D. C. (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá D. C. (Colombia)

    2016-09-02

    Fully-protective, long-lasting, immunological (FPLLI) memory against Plasmodium falciparum malaria regarding immune protection-inducing protein structures (IMPIPS) vaccinated into monkeys previously challenged and re-challenged 60 days later with a lethal Aotus monkey-adapted P. falciparum strain was found to be associated with preferential high binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1* allelic molecules of the major histocompatibility class II (MHC-II), rather than HLA-DRβ3*, β4*, β5* alleles. Complete PPII{sub L} 3D structure, a longer distance (26.5 Å ± 1.5 Å) between residues perfectly fitting into HLA-DRβ1*PBR pockets 1 and 9, a gauche{sup −} rotamer orientation in p8 TCR-contacting polar residue and a larger volume of polar p2 residues was also found. This data, in association with previously-described p3 and p7 apolar residues having gauche{sup +} orientation to form a perfect MHC-II-peptide-TCR complex, determines the stereo-electronic and topochemical characteristics associated with FPLLI immunological memory. - Highlights: • Stereo-electronic and topochemical rules associated with FPLLI immunological memory. • Presence of very high long-lasting antibody titres against Plasmodium falciparum Spz. • Protective memory induction associated with a binding capacity to HLA-DRβ1*. • gauche{sup −} rotamer orientation in p8 polar residue is related to is related to immunological memory.

  2. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    -target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...... potency against class 1 HDACs and are active in tissue culture against various human cancer cell lines. Importantly, enzymological analysis of 26 indicates that the cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide is a fast-on/ off competitive inhibitor of HDACs 1−3 with Ki values of 49, 33, and 37 nM, respectively. Our proof...

  3. Estimating the relative position of risperidone primary binding site in Sera Albumins. Modeling from spectrofluorimetric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Fragoso, Viviane Muniz S.; Silva, Dilson

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we used a mathematical model to study the interaction of risperidone with human and bovine serum albumins estimating the relative position of the primary binding site, based on the fluorescence quenching theory. Results have shown that the model was able to demonstrate that primary binding site for risperidone in HSA and BSA is very close to the position where is tryptophan 134 of BSA, possibly in domain 1B.

  4. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  5. Serotoninergic receptors in brain tissue: properties and identification of various 3H-ligand binding sites in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro binding studies to serotoninergic receptors were performed using 3 H-LSD, 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-spiperone. An overwiew is given on findings using these three ligands with respect to the following: localization of specific binding sites, in various animal species, the regional distribution in the brain and periphery, the subcellular and cellular distribution. Properties of the binding sites, influence of the composition of the assay medium, binding kinetic properties, receptor regulation in vivo. Identity of the binding sites, differences between site for various 3 H-ligands, pharmacological specificity of the membranous binding sites, chemical composition of the macromolecular complex constituting the binding site. Function of the receptor. Binding affinities of 44 compounds were measured in binding assays using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-LSD with rat frontal cortex membrane preparations and using 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-LSD with rat hippocampal membrane preparations

  6. Derivation of cesium-137 residual radioactive material guidelines for the Peek Street site, Schenectady, New York

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, L.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1992-01-01

    Residual radioactive material guidelines for cesium-137 were derived for the Peek rk. The derivation was based on the requirement that the Street site in Schenectady, New York. The derivation was based on the requirement that the 50-year committed effective dose equivalent to a hypothetical individual who lives or works in the immediate vicinity of the Peek Street site should not exceed a dose of 100 mrem/yr following remedial action. The US Department of Energy (DOE) residual radioactive material guideline computer code, RESRAD was used in this evaluation. Three potential scenarios were considered for the site on the assumption that for a period of 1,000 years following remedial action, the site wig be utilized without radiological restrictions. The scenarios vary with regard to use of the site, time spent at the site, and sources of food consumed. Results indicate that the basic dose limit of 100 mrem/yr will not be exceeded for cesium-137 within 1,000 years, provided that the soil concentration of cesium-137 at the Peek Street site does not exceed the following levels: 98 pCi/g for Scenario A (industrial worker: the expected scenario), 240 pCi/g for Scenario B (recreationist: a plausible scenario), and 34 pCi/g for Scenario C (resident farmer ingesting food produced in the decontaminated area: a plausible scenario)

  7. RNABindRPlus: a predictor that combines machine learning and sequence homology-based methods to improve the reliability of predicted RNA-binding residues in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Rasna R; Xue, Li C; Wilkins, Katherine; El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions are central to essential cellular processes such as protein synthesis and regulation of gene expression and play roles in human infectious and genetic diseases. Reliable identification of protein-RNA interfaces is critical for understanding the structural bases and functional implications of such interactions and for developing effective approaches to rational drug design. Sequence-based computational methods offer a viable, cost-effective way to identify putative RNA-binding residues in RNA-binding proteins. Here we report two novel approaches: (i) HomPRIP, a sequence homology-based method for predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins; (ii) RNABindRPlus, a new method that combines predictions from HomPRIP with those from an optimized Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on a benchmark dataset of 198 RNA-binding proteins. Although highly reliable, HomPRIP cannot make predictions for the unaligned parts of query proteins and its coverage is limited by the availability of close sequence homologs of the query protein with experimentally determined RNA-binding sites. RNABindRPlus overcomes these limitations. We compared the performance of HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus with that of several state-of-the-art predictors on two test sets, RB44 and RB111. On a subset of proteins for which homologs with experimentally determined interfaces could be reliably identified, HomPRIP outperformed all other methods achieving an MCC of 0.63 on RB44 and 0.83 on RB111. RNABindRPlus was able to predict RNA-binding residues of all proteins in both test sets, achieving an MCC of 0.55 and 0.37, respectively, and outperforming all other methods, including those that make use of structure-derived features of proteins. More importantly, RNABindRPlus outperforms all other methods for any choice of tradeoff between precision and recall. An important advantage of both HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus is that they rely on readily available sequence and sequence

  8. RNABindRPlus: A Predictor that Combines Machine Learning and Sequence Homology-Based Methods to Improve the Reliability of Predicted RNA-Binding Residues in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Rasna R.; Xue, Li C.; Wilkins, Katherine; El-Manzalawy, Yasser; Dobbs, Drena; Honavar, Vasant

    2014-01-01

    Protein-RNA interactions are central to essential cellular processes such as protein synthesis and regulation of gene expression and play roles in human infectious and genetic diseases. Reliable identification of protein-RNA interfaces is critical for understanding the structural bases and functional implications of such interactions and for developing effective approaches to rational drug design. Sequence-based computational methods offer a viable, cost-effective way to identify putative RNA-binding residues in RNA-binding proteins. Here we report two novel approaches: (i) HomPRIP, a sequence homology-based method for predicting RNA-binding sites in proteins; (ii) RNABindRPlus, a new method that combines predictions from HomPRIP with those from an optimized Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier trained on a benchmark dataset of 198 RNA-binding proteins. Although highly reliable, HomPRIP cannot make predictions for the unaligned parts of query proteins and its coverage is limited by the availability of close sequence homologs of the query protein with experimentally determined RNA-binding sites. RNABindRPlus overcomes these limitations. We compared the performance of HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus with that of several state-of-the-art predictors on two test sets, RB44 and RB111. On a subset of proteins for which homologs with experimentally determined interfaces could be reliably identified, HomPRIP outperformed all other methods achieving an MCC of 0.63 on RB44 and 0.83 on RB111. RNABindRPlus was able to predict RNA-binding residues of all proteins in both test sets, achieving an MCC of 0.55 and 0.37, respectively, and outperforming all other methods, including those that make use of structure-derived features of proteins. More importantly, RNABindRPlus outperforms all other methods for any choice of tradeoff between precision and recall. An important advantage of both HomPRIP and RNABindRPlus is that they rely on readily available sequence and sequence

