WorldWideScience

Sample records for binding site motifs

  1. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

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    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  2. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    OpenAIRE

    Ngoc Tam L. Tran; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs tha...

  3. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Minli Xu; Zhengchang Su

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between ...

  4. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

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    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  5. SPIC: A novel similarity metric for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs based on information contents

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Xiguo; Du, Chuanbin; Su, Zhengchang

    2013-01-01

    Background Discovering transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) is one of primary challenges to decipher complex gene regulatory networks encrypted in a genome. A set of short DNA sequences identified by a transcription factor (TF) is known as a motif, which can be expressed accurately in matrix form such as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and a position frequency matrix. Very frequently, we need to query a motif in a database of motifs by seeking its similar motifs, merge similar ...

  6. A novel alignment-free method for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs.

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    Minli Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family.

  7. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family. PMID:20098703

  8. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

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    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Regulatory Motif Discovery Tools for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, identification of specific regulatory motifs or transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in non-coding DNA sequences, which is essential to elucidate transcriptional regulatory networks, has emerged as an obstacle that frustrates many researchers. Consequently, numerous motif discovery tools and correlated databases have been applied to solving this problem. However, these existing methods, based on different computational algorithms, show diverse motif prediction efficiency in non-coding DNA sequences. Therefore, understanding the similarities and differences of computational algorithms and enriching the motif discovery literatures are important for users to choose the most appropriate one among the online available tools. Moreover, there still lacks credible criterion to assess motif discovery tools and instructions for researchers to choose the best according to their own projects. Thus integration of the related resources might be a good approach to improve accuracy of the application. Recent studies integrate regulatory motif discovery tools with experimental methods to offer a complementary approach for researchers, and also provide a much-needed model for current researches on transcriptional regulatory networks. Here we present a comparative analysis of regulatory motif discovery tools for TFBSs.

  10. Automatic generation of 3D motifs for classification of protein binding sites

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    Herzyk Pawel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since many of the new protein structures delivered by high-throughput processes do not have any known function, there is a need for structure-based prediction of protein function. Protein 3D structures can be clustered according to their fold or secondary structures to produce classes of some functional significance. A recent alternative has been to detect specific 3D motifs which are often associated to active sites. Unfortunately, there are very few known 3D motifs, which are usually the result of a manual process, compared to the number of sequential motifs already known. In this paper, we report a method to automatically generate 3D motifs of protein structure binding sites based on consensus atom positions and evaluate it on a set of adenine based ligands. Results Our new approach was validated by generating automatically 3D patterns for the main adenine based ligands, i.e. AMP, ADP and ATP. Out of the 18 detected patterns, only one, the ADP4 pattern, is not associated with well defined structural patterns. Moreover, most of the patterns could be classified as binding site 3D motifs. Literature research revealed that the ADP4 pattern actually corresponds to structural features which show complex evolutionary links between ligases and transferases. Therefore, all of the generated patterns prove to be meaningful. Each pattern was used to query all PDB proteins which bind either purine based or guanine based ligands, in order to evaluate the classification and annotation properties of the pattern. Overall, our 3D patterns matched 31% of proteins with adenine based ligands and 95.5% of them were classified correctly. Conclusion A new metric has been introduced allowing the classification of proteins according to the similarity of atomic environment of binding sites, and a methodology has been developed to automatically produce 3D patterns from that classification. A study of proteins binding adenine based ligands showed that

  11. Identification of Ubiquinol Binding Motifs at the Qo-Site of the Cytochrome bc1 Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barragan, Angela M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Schulten, Klaus;

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes of the bc1 complex family power the biosphere through their central role in respiration and photosynthesis. These enzymes couple the oxidation of quinol molecules by cytochrome c to the transfer of protons across the membrane, to generate a proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. Key...... for the function of the bc1 complex is the initial redox process that involves a bifurcated electron transfer in which the two electrons from a quinol substrate are passed to different electron acceptors in the bc1 complex. The electron transfer is coupled to proton transfer. The overall mechanism of...... quinol oxidation by the bc1 complex is well enough characterized to allow exploration at the atomistic level, but details are still highly controversial. The controversy stems from the uncertain binding motifs of quinol at the so-called Qo active site of the bc1 complex. Here we employ a combination of...

  12. Divergent evolution of a beta/alpha-barrel subclass: detection of numerous phosphate-binding sites by motif search.

    OpenAIRE

    Bork, P.; Gellerich, J.; Groth, H.; Hooft, R.; Martin, F.

    1995-01-01

    Study of the most conserved region in many beta/alpha-barrels, the phosphate-binding site, revealed a sequence motif in a few beta/alpha-barrels with known tertiary structure, namely glycolate oxidase (GOX), cytochrome b2 (Cyb2), tryptophan synthase alpha subunit (TrpA), and the indoleglycerolphosphate synthase (TrpC). Database searches identified this motif in numerous other enzyme families: (1) IMP dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and GMP reductase (GuaC); (2) phosphoribosylformimino-5-aminoimidazol c...

  13. Synergic approach to XAFS analysis for the identification of most probable binding motifs for mononuclear zinc sites in metalloproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachini, Lisa; Veronesi, Giulia; Francia, Francesco; Venturoli, Giovanni; Boscherini, Federico

    2010-01-01

    In the present work a data analysis approach, based on XAFS data, is proposed for the identification of most probable binding motifs of unknown mononuclear zinc sites in metalloproteins. This approach combines multiple-scattering EXAFS analysis performed within the rigid-body refinement scheme, non-muffin-tin ab initio XANES simulations, average structural information on amino acids and metal binding clusters provided by the Protein Data Bank, and Debye-Waller factor calculations based on density functional theory. The efficiency of the method is tested by using three reference zinc proteins for which the local structure around the metal is already known from protein crystallography. To show the applicability of the present analysis to structures not deposited in the Protein Data Bank, the XAFS spectra of six mononuclear zinc binding sites present in diverse membrane proteins, for which we have previously proposed the coordinating amino acids by applying a similar approach, is also reported. By comparing the Zn K-edge XAFS features exhibited by these proteins with those pertaining to the reference structures, key spectral characteristics, related to specific binding motifs, are observed. These case studies exemplify the combined data analysis proposed and further support its validity.

  14. Function of the PEX19-binding site of human adrenoleukodystrophy protein as targeting motif in man and yeast. PMP targeting is evolutionarily conserved.

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    Halbach, André; Lorenzen, Stephan; Landgraf, Christiane; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Erdmann, Ralf; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter

    2005-06-01

    We predicted in human peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) the binding sites for PEX19, a key player in the topogenesis of PMPs, by virtue of an algorithm developed for yeast PMPs. The best scoring PEX19-binding site was found in the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP). The identified site was indeed bound by human PEX19 and was also recognized by the orthologous yeast PEX19 protein. Likewise, both human and yeast PEX19 bound with comparable affinities to the PEX19-binding site of the yeast PMP Pex13p. Interestingly, the identified PEX19-binding site of ALDP coincided with its previously determined targeting motif. We corroborated the requirement of the ALDP PEX19-binding site for peroxisomal targeting in human fibroblasts and showed that the minimal ALDP fragment targets correctly also in yeast, again in a PEX19-binding site-dependent manner. Furthermore, the human PEX19-binding site of ALDP proved interchangeable with that of yeast Pex13p in an in vivo targeting assay. Finally, we showed in vitro that most of the predicted binding sequences of human PMPs represent true binding sites for human PEX19, indicating that human PMPs harbor common PEX19-binding sites that do resemble those of yeast. Our data clearly revealed a role for PEX19-binding sites as PMP-targeting motifs across species, thereby demonstrating the evolutionary conservation of PMP signal sequences from yeast to man.

  15. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M.; Christiansen, Camilla;

    2015-01-01

    degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser...

  16. MicroRNA genes preferentially expressed in dendritic cells contain sites for conserved transcription factor binding motifs in their promoters

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    Huynen Martijn A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs play a fundamental role in the regulation of gene expression by translational repression or target mRNA degradation. Regulatory elements in miRNA promoters are less well studied, but may reveal a link between their expression and a specific cell type. Results To explore this link in myeloid cells, miRNA expression profiles were generated from monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs. Differences in miRNA expression among monocytes, DCs and their stimulated progeny were observed. Furthermore, putative promoter regions of miRNAs that are significantly up-regulated in DCs were screened for Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs based on TFBS motif matching score, the degree to which those TFBSs are over-represented in the promoters of the up-regulated miRNAs, and the extent of conservation of the TFBSs in mammals. Conclusions Analysis of evolutionarily conserved TFBSs in DC promoters revealed preferential clustering of sites within 500 bp upstream of the precursor miRNAs and that many mRNAs of cognate TFs of the conserved TFBSs were indeed expressed in the DCs. Taken together, our data provide evidence that selected miRNAs expressed in DCs have evolutionarily conserved TFBSs relevant to DC biology in their promoters.

  17. MSDmotif: exploring protein sites and motifs

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    Henrick Kim

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures have conserved features – motifs, which have a sufficient influence on the protein function. These motifs can be found in sequence as well as in 3D space. Understanding of these fragments is essential for 3D structure prediction, modelling and drug-design. The Protein Data Bank (PDB is the source of this information however present search tools have limited 3D options to integrate protein sequence with its 3D structure. Results We describe here a web application for querying the PDB for ligands, binding sites, small 3D structural and sequence motifs and the underlying database. Novel algorithms for chemical fragments, 3D motifs, ϕ/ψ sequences, super-secondary structure motifs and for small 3D structural motif associations searches are incorporated. The interface provides functionality for visualization, search criteria creation, sequence and 3D multiple alignment options. MSDmotif is an integrated system where a results page is also a search form. A set of motif statistics is available for analysis. This set includes molecule and motif binding statistics, distribution of motif sequences, occurrence of an amino-acid within a motif, correlation of amino-acids side-chain charges within a motif and Ramachandran plots for each residue. The binding statistics are presented in association with properties that include a ligand fragment library. Access is also provided through the distributed Annotation System (DAS protocol. An additional entry point facilitates XML requests with XML responses. Conclusion MSDmotif is unique by combining chemical, sequence and 3D data in a single search engine with a range of search and visualisation options. It provides multiple views of data found in the PDB archive for exploring protein structures.

  18. Aminopeptidase B, a glucagon-processing enzyme: site directed mutagenesis of the Zn2+-binding motif and molecular modelling

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    Etchebest Catherine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aminopeptidase B (Ap-B; EC 3.4.11.6 catalyzes the cleavage of basic residues at the N-terminus of peptides and processes glucagon into miniglucagon. The enzyme exhibits, in vitro, a residual ability to hydrolyze leukotriene A4 into the pro-inflammatory lipid mediator leukotriene B4. The potential bi-functional nature of Ap-B is supported by close structural relationships with LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H ; EC 3.3.2.6. A structure-function analysis is necessary for the detailed understanding of the enzymatic mechanisms of Ap-B and to design inhibitors, which could be used to determine the complete in vivo functions of the enzyme. Results The rat Ap-B cDNA was expressed in E. coli and the purified recombinant enzyme was characterized. 18 mutants of the H325EXXHX18E348 Zn2+-binding motif were constructed and expressed. All mutations were found to abolish the aminopeptidase activity. A multiple alignment of 500 sequences of the M1 family of aminopeptidases was performed to identify 3 sub-families of exopeptidases and to build a structural model of Ap-B using the x-ray structure of LTA4H as a template. Although the 3D structures of the two enzymes resemble each other, they differ in certain details. The role that a loop, delimiting the active center of Ap-B, plays in discriminating basic substrates, as well as the function of consensus motifs, such as RNP1 and Armadillo domain are discussed. Examination of electrostatic potentials and hydrophobic patches revealed important differences between Ap-B and LTA4H and suggests that Ap-B is involved in protein-protein interactions. Conclusion Alignment of the primary structures of the M1 family members clearly demonstrates the existence of different sub-families and highlights crucial residues in the enzymatic activity of the whole family. E. coli recombinant enzyme and Ap-B structural model constitute powerful tools for investigating the importance and possible roles of these conserved residues

  19. Aminopeptidase B, a glucagon-processing enzyme: site directed mutagenesis of the Zn2+-binding motif and molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Viet-Laï; Cadel, Marie-Sandrine; Gouzy-Darmon, Cécile; Hanquez, Chantal; Beinfeld, Margery C; Nicolas, Pierre; Etchebest, Catherine; Foulon, Thierry

    2007-01-01

    Background Aminopeptidase B (Ap-B; EC 3.4.11.6) catalyzes the cleavage of basic residues at the N-terminus of peptides and processes glucagon into miniglucagon. The enzyme exhibits, in vitro, a residual ability to hydrolyze leukotriene A4 into the pro-inflammatory lipid mediator leukotriene B4. The potential bi-functional nature of Ap-B is supported by close structural relationships with LTA4 hydrolase (LTA4H ; EC 3.3.2.6). A structure-function analysis is necessary for the detailed understanding of the enzymatic mechanisms of Ap-B and to design inhibitors, which could be used to determine the complete in vivo functions of the enzyme. Results The rat Ap-B cDNA was expressed in E. coli and the purified recombinant enzyme was characterized. 18 mutants of the H325EXXHX18E348 Zn2+-binding motif were constructed and expressed. All mutations were found to abolish the aminopeptidase activity. A multiple alignment of 500 sequences of the M1 family of aminopeptidases was performed to identify 3 sub-families of exopeptidases and to build a structural model of Ap-B using the x-ray structure of LTA4H as a template. Although the 3D structures of the two enzymes resemble each other, they differ in certain details. The role that a loop, delimiting the active center of Ap-B, plays in discriminating basic substrates, as well as the function of consensus motifs, such as RNP1 and Armadillo domain are discussed. Examination of electrostatic potentials and hydrophobic patches revealed important differences between Ap-B and LTA4H and suggests that Ap-B is involved in protein-protein interactions. Conclusion Alignment of the primary structures of the M1 family members clearly demonstrates the existence of different sub-families and highlights crucial residues in the enzymatic activity of the whole family. E. coli recombinant enzyme and Ap-B structural model constitute powerful tools for investigating the importance and possible roles of these conserved residues in Ap-B, LTA4H and M1

  20. PscanChIP: finding over-represented transcription factor-binding site motifs and their correlations in sequences from ChIP-Seq experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Federico; Pesole, Graziano; Pavesi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing with next-generation technologies (ChIP-Seq) has become the de facto standard for building genome-wide maps of regions bound by a given transcription factor (TF). The regions identified, however, have to be further analyzed to determine the actual DNA-binding sites for the TF, as well as sites for other TFs belonging to the same TF complex or in general co-operating or interacting with it in transcription regulation. PscanChIP is a web server that, starting from a collection of genomic regions derived from a ChIP-Seq experiment, scans them using motif descriptors like JASPAR or TRANSFAC position-specific frequency matrices, or descriptors uploaded by users, and it evaluates both motif enrichment and positional bias within the regions according to different measures and criteria. PscanChIP can successfully identify not only the actual binding sites for the TF investigated by a ChIP-Seq experiment but also secondary motifs corresponding to other TFs that tend to bind the same regions, and, if present, precise positional correlations among their respective sites. The web interface is free for use, and there is no login requirement. It is available at http://www.beaconlab.it/pscan_chip_dev. PMID:23748563

  1. Sites for phosphates and iron-sulfur thiolates in the first membranes: 3 to 6 residue anion-binding motifs (nests).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner-White, E James; Russell, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    Nests are common three to six amino acid residue motifs in proteins where successive main chain NH groups bind anionic atoms or groups. On average 8% of residues in proteins belong to nests. Nests form a key part of a number of phosphate binding sites, notably the P-loop, which is the commonest of the binding sites for the phosphates of ATP and GTP. They also occur regularly in sites that bind [Fe2S2](RS)4 [Fe3S4](RS)3and [Fe4S4](RS)4 iron-sulfur centers, which are also anionic groups. Both phosphates and iron-sulfur complexes would have occurred in the precipitates within hydrothermal vents of moderate temperature as key components of the earliest metabolism and it is likely existing organisms emerging in this milieu would have benefited from evolving molecules binding such anions. The nest conformation is favored by high proportions of glycine residues and there is evidence for glycine being the commonest amino acid during the stage of evolution when proteins were evolving so it is likely nests would have been common features in peptides occupying the membranes at the dawn of life.

  2. A conserved motif in the linker domain of STAT1 transcription factor is required for both recognition and release from high-affinity DNA-binding sites.

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    Bettina Hüntelmann

    Full Text Available Binding to specific palindromic sequences termed gamma-activated sites (GAS is a hallmark of gene activation by members of the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription family of cytokine-inducible transcription factors. However, the precise molecular mechanisms involved in the signal-dependent finding of target genes by STAT dimers have not yet been very well studied. In this study, we have characterized a sequence motif in the STAT1 linker domain which is highly conserved among the seven human STAT proteins and includes surface-exposed residues in close proximity to the bound DNA. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that a lysine residue in position 567 of the full-length molecule is required for GAS recognition. The substitution of alanine for this residue completely abolished both binding to high-affinity GAS elements and transcriptional activation of endogenous target genes in cells stimulated with interferon-γ (IFNγ, while the time course of transient nuclear accumulation and tyrosine phosphorylation were virtually unchanged. In contrast, two glutamic acid residues (E559 and E563 on each monomer are important for the dissociation of dimeric STAT1 from DNA and, when mutated to alanine, result in elevated levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1 as well as prolonged IFNγ-stimulated nuclear accumulation. In conclusion, our data indicate that the kinetics of signal-dependent GAS binding is determined by an array of glutamic acid residues located at the interior surface of the STAT1 dimer. These negatively charged residues appear to align the long axis of the STAT1 dimer in a position perpendicular to the DNA, thereby facilitating the interaction between lysine 567 and the phosphodiester backbone of a bound GAS element, which is a prerequisite for transient gene induction.

  3. Regulation and function of the CD3¿ DxxxLL motif: a binding site for adaptor protein-1 and adaptor protein-2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1997-01-01

    /CD3gamma chimeras; and in vitro by binding CD3gamma peptides to clathrin-coated vesicle adaptor proteins (APs). We find that the CD3gamma D127xxxLL131/132 sequence represents one united motif for binding of both AP-1 and AP-2, and that this motif functions as an active sorting motif in monomeric CD4....../ CD3gamma molecules independently of S126. An acidic amino acid is required at position 127 and a leucine (L) is required at position 131, whereas the requirements for position 132 are more relaxed. The spacing between aspartic acid 127 (D127) and L131 is crucial for the function of the motif in vivo...... subunit clusters of differentiation (CD)3gamma. Thus, phosphorylation of CD3gamma serine 126 (S126) causes a downregulation of the TCR. In this study, we have analyzed the CD3gamma internalization motif in three different systems in parallel: in the context of the complete multimeric TCR; in monomeric CD4...

  4. The κB transcriptional enhancer motif and signal sequences of V(DJ recombination are targets for the zinc finger protein HIVEP3/KRC: a site selection amplification binding study

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    Wu Lai-Chu

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ZAS family is composed of proteins that regulate transcription via specific gene regulatory elements. The amino-DNA binding domain (ZAS-N and the carboxyl-DNA binding domain (ZAS-C of a representative family member, named κB DNA binding and recognition component (KRC, were expressed as fusion proteins and their target DNA sequences were elucidated by site selection amplification binding assays, followed by cloning and DNA sequencing. The fusion proteins-selected DNA sequences were analyzed by the MEME and MAST computer programs to obtain consensus motifs and DNA elements bound by the ZAS domains. Results Both fusion proteins selected sequences that were similar to the κB motif or the canonical elements of the V(DJ recombination signal sequences (RSS from a pool of degenerate oligonucleotides. Specifically, the ZAS-N domain selected sequences similar to the canonical RSS nonamer, while ZAS-C domain selected sequences similar to the canonical RSS heptamer. In addition, both KRC fusion proteins selected oligonucleoties with sequences identical to heptamer and nonamer sequences within endogenous RSS. Conclusions The RSS are cis-acting DNA motifs which are essential for V(DJ recombination of antigen receptor genes. Due to its specific binding affinity for RSS and κB-like transcription enhancer motifs, we hypothesize that KRC may be involved in the regulation of V(DJ recombination.

  5. Miz-1 activates gene expression via a novel consensus DNA binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrilleaux, Bonnie L; Burow, Dana; Lockwood, Sarah H; Yu, Abigail; Segal, David J; Knoepfler, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences--ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2)--bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate. PMID:24983942

  6. Miz-1 activates gene expression via a novel consensus DNA binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Barrilleaux

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences--ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2--bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate.

  7. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Erill

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls.

  8. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls.

  9. The Verrucomicrobia LexA-Binding Motif: Insights into the Evolutionary Dynamics of the SOS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Kılıç, Sefa; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The SOS response is the primary bacterial mechanism to address DNA damage, coordinating multiple cellular processes that include DNA repair, cell division, and translesion synthesis. In contrast to other regulatory systems, the composition of the SOS genetic network and the binding motif of its transcriptional repressor, LexA, have been shown to vary greatly across bacterial clades, making it an ideal system to study the co-evolution of transcription factors and their regulons. Leveraging comparative genomics approaches and prior knowledge on the core SOS regulon, here we define the binding motif of the Verrucomicrobia, a recently described phylum of emerging interest due to its association with eukaryotic hosts. Site directed mutagenesis of the Verrucomicrobium spinosum recA promoter confirms that LexA binds a 14 bp palindromic motif with consensus sequence TGTTC-N4-GAACA. Computational analyses suggest that recognition of this novel motif is determined primarily by changes in base-contacting residues of the third alpha helix of the LexA helix-turn-helix DNA binding motif. In conjunction with comparative genomics analysis of the LexA regulon in the Verrucomicrobia phylum, electrophoretic shift assays reveal that LexA binds to operators in the promoter region of DNA repair genes and a mutagenesis cassette in this organism, and identify previously unreported components of the SOS response. The identification of tandem LexA-binding sites generating instances of other LexA-binding motifs in the lexA gene promoter of Verrucomicrobia species leads us to postulate a novel mechanism for LexA-binding motif evolution. This model, based on gene duplication, successfully addresses outstanding questions in the intricate co-evolution of the LexA protein, its binding motif and the regulatory network it controls. PMID:27489856

  10. Molecular Models of STAT5A Tetramers Complexed to DNA Predict Relative Genome-Wide Frequencies of the Spacing between the Two Dimer Binding Motifs of the Tetramer Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayana, Bangalore K; Li, Peng; Lin, Jian-Xin; Leonard, Warren J; Lee, Byungkook

    2016-01-01

    STAT proteins bind DNA as dimers and tetramers to control cellular development, differentiation, survival, and expansion. The tetramer binding sites are comprised of two dimer-binding sites repeated in tandem. The genome-wide distribution of the spacings between the dimer binding sites shows a distinctive, non-random pattern. Here, we report on estimating the feasibility of building possible molecular models of STAT5A tetramers bound to a DNA double helix with all possible spacings between the dimer binding sites. We found that the calculated feasibility estimates correlated well with the experimentally measured frequency of tetramer-binding sites. This suggests that the feasibility of forming the tetramer complex was a major factor in the evolution of this DNA sequence variation. PMID:27537504

  11. The MHC motif viewer: a visualization tool for MHC binding motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the onset of cellular immune reactions is controlled by presentation of peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to T cell receptors. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Different MHC molecules present different subsets of...... peptides, and knowledge of their binding specificities is important for understanding differences in the immune response between individuals. Algorithms predicting which peptides bind a given MHC molecule have recently been developed with high prediction accuracy. The utility of these algorithms is...... binding motif for each MHC molecule is predicted using state-of-the-art, pan-specific peptide-MHC binding-prediction methods, and is visualized as a sequence logo, in a format that allows for a comprehensive interpretation of binding motif anchor positions and amino acid preferences....

  12. A Prominent Site of Antibody Vulnerability on HIV Envelope Incorporates a Motif Associated with CCR5 Binding and Its Camouflaging Glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Briney, Bryan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Hsueh, Jessica; Ramos, Alejandra; Le, Khoa M; Jones, Meaghan; Jardine, Joseph G; Bastidas, Raiza; Sarkar, Anita; Liang, Chi-Hui; Shivatare, Sachin S; Wu, Chung-Yi; Schief, William R; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Zhu, Jiang; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-07-19

    The dense patch of high-mannose-type glycans surrounding the N332 glycan on the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is targeted by multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). This region is relatively conserved, implying functional importance, the origins of which are not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of new bnAbs targeting this region. Examination of these and previously described antibodies to Env revealed that four different bnAb families targeted the (324)GDIR(327) peptide stretch at the base of the gp120 V3 loop and its nearby glycans. We found that this peptide stretch constitutes part of the CCR5 co-receptor binding site, with the high-mannose patch glycans serving to camouflage it from most antibodies. GDIR-glycan bnAbs, in contrast, bound both (324)GDIR(327) peptide residues and high-mannose patch glycans, which enabled broad reactivity against diverse HIV isolates. Thus, as for the CD4 binding site, bnAb effectiveness relies on circumventing the defenses of a critical functional region on Env. PMID:27438765

  13. Plant Hormone Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Napier, Richard

    2004-01-01

    • Aims Receptors for plant hormones are becoming identified with increasing rapidity, although a frustrating number remain unknown. There have also been many more hormone‐binding proteins described than receptors. This Botanical Briefing summarizes what has been discovered about hormone binding sites, their discovery and descriptions, and will not dwell on receptor functions or activities except where these are relevant to understand binding.

  14. A Review of Protein-DNA Binding Motif using Association Rule Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Kumar Tripathi,

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Thesurvival of gene regulation and lifemechanisms is pre-request of finding unknownpattern oftranscription factor binding sites. Thediscovery motif of gene regulation inbioinformaticsis challenging jobs for getting relation betweentranscription factors and transcription factorbinding sites. The increasing size and length ofstring pattern of motif is issued a problem related tomodeling and optimization of gene selectionprocess. In this paper we give a survey of protein-DNA binding using association rule mining.Association rule mining well knowndata miningtechnique for pattern analysis. The capability ofnegative and positive pattern generation help fullfordiscoveringof new pattern in DNA bindingbioinformatics data. The other data miningapproach such as clustering and classification alsoapplied the process of gene selection grouping forknown and unknown pattern. But faced a problemof valid string of DNA data, the rule miningprinciple find a better relation between transcriptionfactors and transcription factor binding sites.

  15. A Comparison Study for DNA Motif Modeling on Protein Binding Microarray

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-06-11

    Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBSs) are relatively short (5-15 bp) and degenerate. Identifying them is a computationally challenging task. In particular, Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner; for instance, a typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all possible DNA k-mers (k=810). Since proteins can often bind to DNA with different binding intensities, one of the major challenges is to build motif models which can fully capture the quantitative binding affinity data. To learn DNA motif models from the non-convex objective function landscape, several optimization methods are compared and applied to the PBM motif model building problem. In particular, representative methods from different optimization paradigms have been chosen for modeling performance comparison on hundreds of PBM datasets. The results suggest that the multimodal optimization methods are very effective for capturing the binding preference information from PBM data. In particular, we observe a general performance improvement using di-nucleotide modeling over mono-nucleotide modeling. In addition, the models learned by the best-performing method are applied to two independent applications: PBM probe rotation testing and ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction, demonstrating its biological applicability.

  16. A Comparison Study for DNA Motif Modeling on Protein Binding Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Chun; Li, Yue; Peng, Chengbin; Wong, Hau-San

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are relatively short (5-15 bp) and degenerate. Identifying them is a computationally challenging task. In particular, protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner; for instance, a typical PBM experiment can measure binding signal intensities of a protein to all possible DNA k-mers (k = 8∼10). Since proteins can often bind to DNA with different binding intensities, one of the major challenges is to build TFBS (also known as DNA motif) models which can fully capture the quantitative binding affinity data. To learn DNA motif models from the non-convex objective function landscape, several optimization methods are compared and applied to the PBM motif model building problem. In particular, representative methods from different optimization paradigms have been chosen for modeling performance comparison on hundreds of PBM datasets. The results suggest that the multimodal optimization methods are very effective for capturing the binding preference information from PBM data. In particular, we observe a general performance improvement if choosing di-nucleotide modeling over mono-nucleotide modeling. In addition, the models learned by the best-performing method are applied to two independent applications: PBM probe rotation testing and ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction, demonstrating its biological applicability.

  17. Prediction and experimental characterization of nsSNPs altering human PDZ-binding motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gfeller

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are a major contributor to genetic and phenotypic variation within populations. Non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs modify the sequence of proteins and can affect their folding or binding properties. Experimental analysis of all nsSNPs is currently unfeasible and therefore computational predictions of the molecular effect of nsSNPs are helpful to guide experimental investigations. While some nsSNPs can be accurately characterized, for instance if they fall into strongly conserved or well annotated regions, the molecular consequences of many others are more challenging to predict. In particular, nsSNPs affecting less structured, and often less conserved regions, are difficult to characterize. Binding sites that mediate protein-protein or other protein interactions are an important class of functional sites on proteins and can be used to help interpret nsSNPs. Binding sites targeted by the PDZ modular peptide recognition domain have recently been characterized. Here we use this data to show that it is possible to computationally identify nsSNPs in PDZ binding motifs that modify or prevent binding to the proteins containing the motifs. We confirm these predictions by experimentally validating a selected subset with ELISA. Our work also highlights the importance of better characterizing linear motifs in proteins as many of these can be affected by genetic variations.

  18. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  19. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  20. Metal-binding and redox properties of substituted linear and cyclic ATCUN motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Kosh P; Aldous, Amanda R; Kritzer, Joshua A

    2014-10-01

    The amino-terminal copper and nickel binding (ATCUN) motif is a short peptide sequence found in human serum albumin and other proteins. Synthetic ATCUN-metal complexes have been used to oxidatively cleave proteins and DNA, cross-link proteins, and damage cancer cells. The ATCUN motif consists of a tripeptide that coordinates Cu(II) and Ni(II) ions in a square planar geometry, anchored by chelation sites at the N-terminal amine, histidine imidazole and two backbone amides. Many studies have shown that the histidine is required for tight binding and square planar geometry. Previously, we showed that macrocyclization of the ATCUN motif can lead to high-affinity binding with altered metal ion selectivity and enhanced Cu(II)/Cu(III) redox cycling (Inorg. Chem. 2013, 52, 2729-2735). In this work, we synthesize and characterize several linear and cyclic ATCUN variants to explore how substitutions at the histidine alter the metal-binding and catalytic properties. UV-visible spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry indicate that cyclization can promote the formation of ATCUN-like complexes even in the absence of imidazole. We also report several novel ATCUN-like complexes and quantify their redox properties. These findings further demonstrate the effects of conformational constraints on short, metal-binding peptides, and also provide novel redox-active metallopeptides suitable for testing as catalysts for stereoselective or regioselective oxidation reactions.

  1. A Review of Protein-DNA Binding Motif using Association Rule Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra Kumar Tripathi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The survival of gene regulation and life mechanisms is pre-request of finding unknown pattern of transcription factor binding sites. The discovery motif of gene regulation in bioinformatics is challenging jobs for getting relation between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites. The increasing size and length of string pattern of motif is issued a problem related to modeling and optimization of gene selection process. In this paper we give a survey of protein-DNA binding using association rule mining. Association rule mining well known data mining technique for pattern analysis. The capability of negative and positive pattern generation help full for discovering of new pattern in DNA binding bioinformatics data. The other data mining approach such as clustering and classification also applied the process of gene selection grouping for known and unknown pattern. But faced a problem of valid string of DNA data, the rule mining principle find a better relation between transcription factors and transcription factor binding sites.

  2. The GTP binding motif: variations on a theme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldgaard, M; Nyborg, J; Clark, B F

    1996-10-01

    GTP binding proteins (G-proteins) have wide-ranging functions in biology, being involved in cell proliferation, signal transduction, protein synthesis, and protein targeting. Common to their functioning is that they are active in the GTP-bound form and inactive in the GDP-bound form. The protein synthesis elongation factor EF-Tu was the first G-protein whose nucleotide binding domain was solved structurally by X-ray crystallography to yield a structural definition of the GDP-bound form, but a still increasing number of new structures of G-proteins are appearing in the literature, in both GDP and GTP bound forms. A common structural core for nucleotide binding is present in all these structures, and this core has long been known to include common consensus sequence elements involved in binding of the nucleotide. Nevertheless, subtle changes in the common sequences reflect functional differences. Therefore, it becomes increasingly important to focus on how these differences are reflected in the structures, and how these structural differences are related to function. The aim of this review is to describe to what extent this structural motif for GDP/GTP binding is common to other known structures of this class of proteins. We first describe the common structural core of the G-proteins. Next, examples are based on information available on the Ras protein superfamily, the targeting protein ARF, elongation factors EF-Tu and EF-G, and the heterotrimeric G-proteins. Finally, we discuss the important structures of complexes between GTP binding proteins and their substrates that have appeared in the literature recently.

  3. Investigation of Structural Mimetics of Natural Phosphate Ion Binding Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Evgeny A. Kataev; Tatiana A. Shumilova

    2015-01-01

    Phosphates are ubiquitous in biology and nearly half of all proteins interact with their partners by means of recognition of phosphate residues. Therefore, a better understanding of the phosphate ion binding by peptidic structures is highly desirable. Two new receptors have been designed and synthesized and their anion binding properties in an acetonitrile solution have been determined. The structure of hosts mimics a part of the kinase active site that is responsible for the recognition of ...

  4. Negative Example Aided Transcription Factor Binding Site Search

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2011-01-01

    Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched for the past decade. Negative examples have long been utilized in de novo motif discovery and have been shown useful in transcription factor binding site search as well. However, understanding of the roles of negative examples in binding site search is still very limited. We propose the 2-centroid and optimal discriminating vector methods, taking into account negative examples. Cross-val...

  5. A phosphoserine/threonine-binding pocket in AGC kinases and PDK1 mediates activation by hydrophobic motif phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, Morten; Antal, Torben L; Dümmler, Bettina A;

    2002-01-01

    The growth factor-activated AGC protein kinases RSK, S6K, PKB, MSK and SGK are activated by serine/threonine phosphorylation in the activation loop and in the hydrophobic motif, C-terminal to the kinase domain. In some of these kinases, phosphorylation of the hydrophobic motif creates a specific...... docking site that recruits and activates PDK1, which then phosphorylates the activation loop. Here, we discover a pocket in the kinase domain of PDK1 that recognizes the phosphoserine/phosphothreonine in the hydrophobic motif by identifying two oppositely positioned arginine and lysine residues that bind...... the phosphate. Moreover, we demonstrate that RSK2, S6K1, PKBalpha, MSK1 and SGK1 contain a similar phosphate-binding pocket, which they use for intramolecular interaction with their own phosphorylated hydrophobic motif. Molecular modelling and experimental data provide evidence for a common activation mechanism...

  6. Bacteria binding by DMBT1/SAG/gp-340 is confined to the VEVLXXXXW motif in its scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; End, Caroline;

    2004-01-01

    synthetic peptides covering the SRCR consensus sequence to identify a 16-amino acid bacteria-binding protein loop (peptide SRCRP2; QGRVEVLYRGSWGTVC) within the SRCR domains. In this study, using overlapping peptides, we pinpointed the minimal bacteria-binding site on SRCRP2, and thus DMBT1, to an 11-amino...... acid motif (DMBT1 pathogen-binding site 1 or DMBT1pbs1; GRVEVLYRGSW). An alanine substitution scan revealed that VEVL and Trp are critical residues in this motif. Bacteria binding by DMBT1pbs1 was different from the bacteria binding by the macrophage receptor MARCO in which an RXR motif was critical....... In addition, the homologous consensus sequences of a number of SRCR proteins were synthesized and tested for bacteria binding. Only consensus sequences of DMBT1 orthologues bound bacteria by this motif....

  7. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffatt Barbara A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. Results The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192 in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Conclusions Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure.

  8. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  9. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Laboratory of Applied Structural Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Wataru [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murata, Kousaku, E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  10. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A.; Golden, Barbara L. (Purdue); (Colorado)

    2010-05-24

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions.

  11. A novel fibronectin binding motif in MSCRAMMs targets F3 modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha Prabhakaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BBK32 is a surface expressed lipoprotein and fibronectin (Fn-binding microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Previous studies from our group showed that BBK32 is a virulence factor in experimental Lyme disease and located the Fn-binding region to residues 21-205 of the lipoprotein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Studies aimed at identifying interacting sites between BBK32 and Fn revealed an interaction between the MSCRAMM and the Fn F3 modules. Further analysis of this interaction showed that BBK32 can cause the aggregation of human plasma Fn in a similar concentration-dependent manner to that of anastellin, the superfibronectin (sFn inducing agent. The resulting Fn aggregates are conformationally distinct from plasma Fn as indicated by a change in available thermolysin cleavage sites. Recombinant BBK32 and anastellin affect the structure of Fn matrices formed by cultured fibroblasts and inhibit endothelial cell proliferation similarly. Within BBK32, we have located the sFn-forming activity to a region between residues 160 and 175 which contains two sequence motifs that are also found in anastellin. Synthetic peptides mimicking these motifs induce Fn aggregation, whereas a peptide with a scrambled sequence motif was inactive, suggesting that these motifs represent the sFn-inducing sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that BBK32 induces the formation of Fn aggregates that are indistinguishable from those formed by anastellin. The results of this study provide evidence for how bacteria can target host proteins to manipulate host cell activities.

  12. Angiotensinogen gene-inducible enhancer-binding protein 1, a member of a new family of large nuclear proteins that recognize nuclear factor kappa B-binding sites through a zinc finger motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Ron, D; Brasier, A R; Habener, J F

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of the rat angiotensinogen gene during the acute-phase response is dependent on a previously characterized acute-phase response element (APRE) that binds at least two types of nuclear proteins: a cytokine-inducible activity indistinguishable from nuclear factor kappa-B (NF kappa B) and a family of C/EBP-like proteins. We screened a rat liver cDNA expression library with a labeled APRE DNA probe and isolated a single clone that encodes a sequence-specific APRE-bindin...

  13. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun, E-mail: hirayama.dbio@mri.tmd.ac.jp; Nishina, Hiroshi, E-mail: nishina.dbio@mri.tmd.ac.jp

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  14. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral s...

  15. A Nucleotide Binding Motif in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NS4B Mediates HCV RNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Shirit; Elazar, Menashe; Danieli, Tsafi; Glenn, Jeffrey S.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of viral hepatitis. There is no effective therapy for most patients. We have identified a nucleotide binding motif (NBM) in one of the virus's nonstructural proteins, NS4B. This structural motif binds and hydrolyzes GTP and is conserved across HCV isolates. Genetically disrupting the NBM impairs GTP binding and hydrolysis and dramatically inhibits HCV RNA replication. These results have exciting implications for the HCV life cycle and novel antiviral strategies. PMID:15452248

  16. A Novel Protein Interaction between Nucleotide Binding Domain of Hsp70 and p53 Motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asita Elengoe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, protein interaction of Homo sapiens nucleotide binding domain (NBD of heat shock 70 kDa protein (PDB: 1HJO with p53 motif remains to be elucidated. The NBD-p53 motif complex enhances the p53 stabilization, thereby increasing the tumor suppression activity in cancer treatment. Therefore, we identified the interaction between NBD and p53 using STRING version 9.1 program. Then, we modeled the three-dimensional structure of p53 motif through homology modeling and determined the binding affinity and stability of NBD-p53 motif complex structure via molecular docking and dynamics (MD simulation. Human DNA binding domain of p53 motif (SCMGGMNR retrieved from UniProt (UniProtKB: P04637 was docked with the NBD protein, using the Autodock version 4.2 program. The binding energy and intermolecular energy for the NBD-p53 motif complex were −0.44 Kcal/mol and −9.90 Kcal/mol, respectively. Moreover, RMSD, RMSF, hydrogen bonds, salt bridge, and secondary structure analyses revealed that the NBD protein had a strong bond with p53 motif and the protein-ligand complex was stable. Thus, the current data would be highly encouraging for designing Hsp70 structure based drug in cancer therapy.

  17. Mycobacterial PE_PGRS Proteins Contain Calcium-Binding Motifs with Parallel β-roll Folds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nandita; Bachhawat; Balvinder; Singh

    2007-01-01

    The PE_PGRS family of proteins unique to mycobacteria is demonstrated to con- rain multiple calcium-binding and glycine-rich sequence motifs GGXGXD/NXUX. This sequence repeat constitutes a calcium-binding parallel/3-roll or parallel β-helix structure and is found in RTX toxins secreted by many Gram-negative bacteria. It is predicted that the highly homologous PE_PGRS proteins containing multiple copies of the nona-peptide motif could fold into similar calcium-binding structures. The implication of the predicted calcium-binding property of PE_PGRS proteins in the Ught of macrophage-pathogen interaction and pathogenesis is presented.

  18. Synthetic Peptide Immunogens Elicit Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Linear Epitopes in the D Motifs of Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin-Binding Protein, Which Are Composed of Amino Acids That Are Essential for Fibronectin Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Huesca, Mario; Sun, Qing; Peralta, Robert; Shivji, Gulnar M.; Sauder, Daniel N.; McGavin, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A fibronectin (Fn)-binding adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus contains three tandem 37- or 38-amino-acid motifs (D1, D2, and D3), which function to bind Fn. Plasma from patients with S. aureus infections contain antibodies that preferentially recognize ligand induced binding sites in the D motifs and do not inhibit Fn binding (F. Casolini, L. Visai, D. Joh, P. G. Conaldi, A. Toniolo, M. Höök, and P. Speziale, Infect. Immun. 66:5433–5442, 1998). To eliminate the influence of Fn binding on antibo...

  19. Stringency of the 2-His-1-Asp active-site motif in prolyl 4-hydroxylase.

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    Kelly L Gorres

    Full Text Available The non-heme iron(II dioxygenase family of enzymes contain a common 2-His-1-carboxylate iron-binding motif. These enzymes catalyze a wide variety of oxidative reactions, such as the hydroxylation of aliphatic C-H bonds. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase (P4H is an alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent iron(II dioxygenase that catalyzes the post-translational hydroxylation of proline residues in protocollagen strands, stabilizing the ensuing triple helix. Human P4H residues His412, Asp414, and His483 have been identified as an iron-coordinating 2-His-1-carboxylate motif. Enzymes that catalyze oxidative halogenation do so by a mechanism similar to that of P4H. These halogenases retain the active-site histidine residues, but the carboxylate ligand is replaced with a halide ion. We replaced Asp414 of P4H with alanine (to mimic the active site of a halogenase and with glycine. These substitutions do not, however, convert P4H into a halogenase. Moreover, the hydroxylase activity of D414A P4H cannot be rescued with small molecules. In addition, rearranging the two His and one Asp residues in the active site eliminates hydroxylase activity. Our results demonstrate a high stringency for the iron-binding residues in the P4H active site. We conclude that P4H, which catalyzes an especially demanding chemical transformation, is recalcitrant to change.

  20. An unusual helix turn helix motif in the catalytic core of HIV-1 integrase binds viral DNA and LEDGF.

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    Hayate Merad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrase (IN of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into host cellular DNA. We identified a bi-helix motif (residues 149-186 in the crystal structure of the catalytic core (CC of the IN-Phe185Lys variant that consists of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices connected by a 3 to 5-residue turn. The motif is embedded in a large array of interactions that stabilize the monomer and the dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the conformational and binding properties of the corresponding synthetic peptide. This displays features of the protein motif structure thanks to the mutual intramolecular interactions of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices that maintain the fold. The main properties are the binding to: 1- the processing-attachment site at the LTR (long terminal repeat ends of virus DNA with a K(d (dissociation constant in the sub-micromolar range; 2- the whole IN enzyme; and 3- the IN binding domain (IBD but not the IBD-Asp366Asn variant of LEDGF (lens epidermal derived growth factor lacking the essential Asp366 residue. In our motif, in contrast to the conventional HTH (helix-turn-helix, it is the N terminal helix (alpha(4 which has the role of DNA recognition helix, while the C terminal helix (alpha(5 would rather contribute to the motif stabilization by interactions with the alpha(4 helix. CONCLUSION: The motif, termed HTHi (i, for inverted emerges as a central piece of the IN structure and function. It could therefore represent an attractive target in the search for inhibitors working at the DNA-IN, IN-IN and IN-LEDGF interfaces.

