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Sample records for binding proteins structural

  1. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

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    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  2. Predicting nucleic acid binding interfaces from structural models of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Iris; Shazman, Shula; Mukherjee, Srayanta; Zhang, Yang; Glaser, Fabian; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2012-02-01

    The function of DNA- and RNA-binding proteins can be inferred from the characterization and accurate prediction of their binding interfaces. However, the main pitfall of various structure-based methods for predicting nucleic acid binding function is that they are all limited to a relatively small number of proteins for which high-resolution three-dimensional structures are available. In this study, we developed a pipeline for extracting functional electrostatic patches from surfaces of protein structural models, obtained using the I-TASSER protein structure predictor. The largest positive patches are extracted from the protein surface using the patchfinder algorithm. We show that functional electrostatic patches extracted from an ensemble of structural models highly overlap the patches extracted from high-resolution structures. Furthermore, by testing our pipeline on a set of 55 known nucleic acid binding proteins for which I-TASSER produces high-quality models, we show that the method accurately identifies the nucleic acids binding interface on structural models of proteins. Employing a combined patch approach we show that patches extracted from an ensemble of models better predicts the real nucleic acid binding interfaces compared with patches extracted from independent models. Overall, these results suggest that combining information from a collection of low-resolution structural models could be a valuable approach for functional annotation. We suggest that our method will be further applicable for predicting other functional surfaces of proteins with unknown structure.

  3. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

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    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  4. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

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    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  5. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  6. Structure fluctuations and conformational changes in protein binding

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinsky, Anatoly M; Tuzikov, Alexander V; Vakser, Ilya A

    2011-01-01

    Structure fluctuations and conformational changes accompany all biological processes involving macromolecules. The paper presents a classification of protein residues based on the normalized equilibrium fluctuations of the residue centers of mass in proteins and a statistical analysis of conformation changes in the side-chains upon binding. Normal mode analysis and an elastic network model were applied to a set of protein complexes to calculate the residue fluctuations and develop the residue classification. Comparison with a classification based on normalized B-factors suggests that the B-factors may underestimate protein flexibility in solvent. Our classification shows that protein loops and disordered fragments are enriched with highly fluctuating residues and depleted with weakly fluctuating residues. To calculate the dihedral angles distribution functions, the configuration space was divided into cells by a cubic grid. The effect of protein association on the distribution functions depends on the amino a...

  7. Structural Perspectives on the Evolutionary Expansion of Unique Protein-Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncearenco, Alexander; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Panchenko, Anna R

    2015-09-15

    Structures of protein complexes provide atomistic insights into protein interactions. Human proteins represent a quarter of all structures in the Protein Data Bank; however, available protein complexes cover less than 10% of the human proteome. Although it is theoretically possible to infer interactions in human proteins based on structures of homologous protein complexes, it is still unclear to what extent protein interactions and binding sites are conserved, and whether protein complexes from remotely related species can be used to infer interactions and binding sites. We considered biological units of protein complexes and clustered protein-protein binding sites into similarity groups based on their structure and sequence, which allowed us to identify unique binding sites. We showed that the growth rate of the number of unique binding sites in the Protein Data Bank was much slower than the growth rate of the number of structural complexes. Next, we investigated the evolutionary roots of unique binding sites and identified the major phyletic branches with the largest expansion in the number of novel binding sites. We found that many binding sites could be traced to the universal common ancestor of all cellular organisms, whereas relatively few binding sites emerged at the major evolutionary branching points. We analyzed the physicochemical properties of unique binding sites and found that the most ancient sites were the largest in size, involved many salt bridges, and were the most compact and least planar. In contrast, binding sites that appeared more recently in the evolution of eukaryotes were characterized by a larger fraction of polar and aromatic residues, and were less compact and more planar, possibly due to their more transient nature and roles in signaling processes.