  9. Identification of the site of human mannan-binding lectin involved in the interaction with its partner serine proteases: the essential role of Lys55

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teillet, F; Lacroix, M; Thiel, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is an oligomeric lectin that binds neutral carbohydrates on pathogens, forms complexes with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASP)-1, -2, and -3 and 19-kDa MBL-associated protein (MAp19), and triggers the complement lectin pathway through activation of MASP-2. To ident...... centered on residue Lys(55), which may form an ionic bond representing the major component of the MBL-MASP interaction. The binding sites for MASP-2/MAp19 and MASP-1/3 have common features but are not strictly identical........ To identify the MASP binding site(s) of human MBL, point mutants targeting residues C-terminal to the hinge region were produced and tested for their interaction with the MASPs and MAp19 using surface plasmon resonance and functional assays. Mutation Lys(55)Ala abolished interaction with the MASPs and MAp19...... and prevented formation of functional MBL-MASP-2 complexes. Mutations Lys(55)Gln and Lys(55)Glu abolished binding to MASP-1 and -3 and strongly inhibited interaction with MAp19. Conversely, mutation Lys(55)Arg abolished interaction with MASP-2 and MAp19, but only weakened interaction with MASP-1 and -3...

  10. Up-regulatory effect of triphasic oral contraceptive on platelet 3H-imipramine binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weizman, A; Morgenstern, H; Kaplan, B; Amiri, Z; Tyano, S; Ovadia, Y; Rehavi, M

    1988-01-01

    Triphasic oral contraceptive (Logynon) induced a significant increase (36%) in the maximal binding capacity of platelet membranes for [3H]imipramine. The increase was achieved in the second Logynon cycle as compared to pretreatment and first Logynon cycle binding values. The pill contains a combination of ethinyl estradiol and levonorgestrel, and it is as yet unclear which of the two hormones is responsible for the up-regulatory effect. The increase in the density of platelet imipramine binding sites may reflect a similar alteration in brain. The increase in imipramine binding did not correlate with alteration in mood as assessed by Beck Depression Inventory scores.

  11. Design and creation of a Ca2+ binding site in human lysozyme to enhance structural stability.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, R; Taniyama, Y; Seko, C; Nakamura, H; Kikuchi, M; Ikehara, M

    1989-01-01

    A Ca2+ binding site like an EF-hand motif was designed and created in human lysozyme by replacing both Gln-86 and Ala-92 with aspartic acids by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant human lysozyme (D86/92-lysozyme) was expressed and secreted by yeast. One Ca2+ was found to bind one molecule of the purified protein with the binding constant 5.0 x 10(6) M-1. The enzymatic activity of holo-D86/92-lysozyme against glycol chitin at 40 degrees C was 2-fold higher than that of the native lysozyme. M...

  12. Rac1 GTPase activates the WAVE regulatory complex through two distinct binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brautigam, Chad A; Xing, Wenmin; Yang, Sheng; Henry, Lisa; Doolittle, Lynda K; Walz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Rac1 activates the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) to drive Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization, which underpins diverse cellular processes. Here we report the structure of a WRC-Rac1 complex determined by cryo-electron microscopy. Surprisingly, Rac1 is not located at the binding site on the Sra1 subunit of the WRC previously identified by mutagenesis and biochemical data. Rather, it binds to a distinct, conserved site on the opposite end of Sra1. Biophysical and biochemical data on WRC mutants confirm that Rac1 binds to both sites, with the newly identified site having higher affinity and both sites required for WRC activation. Our data reveal that the WRC is activated by simultaneous engagement of two Rac1 molecules, suggesting a mechanism by which cells may sense the density of active Rac1 at membranes to precisely control actin assembly. PMID:28949297

  13. Evaluation of a novel virtual screening strategy using receptor decoy binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-08-23

    Virtual screening is used in biomedical research to predict the binding affinity of a large set of small organic molecules to protein receptor targets. This report shows the development and evaluation of a novel yet straightforward attempt to improve this ranking in receptor-based molecular docking using a receptor-decoy strategy. This strategy includes defining a decoy binding site on the receptor and adjusting the ranking of the true binding-site virtual screen based on the decoy-site screen. The results show that by docking against a receptor-decoy site with Autodock Vina, improved Receiver Operator Characteristic Enrichment (ROCE) was achieved for 5 out of fifteen receptor targets investigated, when up to 15 % of a decoy site rank list was considered. No improved enrichment was seen for 7 targets, while for 3 targets the ROCE was reduced. The extent to which this strategy can effectively improve ligand prediction is dependent on the target receptor investigated.

  14. Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables.

  15. Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables

  16. Differential Nucleosome Occupancies across Oct4-Sox2 Binding Sites in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Sebeson

    Full Text Available The binding sequence for any transcription factor can be found millions of times within a genome, yet only a small fraction of these sequences encode functional transcription factor binding sites. One of the reasons for this dichotomy is that many other factors, such as nucleosomes, compete for binding. To study how the competition between nucleosomes and transcription factors helps determine a functional transcription factor site from a predicted transcription factor site, we compared experimentally-generated in vitro nucleosome occupancy with in vivo nucleosome occupancy and transcription factor binding in murine embryonic stem cells. Using a solution hybridization enrichment technique, we generated a high-resolution nucleosome map from targeted regions of the genome containing predicted sites and functional sites of Oct4/Sox2 regulation. We found that at Pax6 and Nes, which are bivalently poised in stem cells, functional Oct4 and Sox2 sites show high amounts of in vivo nucleosome displacement compared to in vitro. Oct4 and Sox2, which are active, show no significant displacement of in vivo nucleosomes at functional sites, similar to nonfunctional Oct4/Sox2 binding. This study highlights a complex interplay between Oct4 and Sox2 transcription factors and nucleosomes among different target genes, which may result in distinct patterns of stem cell gene regulation.

  17. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor binding sites: autoradiographic distribution in the rat and guinea pig brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, A.; Cortes, R.; Palacios, J.M.