  1. Human transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is downregulated during decidualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakova, Zuzana; Reed, Jennifer; Ihnatovych, Ivanna

    2010-06-01

    Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is known to bind to a variety of transcription factors to control cell differentiation and organ development. However, its role in uterine physiology has not yet been described. To study its regulation during the unique process of differentiation of fibroblasts into decidual cells (decidualization), we utilized the human uterine fibroblast (HuF) in vitro cell model. Immunocytochemistry data demonstrated that the majority of the TAZ protein is localized in the nucleus. Treatment of HuF cells with the embryonic stimulus cytokine interleukin 1 beta in the presence of steroid hormones (estradiol-17 beta and medroxyprogesterone acetate) for 13 days did not cause any apparent TAZ mRNA changes but resulted in a significant TAZ protein decline (approximately 62%) in total cell lysates. Analysis of cytosolic and nuclear extracts revealed that the decline of total TAZ was caused primarily by a drop of TAZ protein levels in the nucleus. TAZ was localized on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor response element site (located at position -1200 bp relative to the transcription start site) of the genomic region of decidualization marker insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) in HuF cells as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation. TAZ is also present in human endometrium tissue as confirmed by immunohistochemistry. During the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle, specific TAZ staining particularly diminishes in the stroma, suggesting its participation during the decidualization process, as well as implantation. During early baboon pregnancy, TAZ protein expression remains minimal in the endometrium close to the implantation site. In summary, the presented evidence shows for the first time to date TAZ protein in the human uterine tract, its downregulation during in vitro decidualization, and its localization on the IGFBP1 promoter region, all of which indicate its presence in the uterine

  2. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites: the EPLYA and EGLYA motifs have a key role in tyrosine phosphorylation and Csk binding, and are substrates of the Abl kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Repetto

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation. p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes phosphorylation and tunes its interactions with other regulatory molecules via post-translation modification. In this work, using mass spectrometry, we found that p140Cap is in vivo phosphorylated on tyrosine (Y within the peptide GEGLpYADPYGLLHEGR (from now on referred to as EGLYA as well as on three serine residues. Consistently, EGLYA has the highest score of in silico prediction of p140Cap phosphorylation. To further investigate the p140Cap function, we performed site specific mutagenesis on tyrosines inserted in EGLYA and EPLYA, a second sequence with the same highest score of phosphorylation. The mutant protein, in which both EPLYA/EGLYA tyrosines were converted to phenylalanine, was no longer tyrosine phosphorylated, despite the presence of other tyrosine residues in p140Cap sequence. Moreover, this mutant lost its ability to bind the C-terminal Src kinase (Csk, previously shown to interact with p140Cap by Far Western analysis. In addition, we found that in vitro and in HEK-293 cells, the Abelson kinase is the major kinase involved in p140Cap tyrosine phosphorylation on the EPLYA and EGLYA sequences. Overall, these data represent an original attempt to in vivo characterise phosphorylated residues of p140Cap. Elucidating the function of p140Cap will provide novel insights into its biological activity not only in normal cells, but also in tumors.

  3. Pseudouridine synthases: four families of enzymes containing a putative uridine-binding motif also conserved in dUTPases and dCTP deaminases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koonin, E V

    1996-06-15

    Using a combination of several methods for protein sequence comparison and motif analysis, it is shown that the four recently described pseudouridine syntheses with different specificities belong to four distinct families. Three of these families share two conserved motifs that are likely to be directly involved in catalysis. One of these motifs is detected also in two other families of enzymes that specifically bind uridine, namely deoxycitidine triphosphate deaminases and deoxyuridine triphosphatases. It is proposed that this motif is an essential part of the uridine-binding site. Two of the pseudouridine syntheses, one of which modifies the anticodon arm of tRNAs and the other is predicted to modify a portion of the large ribosomal subunit RNA belonging to the peptidyltransferase center, are encoded in all extensively sequenced genomes, including the 'minimal' genome of Mycoplasma genitalium. These particular RNA modifications and the respective enzymes are likely to be essential for the functioning of any cell.

  4. MICU1 motifs define mitochondrial calcium uniporter binding and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nicholas E; Chandramoorthy, Harish C; Shamugapriya, Santhanam; Zhang, Xueqian; Rajan, Sudarsan; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Gandhirajan, Rajesh Kumar; Vagnozzi, Ronald J; Ferrer, Lucas M; Sreekrishnanilayam, Krishnalatha; Natarajaseenivasan, Kalimuthusamy; Vallem, Sandhya; Force, Thomas; Choi, Eric T; Cheung, Joseph Y; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2013-12-26

    Resting mitochondrial matrix Ca(2+) is maintained through a mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1)-established threshold inhibition of mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) activity. It is not known how MICU1 interacts with MCU to establish this Ca(2+) threshold for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and MCU activity. Here, we show that MICU1 localizes to the mitochondrial matrix side of the inner mitochondrial membrane and MICU1/MCU binding is determined by a MICU1 N-terminal polybasic domain and two interacting coiled-coil domains of MCU. Further investigation reveals that MICU1 forms homo-oligomers, and this oligomerization is independent of the polybasic region. However, the polybasic region confers MICU1 oligomeric binding to MCU and controls mitochondrial Ca(2+) current (IMCU). Moreover, MICU1 EF hands regulate MCU channel activity, but do not determine MCU binding. Loss of MICU1 promotes MCU activation leading to oxidative burden and a halt to cell migration. These studies establish a molecular mechanism for MICU1 control of MCU-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation, and dysregulation of this mechanism probably enhances vascular dysfunction.

  5. Bioinformatics Study of Cancer-Related Mutations within p53 Phosphorylation Site Motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Ji

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available p53 protein has about thirty phosphorylation sites located at the N- and C-termini and in the core domain. The phosphorylation sites are relatively less mutated than other residues in p53. To understand why and how p53 phosphorylation sites are rarely mutated in human cancer, using a bioinformatics approaches, we examined the phosphorylation site and its nearby flanking residues, focusing on the consensus phosphorylation motif pattern, amino-acid correlations within the phosphorylation motifs, the propensity of structural disorder of the phosphorylation motifs, and cancer mutations observed within the phosphorylation motifs. Many p53 phosphorylation sites are targets for several kinases. The phosphorylation sites match 17 consensus sequence motifs out of the 29 classified. In addition to proline, which is common in kinase specificity-determining sites, we found high propensity of acidic residues to be adjacent to phosphorylation sites. Analysis of human cancer mutations in the phosphorylation motifs revealed that motifs with adjacent acidic residues generally have fewer mutations, in contrast to phosphorylation sites near proline residues. p53 phosphorylation motifs are mostly disordered. However, human cancer mutations within phosphorylation motifs tend to decrease the disorder propensity. Our results suggest that combination of acidic residues Asp and Glu with phosphorylation sites provide charge redundancy which may safe guard against loss-of-function mutations, and that the natively disordered nature of p53 phosphorylation motifs may help reduce mutational damage. Our results further suggest that engineering acidic amino acids adjacent to potential phosphorylation sites could be a p53 gene therapy strategy.

  6. Coregulator control of androgen receptor action by a novel nuclear receptor-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehle, Katja; Cato, Laura; Neeb, Antje; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Jung, Nicole; Smith, Emmanuel W; Buzon, Victor; Carbó, Laia R; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; Schmitz, Katja; Fruk, Ljiljana; Luy, Burkhard; Chen, Yu; Cox, Marc B; Bräse, Stefan; Brown, Myles; Cato, Andrew C B

    2014-03-28

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is essential for prostate cancer development. It is activated by androgens through its ligand-binding domain (LBD), which consists predominantly of 11 α-helices. Upon ligand binding, the last helix is reorganized to an agonist conformation termed activator function-2 (AF-2) for coactivator binding. Several coactivators bind to the AF-2 pocket through conserved LXXLL or FXXLF sequences to enhance the activity of the receptor. Recently, a small compound-binding surface adjacent to AF-2 has been identified as an allosteric modulator of the AF-2 activity and is termed binding function-3 (BF-3). However, the role of BF-3 in vivo is currently unknown, and little is understood about what proteins can bind to it. Here we demonstrate that a duplicated GARRPR motif at the N terminus of the cochaperone Bag-1L functions through the BF-3 pocket. These findings are supported by the fact that a selective BF-3 inhibitor or mutations within the BF-3 pocket abolish the interaction between the GARRPR motif(s) and the BF-3. Conversely, amino acid exchanges in the two GARRPR motifs of Bag-1L can impair the interaction between Bag-1L and AR without altering the ability of Bag-1L to bind to chromatin. Furthermore, the mutant Bag-1L increases androgen-dependent activation of a subset of AR targets in a genome-wide transcriptome analysis, demonstrating a repressive function of the GARRPR/BF-3 interaction. We have therefore identified GARRPR as a novel BF-3 regulatory sequence important for fine-tuning the activity of the AR.

  7. Identification and characterization of anion binding sites in RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S; Chase, Elaine; Costantino, David A; Golden, Barbara L

    2010-06-01

    Although RNA molecules are highly negatively charged, anions have been observed bound to RNA in crystal structures. It has been proposed that anion binding sites found within isolated RNAs represent regions of the molecule that could be involved in intermolecular interactions, indicating potential contact points for negatively charged amino acids from proteins or phosphate groups from an RNA. Several types of anion binding sites have been cataloged based on available structures. However, currently there is no method for unambiguously assigning anions to crystallographic electron density, and this has precluded more detailed analysis of RNA-anion interaction motifs and their significance. We therefore soaked selenate into two different types of RNA crystals and used the anomalous signal from these anions to identify binding sites in these RNA molecules unambiguously. Examination of these sites and comparison with other suspected anion binding sites reveals features of anion binding motifs, and shows that selenate may be a useful tool for studying RNA-anion interactions. PMID:20410239

  8. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  9. Sequence similarity between the erythrocyte binding domain of the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein and the V3 loop of HIV-1 strain MN reveals a functional heparin binding motif involved in binding to the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolton Michael J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV surface glycoprotein gp120 (SU, gp120 and the Plasmodium vivax Duffy binding protein (PvDBP bind to chemokine receptors during infection and have a site of amino acid sequence similarity in their binding domains that often includes a heparin binding motif (HBM. Infection by either pathogen has been found to be inhibited by polyanions. Results Specific polyanions that inhibit HIV infection and bind to the V3 loop of X4 strains also inhibited DBP-mediated infection of erythrocytes and DBP binding to the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC. A peptide including the HBM of PvDBP had similar affinity for heparin as RANTES and V3 loop peptides, and could be specifically inhibited from heparin binding by the same polyanions that inhibit DBP binding to DARC. However, some V3 peptides can competitively inhibit RANTES binding to heparin, but not the PvDBP HBM peptide. Three other members of the DBP family have an HBM sequence that is necessary for erythrocyte binding, however only the protein which binds to DARC, the P. knowlesi alpha protein, is inhibited by heparin from binding to erythrocytes. Heparitinase digestion does not affect the binding of DBP to erythrocytes. Conclusion The HBMs of DBPs that bind to DARC have similar heparin binding affinities as some V3 loop peptides and chemokines, are responsible for specific sulfated polysaccharide inhibition of parasite binding and invasion of red blood cells, and are more likely to bind to negative charges on the receptor than cell surface glycosaminoglycans.

  10. Flexibility of EF-hand motifs: structural and thermodynamic studies of Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica with Pb2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+

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    Kumar Shivesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EF-hand proteins can be activated by the binding of various heavy metals other than calcium, and such complexes can disturb the calcium-signaling pathway and cause toxicity and disease causing state. So far, no comprehensive study has been done to understand different heavy metals binding to calcium signaling proteins. Results In this work, the flexibility of the EF-hand motifs are examined by crystallographic and thermodynamic studies of binding of Pb2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+ to Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP1. The structures of the EhCaBP1- heavy metal complexes are found to be overall similar, nevertheless specific differences in metal coordination, and small differences in the coordination distances between the metal and the ligands in the metal binding loop. The largest such distances occur for the Ba2+- EhCaBP1 complex, where two bariums are bound with partial occupancy at the EF2 motif. Thermodynamic studies confirm that EhCaBP1 has five binding sites for Ba2+ compared to four binding sites for the other metals. These structures and thermodynamic studies reveal that the EF-hand motifs can accommodate several heavy atoms with similar binding affinities. The binding of Ca2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites and the binding of Ba2+ to the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th sites are both enthalpically and entropically driven, whereas the binding of Sr2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites are simply enthalpy driven, interestingly in agreement with ITC data, Sr2+ do not coordinate with water in this structure. For all the metals, binding to the 3rd site is only entropy driven. Conclusion Energetically, Ca2+ is preferred in three sites, while in one site Ba2+ has better binding energy. The Sr2+-coordination in the EF hand motifs is similar to that of the native Ca2+ bound structure, except for the lack of water coordination. Sr2+ coordination seems to be a pre-formed in nature since all seven coordinating atoms are from the

  11. Hinderin, a five-domains protein including coiled-coil motifs that binds to SMC3

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    Ghiselli Giancarlo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structural maintenance of chromosome proteins SMC1 and SMC3 play an important role in the maintenance of chromosomal integrity by preventing the premature separation of the sister chromatids at the onset of anaphase. The two proteins are constitutive components of the multimeric complex cohesin and form dimers by interacting at their central globular regions. Results In order to identify proteins that by binding to SMC3 may interfere with the protein dimerization process, a human cDNA library was screened by the yeast two-hybrid system by using the hinge region of SMC3 as bait. This has lead to the identification of Hinderin, a novel five domains protein including two coiled-coil motifs and sharing a strikingly structural similarity to the SMC family of proteins. Hinderin is ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. Orthologue forms of the protein are present in other vertebrates but not in lower organisms. A mapping of the interaction sites revealed that the N- and C-terminal globular domains mediate the binding of Hinderin to SMC3. Hinderin/SMC3 complexes could be recovered by immunoprecipitation from cell lysates using an anti-SMC3 antibody, thus demonstrating that the two proteins interact in vivo. On the contrary, Hinderin did not interact with SMC1. In vivo the rate of SMC1/SMC3 interaction was decreased by the ectopic expression of Hinderin. Conclusions Hinderin is a novel binding partner of SMC3. Based on its ability to modulate SMC1/SMC3 interaction we postulate that Hinderin affects the availability of SMC3 to engage in the formation of multimeric protein complexes.

  12. Characterization of transcription factors binding to-120 GATA motif of rat βbminy-globin promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović Sonja T.; Mitrović Tatjana; Karan-Đurašević Teodora; Nikčević Gordana T.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of rat adult βbminy-globin gene transcription. We used DNasel foot printing, gel mobility shift and super shift assays to characterize transcription factors involved in this regulation. In this study we analyzed GATA motif at-120 bp in the distal promoter of βbminy-globin gene. Footprint analysis revealed the binding of nuclear factors from MEL cells to the GATA motif. By using gel mobility shift assay two protein complexes were detected. ...

  13. Discovery of widespread GTP-binding motifs in genomic DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Edward A; Liu, David R

    2013-04-18

    Biological RNAs that bind small molecules have been implicated in a variety of regulatory and catalytic processes. Inspired by these examples, we used in vitro selection to search a pool of genome-encoded RNA fragments for naturally occurring GTP aptamers. Several aptamer classes were identified, including one (the "G motif") with a G-quadruplex structure. Further analysis revealed that most RNA and DNA G-quadruplexes bind GTP. The G motif is abundant in eukaryotes, and the human genome contains ~75,000 examples with dissociation constants comparable to the GTP concentration of a eukaryotic cell (~300 μM). G-quadruplexes play roles in diverse cellular processes, and our findings raise the possibility that GTP may play a role in the function of these elements. Consistent with this possibility, the sequence requirements of several classes of regulatory G-quadruplexes parallel those of GTP binding.

  14. An Unexpected Duo: Rubredoxin Binds Nine TPR Motifs to Form LapB, an Essential Regulator of Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Chelsy; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis and export are essential pathways for bacterial growth, proliferation, and virulence. The essential protein LapB from Escherichia coli has recently been identified as a regulator of LPS synthesis. We have determined the crystal structure of LapB (without the N-terminal transmembrane helix) at 2 Å resolution using zinc single-wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing derived from a single bound zinc atom. This structure demonstrates the presence of nine tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) motifs, including two TPR folds that were not predicted from sequence, and a rubredoxin-type metal binding domain. The rubredoxin domain is bound intimately to the TPR motifs, which has not been previously observed or predicted. Mutations in the rubredoxin/TPR interface inhibit in vivo cell growth, and in vitro studies indicate that these modifications cause local displacement of rubredoxin from its binding site without changing the secondary structure of LapB. LapB is the first reported structure to contain both a rubredoxin domain and TPR motifs.

  15. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  16. Affinity of the heparin binding motif of Noggin1 to heparan sulfate and its visualization in the embryonic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, Alexey M; Orlov, Eugeny E; Ermakova, Galina V; Ivanov, Igor A; Semenyuk, Pavel I; Orlov, Victor N; Martynova, Natalia Y; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    Heparin binding motifs were found in many secreted proteins and it was suggested that they are responsible for retardation of the protein diffusion within the intercellular space due to the binding to heparan sulfate proteoglycanes (HSPG). Here we used synthetic FITC labeled heparin binding motif (HBM peptide) of the Xenopus laevis secreted BMP inhibitor Noggin1 to study its diffusion along the surface of the heparin beads by FRAP method. As a result, we have found out that diffusivity of HBM-labeled FITC was indeed much lesser than those predicted by theoretical calculations even for whole protein of the Noggin size. We also compared by isothermal titration calorimetry the binding affinity of HBM and the control oligolysine peptide to several natural polyanions including heparan sulfate (HS), heparin, the bacterial dextran sulfate and salmon sperm DNA, and demonstrated that HBM significantly exceeds oligolysine peptide in the affinity to HS, heparin and DNA. By contrast, oligolysine peptide bound with higher affinity to dextran sulfate. We speculate that such a difference may ensure specificity of the morphogen binding to HSPG and could be explained by steric constrains imposed by different distribution of the negative charges along a given polymeric molecule. Finally, by using EGFP-HBM recombinant protein we have visualized the natural pattern of the Noggin1 binding sites within the X. laevis gastrula and demonstrated that these sites forms a dorsal-ventral concentration gradient, with a maximum in the dorsal blastopore lip. In sum, our data provide a quantitative basis for modeling the process of Noggin1 diffusion in embryonic tissues, considering its interaction with HSPG.

  17. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins. PMID:23157284

  18. ATtRACT-a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available athttp://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid-F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discoveringde novomotifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database.Database URL:http:// attract. cnic. es. PMID:27055826

  19. ATtRACT-a database of RNA-binding proteins and associated motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Girolamo; Sánchez-Cabo, Fátima; Torroja, Carlos; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play a crucial role in key cellular processes, including RNA transport, splicing, polyadenylation and stability. Understanding the interaction between RBPs and RNA is key to improve our knowledge of RNA processing, localization and regulation in a global manner. Despite advances in recent years, a unified non-redundant resource that includes information on experimentally validated motifs, RBPs and integrated tools to exploit this information is lacking. Here, we developed a database named ATtRACT (available athttp://attract.cnic.es) that compiles information on 370 RBPs and 1583 RBP consensus binding motifs, 192 of which are not present in any other database. To populate ATtRACT we (i) extracted and hand-curated experimentally validated data from CISBP-RNA, SpliceAid-F, RBPDB databases, (ii) integrated and updated the unavailable ASD database and (iii) extracted information from Protein-RNA complexes present in Protein Data Bank database through computational analyses. ATtRACT provides also efficient algorithms to search a specific motif and scan one or more RNA sequences at a time. It also allows discoveringde novomotifs enriched in a set of related sequences and compare them with the motifs included in the database.Database URL:http:// attract. cnic. es.

  20. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  1. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  2. A novel ensemble learning method for de novo computational identification of DNA binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khetani Radhika S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the diversity of motif representations and search algorithms, the de novo computational identification of transcription factor binding sites remains constrained by the limited accuracy of existing algorithms and the need for user-specified input parameters that describe the motif being sought. Results We present a novel ensemble learning method, SCOPE, that is based on the assumption that transcription factor binding sites belong to one of three broad classes of motifs: non-degenerate, degenerate and gapped motifs. SCOPE employs a unified scoring metric to combine the results from three motif finding algorithms each aimed at the discovery of one of these classes of motifs. We found that SCOPE's performance on 78 experimentally characterized regulons from four species was a substantial and statistically significant improvement over that of its component algorithms. SCOPE outperformed a broad range of existing motif discovery algorithms on the same dataset by a statistically significant margin. Conclusion SCOPE demonstrates that combining multiple, focused motif discovery algorithms can provide a significant gain in performance. By building on components that efficiently search for motifs without user-defined parameters, SCOPE requires as input only a set of upstream sequences and a species designation, making it a practical choice for non-expert users. A user-friendly web interface, Java source code and executables are available at http://genie.dartmouth.edu/scope.

  3. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Derek M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip) using MYCN amplified\\/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016), with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription factor affecting the

  4. Global MYCN transcription factor binding analysis in neuroblastoma reveals association with distinct E-box motifs and regions of DNA hypermethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek M Murphy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroblastoma, a cancer derived from precursor cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is a major cause of childhood cancer related deaths. The single most important prognostic indicator of poor clinical outcome in this disease is genomic amplification of MYCN, a member of a family of oncogenic transcription factors. METHODOLOGY: We applied MYCN chromatin immunoprecipitation to microarrays (ChIP-chip using MYCN amplified/non-amplified cell lines as well as a conditional knockdown cell line to determine the distribution of MYCN binding sites within all annotated promoter regions. CONCLUSION: Assessment of E-box usage within consistently positive MYCN binding sites revealed a predominance for the CATGTG motif (p<0.0016, with significant enrichment of additional motifs CATTTG, CATCTG, CAACTG in the MYCN amplified state. For cell lines over-expressing MYCN, gene ontology analysis revealed enrichment for the binding of MYCN at promoter regions of numerous molecular functional groups including DNA helicases and mRNA transcriptional regulation. In order to evaluate MYCN binding with respect to other genomic features, we determined the methylation status of all annotated CpG islands and promoter sequences using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP. The integration of MYCN ChIP-chip and MeDIP data revealed a highly significant positive correlation between MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation. This association was also detected in regions of hemizygous loss, indicating that the observed association occurs on the same homologue. In summary, these findings suggest that MYCN binding occurs more commonly at CATGTG as opposed to the classic CACGTG E-box motif, and that disease associated over expression of MYCN leads to aberrant binding to additional weaker affinity E-box motifs in neuroblastoma. The co-localization of MYCN binding and DNA hypermethylation further supports the dual role of MYCN, namely that of a classical transcription

  5. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  6. Nucleotide binding database NBDB – a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand–protein interactions found in crystallized ligand–protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  7. Nucleotide binding database NBDB--a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand-protein interactions found in crystallized ligand-protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  8. GABPα Binding to Overlapping ETS and CRE DNA Motifs Is Enhanced by CREB1: Custom DNA Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ximiao; Syed, Khund Sayeed; Tillo, Desiree; Mann, Ishminder; Weirauch, Matthew T; Vinson, Charles

    2015-07-16

    To achieve proper spatiotemporal control of gene expression, transcription factors cooperatively assemble onto specific DNA sequences. The ETS domain protein monomer of GABPα and the B-ZIP domain protein dimer of CREB1 cooperatively bind DNA only when the ETS ((C)/GCGGAA GT: ) and CRE ( GT: GACGTCAC) motifs overlap precisely, producing the ETS↔CRE motif ((C)/GCGGAA GT: GACGTCAC). We designed a Protein Binding Microarray (PBM) with 60-bp DNAs containing four identical sectors, each with 177,440 features that explore the cooperative interactions between GABPα and CREB1 upon binding the ETS↔CRE motif. The DNA sequences include all 15-mers of the form (C)/GCGGA--CG-, the ETS↔CRE motif, and all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and occurrences in the human and mouse genomes. CREB1 enhanced GABPα binding to the canonical ETS↔CRE motif CCGGAAGT two-fold, and up to 23-fold for several SNPs at the beginning and end of the ETS motif, which is suggestive of two separate and distinct allosteric mechanisms of cooperative binding. We show that the ETS-CRE array data can be used to identify regions likely cooperatively bound by GABPα and CREB1 in vivo, and demonstrate their ability to identify human genetic variants that might inhibit cooperative binding.

  9. Characterizing the binding motifs of 11 common human HLA‐DP and HLA‐DQ molecules using NNAlign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Compared with HLA‐DR molecules, the specificities of HLA‐DP and HLA‐DQ molecules have only been studied to a limited extent. The description of the binding motifs has been mostly anecdotal and does not provide a quantitative measure of the importance of each position in the binding core and the......‐based method NNAlign, we characterized the binding specificities of five HLA‐DP and six HLA‐DQ among the most frequent in the human population. The identified binding motifs showed an overall concurrence with earlier studies but revealed subtle differences. The DP molecules revealed a large overlap in the...

  10. Trans-Regulation of RNA-Binding Protein Motifs by MicroRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eTenenbaum

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The wide array of vital functions that RNA performs is dependent on its ability to dynamically fold into different structures in response to intracellular and extracellular changes. RNA-binding proteins regulate much of this activity by targeting specific RNA structures or motifs. One of these structures, the 3-way RNA junction, is characteristically found in ribosomal RNA and results from the RNA folding in cis, to produce three separate helices that meet around a central unpaired region. Here we demonstrate that 3-way junctions can also form in trans as a result of the binding of microRNAs in an unconventional manner with mRNA by splinting two non-contiguous regions together. This may be used to reinforce the base of a stem-loop motif being targeted by an RNA-binding protein. Trans interactions between non-coding RNA and mRNA may be used to control the post-transcriptional regulatory code and suggests a possible role for some of the recently described transcripts of unknown function expressed from the human genome.

  11. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in -prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Sharma; Divya Chandran; Desh D Singh; M Vijayan

    2007-09-01

    The -prism II fold lectins of known structure, all from monocots, invariably have three carbohydrate-binding sites in each subunit/domain. Until recently, -prism I fold lectins of known structure were all from dicots and they exhibited one carbohydrate-binding site per subunit/domain. However, the recently determined structure of the -prism fold I lectin from banana, a monocot, has two very similar carbohydrate-binding sites. This prompted a detailed analysis of all the sequences appropriate for two-lectin folds and which carry one or more relevant carbohydrate-binding motifs. The very recent observation of a -prism I fold lectin, griffithsin, with three binding sites in each domain further confirmed the need for such an analysis. The analysis demonstrates substantial diversity in the number of binding sites unrelated to the taxonomical position of the plant source. However, the number of binding sites and the symmetry within the sequence exhibit reasonable correlation. The distribution of the two families of -prism fold lectins among plants and the number of binding sites in them, appear to suggest that both of them arose through successive gene duplication, fusion and divergent evolution of the same primitive carbohydrate-binding motif involving a Greek key. Analysis with sequences in individual Greek keys as independent units lends further support to this conclusion. It would seem that the preponderance of three carbohydrate-binding sites per domain in monocot lectins, particularly those with the -prism II fold, is related to the role of plant lectins in defence.

  12. Triple helix formation: binding avidity of acridine-conjugated AG motif third strands containing natural, modified and surrogate bases opposed to pyrimidine interruptions in a polypurine target.

    OpenAIRE

    Orson, F M; Klysik, J; Bergstrom, D E; Ward, B; Glass, G A; P. Hua; Kinsey, B M

    1999-01-01

    A critical issue for the general application of triple-helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as modulators of gene expression is the dramatically reduced binding of short TFOs to targets that contain one or two pyrimidines within an otherwise homopurine sequence. Such targets are often found in gene regulatory regions, which represent desirable sites for triple helix formation. Using intercalator-conjugated AG motif TFOs, we compared the efficacy and base selectivity of 13 different bases or ...

  13. An activating mutation reveals a second binding mode of the integrin α2 I domain to the GFOGER motif in collagens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Carafoli

    Full Text Available The GFOGER motif in collagens (O denotes hydroxyproline represents a high-affinity binding site for all collagen-binding integrins. Other GxOGER motifs require integrin activation for maximal binding. The E318W mutant of the integrin α2β1 I domain displays a relaxed collagen specificity, typical of an active state. E318W binds more strongly than the wild-type α2 I domain to GMOGER, and forms a 2:1 complex with a homotrimeric, collagen-like, GFOGER peptide. Crystal structure analysis of this complex reveals two E318W I domains, A and B, bound to a single triple helix. The E318W I domains are virtually identical to the collagen-bound wild-type I domain, suggesting that the E318W mutation activates the I domain by destabilising the unligated conformation. E318W I domain A interacts with two collagen chains similarly to wild-type I domain (high-affinity mode. E318W I domain B makes favourable interactions with only one collagen chain (low-affinity mode. This observation suggests that single GxOGER motifs in the heterotrimeric collagens V and IX may support binding of activated integrins.

  14. A calmodulin binding protein from Arabidopsis is induced by ethylene and contains a DNA-binding motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, A. S.; Reddy, V. S.; Golovkin, M.

    2000-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a key calcium sensor in all eukaryotes, regulates diverse cellular processes by interacting with other proteins. To isolate CaM binding proteins involved in ethylene signal transduction, we screened an expression library prepared from ethylene-treated Arabidopsis seedlings with 35S-labeled CaM. A cDNA clone, EICBP (Ethylene-Induced CaM Binding Protein), encoding a protein that interacts with activated CaM was isolated in this screening. The CaM binding domain in EICBP was mapped to the C-terminus of the protein. These results indicate that calcium, through CaM, could regulate the activity of EICBP. The EICBP is expressed in different tissues and its expression in seedlings is induced by ethylene. The EICBP contains, in addition to a CaM binding domain, several features that are typical of transcription factors. These include a DNA-binding domain at the N terminus, an acidic region at the C terminus, and nuclear localization signals. In database searches a partial cDNA (CG-1) encoding a DNA-binding motif from parsley and an ethylene up-regulated partial cDNA from tomato (ER66) showed significant similarity to EICBP. In addition, five hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome also showed a very high sequence similarity with EICBP, indicating that there are several EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis. The structural features of EICBP are conserved in all EICBP-related proteins in Arabidopsis, suggesting that they may constitute a new family of DNA binding proteins and are likely to be involved in modulating gene expression in the presence of ethylene.

  15. [3]tetrahydrotrazodone binding. Association with serotonin binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High (17 nM) and low (603 nM) affinity binding sites for [3]tetrahydrotrazodone ([3] THT), a biologically active analogue of trazodone, have been identified in rat brain membranes. The substrate specificity, concentration, and subcellular and regional distributions of these sites suggest that they may represent a component of the serotonin transmitter system. Pharmacological analysis of [3]THT binding, coupled with brain lesion and drug treatment experiments, revealed that, unlike other antidepressants, [3] THT does not attach to either a biogenic amine transporter or serotonin binding sites. Rather, it would appear that [3]THT may be an antagonist ligand for the serotonin binding site. This probe may prove of value in defining the mechanism of action of trazodone and in further characterizing serotonin receptors

  16. Signatures of RNA binding proteins globally coupled to effective microRNA target sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Anders; Wen, Jiayu; Marks, Debora S;

    2010-01-01

    in 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) correlate with expression changes following transfection of small RNAs. The most significantly overrepresented motifs in down-regulated mRNAs are two novel U-rich motifs (URMs), UUUUAAA and UUUGUUU, recently discovered as binding sites for the ELAVL4 (also known as Hu......D) RNA-BP. Surprisingly, the most significantly overrepresented motif in up-regulated mRNAs is the heptanucleotide AU-rich element (ARE), UAUUUAU, which is known to affect mRNA stability via at least 20 different RNA-BPs. We show that destabilization mediated by the transfected miRNA is generally...

  17. Conserved functional motifs and homology modelling to predict hidden moonlighting functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen R Irving

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Moonlighting functional centers within proteins can provide them with hitherto unrecognized functions. Here we review how hidden moonlighting functional centers which we define as binding sites that have catalytic activity or regulate protein function in a novel manner, can be identified using targeted bioinformatic searches. Functional motifs used in such searches include amino acid residues that are conserved across species and many of which have been assigned functional roles based on experimental evidence. Molecules that were identified in this manner seeking cyclic mononucleotide cyclases in plants are used as examples. The strength of this computational approach is enhanced when good homology models can be developed to test the functionality of the predicted centers in silico which in turn, increases confidence in the ability of the identified candidates to perform the predicted functions. Computational characterization of moonlighting functional centers is not diagnostic for catalysis but serves as a rapid screening method, and highlights testable targets from a potentially large pool of candidates for subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments required to confirm the functionality of the predicted moonlighting centers.

  18. Conserved Functional Motifs and Homology Modeling to Predict Hidden Moonlighting Functional Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2015-06-09

    Moonlighting functional centers within proteins can provide them with hitherto unrecognized functions. Here, we review how hidden moonlighting functional centers, which we define as binding sites that have catalytic activity or regulate protein function in a novel manner, can be identified using targeted bioinformatic searches. Functional motifs used in such searches include amino acid residues that are conserved across species and many of which have been assigned functional roles based on experimental evidence. Molecules that were identified in this manner seeking cyclic mononucleotide cyclases in plants are used as examples. The strength of this computational approach is enhanced when good homology models can be developed to test the functionality of the predicted centers in silico, which, in turn, increases confidence in the ability of the identified candidates to perform the predicted functions. Computational characterization of moonlighting functional centers is not diagnostic for catalysis but serves as a rapid screening method, and highlights testable targets from a potentially large pool of candidates for subsequent in vitro and in vivo experiments required to confirm the functionality of the predicted moonlighting centers.

  19. Erythropoietin binding sites in human foetal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pekonen, F.; Rosenloef, K.; Rutanen, E.-M.

    1987-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I labelled recombinant DNA human erythropoietin (EP), we have explored the presence and properties of EP binding sites in foetal human tissues. The EP binding site is present in the foetal liver already during the first trimester of pregnancy. The binding site has a equilibrium association constant of 4.1-6.2 x 10/sup 9/l/mol and is specific for EP. The cross-reactivities of FSH, TSH, hCG, insulin and renin substrate were less than 0.01%. The EP binding capacity of foetal liver was 5.4-16 fmol/mg membrane protein. In foetal lung tissue, a slight EP binding activity was observed, whereas foetal spleen, muscle, brain, thyroid and placental tissues were virtually devoid of EP binding capacity. The same level of binding was reached at 37 deg. C in 1 h and at 4 deg. C in 24 h. The binding was pH-dependent with maximal specific binding at pH 7.7. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently cross-linked /sup 125/I-EP to foetal liver membranes suggested that the EP binding site was composed of two subunits with an apparent mol wt of 41000 and 86000 dalton, respectively.

  20. Erythropoietin binding sites in human foetal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using 125I labelled recombinant DNA human erythropoietin (EP), we have explored the presence and properties of EP binding sites in foetal human tissues. The EP binding site is present in the foetal liver already during the first trimester of pregnancy. The binding site has a equilibrium association constant of 4.1-6.2 x 109l/mol and is specific for EP. The cross-reactivities of FSH, TSH, hCG, insulin and renin substrate were less than 0.01%. The EP binding capacity of foetal liver was 5.4-16 fmol/mg membrane protein. In foetal lung tissue, a slight EP binding activity was observed, whereas foetal spleen, muscle, brain, thyroid and placental tissues were virtually devoid of EP binding capacity. The same level of binding was reached at 37 deg. C in 1 h and at 4 deg. C in 24 h. The binding was pH-dependent with maximal specific binding at pH 7.7. SDS-PAGE gel electrophoresis analysis of covalently cross-linked 125I-EP to foetal liver membranes suggested that the EP binding site was composed of two subunits with an apparent mol wt of 41000 and 86000 dalton, respectively. (author)

  1. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddey, Justin A; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G; Hodder, Anthony N; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  2. Model-based Comparative Prediction of Transcription-Factor Binding Motifs in Anabolic Responses in Bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andy; B.; Chen; Kazunori; Hamamura; Guohua; Wang; Weirong; Xing; Subburaman; Mohan; Hiroki; Yokota; Yunlong; Liu

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory mechanism that controls the alteration of global gene expression patterns continues to be a challenging task in computational biology. We previously developed an ant algorithm, a biologically-inspired computational technique for microarray data, and predicted putative transcription-factor binding motifs (TFBMs) through mimicking interactive behaviors of natural ants. Here we extended the algorithm into a set of web-based software, Ant Modeler, and applied it to investigate the transcriptional mechanism underlying bone formation. Mechanical loading and administration of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are two known treatments to strengthen bone. We addressed a question: Is there any TFBM that stimulates both "anabolic responses of mechanical loading" and "BMP-mediated osteogenic signaling"? Although there is no significant overlap among genes in the two responses, a comparative model-based analysis suggests that the two independent osteogenic processes employ common TFBMs, such as a stress responsive element and a motif for peroxisome proliferator-activated recep- tor (PPAR). The post-modeling in vitro analysis using mouse osteoblast cells sup- ported involvements of the predicted TFBMs such as PPAR, Ikaros 3, and LMO2 in response to mechanical loading. Taken together, the results would be useful to derive a set of testable hypotheses and examine the role of specific regulators in complex transcriptional control of bone formation.

  3. Genome-wide identification of estrogen receptor alpha-binding sites in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Hui; Fält, Susann; Sandelin, Albin;

    2007-01-01

    We report the genome-wide identification of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-binding regions in mouse liver using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiled microarrays that cover all nonrepetitive sequences in the mouse genome. This analysis identified 5568 ERalpha-binding regions...... genes. The majority of ERalpha-binding regions lie in regions that are evolutionarily conserved between human and mouse. Motif-finding algorithms identified the estrogen response element, and variants thereof, together with binding sites for activator protein 1, basic-helix-loop-helix proteins, ETS...... signaling in mouse liver, by characterizing the first step in this signaling cascade, the binding of ERalpha to DNA in intact chromatin....

  4. The Human Papillomavirus E6 PDZ Binding Motif: From Life Cycle to Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketaki Ganti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-causing HPV E6 oncoproteins are characterized by the presence of a PDZ binding motif (PBM at their extreme carboxy terminus. It was long thought that this region of E6 had a sole function to confer interaction with a defined set of cellular substrates. However, more recent studies have shown that the E6 PBM has a complex pattern of regulation, whereby phosphorylation within the PBM can regulate interaction with two classes of cellular proteins: those containing PDZ domains and the members of the 14-3-3 family of proteins. In this review, we explore the roles that the PBM and its ligands play in the virus life cycle, and subsequently how these can inadvertently contribute towards the development of malignancy. We also explore how subtle alterations in cellular signal transduction pathways might result in aberrant E6 phosphorylation, which in turn might contribute towards disease progression.

  5. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-02

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  6. A poxvirus protein with a RING finger motif binds zinc and localizes in virus factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, C; Schiff, L; Rice, S A; Dowdeswell, T; Yang, X; McFadden, G

    1994-07-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV) is a Leporipoxvirus closely related to the highly virulent myxoma virus. The DNA sequence of the BamHI N fragment of the SFV DNA genome was determined, and the single complete open reading frame (N1R) was characterized. The protein encoded by the N1R gene was found to contain a C3HC4 RING finger motif at the C terminus. This C3HC4 motif is the hallmark of a growing family of proteins, many of which are involved in regulation of gene expression, DNA repair, or DNA recombination. Complete homologs of the SFV N1R gene were also detected in variola virus, myxoma virus, and vaccinia virus strain IHD-W. In contrast, the gene is completely absent from vaccinia virus strain Copenhagen, and in vaccinia virus strain WR, the open reading frame is truncated prior to the zinc binding domain because of an 11-bp deletion, thus producing a frameshift and premature stop codon. Recombinant N1R protein from SFV was expressed in Escherichia coli and shown to bind zinc in a specific manner. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize a peptide epitope tag (derived from ICP27 of herpes simplex virus) fused to the N terminus of the poxvirus proteins, we observed that the N1R protein of SFV and its homologs in myxoma virus and vaccinia virus IHD-W were localized primarily to the virus factories in the cytoplasm of infected cells and, to a lesser degree, the host cell nucleus. The truncated protein of vaccinia virus strain WR failed to localize in this manner but instead was observed throughout the cytoplasm.

  7. Multiple ETS family proteins regulate PF4 gene expression by binding to the same ETS binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Okada

    Full Text Available In previous studies on the mechanism underlying megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, several ETS motifs were found in each megakaryocyte-specific gene promoter. Although these studies suggested that several ETS family proteins regulate megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, only a few ETS family proteins have been identified. Platelet factor 4 (PF4 is a megakaryocyte-specific gene and its promoter includes multiple ETS motifs. We had previously shown that ETS-1 binds to an ETS motif in the PF4 promoter. However, the functions of the other ETS motifs are still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate a novel functional ETS motif in the PF4 promoter and identify proteins binding to the motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP bound to the -51 ETS site. Expression of FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP activated the PF4 promoter in HepG2 cells. Mutation of a -51 ETS site attenuated FLI-1-, ELF-1-, and GABP-mediated transactivation of the promoter. siRNA analysis demonstrated that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression in HEL cells. Among these three proteins, only FLI-1 synergistically activated the promoter with GATA-1. In addition, only FLI-1 expression was increased during megakaryocytic differentiation. Finally, the importance of the -51 ETS site for the activation of the PF4 promoter during physiological megakaryocytic differentiation was confirmed by a novel reporter gene assay using in vitro ES cell differentiation system. Together, these data suggest that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression through the -51 ETS site in megakaryocytes and implicate the differentiation stage-specific regulation of PF4 gene expression by multiple ETS factors.

  8. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: ► Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. ► Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. ► Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination. ► Single CpG methylation located at Pax6 binding motif regulates St

  9. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Chen, Man; Liu, Lian [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cheng, Huaiyan [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Yan, You-E [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Ying-Hong, E-mail: yhfeng@usuhs.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination

  10. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition

  11. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Zhang, Qing [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biological Cancer Therapy, Xuzhou Medical College, Xuzhou 221002 (China); Yang, Yu [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China); Wu, Chuanfang, E-mail: wuchuanfangsichuan@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Bioresources and Ecoenvironment (Ministry of Education), College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  12. Rapid Identification of Protein Kinase Phosphorylation Site Motifs Using Combinatorial Peptide Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chad J; Turk, Benjamin E

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases phosphorylate substrates at serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues that fall within the context of short sequence motifs. Knowing the phosphorylation site motif for a protein kinase facilitates designing substrates for kinase assays and mapping phosphorylation sites in protein substrates. Here, we describe an arrayed peptide library protocol for rapidly determining kinase phosphorylation consensus sequences. This method uses a set of peptide mixtures in which each of the 20 amino acid residues is systematically substituted at nine positions surrounding a central site of phosphorylation. Peptide mixtures are arrayed in multiwell plates and analyzed by radiolabel assay with the kinase of interest. The preferred sequence is determined from the relative rate of phosphorylation of each peptide in the array. Consensus peptides based on these sequences typically serve as efficient and specific kinase substrates for high-throughput screening or incorporation into biosensors.

  13. FISim: A new similarity measure between transcription factor binding sites based on the fuzzy integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory motifs describe sets of related transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and can be represented as position frequency matrices (PFMs. De novo identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology which includes the issue of comparing putative motifs with one another and with motifs that are already known. The relative importance of each nucleotide within a given position in the PFMs should be considered in order to compute PFM similarities. Furthermore, biological data are inherently noisy and imprecise. Fuzzy set theory is particularly suitable for modeling imprecise data, whereas fuzzy integrals are highly appropriate for representing the interaction among different information sources. Results We propose FISim, a new similarity measure between PFMs, based on the fuzzy integral of the distance of the nucleotides with respect to the information content of the positions. Unlike existing methods, FISim is designed to consider the higher contribution of better conserved positions to the binding affinity. FISim provides excellent results when dealing with sets of randomly generated motifs, and outperforms the remaining methods when handling real datasets of related motifs. Furthermore, we propose a new cluster methodology based on kernel theory together with FISim to obtain groups of related motifs potentially bound by the same TFs, providing more robust results than existing approaches. Conclusion FISim corrects a design flaw of the most popular methods, whose measures favour similarity of low information content positions. We use our measure to successfully identify motifs that describe binding sites for the same TF and to solve real-life problems. In this study the reliability of fuzzy technology for motif comparison tasks is proven.

  14. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-03-21

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include: (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a multimeric protein assembly with cofactors and metal ions and (3) analysis of consensus interaction motifs within the ensembles and identification of conserved determinants of these interactions. Currently the database contains 585 proteins with 650 peptide-binding sites. http://peptisite.ucsd.edu/ link allows searching for the sites of interest and interactive visualization of the ensembles using the ActiveICM web-browser plugin. This structural database for protein-peptide interactions enables understanding of structural principles of these interactions and may assist the development of an efficient peptide docking benchmark. PMID:24406170

  15. Discovery and mapping of an intracellular antagonist binding site at the chemokine receptor CCR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweemer, Annelien J M; Bunnik, Julia; Veenhuizen, Margo;

    2014-01-01

    for an intracellular binding site for CCR2-RA-[R], JNJ-27141491, and SD-24. For CCR2-RA-[R] the most important residues for binding were found to be the highly conserved tyrosine Y(7.53) and phenylalanine F(8.50) of the NPxxYx(5,6)F motif, as well as V(6.36) at the bottom of TM-VI and K(8.49) in helix...

  16. PairMotif: A New Pattern-Driven Algorithm for Planted (l, d) DNA Motif Search

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Yu; Hongwei Huo; Yipu Zhang; Hongzhi Guo

    2012-01-01

    Motif search is a fundamental problem in bioinformatics with an important application in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. The exact algorithms can report all (l, d) motifs and find the best one under a specific objective function. However, it is still a challenging task to identify weak motifs, since either a large amount of memory or execution time is required by current exact algorithms. A new exact algorithm, PairMotif, is proposed for planted (l, d) mo...

  17. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/.