  8. Crystal Structure of Human Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 9

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    Vorobiev, S.; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Huang, Y; Chen, C; Maglaqui, M; Janjua, H; Montelione, G; Tong, L; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    As a step towards better integrating protein three-dimensional (3D) structural information in cancer systems biology, the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG) (www.nesg.org) has constructed a Human Cancer Pathway Protein Interaction Network (HCPIN) by analysis of several classical cancer-associated signaling pathways and their physical protein-protein interactions. Many well-known cancer-associated proteins play central roles as hubs or bottlenecks in the HCPIN (http://nmr.cabm.rutgers.edu/hcpin). NESG has selected more than 1000 human proteins and protein domains from the HCPIN for sample production and 3D structure determination. The long-range goal of this effort is to provide a comprehensive 3D structure-function database for human cancer-associated proteins and protein complexes, in the context of their interaction networks. Human retinoblastoma binding protein 9 (RBBP9) is one of the HCPIN proteins targeted by NESG. RBBP9 was initially identified as the product of a new gene, Bog (for B5T over-expressed gene), in several transformed rat liver epithelial cell lines resistant to the growth-inhibitory effect of TGF-1 as well as in primary human liver tumors. RBBP9 contains the retinoblastoma (Rb) binding motif LxCxE in its sequence, and was shown to interact with Rb by yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Mutation of the Leu residue in this motif to Gln blocked the binding to Rb. RBBP9 can displace E2F1 from E2F1-Rb complexes, and over expression of RBBP9 overcomes TGF-1 induced growth arrest and results in transformation of rat liver epithelial cells leading to hepatoblastoma-like tumors in nude mice. RBBP9 may also play a role in cellular responses to chronic low dose radiation. A close homolog of RBBP9, sharing 93% amino acid sequence identity and also known as RBBP10, interacts with a protein with sua5-yciO-yrdC domains.

  9. Structural and binding studies of SAP-1 protein with heparin.

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    Yadav, Vikash K; Mandal, Rahul S; Puniya, Bhanwar L; Kumar, Rahul; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2015-03-01

    SAP-1 is a low molecular weight cysteine protease inhibitor (CPI) which belongs to type-2 cystatins family. SAP-1 protein purified from human seminal plasma (HuSP) has been shown to inhibit cysteine and serine proteases and exhibit interesting biological properties, including high temperature and pH stability. Heparin is a naturally occurring glycosaminoglycan (with varied chain length) which interacts with a number of proteins and regulates multiple steps in different biological processes. As an anticoagulant, heparin enhances inhibition of thrombin by the serpin antithrombin III. Therefore, we have employed surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to improve our understanding of the binding interaction between heparin and SAP-1 (protease inhibitor). SPR data suggest that SAP-1 binds to heparin with a significant affinity (KD = 158 nm). SPR solution competition studies using heparin oligosaccharides showed that the binding of SAP-1 to heparin is dependent on chain length. Large oligosaccharides show strong binding affinity for SAP-1. Further to get insight into the structural aspect of interactions between SAP-1 and heparin, we used modelled structure of the SAP-1 and docked with heparin and heparin-derived polysaccharides. The results suggest that a positively charged residue lysine plays important role in these interactions. Such information should improve our understanding of how heparin, present in the reproductive tract, regulates cystatins activity.

  10. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

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    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  11. Crystal structure of the Locusta migratoria odorant binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiangge; Li, Junru; Han, Lei; Wang, Yang; Wu, Wei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Tao, Ye; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Ziding; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-01-16

    Locusta migratoria (Lmig) causes enormous losses to agricultural products, especially because it often infests the world with great swarms as locust plagues. Locusts find their plant hosts on which they feed through their olfactory system, in which odorant binding proteins (OBPs) play an important role. Previous study indicated that the amino acid sequences of LmigOBP showed low similarity to OBPs from other insect orders and we speculated that it might perform unique binding behavior. Here, we solved the first LmigOBP1 structure at 1.65Å, which is a monomer in solution and disulfide bonds play a key role in maintaining its function. We show that LmigOBP1 possesses a unique seventh α-helix, which is located at the surface with strong interactions with the LmigOBP1 scaffold consisting of other six α-helices. Moreover, the seventh α-helix forms a wall of an "L" shaped internal hydrophobic cavity to accommodate linear ligands, which is consistent with the binding experiments. We also demonstrate that the ligand-binding pocket in LmigOBP1 is greatly different from that in the closest homologs mosquito OBPs. Taken together, this study provides a structural basis for designing small inhibitors to control locust.