    1985-11-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) binding sites were labeled in vitro in mounted brain tissue sections from rat and guinea pig brains with (TH)methyl TRH and localized autoradiographically using TH-sensitive film. Regional densities of TRH binding sites were measured by computer-assisted microdensitometry. The distribution of sites in both species was highly heterogeneous. In both guinea pig and rat brains, the highest densities of binding sites were seen in the amygdaloid nuclei and the perirhinal cortex. In contrast, in other brain areas, a clear difference between the distribution of sites in rat and guinea pig was found. The temporal cortex, pontine nuclei, and interpeduncular nucleus, which contained high densities of binding in the guinea pig, were scarcely labeled in the rat. The accessory olfactory bulb and the septohippocampal area presented in the rat higher concentrations of binding sites than in the guinea pig. The anterior pituitary also presented low to intermediate concentrations of receptors. The distribution of TRH sites here described does not completely correlate with that of endogenous TRH, but is in good agreement with previous biochemical data. The results are discussed in correlation to the physiological effects that appear to be mediated by TRH.

  18. Mutational analysis of the antagonist-binding site of the histamine H(1) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, K; Laak, A M; Smit, M J; Kühne, R; Timmerman, H; Leurs, R

    1999-10-15

    We combined in a previously derived three-dimensional model of the histamine H(1) receptor (Ter Laak, A. M., Timmerman, H., Leurs, H., Nederkoorn, P. H. J., Smit, M. J., and Donne-Op den Kelder, G. M. (1995) J. Comp. Aid. Mol. Design. 9, 319-330) a pharmacophore for the H(1) antagonist binding site (Ter Laak, A. M., Venhorst, J., Timmerman, H., and Donné-Op de Kelder, G. M. (1994) J. Med. Chem. 38, 3351-3360) with the known interacting amino acid residue Asp(116) (in transmembrane domain III) of the H(1) receptor and verified the predicted receptor-ligand interactions by site-directed mutagenesis. This resulted in the identification of the aromatic amino acids Trp(167), Phe(433), and Phe(436) in transmembrane domains IV and VI of the H(1) receptor as probable interaction points for the trans-aromatic ring of the H(1) antagonists. Subsequently, a specific interaction of carboxylate moieties of two therapeutically important, zwitterionic H(1) antagonists with Lys(200) in transmembrane domain V was predicted. A Lys(200) --> Ala mutation results in a 50- (acrivastine) to 8-fold (d-cetirizine) loss of affinity of these zwitterionic antagonists. In contrast, the affinities of structural analogs of acrivastine and cetirizine lacking the carboxylate group, triprolidine and meclozine, respectively, are unaffected by the Lys(200) --> Ala mutation. These data strongly suggest that Lys(200), unique for the H(1) receptor, acts as a specific anchor point for these "second generation" H(1) antagonists.

  19. 2[125I]Iodomelatonin binding sites in spleens of guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poon, A.M.S.; Pang, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    2-[ 125 I]Iodomelatonin was found to bind specifically to the membrane preparations of the spleens of guinea pigs with high affinity. The binding was rapid, stable, saturable and reversible. Scatchard analysis of the binding assays revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 49.8±4.12 pmol/l and binding site density (Bmax) of 0.69±0.082 fmol/mg protein at mid-light. There was no significant change in the Kd or the Bmax at mid-dark. Kinetic analysis showed a Kd of 23.13±4.81 pmol/l, in agreement to that derived from the saturation studies. The 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites have the following order of potency: 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 6-chloromelatonin much-gt N-acetylserotonin, 6-hydroxymelatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine, 5-methoxytryptophol > serotonin, 5-methoxyindole-3-acetic acid > 5-hydroxytryptophol, 3-acetylindole, 1-acetylindole-3-carboxyaldehyde, L-tryptophan > tryptamine, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid. Differential centrifugation studies showed that the binding sites are localized mainly in the nuclear fraction, the rest are distributed in the microsomal fraction, mitochondrial fraction and cytosolic fraction. The demonstration of 2-[ 125 I]iodomelatonin binding sites in the spleen suggests the presence of melatonin receptors and a direct mechanism of action of melatonin on the immune system

  20. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  1. Resonance energy transfer study on the proximity relationship between the GTP binding site and the rifampicin binding site of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.P.; Chatterji, D.

    1990-01-01

    Terbium(III) upon complexation with guanosine 5'-triphosphate showed remarkable enhancement of fluorescence emission at 488 and 545 nm when excited at 295 nm. Analysis of the binding data yielded a value for the mean K d between Tb(III) and GTP of 0.2 μM, with three binding sites for TB(III) on GTP. 31 P and 1 H NMR measurements revealed that Tb(III) mainly binds the phosphate moiety of GTP. Fluorescence titration of the emission signals of the TbGTP complex with varying concentrations of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase resulted in a K d values of 4 μM between the TbGTP and the enzyme. It was observed that TbGTP can be incorporated in the place of GTP during E. coli RNA polymerase catalyzed abortive synthesis of dinucleotide tetraphosphate at T7A2 promoter. Both the substrate TbGTP and the inhibitor of the initiation of transcription rifampicin bind to the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. This allows the measurement of the fluorescence excited-state energy transfer from the donor TbGTP-RNA polymerase to the acceptor rifampicin. Both emission bands of Tb(III) overlap with the rifampicin absorption, and the distances at 50% efficiency of energy transfer were calculated to be 28 and 24 angstrom for the 488- and 545-nm emission bands, respectively. The distance between the substrate binding site and the rifampicin binding site on the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase was measured to be around 30 angstrom. This suggest that the nature of inhibition of transcription by rifampicin is essentially noncompetitive with the substrate

  2. Flexibility of amino acid residues at position four of nonapeptides enhances their binding to human leucocyte antigen (HLA) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; di Modugno, F; Rosano, L

    2000-01-01

    The binding affinity of synthetic nonapeptides to human leucocyte antigens (HLA) molecules of the A0201 allotype, the most common in Caucasian, is enhanced or reduced by suitable amino acid substitutions at position 4, as a result of increased or decreased chain flexibility. A higher flexibility of the bond at this position correlates with an easier accommodation of the fragment into the HLA groove, while rigidity of the peptide chain appears to interfere. These data are based on two lines of evidence: a) most natural high affinity ligands for HLA-A0201 possess, at position 4, flexible residues b) substitutions of such residues by rigid amino acids results in a decrease of binding affinity.

  3. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A

    2015-01-01

    around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro...

  4. Analysis of functional importance of binding sites in the Drosophila gap gene network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Konstantin; Gursky, Vitaly V; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V; Dymova, Arina; Samsonova, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The statistical thermodynamics based approach provides a promising framework for construction of the genotype-phenotype map in many biological systems. Among important aspects of a good model connecting the DNA sequence information with that of a molecular phenotype (gene expression) is the selection of regulatory interactions and relevant transcription factor bindings sites. As the model may predict different levels of the functional importance of specific binding sites in different genomic and regulatory contexts, it is essential to formulate and study such models under different modeling assumptions. We elaborate a two-layer model for the Drosophila gap gene network and include in the model a combined set of transcription factor binding sites and concentration dependent regulatory interaction between gap genes hunchback and Kruppel. We show that the new variants of the model are more consistent in terms of gene expression predictions for various genetic constructs in comparison to previous work. We quantify the functional importance of binding sites by calculating their impact on gene expression in the model and calculate how these impacts correlate across all sites under different modeling assumptions. The assumption about the dual interaction between hb and Kr leads to the most consistent modeling results, but, on the other hand, may obscure existence of indirect interactions between binding sites in regulatory regions of distinct genes. The analysis confirms the previously formulated regulation concept of many weak binding sites working in concert. The model predicts a more or less uniform distribution of functionally important binding sites over the sets of experimentally characterized regulatory modules and other open chromatin domains.