  18. The First Residue of the PWWP Motif Modulates HATH Domain Binding, Stability, and Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Lee, Hsia-Ju; Jiang, Ingjye; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jan; Sue, Shih-Che

    2015-07-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (hHDGF) and HDGF-related proteins (HRPs) contain conserved N-terminal HATH domains with a characteristic structural motif, namely the PWWP motif. The HATH domain has attracted attention because of its ability to bind with heparin/heparan sulfate, DNA, and methylated histone peptide. Depending on the sequence of the PWWP motif, HRP HATHs are classified into P-type (Pro-His-Trp-Pro) and A-type (Ala-His-Trp-Pro) forms. A-type HATH is highly unstable and tends to precipitate in solution. We replaced the Pro residue in P-type HATHHDGF with Ala and evaluated the influence on structure, dynamics, and ligand binding. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hydrogen/deuterium exchange and circular dichroism (CD) measurements revealed reduced stability. Analysis of NMR backbone (15)N relaxations (R1, R2, and nuclear Overhauser effect) revealed additional backbone dynamics in the interface between the β-barrel and the C-terminal helix bundle. The β1-β2 loop, where the AHWP sequence is located, has great structural flexibility, which aids HATH-HATH interaction through the loop. A-type HATH, therefore, shows a stronger tendency to aggregate when binding with heparin and DNA oligomers. This study defines the role of the first residue of the PWWP motif in modulating HATH domain stability and oligomer formation in binding.

  19. The oxyanion hole of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase: a novel structural motif for electrostatic stabilisation in alcohol dehydrogenase active sites

    OpenAIRE

    Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, B

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The side chains of Asn-191 and Asn-300 constitute a characteristic structural motif of the active site of Pseudomonas fluorescens mannitol 2-dehydrogenase that lacks precedent in known alcohol dehydrogenases and resembles the canonical oxyanion binding pocket of serine proteases. We have used steady-state and transient kinetic studies of the effects of varied pH and deuterium isotopic substitutions in substrates and solvent on the enzymatic rates to delineate catalytic con...

  20. The Runt domain of AML1 (RUNX1) binds a sequence-conserved RNA motif that mimics a DNA element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukunaga, Junichi; Nomura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Yoichiro; Amano, Ryo; Tanaka, Taku; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Kawai, Gota; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Kozu, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) is a key transcription factor for hematopoiesis that binds to the Runt-binding double-stranded DNA element (RDE) of target genes through its N-terminal Runt domain. Aberrations in the AML1 gene are frequently found in human leukemia. To better understand AML1 and its potential utility for diagnosis and therapy, we obtained RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the AML1 Runt domain. Enzymatic probing and NMR analyses revealed that Apt1-S, which is a truncated variant of one of the aptamers, has a CACG tetraloop and two stem regions separated by an internal loop. All the isolated aptamers were found to contain the conserved sequence motif 5′-NNCCAC-3′ and 5′-GCGMGN′N′-3′ (M:A or C; N and N′ form Watson–Crick base pairs). The motif contains one AC mismatch and one base bulged out. Mutational analysis of Apt1-S showed that three guanines of the motif are important for Runt binding as are the three guanines of RDE, which are directly recognized by three arginine residues of the Runt domain. Mutational analyses of the Runt domain revealed that the amino acid residues used for Apt1-S binding were similar to those used for RDE binding. Furthermore, the aptamer competed with RDE for binding to the Runt domain in vitro. These results demonstrated that the Runt domain of the AML1 protein binds to the motif of the aptamer that mimics DNA. Our findings should provide new insights into RNA function and utility in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:23709277

  1. Binding of a proline-independent hydrophobic motif by the Candida albicans Rvs167-3 SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkourtsa, Areti; van den Burg, Janny; Avula, Teja; Hochstenbach, Frans; Distel, Ben

    2016-09-01

    Src-homology 3 (SH3) domains are small protein-protein interaction modules. While most SH3 domains bind to proline-x-x-proline (PxxP) containing motifs in their binding partners, some SH3 domains recognize motifs other than proline-based sequences. Recently, we showed that the SH3 domain of Candida albicans Rvs167-3 binds peptides enriched in hydrophobic residues and containing a single proline residue (RΦxΦxΦP, where x is any amino acid and Φ is a hydrophobic residue). Here, we demonstrate that the proline in this motif is not required for Rvs167-3 SH3 recognition. Through mutagenesis studies we show that binding of the peptide ligand involves the conserved tryptophan in the canonical PxxP binding pocket as well as residues in the extended n-Src loop of Rvs167-3 SH3. Our studies establish a novel, proline-independent, binding sequence for Rvs167-3 SH3 (RΦxΦxΦ) that is comprised of a positively charged residue (arginine) and three hydrophobic residues. PMID:27393996

  2. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  3. Using DNA duplex stability information for transcription factor binding site discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordân, Raluca; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site discovery is an important step in understanding transcriptional regulation. Many computational tools have already been developed, but their success in detecting TF motifs is still limited. We believe one of the main reasons for the low accuracy of current methods is that they do not take into account the structural aspects of TF-DNA interaction. We have previously shown that knowledge about the structural class of the TF and information about nucleosome occupancy can be used to improve motif discovery. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of using information about the DNA double-helical stability for motif discovery. We notice that, in general, the energy needed to destabilize the DNA double helix is higher at TF binding sites than at random DNA sites. We use this information to derive informative positional priors that we incorporate into a motif finding algorithm. When applied to yeast ChIP-chip data, the new informative priors improve the performance of the motif finder significantly when compared to priors that do not use the energetic stability information.

  4. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization

  5. Computational analysis and prediction of the binding motif and protein interacting partners of the Abl SH3 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingjun Hou

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions, particularly weak and transient ones, are often mediated by peptide recognition domains, such as Src Homology 2 and 3 (SH2 and SH3 domains, which bind to specific sequence and structural motifs. It is important but challenging to determine the binding specificity of these domains accurately and to predict their physiological interacting partners. In this study, the interactions between 35 peptide ligands (15 binders and 20 non-binders and the Abl SH3 domain were analyzed using molecular dynamics simulation and the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Solvent Area method. The calculated binding free energies correlated well with the rank order of the binding peptides and clearly distinguished binders from non-binders. Free energy component analysis revealed that the van der Waals interactions dictate the binding strength of peptides, whereas the binding specificity is determined by the electrostatic interaction and the polar contribution of desolvation. The binding motif of the Abl SH3 domain was then determined by a virtual mutagenesis method, which mutates the residue at each position of the template peptide relative to all other 19 amino acids and calculates the binding free energy difference between the template and the mutated peptides using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Solvent Area method. A single position mutation free energy profile was thus established and used as a scoring matrix to search peptides recognized by the Abl SH3 domain in the human genome. Our approach successfully picked ten out of 13 experimentally determined binding partners of the Abl SH3 domain among the top 600 candidates from the 218,540 decapeptides with the PXXP motif in the SWISS-PROT database. We expect that this physical-principle based method can be applied to other protein domains as well.

  6. MotifLab: a tools and data integration workbench for motif discovery and regulatory sequence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klepper Kjetil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traditional methods for computational motif discovery often suffer from poor performance. In particular, methods that search for sequence matches to known binding motifs tend to predict many non-functional binding sites because they fail to take into consideration the biological state of the cell. In recent years, genome-wide studies have generated a lot of data that has the potential to improve our ability to identify functional motifs and binding sites, such as information about chromatin accessibility and epigenetic states in different cell types. However, it is not always trivial to make use of this data in combination with existing motif discovery tools, especially for researchers who are not skilled in bioinformatics programming. Results Here we present MotifLab, a general workbench for analysing regulatory sequence regions and discovering transcription factor binding sites and cis-regulatory modules. MotifLab supports comprehensive motif discovery and analysis by allowing users to integrate several popular motif discovery tools as well as different kinds of additional information, including phylogenetic conservation, epigenetic marks, DNase hypersensitive sites, ChIP-Seq data, positional binding preferences of transcription factors, transcription factor interactions and gene expression. MotifLab offers several data-processing operations that can be used to create, manipulate and analyse data objects, and complete analysis workflows can be constructed and automatically executed within MotifLab, including graphical presentation of the results. Conclusions We have developed MotifLab as a flexible workbench for motif analysis in a genomic context. The flexibility and effectiveness of this workbench has been demonstrated on selected test cases, in particular two previously published benchmark data sets for single motifs and modules, and a realistic example of genes responding to treatment with forskolin. MotifLab is freely

  7. A ChIP-Seq benchmark shows that sequence conservation mainly improves detection of strong transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Håndstad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors are important controllers of gene expression and mapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBS is key to inferring transcription factor regulatory networks. Several methods for predicting TFBS exist, but there are no standard genome-wide datasets on which to assess the performance of these prediction methods. Also, it is believed that information about sequence conservation across different genomes can generally improve accuracy of motif-based predictors, but it is not clear under what circumstances use of conservation is most beneficial. RESULTS: Here we use published ChIP-seq data and an improved peak detection method to create comprehensive benchmark datasets for prediction methods which use known descriptors or binding motifs to detect TFBS in genomic sequences. We use this benchmark to assess the performance of five different prediction methods and find that the methods that use information about sequence conservation generally perform better than simpler motif-scanning methods. The difference is greater on high-affinity peaks and when using short and information-poor motifs. However, if the motifs are specific and information-rich, we find that simple motif-scanning methods can perform better than conservation-based methods. CONCLUSIONS: Our benchmark provides a comprehensive test that can be used to rank the relative performance of transcription factor binding site prediction methods. Moreover, our results show that, contrary to previous reports, sequence conservation is better suited for predicting strong than weak transcription factor binding sites.

  8. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    OpenAIRE

    CHENG, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we...

  9. Hydrogen Bound Complexes with Tropolone: Binding Motifs, Barrier Heights, and the Search for Bifurcating Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemchick, Deacon; Chew, Kathryn; Vaccaro, Patrick

    2014-06-01

    The potentially frustrated transfer of a proton between the hydroxylic (proton-donating) and ketonic (proton-accepting) oxygen atom centers in tropolone (TrOH) long has served as a model system for the study of coherent (symmetrical) proton-transfer events. A litany of hydrogen-bound complexes [TrOH \\cdot Xn] can be formed in situ by docking amphoteric ligands onto the TrOH substrate under supersonic free-jet expansion conditions. Binary (n = 1) and higher order (n = 2, 3, ldots) complexes formed with formic acid, hydrogen fluoride, acetic acid and propiolic acid (X = FA, HF, AA, and PA) have been synthesized and interrogated using a variety of spectroscopic probes built upon the intense ˜{A1}B2-˜{X1}{A}1 (π *←π) near-ultraviolet absorption system of bare tropolone, thereby providing vibronically resolved information through combined use of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), dispersed fluorescence (DF), fluorescence hole-burning (FHB), and stimulated emission pumping (SEP) methods. Experimental results reveal the propensity for binary complexes to adopt a higher-energy external binding motif (ligand attached to the seven membered aromatic ring) over the energetically preferred internal form (ligand bound to the O-H\\cdotsO reaction center), where the latter cleft-bound species can undergo unique symmetric (coherent) double proton-transfer reactions. These findings will be discussed in light of supporting quantum-chemical calculations.

  10. IGD motifs, which are required for migration stimulatory activity of fibronectin type I modules, do not mediate binding in matrix assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Maurer

    Full Text Available Picomolar concentrations of proteins comprising only the N-terminal 70-kDa region (70K of fibronectin (FN stimulate cell migration into collagen gels. The Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD motifs in four of the nine FN type 1 (FNI modules in 70K are important for such migratory stimulating activity. The 70K region mediates binding of nanomolar concentrations of intact FN to cell-surface sites where FN is assembled. Using baculovirus, we expressed wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations in (3FNI and (5FNI; (7FNI and (9FNI; or (3FNI, (5FNI, (7FNI, and (9FNI. Wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations were equally active in binding to assembly sites of FN-null fibroblasts. This finding indicates that IGD motifs do not mediate the interaction between 70K and the cell-surface that is important for FN assembly. Further, FN fragment N-(3FNIII, which does not stimulate migration, binds to assembly sites on FN-null fibroblast. The Ile-to-Ala mutations had effects on the structure of FNI modules as evidenced by decreases in abilities of 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations to bind to monoclonal antibody 5C3, which recognizes an epitope in (9FNI, or to bind to FUD, a polypeptide based on the F1 adhesin of Streptococcus pyogenes that interacts with 70K by the β-zipper mechanism. These results suggest that the picomolar interactions of 70K with cells that stimulate cell migration require different conformations of FNI modules than the nanomolar interactions required for assembly.

  11. Novel porphyrin-daunomycin hybrids: Synthesis and preferential binding to G-quadruplexes over i-motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ping; Jin, Shu-fang; Lu, Jia-Zheng; Lv, Jun-liang; Wu, Gong-qing; Chen, Pan-Pan; Tan, Cai-Lian; Chen, Dian-Wen

    2015-02-01

    Encouraged by the enormous importance attributed to the structure and function of human telomeric DNA, herein we focused our attention on the interaction of a serious of newly prepared porphyrin-daunomycin (Por-DNR) hybrids with the guanine-rich single-strand oligomer (G4) and the complementary cytosine-rich strand (i-motif). Various spectral methods such as absorption and fluorescence titration, surface-enhanced Raman and circular dichroism spectrum were integrated in the experiment and it was found that these Por-DNR hybrids could serve as prominent molecules to recognize G4 and i-motif. What is more, interesting results were obtained that the hybrids with longer flexible links are more favorable in binding with both G4 and i-motif than the hybrid with shorter linkage. These Por-DNR hybrids may help to develop new ideas in the research of human telomeric DNA with small molecules.

  12. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  13. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  14. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome.

  15. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  16. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  17. Conserved retinoblastoma protein-binding motif in human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase minimally impacts viral replication but affects susceptibility to maribavir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Sunwen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The UL97 kinase has been shown to phosphorylate and inactivate the retinoblastoma protein (Rb and has three consensus Rb-binding motifs that might contribute to this activity. Recombinant viruses containing mutations in the Rb-binding motifs generally replicated well in human foreskin fibroblasts with only a slight delay in replication kinetics. Their susceptibility to the specific UL97 kinase inhibitor, maribavir, was also examined. Mutation of the amino terminal motif, which is involved in the inactivation of Rb, also renders the virus hypersensitive to the drug and suggests that the motif may play a role in its mechanism of action.

  18. A biophysical model for analysis of transcription factor interaction and binding site arrangement from genome-wide binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How transcription factors (TFs interact with cis-regulatory sequences and interact with each other is a fundamental, but not well understood, aspect of gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a computational method to address this question, relying on the established biophysical principles. This method, STAP (sequence to affinity prediction, takes into account all combinations and configurations of strong and weak binding sites to analyze large scale transcription factor (TF-DNA binding data to discover cooperative interactions among TFs, infer sequence rules of interaction and predict TF target genes in new conditions with no TF-DNA binding data. The distinctions between STAP and other statistical approaches for analyzing cis-regulatory sequences include the utility of physical principles and the treatment of the DNA binding data as quantitative representation of binding strengths. Applying this method to the ChIP-seq data of 12 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, we found that the strength of TF-DNA binding could be significantly modulated by cooperative interactions among TFs with adjacent binding sites. However, further analysis on five putatively interacting TF pairs suggests that such interactions may be relatively insensitive to the distance and orientation of binding sites. Testing a set of putative Nanog motifs, STAP showed that a novel Nanog motif could better explain the ChIP-seq data than previously published ones. We then experimentally tested and verified the new Nanog motif. A series of comparisons showed that STAP has more predictive power than several state-of-the-art methods for cis-regulatory sequence analysis. We took advantage of this power to study the evolution of TF-target relationship in Drosophila. By learning the TF-DNA interaction models from the ChIP-chip data of D. melanogaster (Mel and applying them to the genome of D. pseudoobscura (Pse, we found that only about half of the

  19. Redefining the structural motifs that determine RNA binding and RNA editing by pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shifeng; Gutmann, Bernard; Zhong, Xiao; Ye, Yongtao; Fisher, Mark F; Bai, Fengqi; Castleden, Ian; Song, Yue; Song, Bo; Huang, Jiaying; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Lim, Boon L; Bond, Charles S; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Small, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form one of the largest protein families in land plants. They are characterised by tandem 30-40 amino acid motifs that form an extended binding surface capable of sequence-specific recognition of RNA strands. Almost all of them are post-translationally targeted to plastids and mitochondria, where they play important roles in post-transcriptional processes including splicing, RNA editing and the initiation of translation. A code describing how PPR proteins recognise their RNA targets promises to accelerate research on these proteins, but making use of this code requires accurate definition and annotation of all of the various nucleotide-binding motifs in each protein. We have used a structural modelling approach to define 10 different variants of the PPR motif found in plant proteins, in addition to the putative deaminase motif that is found at the C-terminus of many RNA-editing factors. We show that the super-helical RNA-binding surface of RNA-editing factors is potentially longer than previously recognised. We used the redefined motifs to develop accurate and consistent annotations of PPR sequences from 109 genomes. We report a high error rate in PPR gene models in many public plant proteomes, due to gene fusions and insertions of spurious introns. These consistently annotated datasets across a wide range of species are valuable resources for future comparative genomics studies, and an essential pre-requisite for accurate large-scale computational predictions of PPR targets. We have created a web portal (http://www.plantppr.com) that provides open access to these resources for the community. PMID:26764122

  20. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  1. Key importance of small RNA binding for the activity of a glycine-tryptophan (GW) motif-containing viral suppressor of RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-30

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  2. Putative hAPN receptor binding sites in SARS_CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUXiao-Jing; LUOCheng; LinJian-Cheng; HAOPei; HEYou-Yu; GUOZong-Ming; QINLei; SUJiong; LIUBo-Shu; HUANGYin; NANPeng; LIChuan-Song; XIONGBin; LUOXiao-Min; ZHAOGuo-Ping; PEIGang; CHENKai-Xian; SHENXu; SHENJian-Hua; ZOUJian-Ping; HEWei-Zhong; SHITie-Liu; ZHONGYang; JIANGHua-Liang; LIYi-Xue

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To obtain the information of ligand-receptor binding between thd S protein of SARS_CoV and CD13, identify the possible interacting domains or motifs related to binding sites, and provide clues for studying the functions of SARS proteins and designing anti-SARS drugs and vaccines. METHODS: On the basis of comparative genomics, the homology search, phylogenetic analyses, and multi-sequence alignment were used to predict CD13 related interacting domains and binding sites sites in the S protein of SARS_CoV. Molecular modeling and docking simulation methods were employed to address the interaction feature between CD13 and S protein of SARS_CoV in validating the bioinformatics predictions. RESULTS:Possible binding sites in the SARS_CoV S protein to CD13 have been mapped out by using bioinformatics analysis tools. The binding for one protein-protein interaction pair (D757-R761 motif of the SARS_CoV S protein to P585-A653 domain of CD13) has been simulated by molecular modeling and docking simulation methods. CONCLUSION:CD13 may be a possible receptor of the SARS_CoV S protein which may be associated with the SARS infection. This study also provides a possible strategy for mapping the possible binding receptors of the proteins in a genome.

  3. Type 2 diabetes mellitus: phylogenetic motifs for predicting protein functional sites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok Sharma; Tanuja Rastogi; Meenakshi Bhartiya; A K Shasany; S P S Khanuja

    2007-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a medical condition associated with abnormally high levels of glucose (or sugar) in the blood. Keeping this view, we demonstrate the phylogenetic motifs (PMs) identification in type 2 diabetes mellitus very likely corresponding to protein functional sites. In this article, we have identified PMs for all the candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Glycine 310 remains conserved for glucokinase and potassium channel KCNJ11. Isoleucine 137 was conserved for insulin receptor and regulatory subunit of a phosphorylating enzyme. Whereas residues valine, leucine, methionine were highly conserved for insulin receptor. Occurrence of proline was very high for calpain 10 gene and glucose transporter

  4. SiteComp: a server for ligand binding site analysis in protein structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yingjie; Yoo, Seungyeul; Sanchez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Computational characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins provides preliminary information for functional annotation, protein design and ligand optimization. SiteComp implements binding site analysis for comparison of binding sites, evaluation of residue contribution to binding sites and identification of sub-sites with distinct molecular interaction properties.

  5. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates with translational efficiency across bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; M. Pilar Francino

    2008-01-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the sigma(70) subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory s...

  6. Mutation of the Conserved Calcium-Binding Motif in Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 Impacts Adhesion but Not Piliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Johnson, Michael D. L.; Burillo-Kirch, Christine; Mocny, Jeffrey C.; Anderson, James E.; Garrett, Christopher K.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae PilC1 is a member of the PilC family of type IV pilus-associated adhesins found in Neisseria species and other type IV pilus-producing genera. Previously, a calcium-binding domain was described in the C-terminal domains of PilY1 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in PilC1 and PilC2 of Kingella kingae. Genetic analysis of N. gonorrhoeae revealed a similar calcium-binding motif in PilC1. To evaluate the potential significance of this calcium-binding region in N. gonorrhoeae, we produced recombinant full-length PilC1 and a PilC1 C-terminal domain fragment. We show that, while alterations of the calcium-binding motif disrupted the ability of PilC1 to bind calcium, they did not grossly affect the secondary structure of the protein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that both full-length wild-type PilC1 and full-length calcium-binding-deficient PilC1 inhibited gonococcal adherence to cultured human cervical epithelial cells, unlike the truncated PilC1 C-terminal domain. Similar to PilC1 in K. kingae, but in contrast to the calcium-binding mutant of P. aeruginosa PilY1, an equivalent mutation in N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 produced normal amounts of pili. However, the N. gonorrhoeae PilC1 calcium-binding mutant still had partial defects in gonococcal adhesion to ME180 cells and genetic transformation, which are both essential virulence factors in this human pathogen. Thus, we conclude that calcium binding to PilC1 plays a critical role in pilus function in N. gonorrhoeae. PMID:24002068

  7. Enhancement of binding activity of soluble human CD40 to CD40 ligand through incorporation of an isoleucine zipper motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui HE; Li-hui XU; Yi LIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of incorporation of all isoleucine zipper(IZ)motif into CD40 on binding activity of CD40 for the CD40 ligand (CD40L).Methods:Prokaryotic expression vectors for 2 soluble CD40 derivatives,shCD40His and shCD40IZ containing an IZ dowain,were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli.The recombinant proteins were purified to homogeneity after refolding from inclusion bodies.Their molecular weights in solution of shCD40His and shCD40IZ were compared by size-exclusion chromatography,and their binding activity for CD40L on Jurkat T cells was determined by flow cytometry.Results:shCD40His and shCD40IZ were generated.Both of them possessed significant binding activity for the cognate ligand CD40L expressed on the cell surface.shCD40IZ had much higher binding activity to its ligand(CD40L)than did shCD40His.Furthermore,size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that shCD40IZ existed in high molecular mass forms that were most likely to be trimers in solution.Conclusion:Incorporation of an IZ motif into CD40 enhances its binding activity for CD40L through trimerization of the CD40 derivative.

  8. GIT1 Paxillin-binding Domain Is a Four-helix Bundle, and It Binds to Both Paxillin LD2 and LD4 Motifs*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ziwei M.; Simmerman, Joseph A.; Guibao, Cristina D.; Zheng, Jie J.

    2008-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a multidomain protein that plays an important role in cell adhesion, motility, cytoskeletal remodeling, and membrane trafficking. GIT1 mediates the localization of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) and PAK-interactive exchange factor to focal adhesions, and its activation is regulated by the interaction between its C-terminal paxillin-binding domain (PBD) and the LD motifs of paxillin. In this study, we...

  9. Differential expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 in human astrocytoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hai-tao; ZHANG Zhi-wen; XUE Jing-hui; KONG Hai-bo; LIU Ai-jun; LI Shou-chun; LIU Yu-xiao

    2013-01-01

    Background The RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3),which is transcriptionally induced by low temperature and hypoxia,has recently been found to be upregulated in human tumors.However,its expression status in human astrocytoma is not well defined.This article focuses on the differential expression of RBM3 in human astrocytomas of different grades and normal brain tissues.Methods RBM3 was detected in astrocytomas and normal brain tissues by quantitative real-time PCR,immunohistochemistry,and Western blotting.Analysis of variance was performed on the data from quantitative real-time PCR.The Fisher's exact test was used to analyze the immunohistochemistry results.A P-value of less than 0.05 indicates a statistically significant difference.Results On one hand,the mRNA expression levels of three X-chromosome-related RBM genes (RBMX,RBM3,and RBM10) were detected by quantitative real-time PCR.The results showed that there were no significant differences in RBMX and RBM10 mRNA expression levels in human astrocytomas of different grades and normal brain tissues.However,RBM3 mRNA expression levels were elevated in high-grade (World Health Organization (WHO) Grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ) astrocytomas versus low-grade (WHO Grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ) astrocytomas (5.06±0.66 vs.1.60±0.58; P <0.05) or normal controls (5.06±0.66 vs.1.03±0.22; P <0.05) as determined by quantitative real-time PCR analysis.On the other hand,immunohistochemistry showed an increased RBM3 labeling index in astrocytomas of different grades and normal brain tissues (positive staining rate:astrocytoma Grade Ⅳ,92.9%; astrocytoma Grade Ⅲ,81.8%; astrocytoma Grade Ⅰ-Ⅱ,50%;normal brain tissues,37.5%; high-grade astrocytoma versus normal brain tissues,P <0.05; high-grade astrocytoma versus low-grade astrocytoma,P <0.05).The higher protein levels of RBM3 were also validated in high-grade astrocytomas and low-grade astrocytomas compared with normal brain tissues by Western blotting.Conclusions These

  10. Oxytocin binding sites in bovine mammary tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xin.

    1989-01-01

    Oxytocin binding sites were identified and characterized in bovine mammary tissue. ({sup 3}H)-oxytocin binding reached equilibrium by 50 min at 20{degree}C and by 8 hr at 4{degree}C. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. Thyrotropin releasing hormone, adrenocorticotropin, angiotensin I, angiotensin II, pentagastrin, bradykinin, xenopsin and L-valyl-histidyl-L-leucyl-L-threonyl-L-prolyl-L-valyl-L-glutamyl-L-lysine were not competitive. In the presence of 10 nM LiCl, addition of oxytocin to dispersed bovine mammary cells, in which phosphatidylinositol was pre-labelled, caused a time and dose-dependent increase in radioactive inositiol monophosphate incorporation. The possibility that there are distinct vasopressin receptors in bovine mammary tissue was investigated. ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding reached equilibrium by 40 min at 20{degree}. The half-time of displacement at 20{degree}C was approximately 1 hr. The ability of the peptides to inhibit ({sup 3}H)-vasopressin binding was: (Thr{sup 4},Gly{sup 7})-oxytocin > Arg{sup 8}-vasopressin > (lys{sup 8})-vasopressin > (Deamino{sup 1},D-arg{sup 8})-vasopressin > oxytocin > d (CH{sub 2}){sub 5}Tyr(Me)AVP.

  11. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  12. Structure-activity relationship of the peptide binding-motif mediating the BRCA2:RAD51 protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Duncan E; Marsh, May; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-04-01

    RAD51 is a recombinase involved in the homologous recombination of double-strand breaks in DNA. RAD51 forms oligomers by binding to another molecule of RAD51 via an 'FxxA' motif, and the same recognition sequence is similarly utilised to bind BRCA2. We have tabulated the effects of mutation of this sequence, across a variety of experimental methods and from relevant mutations observed in the clinic. We use mutants of a tetrapeptide sequence to probe the binding interaction, using both isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography. Where possible, comparison between our tetrapeptide mutational study and the previously reported mutations is made, discrepancies are discussed and the importance of secondary structure in interpreting alanine scanning and mutational data of this nature is considered.

  13. STUDY OF ESTROGEN BINDING SITE ON HUMAN EJACULATED SPERMATOZOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHUJin-Shong; WANGYi-Fei

    1989-01-01

    The specific estrogen binding site for 17β-estradiol has been investigated on human spermatozoa by electron microscopec autoradiography. The results show that the binding sites were distributed over the surface of human spermatozoa: acrosomal cap, equatorial

  14. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  15. TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Sakata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Fetoprotein (AFP is known to be highly produced in fetal liver despite its barely detectable level in normal adult liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular carcinoma often shows high expression of AFP. Thus, AFP seems to be an oncogenic marker. In our present study, we investigated how TGF-β signaling cooperates with AT motif-binding factor-1 (ATBF1 to inhibit AFP transcription. Indeed, the expression of AFP mRNA in HuH-7 cells was negatively regulated by TGF-β signaling. To further understand how TGF-β suppresses the transcription of the AFP gene, we analyzed the activity of the AFP promoter in the presence of TGF-β. We found that the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 suppressed AFP transcription through two ATBF1 binding elements (AT-motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, both AT-motifs were required for transcriptional repression upon TGF-β stimulation. Furthermore, Smads were found to interact with ATBF1 at both its N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Since the N-terminal (ATBF1N and C-terminal regions of ATBF1 (ATBF1C lack the ability of DNA binding, both truncated mutants rescued the cooperative inhibitory action by the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-β signaling can act in concert with ATBF1 to suppress the activity of the AFP promoter through direct interaction of ATBF1 with Smads.

  16. Berberine inhibits cyclin D1 expression via suppressed binding of AP-1 transcription factors to CCND1 AP-1 motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye LUO; Yu HAO; Tai-ping SHI; Wei-wei DENG; Na LI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To verify the suppressive effect of berberine on the proliferation of the human pulmonary giant cell carcinoma cell line PG and to demonstrate the mecha-nisms behind the antitumoral effects of berberine. Methods: The proliferative effects of PG cells were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetry. The cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. The expression level of cyclin D1 was detected by RT-PCR. The activities of the activating protein-1 (AP-1) and NF-κB signaling pathways related to cyclin D1 were examined by luciferase assay. The cytoplasmic level of c-Jun was detected by Western blot analysis. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to examiae the binding of transcription factors to the cyclin D1 gene (CCNDl) AP-1 motif. Results: The results showed that the proliferation of PG cells treated with different concentrations (10, 20, and 40 μg/mL) of berberine for 24 and 48 h was suppressed significantly compared to the control group. After treatment with berberine, the proportion of PG cells at the G0/G1 phase increased, while cells at the S and G2/M phases decreased. Berberine could inhibit the expression of cyclin D1 in PG cells. Berberine inhibited the activity of the AP-1 signaling pathway, but had no significant effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Berberine suppressed the expression of c-Jun and decreased the binding of tran-scription factors to the CCND1 AP-1 motif. Conclusion: Berberine suppresses the activity of the AP-1 signaling pathway and decreases the binding of transcrip-tion factors to the CCND1 AP-1 motif. This is one of the important mechanisms behind the antitumoral effects of berberine as a regulator of cyclin D1.

  17. rMotifGen: random motif generator for DNA and protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardin C Timothy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detection of short, subtle conserved motif regions within a set of related DNA or amino acid sequences can lead to discoveries about important regulatory domains such as transcription factor and DNA binding sites as well as conserved protein domains. In order to help assess motif detection algorithms on motifs with varying properties and levels of conservation, we have developed a computational tool, rMotifGen, with the sole purpose of generating a number of random DNA or protein sequences containing short sequence motifs. Each motif consensus can be user-defined, randomly generated, or created from a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM. Insertions and mutations within these motifs are created according to user-defined parameters and substitution matrices. The resulting sequences can be helpful in mutational simulations and in testing the limits of motif detection algorithms. Results Two implementations of rMotifGen have been created, one providing a graphical user interface (GUI for random motif construction, and the other serving as a command line interface. The second implementation has the added advantages of platform independence and being able to be called in a batch mode. rMotifGen was used to construct sample sets of sequences containing DNA motifs and amino acid motifs that were then tested against the Gibbs sampler and MEME packages. Conclusion rMotifGen provides an efficient and convenient method for creating random DNA or amino acid sequences with a variable number of motifs, where the instance of each motif can be incorporated using a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM or by creating an instance mutated from its corresponding consensus using an evolutionary model based on substitution matrices. rMotifGen is freely available at: http://bioinformatics.louisville.edu/brg/rMotifGen/.

  18. Coregulator Control of Androgen Receptor Action by a Novel Nuclear Receptor-Binding Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Jehle, Katja; Cato, Laura; Neeb, Antje; Muhle-Goll, Claudia; Jung, Nicole; Smith, Emmanuel W.; Buzon, Victor; Carbó, Laia R.; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva; Schmitz, Katja; Fruk, Ljiljana; Luy, Burkhard; Chen, Yu; Cox, Marc B.; Bräse, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that is essential for prostate cancer development. It is activated by androgens through its ligand-binding domain (LBD), which consists predominantly of 11 α-helices. Upon ligand binding, the last helix is reorganized to an agonist conformation termed activator function-2 (AF-2) for coactivator binding. Several coactivators bind to the AF-2 pocket through conserved LXXLL or FXXLF sequences to enhance the activity of the rec...

  19. AISMOTIF-An Artificial Immune System for DNA Motif Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeja K R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Discovery of transcription factor binding sites is a much explored and still exploring area of research in functional genomics. Many computational tools have been developed for finding motifs and each of them has their own advantages as well as disadvantages. Most of these algorithms need prior knowledge about the data to construct background models. However there is not a single technique that can be considered as best for finding regulatory motifs. This paper proposes an artificial immune system based algorithm for finding the transcription factor binding sites or motifs and two new weighted scores for motif evaluation. The algorithm is enumerative, but sufficient pruning of the pattern search space has been incorporated using immune system concepts. The performance of AISMOTIF has been evaluated by comparing it with eight state of art composite motif discovery algorithms and found that AISMOTIF predicts known motifs as well as new motifs from the benchmark dataset without any prior knowledge about the data.

  20. AISMOTIF-An Artificial Immune System for DNA Motif Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Seeja, K R

    2011-01-01

    Discovery of transcription factor binding sites is a much explored and still exploring area of research in functional genomics. Many computational tools have been developed for finding motifs and each of them has their own advantages as well as disadvantages. Most of these algorithms need prior knowledge about the data to construct background models. However there is not a single technique that can be considered as best for finding regulatory motifs. This paper proposes an artificial immune system based algorithm for finding the transcription factor binding sites or motifs and two new weighted scores for motif evaluation. The algorithm is enumerative, but sufficient pruning of the pattern search space has been incorporated using immune system concepts. The performance of AISMOTIF has been evaluated by comparing it with eight state of art composite motif discovery algorithms and found that AISMOTIF predicts known motifs as well as new motifs from the benchmark dataset without any prior knowledge about the data...

  1. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  2. Novel hinge-binding motifs for Janus kinase 3 inhibitors: a comprehensive structure-activity relationship study on tofacitinib bioisosteres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Matthias; Forster, Michael; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Bauer, Silke M; Laufer, Stefan A

    2014-11-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytosolic tyrosine kinases crucially involved in cytokine signaling. JAKs have been demonstrated to be valid targets in the treatment of inflammatory and myeloproliferative disorders, and two inhibitors, tofacitinib and ruxolitinib, recently received their marketing authorization. Despite this success, selectivity within the JAK family remains a major issue. Both approved compounds share a common 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine hinge binding motif, and little is known about modifications tolerated at this heterocyclic core. In the current study, a library of tofacitinib bioisosteres was prepared and tested against JAK3. The compounds possessed the tofacitinib piperidinyl side chain, whereas the hinge binding motif was replaced by a variety of heterocycles mimicking its pharmacophore. In view of the promising expectations obtained from molecular modeling, most of the compounds proved to be poorly active. However, strategies for restoring activity within this series of novel chemotypes were discovered and crucial structure-activity relationships were deduced. The compounds presented may serve as starting point for developing novel JAK inhibitors and as a valuable training set for in silico models.

  3. Use of Cre/loxP recombination to swap cell binding motifs on the adenoviral capsid protein IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We used Cre/loxP recombination to swap targeting ligands present on the adenoviral capsid protein IX (pIX). A loxP-flanked sequence encoding poly-lysine (pK-binds heparan sulfate proteoglycans) was engineered onto the 3'-terminus of pIX, and the resulting fusion protein allowed for routine virus propagation. Growth of this virus on Cre-expressing cells removed the pK coding sequence, generating virus that could only infect through alternative ligands, such as a tyrosine kinase receptor A (TrkA)-binding motif engineered into the capsid fibre protein for enhanced infection of neuronal cells. We used a similar approach to swap the pK motif on pIX for a sequence encoding a single-domain antibody directed towards CD66c for targeted infection of cancer cells; Cre-mediated removal of the pK-coding sequence simultaneously placed the single-domain antibody coding sequence in frame with pIX. Thus, we have developed a simple method to propagate virus lacking native viral tropism but containing cell-specific binding ligands. - Highlights: → We describe a method to grow virus lacking native tropism but containing novel cell-binding ligands. → Cre/loxP recombination was used to modify the adenovirus genome. → A targeting ligand present on capsid protein IX was removed or replaced using recombination. → Cre-loxP was also used to 'swap' the identity of the targeting ligand present on pIX.

  4. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  5. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  6. The conserved WW-domain binding sites in Dystroglycan C-terminus are essential but partially redundant for Dystroglycan function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng W-M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dystroglycan (Dg is a transmembrane protein that is a part of the Dystrophin Glycoprotein Complex (DGC which connects the extracellular matrix to the actin cytoskeleton. The C-terminal end of Dg contains a number of putative SH3, SH2 and WW domain binding sites. The most C-terminal PPXY motif has been established as a binding site for Dystrophin (Dys WW-domain. However, our previous studies indicate that both Dystroglycan PPXY motives, WWbsI and WWbsII can bind Dystrophin protein in vitro. Results We now find that both WW binding sites are important for maintaining full Dg function in the establishment of oocyte polarity in Drosophila. If either WW binding site is mutated, the Dg protein can still be active. However, simultaneous mutations in both WW binding sites abolish the Dg activities in both overexpression and loss-of-function oocyte polarity assays in vivo. Additionally, sequence comparisons of WW binding sites in 12 species of Drosophila, as well as in humans, reveal a high level of conservation. This preservation throughout evolution supports the idea that both WW binding sites are functionally required. Conclusion Based on the obtained results we propose that the presence of the two WW binding sites in Dystroglycan secures the essential interaction between Dg and Dys and might further provide additional regulation for the cytoskeletal interactions of this complex.

  7. Characteristics of human erythrocyte insulin binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Okada, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    Insulin and human erythrocyte cell membrane interactions were studied with respect to binding and dissociation. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin to erythrocytes was directly proportional to the cell concentration. The optimum pH for binding was 8.1. The initial binding rate was directly proportional to, and the steady state insulin binding was reversely proportional to, the incubation temperature. The per cent of specific binding of 125I-labeled insulin was 12.10 +/- 1...

  8. Strains of Actinomyces naeslundii and Actinomyces viscosus Exhibit Structurally Variant Fimbrial Subunit Proteins and Bind to Different Peptide Motifs in Salivary Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Tong; Johansson, Ingegerd; Hay, Donald I.; Strömberg, Nicklas

    1999-01-01

    Oral strains of Actinomyces spp. express type 1 fimbriae, which are composed of major FimP subunits, and bind preferentially to salivary acidic proline-rich proteins (APRPs) or to statherin. We have mapped genetic differences in the fimP subunit genes and the peptide recognition motifs within the host proteins associated with these differential binding specificities. The fimP genes were amplified by PCR from Actinomyces viscosus ATCC 19246, with preferential binding to statherin, and from Act...

  9. One motif to bind them: A small-XXX-small motif affects transmembrane domain 1 oligomerization, function, localization, and cross-talk between two yeast GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Antonia; Forfar, Rachel; Weston, Cathryn; Bowsher, Leo; Upton, Graham J G; Reynolds, Christopher A; Ladds, Graham; Dixon, Ann M

    2014-12-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of cell-surface receptors in mammals and facilitate a range of physiological responses triggered by a variety of ligands. GPCRs were thought to function as monomers, however it is now accepted that GPCR homo- and hetero-oligomers also exist and influence receptor properties. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe GPCR Mam2 is a pheromone-sensing receptor involved in mating and has previously been shown to form oligomers in vivo. The first transmembrane domain (TMD) of Mam2 contains a small-XXX-small motif, overrepresented in membrane proteins and well-known for promoting helix-helix interactions. An ortholog of Mam2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ste2, contains an analogous small-XXX-small motif which has been shown to contribute to receptor homo-oligomerization, localization and function. Here we have used experimental and computational techniques to characterize the role of the small-XXX-small motif in function and assembly of Mam2 for the first time. We find that disruption of the motif via mutagenesis leads to reduction of Mam2 TMD1 homo-oligomerization and pheromone-responsive cellular signaling of the full-length protein. It also impairs correct targeting to the plasma membrane. Mutation of the analogous motif in Ste2 yielded similar results, suggesting a conserved mechanism for assembly. Using co-expression of the two fungal receptors in conjunction with computational models, we demonstrate a functional change in G protein specificity and propose that this is brought about through hetero-dimeric interactions of Mam2 with Ste2 via the complementary small-XXX-small motifs. This highlights the potential of these motifs to affect a range of properties that can be investigated in other GPCRs.

  10. Triplex-induced recombination and repair in the pyrimidine motif

    OpenAIRE

    Kalish, Jennifer M.; Seidman, Michael M.; Weeks, Daniel L.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2005-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner at polypurine/polypyrimidine sites and mediate targeted genome modification. Triplexes are formed by either pyrimidine TFOs, which bind parallel to the purine strand of the duplex (pyrimidine, parallel motif), or purine TFOs, which bind in an anti-parallel orientation (purine, anti-parallel motif). Both purine and pyrimidine TFOs, when linked to psoralen, have been shown to direct psoralen adduct formation in cells...

  11. Analysis of the key elements of FFAT-like motifs identifies new proteins that potentially bind VAP on the ER, including two AKAPs and FAPP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mikitova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two phenylalanines (FF in an acidic tract (FFAT-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA-E. Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP. Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bind VAP. Among other proteins that bind VAP, some contain FFAT-like motifs that are missing one or more of the seven elements. Defining how much variation is tolerated in FFAT-like motifs is a preliminary step prior to the identification of the full range of VAP interactors. RESULTS: We used a quantifiable in vivo system that measured ER targeting in a reporter yeast strain that over-expressed VAP to study the effect of substituting different elements of FFAT-like motifs in turn. By defining FFAT-like motifs more widely than before, we found them in novel proteins the functions of which had not previously been directly linked to the ER, including: two PKA anchoring proteins, AKAP220 and AKAP110; a family of plant LTPs; and the glycolipid LTP phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor-protein-2 (FAPP-2. CONCLUSION: All of the seven essential elements of a FFAT motif tolerate variation, and weak targeting to the ER via VAP is still detected if two elements are substituted. In addition to the strong FFAT motifs already known, there are additional proteins with weaker FFAT-like motifs, which might be functionally important VAP interactors.

  12. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provid...

  13. Searching for transcription factor binding sites in vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Chih; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched in the past decade. Learning from known binding sites, new binding sites of a transcription factor in unannotated sequences can be identified. A number of search methods have been introduced over the years. However, one can rarely find one single method that performs the best on all the transcription factors. Instead, to identify the best method for a particular trans...

  14. The CUGBP2 splicing factor regulates an ensemble of branchpoints from perimeter binding sites with implications for autoregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Dembowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing adjusts the transcriptional output of the genome by generating related mRNAs from a single primary transcript, thereby expanding protein diversity. A fundamental unanswered question is how splicing factors achieve specificity in the selection of target substrates despite the recognition of information-poor sequence motifs. The CUGBP2 splicing regulator plays a key role in the brain region-specific silencing of the NI exon of the NMDA R1 receptor. However, the sequence motifs utilized by this factor for specific target exon selection and its role in splicing silencing are not understood. Here, we use chemical modification footprinting to map the contact sites of CUGBP2 to GU-rich motifs closely positioned at the boundaries of the branch sites of the NI exon, and we demonstrate a mechanistic role for this specific arrangement of motifs for the regulation of branchpoint formation. General support for a branch site-perimeter-binding model is indicated by the identification of a group of novel target exons with a similar configuration of motifs that are silenced by CUGBP2. These results reveal an autoregulatory role for CUGBP2 as indicated by its direct interaction with functionally significant RNA motifs surrounding the branch sites upstream of exon 6 of the CUGBP2 transcript itself. The perimeter-binding model explains how CUGBP2 can effectively embrace the branch site region to achieve the specificity needed for the selection of exon targets and the fine-tuning of alternative splicing patterns.

  15. SLIDER: A Generic Metaheuristic for the Discovery of Correlated Motifs in Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyen, P.; Dyck, van D.; Neven, F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Dijk, van A.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Correlated motif mining (CMM) is the problem of finding overrepresented pairs of patterns, called motifs, in sequences of interacting proteins. Algorithmic solutions for CMM thereby provide a computational method for predicting binding sites for protein interaction. In this paper, we adopt a motif-d

  16. An Unexpected Gas-Phase Binding Motif for Metal Dication Complexation with Peptides: Irmpd Spectroscopic Structure Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Robert C.; Steill, Jeffrey; Polfer, Nicolas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2011-06-01

    The favorable orientation of the amide linkage and the aromatic side chain of N-terminal Phe or Trp leads to several favorable motifs for metal ion binding to dipeptides, having distinct characteristics in the IR spectrum. Infrared multiple photon photodissociation spectroscopy using the FELIX free electron laser has enabled clear resolution of these isomeric forms. The spectral patterns of complexes of small dications (Mg2+, Ni2+ and Co2+) reveal an unexpected new isomeric form, in which the metal ion displaces the amide hydrogen, forming a metal-nitrogen bond with covalent character which is unprecedented in such gas-phase complexes. Spectra of the ions were acquired by irradiating the cell of the Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer with infrared light from the FELIX laser at wavelengths in the approximate range 500 to 1900 Cm-1.