  12. Integrating protein structures and precomputed genealogies in the Magnum database: Examples with cellular retinoid binding proteins

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    Bradley Michael E

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When accurate models for the divergent evolution of protein sequences are integrated with complementary biological information, such as folded protein structures, analyses of the combined data often lead to new hypotheses about molecular physiology. This represents an excellent example of how bioinformatics can be used to guide experimental research. However, progress in this direction has been slowed by the lack of a publicly available resource suitable for general use. Results The precomputed Magnum database offers a solution to this problem for ca. 1,800 full-length protein families with at least one crystal structure. The Magnum deliverables include 1 multiple sequence alignments, 2 mapping of alignment sites to crystal structure sites, 3 phylogenetic trees, 4 inferred ancestral sequences at internal tree nodes, and 5 amino acid replacements along tree branches. Comprehensive evaluations revealed that the automated procedures used to construct Magnum produced accurate models of how proteins divergently evolve, or genealogies, and correctly integrated these with the structural data. To demonstrate Magnum's capabilities, we asked for amino acid replacements requiring three nucleotide substitutions, located at internal protein structure sites, and occurring on short phylogenetic tree branches. In the cellular retinoid binding protein family a site that potentially modulates ligand binding affinity was discovered. Recruitment of cellular retinol binding protein to function as a lens crystallin in the diurnal gecko afforded another opportunity to showcase the predictive value of a browsable database containing branch replacement patterns integrated with protein structures. Conclusion We integrated two areas of protein science, evolution and structure, on a large scale and created a precomputed database, known as Magnum, which is the first freely available resource of its kind. Magnum provides evolutionary and structural

  13. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  14. Observation of Protein Structural Vibrational Mode Sensitivity to Ligand Binding

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    Niessen, Katherine; Xu, Mengyang; Snell, Edward; Markelz, Andrea

    2014-03-01

    We report the first measurements of the dependence of large-scale protein intramolecular vibrational modes on ligand binding. These collective vibrational modes in the terahertz (THz) frequency range (5-100 cm-1) are of great interest due to their predicted relation to protein function. Our technique, Crystals Anisotropy Terahertz Microscopy (CATM), allows for room temperature, table-top measurements of the optically active intramolecular modes. CATM measurements have revealed surprisingly narrowband features. CATM measurements are performed on single crystals of chicken egg-white lysozyme (CEWL) as well as CEWL bound to tri-N-acetylglucosamine (CEWL-3NAG) inhibitor. We find narrow band resonances that dramatically shift with binding. Quasiharmonic calculations are performed on CEWL and CEWL-3NAG proteins with CHARMM using normal mode analysis. The expected CATM response of the crystals is then calculated by summing over all protein orientations within the unit cell. We will compare the CATM measurements with the calculated results and discuss the changes which arise with protein-ligand binding. This work is supported by NSF grant MRI 2 grant DBI2959989.

  15. Structural dynamics of cisplatin binding to histidine in a protein

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    Simon W. M. Tanley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The platinum anti-cancer agents cisplatin and carboplatin bind to the histidine 15 residue in the model protein hen egg white lysozyme. By using temperatures either side of the protein glass transition state (∼180 K, several platinum binding modes are seen and show that not all these platinum modes are stable. In particular, the mean square displacement vibration amplitudes of the cisplatin and of the histidine to which it is bound are analysed in detail. As well as the multiple platinum peaks, the electron density for the His-15 side chain is weak to absent at 150 K and 200 K, which points to the imidazole ring of the His side chain sampling multiple positions. Most interestingly, the His-15 imidazole becomes more ordered at room temperature.

  16. Structural dynamics of cisplatin binding to histidine in a protein

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    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum anti-cancer agents cisplatin and carboplatin bind to the histidine 15 residue in the model protein hen egg white lysozyme. By using temperatures either side of the protein glass transition state (∼180 K), several platinum binding modes are seen and show that not all these platinum modes are stable. In particular, the mean square displacement vibration amplitudes of the cisplatin and of the histidine to which it is bound are analysed in detail. As well as the multiple platinum peaks, the electron density for the His-15 side chain is weak to absent at 150 K and 200 K, which points to the imidazole ring of the His side chain sampling multiple positions. Most interestingly, the His-15 imidazole becomes more ordered at room temperature. PMID:26798779

  17. Statistical analysis of structural determinants for protein-DNA-binding specificity.

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    Corona, Rosario I; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2016-08-01