  5. Tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site: a perspective of privileged structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlong; Sun, Honghao; Xu, Shengtao; Zhu, Zheying; Xu, Jinyi

    2017-10-01

    The vital roles of microtubule in mitosis and cell division make it an attractive target for antitumor therapy. Colchicine binding site of tubulin is one of the most important pockets that have been focused on to design tubulin-destabilizing agents. Over the past few years, a large number of colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSIs) have been developed inspired by natural products or synthetic origins, and many moieties frequently used in these CBSIs are structurally in common. In this review, we will classify the CBSIs into classical CBSIs and nonclassical CBSIs according to their spatial conformations and binding modes with tubulin, and highlight the privileged structures from these CBSIs in the development of tubulin inhibitors targeting the colchicine binding site.

  6. Properties of achetakinin binding sites on malpighian tubule membranes from the house cricket, Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, J S; Wheeler, C H; Goldsworthy, G J; Coast, G M

    1995-01-01

    A biologically active 125I-labeled analogue of AK-II (3'-hydroxyphenyl propionic-Gly-Gly-Gly-Phe-Ser-Pro-Trp-Gly-NH2) was used to investigate the properties of achetakinin binding sites on plasma membranes from Malpighian tubules of Acheta domesticus. With optimized conditions, binding was rapid, reversible, and specific, and saturation studies revealed a single class of binding sites with Kd 0.55 nM and Bmax 39.9 fmol/mg membrane protein. The affinities of achetakinins for binding sites on tubule membranes ranked AK-V > AK III > AK-II > AK-I > or = AK-IV, in general agreement with their potencies in functional assays. However, IC50 values were several orders of magnitude higher than corresponding values for EC50, which suggests a considerable receptor reserve.

  7. Subtype-Specific Agonists for NMDA Receptor Glycine Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maolanon, Alex R.; Risgaard, Rune; Wang, Shuang Yan

    2017-01-01

    A series of analogues based on serine as lead structure were designed, and their agonist activities were evaluated at recombinant NMDA receptor subtypes (GluN1/2A-D) using two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEVC) electrophysiology. Pronounced variation in subunit-selectivity, potency, and agonist...... efficacy was observed in a manner that was dependent on the GluN2 subunit in the NMDA receptor. In particular, compounds 15a and 16a are potent GluN2C-specific superagonists at the GluN1 subunit with agonist efficacies of 398% and 308% compared to glycine. This study demonstrates that subunit......-selectivity among glycine site NMDA receptor agonists can be achieved and suggests that glycine-site agonists can be developed as pharmacological tool compounds to study GluN2C-specific effects in NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission....

  8. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Maurer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK, but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  9. DNA deformability changes of single base pair mutants within CDE binding sites in S. Cerevisiae centromere DNA correlate with measured chromosomal loss rates and CDE binding site symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Kenneth A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The centromeres in yeast (S. cerevisiae are organized by short DNA sequences (125 bp on each chromosome consisting of 2 conserved elements: CDEI and CDEIII spaced by a CDEII region. CDEI and CDEIII are critical sequence specific protein binding sites necessary for correct centromere formation and following assembly with proteins, are positioned near each other on a specialized nucleosome. Hegemann et al. BioEssays 1993, 15: 451–460 reported single base DNA mutants within the critical CDEI and CDEIII binding sites on the centromere of chromosome 6 and quantitated centromere loss of function, which they measured as loss rates for the different chromosome 6 mutants during cell division. Olson et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1998, 95: 11163–11168 reported the use of protein-DNA crystallography data to produce a DNA dinucleotide protein deformability energetic scale (PD-scale that describes local DNA deformability by sequence specific binding proteins. We have used the PD-scale to investigate the DNA sequence dependence of the yeast chromosome 6 mutants' loss rate data. Each single base mutant changes 2 PD-scale values at that changed base position relative to the wild type. In this study, we have utilized these mutants to demonstrate a correlation between the change in DNA deformability of the CDEI and CDEIII core sites and the overall experimentally measured chromosome loss rates of the chromosome 6 mutants. Results In the CDE I and CDEIII core binding regions an increase in the magnitude of change in deformability of chromosome 6 single base mutants with respect to the wild type correlates to an increase in the measured chromosome loss rate. These correlations were found to be significant relative to 105 Monte Carlo randomizations of the dinucleotide PD-scale applied to the same calculation. A net loss of deformability also tends to increase the loss rate. Binding site position specific, 4 data-point correlations were also

  10. Characterisation of the human NMDA receptor subunit NR3A glycine binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, A; Duan, J; Mo-Boquist, L-L

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we characterise the binding site of the human N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit NR3A. Saturation radioligand binding of the NMDA receptor agonists [(3)H]-glycine and [(3)H]-glutamate showed that only glycine binds to human NR3A (hNR3A) with high affinity (K(d)=535nM (277......-793nM)). Eight amino acids, which correspond to amino acids that are critical for ligand binding to other NMDA receptor subunits, situated within the S1S2 predicted ligand binding domain of hNR3A were mutated, which resulted in complete or near complete loss of [(3)H]-glycine binding to hNR3A. The NMDA...

  11. Endogenously generated plasmin at the vascular wall injury site amplifies lysine binding site-dependent plasminogen accumulation in microthrombi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Brzoska

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic system plays a pivotal role in the regulation of hemostasis; however, it remains unclear how and when the system is triggered to induce thrombolysis. Using intra-vital confocal fluorescence microscopy, we investigated the process of plasminogen binding to laser-induced platelet-rich microthrombi generated in the mesenteric vein of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. The accumulation of GFP-expressing platelets as well as exogenously infused Alexa Fluor 568-labeled Glu-plasminogen (Glu-plg on the injured vessel wall was assessed by measuring the increase in the corresponding fluorescence intensities. Glu-plg accumulated in a time-dependent manner in the center of the microthrombus, where phosphatidylserine is exposed on platelet surfaces and fibrin formation takes place. The rates of binding of Glu-plg in the presence of ε-aminocaproic acid and carboxypeptidase B, as well as the rates of binding of mini-plasminogen lacking kringle domains 1-4 and lysine binding sites, were significantly lower than that of Glu-plg alone, suggesting that the binding was dependent on lysine binding sites. Furthermore, aprotinin significantly suppressed the accumulation of Glu-plg, suggesting that endogenously generated plasmin activity is a prerequisite for the accumulation. In spite of the endogenous generation of plasmin and accumulation of Glu-plg in the center of microthrombi, the microthrombi did not change in size during the 2-hour observation period. When human tissue plasminogen activator was administered intravenously, Glu-plg further accumulated and the microthrombi were lysed. Glu-plg appeared to accumulate in the center of microthrombi in the early phase of microthrombus formation, and plasmin activity and lysine binding sites were required for this accumulation.