  17. Autoradiographic localization of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Y.D.; Springall, D.R.; Wharton, J.; Polak, J.M. (Royal Postgraduate Medical School, London (England))

    1991-01-01

    Autoradiographic techniques and {sup 125}I-labeled endothelin-1 were used to study the distribution of endothelin-1 binding sites in porcine skin. Specific endothelin-1 binding sites were localized to blood vessels (capillaries, deep cutaneous vascular plexus, arteries, and arterioles), the deep dermal and connective tissue sheath of hair follicles, sebaceous and sweat glands, and arrector pili muscle. Specific binding was inhibited by endothelin-2 and endothelin-3 as well as endothelin-1. Non-specific binding was found in the epidermis and the medulla of hair follicles. No binding was found in connective tissue or fat. These vascular binding sites may represent endothelin receptors, in keeping with the known cutaneous vasoconstrictor actions of the peptide. If all binding sites are receptors, the results suggest that endothelin could also regulate the function of sweat glands and may have trophic effects in the skin.

  18. Functional characterization of variations on regulatory motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lapidot

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs regulate gene expression through specific interactions with short promoter elements. The same regulatory protein may recognize a variety of related sequences. Moreover, once they are detected it is hard to predict whether highly similar sequence motifs will be recognized by the same TF and regulate similar gene expression patterns, or serve as binding sites for distinct regulatory factors. We developed computational measures to assess the functional implications of variations on regulatory motifs and to compare the functions of related sites. We have developed computational means for estimating the functional outcome of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. We predict the effects of nucleotide variations within motifs on gene expression patterns. In cases where such predictions could be compared to suitable published experimental evidence, we found very good agreement. We further accumulated statistics from multiple substitutions across various binding sites in an attempt to deduce general properties that characterize nucleotide substitutions that are more likely to alter expression. We found that substitutions involving Adenine are more likely to retain the expression pattern and that substitutions involving Guanine are more likely to alter expression compared to the rest of the substitutions. Our results should facilitate the prediction of the expression outcomes of binding site variations. One typical important implication is expected to be the ability to predict the phenotypic effect of variation in regulatory motifs in promoters.

  19. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  20. Whole-genome cartography of estrogen receptor alpha binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yo Lin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation-paired end diTag cloning and sequencing strategy, we mapped estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha binding sites in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We identified 1,234 high confidence binding clusters of which 94% are projected to be bona fide ERalpha binding regions. Only 5% of the mapped estrogen receptor binding sites are located within 5 kb upstream of the transcriptional start sites of adjacent genes, regions containing the proximal promoters, whereas vast majority of the sites are mapped to intronic or distal locations (>5 kb from 5' and 3' ends of adjacent transcript, suggesting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms over significant physical distances. Of all the identified sites, 71% harbored putative full estrogen response elements (EREs, 25% bore ERE half sites, and only 4% had no recognizable ERE sequences. Genes in the vicinity of ERalpha binding sites were enriched for regulation by estradiol in MCF-7 cells, and their expression profiles in patient samples segregate ERalpha-positive from ERalpha-negative breast tumors. The expression dynamics of the genes adjacent to ERalpha binding sites suggest a direct induction of gene expression through binding to ERE-like sequences, whereas transcriptional repression by ERalpha appears to be through indirect mechanisms. Our analysis also indicates a number of candidate transcription factor binding sites adjacent to occupied EREs at frequencies much greater than by chance, including the previously reported FOXA1 sites, and demonstrate the potential involvement of one such putative adjacent factor, Sp1, in the global regulation of ERalpha target genes. Unexpectedly, we found that only 22%-24% of the bona fide human ERalpha binding sites were overlapping conserved regions in whole genome vertebrate alignments, which suggest limited conservation of functional binding sites. Taken together, this genome-scale analysis suggests complex but definable rules governing ERalpha

  1. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families. PMID:26988505

  2. I-Ad-binding peptides derived from unrelated protein antigens share a common structural motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Colon, S;

    1988-01-01

    represent a mechanism to achieve a very permissive type of interaction that yet retained some degree of specificity. In the present set of experiments we analyzed the I-Ad binding pattern of a series of overlapping peptides derived from sperm whale myoglobin (residues 102-125) and influenza hemagglutinin...

  3. Isolation of a gene encoding a developmentally regulated T cell-specific protein with a guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlow, D.A.; Teh, H.S.; Marth, J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1995-02-15

    In this study, we describe a novel full length cDNA clone designated Tgtp that encodes a predicted 415-amino acid a T cell-specific guanine nucleotide triphosphate-binding protein (TGTP) bearing the characteristic motifs of a guanine nucleotide triphosphate (GTP) binding protein. Tgtp is expressed preferentially, if not exclusively, in T cells, and is up-regulated in both unfractionated and in purified CD4{sup +}8{sup +} thymocytes upon TCR cross-linking. In contrast, expression of Tgtp in peripheral T cells is maintained at relatively high levels and is not grossly affected by TCR cross-linking. Antiserum generated against synthetic peptides from the predicted TGTP amino acid sequence recognized a single protein with a molecular mass of {approx}50 kDa, corresponding well with the computed molecular mass of 47 kDa. The only known relative of Tgtp is MUSGTP, which is reportedly expressed in B cells and bears a GTP binding motif. Thus, the discovery of Tgtp resolves a subfamily of molecules with GTP binding motifs and apparent lymphoid lineage-restricted expression. Given the restricted expression pattern in T cells, the up-regulated expression observed in response to TCR signaling in immature thymocytes, and the presence of the motifs characteristic of GTP binding proteins, we suggest that TGTP may have an important function in T cell development and/or T cell activation. 51 refs., 6 figs.

  4. SLIDER: Mining correlated motifs in protein-protein interaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyen, P.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Neven, F.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract—Correlated motif mining (CMM) is the problem to find overrepresented pairs of patterns, called motif pairs, in interacting protein sequences. Algorithmic solutions for CMM thereby provide a computational method for predicting binding sites for protein interaction. In this paper, we adopt a

  5. MeRNA: a Database of Metal Ion Binding Sites in RNAStructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefan, Liliana R.; Zhang, Rui; Levitan, Aaron G.; Hendrix, DonnaF.; Brenner, Steven E.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2005-10-05

    Metal ions are essential for the folding of RNA into stable tertiary structures and for the catalytic activity of some RNA enzymes. To aid in the study of the roles of metal ions in RNA structural biology, we have created MeRNA (Metals in RNA), a comprehensive compilation of all metal binding sites identified in RNA three-dimensional structures available from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and Nucleic Acid Database (NDB). Currently, our database contains information relating to binding of 9764 metal ions corresponding to 23 distinct elements; in 256 RNA structures. The metal ion locations were confirmed and ligands characterized using original literature references. MeRNA includes eight manually identified metal-ion binding motifs, which are described in the literature. MeRNA is searchable by PDB identifier, metal ion, method of structure determination, resolution and R-values for X-ray structure, and distance from metal to any RNA atom or to water. New structures with their respective binding motifs will be added to the database as they become available. The MeRNA database will further our understanding of the roles of metal ions in RNA folding and catalysis and have applications in structural and functional analysis, RNA design and engineering.

  6. Detecting DNA regulatory motifs by incorporating positional trendsin information content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kechris, Katherina J.; van Zwet, Erik; Bickel, Peter J.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-05-04

    On the basis of the observation that conserved positions in transcription factor binding sites are often clustered together, we propose a simple extension to the model-based motif discovery methods. We assign position-specific prior distributions to the frequency parameters of the model, penalizing deviations from a specified conservation profile. Examples with both simulated and real data show that this extension helps discover motifs as the data become noisier or when there is a competing false motif.

  7. A "coiled-coil" motif is important for oligomerization and DNA binding properties of human cytomegalovirus protein UL77.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Sylvia Meissner

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV UL77 gene encodes the essential protein UL77, its function is characterized in the present study. Immunoprecipitation identified monomeric and oligomeric pUL77 in HCMV infected cells. Immunostaining of purified virions and subviral fractions showed that pUL77 is a structural protein associated with capsids. In silico analysis revealed the presence of a coiled-coil motif (CCM at the N-terminus of pUL77. Chemical cross-linking of either wild-type pUL77 or CCM deletion mutant (pUL77ΔCCM implicated that CCM is critical for oligomerization of pUL77. Furthermore, co-immunoprecipitations of infected and transfected cells demonstrated that pUL77 interacts with the capsid-associated DNA packaging motor components, pUL56 and pUL104, as well as the major capsid protein. The ability of pUL77 to bind dsDNA was shown by an in vitro assay. Binding to certain DNA was further confirmed by an assay using biotinylated 36-, 250-, 500-, 1000-meric dsDNA and 966-meric HCMV-specific dsDNA designed for this study. The binding efficiency (BE was determined by image processing program defining values above 1.0 as positive. While the BE of the pUL56 binding to the 36-mer bio-pac1 containing a packaging signal was 10.0 ± 0.63, the one for pUL77 was only 0.2±0.03. In contrast to this observation the BE of pUL77 binding to bio-500 bp or bio-1000 bp was 2.2 ± 0.41 and 4.9 ± 0.71, respectively. By using pUL77ΔCCM it was demonstrated that this protein could not bind to dsDNA. These data indicated that pUL77 (i could form homodimers, (ii CCM of pUL77 is crucial for oligomerization and (iii could bind to dsDNA in a sequence independent manner.

  8. Oct4/Sox2 binding sites contribute to maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal igf2/h19 imprinting control region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Zimmerman

    Full Text Available A central question in genomic imprinting is how parental-specific DNA methylation of imprinting control regions (ICR is established during gametogenesis and maintained after fertilization. At the imprinted Igf2/H19 locus, CTCF binding maintains the unmethylated state of the maternal ICR after the blastocyst stage. In addition, evidence from Beckwith-Wiedemann patients and cultured mouse cells suggests that two Sox-Oct binding motifs within the Igf2/H19 ICR also participate in maintaining hypomethylation of the maternal allele. We found that the Sox and octamer elements from both Sox-Oct motifs were required to drive hypomethylation of integrated transgenes in mouse embryonic carcinoma cells. Oct4 and Sox2 showed cooperative binding to the Sox-Oct motifs, and both were present at the endogenous ICR. Using a mouse with mutations in the Oct4 binding sites, we found that maternally transmitted mutant ICRs acquired partial methylation in somatic tissues, but there was little effect on imprinted expression of H19 and Igf2. A subset of mature oocytes also showed partial methylation of the mutant ICR, which suggested that the Sox-Oct motifs provide some protection from methylation during oogenesis. The Sox-Oct motifs, however, were not required for erasure of paternal methylation in primordial germ cells, which indicated that the oocyte methylation was acquired post-natally. Maternally inherited mutant ICRs were unmethylated in blastocysts, which suggested that at least a portion of the methylation in somatic tissues occurred after implantation. These findings provide evidence that Sox-Oct motifs contribute to ICR hypomethylation in post-implantation embryos and maturing oocytes and link imprinted DNA methylation with key stem cell/germline transcription factors.

  9. A bidentate Lewis acid with a telluronium ion as an anion-binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haiyan; Gabbaï, François P.

    2010-11-01

    The search for receptors that can selectively capture small and potentially toxic anions in protic media has sparked a renewed interest in the synthesis and anion-binding properties of polydentate Lewis acids. Seeking new paradigms to enhance the anion affinities of such systems, we synthesized a bidentate Lewis acid that contains a boryl and a telluronium moiety as Lewis acidic sites. Anion-complexation studies indicate that this telluronium borane displays a high affinity for fluoride in methanol. Structural and computational studies show that the unusual fluoride affinity of this bidentate telluronium borane can be correlated with the formation of a B-F --> Te chelate motif supported by a strong lone-pair(F) --> σ*(Te-C) donor-acceptor interaction. These results, which illustrate the viability of heavier chalcogenium centres as anion-binding sites, allow us to introduce a novel strategy for the design of polydentate Lewis acids with enhanced anion affinities.

  10. Polycystin-2 activity is controlled by transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif and PALS1-associated tight junction protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duning, Kerstin; Rosenbusch, Deike; Schlüter, Marc A; Tian, Yuemin; Kunzelmann, Karl; Meyer, Nina; Schulze, Ulf; Markoff, Arseni; Pavenstädt, Hermann; Weide, Thomas

    2010-10-29

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most frequent monogenic cause of kidney failure, characterized by the development of renal cysts. ADPKD is caused by mutations of the polycystin-1 (PC1) or polycystin-2 (PC2) genes. PC2 encodes a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel, and its dysfunction has been implicated in cyst development. The transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ) is required for the integrity of renal cilia. Its absence results in the development of renal cysts in a knock-out mouse model. TAZ directly interacts with PC2, and it has been suggested that another yet unidentified PDZ domain protein may be involved in the TAZ/PC2 interaction. Here we describe a novel interaction of TAZ with the multi-PDZ-containing PALS1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ). TAZ interacts with both the N-terminal PDZ domains 1-3 and the C-terminal PDZ domains 8-10 of PATJ, suggesting two distinct TAZ binding domains. We also show that the C terminus of PC2 strongly interacts with PDZ domains 8-10 and to a weaker extent with PDZ domains 1-3 of PATJ. Finally, we demonstrate that both TAZ and PATJ impair PC2 channel activity when co-expressed with PC2 in oocytes of Xenopus laevis. These results implicate TAZ and PATJ as novel regulatory elements of the PC2 channel and might thus be involved in ADPKD pathology.

  11. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel; (Harvard-Med); (EMBL)

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  12. Global identification of hnRNP A1 binding sites for SSO-based splicing modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Gitte H; Doktor, Thomas K; Borch-Jensen, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    for this deregulation by blocking other SREs with splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs). However, the location and sequence of most SREs are not well known. RESULTS: Here, we used individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to establish an in vivo binding map for the key splicing...... regulatory factor hnRNP A1 and to generate an hnRNP A1 consensus binding motif. We find that hnRNP A1 binding in proximal introns may be important for repressing exons. We show that inclusion of the alternative cassette exon 3 in SKA2 can be significantly increased by SSO-based treatment which blocks an iCLIP......-identified hnRNP A1 binding site immediately downstream of the 5' splice site. Because pseudoexons are well suited as models for constitutive exons which have been inactivated by pathogenic mutations in SREs, we used a pseudoexon in MTRR as a model and showed that an iCLIP-identified hnRNP A1 binding site...

  13. An inverted repeat motif stabilizes binding of E2F and enhances transcription of the dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, M; Blake, M C; Jambou, R C;

    1995-01-01

    An overlapping inverted repeat sequence that binds the eukaryotic transcription factor E2F is 100% conserved near the major transcription start sites in the promoters of three mammalian genes encoding dihydrofolate reductase, and is also found in the promoters of several other important cellular ...

  14. Zygotic Expression of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motif Protein Drb2p Is Required for DNA Elimination in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA binding motif (DSRM)-containing proteins play many roles in the regulation of gene transcription and translation, including some with tandem DSRMs that act in small RNA biogenesis. We report the characterization of the genes for double-stranded RNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (DRB1 and DRB2), two genes encoding nuclear proteins with tandem DSRMs in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Both proteins are expressed throughout growth and development but exhibit distinct peaks of ...

  15. Introducing tetraCys motifs at two different sites results in a functional dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orun, Oya; Rasmussen, S; Gether, U

    2009-01-01

    We have introduced tetracysteine motifs into different positions of the dopamine transporter (DAT) for specific FlAsH labeling. Two of the constructs expressed at the cell surface and were functional as determined by [3H] dopamine uptake experiments. The N-terminally modified transporter showed...... uptake levels comparable to the wild-type DAT, while the construct with tetracysteine motif at position 511 displayed an uptake level about 1/3 of its wild-type counterpart. In addition, these two transporter constructs were visualized on the cell surface following labeling with a fluorescent cocaine...

  16. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saray Santamaría-Hernando

    Full Text Available Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20, where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+ coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+ binding with a K(D of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821 is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of

  17. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor Type 1 (CRHR1 Clustering with MAGUKs Is Mediated via Its C-Terminal PDZ Binding Motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Bender

    Full Text Available The corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (CRHR1 plays an important role in orchestrating neuroendocrine, behavioral, and autonomic responses to stress. To identify molecules capable of directly modulating CRHR1 signaling, we performed a yeast-two-hybrid screen using the C-terminal intracellular tail of the receptor as bait. We identified several members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK family: postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95, synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97, SAP102 and membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 (MAGI2. CRHR1 is co-expressed with the identified MAGUKs and with the additionally investigated PSD93 in neurons of the adult mouse brain and in primary hippocampal neurons, supporting the probability of a physiological interaction in vivo. The C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95, discs large, zona occludens 1 binding motif of CRHR1 is essential for its physical interaction with MAGUKs, as revealed by the CRHR1-STAVA mutant, which harbors a functionally impaired PDZ binding motif. The imitation of a phosphorylation at Thr413 within the PDZ binding motif also disrupted the interaction with MAGUKs. In contrast, distinct PDZ domains within the identified MAGUKs are involved in the interactions. Expression of CRHR1 in primary neurons demonstrated its localization throughout the neuronal plasma membrane, including the excitatory post synapse, where the receptor co-localized with PSD95 and SAP97. The co-expression of CRHR1 and respective interacting MAGUKs in HEK293 cells resulted in a clustered subcellular co-localization which required an intact PDZ binding motif. In conclusion, our study characterized the PDZ binding motif-mediated interaction of CRHR1 with multiple MAGUKs, which directly affects receptor function.

  18. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy G Warren

    Full Text Available Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15 catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485, and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/LK motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different

  19. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  20. Temperature and pressure adaptation of the binding site of acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochachka, P W

    1974-12-01

    1. Studies with a carbon substrate analogue, 3,3-dimethylbutyl acetate, indicate that the hydrophobic contribution to binding at the anionic site of acetylcholinesterase is strongly disrupted at low temperatures and high pressures. 2. Animals living in different physical environments circumvent this problem by adjusting the enthalpic and entropic contributions to binding. 3. An extreme example of this adaptational strategy is supplied by brain acetylcholinesterase extracted from an abyssal fish living at 2 degrees C and up to several hundred atmospheres of pressure. This acetylcholinesterase appears to have a smaller hydrophobic binding region in the anionic site, playing a measurably decreased role in ligand binding. PMID:4462739

  1. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  2. A structural-based strategy for recognition of transcription factor binding sites.

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    Beisi Xu

    Full Text Available Scanning through genomes for potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is becoming increasingly important in this post-genomic era. The position weight matrix (PWM is the standard representation of TFBSs utilized when scanning through sequences for potential binding sites. However, many transcription factor (TF motifs are short and highly degenerate, and methods utilizing PWMs to scan for sites are plagued by false positives. Furthermore, many important TFs do not have well-characterized PWMs, making identification of potential binding sites even more difficult. One approach to the identification of sites for these TFs has been to use the 3D structure of the TF to predict the DNA structure around the TF and then to generate a PWM from the predicted 3D complex structure. However, this approach is dependent on the similarity of the predicted structure to the native structure. We introduce here a novel approach to identify TFBSs utilizing structure information that can be applied to TFs without characterized PWMs, as long as a 3D complex structure (TF/DNA exists. This approach utilizes an energy function that is uniquely trained on each structure. Our approach leads to increased prediction accuracy and robustness compared with those using a more general energy function. The software is freely available upon request.

  3. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Travé, Gilles [UMR 7242 CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie, Boulevard Sébastien Brant, Illkirch 67412 (France); Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J., E-mail: n.j.stonehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-24

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  4. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Belyaeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4 which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  5. The RCAN carboxyl end mediates calcineurin docking-dependent inhibition via a site that dictates binding to substrates and regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, Sara; Genescà, Lali; Rodríguez, Antonio; Raya, Alicia; Salichs, Eulàlia; Were, Felipe; López-Maderuelo, María Dolores; Redondo, Juan Miguel; de la Luna, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Specificity of signaling kinases and phosphatases toward their targets is usually mediated by docking interactions with substrates and regulatory proteins. Here, we characterize the motifs involved in the physical and functional interaction of the phosphatase calcineurin with a group of modulators, the RCAN protein family. Mutation of key residues within the hydrophobic docking-cleft of the calcineurin catalytic domain impairs binding to all human RCAN proteins and to the calcineurin interacting proteins Cabin1 and AKAP79. A valine-rich region within the RCAN carboxyl region is essential for binding to the docking site in calcineurin. Although a peptide containing this sequence compromises NFAT signaling in living cells, it does not inhibit calcineurin catalytic activity directly. Instead, calcineurin catalytic activity is inhibited by a motif at the extreme C-terminal region of RCAN, which acts in cis with the docking motif. Our results therefore indicate that the inhibitory action of RCAN on calcineurin-NFAT signaling results not only from the inhibition of phosphatase activity but also from competition between NFAT and RCAN for binding to the same docking site in calcineurin. Thus, competition by substrates and modulators for a common docking site appears to be an essential mechanism in the regulation of Ca2+-calcineurin signaling. PMID:19332797

  6. Main: TCA1MOTIF [PLACE

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TCA1MOTIF S000159 17-May-1998 (last modified) kehi TCA-1 (tobacco nuclear protein 1...) binding site; Related to salicylic acid-inducible expression of many genes; Found in barley beta-1,3-gluca...nase and over 30 different plant genes which are known to be induced by one or more forms of stress; A similar sequence (TCA... et al., 1997); SA; salicylic acid; stress; TCA-1; barley (Hordeum vulgare); tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum); TCATCTTCTT ...

  7. Multiple POU-binding motifs, recognized by tissue-specific nuclear factors, are important for Dll1 gene expression in neural stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We cloned the 5'-flanking region of the mouse homolog of the Delta gene (Dll1) and demonstrated that the sequence between nucleotide position -514 and -484 in the 5'-flanking region of Dll1 played a critical role in the regulation of its tissue-specific expression in neural stem cells (NSCs). Further, we showed that multiple POU-binding motifs, located within this short sequence of 30 bp, were essential for transcriptional activation of Dll1 and also that multiple tissue-specific nuclear factors recognized these POU-binding motifs in various combinations through differentiation of NSCs. Thus, POU-binding factors may play an important role in Dll1 expression in developing NSCs

  8. Presence of calcium-binding motifs in PilY1 homologs correlates with Ca-mediated twitching motility and evolutionary history across diverse bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Cruz, Luisa F; Evans, Michael R; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2015-02-01

    Twitching motility, involving type IV pili, is essential for host colonization and virulence of many pathogenic bacteria. Studies of PilY1, a tip-associated type IV pili protein, indicate that PilY1 functions as a switch between pilus extension and retraction, resulting in twitching motility. Recent work detected a calcium-binding motif in PilY1 of some animal bacterial pathogens and demonstrated that binding of calcium to PilY1 with this motif regulates twitching. Though studies of PilY1 in non-animal pathogens are limited, our group demonstrated that twitching motility in the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, which contains three PilY1 homologs, is increased by calcium supplementation. A study was conducted to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between multiple PilY1 homologs, the presence of calcium-binding motifs therein, and calcium-mediated twitching motility across diverse bacteria. Strains analyzed contained one to three PilY1 homologs, but phylogenetic analyses indicated that PilY1 homologs containing the calcium-binding motif Dx[DN]xDGxxD are phylogenetically divergent from other PilY1 homologs. Plant-associated bacteria included in these analyses were then examined for a calcium-mediated twitching response. Results indicate that bacteria must have at least one PilY1 homolog containing the Dx[DN]xDGxxD motif to display a calcium-mediated increase in twitching motility, which likely reflects an adaption to environmental calcium concentrations. PMID:25688068

  9. The structure of Plasmodium vivax phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein suggests a functional motif containing a left-handed helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakaki, Tracy; Neely, Helen; Boni, Erica; Mueller, Natasha [Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (SGPP) Consortium (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7742 (United States); Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C. [Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (SGPP) Consortium (United States); Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7185 (United States); Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph [Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (SGPP) Consortium (United States); Hauptman-Woodward Institute, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States); Hol, Wim G. J. [Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (SGPP) Consortium (United States); Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa (SGPP) Consortium (United States); Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7742 (United States)

    2007-03-01

    The crystal structure of a phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein from P. vivax, a homolog of Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP), has been solved to a resolution of 1.3 Å. The inferred interaction surface near the anion-binding site is found to include a distinctive left-handed α-helix. The structure of a putative Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) homolog from the eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium vivax has been studied to a resolution of 1.3 Å using multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction at the Se K edge. This protozoan protein is topologically similar to previously studied members of the phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP) sequence family, but exhibits a distinctive left-handed α-helical region at one side of the canonical phospholipid-binding site. Re-examination of previously determined PEBP structures suggests that the P. vivax protein and yeast carboxypeptidase Y inhibitor may represent a structurally distinct subfamily of the diverse PEBP-sequence family.

  10. A synthetic peptide with the putative iron binding motif of amyloid precursor protein (APP does not catalytically oxidize iron.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Honarmand Ebrahimi

    Full Text Available The β-amyloid precursor protein (APP, which is a key player in Alzheimer's disease, was recently reported to possess an Fe(II binding site within its E2 domain which exhibits ferroxidase activity [Duce et al. 2010, Cell 142: 857]. The putative ligands of this site were compared to those in the ferroxidase site of ferritin. The activity was indirectly measured using transferrin, which scavenges the Fe(III product of the reaction. A 22-residue synthetic peptide, named FD1, with the putative ferroxidase site of APP, and the E2 domain of APP were each reported to exhibit 40% of the ferroxidase activity of APP and of ceruloplasmin. It was also claimed that the ferroxidase activity of APP is inhibited by Zn(II just as in ferritin. We measured the ferroxidase activity indirectly (i by the incorporation of the Fe(III product of the ferroxidase reaction into transferrin and directly (ii by monitoring consumption of the substrate molecular oxygen. The results with the FD1 peptide were compared to the established ferroxidase activities of human H-chain ferritin and of ceruloplasmin. For FD1 we observed no activity above the background of non-enzymatic Fe(II oxidation by molecular oxygen. Zn(II binds to transferrin and diminishes its Fe(III incorporation capacity and rate but it does not specifically bind to a putative ferroxidase site of FD1. Based on these results, and on comparison of the putative ligands of the ferroxidase site of APP with those of ferritin, we conclude that the previously reported results for ferroxidase activity of FD1 and - by implication - of APP should be re-evaluated.

  11. Novel Catalytically-Inactive PII Metalloproteinases from a Viperid Snake Venom with Substitutions in the Canonical Zinc-Binding Motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Erika; Sanz, Libia; Escalante, Teresa; Pérez, Alicia; Villalta, Fabián; Lomonte, Bruno; Neves-Ferreira, Ana Gisele C.; Feoli, Andrés; Calvete, Juan J.; Gutiérrez, José María; Rucavado, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) play key biological roles in prey immobilization and digestion. The majority of these activities depend on the hydrolysis of relevant protein substrates in the tissues. Hereby, we describe several isoforms and a cDNA clone sequence, corresponding to PII SVMP homologues from the venom of the Central American pit viper Bothriechis lateralis, which have modifications in the residues of the canonical sequence of the zinc-binding motif HEXXHXXGXXH. As a consequence, the proteolytic activity of the isolated proteins was undetectable when tested on azocasein and gelatin. These PII isoforms comprise metalloproteinase and disintegrin domains in the mature protein, thus belonging to the subclass PIIb of SVMPs. PII SVMP homologues were devoid of hemorrhagic and in vitro coagulant activities, effects attributed to the enzymatic activity of SVMPs, but induced a mild edema. One of the isoforms presents the characteristic RGD sequence in the disintegrin domain and inhibits ADP- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Catalytically-inactive SVMP homologues may have been hitherto missed in the characterization of snake venoms. The presence of such enzymatically-inactive homologues in snake venoms and their possible toxic and adaptive roles deserve further investigation. PMID:27754342

  12. Identification of the Raptor-binding motif on Arabidopsis S6 kinase and its use as a TOR signaling suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Ora; Kim, Sunghan; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Cheon, Choong-Ill

    2016-03-25

    TOR (target of rapamycin) kinase signaling plays central role as a regulator of growth and proliferation in all eukaryotic cells and its key signaling components and effectors are also conserved in plants. Unlike the mammalian and yeast counterparts, however, we found through yeast two-hybrid analysis that multiple regions of the Arabidopsis Raptor (regulatory associated protein of TOR) are required for binding to its substrate. We also identified that a 44-amino acid region at the N-terminal end of Arabidopsis ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) specifically interacted with AtRaptor1, indicating that this region may contain a functional equivalent of the TOS (TOR-Signaling) motif present in the mammalian TOR substrates. Transient over-expression of this 44-amino acid fragment in Arabidopsis protoplasts resulted in significant decrease in rDNA transcription, demonstrating a feasibility of developing a new plant-specific TOR signaling inhibitor based upon perturbation of the Raptor-substrate interaction.

  13. PeptiSite: a structural database of peptide binding sites in 4D

    OpenAIRE

    Acharya, Chayan; Kufareva, Irina; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    We developed PeptiSite, a comprehensive and reliable database of biologically and structurally characterized peptide-binding sites, in which each site is represented by an ensemble of its complexes with protein, peptide and small molecule partners. The unique features of the database include (1) the ensemble site representation that provides a fourth dimension to the otherwise three dimensional data, (2) comprehensive characterization of the binding site architecture that may consist of a mul...

  14. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  15. Autoradiographic localization of relaxin binding sites in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osheroff, P.L.; Phillips, H.S. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Relaxin is a member of the insulin family of polypeptide hormones and exerts its best understood actions in the mammalian reproductive system. Using a biologically active 32P-labeled human relaxin, the authors have previously shown by in vitro autoradiography specific relaxin binding sites in rat uterus, cervix, and brain tissues. Using the same approach, they describe here a detailed localization of human relaxin binding sites in the rat brain. Displaceable relaxin binding sites are distributed in discrete regions of the olfactory system, neocortex, hypothalamus, hippocampus, thalamus, amygdala, midbrain, and medulla of the male and female rat brain. Characterization of the relaxin binding sites in the subfornical organ and neocortex reveals a single class of high-affinity sites (Kd = 1.4 nM) in both regions. The binding of relaxin to two of the circumventricular organs (subfornical organ and organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis) and the neurosecretory magnocellular hypothalamic nuclei (i.e., paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei) provides the anatomical and biochemical basis for emerging physiological evidence suggesting a central role for relaxin in the control of blood pressure and hormone release. They conclude that specific, high-affinity relaxin binding sites are present in discrete regions of the rat brain and that the distribution of some of these sites may be consistent with a role for relaxin in control of vascular volume and blood pressure.

  16. Polypharmacology within CXCR4: Multiple binding sites and allosteric behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planesas, Jesús M.; Pérez-Nueno, Violeta I.; Borrell, José I.; Teixidó, Jordi

    2014-10-01

    CXCR4 is a promiscuous receptor, which binds multiple diverse ligands. As usual in promiscuous proteins, CXCR4 has a large binding site, with multiple subsites, and high flexibility. Hence, it is not surprising that it is involved in the phenomenon of allosteric modulation. However, incomplete knowledge of allosteric ligand-binding sites has hampered an in-depth molecular understanding of how these inhibitors work. For example, it is known that lipidated fragments of intracellular GPCR loops, so called pepducins, such as pepducin ATI-2341, modulate CXCR4 activity using an agonist allosteric mechanism. Nevertheless, there are also examples of small organic molecules, such as AMD11070 and GSK812397, which may act as antagonist allosteric modulators. Here, we give new insights into this issue by proposing the binding interactions between the CXCR4 receptor and the above-mentioned allosteric modulators. We propose that CXCR4 has minimum two topographically different allosteric binding sites. One allosteric site would be in the intracellular loop 1 (ICL1) where pepducin ATI-2341 would bind to CXCR4, and the second one, in the extracellular side of CXCR4 in a subsite into the main orthosteric binding pocket, delimited by extracellular loops n° 1, 2, and the N-terminal end, where antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397 would bind. Prediction of allosteric interactions between CXCR4 and pepducin ATI-2341 were studied first by rotational blind docking to determine the main binding region and a subsequent refinement of the best pose was performed using flexible docking methods and molecular dynamics. For the antagonists AMD11070 and GSK812397, the entire CXCR4 protein surface was explored by blind docking to define the binding region. A second docking analysis by subsites of the identified binding region was performed to refine the allosteric interactions. Finally, we identified the binding residues that appear to be essential for CXCR4 (agonists and antagonists) allosteric

  17. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  18. Secondary Structure Preferences of Mn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Khrustaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used. Major Mn2+ binders are aspartic acid (6.82% of Asp residues, histidine (14.76% of His residues, and glutamic acid (3.51% of Glu residues. We found out that the motif of secondary structure “beta strand-major binder-random coil” is overrepresented around all the three major Mn2+ binders. That motif may be followed by either alpha helix or beta strand. Beta strands near Mn2+ binding residues should be stable because they are enriched by such beta formers as valine and isoleucine, as well as by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues characteristic to beta sheet. In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. On the other hand, the percentage of Mn2+ sites with at least one amino acid in the “beta strand-major binder-random coil” motif of secondary structure (77.88% does not depend on genomic GC-content.

  19. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Joachim Haupt

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand

  20. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

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    Raquel Castellanos

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq to further elucidate the

  1. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Raquel; Xie, Qing; Zheng, Deyou; Cvekl, Ales; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome). TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S) do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to further elucidate the molecular

  2. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kostsin, Dzmitry G. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashiwayama, Yoshinori [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi [Laboratory of Plant Gene Expression, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoko University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Imanaka, Tsuneo, E-mail: imanaka@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Morita, Masashi [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  3. Role of NH2-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH2-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH2-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH2-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH2-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH2-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH2-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH2-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms

  4. High-affinity DNA binding sites for H-NS provide a molecular basis for selective silencing within proteobacterial genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Benjamin; Blot, Nicolas; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Buckle, Malcolm; Geertz, Marcel; Gualerzi, Claudio O.; Mavathur, Ramesh; Muskhelishvili, Georgi; Pon, Cynthia L.; Rimsky, Sylvie; Stella, Stefano; Babu, M. Madan; Travers, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The global transcriptional regulator H-NS selectively silences bacterial genes associated with pathogenicity and responses to environmental insults. Although there is ample evidence that H-NS binds preferentially to DNA containing curved regions, we show here that a major basis for this selectivity is the presence of a conserved sequence motif in H-NS target transcriptons. We further show that there is a strong tendency for the H-NS binding sites to be clustered, both within operons and in ge...

  5. Rate of hydrolysis in ATP synthase is fine-tuned by  -subunit motif controlling active site conformation

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, T.

    2013-01-23

    Computer-designed artificial enzymes will require precise understanding of how conformation of active sites may control barrier heights of key transition states, including dependence on structure and dynamics at larger molecular scale. F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is interesting as a model system: a delicate molecular machine synthesizing or hydrolyzing ATP using a rotary motor. Isolated F(1) performs hydrolysis with a rate very sensitive to ATP concentration. Experimental and theoretical results show that, at low ATP concentrations, ATP is slowly hydrolyzed in the so-called tight binding site, whereas at higher concentrations, the binding of additional ATP molecules induces rotation of the central γ-subunit, thereby forcing the site to transform through subtle conformational changes into a loose binding site in which hydrolysis occurs faster. How the 1-Å-scale rearrangements are controlled is not yet fully understood. By a combination of theoretical approaches, we address how large macromolecular rearrangements may manipulate the active site and how the reaction rate changes with active site conformation. Simulations reveal that, in response to γ-subunit position, the active site conformation is fine-tuned mainly by small α-subunit changes. Quantum mechanics-based results confirm that the sub-Ångström gradual changes between tight and loose binding site structures dramatically alter the hydrolysis rate.

  6. Chloride binding site of neurotransmitter sodium symporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantcheva, Adriana Krassimirova; Quick, Matthias; Shi, Lei;

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs) play a critical role in signaling by reuptake of neurotransmitters. Eukaryotic NSSs are chloride-dependent, whereas prokaryotic NSS homologs like LeuT are chloride-independent but contain an acidic residue (Glu290 in LeuT) at a site where eukaryotic NSSs...

  7. Using SCOPE to identify potential regulatory motifs in coregulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyanov, Viktor; Gross, Robert H

    2011-05-31

    SCOPE is an ensemble motif finder that uses three component algorithms in parallel to identify potential regulatory motifs by over-representation and motif position preference. Each component algorithm is optimized to find a different kind of motif. By taking the best of these three approaches, SCOPE performs better than any single algorithm, even in the presence of noisy data. In this article, we utilize a web version of SCOPE to examine genes that are involved in telomere maintenance. SCOPE has been incorporated into at least two other motif finding programs and has been used in other studies. The three algorithms that comprise SCOPE are BEAM, which finds non-degenerate motifs (ACCGGT), PRISM, which finds degenerate motifs (ASCGWT), and SPACER, which finds longer bipartite motifs (ACCnnnnnnnnGGT). These three algorithms have been optimized to find their corresponding type of motif. Together, they allow SCOPE to perform extremely well. Once a gene set has been analyzed and candidate motifs identified, SCOPE can look for other genes that contain the motif which, when added to the original set, will improve the motif score. This can occur through over-representation or motif position preference. Working with partial gene sets that have biologically verified transcription factor binding sites, SCOPE was able to identify most of the rest of the genes also regulated by the given transcription factor. Output from SCOPE shows candidate motifs, their significance, and other information both as a table and as a graphical motif map. FAQs and video tutorials are available at the SCOPE web site which also includes a "Sample Search" button that allows the user to perform a trial run. Scope has a very friendly user interface that enables novice users to access the algorithm's full power without having to become an expert in the bioinformatics of motif finding. As input, SCOPE can take a list of genes, or FASTA sequences. These can be entered in browser text fields, or read from

  8. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  9. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  10. p53CP, a putative p53 competing protein that specifically binds to the consensus p53 DNA binding sites: A third member of the p53 family?

    OpenAIRE

    Bian, Junhui; Sun, Yi

    1997-01-01

    p53 tumor suppressor protein negatively regulates cell growth, mainly through the transactivation of its downstream target genes. As a sequence-specific DNA binding transcription factor, p53 specifically binds to a 20-bp consensus motif 5′-PuPuPuC(A/T) (T/A)GPyPyPyPuPuPuC(A/T)(T/A)GPyPyPy-3′. We have now identified, partially purified, and characterized an additional ≈40-kDa nuclear protein, p53CP (p53 competing protein), that specifically binds to the consensus p53 binding sites found in sev...

  11. KIR polymorphisms modulate peptide-dependent binding to an MHC class I ligand with a Bw6 motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud D Colantonio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs and their MHC class I ligands play a central role in the regulation of natural killer (NK cell responses to viral pathogens and tumors. Here we identify Mamu-A1*00201 (Mamu-A*02, a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque with a canonical Bw6 motif, as a ligand for Mamu-KIR3DL05. Mamu-A1*00201 tetramers folded with certain SIV peptides, but not others, directly stained primary NK cells and Jurkat cells expressing multiple allotypes of Mamu-KIR3DL05. Differences in binding avidity were associated with polymorphisms in the D0 and D1 domains of Mamu-KIR3DL05, whereas differences in peptide-selectivity mapped to the D1 domain. The reciprocal exchange of the third predicted MHC class I-contact loop of the D1 domain switched the specificity of two Mamu-KIR3DL05 allotypes for different Mamu-A1*00201-peptide complexes. Consistent with the function of an inhibitory KIR, incubation of lymphocytes from Mamu-KIR3DL05(+ macaques with target cells expressing Mamu-A1*00201 suppressed the degranulation of tetramer-positive NK cells. These observations reveal a previously unappreciated role for D1 polymorphisms in determining the selectivity of KIRs for MHC class I-bound peptides, and identify the first functional KIR-MHC class I interaction in the rhesus macaque. The modulation of KIR-MHC class I interactions by viral peptides has important implications to pathogenesis, since it suggests that the immunodeficiency viruses, and potentially other types of viruses and tumors, may acquire changes in epitopes that increase the affinity of certain MHC class I ligands for inhibitory KIRs to prevent the activation of specific NK cell subsets.

  12. The clathrin-binding motif and the J-domain of Drosophila Auxilin are essential for facilitating Notch ligand endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Henry C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ligand endocytosis plays a critical role in regulating the activity of the Notch pathway. The Drosophila homolog of auxilin (dAux, a J-domain-containing protein best known for its role in the disassembly of clathrin coats from clathrin-coated vesicles, has recently been implicated in Notch signaling, although its exact mechanism remains poorly understood. Results To understand the role of auxilin in Notch ligand endocytosis, we have analyzed several point mutations affecting specific domains of dAux. In agreement with previous work, analysis using these stronger dAux alleles shows that dAux is required for several Notch-dependent processes, and its function during Notch signaling is required in the signaling cells. In support of the genetic evidences, the level of Delta appears elevated in dAux deficient cells, suggesting that the endocytosis of Notch ligand is disrupted. Deletion analysis shows that the clathrin-binding motif and the J-domain, when over-expressed, are sufficient for rescuing dAux phenotypes, implying that the recruitment of Hsc70 to clathrin is a critical role for dAux. However, surface labeling experiment shows that, in dAux mutant cells, Delta accumulates at the cell surface. In dAux mutant cells, clathrin appears to form large aggregates, although Delta is not enriched in these aberrant clathrin-positive structures. Conclusion Our data suggest that dAux mutations inhibit Notch ligand internalization at an early step during clathrin-mediated endocytosis, before the disassembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. Further, the inhibition of ligand endocytosis in dAux mutant cells possibly occurs due to depletion of cytosolic pools of clathrin via the formation of clathrin aggregates. Together, our observations argue that ligand endocytosis is critical for Notch signaling and auxilin participates in Notch signaling by facilitating ligand internalization.

  13. Calculation of binding constants and concentration of binding sites in a reaction of a ligand with a heterogeneous system of binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the calculation of association constants and the concentration of binding sites in a reaction of a ligand with a heterogeneous system of binding sites. The Scatchard plot for such a system is curvelinear and the method employs previously established relationships between the parameters of the limiting slopes to such a curve and the above mentioned association constants and concentrations of binding sites. The special case of a system with two different and non-interacting groups of binding sites was solved. The expressions thus obtained were used to characterize the reaction of a polypeptide neurotoxin with its specific binding sites in a membranal preparation from insect central nervous system. Moreover it is evident from these expressions that the widely accepted method to analyze such system, by an intuitive generalization of the method applicable to homogeneous systems, is erroneous and should be avoided. (author)

  14. Modulation of gene expression via overlapping binding sites exerted by ZNF143, Notch1 and THAP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngondo-Mbongo, Richard Patryk; Myslinski, Evelyne; Aster, Jon C; Carbon, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    ZNF143 is a zinc-finger protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of both coding and non-coding genes from polymerase II and III promoters. Our study deciphers the genome-wide regulatory role of ZNF143 in relation with the two previously unrelated transcription factors Notch1/ICN1 and thanatos-associated protein 11 (THAP11) in several human and murine cells. We show that two distinct motifs, SBS1 and SBS2, are associated to ZNF143-binding events in promoters of >3000 genes. Without co-occupation, these sites are also bound by Notch1/ICN1 in T-lymphoblastic leukaemia cells as well as by THAP11, a factor involved in self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. We present evidence that ICN1 binding overlaps with ZNF143 binding events at the SBS1 and SBS2 motifs, whereas the overlap occurs only at SBS2 for THAP11. We demonstrate that the three factors modulate expression of common target genes through the mutually exclusive occupation of overlapping binding sites. The model we propose predicts that the binding competition between the three factors controls biological processes such as rapid cell growth of both neoplastic and stem cells. Overall, our study establishes a novel relationship between ZNF143, THAP11 and ICN1 and reveals important insights into ZNF143-mediated gene regulation. PMID:23408857

  15. Perturbation Approaches for Exploring Protein Binding Site Flexibility to Predict Transient Binding Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokh, Daria B; Czodrowski, Paul; Rippmann, Friedrich; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-08-01

    Simulations of the long-time scale motions of a ligand binding pocket in a protein may open up new perspectives for the design of compounds with steric or chemical properties differing from those of known binders. However, slow motions of proteins are difficult to access using standard molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and are thus usually neglected in computational drug design. Here, we introduce two nonequilibrium MD approaches to identify conformational changes of a binding site and detect transient pockets associated with these motions. The methods proposed are based on the rotamerically induced perturbation (RIP) MD approach, which employs perturbation of side-chain torsional motion for initiating large-scale protein movement. The first approach, Langevin-RIP (L-RIP), entails a series of short Langevin MD simulations, each starting with perturbation of one of the side-chains lining the binding site of interest. L-RIP provides extensive sampling of conformational changes of the binding site. In less than 1 ns of MD simulation with L-RIP, we observed distortions of the α-helix in the ATP binding site of HSP90 and flipping of the DFG loop in Src kinase. In the second approach, RIPlig, a perturbation is applied to a pseudoligand placed in different parts of a binding pocket, which enables flexible regions of the binding site to be identified in a small number of 10 ps MD simulations. The methods were evaluated for four test proteins displaying different types and degrees of binding site flexibility. Both methods reveal all transient pocket regions in less than a total of 10 ns of simulations, even though many of these regions remained closed in 100 ns conventional MD. The proposed methods provide computationally efficient tools to explore binding site flexibility and can aid in the functional characterization of protein pockets, and the identification of transient pockets for ligand design. PMID:27399277

  16. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Haldane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  17. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2016-04-20

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from(1)H-(15)N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell.