    DNA-binding proteins play critical roles in biological processes including gene expression, DNA packaging and DNA repair. They bind to DNA target sequences with different degrees of binding specificity, ranging from highly specific (HS) to nonspecific (NS). Alterations of DNA-binding specificity, due to either genetic variation or somatic mutations, can lead to various diseases. In this study, a comparative analysis of protein-DNA complex structures was carried out to investigate the structural features that contribute to binding specificity. Protein-DNA complexes were grouped into three general classes based on degrees of binding specificity: HS, multispecific (MS), and NS. Our results show a clear trend of structural features among the three classes, including amino acid binding propensities, simple and complex hydrogen bonds, major/minor groove and base contacts, and DNA shape. We found that aspartate is enriched in HS DNA binding proteins and predominately binds to a cytosine through a single hydrogen bond or two consecutive cytosines through bidentate hydrogen bonds. Aromatic residues, histidine and tyrosine, are highly enriched in the HS and MS groups and may contribute to specific binding through different mechanisms. To further investigate the role of protein flexibility in specific protein-DNA recognition, we analyzed the conformational changes between the bound and unbound states of DNA-binding proteins and structural variations. The results indicate that HS and MS DNA-binding domains have larger conformational changes upon DNA-binding and larger degree of flexibility in both bound and unbound states. Proteins 2016; 84:1147-1161. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Protein Binding Pocket Dynamics.

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    Stank, Antonia; Kokh, Daria B; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C

    2016-05-17

    The dynamics of protein binding pockets are crucial for their interaction specificity. Structural flexibility allows proteins to adapt to their individual molecular binding partners and facilitates the binding process. This implies the necessity to consider protein internal motion in determining and predicting binding properties and in designing new binders. Although accounting for protein dynamics presents a challenge for computational approaches, it expands the structural and physicochemical space for compound design and thus offers the prospect of improved binding specificity and selectivity. A cavity on the surface or in the interior of a protein that possesses suitable properties for binding a ligand is usually referred to as a binding pocket. The set of amino acid residues around a binding pocket determines its physicochemical characteristics and, together with its shape and location in a protein, defines its functionality. Residues outside the binding site can also have a long-range effect on the properties of the binding pocket. Cavities with similar functionalities are often conserved across protein families. For example, enzyme active sites are usually concave surfaces that present amino acid residues in a suitable configuration for binding low molecular weight compounds. Macromolecular binding pockets, on the other hand, are located on the protein surface and are often shallower. The mobility of proteins allows the opening, closing, and adaptation of binding pockets to regulate binding processes and specific protein functionalities. For example, channels and tunnels can exist permanently or transiently to transport compounds to and from a binding site. The influence of protein flexibility on binding pockets can vary from small changes to an already existent pocket to the formation of a completely new pocket. Here, we review recent developments in computational methods to detect and define binding pockets and to study pocket dynamics. We introduce five

  19. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

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    Bagaria, A.; Swaminathan, S.; Kumaran, D.; Burley, S. K.

    2011-04-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and non-transport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. Typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP) and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consists of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations have been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the integral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, we report 1.9{angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound to

  20. Structural Basis for a Ribofuranosyl Binding Protein: Insights into the Furanose Specific Transport

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    A Bagaria; D Kumaran; S Burley; S Swaminathan

    2011-12-31

    The APT-binding cassette transporters (ABC-transporters) are members of one of the largest protein superfamilies, with representatives in all extant phyla. These integral membrane proteins utilize the energy of ATP hydrolysis to carry out certain biological processes, including translocation of various substrates across membranes and nontransport related processes such as translation of RNA and DNA repair. typically, such transport systems in bacteria consist of an ATP binding component, a transmembrane permease, and a periplasmic receptor or binding protein. Soluble proteins found in the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria serve as the primary receptors for transport of many compounds, such as sugars, small peptides, and some ions. Ligand binding activates these periplasmic components, permitting recognition by the membrane spanning domain, which supports for transport, and, in some cases, chemotaxis. Transport and chemotaxis processes appear to be independent of one another, and a few mutants of bifunctional periplasmic components reveal the absence of one or the other function. Previously published high-resolution X-ray structures of various periplasmic ligand binding proteins include Arabinose binding protein (ABP), Allose binding protein (ALBP), Glucose-galactose binding protein (GBP), and Ribose binding protein (RBP). Each of these proteins consits of two structurally similar domains connected by a three-stranded hinge region, with ligand buried between the domains. Upon ligand binding and release, various conformational changes have been observed. For RBP, open (apo) and closed (ligand bound) conformations hafve been reported and so for MBP. The closed/active form of the protein interacts with the ingral membrane component of the system in both transport and chemotaxis. Herein, they report 1.9 {angstrom} resolution X-ray structure of the R{sub f}BP periplasmic component of an ABC-type sugar transport system from Hahella chejuensis (UniProt Id Q2S7D2) bound