  12. Insights into the roles of non-catalytic residues in the active site of a GH10 xylanase with activity on cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yindi; Tu, Tao; Penttinen, Leena; Xue, Xianli; Wang, Xiaoyu; Yi, Zhuolin; Gong, Li; Rouvinen, Juha; Luo, Huiying; Hakulinen, Nina; Yao, Bin; Su, Xiaoyun

    2017-11-24

    Bifunctional glycoside hydrolases have potential for cost-savings in enzymatic decomposition of plant cell wall polysaccharides for biofuels and bio-based chemicals. The N-terminal GH10 domain of a bifunctional multimodular enzyme Cb Xyn10C/Cel48B from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii is an enzyme able to degrade xylan and cellulose simultaneously. However, the molecular mechanism underlying its substrate promiscuity has not been elucidated. Herein, we discovered that the binding cleft of Cb Xyn10C would have at least six sugar-binding subsites by using isothermal titration calorimetry analysis of the inactive E140Q/E248Q mutant with xylo- and cello-oligosaccharides. This was confirmed by determining the catalytic efficiency of the wild-type enzyme on these oligosaccharides. The free form and complex structures of Cb Xyn10C with xylose- or glucose-configured oligosaccharide ligands were further obtained by crystallographic analysis and molecular modeling and docking. Cb Xyn10C was found to have a typical (β/α) 8 -TIM barrel fold and "salad-bowl" shape of GH10 enzymes. In complex structures with xylo-oligosaccharides, seven sugar-binding subsites were found, and many residues responsible for substrate interactions were identified. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that 6 and 10 amino acid residues were key residues for xylan and cellulose hydrolysis, respectively. The most important residues are centered on subsites -2 and -1 near the cleavage site, whereas residues playing moderate roles could be located at more distal regions of the binding cleft. Manipulating the residues interacting with substrates in the distal regions directly or indirectly improved the activity of Cb Xyn10C on xylan and cellulose. Most of the key residues for cellulase activity are conserved across GH10 xylanases. Revisiting randomly selected GH10 enzymes revealed unreported cellulase activity, indicating that the dual function may be a more common phenomenon than has been expected. © 2017 by

  13. Location and effect of obesity on putative anorectic binding sites in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Meynell, A A; Levin, B E

    1997-05-01

    Anorectic drugs such as mazindol bind to a class of low-affinity, sodium-sensitive sites in the brain which are affected by ambient glucose concentrations and a predisposition to develop diet-induced obesity (DIO). This study used quantitative autoradiography of 10 nM 3H-mazindol binding to identify the cellular location of these putative anorectic binding sites in the brain and to assess the way in which the development of DIO affected their binding. We previously showed that chow-fed, obesity-prone rats have widespread increases in brain 3H-mazindol binding to these low-affinity sites as compared with diet-resistant (DR) rats. Here, low-affinity 3H-mazindol binding was assessed in the brains of eight rats which developed DIO vs. eight which were DR after three months on a high-energy diet. DIO rats gained 89% more weight and had 117% higher plasma insulin levels but no difference in plasma glucose levels compared with DR rats. Along with these differences, low-affinity 3H-mazindol binding in DIO rats was identical to that in DR rats in all of the 23 brain areas assessed. This suggested that this binding was downregulated by the development of obesity in DIO rats. In other chow-fed rats, stereotaxic injections of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine and 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) to ablate serotonin and catecholamine nerve terminals in the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (VMN) had no effect on 3H-mazindol binding. However, ibotenic acid injected into the VMN, substantia nigra, pars reticulata, and pars compacta destroyed intrinsic neurons and/or their local processes and decreased low-affinity 3H-mazindol binding by 13%-22%. Destruction of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, pars compacta, and noradrenergic neurons in the locus ceruleus with 6OHDA also reduced 3H-mazindol binding in those areas by 9% and 12%, respectively. This suggested that up to 22% of putative anorectic binding sites may be located on the cell bodies of dopamine, norepinephrine, and other

  14. MutLα and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen Share Binding Sites on MutSβ*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ravi R.; Pluciennik, Anna; Genschel, Jochen; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Beese, Lorena S.; Modrich, Paul

    2010-01-01

    MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3) mediates repair of insertion-deletion heterologies but also triggers triplet repeat expansions that cause neurological diseases. Like other DNA metabolic activities, MutSβ interacts with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) via a conserved motif (QXX(L/I)XXFF). We demonstrate that MutSβ-PCNA complex formation occurs with an affinity of ∼0.1 μm and a preferred stoichiometry of 1:1. However, up to 20% of complexes are multivalent under conditions where MutSβ is in molar excess over PCNA. Conformational studies indicate that the two proteins associate in an end-to-end fashion in solution. Surprisingly, mutation of the PCNA-binding motif of MutSβ not only abolishes PCNA binding, but unlike MutSα, also dramatically attenuates MutSβ-MutLα interaction, MutLα endonuclease activation, and bidirectional mismatch repair. As predicted by these findings, PCNA competes with MutLα for binding to MutSβ, an effect that is blocked by the cell cycle regulator p21CIP1. We propose that MutSβ-MutLα interaction is mediated in part by residues ((L/I)SRFF) embedded within the MSH3 PCNA-binding motif. To our knowledge this is the first case where residues important for PCNA binding also mediate interaction with a second protein. These findings also indicate that MutSβ- and MutSα-initiated repair events differ in fundamental ways. PMID:20154325

  15. Mercury Binding Sites in Thiol-Functionalized Mesostructured Silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinge, Simon J.L.; McKimmey, Emily J.; Shatnawi, Mouath; Kim, HyunJeong; Petkov, Valeri; Wermeille, Didier; Pinnavaia, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica with anhydrous compositions of (SiO 2 ) 1-x (LSiO 1.5 ) x , where L is a mercaptopropyl group and x is the fraction of functionalized framework silicon centers, are effective trapping agents for the removal of mercuric(II) ions from water. In the present work, we investigate the mercury-binding mechanism for representative thiol-functionalized mesostructures by atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and by Raman spectroscopy. The mesostructures with wormhole framework structures and compositions corresponding to x = 0.30 and 0.50 were prepared by direct assembly methods in the presence of a structure-directing amine porogen. PDF analyses of five mercury-loaded compositions with Hg/S ratios of 0.50-1.30 provided evidence for the bridging of thiolate sulfur atoms to two metal ion centers and the formation of chain structures on the pore surfaces. We find no evidence for Hg-O bonds and can rule out oxygen coordination of the mercury at greater than the 10% level. The relative intensities of the PDF peaks corresponding to Hg-S and Hg-Hg atomic pairs indicate that the mercury centers cluster on the functionalized surfaces by virtue of thiolate bridging, regardless of the overall mercury loading. However, the Raman results indicate that the complexation of mercury centers by thiolate depends on the mercury loading. At low mercury loadings (Hg/S (le) 0.5), the dominant species is an electrically neutral complex in which mercury most likely is tetrahedrally coordinated to bridging thiolate ligands, as in Hg(SBu t ) 2 . At higher loadings (Hg/S 1.0-1.3), mercury complex cations predominate, as evidenced by the presence of charge-balancing anions (nitrate) on the surface. This cationic form of bound mercury is assigned a linear coordination to two bridging thiolate ligands.