  18. The human Ago2 MC region does not contain an eIF4E-like mRNA cap binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grishin Nick V

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Argonaute (Ago proteins interact with small regulatory RNAs to mediate gene regulatory pathways. A recent report by Kiriakidou et al. 1 describes an MC sequence region identified in Ago2 that displays similarity to the cap-binding motif in translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. In a cap-bound eIF4E structure, two important aromatic residues of the motif stack on either side of a 7-methylguanosine 5'-triphosphate (m7Gppp base. The corresponding Ago2 aromatic residues (F450 and F505 were hypothesized to perform the same cap-binding function. However, the detected similarity between the MC sequence and the eIF4E cap-binding motif was questionable. Results A number of sequence-based and structure-based bioinformatics methods reveal the reported similarity between the Ago2 MC sequence region and the eIF4E cap-binding motif to be spurious. Alternatively, the MC sequence region is confidently assigned to the N-terminus of the Ago piwi module, within the mid domain of experimentally determined prokaryotic Ago structures. Confident mapping of the Ago2 MC sequence region to the piwi mid domain results in a homology-based structure model that positions the identified aromatic residues over 20 Å apart, with one of the aromatic side chains (F450 contributing instead to the hydrophobic core of the domain. Conclusion Correct functional prediction based on weak sequence similarity requires substantial evolutionary and structural support. The evolutionary context of the Ago mid domain suggested by multiple sequence alignment is limited to a conserved hydrophobicity profile required for the fold and a motif following the MC region that binds guide RNA. Mapping of the MC sequence to the mid domain structure reveals Ago2 aromatics that are incompatible with eIF4E-like mRNA cap-binding, yet display some limited local structure similarities that cause the chance sequence match to eIF4E. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian

  19. Substrate specificity of three cytochrome c haem lyase isoenzymes from Wolinella succinogenes: unconventional haem c binding motifs are not sufficient for haem c attachment by NrfI and CcsA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Melanie; Eisel, Florian; Scheithauer, Juliane; Kranz, Robert G.; Simon, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bacterial c-type cytochrome maturation is dependent on a complex enzymic machinery. The key reaction is catalysed by cytochrome c haem lyase (CCHL) that usually forms two thioether bonds to attach haem b to the cysteine residues of a haem c binding motif (HBM) which is, in most cases, a CX2CH sequence. Here, the HBM specificity of three distinct CCHL isoenzymes (NrfI, CcsA1 and CcsA2) from the Epsilonproteobacterium Wolinella succinogenes was investigated using either W. succinogenes or Escherichia coli as host organism. Several reporter c-type cytochromes were employed including cytochrome c nitrite reductases (NrfA) from E. coli and Campylobacter jejuni that differ in their active site HBMs (CX2CK or CX2CH). W. succinogenes CcsA2 was found to attach haem to standard CX2CH motifs in various cytochromes whereas other HBMs were not recognized. NrfI was able to attach haem c to the active site CX2CK motif of both W. succinogenes and E. coli NrfA, but not to NrfA from C. jejuni. Different apo-cytochrome variants carrying the CX15CH motif, assumed to be recognized by CcsA1 during maturation of the octahaem cytochrome MccA, were not processed by CcsA1 in either W. succinogenes or E. coli. It is concluded that the dedicated CCHLs NrfI and CcsA1 attach haem to non-standard HBMs only in the presence of further, as yet uncharacterised structural features. Interestingly, it proved impossible to delete the ccsA2 gene from the W. succinogenes genome; a finding that is discussed in the light of the available genomic, proteomic and functional data on W. succinogenes c-type cytochromes. PMID:19919672

  20. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  1. CLIMP: Clustering Motifs via Maximal Cliques with Parallel Computing Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A set of conserved binding sites recognized by a transcription factor is called a motif, which can be found by many applications of comparative genomics for identifying over-represented segments. Moreover, when numerous putative motifs are predicted from a collection of genome-wide data, their similarity data can be represented as a large graph, where these motifs are connected to one another. However, an efficient clustering algorithm is desired for clustering the motifs that belong to the same groups and separating the motifs that belong to different groups, or even deleting an amount of spurious ones. In this work, a new motif clustering algorithm, CLIMP, is proposed by using maximal cliques and sped up by parallelizing its program. When a synthetic motif dataset from the database JASPAR, a set of putative motifs from a phylogenetic foot-printing dataset, and a set of putative motifs from a ChIP dataset are used to compare the performances of CLIMP and two other high-performance algorithms, the results demonstrate that CLIMP mostly outperforms the two algorithms on the three datasets for motif clustering, so that it can be a useful complement of the clustering procedures in some genome-wide motif prediction pipelines. CLIMP is available at http://sqzhang.cn/climp.html. PMID:27487245

  2. CLIMP: Clustering Motifs via Maximal Cliques with Parallel Computing Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A set of conserved binding sites recognized by a transcription factor is called a motif, which can be found by many applications of comparative genomics for identifying over-represented segments. Moreover, when numerous putative motifs are predicted from a collection of genome-wide data, their similarity data can be represented as a large graph, where these motifs are connected to one another. However, an efficient clustering algorithm is desired for clustering the motifs that belong to the same groups and separating the motifs that belong to different groups, or even deleting an amount of spurious ones. In this work, a new motif clustering algorithm, CLIMP, is proposed by using maximal cliques and sped up by parallelizing its program. When a synthetic motif dataset from the database JASPAR, a set of putative motifs from a phylogenetic foot-printing dataset, and a set of putative motifs from a ChIP dataset are used to compare the performances of CLIMP and two other high-performance algorithms, the results demonstrate that CLIMP mostly outperforms the two algorithms on the three datasets for motif clustering, so that it can be a useful complement of the clustering procedures in some genome-wide motif prediction pipelines. CLIMP is available at http://sqzhang.cn/climp.html.

  3. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  4. Site-specific labeling of the type 1 ryanodine receptor using biarsenical fluorophores targeted to engineered tetracysteine motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Fessenden

    Full Text Available The type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1 is an intracellular Ca(2+ release channel that mediates skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. While the overall shape of RyR1 has been elucidated using cryo electron microscopic reconstructions, fine structural details remain elusive. To better understand the structure of RyR1, we have previously used a cell-based fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET method using a fused green fluorescent protein (GFP donor and a fluorescent acceptor, Cy3NTA that binds specifically to short poly-histidine 'tags' engineered into RyR1. However, the need to permeabilize cells to allow Cy3NTA entry as well as the noncovalent binding of Cy3NTA to the His tag limits future applications of this technique for studying conformational changes of the RyR. To overcome these problems, we used a dodecapeptide sequence containing a tetracysteine (Tc motif to target the biarsenical fluorophores, FlAsH and ReAsH to RyR1. These compounds freely cross intact cell membranes where they then bind covalently to the tetracysteine motif. First, we used this system to conduct FRET measurements in intact cells by fusing a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP FRET donor to the N-terminus of RyR1 and then targeting the FRET acceptor, ReAsH to an adjacent Tc tag. Moderate energy transfer (∼33% was observed whereas ReAsH incubation of a YFPRyR1 fusion protein lacking the Tc tag resulted in no detectable FRET. We also developed a FRET-based system that did not require RyR fluorescent protein fusions by labeling N-terminal Tc-tagged RyR1 with FlAsH, a FRET donor and then targeting the FRET acceptor Cy3NTA to an adjacent decahistidine (His10 tag. A high degree of energy transfer (∼66% indicated proper binding of both compounds to these unique recognition sequences in RyR1. Thus, these two systems should provide unprecedented flexibility in future FRET-based structural determinations of RyR1.

  5. Crystal Structure of Menin Reveals Binding Site for Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL) Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Reddy, Gireesh; Grembecka, Jolanta; Cierpicki, Tomasz (Michigan); (UV)

    2014-10-02

    Menin is a tumor suppressor protein that is encoded by the MEN1 (multiple endocrine neoplasia 1) gene and controls cell growth in endocrine tissues. Importantly, menin also serves as a critical oncogenic cofactor of MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) fusion proteins in acute leukemias. Direct association of menin with MLL fusion proteins is required for MLL fusion protein-mediated leukemogenesis in vivo, and this interaction has been validated as a new potential therapeutic target for development of novel anti-leukemia agents. Here, we report the first crystal structure of menin homolog from Nematostella vectensis. Due to a very high sequence similarity, the Nematostella menin is a close homolog of human menin, and these two proteins likely have very similar structures. Menin is predominantly an {alpha}-helical protein with the protein core comprising three tetratricopeptide motifs that are flanked by two {alpha}-helical bundles and covered by a {beta}-sheet motif. A very interesting feature of menin structure is the presence of a large central cavity that is highly conserved between Nematostella and human menin. By employing site-directed mutagenesis, we have demonstrated that this cavity constitutes the binding site for MLL. Our data provide a structural basis for understanding the role of menin as a tumor suppressor protein and as an oncogenic co-factor of MLL fusion proteins. It also provides essential structural information for development of inhibitors targeting the menin-MLL interaction as a novel therapeutic strategy in MLL-related leukemias.

  6. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E. (Vanderbilt); (Scripps); (CDC)

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  7. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  8. A Monte Carlo-based framework enhances the discovery and interpretation of regulatory sequence motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seitzer Phillip

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovery of functionally significant short, statistically overrepresented subsequence patterns (motifs in a set of sequences is a challenging problem in bioinformatics. Oftentimes, not all sequences in the set contain a motif. These non-motif-containing sequences complicate the algorithmic discovery of motifs. Filtering the non-motif-containing sequences from the larger set of sequences while simultaneously determining the identity of the motif is, therefore, desirable and a non-trivial problem in motif discovery research. Results We describe MotifCatcher, a framework that extends the sensitivity of existing motif-finding tools by employing random sampling to effectively remove non-motif-containing sequences from the motif search. We developed two implementations of our algorithm; each built around a commonly used motif-finding tool, and applied our algorithm to three diverse chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP data sets. In each case, the motif finder with the MotifCatcher extension demonstrated improved sensitivity over the motif finder alone. Our approach organizes candidate functionally significant discovered motifs into a tree, which allowed us to make additional insights. In all cases, we were able to support our findings with experimental work from the literature. Conclusions Our framework demonstrates that additional processing at the sequence entry level can significantly improve the performance of existing motif-finding tools. For each biological data set tested, we were able to propose novel biological hypotheses supported by experimental work from the literature. Specifically, in Escherichia coli, we suggested binding site motifs for 6 non-traditional LexA protein binding sites; in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we hypothesize 2 disparate mechanisms for novel binding sites of the Cse4p protein; and in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we discoverd subtle differences in a general transcription factor (GTF binding site motif

  9. Structure of L-Xylulose-5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase (UlaE) from the Anaerobic L-Ascorbate Utilization Pathway of Escherichia coli: Identification of a Novel Phosphate Binding Motif within a TIM Barrel Fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Pineda, Marco; Ajamian, Eunice; Cui, Qizhi; Matte, Allan; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (NRC-Canada)

    2009-01-15

    Three catabolic enzymes, UlaD, UlaE, and UlaF, are involved in a pathway leading to fermentation of L-ascorbate under anaerobic conditions. UlaD catalyzes a {beta}-keto acid decarboxylation reaction to produce L-xylulose-5-phosphate, which undergoes successive epimerization reactions with UlaE (L-xylulose-5-phosphate 3-epimerase) and UlaF (L-ribulose-5-phosphate 4-epimerase), yielding D-xylulose-5-phosphate, an intermediate in the pentose phosphate pathway. We describe here crystallographic studies of UlaE from Escherichia coli O157:H7 that complete the structural characterization of this pathway. UlaE has a triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold and forms dimers. The active site is located at the C-terminal ends of the parallel {beta}-strands. The enzyme binds Zn{sup 2+}, which is coordinated by Glu155, Asp185, His211, and Glu251. We identified a phosphate-binding site formed by residues from the {beta}1/{alpha}1 loop and {alpha}3' helix in the N-terminal region. This site differs from the well-characterized phosphate-binding motif found in several TIM barrel superfamilies that is located at strands {beta}7 and {beta}8. The intrinsic flexibility of the active site region is reflected by two different conformations of loops forming part of the substrate-binding site. Based on computational docking of the L-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate to UlaE and structural similarities of the active site of this enzyme to the active sites of other epimerases, a metal-dependent epimerization mechanism for UlaE is proposed, and Glu155 and Glu251 are implicated as catalytic residues. Mutation and activity measurements for structurally equivalent residues in related epimerases supported this mechanistic proposal.

  10. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, R.; Emmanouel, D.S.; Katz, A.I.

    1983-07-01

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of /sup 125/I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between /sup 125/I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone.

  11. Insulin binding sites in various segments of the rabbit nephron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin binds specifically to basolateral renal cortical membranes and modifies tubular electrolyte transport, but the target sites of this hormone in the nephron have not been identified. Using a microassay that permits measurement of hormone binding in discrete tubule segments we have determined the binding sites of 125I-insulin along the rabbit nephron. Assays were performed under conditions that minimize insulin degradation, and specific binding was measured as the difference between 125I-insulin bound in the presence or absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled hormone. Insulin monoiodinated in position A14 was used in all assays. Specific insulin binding (attomol . cm-1 +/- SE) was highest in the distal convoluted tubule (180.5 +/- 15.0) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (132.9 +/- 14.6), followed by the proximal convoluted and straight tubule. When expressed per milligram protein, insulin binding capacity was highest along the entire thick ascending limb (medullary and cortical portions) and the distal convoluted tubule, i.e., the ''diluting segment'' (congruent to 10(-13) mol . mg protein-1), and was lower (congruent to 4 X 10(-14) mol . mg protein-1), and remarkably similar, in all other nephron segments. Binding specificity was verified in competition studies with unlabeled insulin, insulin analogues (proinsulin and desoctapeptide insulin), and unrelated hormones (glucagon, 1-34 parathyroid hormone, prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone). In addition, serum containing antiinsulin receptor antibody from two patients with type B insulin resistance syndrome markedly inhibited insulin binding to isolated tubules. Whether calculated per unit tubule length or protein content, insulin binding is highest in the thick ascending limb and the distal convoluted tubule, the same nephron sites where a regulatory role in sodium transport has been postulated for this hormone

  12. Exploratory Study on the RNA-Binding Structural Motifs by Library Screening Targeting pre-miRNA-29 a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Takeo; Murata, Asako; Aikawa, Haruo; Harada, Yasue; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-16

    The metabolic stream of microRNA (miRNA) production, the so-called maturation process of miRNAs, became one of important metabolic paths for drug-targeting to modulate the expression of genes related to a number of diseases. We carried out discovery studies on small molecules binding to the precursor of miR-29a (pre-miR-29a) from a chemical library containing 41,119 compounds (AQ library) by the fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assay using the xanthone derivative X2SdiMe as a fluorescent indicator. The FID assay provided 1075 compounds, which showed an increase of fluorescence. These compounds were subsequently submitted to a binding analysis in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay on a pre-miR-29a immobilized surface. 21 hit compounds were identified with a good reproducibility in the binding. These compounds have not been reported to bind to RNA until now and can be classified into two groups on the basis of the kinetics in the binding. To gain more information on the motif structures that could be necessary for the binding to pre-miR-29a, 19 substructures were selected from the hit compounds. The substructure library (SS library) which consisted of 362 compounds was prepared from the AQ library. An SPR assay of the SS library on pre-miR-29a-immobilized surface suggested that five substructures could potentially be important structural motifs to bind to pre-miR-29a. These studies demonstrate that the combination of FID-based screening of chemical library and subsequent SPR assay would be one way for obtaining practical solutions for the discovery of molecules which bind to the target pre-miRNAs.

  13. N-termini of fungal CSL transcription factors are disordered, enriched in regulatory motifs and inhibit DNA binding in fission yeast.

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    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2, we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology.

  14. Acidic/IQ Motif Regulator of Calmodulin*

    OpenAIRE

    Putkey, John A.; Waxham, M. Neal; Gaertner, Tara R.; Brewer, Kari J.; Goldsmith, Michael; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Kleerekoper, Quinn K.

    2007-01-01

    The small IQ motif proteins PEP-19 (62 amino acids) and RC3 (78 amino acids) greatly accelerate the rates of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV in the C-domain of calmodulin (CaM). We show here that PEP-19 decreases the degree of cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to sites III and IV, and we present a model showing that this could increase Ca2+ binding rate constants. Comparative sequence analysis showed that residues 28 to 58 from PEP-19 are conserved in other proteins. This region includes the IQ ...

  15. A Gibbs sampler for motif detection in phylogenetically close sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddharthan, Rahul; van Nimwegen, Erik; Siggia, Eric

    2004-03-01

    Genes are regulated by transcription factors that bind to DNA upstream of genes and recognize short conserved ``motifs'' in a random intergenic ``background''. Motif-finders such as the Gibbs sampler compare the probability of these short sequences being represented by ``weight matrices'' to the probability of their arising from the background ``null model'', and explore this space (analogous to a free-energy landscape). But closely related species may show conservation not because of functional sites but simply because they have not had sufficient time to diverge, so conventional methods will fail. We introduce a new Gibbs sampler algorithm that accounts for common ancestry when searching for motifs, while requiring minimal ``prior'' assumptions on the number and types of motifs, assessing the significance of detected motifs by ``tracking'' clusters that stay together. We apply this scheme to motif detection in sporulation-cycle genes in the yeast S. cerevisiae, using recent sequences of other closely-related Saccharomyces species.

  16. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  17. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The planted (l,d motif search (PMS is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  18. Probabilistic models for semisupervised discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Choi, Seungjin

    2011-01-01

    Methods for discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), searching only for patterns that differentiate two sets (positive and negative sets) of sequences. On one hand, discriminative methods increase the sensitivity and specificity of motif discovery, compared to generative models. On the other hand, generative models can easily exploit unlabeled sequences to better detect functional motifs when labeled training samples are limited. In this paper, we develop a hybrid generative/discriminative model which enables us to make use of unlabeled sequences in the framework of discriminative motif discovery, leading to semisupervised discriminative motif discovery. Numerical experiments on yeast ChIP-chip data for discovering DNA motifs demonstrate that the best performance is obtained between the purely-generative and the purely-discriminative and the semisupervised learning improves the performance when labeled sequences are limited.

  19. Defining the functional binding sites of interleukin 12 receptor β1 and interleukin 23 receptor to Janus kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Doreen M; Klöcker, Tobias; Schröder, Jutta; Lamertz, Larissa; Mrotzek, Simone; Strobl, Birgit; Hermanns, Heike; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-07-15

    The interleukin (IL)-12-type cytokines IL-12 and IL-23 are involved in T-helper (Th) 1 and Th17 immunity, respectively. They share the IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) as one component of their receptor signaling complexes, with IL-12Rβ2 as second receptor for IL-12 and IL-23R for IL-23 signal transduction. Stimulation with IL-12 and IL-23 results in activation of receptor-associated Janus kinases (Jak) and phosphorylation of STAT proteins in target cells. The Janus kinase tyrosine kinase (Tyk) 2 associates with IL-12Rβ1, whereas Jak2 binds to IL-23R and also to IL-12Rβ2. Receptor association of Jak2 is mediated by Box1 and Box2 motifs located within the intracellular domain of the receptor chains. Here we define the Box1 and Box2 motifs in IL-12Rβ1 and an unusual Jak2-binding site in IL-23R by the use of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis. Our data show that nonfunctional box motifs abolish IL-12- and IL-23-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and cytokine-dependent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation of Tyk2 by IL-12Rβ1 and Jak2 by IL‑23R supported these findings. In addition, our data demonstrate that association of Jak2 with IL-23R is mandatory for IL-12 and/or IL-23 signaling, whereas Tyk2 seems to be dispensable.

  20. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Rubio-Villena

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS and glycogen phosphorylase (GP. To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6 and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP. We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  1. Structural and functional studies of a phosphatidic acid-binding antifungal plant defensin MtDef4: Identification of an RGFRRR motif governing fungal cell entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagaram, Uma S.; El-Mounadi, Kaoutar; Buchko, Garry W.; Berg, Howard R.; Kaur, Jagdeep; Pandurangi, Raghoottama; Smith, Thomas J.; Shah, Dilip

    2013-12-04

    A highly conserved plant defensin MtDef4 potently inhibits the growth of a filamentous fungus Fusarium graminearum. MtDef4 is internalized by cells of F. graminearum. To determine its mechanism of fungal cell entry and antifungal action, NMR solution structure of MtDef4 has been determined. The analysis of its structure has revealed a positively charged patch on the surface of the protein consisting of arginine residues in its γ-core signature, a major determinant of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. Here, we report functional analysis of the RGFRRR motif of the γ-core signature of MtDef4. The replacement of RGFRRR to AAAARR or to RGFRAA not only abolishes fungal cell entry but also results in loss of the antifungal activity of MtDef4. MtDef4 binds strongly to phosphatidic acid (PA), a precursor for the biosynthesis of membrane phospholipids and a signaling lipid known to recruit cytosolic proteins to membranes. Mutations of RGFRRR which abolish fungal cell entry of MtDef4 also impair its binding to PA. Our results suggest that RGFRRR motif is a translocation signal for entry of MtDef4 into fungal cells and that this positively charged motif likely mediates interaction of this defensin with PA as part of its antifungal action.

  2. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  3. Binding-site assessment by virtual fragment screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niu Huang

    Full Text Available The accurate prediction of protein druggability (propensity to bind high-affinity drug-like small molecules would greatly benefit the fields of chemical genomics and drug discovery. We have developed a novel approach to quantitatively assess protein druggability by computationally screening a fragment-like compound library. In analogy to NMR-based fragment screening, we dock approximately 11,000 fragments against a given binding site and compute a computational hit rate based on the fraction of molecules that exceed an empirically chosen score cutoff. We perform a large-scale evaluation of the approach on four datasets, totaling 152 binding sites. We demonstrate that computed hit rates correlate with hit rates measured experimentally in a previously published NMR-based screening method. Secondly, we show that the in silico fragment screening method can be used to distinguish known druggable and non-druggable targets, including both enzymes and protein-protein interaction sites. Finally, we explore the sensitivity of the results to different receptor conformations, including flexible protein-protein interaction sites. Besides its original aim to assess druggability of different protein targets, this method could be used to identifying druggable conformations of flexible binding site for lead discovery, and suggesting strategies for growing or joining initial fragment hits to obtain more potent inhibitors.

  4. Vaccinia protein F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain and contains a motor binding motif required for virion export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC, a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs. Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage.

  5. Gene cloning and function analysis of ABP9 protein which specifically binds to ABRE2 motif of maize Cat1 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed using mRNA extracted from 17 days post-pollination (dpp) maize embryos and was screened by employing a yeast one-hybrid system for proteins specifically interacting with ABRE2 motif of maize Cat1 gene. Three truncated overlapping positive clones designated ABP9 were obtained and the full-length cDNA was isolated by 5′ RACE. Searching the database revealed that ABP9 protein belongs to a bZIP-type transcription factor family. ABP9 protein specifically binds to ABRE2 motif and activates the expression of downstream reporter gene in yeast cells. Our results strongly suggest that the ABP9 protein functions as a transcription activator.

  6. Characterization of Heparin-binding Site of Tissue Transglutaminase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J.; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L.; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca2+-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 202KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR222. We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed. PMID:22298777

  7. Consensus PP1 binding motifs regulate transcriptional corepression and alternative RNA splicing activities of the steroid receptor coregulators, p54nrb and PSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liangliang; Xie, Ning; Rennie, Paul; Challis, John R G; Gleave, Martin; Lye, Stephen J; Dong, Xuesen

    2011-07-01

    Originally identified as essential pre-mRNA splicing factors, non-POU-domain-containing, octamer binding protein (p54nrb) and PTB-associated RNA splicing factor (PSF) are also steroid receptor corepressors. The mechanisms by which p54nrb and PSF regulate gene transcription remain unclear. Both p54nrb and PSF contain protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) consensus binding RVxF motifs, suggesting that PP1 may regulate phosphorylation status of p54nrb and PSF and thus their function in gene transcription. In this report, we demonstrated that PP1 forms a protein complex with both p54nrb and PSF. PP1 interacts directly with the RVxF motif only in p54nrb, but not in PSF. Association with PP1 results in dephosphorylation of both p54nrb and PSF in vivo and the loss of their transcriptional corepressor activities. Using the CD44 minigene as a reporter, we showed that PP1 regulates p54nrb and PSF alternative splicing activities that determine exon skipping vs. inclusion in the final mature RNA for translation. In addition, changes in transcriptional corepression and RNA splicing activities of p54nrb and PSF are correlated with alterations in protein interactions of p54nrb and PSF with transcriptional corepressors such as Sin3A and histone deacetylase 1, and RNA splicing factors such as U1A and U2AF. Furthermore, we demonstrated a novel function of the RVxF motif within PSF that enhances its corepression and RNA splicing activities independent of PP1. We conclude that the RVxF motifs play an important role in controlling the multifunctional properties of p54nrb and PSF in the regulation of gene transcription.

  8. Agonist binding to high-affinity dopamine sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have characterized the dopamine D/sub 3/ site and its binding requirements. The dopamine D/sub 3/ site in calf caudate crude homogenate has a site density of 214-230 fmoles/mg. protein by both /sup 3/H-apomorphine (/sup 3/H-AOP) and /sup 3/H-dopamine (/sup 3/H-DA) Scatchard analysis of specific binding (SB). Stereospecific subsets of /sup 3/H-APO and /sup 3/H-DA sites were defined by the use of agonist and antagonist enantiomer-pairs as a rigorous test for D/sub 3/ site heterogeneity. IC/sub 50/ values for both /sup 3/H-APO and /sup 3/H-DA SB sites were assessed for 55 agonist ligands and an excellent correlation was obtained. The authors conclude that both /sup 3/H-ligands label the same D/sub 3/ site. The D/sub 3/ site affinities of 105 dopamine-agonist ligands, in particular 2-aminotetralins,, aporphines and flexible dopamine analogues were measured. Low D/sub 3/-site affinities of N-quaternary analogues confirm the need for a lone pair. Subadditivity of substituents' effects in semi-flexible DA analogues confirms their postulate that sidechain conformation is the critical determinant of affinity. They conclude that there are at least two high-affinity ligand conformations of the DA sidechain pharmacophore. These binding requirements are presented as two interface-Geometry tetrahedral models of the double H-bond interface between the D/sub 3/ site and the ideal ligand.

  9. Structures of quinone binding sites in bc complexes: Functional implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-atomic resolution structures are becoming available for the respiratory chain enzyme known as ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase or the cytochrome bc1 complex. Here we examine our current structure for the chicken bc1 complex to see what it can tell us about the mode of binding and mechanism of reaction of quinone at the two active sites

  10. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward;

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...

  11. CLIPZ: a database and analysis environment for experimentally determined binding sites of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshid, Mohsen; Rodak, Christoph; Zavolan, Mihaela

    2011-01-01

    The stability, localization and translation rate of mRNAs are regulated by a multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that find their targets directly or with the help of guide RNAs. Among the experimental methods for mapping RBP binding sites, cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (CLIP) coupled with deep sequencing provides transcriptome-wide coverage as well as high resolution. However, partly due to their vast volume, the data that were so far generated in CLIP experiments have not been put in a form that enables fast and interactive exploration of binding sites. To address this need, we have developed the CLIPZ database and analysis environment. Binding site data for RBPs such as Argonaute 1-4, Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-3, TNRC6 proteins A-C, Pumilio 2, Quaking and Polypyrimidine tract binding protein can be visualized at the level of the genome and of individual transcripts. Individual users can upload their own sequence data sets while being able to limit the access to these data to specific users, and analyses of the public and private data sets can be performed interactively. CLIPZ, available at http://www.clipz.unibas.ch, aims to provide an open access repository of information for post-transcriptional regulatory elements.

  12. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  13. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  14. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  15. Hybrids of the bHLH and bZIP protein motifs display different DNA-binding activities in vivo vs. in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiu-Kwan Chow

    Full Text Available Minimalist hybrids comprising the DNA-binding domain of bHLH/PAS (basic-helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim protein Arnt fused to the leucine zipper (LZ dimerization domain from bZIP (basic region-leucine zipper protein C/EBP were designed to bind the E-box DNA site, CACGTG, targeted by bHLHZ (basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper proteins Myc and Max, as well as the Arnt homodimer. The bHLHZ-like structure of ArntbHLH-C/EBP comprises the Arnt bHLH domain fused to the C/EBP LZ: i.e. swap of the 330 aa PAS domain for the 29 aa LZ. In the yeast one-hybrid assay (Y1H, transcriptional activation from the E-box was strong by ArntbHLH-C/EBP, and undetectable for the truncated ArntbHLH (PAS removed, as detected via readout from the HIS3 and lacZ reporters. In contrast, fluorescence anisotropy titrations showed affinities for the E-box with ArntbHLH-C/EBP and ArntbHLH comparable to other transcription factors (K(d 148.9 nM and 40.2 nM, respectively, but only under select conditions that maintained folded protein. Although in vivo yeast results and in vitro spectroscopic studies for ArntbHLH-C/EBP targeting the E-box correlate well, the same does not hold for ArntbHLH. As circular dichroism confirms that ArntbHLH-C/EBP is a much more strongly alpha-helical structure than ArntbHLH, we conclude that the nonfunctional ArntbHLH in the Y1H must be due to misfolding, leading to the false negative that this protein is incapable of targeting the E-box. Many experiments, including protein design and selections from large libraries, depend on protein domains remaining well-behaved in the nonnative experimental environment, especially small motifs like the bHLH (60-70 aa. Interestingly, a short helical LZ can serve as a folding- and/or solubility-enhancing tag, an important device given the focus of current research on exploration of vast networks of biomolecular interactions.

  16. Identification of Ubiquinol Binding Motifs at the Q o -Site of the Cytochrome bc 1 Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Barragan, Angela M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Schulten, Klaus; Solov’yov, Ilia A.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes of the bc 1 complex family power the biosphere through their central role in respiration and photosynthesis. These enzymes couple the oxidation of quinol molecules by cytochrome c to the transfer of protons across the membrane, to generate a proton-motive force that drives ATP synthesis. Key for the function of the bc 1 complex is the initial redox process that involves a bifurcated electron transfer in which the two electrons from a quinol substrate are passed to different electron a...

  17. Identification of thyroid hormone receptor binding sites and target genes using ChIP-on-chip in developing mouse cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Dong

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormone (TH is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRbeta of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip spanning -8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5' of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRbeta binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding.

  18. Identification of Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding Sites and Target Genes Using ChIP-on-Chip in Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongyan; Yauk, Carole L.; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; You, Seo-Hee; Zoeller, R. Thomas; Lambert, Iain; Wade, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is critical to normal brain development, but the mechanisms operating in this process are poorly understood. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to enrich regions of DNA bound to thyroid receptor beta (TRβ) of mouse cerebellum sampled on post natal day 15. Enriched target was hybridized to promoter microarrays (ChIP-on-chip) spanning −8 kb to +2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS) of 5000 genes. We identified 91 genes with TR binding sites. Roughly half of the sites were located in introns, while 30% were located within 1 kb upstream (5′) of the TSS. Of these genes, 83 with known function included genes involved in apoptosis, neurodevelopment, metabolism and signal transduction. Two genes, MBP and CD44, are known to contain TREs, providing validation of the system. This is the first report of TR binding for 81 of these genes. ChIP-on-chip results were confirmed for 10 of the 13 binding fragments using ChIP-PCR. The expression of 4 novel TH target genes was found to be correlated with TH levels in hyper/hypothyroid animals providing further support for TR binding. A TRβ binding site upstream of the coding region of myelin associated glycoprotein was demonstrated to be TH-responsive using a luciferase expression system. Motif searches did not identify any classic binding elements, indicating that not all TR binding sites conform to variations of the classic form. These findings provide mechanistic insight into impaired neurodevelopment resulting from TH deficiency and a rich bioinformatics resource for developing a better understanding of TR binding. PMID:19240802

  19. Evidence for a Structural Motif in Toxins and Interleukin-2 That May Be Responsible for Binding to Endothelial Cells and Initiating Vascular Leak Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluna, Roxana; Rizo, Josep; Gordon, Brian E.; Ghetie, Victor; Vitetta, Ellen S.

    1999-03-01

    The dose-limiting toxicity of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and immunotoxin (IT) therapy in humans is vascular leak syndrome (VLS). VLS has a complex etiology involving damage to vascular endothelial cells (ECs), extravasation of fluids and proteins, interstitial edema, and organ failure. IL-2 and ITs prepared with the catalytic A chain of the plant toxin, ricin (RTA), and other toxins, damage human ECs in vitro and in vivo. Damage to ECs may initiate VLS; if this damage could be avoided without losing the efficacy of ITs or IL-2, larger doses could be administered. In this paper, we provide evidence that a three amino acid sequence motif, (x)D(y), in toxins and IL-2 damages ECs. Thus, when peptides from RTA or IL-2 containing this sequence motif are coupled to mouse IgG, they bind to and damage ECs both in vitro and, in the case of RTA, in vivo. In contrast, the same peptides with a deleted or mutated sequence do not. Furthermore, the peptide from RTA attached to mouse IgG can block the binding of intact RTA to ECs in vitro and vice versa. In addition, RTA, a fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38-lys), and fibronectin also block the binding of the mouse IgG-RTA peptide to ECs, suggesting that an (x)D(y) motif is exposed on all three molecules. Our results suggest that deletions or mutations in this sequence or the use of nondamaging blocking peptides may increase the therapeutic index of both IL-2, as well as ITs prepared with a variety of plant or bacterial toxins.

  20. Shared Binding Sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A Toxins

    OpenAIRE

    Herrero, Salvador; González-Cabrera, Joel; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Ferré, Juan

    2001-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At lea...

  1. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  2. An Aromatic Cap Seals the Substrate Binding Site in an ECF-Type S Subunit for Riboflavin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpowich, Nathan K; Song, Jinmei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2016-07-31

    ECF transporters are a family of active membrane transporters for essential micronutrients, such as vitamins and trace metals. Found exclusively in archaea and bacteria, these transporters are composed of four subunits: an integral membrane substrate-binding subunit (EcfS), a transmembrane coupling subunit (EcfT), and two ATP-binding cassette ATPases (EcfA and EcfA'). We have characterized the structural basis of substrate binding by the EcfS subunit for riboflavin from Thermotoga maritima, TmRibU. TmRibU binds riboflavin with high affinity, and the protein-substrate complex is exceptionally stable in solution. The crystal structure of riboflavin-bound TmRibU reveals an electronegative binding pocket at the extracellular surface in which the substrate is completely buried. Analysis of the intermolecular contacts indicates that nearly every available substrate hydrogen bond is satisfied. A conserved aromatic residue at the extracellular end of TM5, Tyr130, caps the binding site to generate a substrate-bound, occluded state, and non-conservative mutation of Tyr130 reduces the stability of this conformation. Using a novel fluorescence binding assay, we find that an aromatic residue at this position is essential for high-affinity substrate binding. Comparison with other S subunit structures suggests that TM5 and Loop5-6 contain a dynamic, conserved motif that plays a key role in gating substrate entry and release by S subunits of ECF transporters. PMID:27312125

  3. Elucidation of Lipid Binding Sites on Lung Surfactant Protein A Using X-ray Crystallography, Mutagenesis, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Boon Chong; Wu, Huixing; Rynkiewicz, Michael J; Schulten, Klaus; Seaton, Barbara A; McCormack, Francis X

    2016-07-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is a collagenous C-type lectin (collectin) that is critical for pulmonary defense against inhaled microorganisms. Bifunctional avidity of SP-A for pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as lipid A and for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), the major component of surfactant membranes lining the air-liquid interface of the lung, ensures that the protein is poised for first-line interactions with inhaled pathogens. To improve our understanding of the motifs that are required for interactions with microbes and surfactant structures, we explored the role of the tyrosine-rich binding surface on the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-A in the interaction with DPPC and lipid A using crystallography, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular dynamics simulations. Critical binding features for DPPC binding include a three-walled tyrosine cage that binds the choline headgroup through cation-π interactions and a positively charged cluster that binds the phosphoryl group. This basic cluster is also critical for binding of lipid A, a bacterial PAMP and target for SP-A. Molecular dynamics simulations further predict that SP-A binds lipid A more tightly than DPPC. These results suggest that the differential binding properties of SP-A favor transfer of the protein from surfactant DPPC to pathogen membranes containing appropriate lipid PAMPs to effect key host defense functions. PMID:27324153

  4. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs.

  5. Extra-helical binding site of a glucagon receptor antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Ali; Doré, Andrew S; Lamb, Daniel; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Southall, Stacey M; Baig, Asma H; Bortolato, Andrea; Koglin, Markus; Robertson, Nathan J; Errey, James C; Andrews, Stephen P; Teobald, Iryna; Brown, Alastair J H; Cooke, Robert M; Weir, Malcolm; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-05-12

    Glucagon is a 29-amino-acid peptide released from the α-cells of the islet of Langerhans, which has a key role in glucose homeostasis. Glucagon action is transduced by the class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor (GCGR), which is located on liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart and pancreas cells, and this receptor has been considered an important drug target in the treatment of diabetes. Administration of recently identified small-molecule GCGR antagonists in patients with type 2 diabetes results in a substantial reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations. Although an X-ray structure of the transmembrane domain of the GCGR has previously been solved, the ligand (NNC0640) was not resolved. Here we report the 2.5 Å structure of human GCGR in complex with the antagonist MK-0893 (ref. 4), which is found to bind to an allosteric site outside the seven transmembrane (7TM) helical bundle in a position between TM6 and TM7 extending into the lipid bilayer. Mutagenesis of key residues identified in the X-ray structure confirms their role in the binding of MK-0893 to the receptor. The unexpected position of the binding site for MK-0893, which is structurally similar to other GCGR antagonists, suggests that glucagon activation of the receptor is prevented by restriction of the outward helical movement of TM6 required for G-protein coupling. Structural knowledge of class B receptors is limited, with only one other ligand-binding site defined--for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRF1R)--which was located deep within the 7TM bundle. We describe a completely novel allosteric binding site for class B receptors, providing an opportunity for structure-based drug design for this receptor class and furthering our understanding of the mechanisms of activation of these receptors. PMID:27111510

  6. Mutational analysis of a predicted zinc-binding motif in the 26-kilodalton protein encoded by the vaccinia virus A2L gene: correlation of zinc binding with late transcriptional transactivation activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Keck, J G; Feigenbaum, F; B. Moss

    1993-01-01

    Transient transfection assays indicated that A2L is one of three vaccinia virus intermediate genes that are required for the transcriptional transactivation of viral late genes. We have expressed the A2L open reading frame in Escherichia coli and shown by blotting experiments that the 26-kDa protein binds zinc, a property predicted by the presence of a CX2CX13CX2C zinc finger motif. The specificity for zinc binding was demonstrated by competition with other metals. The role of the sequence mo...

  7. Genome-wide de novo prediction of cis-regulatory binding sites in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Although cis-regulatory binding sites (CRBSs) are at least as important as the coding sequences in a genome, our general understanding of them in most sequenced genomes is very limited due to the lack of efficient and accurate experimental and computational methods for their characterization, which has largely hindered our understanding of many important biological processes. In this article, we describe a novel algorithm for genome-wide de novo prediction of CRBSs with high accuracy. We designed our algorithm to circumvent three identified difficulties for CRBS prediction using comparative genomics principles based on a new method for the selection of reference genomes, a new metric for measuring the similarity of CRBSs, and a new graph clustering procedure. When operon structures are correctly predicted, our algorithm can predict 81% of known individual binding sites belonging to 94% of known cis-regulatory motifs in the Escherichia coli K12 genome, while achieving high prediction specificity. Our algorithm has also achieved similar prediction accuracy in the Bacillus subtilis genome, suggesting that it is very robust, and thus can be applied to any other sequenced prokaryotic genome. When compared with the prior state-of-the-art algorithms, our algorithm outperforms them in both prediction sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19383880

  8. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  9. 14C-glucose binding assay of the glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of determining the binding sites of glucose transporter in rat muscular cell membrane was introduced. The crude products of cell membrane form the skeletal muscle of control and insulin treated rats were prepared, and then fractionated in sucrose gradient. Both plasma membrane and microsome membrane were incubated with D-[U-14C] glucose respectively for the measurement of radioactivity and Scatchard plot analysis. It was found that the binding sites of glucose transporter in plasma membrane and intracellular membrane were 5.6 nmol 14C-glucose/mg protein and 8.7 nmol 14C-glucose-mg protein respectively at basic state. Insulin treatment in experimental groups caused approximately 146% increase in plasma membrane fraction and 88% decrease in intracellular membrane fraction. Moreover, the kinetic data of Scatchard plot curve were similar to those of the [3H]-cytochalasin B binding assay. D-[U-14C] glucose binding assay of glucose transporter binding sites in muscular cell membrane is simple, easy and practicable. The D-[U-14C] glucose is commercially available

  10. Redundant ERF-VII Transcription Factors Bind to an Evolutionarily Conserved cis-Motif to Regulate Hypoxia-Responsive Gene Expression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, Philipp; Fundinger, Moritz; Müller, Jana T; Lee, Travis; Bailey-Serres, Julia; Mustroph, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The response of Arabidopsis thaliana to low-oxygen stress (hypoxia), such as during shoot submergence or root waterlogging, includes increasing the levels of ∼50 hypoxia-responsive gene transcripts, many of which encode enzymes associated with anaerobic metabolism. Upregulation of over half of these mRNAs involves stabilization of five group VII ethylene response factor (ERF-VII) transcription factors, which are routinely degraded via the N-end rule pathway of proteolysis in an oxygen- and nitric oxide-dependent manner. Despite their importance, neither the quantitative contribution of individual ERF-VIIs nor the cis-regulatory elements they govern are well understood. Here, using single- and double-null mutants, the constitutively synthesized ERF-VIIs RELATED TO APETALA2.2 (RAP2.2) and RAP2.12 are shown to act redundantly as principle activators of hypoxia-responsive genes; constitutively expressed RAP2.3 contributes to this redundancy, whereas the hypoxia-induced HYPOXIA RESPONSIVE ERF1 (HRE1) and HRE2 play minor roles. An evolutionarily conserved 12-bp cis-regulatory motif that binds to and is sufficient for activation by RAP2.2 and RAP2.12 is identified through a comparative phylogenetic motif search, promoter dissection, yeast one-hybrid assays, and chromatin immunopurification. This motif, designated the hypoxia-responsive promoter element, is enriched in promoters of hypoxia-responsive genes in multiple species. PMID:26668304

  11. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  12. Crystal structure of CotA laccase complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) at a novel binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhongchuan; Xie, Tian [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Zhong, Qiuping [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, People’s Republic of (China); Wang, Ganggang, E-mail: wanggg@cib.ac.cn [Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology of Sichuan Province, Chengdu 610041, People’s Republic of (China)

    2016-03-24

    The crystal structure of CotA complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) in a hole motif has been solved; this novel binding site could be a potential structure-based target for protein engineering of CotA laccase. The CotA laccase from Bacillus subtilis is an abundant component of the spore outer coat and has been characterized as a typical laccase. The crystal structure of CotA complexed with 2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) in a hole motif has been solved. The novel binding site was about 26 Å away from the T1 binding pocket. Comparison with known structures of other laccases revealed that the hole is a specific feature of CotA. The key residues Arg476 and Ser360 were directly bound to ABTS. Site-directed mutagenesis studies revealed that the residues Arg146, Arg429 and Arg476, which are located at the bottom of the novel binding site, are essential for the oxidation of ABTS and syringaldazine. Specially, a Thr480Phe variant was identified to be almost 3.5 times more specific for ABTS than for syringaldazine compared with the wild type. These results suggest this novel binding site for ABTS could be a potential target for protein engineering of CotA laccases.

  13. Distinct DNA binding sites contribute to the TCF transcriptional switch in C. elegans and Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Bhambhani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of gene expression by signaling pathways often occurs through a transcriptional switch, where the transcription factor responsible for signal-dependent gene activation represses the same targets in the absence of signaling. T-cell factors (TCFs are transcription factors in the Wnt/ß-catenin pathway, which control numerous cell fate specification events in metazoans. The TCF transcriptional switch is mediated by many co-regulators that contribute to repression or activation of Wnt target genes. It is typically assumed that DNA recognition by TCFs is important for target gene location, but plays no role in the actual switch. TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF and some vertebrate TCF isoforms bind DNA through two distinct domains, a High Mobility Group (HMG domain and a C-clamp, which recognize DNA motifs known as HMG and Helper sites, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that POP-1 (the C. elegans TCF also activates target genes through HMG and Helper site interactions. Helper sites enhanced the ability of a synthetic enhancer to detect Wnt/ß-catenin signaling in several tissues and revealed an unsuspected role for POP-1 in regulating the C. elegans defecation cycle. Searching for HMG-Helper site clusters allowed the identification of a new POP-1 target gene active in the head muscles and gut. While Helper sites and the C-clamp are essential for activation of worm and fly Wnt targets, they are dispensable for TCF-dependent repression of targets in the absence of Wnt signaling. These data suggest that a fundamental change in TCF-DNA binding contributes to the transcriptional switch that occurs upon Wnt stimulation.