  1. Structural basis of heparin binding to camel peptidoglycan recognition protein-S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Dube, Divya; Sinha, Mau; Dey, Sharmistha; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2012-01-01

    Short peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP-S) is a member of the innate immunity system in mammals. PGRP-S from Camelus dromedarius (CPGRP-S) is found to be highly potent against bacterial infections. It is capable of binding to a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and peptidoglycan (PGN). The heparin-like polysaccharides have also been observed in some bacteria such as the capsule of K5 Escherichia coli thus making them relevant for determining the nature of their interactions with CPGRP-S. The binding studies of CPGRP-S with heparin disaccharide in solution using surface plasmon resonance gave a value 3.3×10-7 M for the dissociation constant (Kd). The structure of the heparin bound CPGRP-S determined at 2.8Å resolution revealed the presence of a bound heparin molecule in the binding pocket of CPGRP-S. It was found anchored tightly to the protein with the help of several ionic and hydrogen bonded interactions. Three sulphate groups of heparin S1, S2 and S3 have been found to interact with residues, Arg-31, Lys-90, Thr- 97, Asn-99 Asn-140, Gln-150 and Arg-170 of CPGRP-S. The binding site includes two subsites, S-I and S-II with cleft-like structures. Heparin disaccharide is bound in subsite S-I. Previously determined structures of the complexes of CPGRP-S with LPS, LTA and PGN also showed that their glycan moieties were also held in subsite S-I indicating that heparin disaccharide also represents an important element for the recognition by CPGRP-S. PMID:22509483

  2. Structure, Function, and Evolution of Biogenic Amine-binding Proteins in Soft Ticks

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    Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, Jose M.C.; Andersen, John F. (NIH)

    2008-08-19

    Two highly abundant lipocalins, monomine and monotonin, have been isolated from the salivary gland of the soft tick Argas monolakensis and shown to bind histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), respectively. The crystal structures of monomine and a paralog of monotonin were determined in the presence of ligands to compare the determinants of ligand binding. Both the structures and binding measurements indicate that the proteins have a single binding site rather than the two sites previously described for the female-specific histamine-binding protein (FS-HBP), the histamine-binding lipocalin of the tick Rhipicephalus appendiculatus. The binding sites of monomine and monotonin are similar to the lower, low affinity site of FS-HBP. The interaction of the protein with the aliphatic amine group of the ligand is very similar for the all of the proteins, whereas specificity is determined by interactions with the aromatic portion of the ligand. Interestingly, protein interaction with the imidazole ring of histamine differs significantly between the low affinity binding site of FS-HBP and monomine, suggesting that histamine binding has evolved independently in the two lineages. From the conserved features of these proteins, a tick lipocalin biogenic amine-binding motif could be derived that was used to predict biogenic amine-binding function in other tick lipocalins. Heterologous expression of genes from salivary gland libraries led to the discovery of biogenic amine-binding proteins in soft (Ornithodoros) and hard (Ixodes) tick genera. The data generated were used to reconstruct the most probable evolutionary pathway for the evolution of biogenic amine-binding in tick lipocalins.