  16. Construction of a high affinity zinc binding site in the metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Sheppard, P O; Jensen, L B

    2001-01-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) belong to family C of the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The receptors are characterized by having unusually long amino-terminal domains (ATDs), to which agonist binding has been shown to take place. Previously, we have constructed...... created a Zn(2+) binding site in mGluR1b by mutating the residue Lys(260) to a histidine. Zinc acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of agonist-induced IP accumulation on the K260H mutant with an IC(50) value of 2 microm. Alanine mutations of three potential "zinc coligands" in proximity to the introduced...... of a "closed" conformation, and thus stabilizing a more or less inactive "open" form of the ATD. This study presents the first metal ion site constructed in a family C GPCR. Furthermore, it is the first time a metal ion site has been created in a region outside of the seven transmembrane regions of a GPCR...

  17. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  18. Specificity of cellular DNA-binding sites of microbial populations in a Florida reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, J.H.; Pichard, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the DNA-binding mechanism(s) of bacteria in a Florida reservoir was investigated in short- and long-term uptake studies with radiolabeled DNA and unlabeled competitors. Thymine oligonucleotides ranging in size from 2 base pairs to 19 to 24 base pairs inhibited DNA binding in 20-min incubations by 43 to 77%. Deoxynucleoside monophosphates, thymidine, and thymine had little effect on short-term DNA binding, although several of these compounds inhibited the uptake of the radiolabel from DNA in 4-h incubations. Inorganic phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate inhibited neither short- nor long-term binding of [ 3 H]- or [ 32 P]DNA, indicating that DNA was not utilized as a phosphorous source in this reservoir. RNA inhibited both short- and long-term radiolabeled DNA uptake as effectively as unlabeled DNA. Collectively these results indicate that aquatic bacteria possess a generalized nuclei acid uptake/binding mechanism specific for compounds containing phosphodiester bonds and capable of recognizing oligonucleotides as short as dinucleotides. This binding site is distinct from nucleoside-, nucleotide-, phosphomonoester-, and inorganic phosphate-binding sites. Such a nucleic acid-binding mechanism may have evolved for the utilization of extracellular DNA (and perhaps RNA), which is abundant in many marine and freshwater environments

  19. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta{sup 9} tetrahydrocannabinol (delta{sup 9}THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5{prime}-Trimethylammonium-delta{sup 8}THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta-{sup 8}THC modified on the 5{prime} carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of ({sup 3}H)-5{prime}-trimethylammonium-delta-{sup 8}THC (({sup 3}H)TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. ({sup 3}H)TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of ({sup 3}H)TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight.

  20. Characterization of a second ligand binding site of the insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Caili; Whittaker, Linda; Whittaker, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    Insulin binding to its receptor is characterized by high affinity, curvilinear Scatchard plots, and negative cooperativity. These properties may be the consequence of binding of insulin to two receptor binding sites. The N-terminal L1 domain and the C-terminus of the α subunit contain one binding site. To locate a second site, we examined the binding properties of chimeric receptors in which the L1 and L2 domains and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor were replaced by corresponding regions of the insulin receptor. Substitutions of the L2 domain and the first Fibronectin Type III repeat together with the L1 domain produced 80- and 300-fold increases in affinity for insulin. Fusion of these domains to human immunoglobulin Fc fragment produced a protein which bound insulin with a K d of 2.9 nM. These data strongly suggest that these domains contain an insulin binding site

  1. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective 125 I-labeled OT antagonist ( 125 I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of 125 I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that 125 I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration

  2. Autoradiographic demonstration of oxytocin-binding sites in the macula densa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeckel, M.E.; Freund-Mercier, M.J. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Strasbourg (France))

    1989-08-01

    Specific oxytocin (OT)-binding sites were localized in the rat kidney with use of a selective {sup 125}I-labeled OT antagonist ({sup 125}I-OTA). High concentrations of OT binding sites were detected on the juxtaglomerular apparatus with use of the conventional film autoradiographic technique. No labeling occurred on other renal structures. The cellular localization of the OT binding sites within the juxtaglomerular apparatus was studied in light microscope autoradiography, on semithin sections from paraformaldehyde-fixed kidney slices incubated in the presence of {sup 125}I-OTA. These preparations revealed selective labeling of the macula densa, mainly concentrated at the basal pole of the cells. Control experiments showed first that {sup 125}I-OTA binding characteristics were not noticeably altered by prior paraformaldehyde fixation of the kidneys and second that autoradiographic detection of the binding sites was not impaired by histological treatments following binding procedures. In view of the role of the macula densa in the tubuloglomerular feedback, the putative OT receptors of this structure might mediate the stimulatory effect of OT on glomerular filtration.

  3. High-affinity cannabinoid binding site in brain: A possible marijuana receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nye, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism by which delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9 THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana or hashish, produces its potent psychological and physiological effects is unknown. To find receptor binding sites for THC, we designed a water-soluble analog for use as a radioligand. 5'-Trimethylammonium-delta 8 THC (TMA) is a positively charged analog of delta- 8 THC modified on the 5' carbon, a portion of the molecule not important for its psychoactivity. We have studied the binding of [ 3 H]-5'-trimethylammonium-delta- 8 THC ([ 3 H]TMA) to rat neuronal membranes. [ 3 H]TMA binds saturably and reversibly to brain membranes with high affinity to apparently one class of sites. Highest binding site density occurs in brain, but several peripheral organs also display specific binding. Detergent solubilizes the sites without affecting their pharmacologial properties. Molecular sieve chromatography reveals a bimodal peak of [ 3 H]TMA binding activity of approximately 60,000 daltons apparent molecular weight

  4. Interaction of Palmitic Acid with Metoprolol Succinate at the Binding Sites of Bovine Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashiur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to characterize the binding profile as well as to notify the interaction of palmitic acid with metoprolol succinate at its binding site on albumin. Methods: The binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin (BSA was studied by equilibrium dialysis method (ED at 27°C and pH 7.4, in order to have an insight in the binding chemistry of the drug to BSA in presence and absence of palmitic acid. The study was carried out using ranitidine as site-1 and diazepam as site-2 specific probe. Results: Different analysis of binding of metoprolol succinate to bovine serum albumin suggested two sets of association constants: high affinity association constant (k1 = 11.0 x 105 M-1 with low capacity (n1 = 2 and low affinity association (k2 = 4.0×105 M-1 constant with high capacity (n2 = 8 at pH 7.4 and 27°C. During concurrent administration of palmitic acid and metoprolol succinate in presence or absence of ranitidine or diazepam, it was found that palmitic acid displaced metoprolol succinate from its binding site on BSA resulting reduced binding of metoprolol succinate to BSA. The increment in free fraction of metoprolol succinate was from 26.27% to 55.08% upon the addition of increased concentration of palmitic acid at a concentration of 0×10-5 M to 16×10-5 M. In presence of ranitidine and diazepam, palmitic acid further increases the free fraction of metoprolol succinate from 33.05% to 66.95% and 40.68% to 72.88%, respectively. Conclusion: This data provided the evidence of interaction at higher concentration of palmitic acid at the binding sites on BSA, which might change the pharmacokinetic properties of metoprolol succinate.