  14. Characterization of DNA sequences that mediate nuclear protein binding to the regulatory region of the Pisum sativum (pea) chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80: identification of a repeated heptamer motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argüello, G; García-Hernández, E; Sánchez, M; Gariglio, P; Herrera-Estrella, L; Simpson, J

    1992-05-01

    Two protein factors binding to the regulatory region of the pea chlorophyl a/b binding protein gene AB80 have been identified. One of these factors is found only in green tissue but not in etiolated or root tissue. The second factor (denominated ABF-2) binds to a DNA sequence element that contains a direct heptamer repeat TCTCAAA. It was found that presence of both of the repeats is essential for binding. ABF-2 is present in both green and etiolated tissue and in roots and factors analogous to ABF-2 are present in several plant species. Computer analysis showed that the TCTCAAA motif is present in the regulatory region of several plant genes. PMID:1303797

  15. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.;

    2012-01-01

    potency against class 1 HDACs and are active in tissue culture against various human cancer cell lines. Importantly, enzymological analysis of 26 indicates that the cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide is a fast-on/ off competitive inhibitor of HDACs 1−3 with Ki values of 49, 33, and 37 nM, respectively. Our proof......Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  16. LTBP-2 Has a Single High-Affinity Binding Site for FGF-2 and Blocks FGF-2-Induced Cell Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clementine Menz

    Full Text Available Latent transforming growth factor-beta-1 binding protein-2 (LTBP-2 belongs to the fibrillin-LTBP superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins. LTBPs and fibrillins are involved in the sequestration and storage of latent growth factors, particularly transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, in tissues. Unlike other LTBPs, LTBP-2 does not covalently bind TGF-β, and its molecular functions remain unclear. We are screening LTBP-2 for binding to other growth factors and have found very strong saturable binding to fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2 (Kd = 1.1 nM. Using a series of recombinant LTBP-2 fragments a single binding site for FGF-2 was identified in a central region of LTBP-2 consisting of six tandem epidermal growth factor-like (EGF-like motifs (EGFs 9-14. This region was also shown to contain a heparin/heparan sulphate-binding site. FGF-2 stimulation of fibroblast proliferation was completely negated by the addition of 5-fold molar excess of LTBP-2 to the assay. Confocal microscopy showed strong co-localisation of LTBP-2 and FGF-2 in fibrotic keloid tissue suggesting that the two proteins may interact in vivo. Overall the study indicates that LTBP-2 is a potent inhibitor of FGF-2 that may influence FGF-2 bioactivity during wound repair particularly in fibrotic tissues.

  17. Prediction of DtxR regulon: Identification of binding sites and operons controlled by Diphtheria toxin repressor in Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnain Seyed

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, of Corynebacterium diphtheriae has been shown to be an iron-activated transcription regulator that controls not only the expression of diphtheria toxin but also of iron uptake genes. This study aims to identify putative binding sites and operons controlled by DtxR to understand the role of DtxR in patho-physiology of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Result Positional Shannon relative entropy method was used to build the DtxR-binding site recognition profile and the later was used to identify putative regulatory sites of DtxR within C. diphtheriae genome. In addition, DtxR-regulated operons were also identified taking into account the predicted DtxR regulatory sites and genome annotation. Few of the predicted motifs were experimentally validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The analysis identifies motifs upstream to the novel iron-regulated genes that code for Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FpG, an enzyme involved in DNA-repair and starvation inducible DNA-binding protein (Dps which is involved in iron storage and oxidative stress defense. In addition, we have found the DtxR motifs upstream to the genes that code for sortase which catalyzes anchoring of host-interacting proteins to the cell wall of pathogenic bacteria and the proteins of secretory system which could be involved in translocation of various iron-regulated virulence factors including diphtheria toxin. Conclusions We have used an in silico approach to identify the putative binding sites and genes controlled by DtxR in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Our analysis shows that DtxR could provide a molecular link between Fe+2-induced Fenton's reaction and protection of DNA from oxidative damage. DtxR-regulated Dps prevents lethal combination of Fe+2 and H2O2 and also protects DNA by nonspecific DNA-binding. In addition DtxR could play an important role in host interaction and virulence by regulating the levels of sortase

  18. Autologous peptides constitutively occupy the antigen binding site on Ia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Sette, A; Colon, S M;

    1988-01-01

    Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype was effici......Low molecular weight material associated with affinity-purified class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules of mouse (Ia) had the expected properties of peptides bound to the antigen binding site of Ia. Thus, the low molecular weight material derived from the I-Ad isotype...... was predominantly peptide in nature, as shown by its susceptibility to protease digestion. It was heterogeneous as measured by gel filtration (mean molecular weight approximately 3000), and when characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, it eluted over a wide concentration of solvent. Such self...

  19. Lactococcus lactis TrxD represents a subgroup of thioredoxins prevalent in Gram-positive bacteria containing WCXDC active site motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Efler, Petr; Epie, Denis Ebong;

    2014-01-01

    Three protein disulfide reductases of the thioredoxin superfamily from the industrially important Gram-positive Lactococcus lactis (LlTrxA, LlTrxD and LlNrdH) are compared to the "classical" thioredoxin from Escherichia coil (EcTrx1). LlTrxA resembles EcTrx1 with a WCGPC active site motif and oth...

  20. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs. PMID:27565349

  1. Direct GR Binding Sites Potentiate Clusters of TF Binding across the Human Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vockley, Christopher M; D'Ippolito, Anthony M; McDowell, Ian C; Majoros, William H; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E

    2016-08-25

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binds the human genome at >10,000 sites but only regulates the expression of hundreds of genes. To determine the functional effect of each site, we measured the glucocorticoid (GC) responsive activity of nearly all GR binding sites (GBSs) captured using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in A549 cells. 13% of GBSs assayed had GC-induced activity. The responsive sites were defined by direct GR binding via a GC response element (GRE) and exclusively increased reporter-gene expression. Meanwhile, most GBSs lacked GC-induced reporter activity. The non-responsive sites had epigenetic features of steady-state enhancers and clustered around direct GBSs. Together, our data support a model in which clusters of GBSs observed with ChIP-seq reflect interactions between direct and tethered GBSs over tens of kilobases. We further show that those interactions can synergistically modulate the activity of direct GBSs and may therefore play a major role in driving gene activation in response to GCs.

  2. Evolutionary computation for discovery of composite transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Gary B.; Porto, V. William; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Craven, Andrew M.; Powers, David M.; Harlow, Harry B.; Su, Eric W.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated the use of evolutionary computation for the discovery of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoter regions upstream of coexpressed genes. However, it remained unclear whether or not composite TFBS elements, commonly found in higher organisms where two or more TFBSs form functional complexes, could also be identified by using this approach. Here, we present an important refinement of our previous algorithm and test the identification of composite elem...

  3. Associations of homologous RNA-binding motif gene on the X chromosome (RBMX) and its like sequence on chromosome 9(RBMXL9) with non-obstructive azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Tsujimura; Masao Ota; Akihiko Okuyama; Kazutoshi Fujita; Kazuhiko Komori; Phanu Tanjapatkul; Yasushi Miyagawa; Shingo Takada; Kiyomi Matsumiya; Masaharu Sada; Yoshihiko Katsuyama

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the associations of autosomal and X-chromosome homologs of the RNA-binding-motif (RNA-binding-motif on the Y chromosome, RBMY) gene with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), as genetic factors for NOA may map to chromosomes other than the Y chromosome. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted using a salting-out procedure after treatment of peripheral blood leukocytes with proteinase K from Japanese patients with NOA (n = 67) and normal fertile volunteers (n = 105). The DNA were analyzed for RBMX by expressed sequence tag (EST) deletion and for the like sequence on chromosome 9 (RBMXL9) by microsatellite polymorphism. Results: We examined six ESTs in and around RBMX and found a deletion of SHGC31764 in one patient with NOA and a deletion of DXS7491 in one other patient with NOA. No deletions were detected in control subjects. The association study with nine microsatellite markers near RBMXL9 revealed that D9S319 was less prevalent in patients than in control subjects, whereas D9S1853 was detected more frequently in patients than that in control subjects. Conclusion: We provide evidence that deletions in or around RBMX may be involved in NOA. In addition, analyses of markers in the vicinity of RBMXL9 on chromosome 9 suggest the possibility that variants of this gene may be associated with NOA.Although further studies are necessary, this is the first report of the association between RBMX and RBMXL9 with NOA.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca2+-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P21, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°

  5. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of calcium-binding protein-2 from Entamoeba histolytica and its complexes with strontium and the IQ1 motif of myosin V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourinath, S., E-mail: sgourinath@mail.jnu.ac.in; Padhan, Narendra; Alam, Neelima; Bhattacharya, Alok [School of Life Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2005-04-01

    Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. Calcium plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of amoebiasis, a major disease caused by Entamoeba histolytica. Two domains with four canonical EF-hand-containing calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) have been identified from E. histolytica. Even though they have very high sequence similarity, these bind to different target proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent manner, leading to different functional pathways. Calcium-binding protein-2 (EhCaBP2) crystals were grown using MPD as a precipitant. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.74, b = 68.83, c = 113.25 Å, β = 116.7°. EhCaBP2 also crystallized in complex with strontium (replacing calcium) at similar conditions. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 69.18, b = 112.03, c = 93.42 Å, β = 92.8°. Preliminary data for EhCaBP2 crystals in complex with an IQ motif are also reported. This complex was crystallized with MPD and ethanol as precipitating agents. These crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.5, b = 69.86, c = 86.5 Å, β = 97.9°.

  6. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  7. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  8. The inhibitory binding site(s) of Zn2+ in cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Francesco; Giachini, Lisa; Boscherini, Federico; Venturoli, Giovanni; Capitanio, Giuseppe; Martino, Pietro Luca; Papa, Sergio

    2007-02-20

    EXAFS analysis of Zn binding site(s) in bovine-heart cytochrome c oxidase and characterization of the inhibitory effect of internal zinc on respiratory activity and proton pumping of the liposome reconstituted oxidase are presented. EXAFS identifies tetrahedral coordination site(s) for Zn(2+) with two N-histidine imidazoles, one N-histidine imidazol or N-lysine and one O-COOH (glutamate or aspartate), possibly located at the entry site of the proton conducting D pathway in the oxidase and involved in inhibition of the oxygen reduction catalysis and proton pumping by internally trapped zinc.

  9. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Dupont

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless, there are only a few studies on the molecular basis underlying aptamer-protease interactions and the associated mechanisms of inhibition. In the present study, we use site-directed mutagenesis to delineate the binding sites of two 2´-fluoropyrimidine RNA aptamers (upanap-12 and upanap-126 with therapeutic potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA. We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126 binds to the area around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12 binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro-uPA complex. The results suggest and highlight that the size and shape of an aptamer as well as the domain organization of a multi-domain protein such as uPA, may provide the basis for extensive sterical interference with protein ligand interactions considered distant from the aptamer binding site.

  10. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C; Ketterman, Albert J

    2015-10-20

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme.

  11. Binding characterization, synthesis and biological evaluation of RXRα antagonists targeting the coactivator binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dingyu; Guo, Shangjie; Chen, Ziwen; Bao, Yuzhou; Huang, Fengyu; Xu, Dan; Zhang, Xindao; Zeng, Zhiping; Zhou, Hu; Zhang, Xiaokun; Su, Ying

    2016-08-15

    Previously we identified the first retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRα) modulators that regulate the RXRα biological function via binding to the coregulator-binding site. Here we report the characterization of the interactions between the hit molecule and RXRα through computational modeling, mutagenesis, SAR and biological evaluation. In addition, we reported studies of additional new compounds and identified a molecule that mediated the NF-κB pathway by inhibiting the TNFα-induced IκBα degradation and p65 nuclear translocation. PMID:27450787

  12. A conformational analysis of mouse Nalp3 domain structures by molecular dynamics simulations, and binding site analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bikash R; Maharana, Jitendra; Bhoi, Gopal K; Lenka, Santosh K; Patra, Mahesh C; Dikhit, Manas R; Dubey, Praveen K; Pradhan, Sukanta K; Behera, Bijay K

    2014-05-01

    Scrutinizing various nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) genes in higher eukaryotes is very important for understanding the intriguing mechanism of the host defense against pathogens. The nucleotide-binding domain (NACHT), leucine-rich repeat (LRR), and pyrin domains (PYD)-containing protein 3 (Nalp3), is an intracellular innate immune receptor and is associated with several immune system related disorders. Despite Nalp3's protective role during a pathogenic invasion, the molecular features and structural organization of this crucial protein is poorly understood. Using comparative modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we have studied the structural architecture of Nalp3 domains, and characterized the dynamic and energetic parameters of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding in NACHT, and pathogen-derived ligands muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and imidazoquinoline with LRR domains. The results suggested that walker A, B and extended walker B motifs were the key ATP binding regions in NACHT that mediate self-oligomerization. The analysis of the binding sites of MDP and imidazoquinoline revealed LRR 7-9 to be the most energetically favored site for imidazoquinoline interaction. However, the binding free energy calculations using the Molecular Mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM/PBSA) method indicated that MDP is incompatible for activating the Nalp3 molecule in its monomeric form, and suggest its complex interaction with NOD2 or other NLRs accounts for MDP recognition. The high binding affinity of ATP with NACHT was correlated to the experimental data for human NLRs. Our binding site prediction for imidazoquinoline in LRR warrants further investigation via in vivo models. This is the first study that provides ligand recognition in mouse Nalp3 and its spatial structural arrangements. PMID:24595807

  13. The MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole;

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the onset of cellular immune reactions is controlled by presentation of peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to T cell receptors. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Different MHC molecules present different subsets of...... peptides, and knowledge of their binding specificities is important for understanding differences in the immune response between individuals. Algorithms predicting which peptides bind a given MHC molecule have recently been developed with high prediction accuracy. The utility of these algorithms is...... binding motif for each MHC molecule is predicted using state-of-the-art, pan-specific peptide-MHC binding-prediction methods, and is visualized as a sequence logo, in a format that allows for a comprehensive interpretation of binding motif anchor positions and amino acid preferences....

  14. Characterization of the fibronectin-attachment protein of Mycobacterium avium reveals a fibronectin-binding motif conserved among mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorey, J S; Holsti, M A; Ratliff, T L; Allen, P M; Brown, E J

    1996-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an intracellular pathogen and a major opportunistic infectious agent observed in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Evidence suggests that the initial portal of infection by M. avium is often the gastrointestinal tract. However, the mechanism by which the M. avium crosses the epithelial barrier is unclear. A possible mechanism is suggested by the ability of M. avium to bind fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein that is a virulence factor for several extracellular pathogenic bacteria which bind to mucosal surfaces. To further characterize fibronectin binding by M. avium, we have cloned the M. avium fibronectin-attachment protein (FAP). The M. avium FAP (FAP-A) has an unusually large number of Pro and Ala residues (40% overall) and is 50% identical to FAP of both Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using recombinant FAP-A and FAP-A peptides, we show that two non-continuous regions in FAP-A bind fibronectin. Peptides from these regions and homologous sequences from M. leprae FAP inhibit fibronectin binding by both M. avium and Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG). These regions have no homology to eukaryotic fibronectin-binding proteins and are only distantly related to fibronectin-binding peptides of Gram-positive bacteria. Nevertheless, these fibronectin-binding regions are highly conserved among the mycobacterial FAPs, suggesting an essential function for this interaction in mycobacteria infection of their metazoan hosts.

  15. Structural and Functional Characterization of CRM1-Nup214 Interactions Reveals Multiple FG-Binding Sites Involved in Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Sarah A; Monecke, Thomas; Dickmanns, Achim; Spillner, Christiane; Hofele, Romina; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Kehlenbach, Ralph H

    2015-10-27

    CRM1 is the major nuclear export receptor. During translocation through the nuclear pore, transport complexes transiently interact with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats of multiple nucleoporins. On the cytoplasmic side of the nuclear pore, CRM1 tightly interacts with the nucleoporin Nup214. Here, we present the crystal structure of a 117-amino-acid FG-repeat-containing fragment of Nup214, in complex with CRM1, Snurportin 1, and RanGTP at 2.85 Å resolution. The structure reveals eight binding sites for Nup214 FG motifs on CRM1, with intervening stretches that are loosely attached to the transport receptor. Nup214 binds to N- and C-terminal regions of CRM1, thereby clamping CRM1 in a closed conformation and stabilizing the export complex. The role of conserved hydrophobic pockets for the recognition of FG motifs was analyzed in biochemical and cell-based assays. Comparative studies with RanBP3 and Nup62 shed light on specificities of CRM1-nucleoporin binding, which serves as a paradigm for transport receptor-nucleoporin interactions. PMID:26489467

  16. Flavopiridol inhibits glycogen phosphorylase by binding at the inhibitor site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomakos, N G; Schnier, J B; Zographos, S E; Skamnaki, V T; Tsitsanou, K E; Johnson, L N

    2000-11-01

    Flavopiridol (L86-8275) ((-)-cis-5, 7-dihydroxy-2-(2-chlorophenyl)-8-[4-(3-hydroxy-1-methyl)-piperidinyl] -4H-benzopyran-4-one), a potential antitumor drug, currently in phase II trials, has been shown to be an inhibitor of muscle glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and to cause glycogen accumulation in A549 non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (Kaiser, A., Nishi, K., Gorin, F.A., Walsh, D.A., Bradbury, E. M., and Schnier, J. B., unpublished data). Kinetic experiments reported here show that flavopiridol inhibits GPb with an IC(50) = 15.5 microm. The inhibition is synergistic with glucose resulting in a reduction of IC(50) for flavopiridol to 2.3 microm and mimics the inhibition of caffeine. In order to elucidate the structural basis of inhibition, we determined the structures of GPb complexed with flavopiridol, GPb complexed with caffeine, and GPa complexed with both glucose and flavopiridol at 1.76-, 2.30-, and 2.23-A resolution, and refined to crystallographic R values of 0.216 (R(free) = 0.247), 0.189 (R(free) = 0.219), and 0.195 (R(free) = 0.252), respectively. The structures provide a rational for flavopiridol potency and synergism with glucose inhibitory action. Flavopiridol binds at the allosteric inhibitor site, situated at the entrance to the catalytic site, the site where caffeine binds. Flavopiridol intercalates between the two aromatic rings of Phe(285) and Tyr(613). Both flavopiridol and glucose promote the less active T-state through localization of the closed position of the 280s loop which blocks access to the catalytic site, thereby explaining their synergistic inhibition. The mode of interactions of flavopiridol with GP is different from that of des-chloro-flavopiridol with CDK2, illustrating how different functional parts of the inhibitor can be used to provide specific and potent binding to two different enzymes. PMID:10924512

  17. Site-specific thermodynamic stability and unfolding of a de novo designed protein structural motif mapped by 13C isotopically edited IR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubelka, Ginka S; Kubelka, Jan

    2014-04-23

    The mechanism of protein folding remains poorly understood, in part due to limited experimental information available about partially folded states. Isotopically edited infrared (IR) spectroscopy has emerged as a promising method for studying protein structural changes with site-specific resolution, but its full potential to systematically probe folding at multiple protein sites has not yet been realized. We have used (13)C isotopically edited IR spectroscopy to investigate the site-specific thermal unfolding at seven different locations in the de novo designed helix-turn-helix protein αtα. As one of the few stable helix-turn-helix motifs, αtα is an excellent model for studying the roles of secondary and tertiary interactions in folding. Circular dichroism (CD) experiments on the full αtα motif and its two peptide fragments show that interhelical tertiary contacts are critical for stabilization of the secondary structure. The site-specific thermal unfolding probed by (13)C isotopically edited IR is likewise consistent with primarily tertiary stabilization of the local structure. The least thermally stable part of the αtα motif is near the turn where the interhelical contacts are rather loose, while the motif's center with best established core packing has the highest stability. Similar correlation between the local thermal stability and tertiary contacts was found previously for a naturally occurring helix-turn-helix motif. These results underline the importance of native-like tertiary stabilizing interactions in folding, in agreement with recent state-of-the art folding simulations as well as simplified, native-centric models.

  18. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Brannigan, Grace; Economou, Nicoleta J.; Xi, Jin; Hall, Michael A.; Liu, Renyu; Rossi, Matthew J.; Dailey, William P.; Grasty, Kimberly C.; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Loll, Patrick J.; (Drexel-MED); (UPENN)

    2009-10-21

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  19. A Unitary Anesthetic-Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedula, L.; Brannigan, G; Economou, N; Xi, J; Hall, M; Liu, R; Rossi, M; Dailey, W; Grasty, K; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABAA receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  20. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  1. Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance allow quantifying substrate binding to different binding sites of Bacillus subtilis xylanase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuyvers, Sven; Dornez, Emmie; Abou Hachem, Maher;

    2012-01-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first was a cat......Isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance were tested for their ability to study substrate binding to the active site (AS) and to the secondary binding site (SBS) of Bacillus subtilis xylanase A separately. To this end, three enzyme variants were compared. The first...

  2. PDlim2 selectively interacts with the PDZ binding motif of highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza A virus NS1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    Full Text Available The multi-functional NS1 protein of influenza A virus is a viral virulence determining factor. The last four residues at the C-terminus of NS1 constitute a type I PDZ domain binding motif (PBM. Avian influenza viruses currently in circulation carry an NS1 PBM with consensus sequence ESEV, whereas human influenza viruses bear an NS1 PBM with consensus sequence RSKV or RSEV. The PBM sequence of the influenza A virus NS1 is reported to contribute to high viral pathogenicity in animal studies. Here, we report the identification of PDlim2 as a novel binding target of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus H5N1 strain with an NS1 PBM of ESEV (A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004/H5N1, HN12-NS1 by yeast two-hybrid screening. The interaction was confirmed by in vitro GST pull-down assays, as well as by in vivo mammalian two-hybrid assays and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. The binding was also confirmed to be mediated by the interaction of the PDlim2 PDZ domain with the NS1 PBM motif. Interestingly, our assays showed that PDlim2 bound specifically with HN12-NS1, but exhibited no binding to NS1 from a human influenza H1N1 virus bearing an RSEV PBM (A/Puerto Rico/8/34/H1N1, PR8-NS1. A crystal structure of the PDlim2 PDZ domain fused with the C-terminal hexapeptide from HN12-NS1, together with GST pull-down assays on PDlim2 mutants, reveals that residues Arg16 and Lys31 of PDlim2 are critical for the binding between PDlim2 and HN12-NS1. The identification of a selective binding target of HN12-NS1 (ESEV, but not PR8-NS1 (RSEV, enables us to propose a structural mechanism for the interaction between NS1 PBM and PDlim2 or other PDZ-containing proteins.

  3. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  4. Attachment sites of primary binding proteins L1, L2 and L23 on 23 S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egebjerg, Jan; Christiansen, Jan; Garrett, Roger Antony

    1991-01-01

    The attachment sites of the primary binding proteins L1, L2 and L23 on 23 S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli were examined by a chemical and ribonuclease footprinting method using several probes with different specificities. The results show that the sites are confined to localized RNA regions...... within the large ribonuclease-protected ribonucleoprotein fragments that were characterized earlier. They are as follows: 1. (1) L1 recognizes a tertiary structural motif in domain V centred on two interacting internal loops; the main protein interaction sites occur at the internal loop/helix junctions.2...

  5. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Quader Saad; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC) and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this pape...

  6. Defining the functional binding sites of interleukin 12 receptor β1 and interleukin 23 receptor to Janus kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floss, Doreen M; Klöcker, Tobias; Schröder, Jutta; Lamertz, Larissa; Mrotzek, Simone; Strobl, Birgit; Hermanns, Heike; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-07-15

    The interleukin (IL)-12-type cytokines IL-12 and IL-23 are involved in T-helper (Th) 1 and Th17 immunity, respectively. They share the IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1) as one component of their receptor signaling complexes, with IL-12Rβ2 as second receptor for IL-12 and IL-23R for IL-23 signal transduction. Stimulation with IL-12 and IL-23 results in activation of receptor-associated Janus kinases (Jak) and phosphorylation of STAT proteins in target cells. The Janus kinase tyrosine kinase (Tyk) 2 associates with IL-12Rβ1, whereas Jak2 binds to IL-23R and also to IL-12Rβ2. Receptor association of Jak2 is mediated by Box1 and Box2 motifs located within the intracellular domain of the receptor chains. Here we define the Box1 and Box2 motifs in IL-12Rβ1 and an unusual Jak2-binding site in IL-23R by the use of deletion and site-directed mutagenesis. Our data show that nonfunctional box motifs abolish IL-12- and IL-23-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and cytokine-dependent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation of Tyk2 by IL-12Rβ1 and Jak2 by IL‑23R supported these findings. In addition, our data demonstrate that association of Jak2 with IL-23R is mandatory for IL-12 and/or IL-23 signaling, whereas Tyk2 seems to be dispensable. PMID:27193299

  7. Conformational consequences of cooperative binding of a coiled-coil peptide motif to poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide) HPMA copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter C; Paul, Alison; Apostolovic, Bojana; Klok, Harm-Anton; de Luca, Edoardo; King, Stephen M; Heenan, Richard K

    2011-07-30

    Small-angle neutron scattering and pulsed-gradient spin-echo NMR have been used to examine the solution conformation of a series of water soluble poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide) P(HPMA) co-polymer drug delivery vehicles incorporating a coiled-coil peptide motif as a novel pH sensitive non-covalent linker. The conformation of the HPMA homopolymer is well-described by a Gaussian coil model and changing pH from pH 7 to pH 5 has little effect on the solution conformation, as quantified via the radius of gyration. Copolymerisation with 5-10mol% of the K3 peptide bearing methacrylate monomer (K3-MA), gave a series of copolymers that exhibited an increase in radius of gyration at both pH's, despite being typically 30% lower in molecular weight, indicating that the K3-MA causes a perturbation (expansion) of the copolymer conformation. Subsequent addition of an equimolar amount of the complementary peptide E3 makes little further difference to the conformation, indicative of the intimate binding (coiled-coil motif) between the two peptides. Again, the effects of pH are small. Only the addition of a large aromatic structure such as methotrexate causes a further perturbation of the structure - the hydrophobic interaction between the MTX units causes a significant collapse of the polymer coil. These findings further elaborate the understanding of those factors that determine the solution conformation of novel polymer therapeutics.

  8. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  9. Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic analysis of plant RNA binding proteins comprising both RNA recognition motifs and contiguous glycine residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Martin; Hallmann, Armin; Staiger, Dorothee

    2016-04-01

    This study focused on the identification and phylogenetic analysis of glycine-rich RNA binding proteins that contain an RNA recognition motif (RRM)-type RNA binding domain in addition to a region with contiguous glycine residues in representative plant species. In higher plants, glycine-rich proteins with an RRM have met considerable interest as they are responsive to environmental cues and play a role in cold tolerance, pathogen defense, flowering time control, and circadian timekeeping. To identify such RRM containing proteins in plant genomes we developed an RRM profile based on the known glycine-rich RRM containing proteins in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The application of this remodeled RRM profile that omitted sequences from non-plant species reduced the noise when searching plant genomes for RRM proteins compared to a search performed with the known RRM_1 profile. Furthermore, we developed an island scoring function to identify regions with contiguous glycine residues, using a sliding window approach. This approach tags regions in a protein sequence with a high content of the same amino acid, and repetitive structures score higher. This definition of repetitive structures in a fixed sequence length provided a new glance for characterizing patterns which cannot be easily described as regular expressions. By combining the profile-based domain search for well-conserved regions (the RRM) with a scoring technique for regions with repetitive residues we identified groups of proteins related to the A. thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding proteins in eight plant species. PMID:26589419

  10. Structural and functional analyses of five conserved positively charged residues in the L1 and N-terminal DNA binding motifs of archaeal RADA protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Tzu Chen

    Full Text Available RecA family proteins engage in an ATP-dependent DNA strand exchange reaction that includes a ssDNA nucleoprotein helical filament and a homologous dsDNA sequence. In spite of more than 20 years of efforts, the molecular mechanism of homology pairing and strand exchange is still not fully understood. Here we report a crystal structure of Sulfolobus solfataricus RadA overwound right-handed filament with three monomers per helical pitch. This structure reveals conformational details of the first ssDNA binding disordered loop (denoted L1 motif and the dsDNA binding N-terminal domain (NTD. L1 and NTD together form an outwardly open palm structure on the outer surface of the helical filament. Inside this palm structure, five conserved basic amino acid residues (K27, K60, R117, R223 and R229 surround a 25 A pocket that is wide enough to accommodate anionic ssDNA, dsDNA or both. Biochemical analyses demonstrate that these five positively charged residues are essential for DNA binding and for RadA-catalyzed D-loop formation. We suggest that the overwound right-handed RadA filament represents a functional conformation in the homology search and pairing reaction. A new structural model is proposed for the homologous interactions between a RadA-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament and its dsDNA target.

  11. Linear motif atlas for phosphorylation-dependent signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, LJ; Diella, F;

    2008-01-01

    Systematic and quantitative analysis of protein phosphorylation is revealing dynamic regulatory networks underlying cellular responses to environmental cues. However, matching these sites to the kinases that phosphorylate them and the phosphorylation-dependent binding domains that may subsequently...... sequence models of linear motifs. The atlas is available as a community resource (http://netphorest.info)....

  12. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Monoclonal Anti—CD4 Antibody MT310 Binds HIV-1 gp120 Binding Site on CD4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tests show the monoclonal anti—CD4 antibody (mAb) MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4 as part of its mechanism for strongly inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of CD4+ T cells. In competition tests, mAb MT310 and mAb Leu3a (an anti-CD4 mAb recognizing the gp120-binding site) all inhibited gp120-binding to CD4+ T lymphocytes, while mAb MT405 did not. This result suggests that MT310, like Leu3a, recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4. To further confirm whether MT310 recognizes the gp120-binding site on CD4, we prepared rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera (Ab2) against MT310 (Ab1). The anti-idiotypic antisera against MT310 inhibited binding of MT310 and Leu3a to human CD4+ T lymphocytes, but did not block binding of MT151 with the second domain of CD4, while rabbit anti-idiotypic antisera to MT151 could block binding of itself to these cells, but could not inhibit the binding of MT310 and Leu3a, further indicating that MT310 recognized the gp120-binding site on CD4.

  14. The effect of orthology and coregulation on detecting regulatory motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Storms

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Computational de novo discovery of transcription factor binding sites is still a challenging problem. The growing number of sequenced genomes allows integrating orthology evidence with coregulation information when searching for motifs. Moreover, the more advanced motif detection algorithms explicitly model the phylogenetic relatedness between the orthologous input sequences and thus should be well adapted towards using orthologous information. In this study, we evaluated the conditions under which complementing coregulation with orthologous information improves motif detection for the class of probabilistic motif detection algorithms with an explicit evolutionary model. METHODOLOGY: We designed datasets (real and synthetic covering different degrees of coregulation and orthologous information to test how well Phylogibbs and Phylogenetic sampler, as representatives of the motif detection algorithms with evolutionary model performed as compared to MEME, a more classical motif detection algorithm that treats orthologs independently. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Under certain conditions detecting motifs in the combined coregulation-orthology space is indeed more efficient than using each space separately, but this is not always the case. Moreover, the difference in success rate between the advanced algorithms and MEME is still marginal. The success rate of motif detection depends on the complex interplay between the added information and the specificities of the applied algorithms. Insights in this relation provide information useful to both developers and users. All benchmark datasets are available at http://homes.esat.kuleuven.be/~kmarchal/Supplementary_Storms_Valerie_PlosONE.

  15. A speedup technique for (l, d-motif finding algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh Hieu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of patterns in DNA, RNA, and protein sequences has led to the solution of many vital biological problems. For instance, the identification of patterns in nucleic acid sequences has resulted in the determination of open reading frames, identification of promoter elements of genes, identification of intron/exon splicing sites, identification of SH RNAs, location of RNA degradation signals, identification of alternative splicing sites, etc. In protein sequences, patterns have proven to be extremely helpful in domain identification, location of protease cleavage sites, identification of signal peptides, protein interactions, determination of protein degradation elements, identification of protein trafficking elements, etc. Motifs are important patterns that are helpful in finding transcriptional regulatory elements, transcription factor binding sites, functional genomics, drug design, etc. As a result, numerous papers have been written to solve the motif search problem. Results Three versions of the motif search problem have been proposed in the literature: Simple Motif Search (SMS, (l, d-motif search (or Planted Motif Search (PMS, and Edit-distance-based Motif Search (EMS. In this paper we focus on PMS. Two kinds of algorithms can be found in the literature for solving the PMS problem: exact and approximate. An exact algorithm identifies the motifs always and an approximate algorithm may fail to identify some or all of the motifs. The exact version of PMS problem has been shown to be NP-hard. Exact algorithms proposed in the literature for PMS take time that is exponential in some of the underlying parameters. In this paper we propose a generic technique that can be used to speedup PMS algorithms. Conclusions We present a speedup technique that can be used on any PMS algorithm. We have tested our speedup technique on a number of algorithms. These experimental results show that our speedup technique is indeed very

  16. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates withtranslational efficiency across bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; Francino, M. Pilar

    2007-05-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the {sigma}{sup 70} subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also implies that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria.

  17. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  18. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  19. Antidepressant binding site in a bacterial homologue of neurotransmitter transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satinder K; Yamashita, Atsuko; Gouaux, Eric

    2007-08-23

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 A above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational design of

  20. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TI...

  1. An SH3 binding motif within the nucleocapsid protein of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus interacts with the host cellular signaling proteins STAMI, TXK, Fyn, Hck, and cortactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Scott P; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2015-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes an economically important global swine disease, and has a complicated virus-host immunomodulation that often leads to a weak Th2 immune response and viral persistence. In this study, we identified a Src homology 3 (SH3) binding motif, PxxPxxP, that is conserved within the N protein of PRRSV strains. Subsequently, we identified five host cellular proteins [signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM)I, TXK tyrosine kinase (TXK), protein tyrosine kinase fyn (Fyn), hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck), and cortactin] that interact with this SH3 motif. We demonstrated that binding of SH3 proteins with PRRSV N protein depends on at least one intact PxxP motif as disruption of P53 within the motif significantly reduced interaction of each of the 5 proteins. The first PxxP motif appears to be more important for STAMI-N protein interactions whereas the second PxxP motif was more important for Hck interaction. Both STAMI and Hck interactions with PRRSV N protein required an unhindered C-terminal domain as the interaction was only observed with STAMI and Hck proteins with N-terminal but not C-terminal fluorescent tags. We showed that the P56 residue within the SH3 motif is critical for virus lifecycle as mutation resulted in a loss of virus infectivity, however the P50 and P53 mutations did not abolish virus infectivity suggesting that these highly conserved proline residues within the SH3 motif may provide a selective growth advantage through interactions with the host rather than a vital functional element. These results have important implications in understanding PRRSV-host interactions.

  2. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  3. Investigating actinomycin D binding to G-quadruplex, i-motif and double-stranded DNA in 27-nt segment of c-MYC gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknezhad, Zhila; Hassani, Leila; Norouzi, Davood

    2016-01-01

    c-MYC DNA is an attractive target for drug design, especially for cancer chemotherapy. Around 90% of c-MYC transcription is controlled by NHE III1, whose 27-nt purine-rich strand has the ability to form G-quadruplex structure. In this investigation, interaction of ActD with 27-nt G-rich strand (G/c-MYC) and its equimolar mixture with the complementary sequence, (GC/c-MYC) as well as related C-rich oligonucleotide (C/c-MYC) was evaluated. Molecular dynamic simulations showed that phenoxazine and lactone rings of ActD come close to the outer G-tetrad nucleotides indicating that ActD binds through end-stacking to the quadruplex DNA. RMSD and RMSF revealed that fluctuation of the quadruplex DNA increases upon interaction with the drug. The results of spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry indicated that ActD most probably binds to the c-MYC quadruplex and duplex DNA via end-stacking and intercalation, respectively and polarity of ActD environment decreases due to the interaction. It was also found that binding of ActD to the GC-rich DNA is stronger than the two other forms of DNA. Circular dichroism results showed that the type of the three forms of DNA structures doesn't change, but their compactness alters due to their interaction with ActD. Finally, it can be concluded that ActD binds differently to double stranded DNA, quadruplex DNA and i-motif.

  4. T-cell memory responses elicited by yellow fever vaccine are targeted to overlapping epitopes containing multiple HLA-I and -II binding motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Barbosa de Melo

    Full Text Available The yellow fever vaccines (YF-17D-204 and 17DD are considered to be among the safest vaccines and the presence of neutralizing antibodies is correlated with protection, although other immune effector mechanisms are known to be involved. T-cell responses are known to play an important role modulating antibody production and the killing of infected cells. However, little is known about the repertoire of T-cell responses elicited by the YF-17DD vaccine in humans. In this report, a library of 653 partially overlapping 15-mer peptides covering the envelope (Env and nonstructural (NS proteins 1 to 5 of the vaccine was utilized to perform a comprehensive analysis of the virus-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ T-cell responses. The T-cell responses were screened ex-vivo by IFN-γ ELISPOT assays using blood samples from 220 YF-17DD vaccinees collected two months to four years after immunization. Each peptide was tested in 75 to 208 separate individuals of the cohort. The screening identified sixteen immunodominant antigens that elicited activation of circulating memory T-cells in 10% to 33% of the individuals. Biochemical in-vitro binding assays and immunogenetic and immunogenicity studies indicated that each of the sixteen immunogenic 15-mer peptides contained two or more partially overlapping epitopes that could bind with high affinity to molecules of different HLAs. The prevalence of the immunogenicity of a peptide in the cohort was correlated with the diversity of HLA-II alleles that they could bind. These findings suggest that overlapping of HLA binding motifs within a peptide enhances its T-cell immunogenicity and the prevalence of the response in the population. In summary, the results suggests that in addition to factors of the innate immunity, "promiscuous" T-cell antigens might contribute to the high efficacy of the yellow fever vaccines.

  5. Substance P and substance K receptor binding sites in the human gastrointestinal tract: localization by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, T.S.; Zimmerman, R.P.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Maggio, J.E.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Quantitative receptor autoradiography was used to localize and quantify the distribution of binding sites for /sup 125/I-radiolabeled substance P (SP), substance K (SK) and neuromedin K (NK) in the human GI tract using histologically normal tissue obtained from uninvolved margins of resections for carcinoma. The distribution of SP and SK binding sites is different for each gastrointestinal (GI) segment examined. Specific SP binding sites are expressed by arterioles and venules, myenteric plexus, external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, muscularis mucosa, epithelial cells of the mucosa, and the germinal centers of lymph nodules. SK binding sites are distributed in a pattern distinct from SP binding sites and are localized to the external circular muscle, external longitudinal muscle, and the muscularis mucosa. Binding sites for NK were not detected in any part of the human GI tract. These results demonstrate that: (1) surgical specimens from the human GI tract can be effectively processed for quantitative receptor autoradiography; (2) of the three mammalian tachykinins tested, SP and SK, but not NK binding sites are expressed in detectable levels in the human GI tract; (3) whereas SK receptor binding sites are expressed almost exclusively by smooth muscle, SP binding sites are expressed by smooth muscle cells, arterioles, venules, epithelial cells of the mucosa and cells associated with lymph nodules; and (4) both SP and SK binding sites expressed by smooth muscle are more stable than SP binding sites expressed by blood vessels, lymph nodules, and mucosal cells.

  6. The zinc fingers of the SR-like protein ZRANB2 are single-stranded RNA-binding domains that recognize 5′ splice site-like sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughlin, Fionna E.; Mansfield, Robyn E.; Vaz, Paula M.; McGrath, Aaron P.; Setiyaputra, Surya; Gamsjaeger, Roland; Chen, Eva S.; Morris, Brian J.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Mackay, Joel P.; (Sydney)

    2009-09-02

    The alternative splicing of mRNA is a critical process in higher eukaryotes that generates substantial proteomic diversity. Many of the proteins that are essential to this process contain arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. ZRANB2 is a widely-expressed and highly-conserved RS-domain protein that can regulate alternative splicing but lacks canonical RNA-binding domains. Instead, it contains 2 RanBP2-type zinc finger (ZnF) domains. We demonstrate that these ZnFs recognize ssRNA with high affinity and specificity. Each ZnF binds to a single AGGUAA motif and the 2 domains combine to recognize AGGUAA(N{sub x})AGGUAA double sites, suggesting that ZRANB2 regulates alternative splicing via a direct interaction with pre-mRNA at sites that resemble the consensus 5{prime} splice site. We show using X-ray crystallography that recognition of an AGGUAA motif by a single ZnF is dominated by side-chain hydrogen bonds to the bases and formation of a guanine-tryptophan-guanine 'ladder.' A number of other human proteins that function in RNA processing also contain RanBP2 ZnFs in which the RNA-binding residues of ZRANB2 are conserved. The ZnFs of ZRANB2 therefore define another class of RNA-binding domain, advancing our understanding of RNA recognition and emphasizing the versatility of ZnF domains in molecular recognition.

  7. Genome-wide prediction, display and refinement of binding sites with information theory-based models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeder J Steven

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present Delila-genome, a software system for identification, visualization and analysis of protein binding sites in complete genome sequences. Binding sites are predicted by scanning genomic sequences with information theory-based (or user-defined weight matrices. Matrices are refined by adding experimentally-defined binding sites to published binding sites. Delila-Genome was used to examine the accuracy of individual information contents of binding sites detected with refined matrices as a measure of the strengths of the corresponding protein-nucleic acid interactions. The software can then be used to predict novel sites by rescanning the genome with the refined matrices. Results Parameters for genome scans are entered using a Java-based GUI interface and backend scripts in Perl. Multi-processor CPU load-sharing minimized the average response time for scans of different chromosomes. Scans of human genome assemblies required 4–6 hours for transcription factor binding sites and 10–19 hours for splice sites, respectively, on 24- and 3-node Mosix and Beowulf clusters. Individual binding sites are displayed either as high-resolution sequence walkers or in low-resolution custom tracks in the UCSC genome browser. For large datasets, we applied a data reduction strategy that limited displays of binding sites exceeding a threshold information content to specific chromosomal regions within or adjacent to genes. An HTML document is produced listing binding sites ranked by binding site strength or chromosomal location hyperlinked to the UCSC custom track, other annotation databases and binding site sequences. Post-genome scan tools parse binding site annotations of selected chromosome intervals and compare the results of genome scans using different weight matrices. Comparisons of multiple genome scans can display binding sites that are unique to each scan and identify sites with significantly altered binding strengths

  8. Discriminative motif discovery in DNA and protein sequences using the DEME algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Motif discovery aims to detect short, highly conserved patterns in a collection of unaligned DNA or protein sequences. Discriminative motif finding algorithms aim to increase the sensitivity and selectivity of motif discovery by utilizing a second set of sequences, and searching only for patterns that can differentiate the two sets of sequences. Potential applications of discriminative motif discovery include discovering transcription factor binding site motifs in ChIP-chip data and finding protein motifs involved in thermal stability using sets of orthologous proteins from thermophilic and mesophilic organisms. Results We describe DEME, a discriminative motif discovery algorithm for use with protein and DNA sequences. Input to DEME is two sets of sequences; a "positive" set and a "negative" set. DEME represents motifs using a probabilistic model, and uses a novel combination of global and local search to find the motif that optimally discriminates between the two sets of sequences. DEME is unique among discriminative motif finders in that it uses an informative Bayesian prior on protein motif columns, allowing it to incorporate prior knowledge of residue characteristics. We also introduce four, synthetic, discriminative motif discovery problems that are designed for evaluating discriminative motif finders in various biologically motivated contexts. We test DEME using these synthetic problems and on two biological problems: finding yeast transcription factor binding motifs in ChIP-chip data, and finding motifs that discriminate between groups of thermophilic and mesophilic orthologous proteins. Conclusion Using artificial data, we show that DEME is more effective than a non-discriminative approach when there are "decoy" motifs or when a variant of the motif is present in the "negative" sequences. With real data, we show that DEME is as good, but not better than non-discriminative algorithms at discovering yeast transcription

  9. L-(TH)glutamate binds to kainate-, NMDA- and AMPA-sensitive binding sites: an autoradiographic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monaghan, D.T.; Yao, D.; Cotman, C.W.