  3. RNAcontext: a new method for learning the sequence and structure binding preferences of RNA-binding proteins.

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    Hilal Kazan

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. These proteins regulate post-transcriptional gene expression and have critical roles in numerous cellular processes including mRNA splicing, export, stability and translation. Despite their ubiquity and importance, the binding preferences for most RBPs are not well characterized. In vitro and in vivo studies, using affinity selection-based approaches, have successfully identified RNA sequence associated with specific RBPs; however, it is difficult to infer RBP sequence and structural preferences without specifically designed motif finding methods. In this study, we introduce a new motif-finding method, RNAcontext, designed to elucidate RBP-specific sequence and structural preferences with greater accuracy than existing approaches. We evaluated RNAcontext on recently published in vitro and in vivo RNA affinity selected data and demonstrate that RNAcontext identifies known binding preferences for several control proteins including HuR, PTB, and Vts1p and predicts new RNA structure preferences for SF2/ASF, RBM4, FUSIP1 and SLM2. The predicted preferences for SF2/ASF are consistent with its recently reported in vivo binding sites. RNAcontext is an accurate and efficient motif finding method ideally suited for using large-scale RNA-binding affinity datasets to determine the relative binding preferences of RBPs for a wide range of RNA sequences and structures.

  4. Crystal structure of the single-stranded RNA binding protein HutP from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiruselvam, Viswanathan; Sivaraman, Padavattan; Kumarevel, Thirumananseri; Ponnuswamy, Mondikalipudur Nanjappagounder

    2014-04-18

    RNA binding proteins control gene expression by the attenuation/antitermination mechanism. HutP is an RNA binding antitermination protein. It regulates the expression of hut operon when it binds with RNA by modulating the secondary structure of single-stranded hut mRNA. HutP necessitates the presence of l-histidine and divalent metal ion to bind with RNA. Herein, we report the crystal structures of ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)) and EDTA (0.5 M) treated ternary complex (HutP-l-histidine-Mg(2+)), solved at 1.9 Å and 2.5 Å resolutions, respectively, from Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. The addition of 0.5 M EDTA does not affect the overall metal-ion mediated ternary complex structure and however, the metal ions at the non-specific binding sites are chelated, as evidenced from the results of structural features.

  5. Predicting DNA-binding sites of proteins based on sequential and 3D structural information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bi-Qing; Feng, Kai-Yan; Ding, Juan; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play important roles in many biological processes. To understand the molecular mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction, it is necessary to identify the DNA-binding sites in DNA-binding proteins. In the last decade, computational approaches have been developed to predict protein-DNA-binding sites based solely on protein sequences. In this study, we developed a novel predictor based on support vector machine algorithm coupled with the maximum relevance minimum redundancy method followed by incremental feature selection. We incorporated not only features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, but also five three-dimensional (3D) structural features calculated from PDB data to predict the protein-DNA interaction sites. Feature analysis showed that 3D structural features indeed contributed to the prediction of DNA-binding site and it was demonstrated that the prediction performance was better with 3D structural features than without them. It was also shown via analysis of features from each site that the features of DNA-binding site itself contribute the most to the prediction. Our prediction method may become a useful tool for identifying the DNA-binding sites and the feature analysis described in this paper may provide useful insights for in-depth investigations into the mechanisms of protein-DNA interaction.

  6. Structural Insights for Engineering Binding Proteins Based on Non-Antibody Scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Engineered binding proteins derived from non-antibody scaffolds constitute an increasingly prominent class of reagents in both research and therapeutic applications. The growing number of crystal structures of these “alternative” scaffold-based binding proteins in complex with their targets illustrate the mechanisms of molecular recognition that are common among these systems and those unique to each. This information is useful for critically assessing and improving/expanding engineering stra...

  7. Structural basis for antifreeze activity of ice-binding protein from arctic yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Hyuck; Park, Ae Kyung; Do, Hackwon; Park, Kyoung Sun; Moh, Sang Hyun; Chi, Young Min; Kim, Hak Jun

    2012-03-30

    Arctic yeast Leucosporidium sp. produces a glycosylated ice-binding protein (LeIBP) with a molecular mass of ∼25 kDa, which can lower the freezing point below the melting point once it binds to ice. LeIBP is a member of a large class of ice-binding proteins, the structures of which are unknown. Here, we report the crystal structures of non-glycosylated LeIBP and glycosylated LeIBP at 1.57- and 2.43-Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis of the LeIBPs revealed a dimeric right-handed β-helix fold, which is composed of three parts: a large coiled structural domain, a long helix region (residues 96-115 form a long α-helix that packs along one face of the β-helix), and a C-terminal hydrophobic loop region ((243)PFVPAPEVV(251)). Unexpectedly, the C-terminal hydrophobic loop region has an extended conformation pointing away from the body of the coiled structural domain and forms intertwined dimer interactions. In addition, structural analysis of glycosylated LeIBP with sugar moieties attached to Asn(185) provides a basis for interpreting previous biochemical analyses as well as the increased stability and secretion of glycosylated LeIBP. We also determined that the aligned Thr/Ser/Ala residues are critical for ice binding within the B face of LeIBP using site-directed mutagenesis. Although LeIBP has a common β-helical fold similar to that of canonical hyperactive antifreeze proteins, the ice-binding site is more complex and does not have a simple ice-binding motif. In conclusion, we could identify the ice-binding site of LeIBP and discuss differences in the ice-binding modes compared with other known antifreeze proteins and ice-binding proteins.