  5. Sequences Flanking the Gephyrin-Binding Site of GlyRβ Tune Receptor Stabilization at Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Nora; Jan, Audric; Salvatico, Charlotte; Kress, Vanessa; Renner, Marianne; Triller, Antoine; Specht, Christian G; Schwarz, Guenter

    2018-01-01

    The efficacy of synaptic transmission is determined by the number of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses. Their recruitment depends upon the availability of postsynaptic scaffolding molecules that interact with specific binding sequences of the receptor. At inhibitory synapses, gephyrin is the major scaffold protein that mediates the accumulation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) via the cytoplasmic loop in the β-subunit (β-loop). This binding involves high- and low-affinity interactions, but the molecular mechanism of this bimodal binding and its implication in GlyR stabilization at synapses remain unknown. We have approached this question using a combination of quantitative biochemical tools and high-density single molecule tracking in cultured rat spinal cord neurons. The high-affinity binding site could be identified and was shown to rely on the formation of a 3 10 -helix C-terminal to the β-loop core gephyrin-binding motif. This site plays a structural role in shaping the core motif and represents the major contributor to the synaptic confinement of GlyRs by gephyrin. The N-terminal flanking sequence promotes lower affinity interactions by occupying newly identified binding sites on gephyrin. Despite its low affinity, this binding site plays a modulatory role in tuning the mobility of the receptor. Together, the GlyR β-loop sequences flanking the core-binding site differentially regulate the affinity of the receptor for gephyrin and its trapping at synapses. Our experimental approach thus bridges the gap between thermodynamic aspects of receptor-scaffold interactions and functional receptor stabilization at synapses in living cells.

  6. Determination of structure of the MinD-ATP complex reveals the orientation of MinD on the membrane and the relative location of the binding sites for MinE and MinC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Park, Kyung-Tae; Holyoak, Todd; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Summary The three Min proteins spatially regulate Z ring positioning in E. coli and are dynamically associated with the membrane. MinD binds to vesicles in the presence of ATP and can recruit MinC or MinE. Biochemical and genetic evidence indicate the binding sites for these two proteins on MinD overlap. Here we solved the structure of a hydrolytic-deficient mutant of MinD truncated for the C-terminal amphipathic helix involved in binding to the membrane. The structure solved in the presence of ATP is a dimer and reveals the face of MinD abutting the membrane. Using a combination of random and extensive site-directed mutagenesis additional residues important for MinE and MinC binding were identified. The location of these residues on the MinD structure confirms that the binding sites overlap and reveals that the binding sites are at the dimer interface and exposed to the cytosol. The location of the binding sites at the dimer interface offers a simple explanation for the ATP-dependency of MinC and MinE binding to MinD. PMID:21231967

  7. Identification of coagulation factor VIII A2 domain residues forming the binding epitope for low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarafanov, Andrey G; Makogonenko, Evgeny M; Pechik, Igor V; Radtke, Klaus-Peter; Khrenov, Alexey V; Ananyeva, Natalya M; Strickland, Dudley K; Saenko, Evgueni L

    2006-02-14

    Regulation of the coagulation factor VIII (fVIII) level in circulation involves a hepatic receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP). One of two major LRP binding sites in fVIII is located within the A2 domain (A2), likely exposed within the fVIII complex with von Willebrand factor and contributing to regulation of fVIII via LRP. This work aimed to identify A2 residues forming its LRP-binding site, previously shown to involve residues 484-509. Isolated A2 was subjected to alanine-scanning mutagenesis followed by expression of a set of mutants in a baculovirus system. In competition and surface plasmon resonance assays, affinities of A2 mutants K466A, R471A, R484A, S488A, R489A, R490A, H497A, and K499A for LRP were found to be decreased by 2-4-fold. This correlated with 1.3-1.5-fold decreases in the degree of LRP-mediated internalization of the mutants in cell culture. Combining these mutations into pairs led to cumulative effects, i.e., 7-13-fold decrease in affinity for LRP and 1.6-2.2-fold decrease in the degree of LRP-mediated internalization in cell culture. We conclude that the residues mentioned above play a key role in formation of the A2 binding epitope for LRP. Experiments in mice revealed an approximately 4.5 times shorter half-life for A2 in the circulation in comparison with that of fVIII. The half-lives of A2 mutant R471A/R484A or A2 co-injected with receptor-associated protein, a classical ligand of LRP, were prolonged by approximately 1.9 and approximately 3.5 times, respectively, compared to that of A2. This further confirms the importance of the mutated residues for interaction of A2 with LRP and suggests the existence of an LRP-dependent mechanism for removing A2 as a product of dissociation of activated fVIII from the circulation.

  8. Fluorone dyes have binding sites on both cytoplasmic and extracellular domains of Na,K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlíková, Marika; Huličiak, Miroslav; Bazgier, Václav; Berka, Karel; Kubala, Martin

    2013-02-01

    Combination of fluorescence techniques and molecular docking was used to monitor interaction of Na,K-ATPase and its large cytoplasmic loop connecting fourth and fifth transmembrane helices (C45) with fluorone dyes (i.e. eosin Y, 5(6)-carboxyeosin, rose bengal, fluorescein, and erythrosine B). Our data suggested that there are at least two binding sites for all used fluorone dyes, except of 5(6)-carboxyeosin. The first binding site is located on C45 loop, and it is sensitive to the presence of nucleotide. The other site is located on the extracellular part of the enzyme, and it is sensitive to the presence of Na(+) or K(+) ions. The molecular docking revealed that in the open conformation of C45 loop (which is obtained in the presence of ATP) all used fluorone dyes occupy position directly inside the ATP-binding pocket, while in the closed conformation (i.e. in the absence of any ligand) they are located only near the ATP-binding site depending on their different sizes. On the extracellular part of the protein, the molecular docking predicts two possible binding sites with similar binding energy near Asp897(α) or Gln69(β). The former was identified as a part of interaction site between α- and β-subunits, the latter is in contact with conserved FXYD sequence of the γ-subunit. Our findings provide structural explanation for numerous older studies, which were performed with fluorone dyes before the high-resolution structures were known. Further, fluorone dyes seem to be good probes for monitoring of intersubunit interactions influenced by Na(+) and K(+) binding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Small Molecule Interactome Mapping by Photoaffinity Labeling Reveals Binding Site Hotspots for the NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinxu; Mfuh, Adelphe; Amako, Yuka; Woo, Christina M