    1985-08-12

    The anatomical distribution of L-(TH)glutamate binding sites was determined in the presence of various glutamate analogues using quantitative autoradiography. The binding of L-(TH)glutamate is accounted for by the presence of 3 distinct binding sites when measured in the absence of CaS , Cl and Na ions. The anatomical distribution and pharmacological specificity of these binding sites correspond to that reported for the 3 excitatory amino acid binding sites selectively labelled by D-(TH)2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoate (D-(TH)AP5), (TH)kainate ((TH)KA) and (TH) -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid ((TH)AMPA) which are thought to be selective ligands for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), KA and quisqualate (QA) receptors, respectively. (Auth.). 29 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  10. Study on Synthesis and Binding Ability of a New Anion Receptor Containing NH Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO,Yan-Hong; LIN,Hai; LIN,Hua-Kuan

    2007-01-01

    A new colorimetric recognition receptor 1 based on the dual capability containing NH binding sites of selectively sensing anionic guest species has been synthesized. Compared with other halide anions, its UV/Vis absorption spectrum in dimethyl sulfoxide showed the response toward the presence of fluoride anion with high selectivity,and also displayed dramatic color changes from colorless to yellow in the presence of TBAF (5 × 10-5 mol/L). The similar UV/Vis absorption spectrum change also occurred when 1 was treated with AcO- while a little change with H2PO-4 and OH-. Receptor 1 has almost not affinity abilities to Cl-, Br- and I-. The binding ability of receptor 1to fluoride with high selectivity over other halides contributes to the anion size and the ability of forming hydrogen bonding. While the different ability of binding with geometrically triangular (AcO-), tetrahedral (H2PO-4 ) and linear (OH-) anions maybe result from their geometry configuration.

  11. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin signature motif: a critical element in the allosteric pathway that couples membrane binding to pore assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley J Dowd

    Full Text Available The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs constitute a family of pore-forming toxins that contribute to the pathogenesis of a large number of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens.The most highly conserved region in the primary structure of the CDCs is the signature undecapeptide sequence (ECTGLAWEWWR. The CDC pore forming mechanism is highly sensitive to changes in its structure, yet its contribution to the molecular mechanism of the CDCs has remained enigmatic. Using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopic methods we provide evidence that shows the undecapeptide motif of the archetype CDC, perfringolysin O (PFO, is a key structural element in the allosteric coupling of the cholesterol-mediated membrane binding in domain 4 (D4 to distal structural changes in domain 3 (D3 that are required for the formation of the oligomeric pore complex. Loss of the undecapeptide function prevents all measurable D3 structural transitions, the intermolecular interaction of membrane bound monomers and the assembly of the oligomeric pore complex. We further show that this pathway does not exist in intermedilysin (ILY, a CDC that exhibits a divergent undecapeptide and that has evolved to use human CD59 rather than cholesterol as its receptor. These studies show for the first time that the undecapeptide of the cholesterol-binding CDCs forms a critical element of the allosteric pathway that controls the assembly of the pore complex.

  12. Zygotic Expression of the Double-Stranded RNA Binding Motif Protein Drb2p Is Required for DNA Elimination in the Ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Jason A.; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA binding motif (DSRM)-containing proteins play many roles in the regulation of gene transcription and translation, including some with tandem DSRMs that act in small RNA biogenesis. We report the characterization of the genes for double-stranded RNA binding proteins 1 and 2 (DRB1 and DRB2), two genes encoding nuclear proteins with tandem DSRMs in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila. Both proteins are expressed throughout growth and development but exhibit distinct peaks of expression, suggesting different biological roles. In support of this, we show that expression of DRB2 is essential for vegetative growth while DRB1 expression is not. During conjugation, Drb1p and Drb2p localize to distinct nuclear foci. Cells lacking all DRB1 copies are able to produce viable progeny, although at a reduced rate relative to wild-type cells. In contrast, cells lacking germ line DRB2 copies, which thus cannot express Drb2p zygotically, fail to produce progeny, arresting late into conjugation. This arrest phenotype is accompanied by a failure to organize the essential DNA rearrangement protein Pdd1p into DNA elimination bodies and execute DNA elimination and chromosome breakage. These results implicate zygotically expressed Drb2p in the maturation of these nuclear structures, which are necessary for reorganization of the somatic genome. PMID:22021239

  13. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Cell Migration and Invasion via Down-Regulation of RNA Binding Motif Protein 38 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR exerts regulatory functions in various biological processes in cancer cells, such as proliferation, apoptosis, mobility, and invasion. We previously found that HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits oncogenic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in promoting HCC cell migration and invasion. Firstly, we profiled its gene expression pattern by microarray analysis of HOTAIR loss in Bel-7402 HCC cell line. The results showed that 129 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 167 genes were significantly up-regulated (fold change >2, p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RNA binding proteins were involved in this biological process. HOTAIR suppression using RNAi strategy with HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38. Moreover, the expression levels of RBM38 in HCC specimens were significantly lower than paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, knockdown of HOTAIR resulted in a decrease of cell migration and invasion, which could be specifically rescued by down-regulation of RBM38. Taken together, HOTAIR could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells by inhibiting RBM38, which indicated critical roles of HOTAIR and RBM38 in HCC progression.

  14. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) binds specifically to the brain cytoplasmic RNAs BC1/BC200 via a novel RNA-binding motif

    OpenAIRE

    Zalfa, F.; S. Adinolfi; Napoli, I; Kuhn-Holsken, E; Urlaub, H.; Achsel, Tilmann; Pastore, A; Bagni, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), the protein responsible for the fragile X syndrome, is an RNA-binding protein involved in localization and translation of neuronal mRNAs. One of the RNAs known to interact with FMRP is the dendritic non-translatable brain cytoplasmic RNA 1 BC1 RNA that works as an adaptor molecule linking FMRP and some of its regulated mRNAs. Here, we showed that the N terminus of FMRP binds strongly and specifically to BC1 and to its potential human analog BC200. ...

  15. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  16. XAS and Pulsed EPR Studies of the Copper Binding Site in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith,S.; Bencze, K.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, T.; Stemmler, T.

    2008-01-01

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 Angstroms, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a CuO3N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  17. ncDNA and drift drive binding site accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruths Troy

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS in an organism’s genome positively correlates with the complexity of the regulatory network of the organism. However, the manner by which TFBS arise and accumulate in genomes and the effects of regulatory network complexity on the organism’s fitness are far from being known. The availability of TFBS data from many organisms provides an opportunity to explore these issues, particularly from an evolutionary perspective. Results We analyzed TFBS data from five model organisms – E. coli K12, S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, A. thaliana – and found a positive correlation between the amount of non-coding DNA (ncDNA in the organism’s genome and regulatory complexity. Based on this finding, we hypothesize that the amount of ncDNA, combined with the population size, can explain the patterns of regulatory complexity across organisms. To test this hypothesis, we devised a genome-based regulatory pathway model and subjected it to the forces of evolution through population genetic simulations. The results support our hypothesis, showing neutral evolutionary forces alone can explain TFBS patterns, and that selection on the regulatory network function does not alter this finding. Conclusions The cis-regulome is not a clean functional network crafted by adaptive forces alone, but instead a data source filled with the noise of non-adaptive forces. From a regulatory perspective, this evolutionary noise manifests as complexity on both the binding site and pathway level, which has significant implications on many directions in microbiology, genetics, and synthetic biology.

  18. A Specific Cholesterol Binding Site Is Established by the 2.8 Å Structure of the Human [beta][subscript 2]-Adrenergic Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Michael A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Griffith, Mark T.; Roth, Christopher B.; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Kuhn, Peter; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps)

    2008-07-08

    The role of cholesterol in eukaryotic membrane protein function has been attributed primarily to an influence on membrane fluidity and curvature. We present the 2.8 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a thermally stabilized human {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor bound to cholesterol and the partial inverse agonist timolol. The receptors pack as monomers in an antiparallel association with two distinct cholesterol molecules bound per receptor, but not in the packing interface, thereby indicating a structurally relevant cholesterol-binding site between helices I, II, III, and IV. Thermal stability analysis using isothermal denaturation confirms that a cholesterol analog significantly enhances the stability of the receptor. A consensus motif is defined that predicts cholesterol binding for 44% of human class A receptors, suggesting that specific sterol binding is important to the structure and stability of other G protein-coupled receptors, and that this site may provide a target for therapeutic discovery.

  19. High-affinity dextromethorphan binding sites in guinea pig brain. II. Competition experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craviso, G L; Musacchio, J M

    1983-05-01

    Binding of dextromethorphan (DM) to guinea pig brain is stereoselective, since levomethorphan is 20 times weaker than DM in competing for DM sites. In general, opiate agonists and antagonists as well as their corresponding dextrorotatory isomers are weak competitors for tritiated dextromethorphan ([3H]DM) binding sites and display IC50 values in the micromolar range. In contrast, several non-narcotic, centrally acting antitussives are inhibitory in the nanomolar range (IC50 values for caramiphen, carbetapentane, dimethoxanate, and pipazethate are 25 nM, 9 nM, 41 nM, and 190 nM, respectively). Other antitussives, such as levopropoxyphene, chlophedianol, and fominoben, have poor affinity for DM sites whereas the antitussive noscapine enhances DM binding by increasing the affinity of DM for its central binding sites. Additional competition studies indicate that there is no correlation of DM binding with any of the known or putative neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. DM binding is also not related to tricyclic antidepressant binding sites or biogenic amine uptake sites. However, certain phenothiazine neuroleptics and typical and atypical antidepressants inhibit binding with IC50 values in the nanomolar range. Moreover, the anticonvulsant drug diphenylhydantoin enhances DM binding in a manner similar to that of noscapine. Preliminary experiments utilizing acid extracts of brain have not demonstrated the presence of an endogenous ligand for DM sites. The binding characteristics of DM sites studied in rat and mouse brain indicate that the relative potencies of several antitussives to inhibit specific DM binding vary according to species. High-affinity, saturable, and stereoselective [3H]DM binding sites are present in liver homogenates, but several differences have been found for these peripheral binding sites and those described for brain. Although the nature of central DM binding sites is not known, the potent interaction of several classes of centrally

  20. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  1. Sequence Length Limits for Controlling False Positives in Discovering Nucleotide Sequence Motifs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lei; QiAN Zi-liang

    2008-01-01

    In the study of motif discovery, especially the transcription factor DNA binding sites discovery, a too long input sequence would return non-informative motifs rather than those biological functional motifs. This paper gave theoretical analyses and computational experiments to suggest the length limits of the input sequence. When the sequence length exceeds a certain critical point, the probability of discovering the motif decreases sharply. The work not only gave an explanation on the unsatisfying results of the existed motif discovery problems that the input sequence length might be too long and exceed the point, but also provided an estimation of input sequence length we should accept to get more meaningful and reliable results in motif discovery.

  2. Osteopontin: A uranium phosphorylated binding-site characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, we describe the structural investigation of one possible uranyl binding site inside a non structured protein. This approach couples spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and theoretical calculations (DFT) and studies the interaction of uranyl ions with a phospho-peptide, thus mimicking a possible osteopontin (OPN) hydroxyapatite growth-inhibition site. Although thermodynamical aspects were investigated by using time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), structural characterization was performed by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the U L(III)-edge combined with attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. From the vibrational and fluorescence spectra, several structural models of a UO22+/peptide complex were developed and subsequently refined by using theoretical calculations to fit the experimental EXAFS obtained. The structural effect of the pH value was also considered under acidic to moderately acidic conditions (pH 1.5-5.5). Most importantly, the uranyl/peptide coordination environment was similar to that of the native protein. (authors)

  3. A delocalized proton-binding site within a membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steffen; Freier, Erik; Gerwert, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    The role of protein-bound water molecules in protein function and catalysis is an emerging topic. Here, we studied the solvation of an excess proton by protein-bound water molecules and the contribution of the surrounding amino acid residues at the proton release site of the membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin. It hosts an excess proton within a protein-bound water cluster, which is hydrogen bonded to several surrounding amino acids. Indicative of delocalization is a broad continuum absorbance experimentally observed by time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In combination with site-directed mutagenesis, the involvement of several amino acids (especially Glu-194 and Glu-204) in the delocalization was elaborated. Details regarding the contributions of the glutamates and water molecules to the delocalization mode in biomolecular simulations are controversial. We carried out quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding simulations for all amino acids that have been experimentally shown to be involved in solvation of the excess proton, and systematically investigated the influence of the quantum box size. We compared calculated theoretical infrared spectra with experimental ones as a measure for the correct description of excess proton delocalization. A continuum absorbance can only be observed for small quantum boxes containing few amino acids and/or water molecules. Larger quantum boxes, including all experimentally shown involved amino acids, resulted in narrow absorbance bands, indicating protonation of a single binding site in contradiction to experimental results. We conclude that small quantum boxes seem to reproduce representative extreme cases of proton delocalization modes: proton delocalization only on water molecules or only between Glu-194 and Glu-204. Extending the experimental spectral region to lower wave numbers, a water-delocalized proton reproduces the observed continuum

  4. Ice-binding site of snow mold fungus antifreeze protein deviates from structural regularity and high conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hidemasa; Hanada, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Garnham, Christopher P; Davies, Peter L; Tsuda, Sakae

    2012-06-12

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in organisms ranging from fish to bacteria, where they serve different functions to facilitate survival of their host. AFPs that protect freeze-intolerant fish and insects from internal ice growth bind to ice using a regular array of well-conserved residues/motifs. Less is known about the role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species, which might be to beneficially alter the structure of ice in or around the host. Here we report the 0.95-Å high-resolution crystal structure of a 223-residue secreted AFP from the snow mold fungus Typhula ishikariensis. Its main structural element is an irregular β-helix with six loops of 18 or more residues that lies alongside an α-helix. β-Helices have independently evolved as AFPs on several occasions and seem ideally structured to bind to several planes of ice, including the basal plane. A novelty of the β-helical fold is the nonsequential arrangement of loops that places the N- and C termini inside the solenoid of β-helical coils. The ice-binding site (IBS), which could not be predicted from sequence or structure, was located by site-directed mutagenesis to the flattest surface of the protein. It is remarkable for its lack of regularity and its poor conservation in homologs from psychrophilic diatoms and bacteria and other fungi.

  5. MicroRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaochun; Rennie, William A; Mallick, Bibekanand; Kanoria, Shaveta; Long, Dang; Wolenc, Adam; Carmack, C Steven; Ding, Ye

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Since the discovery of lin-4, the founding member of the miRNA family, over 360 miRNAs have been identified for Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). Prediction and validation of targets are essential for elucidation of regulatory functions of these miRNAs. For C. elegans, crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) has been successfully performed for the identification of target mRNA sequences bound by Argonaute protein ALG-1. In addition, reliable annotation of the 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) as well as developmental stage-specific expression profiles for both miRNAs and 3' UTR isoforms are available. By utilizing these data, we developed statistical models and bioinformatics tools for both transcriptome-scale and developmental stage-specific predictions of miRNA binding sites in C. elegans 3' UTRs. In performance evaluation via cross validation on the ALG-1 CLIP data, the models were found to offer major improvements over established algorithms for predicting both seed sites and seedless sites. In particular, our top-ranked predictions have a substantially higher true positive rate, suggesting a much higher likelihood of positive experimental validation. A gene ontology analysis of stage-specific predictions suggests that miRNAs are involved in dynamic regulation of biological functions during C. elegans development. In particular, miRNAs preferentially target genes related to development, cell cycle, trafficking, and cell signaling processes. A database for both transcriptome-scale and stage-specific predictions and software for implementing the prediction models are available through the Sfold web server at http://sfold.wadsworth.org. PMID:24827614

  6. Structural fragment clustering reveals novel structural and functional motifs in α-helical transmembrane proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilev Boris

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large proportion of an organism's genome encodes for membrane proteins. Membrane proteins are important for many cellular processes, and several diseases can be linked to mutations in them. With the tremendous growth of sequence data, there is an increasing need to reliably identify membrane proteins from sequence, to functionally annotate them, and to correctly predict their topology. Results We introduce a technique called structural fragment clustering, which learns sequential motifs from 3D structural fragments. From over 500,000 fragments, we obtain 213 statistically significant, non-redundant, and novel motifs that are highly specific to α-helical transmembrane proteins. From these 213 motifs, 58 of them were assigned to function and checked in the scientific literature for a biological assessment. Seventy percent of the motifs are found in co-factor, ligand, and ion binding sites, 30% at protein interaction interfaces, and 12% bind specific lipids such as glycerol or cardiolipins. The vast majority of motifs (94% appear across evolutionarily unrelated families, highlighting the modularity of functional design in membrane proteins. We describe three novel motifs in detail: (1 a dimer interface motif found in voltage-gated chloride channels, (2 a proton transfer motif found in heme-copper oxidases, and (3 a convergently evolved interface helix motif found in an aspartate symporter, a serine protease, and cytochrome b. Conclusions Our findings suggest that functional modules exist in membrane proteins, and that they occur in completely different evolutionary contexts and cover different binding sites. Structural fragment clustering allows us to link sequence motifs to function through clusters of structural fragments. The sequence motifs can be applied to identify and characterize membrane proteins in novel genomes.

  7. Mapping convulsants’ binding to the GABA-A receptor chloride ionophore: a proposed model for channel binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Kalueff, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors play a key role in brain inhibitory neurotransmission, and are ligand-activated chloride channels blocked by numerous convulsant ligands. Here we summarize data on binding of picrotoxin, tetrazoles, β-lactams, bicyclophosphates, butyrolactones and neurotoxic pesticides to GABA-A ionophore, and discuss functional and structural overlapping of their binding sites. The paper reviews data on convulsants’ binding sensitivity to different point mutati...

  8. Characterization of a highly conserved binding site of Mlh1 required for exonuclease I-dependent mismatch repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dherin, Claudine; Gueneau, Emeric; Francin, Mathilde;

    2009-01-01

    Mlh1 is an essential factor of mismatch repair (MMR) and meiotic recombination. It interacts through its C-terminal region with MutL homologs and proteins involved in DNA repair and replication. In this study, we identified the site of yeast Mlh1 critical for the interaction with Exo1, Ntg2...... protein box. Direct and specific interactions between yeast Mlh1 and peptides derived from Exo1, Ntg2, and Sgs1 and between human MLH1 and peptide derived from EXO1 and BLM were measured with K(d) values ranging from 8.1 to 17.4 microM. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a mutant of Mlh1 targeted at site S2......, and Sgs1 proteins, designated as site S2 by reference to the Mlh1/Pms1 heterodimerization site S1. We show that site S2 is also involved in the interaction between human MLH1 and EXO1 or BLM. Binding at this site involves a common motif on Mlh1 partners that we called the MIP-box for the Mlh1 interacting...

  9. Shared binding sites in Lepidoptera for Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, S; González-Cabrera, J; Tabashnik, B E; Ferré, J

    2001-12-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxins act by binding to specific target sites in the insect midgut epithelial membrane. The best-known mechanism of resistance to B. thuringiensis toxins is reduced binding to target sites. Because alteration of a binding site shared by several toxins may cause resistance to all of them, knowledge of which toxins share binding sites is useful for predicting cross-resistance. Conversely, cross-resistance among toxins suggests that the toxins share a binding site. At least two strains of diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) with resistance to Cry1A toxins and reduced binding of Cry1A toxins have strong cross-resistance to Cry1Ja. Thus, we hypothesized that Cry1Ja shares binding sites with Cry1A toxins. We tested this hypothesis in six moth and butterfly species, each from a different family: Cacyreus marshalli (Lycaenidae), Lobesia botrana (Tortricidae), Manduca sexta (Sphingidae), Pectinophora gossypiella (Gelechiidae), P. xylostella (Plutellidae), and Spodoptera exigua (Noctuidae). Although the extent of competition varied among species, experiments with biotinylated Cry1Ja and radiolabeled Cry1Ac showed that Cry1Ja and Cry1Ac competed for binding sites in all six species. A recent report also indicates shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A toxins in Heliothis virescens (Noctuidae). Thus, shared binding sites for Cry1Ja and Cry1A occur in all lepidopteran species tested so far. PMID:11722929

  10. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  11. The p53 cofactor Strap exhibits an unexpected TPR motif and oligonucleotide-binding (OB)-fold structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Cassandra J; Pike, Ashley C W; Maniam, Sandra; Sharpe, Timothy D; Coutts, Amanda S; Knapp, Stefan; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Bullock, Alex N

    2012-03-01

    Activation of p53 target genes for tumor suppression depends on the stress-specific regulation of transcriptional coactivator complexes. Strap (stress-responsive activator of p300) is activated upon DNA damage by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Chk2 kinases and is a key regulator of the p53 response. In addition to antagonizing Mdm2, Strap facilitates the recruitment of p53 coactivators, including JMY and p300. Strap is a predicted TPR-repeat protein, but shows only limited sequence identity with any protein of known structure. To address this and to elucidate the molecular mechanism of Strap activity we determined the crystal structure of the full-length protein at 2.05 Å resolution. The structure of Strap reveals an atypical six tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein that also contains an unexpected oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain. This previously unseen domain organization provides an extended superhelical scaffold allowing for protein-protein as well as protein-DNA interaction. We show that both of the TPR and OB-fold domains localize to the chromatin of p53 target genes and exhibit intrinsic regulatory activity necessary for the Strap-dependent p53 response.

  12. Discovering multiple realistic TFBS motifs based on a generalized model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leung Kwong-Sak

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is a central problem in Bioinformatics on gene regulation. de novo motif discovery serves as a promising way to predict and better understand TFBSs for biological verifications. Real TFBSs of a motif may vary in their widths and their conservation degrees within a certain range. Deciding a single motif width by existing models may be biased and misleading. Additionally, multiple, possibly overlapping, candidate motifs are desired and necessary for biological verification in practice. However, current techniques either prohibit overlapping TFBSs or lack explicit control of different motifs. Results We propose a new generalized model to tackle the motif widths by considering and evaluating a width range of interest simultaneously, which should better address the width uncertainty. Moreover, a meta-convergence framework for genetic algorithms (GAs, is proposed to provide multiple overlapping optimal motifs simultaneously in an effective and flexible way. Users can easily specify the difference amongst expected motif kinds via similarity test. Incorporating Genetic Algorithm with Local Filtering (GALF for searching, the new GALF-G (G for generalized algorithm is proposed based on the generalized model and meta-convergence framework. Conclusion GALF-G was tested extensively on over 970 synthetic, real and benchmark datasets, and is usually better than the state-of-the-art methods. The range model shows an increase in sensitivity compared with the single-width ones, while providing competitive precisions on the E. coli benchmark. Effectiveness can be maintained even using a very small population, exhibiting very competitive efficiency. In discovering multiple overlapping motifs in a real liver-specific dataset, GALF-G outperforms MEME by up to 73% in overall F-scores. GALF-G also helps to discover an additional motif which has probably not been annotated in the dataset

  13. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented.

  14. Peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites on striated muscles of the rat: Properties and effect of denervation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, W.E.; Ickstadt, A. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Pharmakologisches Inst.); Hopf, H.Ch. (Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.))

    1985-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites mediate some direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles, the properties of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding to rat biceps and rat diaphragm homogenates were investigated. In both tissues a single population of sites was found with a Ksub(D) value of 3 nmol/l. The density of these sites in both muscles was higher than the density in rat brain, but was considerably lower than in rat kidney. Competition experiments indicate a substrate specificity of specific /sup 3/H-Ro 5-4864 binding similar to the properties already demonstrated for the specific binding of this ligand to peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites in many other tissues. The properties of these sites in the rat diaphragm are not changed after motoric denervation by phrenicectomy. It is concluded that peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites are not involved in direct effects of benzodiazepines on striated muscles.

  15. The hepcidin-binding site on ferroportin is evolutionarily conserved

    OpenAIRE

    De Domenico, Ivana; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Nelson, Jenifer M.; Phillips, John D.; Ajioka, Richard S.; Kay, Michael S.; Kushner, James P.; Ganz, Tomas; Ward, Diane M.; Kaplan, Jerry

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian iron homeostasis is regulated by the interaction of the liver-produced peptide hepcidin and its receptor, the iron transporter ferroportin. Hepcidin binds to ferroportin resulting in degradation of ferroportin and decreased cellular iron export. We identify the hepcidin-binding domain (HBD) on ferroportin and show that a synthetic 19 amino acid peptide corresponding to the HBD recapitulates the characteristics and specificity of hepcidin binding to cell surface ferroportin. The bind...

  16. Local atomic structure and oxidation processes of Cu(I) binding site in amyloid beta peptide: XAS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremennaya, M. A.; Soldatov, M. A.; Stretsov, V. A.; Soldatov, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    There are two different motifs of X-ray absorption spectra for Cu(I) K-edge in amyloid-β peptide which could be due to two different configurations of local Cu(I) environment. Two or three histidine ligands can coordinate copper ion in varying conformations. On the other hand, oxidation of amyloid-β peptide could play an additional role in local copper environment. In order to explore the peculiarities of local atomic and electronic structure of Cu(I) binding sites in amyloid-β peptide the x-ray absorption spectra were simulated for various Cu(I) environments including oxidized amyloid-β and compared with experimental data.

  17. The function of the octamer-binding site in the DRA promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voliva, C.F. [Monsanto Co., St. Louis, MO (United States); Jabrane-Ferrat, N.; Peterlin, B.M. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The octamer binding site, which is located immediately upstream of the poorly conserved DRA TATA sequence, is important for high levels of expression of this human major histocompatibility class II gene in B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the substitution of the DRA TATA sequence with the TATA box from the adenovirus Elb promoter removes the requirement for the octamer binding site for high levels of expression from the DRA promoter. Since only the TATA box from the Elb but not the DRA promoters binds the TATA binding protein, we conclude that the octamer binding site helps to recruit TBP to the DRA promoter. 32 refs., 7 figs.

  18. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya.

  19. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. PMID:22410205

  20. Discovery of sequence motifs related to coexpression of genes using evolutionary computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Gary B.; Weekes, Dana G.; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Harlow, Harry B.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2004-01-01

    Transcription factors are key regulatory elements that control gene expression. Recognition of transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs in the upstream region of coexpressed genes is therefore critical towards a true understanding of the regulations of gene expression. The task of discovering eukaryotic TFBSs remains a challenging problem. Here, we demonstrate that evolutionary computation can be used to search for TFBSs in upstream regions of genes known to be coexpressed. Evolutionary computation was used to search for TFBSs of genes regulated by octamer-binding factor and nuclear factor kappa B. The discovered binding sites included experimentally determined known binding motifs as well as lists of putative, previously unknown TFBSs. We believe that this method to search nucleotide sequence information efficiently for similar motifs will be useful for discovering TFBSs that affect gene regulation. PMID:15266008

  1. 植物具IQ基序的钙调素结合蛋白的研究进展%Research Progress in Plant IQ Motif-containing Calmodulin-binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田长恩; 周玉萍

    2013-01-01

    钙调素作为细胞内主要的Ca2+传感蛋白,通过与不同的钙调素结合蛋白的结合传递钙信号,调控细胞生理和生长发育过程.IQ基序(IQxxxRGxxxR,Pfam 00612)是少数几个钙调素与钙调素结合蛋白结合的结构域之一.植物具IQ基序的钙调素结合蛋白包括IQM、IQD、CAMTA、CNGC和myosin 5个家族及少数其它蛋白.该文综述了植物具IQ基序的钙调素结合蛋白的类型、结构特点和功能等方面的研究进展,并对今后的研究进行了展望.%As the primary intracellular calcium sensors,calmodulins regulate different cellular physiologic,growth and development processes by binding to different calmodulin-binding proteins.The IQ motif,IQxxxRGxxxR (Pfam 00612),is one of a few recognition motifs for calmodulins in calmodulin-binding proteins.As well as a few other proteins,5 major families,including IQM,IQD,CAMTA,CNGC and myosin family,have been found to possess the IQ motif(s) in plants.Here,we review the research progress in plant IQ motif-containing calmodulin-binding proteins,including their type,structural characteristics and function,and prospects for future study.

  2. Residues accessible in the binding-site crevice of transmembrane helix 6 of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebane, Ntsang M; Hurst, Dow P; Carrasquer, Carl A; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Reggio, Patricia H; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2008-12-30

    We have used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method (SCAM) to map the residues in the sixth membrane-spanning segment of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor that contribute to the surface of the water-accessible binding-site crevice. Using a background of the mutant C2.59S which is relatively insensitive to the methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents, we mutated to cysteine, one at a time, 34 consecutive residues in TMH6 of the CB2 receptor. These mutant receptors were then expressed in HEK293 cells. By incubating HEK293 cells stably transfected with CB2 receptors with the small, charged, hydrophilic, thiol-specific reagent methanethiosulfonate ethylammonium (MTSEA), [(3)H]CP55940 binding was significantly inhibited for six mutant receptors. All six of the mutants that reacted with MTSEA were protected from the reaction when pretreated with the cannabinoid agonist WIN55212-2, suggesting that MTSEA modification occurred within the binding crevice. Therefore, the side chains of the residues at these reactive loci (V6.51, L6.52, L6.54, M6.55, L6.59, and T6.62) are on the water-accessible surface of the binding-site crevice. These residues are extracellular to the TMH6 CWXP hinge motif. The pattern of accessibility is consistent with a alpha-helical conformation for this segment of TMH6. Molecular modeling studies performed in the context of the CB2 model show that V6.51, L6.52, L6.54, M6.55, L6.59, and T6.62 face into the CB2 binding pocket, further confirming our SCAM results. These results are similar to the accessibility patterns determined by SCAM studies of TMH6 in the opioid and dopamine D2 receptors. PMID:19053233

  3. (-)-Epicatechin gallate (ECG) stimulates osteoblast differentiation via Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ)-mediated transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Mi Ran; Sung, Mi Kyung; Kim, A Rum; Lee, Cham Han; Jang, Eun Jung; Jeong, Mi Gyeong; Noh, Minsoo; Hwang, Eun Sook; Hong, Jeong-Ho

    2014-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disease characterized by low bone mass and is caused by an imbalance between osteoblastic bone formation and osteoclastic bone resorption. It is known that the bioactive compounds present in green tea increase osteogenic activity and decrease the risk of fracture by improving bone mineral density. However, the detailed mechanism underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the osteogenic effect of (-)-epicatechin gallate (ECG), a major bioactive compound found in green tea. We found that ECG effectively stimulates osteoblast differentiation, indicated by the increased expression of osteoblastic marker genes. Up-regulation of osteoblast marker genes is mediated by increased expression and interaction of the transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) and Runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2). ECG facilitates nuclear localization of TAZ through PP1A. PP1A is essential for osteoblast differentiation because inhibition of PP1A activity was shown to suppress ECG-mediated osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, the results showed that ECG stimulates osteoblast differentiation through the activation of TAZ and RUNX2, revealing a novel mechanism for green tea-stimulated osteoblast differentiation.

  4. Evolutionary computation for discovery of composite transcription factor binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Gary B.; Porto, V. William; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Craven, Andrew M.; Powers, David M.; Harlow, Harry B.; Su, Eric W.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated the use of evolutionary computation for the discovery of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoter regions upstream of coexpressed genes. However, it remained unclear whether or not composite TFBS elements, commonly found in higher organisms where two or more TFBSs form functional complexes, could also be identified by using this approach. Here, we present an important refinement of our previous algorithm and test the identification of composite elements using NFAT/AP-1 as an example. We demonstrate that by using appropriate existing parameters such as window size, novel-scoring methods such as central bonusing and methods of self-adaptation to automatically adjust the variation operators during the evolutionary search, TFBSs of different sizes and complexity can be identified as top solutions. Some of these solutions have known experimental relationships with NFAT/AP-1. We also indicate that even after properly tuning the model parameters, the choice of the appropriate window size has a significant effect on algorithm performance. We believe that this improved algorithm will greatly augment TFBS discovery. PMID:18927103

  5. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  6. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J;

    1993-01-01

    Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...

  7. Ligand binding studies in the mouse olfactory bulb: identification and characterisation of a L-[3H]carnosine binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding sites for the dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-t-histidine) have been detected in membranes prepared from mouse olfactory bulbs. The binding of L-[3H]- carnosine was saturable, reversible and stereospecific and had a Ksub(d) of about 770 nM. The stereospecific binding of L-carnosine represented about 30% of the totoal binding at pH 6.8, and decreased markedly with increasing pH. Binding was stimulated by calcium, unaffected by zinc, magnesium or manganese and inhibted by sodium and potassium. Carnosine binding was sensitive to trypsin and phospholipases A and C, but not to neuraminidase. Nystatin and filipin, which interact with membrane lipids, also interfered with binding. Some peptide analogues of carnosine were potent inhibitors of binding, but a variety of drugs serving as potent inhibitors in other binding systems had no effect on carnosine binding. Carnosine binding to mouse olfactory bulb membranes was 15-fold higher than that seen in membranes prepared from cerebral hemispheres, 5-fold higher than in cerebellum membranes and 3-fold higher than in membranes from spinal medulla and the olfactory tubercle-lateral olfactory tract area. (Auth.)

  8. CD91 interacts with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) through the MBL-associated serine protease-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Karen; Thielens, Nicole M; Lacroix, Monique;

    2010-01-01

    CD91 plays an important role in the scavenging of apoptotic material, possibly through binding to soluble pattern-recognition molecules. In this study, we investigated the interaction of CD91 with mannan-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins and lung surfactant proteins. Both MBL and L-ficolin were found...... to bind CD91. The MBL-CD91 interaction was time- and concentration-dependent and could be inhibited by known ligands of CD91. MBL-associated serine protease 3 (MASP-3) also inhibited binding between MBL and CD91, suggesting that the site of interaction is located at or near the MASP-MBL interaction site....... This was confirmed by using MBL mutants deficient for MASP binding that were unable to interact with CD91. These findings demonstrate that MBL and L-ficolin interact with CD91, strongly suggesting that they have the potential to function as soluble recognition molecules for scavenging microbial and apoptotic...

  9. Platelet binding sites for factor VIII in relation to fibrin and phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gary E; Novakovic, Valerie A; Shi, Jialan; Rasmussen, Jan; Pipe, Steven W

    2015-09-01

    Thrombin-stimulated platelets expose very little phosphatidylserine (PS) but express binding sites for factor VIII (fVIII), casting doubt on the role of exposed PS as the determinant of binding sites. We previously reported that fVIII binding sites are increased three- to sixfold when soluble fibrin (SF) binds the αIIbβ3 integrin. This study focuses on the hypothesis that platelet-bound SF is the major source of fVIII binding sites. Less than 10% of fVIII was displaced from thrombin-stimulated platelets by lactadherin, a PS-binding protein, and an fVIII mutant defective in PS-dependent binding retained platelet affinity. Therefore, PS is not the determinant of most binding sites. FVIII bound immobilized SF and paralleled platelet binding in affinity, dependence on separation from von Willebrand factor, and mediation by the C2 domain. SF also enhanced activity of fVIII in the factor Xase complex by two- to fourfold. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) ESH8, against the fVIII C2 domain, inhibited binding of fVIII to SF and platelets but not to PS-containing vesicles. Similarly, mAb ESH4 against the C2 domain, inhibited >90% of platelet-dependent fVIII activity vs 35% of vesicle-supported activity. These results imply that platelet-bound SF is a component of functional fVIII binding sites. PMID:26162408

  10. Genes expressed in mouse cortical progenitors are enriched in Pax, Lhx, and Sox transcription factor putative binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bery, Amandine; Mérot, Yohann; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2016-02-15

    Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling the development of the mammalian cortex. The proliferative and neurogenic properties of cortical progenitors located in the ventricular germinal zone start being understood. Little is known however on the cis-regulatory control that finely tunes gene expression in these progenitors. Here, we undertook an in silico-based approach to address this question, followed by some functional validation. Using the Eurexpress database, we established a list of 30 genes specifically expressed in the cortical germinal zone, we selected mouse/human conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) around these genes and we performed motif-enrichment search in these CNEs. We found an over-representation of motifs corresponding to binding sites for Pax, Sox, and Lhx transcription factors, often found as pairs and located within 100bp windows. A small subset of CNEs (n=7) was tested for enhancer activity, by ex-vivo and in utero electroporation assays. Two showed strong enhancer activity in the germinal zone progenitors. Mutagenesis experiments on a selected CNE showed the functional importance of the Pax, Sox, and Lhx TFBS for conferring enhancer activity to the CNE. Overall, from a cis-regulatory viewpoint, our data suggest an input from Pax, Sox and Lhx transcription factors to orchestrate corticogenesis. These results are discussed with regards to the known functional roles of Pax6, Sox2 and Lhx2 in cortical development. PMID:26721689

  11. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP–BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: ► Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. ► Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. ► Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP–BSA complex. ► Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions

  12. Characterization of 6-mercaptopurine binding to bovine serum albumin and its displacement from the binding sites by quercetin and rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehteshami, Mehdi [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh [Drug Applied Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahboob, Soltanali [Nutrition Research Center, School of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza, E-mail: rashidi@tbzmed.ac.ir [Research Center for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz 51644-14766 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    Binding of a drug to the serum albumins as major serum transport proteins can be influenced by other ligands leading to alteration of its pharmacological properties. In the present study, binding characteristics of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) together with its displacement from its binding site by quercetin and rutin have been investigated by the spectroscopic method. According to the binding parameters, a static quenching component in overall dynamic quenching process is operative in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. The binding of 6-MP to BSA occurred spontaneously due to entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions. The synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy study revealed that the secondary structure of BSA is changed in the presence of 6-MP and both Tyr and Trp residues participate in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA with the later one being more dominant. The binding constant value of 6-MP-BSA in the presence of quercetin and rutin increased. 6-MP was displaced by ibuprofen indicating that the binding site of 6-MP on albumin is site II. Therefore, the change of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of 6-MP by quercetin and rutin through alteration of binding capacity of 6-MP to the serum albumin cannot be ruled out. In addition, the displacement study showed that 6-MP is located in site II of BSA. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of both Tyr and particularly Trp residues in the interaction between 6-MP and BSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involvement of a static quenching component in an overall dynamic quenching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ability of quercetin and rutin to change the binding constants of 6-MP-BSA complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of 6-MP to BSA through entropy-driven hydrophobic interactions.

  13. Mapping of the leptin binding sites and design of a leptin antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelman, Frank; Van Beneden, Katrien; Zabeau, Lennart; Iserentant, Hannes; Ulrichts, Peter; Defeau, Delphine; Verhee, Annick; Catteeuw, Dominiek; Elewaut, Dirk; Tavernier, Jan

    2004-09-24

    The leptin/leptin receptor system shows strong similarities to the long-chain cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor cytokine/receptor systems. The IL-6 family cytokines interact with their receptors through three different binding sites I-III. The leptin structure was superposed on the crystal structures of several long-chain cytokines, and a series of leptin mutants was generated focusing on binding sites I-III. The effect of the mutations on leptin receptor (LR) signaling and on binding to the membrane proximal cytokine receptor homology domain (CRH2) of the LR was determined. Mutations in binding site I at the C terminus of helix D show a modest effect on signaling and do not affect binding to CRH2. Binding site II is composed of residues at the surface of helices A and C. Mutations in this site impair binding to CRH2 but have only limited effect on signaling. Site III mutations around the N terminus of helix D impair receptor activation without affecting binding to CRH2. We identified an S120A/T121A mutant in binding site III, which lacks any signaling capacity, but which still binds to CRH2 with wild type affinity. This leptin mutant behaves as a potent leptin antagonist both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15213225

  14. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in mice tibiae and their relationship with bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A; Ventanas, J; Burgos, J

    1986-11-01

    High affinity oestradiol and testosterone binding sites were found in tibiae cytosol from entire male and female of different ages. Scatchard assay allowed to estimate a Kd of 2.7 X 10(-9) M for oestradiol binding sites indicating that the 3H-oestradiol binding was of high affinity. Oestradiol and testosterone binding sites abundance in mice tibiae are subject to change with age. It is not easy to establish a direct correlation between these changes and the values reported here on bone growth in weight and length, however seems possible to point a negative relationship between bone lengthening and oestradiol binding site levels in female, as well a positive relationship with testosterone in both sexes. The presence of oestradiol and testosterone binding sites in epiphyses and not in the diaphyses reinforces the hypothesis that both are playing some role in bone growth.

  15. Structural Perspectives on the Evolutionary Expansion of Unique Protein-Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-09-15

    Structures of protein complexes provide atomistic insights into protein interactions. Human proteins represent a quarter of all structures in the Protein Data Bank; however, available protein complexes cover less than 10% of the human proteome. Although it is theoretically possible to infer interactions in human proteins based on structures of homologous protein complexes, it is still unclear to what extent protein interactions and binding sites are conserved, and whether protein complexes from remotely related species can be used to infer interactions and binding sites. We considered biological units of protein complexes and clustered protein-protein binding sites into similarity groups based on their structure and sequence, which allowed us to identify unique binding sites. We showed that the growth rate of the number of unique binding sites in the Protein Data Bank was much slower than the growth rate of the number of structural complexes. Next, we investigated the evolutionary roots of unique binding sites and identified the major phyletic branches with the largest expansion in the number of novel binding sites. We found that many binding sites could be traced to the universal common ancestor of all cellular organisms, whereas relatively few binding sites emerged at the major evolutionary branching points. We analyzed the physicochemical properties of unique binding sites and found that the most ancient sites were the largest in size, involved many salt bridges, and were the most compact and least planar. In contrast, binding sites that appeared more recently in the evolution of eukaryotes were characterized by a larger fraction of polar and aromatic residues, and were less compact and more planar, possibly due to their more transient nature and roles in signaling processes.

  16. Measurement of the Interaction Between Recombinant I-domain from Integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and a Triple Helical Collagen Peptide with the GFOGER Binding Motif Using Molecular Force Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Welland

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the collagen-platelet interaction is of crucial importance to the haemostatic response during both injury and pathogenesis of the blood vessel wall. Of particular interest is the high affinity interaction of the platelet transmembrane receptor, alpha 2 beta 1, responsible for firm attachment of platelets to collagen at and around injury sites. We employ single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS using the atomic force microscope (AFM to study the interaction of the I-domain from integrin alpha 2 beta 1 with a synthetic collagen related triple-helical peptide containing the high-affinity integrin-binding GFOGER motif, and a control peptide lacking this sequence, referred to as GPP. By utilising synthetic peptides in this manner we are able to study at the molecular level subtleties that would otherwise be lost when considering cell-to-collagen matrix interactions using ensemble techniques. We demonstrate for the first time the complexity of this interaction as illustrated by the complex multi-peaked force spectra and confirm specificity using control blocking experiments. In addition we observe specific interaction of the GPP peptide sequence with the I-domain. We propose a model to explain these observations.

  17. Identification of clustered YY1 binding sites in Imprinting Control Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J D; Hinz, A; Bergmann, A; Huang, J; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Kim, J

    2006-04-19

    Mammalian genomic imprinting is regulated by Imprinting Control Regions (ICRs) that are usually associated with tandem arrays of transcription factor binding sites. In the current study, the sequence features derived from a tandem array of YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR (differentially methylated region) led us to identify three additional clustered YY1 binding sites, which are also localized within the DMRs of Xist, Tsix, and Nespas. These regions have been shown to play a critical role as ICRs for the regulation of surrounding genes. These ICRs have maintained a tandem array of YY1 binding sites during mammalian evolution. The in vivo binding of YY1 to these regions is allele-specific and only to the unmethylated active alleles. Promoter/enhancer assays suggest that a tandem array of YY1 binding sites function as a potential orientation-dependent enhancer. Insulator assays revealed that the enhancer-blocking activity is detected only in the YY1 binding sites of Peg3-DMR but not in the YY1 binding sites of other DMRs. Overall, our identification of three additional clustered YY1 binding sites in imprinted domains suggests a significant role for YY1 in mammalian genomic imprinting.

  18. Computational analysis of a novel mutation in ETFDH gene highlights its long-range effects on the FAD-binding motif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Jan-Gowth

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD is an autosomal recessive disease caused by the defects in the mitochondrial electron transfer system and the metabolism of fatty acids. Recently, mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH gene, encoding electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO have been reported to be the major causes of riboflavin-responsive MADD. To date, no studies have been performed to explore the functional impact of these mutations or their mechanism of disrupting enzyme activity. Results High resolution melting (HRM analysis and sequencing of the entire ETFDH gene revealed a novel mutation (p.Phe128Ser and the hotspot mutation (p.Ala84Thr from a patient with MADD. According to the predicted 3D structure of ETF:QO, the two mutations are located within the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD binding domain; however, the two residues do not have direct interactions with the FAD ligand. Using molecular dynamics (MD simulations and normal mode analysis (NMA, we found that the p.Ala84Thr and p.Phe128Ser mutations are most likely to alter the protein structure near the FAD binding site as well as disrupt the stability of the FAD binding required for the activation of ETF:QO. Intriguingly, NMA revealed that several reported disease-causing mutations in the ETF:QO protein show highly correlated motions with the FAD-binding site. Conclusions Based on the present findings, we conclude that the changes made to the amino acids in ETF:QO are likely to influence the FAD-binding stability.