    2018-03-15

    Many therapeutics elicit cell-type specific polypharmacology that is executed by a network of molecular recognition events between a small molecule and the whole proteome. However, measurement of the structures that underpin the molecular associations between the proteome and even common therapeutics, such as the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), is limited by the inability to map the small molecule interactome. To address this gap, we developed a platform termed small molecule interactome mapping by photoaffinity labeling (SIM-PAL) and applied it to the in cellulo direct characterization of specific NSAID binding sites. SIM-PAL uses (1) photochemical conjugation of NSAID derivatives in the whole proteome and (2) enrichment and isotope-recoding of the conjugated peptides for (3) targeted mass spectrometry-based assignment. Using SIM-PAL, we identified the NSAID interactome consisting of over 1000 significantly enriched proteins and directly characterized nearly 200 conjugated peptides representing direct binding sites of the photo-NSAIDs with proteins from Jurkat and K562 cells. The enriched proteins were often identified as parts of complexes, including known targets of NSAID activity (e.g., NF-κB) and novel interactions (e.g., AP-2, proteasome). The conjugated peptides revealed direct NSAID binding sites from the cell surface to the nucleus and a specific binding site hotspot for the three photo-NSAIDs on histones H2A and H2B. NSAID binding stabilized COX-2 and histone H2A by cellular thermal shift assay. Since small molecule stabilization of protein complexes is a gain of function regulatory mechanism, it is conceivable that NSAIDs affect biological processes through these broader proteomic interactions. SIM-PAL enabled characterization of NSAID binding site hotspots and is amenable to map global binding sites for virtually any molecule of interest.

  10. Diazepam-bound GABAA receptor models identify new benzodiazepine binding-site ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Lars; de Graaf, Chris; Sieghart, Werner; Varagic, Zdravko; Mörzinger, Martina; de Esch, Iwan J P; Ecker, Gerhard F; Ernst, Margot

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepines exert their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, muscle-relaxant and sedative-hypnotic properties by allosterically enhancing the action of GABA at GABAA receptors via their benzodiazepine-binding site. Although these drugs have been used clinically since 1960, the molecular basis of this interaction is still not known. By using multiple homology models and an un biased docking protocol, we identified a binding hypothesis for the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine site, which was confirmed by experimental evidence. Moreover, two independent virtual screening approaches based on this structure identified known benzodiazepine-site ligands from different structural classes and predicted potential new ligands for this site. Receptor-binding assays and electrophysiological studies on recombinant receptors confirmed these predictions and thus identified new chemotypes for the benzodiazepine-binding site. Our results support the validity of the diazepam-bound structure of the benzodiazepine-binding pocket, demonstrate its suitability for drug discovery and pave the way for structure-based drug design. PMID:22446838

  11. Egernia stokesii (gidgee skink) MHC I positively selected sites lack concordance with HLA peptide binding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Sarah K; Bull, C Michael; Gardner, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play an important role in vertebrate disease resistance, kin recognition and mate choice. Mammalian MHC is the most widely characterised of all vertebrates, and attention is often given to the peptide binding regions of the MHC because they are presumed to be under stronger selection than non-peptide binding regions. For vertebrates where the MHC is less well understood, researchers commonly use the amino acid positions of the peptide binding regions of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) to infer the peptide binding regions within the MHC sequences of their taxon of interest. However, positively selected sites within MHC have been reported to lack correspondence with the HLA in fish, frogs, birds and reptiles including squamates. Despite squamate diversity, the MHC has been characterised in few snakes and lizards. The Egernia group of scincid lizards is appropriate for investigating mechanisms generating MHC variation, as their inclusion will add a new lineage (i.e. Scincidae) to studies of selection on the MHC. We aimed to identify positively selected sites within the MHC of Egernia stokesii and then determine if these sites corresponded with the peptide binding regions of the HLA. Six positively selected sites were identified within E. stokesii MHC I, only two were homologous with the HLA. E. stokesii positively selected sites corresponded more closely to non-lizard than other lizard taxa. The characterisation of the MHC of more intermediate taxa within the squamate order is necessary to understand the evolution of the MHC across all vertebrates.

  12. Validating metal binding sites in macromolecule structures using the CheckMyMetal web server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Heping; Chordia, Mahendra D.; Cooper, David R.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Müller, Peter; Sheldrick, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Metals play vital roles in both the mechanism and architecture of biological macromolecules. Yet structures of metal-containing macromolecules where metals are misidentified and/or suboptimally modeled are abundant in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). This shows the need for a diagnostic tool to identify and correct such modeling problems with metal binding environments. The "CheckMyMetal" (CMM) web server (http://csgid.org/csgid/metal_sites/) is a sophisticated, user-friendly web-based method to evaluate metal binding sites in macromolecular structures in respect to 7350 metal binding sites observed in a benchmark dataset of 2304 high resolution crystal structures. The protocol outlines how the CMM server can be used to detect geometric and other irregularities in the structures of metal binding sites and alert researchers to potential errors in metal assignment. The protocol also gives practical guidelines for correcting problematic sites by modifying the metal binding environment and/or redefining metal identity in the PDB file. Several examples where this has led to meaningful results are described in the anticipated results section. CMM was designed for a broad audience—biomedical researchers studying metal-containing proteins and nucleic acids—but is equally well suited for structural biologists to validate new structures during modeling or refinement. The CMM server takes the coordinates of a metal-containing macromolecule structure in the PDB format as input and responds within a few seconds for a typical protein structure modeled with a few hundred amino acids. PMID:24356774

  13. The Adenovirus Type 3 Dodecahedron's RGD Loop Comprises an HSPG Binding Site That Influences Integrin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gout

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human type 3 adenovirus dodecahedron (a virus like particle made of twelve penton bases features the ability to enter cells through Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans (HSPGs and integrins interaction and is used as a versatile vector to deliver DNA or proteins. Cryo-EM reconstruction of the pseudoviral particle with Heparan Sulphate (HS oligosaccharide shows an extradensity on the RGD loop. A set of mutants was designed to study the respective roles of the RGD sequence (RGE mutant and of a basic sequence located just downstream. Results showed that the RGE mutant binding to the HS deficient CHO-2241 cells was abolished and unexpectedly, mutation of the basic sequence (KQKR to AQAS dramatically decreased integrin recognition by the viral pseudoparticle. This basic sequence is thus involved in integrin docking, showing a close interplay between HSPGs and integrin receptors.

  14. 3D-QSAR model of flavonoids binding at benzodiazepine site in GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X; Liu, T; Gu, J; Luo, X; Ji, R; Cao, Y; Xue, H; Wong, J T; Wong, B L; Pei, G; Jiang, H; Chen, K

    2001-06-07

    With flavone as a structural template, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies and ab initio calculations were performed on a series of flavonoids. A reasonable pharmacophore model was built through CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR analyses and electrostatic potential calculations. A plausible binding mode for flavonoids with GABA(A) receptors was rationalized. On the basis of the commonly recognized binding site, the specific S1 and S2 subsites relating to substituent positions were proposed. The different binding affinities could be explained according to the frontier orbitals and electrostatic potential (ESP) maps. The ESP could be used as a novel starting point for designing more selective BZ-binding-site ligands.

  15. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular 3H-naloxone binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The binding of the opiate antagonist 3 H-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, 3 H-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables

  16. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  17. Modular insulators: genome wide se