  19. Site-directed alkylation of multiple opioid receptors. I. Binding selectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for measuring and expressing the binding selectivity of ligands for mu, delta, and kappa opioid binding sites is reported. Radioligands are used that are partially selective for these sites in combination with membrane preparations enriched in each site. Enrichment was obtained by treatment of membranes with the alkylating agent beta-chlornaltrexamine in the presence of appropriate protecting ligands. After enrichment for mu receptors, [3H] dihydromorphine bound to a single type of site as judged by the slope of competition binding curves. After enrichment for delta or kappa receptors, binding sites for [3H] [D-Ala2, D-Leu5]enkephalin and [3H]ethylketocyclazocine, respectively, were still not homogeneous. There were residual mu sites in delta-enriched membranes but no evidence for residual mu or delta sites in kappa-enriched membranes were found. This method was used to identify ligands that are highly selective for each of the three types of sites

  20. How cholesterol interacts with membrane proteins: an exploration of cholesterol-binding sites including CRAC, CARC and tilted domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques eFantini

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells contains several types of lipids displaying high biochemical variability in both their apolar moiety (e.g. the acyl chain of glycerolipids and their polar head (e.g. the sugar structure of glycosphingolipids. Among these lipids, cholesterol is unique because its biochemical variability is almost exclusively restricted to the oxidation of its polar -OH group. Although generally considered the most rigid membrane lipid, cholesterol can adopt a broad range of conformations due to the flexibility of its isooctyl chain linked to the polycyclic sterane backbone. Moreover, cholesterol is an asymmetric molecule displaying a planar face and a rough  face. Overall, these structural features open up a number of possible interactions between cholesterol and membrane lipids and proteins, consistent with the prominent regulatory functions that this unique lipid exerts on membrane components. The aim of this review is to describe how cholesterol interacts with membrane lipids and proteins at the molecular/atomic scale, with special emphasis on transmembrane domains of proteins containing either the consensus cholesterol-binding motifs CRAC and CARC or a tilted peptide. Despite their broad structural diversity, all these domains bind cholesterol through common molecular mechanisms, leading to the identification of a subset of amino acid residues that are overrepresented in both linear and three-dimensional membrane cholesterol-binding sites.

  1. Effect of the DEF motif on phosphorylation of peptide substrates by ERK

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Neychelle; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2009-01-01

    MAP kinase ERK maintains specificity by binding to docking sites such as the DEF domain or D domain. It was previously shown that appending peptides derived from D domains to a substrate peptide increased apparent efficiency of peptide phosphorylation while preserving its apparent specificity for ERK. Here we determine the effect of the DEF motif on efficiency and specificity of peptide phosphorylation by ERK. The DEF motif modulated the apparent affinity of the peptide for ERK while the subs...

  2. The protein ORF80 from the acidophilic and thermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus islandicus binds highly site-specifically to double-stranded DNA and represents a novel type of basic leucine zipper protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipps, Georg; Ibanez, Pablo; Stroessenreuther, Thomas; Hekimian, Katya; Krauss, Gerhard

    2001-01-01

    The cryptic high copy number plasmid pRN1 from the thermophilic and acidophilic crenarchaeote Sulfolobus islandicus shares three conserved open reading frames with other S.islandicus plasmids. One of the open reading frames, namely orf80, encodes a 9.5 kDa protein that has no homology to any characterised protein. Recombinant ORF80 purified from Escherichia coli binds to double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner as suggested by EMSA experiments and DNase I footprints. Two highly symmetrical binding sites separated by ∼60 bp were found upstream of the orf80 gene. Both binding sites contain two TTAA motifs as well as other conserved bases. Fluorescence measurements show that short duplex DNAs derived from a single binding site sequence are bound with submicromolar affinity and moderate cooperativity by ORF80. On DNA fragments carrying both binding sites, a rather large protein–DNA complex is formed in a highly cooperative manner. ORF80 contains an N-terminal leucine zipper motif and a highly basic domain at its C-terminus. Compared to all known basic leucine zipper proteins the order of the domains is reversed in ORF80. ORF80 may therefore constitute a new subclass of basic leucine zipper DNA-binding proteins. PMID:11812827

  3. In Silico Investigation of the Neurotensin Receptor 1 Binding Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lückmann, Michael; Holst, Birgitte; Schwartz, Thue W.;

    2016-01-01

    the binding mode of SR48692 and other small mol. compds. to NTSR1, we applied an Automated Ligand-guided Backbone Ensemble Receptor Optimization protocol (ALiBERO), taking receptor flexibility and ligand knowledge into account. Structurally overlapping binding poses for SR48692 and NTS8-13 were obsd., despite...

  4. Site-directed mutants of human RECQ1 reveal functional importance of the zinc binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Furqan; Gary, Ronald K; Fang, Yayin; Sharma, Sudha

    2016-08-01

    RecQ helicases are a highly conserved family of ATP-dependent DNA-unwinding enzymes with key roles in DNA replication and repair in all kingdoms of life. The RECQ1 gene encodes the most abundant RecQ homolog in humans. We engineered full-length RECQ1 harboring point mutations in the zinc-binding motif (amino acids 419-480) within the conserved RecQ-specific-C-terminal (RQC) domain known to be critical for diverse biochemical and cellular functions of RecQ helicases. Wild-type RECQ1 contains a zinc ion. Substitution of three of the four conserved cysteine residues that coordinate zinc severely impaired the ATPase and DNA unwinding activities but retained DNA binding and single strand DNA annealing activities. Furthermore, alteration of these residues attenuated zinc binding and significantly changed the overall conformation of full-length RECQ1 protein. In contrast, substitution of cysteine residue at position 471 resulted in a wild-type like RECQ1 protein. Differential contribution of the conserved cysteine residues to the structure and functions of the RECQ1 protein is also inferred by homology modeling. Overall, our results indicate that the zinc binding motif in the RQC domain of RECQ1 is a key structural element that is essential for the structure-functions of RECQ1. Given the recent association of RECQ1 mutations with breast cancer, these results will contribute to understanding the molecular basis of RECQ1 functions in cancer etiology. PMID:27248010

  5. Using circular permutation analysis to redefine the R17 coat protein binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J M; Pan, T; LeCuyer, K A; Uhlenbeck, O C

    1993-12-14

    The bacteriophage R17 coat protein binding site consists of an RNA hairpin with a single purine nucleotide bulge in the helical stem. Circular permutation analysis (CPA) was used to examine binding effects caused by a single break in the phosphodiester backbone. This method revealed that breakage of all but one phosphodiester bond within a well-defined binding site substantially reduced the binding affinity. This is probably due to destabilization of the hairpin structure upon breaking the ribose phosphates at these positions. One circularly permuted isomer with the 5' and 3' ends at the bulged nucleotide bound with wild-type affinity. However, extending the 5' end of this CP isomer greatly reduces binding, making it unlikely that this circularly permuted binding site will be active when embedded in a larger RNA. CPA also locates the 5' and 3' boundaries of protein binding sites on the RNA. The 5' boundary of the R17 coat protein site as defined by CPA was two nucleotides shorter (nucleotides -15 to +2) than the previously determined site (-17 to +2). The smaller binding site was verified by terminal truncation experiments. A minimal-binding fragment (-14 to +2) was synthesized and was found to bind tightly to the coat protein. The site size determined by 3-ethyl-1-nitrosourea-modification interference was larger at the 5' end (-16 to +1), probably due, however, to steric effects of ethylation of phosphate oxygens. Thus, the apparent site size of a protein binding site is dependent upon the method used. PMID:7504949

  6. Shared RNA-binding sites for interacting members of the Drosophila ELAV family of neuronal proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Borgeson, Claudia D.; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2005-01-01

    The product of the Drosophila embryonic lethal abnormal visual system is a conserved protein (ELAV) necessary for normal neuronal differentiation and maintenance. It possesses three RNA-binding domains and is involved in the regulation of RNA metabolism. The long elav 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) is necessary for autoregulation. We used RNA-binding assays and in vitro selection to identify the ELAV best binding site in the elav 3′-UTR. This site resembles ELAV-binding sites identified prev...

  7. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L;

    2008-01-01

    T. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopamine and amphetamine, as well as for benztropine-like DAT inhibitors. We validated our models by detailed...... mutagenesis and by trapping the radiolabeled cocaine analog [3H]CFT in the transporter, either by cross-linking engineered cysteines or with an engineered Zn2+-binding site that was situated extracellularly to the predicted common binding pocket. Our data demonstrate the molecular basis for the competitive...

  8. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol;

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...... for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon...... resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding...

  9. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A;

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is primed by a cellular tRNA molecule annealed to an 18-bp primer binding site sequence. The sequence of the primer binding site coincides with that of a negatively acting cis element that mediates transcriptional silencing of murine leukemia virus (MLV) in undiff...

  10. Inhibition of RNA polymerase by captan at both DNA and substrate binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, G; Lewis, R A

    1992-12-01

    RNA synthesis carried out in vitro by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase was inhibited irreversibly by captan when T7 DNA was used as template. An earlier report and this one show that captan blocks the DNA binding site on the enzyme. Herein, it is also revealed that captan acts at the nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) binding site, and kinetic relationships of the action of captan at the two sites are detailed. The inhibition by captan via the DNA binding site of the enzyme was confirmed by kinetic studies and it was further shown that [14C]captan bound to the beta' subunit of RNA polymerase. This subunit contains the DNA binding site. Competitive-like inhibition by captan versus UTP led to the conclusion that captan also blocked the NTP binding site. In support of this conclusion, [14C]captan was observed to bind to the beta subunit which contains the NTP binding site. Whereas, preincubation of RNA polymerase with both DNA and NTPs prevented captan inhibition, preincubation with either DNA or NTPs alone was insufficient to protect the enzyme from the action of captan. Furthermore, the interaction of [14C]captan with the beta and beta' subunits was not prevented by a similar preincubation. Captan also bound, to a lesser extent, to the alpha and sigma subunits. Therefore, captan binding appears to involve interaction with RNA polymerase at sites in addition to those for DNA and NTP; however, this action does not inhibit the polymerase activity.

  11. Does transcription play a role in creating a condensin binding site?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Pascal; Vanoosthuyse, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved condensin complex is essential for the condensation and integrity of chromosomes through cell division. Published data argue that high levels of transcription contribute to specify some condensin-binding sites on chromosomes but the exact role of transcription in this process remains elusive. Here we discuss our recent data addressing the role of transcription in establishing a condensin-binding site.

  12. Different binding motifs of the celiac disease-associated HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 revealed by relative quantitative proteomics of endogenous peptide repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergseng, Elin; Dørum, Siri; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.;

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is caused by intolerance to cereal gluten proteins, and HLA-DQ molecules are involved in the disease pathogenesis by presentation of gluten peptides to CD4+ T cells. The α- or β-chain sharing HLA molecules DQ2.5, DQ2.2, and DQ7.5 display different risks for the disease...... established binding motifs. The binding motif of DQ2.2 was strikingly different from that of DQ2.5 with position P3 being a major anchor having a preference for threonine and serine. This is notable as three recently identified epitopes of gluten recognized by T cells of DQ2.2 celiac patients harbor serine...... at position P3. This study demonstrates that relative quantitative comparison of endogenous peptides sampled from our protein metabolism by HLA molecules provides clues to understand HLA association with disease....

  13. The binding sites for cocaine and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    OpenAIRE

    Beuming, Thijs; Kniazeff, Julie; Bergmann, Marianne L; Shi, Lei; Gracia, Luis; Raniszewska, Klaudia; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Loland, Claus J

    2008-01-01

    Cocaine is a widely abused substance with psychostimulant effects that are attributed to inhibition of the dopamine transporter (DAT). We present molecular models for DAT binding of cocaine and cocaine analogs constructed from the high-resolution structure of the bacterial transporter homolog LeuT. Our models suggest that the binding site for cocaine and cocaine analogs is deeply buried between transmembrane segments 1, 3, 6 and 8, and overlaps with the binding sites for the substrates dopami...

  14. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua; (NCI)

    2009-03-27

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA, and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), revealing critical structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the structures show how conformational changes that occur upon RNA binding create the cofactor-binding site. There are nine conserved functional motifs (motifs IVIII and X) in KsgA. Prior to RNA binding, motifs I and VIII are flexible, each exhibiting two distinct conformations. Upon RNA binding, the two motifs become stabilized in one of these conformations, which is compatible with the binding of SAH. Motif X, which is also stabilized upon RNA binding, is directly involved in the binding of SAH.

  15. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  16. Increased abundance of the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1) in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes: evidence for altered adiponectin signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, R.M.; Yi, Z; De Filippis, E.; Berria, R.; S. Shahani; P. Sathyanarayana; Sherman, V.; K. Fujiwara; Meyer, C.; Christ-Roberts, C.; Hwang, H; Finlayson, J.; Dong, L. Q.; Mandarino, L. J.; Bajaj, M.

    2011-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis The adiponectin signalling pathway is largely unknown, but recently the adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif (APPL1), has been shown to interact directly with adiponectin receptor (ADIPOR)1. APPL1 is present in C2C12 myoblasts and mouse skeletal muscle, but its presence in human skeletal muscle has not been investigated. Methods Samples from type 2 diabetic, and lean and non-diabetic obese participants w...

  17. Structural basis for the recognition of two consecutive mutually interacting DPF motifs by the SGIP1 μ homology domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Kohda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    FCHo1, FCHo2, and SGIP1 are key regulators of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Their μ homology domains (μHDs) interact with the C-terminal region of an endocytic scaffold protein, Eps15, containing fifteen Asp-Pro-Phe (DPF) motifs. Here, we show that the high-affinity μHD-binding site in Eps15 is a region encompassing six consecutive DPF motifs, while the minimal μHD-binding unit is two consecutive DPF motifs. We present the crystal structures of the SGIP1 μHD in complex with peptides containing two DPF motifs. The peptides bind to a novel ligand-binding site of the μHD, which is distinct from those of other distantly related μHD-containing proteins. The two DPF motifs, which adopt three-dimensional structures stabilized by sequence-specific intramotif and intermotif interactions, are extensively recognized by the μHD and are both required for binding. Thus, consecutive and singly scattered DPF motifs play distinct roles in μHD binding.

  18. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  19. 2,6-Diiminopiperidin-1-ol: an overlooked motif relevant to uranyl and transition metal binding on poly(amidoxime) adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Zachary C.; Cardenas, Allan J.; Corbey, Jordan F.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2016-06-06

    Glutardiamidoxime, a structural motif on sorbents used in uranium extraction from seawater, was discovered to cyclize in situ at room temperature to 2,6-diimino-piperidin-1-ol in the presence of uranyl nitrate. The new diimino motif was also generated when exposed to competing transition metals Cu(II) and Ni(II). Multinuclear μ-O bridged U(VI), Cu(II), and Ni(II) complexes featuring bound diimino ligands were isolated. A Cu(II) complex with the historically relevant cyclic imide dioxime motif is also reported for structural comparison to the reported diimino complexes.

  20. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  1. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  2. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. PMID:27129202

  3. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  4. Efficient motif finding algorithms for large-alphabet inputs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlovic Vladimir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We consider the problem of identifying motifs, recurring or conserved patterns, in the biological sequence data sets. To solve this task, we present a new deterministic algorithm for finding patterns that are embedded as exact or inexact instances in all or most of the input strings. Results The proposed algorithm (1 improves search efficiency compared to existing algorithms, and (2 scales well with the size of alphabet. On a synthetic planted DNA motif finding problem our algorithm is over 10× more efficient than MITRA, PMSPrune, and RISOTTO for long motifs. Improvements are orders of magnitude higher in the same setting with large alphabets. On benchmark TF-binding site problems (FNP, CRP, LexA we observed reduction in running time of over 12×, with high detection accuracy. The algorithm was also successful in rapidly identifying protein motifs in Lipocalin, Zinc metallopeptidase, and supersecondary structure motifs for Cadherin and Immunoglobin families. Conclusions Our algorithm reduces computational complexity of the current motif finding algorithms and demonstrate strong running time improvements over existing exact algorithms, especially in important and difficult cases of large-alphabet sequences.

  5. Correlating novel variable and conserved motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein with significant biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Mark

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Variations in the influenza Hemagglutinin protein contributes to antigenic drift resulting in decreased efficiency of seasonal influenza vaccines and escape from host immune response. We performed an in silico study to determine characteristics of novel variable and conserved motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein from previously reported H3N2 strains isolated from Hong Kong from 1968–1999 to predict viral motifs involved in significant biological functions. Results 14 MEME blocks were generated and comparative analysis of the MEME blocks identified blocks 1, 2, 3 and 7 to correlate with several biological functions. Analysis of the different Hemagglutinin sequences elucidated that the single block 7 has the highest frequency of amino acid substitution and the highest number of co-mutating pairs. MEME 2 showed intermediate variability and MEME 1 was the most conserved. Interestingly, MEME blocks 2 and 7 had the highest incidence of potential post-translational modifications sites including phosphorylation sites, ASN glycosylation motifs and N-myristylation sites. Similarly, these 2 blocks overlap with previously identified antigenic sites and receptor binding sites. Conclusion Our study identifies motifs in the Hemagglutinin protein with different amino acid substitution frequencies over a 31 years period, and derives relevant functional characteristics by correlation of these motifs with potential post-translational modifications sites, antigenic and receptor binding sites.

  6. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  7. Multiple sup 3 H-oxytocin binding sites in rat myometrial plasma membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crankshaw, D.; Gaspar, V.; Pliska, V. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario, (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    The affinity spectrum method has been used to analyse binding isotherms for {sup 3}H-oxytocin to rat myometrial plasma membranes. Three populations of binding sites with dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.6-1.5 x 10(-9), 0.4-1.0 x 10(-7) and 7 x 10(-6) mol/l were identified and their existence verified by cluster analysis based on similarities between Kd, binding capacity and Hill coefficient. When experimental values were compared to theoretical curves constructed using the estimated binding parameters, good fits were obtained. Binding parameters obtained by this method were not influenced by the presence of GTP gamma S (guanosine-5'-O-3-thiotriphosphate) in the incubation medium. The binding parameters agree reasonably well with those found in uterine cells, they support the existence of a medium affinity site and may allow for an explanation of some of the discrepancies between binding and response in this system.

  8. Mapping the heparin-binding site of the osteoinductive protein NELL1 by site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaneyoshi; Imai, Arisa; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Maturana, Andrés D; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Niimi, Tomoaki

    2015-12-21

    Neural epidermal growth factor-like (NEL)-like 1 (NELL1) is a secretory osteogenic protein comprising an N-terminal thrombospondin-1-like (TSPN) domain, four von Willebrand factor type C domains, and six epidermal growth factor-like repeats. NELL1 shows heparin-binding activity; however, the biological significance remains to be explored. In this report, we demonstrate that NELL1 binds to cell surface proteoglycans through its TSPN domain. Major heparin-binding sites were identified on the three-dimensional structural model of the TSPN domain of NELL1. Mutant analysis of the heparin-binding sites indicated that the heparin-binding activity of the TSPN domain is involved in interaction of NELL1 with cell surface proteoglycans.

  9. Analysis of the Key Elements of FFAT-Like Motifs Identifies New Proteins That Potentially Bind VAP on the ER, Including Two AKAPs and FAPP2

    OpenAIRE

    Mikitova, V.; Levine, T. P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two phenylalanines (FF) in an acidic tract (FFAT)-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA–E). Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP) families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP). Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bi...

  10. Prediction of the key binding site of odorant-binding protein of Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X; Wang, Q; Wang, B; Zhong, T; Cao, Y; Li, K; Yin, J

    2014-06-01

    The scarab beetle Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is a predominant underground pest in the northern parts of China, and its larvae (grubs) cause great economic losses because of its wide range of host plants and covert habitats. Environmentally friendly strategies for controlling adults would have novel and broad potential applications. One potential pest management measure is the regulation of olfactory chemoreception to control target insect pests. In the process of olfactory recognition, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are believed to carry hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the surface of olfactory receptor neurons. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between OBP structures and their ligands, homology modelling and molecular docking have been conducted on the interaction between HoblOBP1 and hexyl benzoate in the present study. Based on the results, site-directed mutagenesis and binding experiments were combined to describe the binding sites of HoblOBP1 and to explore its ligand-binding mechanism. After homology modelling of HoblOBP1, it was found that the three-dimensional structure of HoblOBP1 consists of six α-helices and three disulphide bridges that connect the helices, and the hydrophobic pockets are both composed of five helices. Based on the docking study, we found that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic interactions are both important in the bonding between HoblOBP1 and hexyl benzoate. Intramolecular residues formed the hydrogen bonds in the C terminus of the protein and the bonds are crucial for the ligand-binding specificity. Finally, MET48, ILE80 and TYR111 are binding sites predicted for HoblOBP1. Using site-directed mutagenesis and fluorescence assays, it was found that ligands could not be recognized by mutant of Tyr111. A possible explanation is that the compound could not be recognized by the mutant, and remains in the binding cavity because of the loss of the intramolecular

  11. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity. PMID:27318092

  12. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods.

  13. Six independent fucose-binding sites in the crystal structure of Aspergillus oryzae lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makyio, Hisayoshi; Shimabukuro, Junpei; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Imamura, Akihiro; Ishida, Hideharu; Kiso, Makoto; Ando, Hiromune; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-08-26

    The crystal structure of AOL (a fucose-specific lectin of Aspergillus oryzae) has been solved by SAD (single-wavelength anomalous diffraction) and MAD (multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction) phasing of seleno-fucosides. The overall structure is a six-bladed β-propeller similar to that of other fucose-specific lectins. The fucose moieties of the seleno-fucosides are located in six fucose-binding sites. Although the Arg and Glu/Gln residues bound to the fucose moiety are common to all fucose-binding sites, the amino-acid residues involved in fucose binding at each site are not identical. The varying peak heights of the seleniums in the electron density map suggest that each fucose-binding site has a different carbohydrate binding affinity.

  14. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo exchange with the bulk medium readily, suggesting that the tau-microtubule interaction is essentially irreversible. Given this dilemma, we investigated the mechanism of interaction between tau and microtubules in kinetic detail. Stopped-flow kinetic analysis reveals moderate binding affinity between tau and preassembled microtubules and rapid dissociation/association kinetics. In contrast, when microtubules are generated by copolymerization of tubulin and tau, a distinct population of microtubule-bound tau is observed, the binding of which seems irreversible. We propose that reversible binding occurs between tau and the surface of preassembled microtubules, whereas irreversible binding results when tau is coassembled with tubulin into a tau-microtubule copolymer. Because the latter is expected to be physiologically relevant, its characterization is of central importance. PMID:15096589

  15. An NMR-Based Structural Rationale for Contrasting Stoichiometry and Ligand Binding Site(s) in Fatty Acid-binding Proteins†

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yan; Estephan, Rima; Yang, Xiaomin; Vela, Adriana; Wang, Hsin; Bernard, Cédric; Stark, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is a 14-kDa cytosolic polypeptide, differing from other family members in number of ligand binding sites, diversity of bound ligands, and transfer of fatty acid(s) to membranes primarily via aqueous diffusion rather than direct collisional interactions. Distinct two-dimensional 1H-15N NMR signals indicative of slowly exchanging LFABP assemblies formed during stepwise ligand titration were exploited, without solving the protein-ligand complex structures...

  16. Computational predictions suggest that structural similarity in viral polymerases may lead to comparable allosteric binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jodian A; Espiritu, Marie V; Abraham, Joel; Thorpe, Ian F

    2016-08-15

    The identification of ligand-binding sites is often the first step in drug targeting and design. To date there are numerous computational tools available to predict ligand binding sites. These tools can guide or mitigate the need for experimental methods to identify binding sites, which often require significant resources and time. Here, we evaluate four ligand-binding site predictor (LBSP) tools for their ability to predict allosteric sites within the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) polymerase. Our results show that the LISE LBSP is able to identify all three target allosteric sites within the HCV polymerase as well as a known allosteric site in the Coxsackievirus polymerase. LISE was then employed to identify novel binding sites within the polymerases of the Dengue, West Nile, and Foot-and-mouth Disease viruses. Our results suggest that all three viral polymerases have putative sites that share structural or chemical similarities with allosteric pockets of the HCV polymerase. Thus, these binding locations may represent an evolutionarily conserved structural feature of several viral polymerases that could be exploited for the development of small molecule therapeutics. PMID:27262620

  17. Characterization and autoradiographic localization of multiple tachykinin binding sites in gastrointestinal tract and bladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burcher, E.; Buck, S.H.; Lovenberg, W.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Binding sites for the (125I)Bolton-Hunter-labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE) and substance P (BHSP) were investigated using crude membrane suspensions and autoradiography. In smooth muscle membranes from guinea-pig small intestine and rat duodenum, specific binding of BHSK was saturable and reversible, showing a single class of sites with a KD of 1 to 3 nM and maximum number of specific binding sites of 1 to 2 fmol/mg of wet weight tissue. Pharmacological characterization of this binding revealed a novel receptor site (K) with affinity for substance K greater than kassinin greater than or equal to eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin. Inhibition of the binding of BHSK in membranes from mouse urinary bladder exhibited a similar K-type pattern. In rat duodenum and mouse bladder membranes, the binding of BHE was inhibited by substance K greater than kassinin greater than eledoisin greater than neuromedin K greater than substance P greater than physalaemin indicating the same receptor site as for BHSK. In rat cerebral cortex membranes BHE binding was inhibited by neuromedin K = kassinin = eledoisin greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than substance P indicating a definitive tachykinin E receptor site. The same displacement pattern of BHE binding was also detected in longitudinal muscle membranes from the guinea-pig small intestine. In mouse bladder membranes and in rat and guinea-pig intestine, the binding of BHSP was inhibited by substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than or equal to eledoisin = kassinin greater than neuromedin K indicating a definitive tachykinin P receptor site. Autoradiographic binding sites for both BHSK and BHSP were seen in circular muscle of the rat stomach, small intestine and colon and in circular and longitudinal muscle of the guinea-pig small intestine and colon.

  18. An Overview of the Prediction of Protein DNA-Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and DNA play an important role in many essential biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and repair. The identification of amino acid residues involved in DNA-binding sites is critical for understanding the mechanism of these biological activities. In the last decade, numerous computational approaches have been developed to predict protein DNA-binding sites based on protein sequence and/or structural information, which play an important role in complementing experimental strategies. At this time, approaches can be divided into three categories: sequence-based DNA-binding site prediction, structure-based DNA-binding site prediction, and homology modeling and threading. In this article, we review existing research on computational methods to predict protein DNA-binding sites, which includes data sets, various residue sequence/structural features, machine learning methods for comparison and selection, evaluation methods, performance comparison of different tools, and future directions in protein DNA-binding site prediction. In particular, we detail the meta-analysis of protein DNA-binding sites. We also propose specific implications that are likely to result in novel prediction methods, increased performance, or practical applications.

  19. The kissing-loop motif is a preferred site of 5' leader recombination during replication of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Mikkelsen, J G; Schmidt, J;

    1999-01-01

    A panel of mouse T-cell lymphomas induced by SL3-3 murine leukemia virus (MLV) and three primer binding site mutants thereof (A. H. Lund, J. Schmidt, A. Luz, A. B. Sorensen, M. Duch, and F. S. Pedersen, J. Virol. 73:6117-6122, 1999) were analyzed for the occurrence of recombination between...

  20. SITE-DIRECTED MUTAGENESIS OF PROPOSED ACTIVE-SITE RESIDUES OF PENICILLIN-BINDING PROTEIN-5 FROM ESCHERICHIA-COLI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERLINDEN, MPG; DEHAAN, L; DIDEBERG, O; KECK, W

    1994-01-01

    Alignment of the amino acid sequence of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) with the sequences of other members of the family of active-site-serine penicillin-interacting enzymes predicted the residues playing a role in the catalytic mechanism of PBP5. Apart from the active-site (Ser(44)), Lys(47),

  1. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  2. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.;

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  3. Computational investigation of stoichiometric effects, binding site heterogeneities, and selectivities of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracina, Jacob J; Bergkvist, Magnus; Sharfstein, Susan T

    2016-06-01

    A series of quantum mechanical (QM) computational optimizations of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) systems were used to determine optimal monomer-to-target ratios. Imidazole- and xanthine-derived target molecules were studied. The investigation included both small-scale models (3-7 molecules) and larger-scale models (15-35 molecules). The optimal ratios differed between the small and larger scales. For the larger models containing multiple targets, binding-site surface area analysis was used to quantify the heterogeneity of these sites. The more fully surrounded sites had greater binding energies. No discretization of binding modes was seen, furthering arguments for continuous affinity distribution models. Molecular mechanical (MM) docking was then used to measure the selectivities of the QM-optimized binding sites. Selectivity was also shown to improve as binding sites become more fully encased by the monomers. For internal sites, docking consistently showed selectivity favoring the molecules that had been imprinted via QM geometry optimizations. The computationally imprinted sites were shown to exhibit size-, shape-, and polarity-based selectivity. Here we present a novel approach to investigate the selectivity and heterogeneity of imprinted polymer binding sites, by applying the rapid orientation screening of MM docking to the highly accurate QM-optimized geometries. Modeling schemes were designed such that no computing clusters or other specialized modeling equipment would be required. Improving the in silico analysis of MIP system properties will ultimately allow for the production of more sensitive and selective polymers. PMID:27207254

  4. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the high-affinity cation binding site of the purple membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Pardo, Leonardo; Sepulcre Sánchez, Francesc; Cladera Cerdà, Josep Bartomeu; Duñach, Mireia; Labarta, A.; Tejada, J.; Padrós Morell, Esteve

    1998-01-01

    Binding of Mn2+ or Mg2+ to the high-affinity site of the purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarium has been studied by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry or by ab initio quantum mechanical calculations, respectively. The binding of Mn2+ cation, in a low-spin state, to the high-affinity site occurs through a major octahedral local symmetry character with a minor rhombic distortion and a coordination number of six. A molecular model of this binding site in the Schiff b...

  5. Brominated lipids identify lipid binding sites on the surface of the reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszak, Aleksander W; Gardiner, Alastair T; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2007-03-20

    This study describes the use of brominated phospholipids to distinguish between lipid and detergent binding sites on the surface of a typical alpha-helical membrane protein. Reaction centers isolated from Rhodobacter sphaeroides were cocrystallized with added brominated phospholipids. X-ray structural analysis of these crystals has revealed the presence of two lipid binding sites from the characteristic strong X-ray scattering from the bromine atoms. These results demonstrate the usefulness of this approach to mapping lipid binding sites at the surface of membrane proteins.

  6. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  7. A conserved docking site in MEKs mediates high-affinity binding to MAP kinases and cooperates with a scaffold protein to enhance signal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardwell, A J; Flatauer, L J; Matsukuma, K; Thorner, J; Bardwell, L

    2001-03-30

    The recognition of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by their upstream activators, MAPK/ERK kinases (MEKs), is crucial for the effective and accurate transmission of many signals. We demonstrated previously that the yeast MAPKs Kss1 and Fus3 bind with high affinity to the N terminus of the MEK Ste7, and proposed that a conserved motif in Ste7, the MAPK-docking site, mediates this interaction. Here we show that the corresponding sequences in human MEK1 and MEK2 are necessary and sufficient for the direct binding of the MAPKs ERK1 and ERK2. Mutations in MEK1, MEK2, or Ste7 that altered conserved residues in the docking site diminished binding of the cognate MAPKs. Furthermore, short peptides corresponding to the docking sites in these MEKs inhibited MEK1-mediated phosphorylation of ERK2 in vitro. In yeast cells, docking-defective alleles of Ste7 were modestly compromised in their ability to transmit the mating pheromone signal. This deficiency was dramatically enhanced when the ability of the Ste5 scaffold protein to associate with components of the MAPK cascade was also compromised. Thus, both the MEK-MAPK docking interaction and binding to the Ste5 scaffold make mutually reinforcing contributions to the efficiency of signaling by this MAPK cascade in vivo. PMID:11134045

  8. Protein-binding RNA aptamers affect molecular interactions distantly from their binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Daniel M; Thuesen, Cathrine K; Bøtkjær, Kenneth A;

    2015-01-01

    Nucleic acid aptamer selection is a powerful strategy for the development of regulatory agents for molecular intervention. Accordingly, aptamers have proven their diligence in the intervention with serine protease activities, which play important roles in physiology and pathophysiology. Nonetheless...... potential, both binding to the serine protease urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). We determine the subsequent impact of aptamer binding on the well-established molecular interactions (plasmin, PAI-1, uPAR, and LRP-1A) controlling uPA activities. One of the aptamers (upanap-126) binds to the area...... around the C-terminal α-helix in pro-uPA, while the other aptamer (upanap-12) binds to both the β-hairpin of the growth factor domain and the kringle domain of uPA. Based on the mapping studies, combined with data from small-angle X-ray scattering analysis, we construct a model for the upanap-12:pro...

  9. MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole;

    2008-01-01

    In vertebrates, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents peptides to the immune system. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), and some of the loci encoding them are the most polymorphic in the human genome. Different MHC molecules present different subsets of....... Algorithms that predict which peptides MHC molecules bind have recently been developed and cover many different alleles, but the utility of these algorithms is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing the specificity of these molecules. We have, therefore, developed a web server, MHC motif...

  10. NestedMICA as an ab initio protein motif discovery tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Down Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovering overrepresented patterns in amino acid sequences is an important step in protein functional element identification. We adapted and extended NestedMICA, an ab initio motif finder originally developed for finding transcription binding site motifs, to find short protein signals, and compared its performance with another popular protein motif finder, MEME. NestedMICA, an open source protein motif discovery tool written in Java, is driven by a Monte Carlo technique called Nested Sampling. It uses multi-class sequence background models to represent different "uninteresting" parts of sequences that do not contain motifs of interest. In order to assess NestedMICA as a protein motif finder, we have tested it on synthetic datasets produced by spiking instances of known motifs into a randomly selected set of protein sequences. NestedMICA was also tested using a biologically-authentic test set, where we evaluated its performance with respect to varying sequence length. Results Generally NestedMICA recovered most of the short (3–9 amino acid long test protein motifs spiked into a test set of sequences at different frequencies. We showed that it can be used to find multiple motifs at the same time, too. In all the assessment experiments we carried out, its overall motif discovery performance was better than that of MEME. Conclusion NestedMICA proved itself to be a robust and sensitive ab initio protein motif finder, even for relatively short motifs that exist in only a small fraction of sequences. Availability NestedMICA is available under the Lesser GPL open-source license from: http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/analysis/nmica/

  11. Rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, S.H.; Burcher, E.

    1985-11-01

    The specific binding of the /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter labeled tachykinins substance K (BHSK), eledoisin (BHE), and substance P (BHSP) was examined in crude membrane suspensions and by autoradiography in rat submaxillary gland. All three ligands at 0.1 nM concentrations exhibited binding that was inhibited by tachykinins in a potency rank order of substance P greater than physalaemin greater than substance K greater than eledoisin greater than kassinin greater than neuromedin K with slope factors essentially equal to unity. All tachykinins were 5 to 10 times more potent in inhibiting BHSK and BHE binding compared to BHSP binding. Autoradiographic visualization of BHSK and BHSP binding sites in the gland revealed extensive labeling of mucous and serous acini. The intensity of labeling was much less for BHSK than for BHSP. The results indicate that the rat submaxillary gland contains predominantly P-type tachykinin binding sites.

  12. Evidence for two distinct binding sites for tau on microtubules

    OpenAIRE

    Makrides, Victoria; Massie, Michelle R.; Feinstein, Stuart C.; Lew, John

    2004-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau regulates diverse and essential microtubule functions, from the nucleation and promotion of microtubule polymerization to the regulation of microtubule polarity and dynamics, as well as the spacing and bundling of axonal microtubules. Thermodynamic studies show that tau interacts with microtubules in the low- to mid-nanomolar range, implying moderate binding affinity. At the same time, it is well established that microtubule-bound tau does not undergo ex...

  13. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu3+/Na+ or K+ with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan

  14. Europium ion as a probe for binding sites to carrageenans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Ana P.; Goncalves, Rogeria R.; Serra, Osvaldo A. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil); Zaniquelli, Maria Elisabete D. [Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo 14040-901 (Brazil)], E-mail: medzaniquelli@ffclrp.usp.br; Wong, Kenneth [Laboratorio de Fisico-Quimica, Centro de Pesquisas de Paulinia, Rhodia Brasil, Paulinia, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Carrageenans, sulfated polysaccharides extracted from red algae, present a coil-helix transition and helix aggregation dependence on the type and concentration of counterions. In this study, we focus attention on a mixed valence counterion system: Eu{sup 3+}/Na{sup +} or K{sup +} with different gel-forming carrageenans: kappa, iota, and kappa-2. Results of stationary and time-dependent luminescence showed to be a suitable tool to probe ion binding to both the negatively charged sulfate group and the hydroxyl groups present in the biopolymer. For lower europium ion concentrations, a single longer decay emission lifetime was detected, which was attributed to the binding of europium ion to the carrageenan sulfate groups. An additional decay ascribed to europium binding to hydroxyl groups was observed above a threshold concentration, and this decay was dependent on the carrageenan charge density. Symmetry of the europium ion microenvironment was estimated by the ratio between the intensities of its emission bands, which has been shown to depend on the concentration of europium ions and on the specificity of the monovalent counterion bound to the carrageenan.

  15. Current Understanding of the Binding Sites, Capacity, Affinity, and Biological Significance of Metals in Melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Lian; Simon, John D.

    2007-01-01

    Metal chelation is often invoked as one of the main biological functions of melanin. In order to understand the interaction between metals and melanin, extensive studies have been carried out to determine the nature of the metal binding sites, binding capacity and affinity. These data are central to efforts aimed at elucidating the role metal binding plays in determining the physical, structural, biological, and photochemical properties of melanin. This article examines the current state of u...

  16. Localization of 125I-insulin binding sites in the rat hypothalamus by quantitative autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro autoradiography and computer video densitometry were used to localize and quantify binding of 125I-insulin in the hypothalamus of the rat brain. Highest specific binding was found in the arculate, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and periventricular regions. Significantly lower binding was present in the ventromedial nucleus and median eminence. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that insulin modulates the neural regulation of feeding by acting at sites in the hypothalamus. (author)

  17. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  18. CONREAL web server : identification and visualization of conserved transcription factor binding sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berezikov, Eugene; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    The use of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic footprinting approaches have become popular for the recognition of conserved and potentially functional sequences. Several algorithms have been developed for the identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), which are charac

  19. A stage—specific protein factor binding to a CACCC motif in both human β—globin gene promoter and 5‘—HS2 region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNTONG; YADICHEN; 等

    1994-01-01

    The DNaseI hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) of human β-globin locus control region(LCR) is required for the high level expression of human β-globin genes.In the present study,a stage-specific protein factor (LPF-β) was identified in the nuclear extract prepared from mouse fetal liver at d 18 of gestation,which could bind to the HS2 region of human β-globin LCR.We also found that the shift band of LPF-β factor could be competed by human β-globin promoter.However,it couldn't be competed by human ε-globin promoter or by human Aγ-globin promoter.Furthermore,our data demonstrated that the binding-sequence of LPF-β factor is 5'CACACCCTA 3',which is located at the HS2 region of β-LCR(from-10845 to-10853 bp)and human β-globin promoter(from-92 to -84 bp).We speculated that these regions containing the CACCC box in both the human β-globin promoter and HS2 might function as stage selector elements in the regulation of human β-globin switching and the LPF-β factor might be a stage-specific protein factor involved in the regulation of human β-globin gene expression.

  20. Arabidopsis AtADF1 is Functionally Affected by Mutations on Actin Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hai Dong; Wei-Ping Tang; Jia-Yao Liu

    2013-01-01

    The plant actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) binds to both monomeric and filamentous actin,and is directly involved in the depolymerization of actin filaments.To better understand the actin binding sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana L.AtADF1,we generated mutants of AtADF1 and investigated their functions in vitro and in vivo.Analysis of mutants harboring amino acid substitutions revealed that charged residues (Arg98 and Lys100) located at the α-helix 3 and forming an actin binding site together with the N-terminus are essential for both G-and F-actin binding.The basic residues on the β-strand 5 (K82/A) and the α-helix 4 (R135/A,R137/A) form another actin binding site that is important for F-actin binding.Using transient expression of CFP-tagged AtADF1 mutant proteins in onion (Allium cepa) peel epidermal cells and transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana L.plants overexpressing these mutants,we analyzed how these mutant proteins regulate actin organization and affect seedling growth.Our results show that the ADF mutants with a lower affinity for actin filament binding can still be functional,unless the affinity foractin monomers is also affected.The G-actin binding activity of the ADF plays an essential role in actin binding,depolymerization of actin polymers,and therefore in the control of actin organization.

  1. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  2. Discovering motifs in ranked lists of DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Eden

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods for discovery of sequence elements that are enriched in a target set compared with a background set are fundamental in molecular biology research. One example is the discovery of transcription factor binding motifs that are inferred from ChIP-chip (chromatin immuno-precipitation on a microarray measurements. Several major challenges in sequence motif discovery still require consideration: (i the need for a principled approach to partitioning the data into target and background sets; (ii the lack of rigorous models and of an exact p-value for measuring motif enrichment; (iii the need for an appropriate framework for accounting for motif multiplicity; (iv the tendency, in many of the existing methods, to report presumably significant motifs even when applied to randomly generated data. In this paper we present a statistical framework for discovering enriched sequence elements in ranked lists that resolves these four issues. We demonstrate the implementation of this framework in a software application, termed DRIM (discovery of rank imbalanced motifs, which identifies sequence motifs in lists of ranked DNA sequences. We applied DRIM to ChIP-chip and CpG methylation data and obtained the following results. (i Identification of 50 novel putative transcription factor (TF binding sites in yeast ChIP-chip data. The biological function of some of them was further investigated to gain new insights on transcription regulation networks in yeast. For example, our discoveries enable the elucidation of the network of the TF ARO80. Another finding concerns a systematic TF binding enhancement to sequences containing CA repeats. (ii Discovery of novel motifs in human cancer CpG methylation data. Remarkably, most of these motifs are similar to DNA sequence elements bound by the Polycomb complex that promotes histone methylation. Our findings thus support a model in which histone methylation and CpG methylation are mechanistically linked

  3. Radiolabelling of phoneutria nigriventer spider toxin (Tx1): a tool to study its binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Diniz, Carlos Roberto; Nascimento, Marta Cordeiro [FUNED, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Maria Elena de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia

    1996-07-01

    The neurotoxin Tx1, isolated from the venom of the South American spider Phoneutria nigriventer produces tail elevation and spastic paralysis of posterior limbs after intracerebral ventricular injection in mice. Tx1 also produces ileum contraction in bioassay. We have investigated the binding of radioiodinated-Tx1 ({sup 125} I-Tx1) on the preparation of myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle membrane from guinea pig ileum (MPLM) as a tool to characterize the interaction of this neurotoxin with its site. The neurotoxin Tx1 was radioiodinated with Na{sup 125} I by the lactoperoxidase method. {sup 125} I-Tx1 specifically binds to a single class of noninteracting binding sites of high affinity (Kd= 3.5 x 10{sup -10} M) and low capacity (1.2 pmol/mg protein). The specific binding increased in parallel with the protein concentration. In competition experiments the ligands of ionic channels used (sodium, potassium and calcium) did not affect the binding of {sup 125} I-Tx1 to MPLM neither did the cholinergic ligands (hemicholinium-3, hexamethonium, d-tubocurarine and atropine). Another neurotoxin (Tx2-6, one of the isoforms of Tx2 pool) decreased toxin with MPLM and showed that toxin has a specific and saturable binding site in guinea pig ileum and this binding site appears to be related to the Tx2 site. (author)

  4. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  5. DETERMINANTS OF LIGAND BINDING AFFINITY AND COOPERATIVITY AT THE GLUT1 ENDOFACIAL SITE

    OpenAIRE

    Robichaud, Trista; Appleyard, Antony N.; Herbert, Richard B.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cytochalasin B (CB) and forskolin (FSK) inhibit GLUT1-mediated sugar transport in red cells by binding at or close to the GLUT1 endofacial sugar binding site. Paradoxically, very low concentrations of each of these inhibitors produce a modest stimulation of sugar transport (Cloherty, E. K., Levine, K. B., & Carruthers, A. (2001). The red blood cell glucose transporter presents multiple, nucleotide-sensitive sugar exit sites. Biochemistry, 40(51), 15549–15561). This result is consistent with t...

  6. Protective Action of Resveratrol in Human Skin: Possible Involvement of Specific Receptor Binding Sites

    OpenAIRE

    Stéphane Bastianetto; Yvan Dumont; Albert Duranton; Freya Vercauteren; Lionel Breton; Rémi Quirion

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resveratrol is a plant-derived polyphenol with purported protecting action on various disorders associated with aging. It has been suggested that resveratrol could exert its protective action by acting on specific plasma membrane polyphenol binding sites (Han Y.S., et al. (2006) J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318:238-245). The purpose of this study was to investigate, in human skin, the possible existence of specific binding sites that mediate the protective action of resveratrol. METHODS A...

  7. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  8. Quantitative determination of angiotensin II binding sites in rat brain and pituitary gland by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Niwa, M.; Saavedra, J.M. (National Inst. of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1984-11-26

    Rat brain and pituitary angiotensin II (AII) binding sites were quantitated by incubation of tissue sections with /sup 125/I-(Sar/sup 1/) AII, Ultrofilm radioautography, computerized densitometry, and comparison with /sup 125/I-standards at appropriate film exposure times. The highest number of AII binding sites was found in anterior pituitary and the circumventricular organs, organon subfornicalis and organon vasculosum laminae terminalis.

  9. Partial enterectomy decreases somatostatin-binding sites in residual intestine of rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Colás Escudero, Begoña; Bodega Magro, Guillermo; Sanz, M.; Prieto Villapún, Juan Carlos; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    1988-01-01

    Three weeks after partial enterectomy in the rabbit there was an increased somatostatin concentration and a decreased number of somatostatin-binding sites (without changes in the corresponding affinity values) in the cytosol of the residual intestinal tissue, except in the terminal ileum and the colon. Five weeks after surgery both the somatostatin concentration and the number of somatostatin-binding sites returned towards control value