  8. The Solution Structure, Binding Properties, and Dynamics of the Bacterial Siderophore-binding Protein FepB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chu, Byron C. H.; Otten, Renee; Krewulak, Karla D.; Mulder, Frans A.A.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) FepB plays a key role in transporting the catecholate siderophore ferric enterobactin from the outer to the inner membrane in Gram-negative bacteria. The solution structures of the 34-kDa apo- and holo-FepB from Escherichia coli, solved by NMR, represent the fir

  9. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes.

  10. Crystallographic structure and substrate-binding interactions of the molybdate-binding protein of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Andrea; Santacruz-Pérez, Carolina; Moutran, Alexandre; Ferreira, Luís Carlos Souza; Neshich, Goran; Gonçalves Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro

    2008-02-01

    In Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac or X. citri), the modA gene codes for a periplasmic protein (ModA) that is capable of binding molybdate and tungstate as part of the ABC-type transporter required for the uptake of micronutrients. In this study, we report the crystallographic structure of the Xac ModA protein with bound molybdate. The Xac ModA structure is similar to orthologs with known three-dimensional structures and consists of two nearly symmetrical domains separated by a hinge region where the oxyanion-binding site lies. Phylogenetic analysis of different ModA orthologs based on sequence alignments revealed three groups of molybdate-binding proteins: bacterial phytopathogens, enterobacteria and soil bacteria. Even though the ModA orthologs are segregated into different groups, the ligand-binding hydrogen bonds are mostly conserved, except for Archaeglobus fulgidus ModA. A detailed discussion of hydrophobic interactions in the active site is presented and two new residues, Ala38 and Ser151, are shown to be part of the ligand-binding pocket.

  11. Structural and binding properties of two paralogous fatty acid binding proteins of Taenia solium metacestode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Hee Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fatty acid (FA binding proteins (FABPs of helminths are implicated in acquisition and utilization of host-derived hydrophobic substances, as well as in signaling and cellular interactions. We previously demonstrated that secretory hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs of Taenia solium metacestode (TsM, a causative agent of neurocysticercosis (NC, shuttle FAs in the surrounding host tissues and inwardly transport the FAs across the parasite syncytial membrane. However, the protein molecules responsible for the intracellular trafficking and assimilation of FAs have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated two novel TsMFABP genes (TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2, which encoded 133- and 136-amino acid polypeptides with predicted molecular masses of 14.3 and 14.8 kDa, respectively. They shared 45% sequence identity with each other and 15-95% with other related-members. Homology modeling demonstrated a characteristic β-barrel composed of 10 anti-parallel β-strands and two α-helices. TsMFABP2 harbored two additional loops between β-strands two and three, and β-strands six and seven, respectively. TsMFABP1 was secreted into cyst fluid and surrounding environments, whereas TsMFABP2 was intracellularly confined. Partially purified native proteins migrated to 15 kDa with different isoelectric points of 9.2 (TsMFABP1 and 8.4 (TsMFABP2. Both native and recombinant proteins bound to 11-([5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl]aminoundecannoic acid, dansyl-DL-α-amino-caprylic acid, cis-parinaric acid and retinol, which were competitively inhibited by oleic acid. TsMFABP1 exhibited high affinity toward FA analogs. TsMFABPs showed weak binding activity to retinol, but TsMFABP2 showed relatively high affinity. Isolation of two distinct genes from an individual genome strongly suggested their paralogous nature. Abundant expression of TsMFABP1 and TsMFABP2 in the canal region of worm matched well with the histological distributions

  12. Structural delineation of stem-loop RNA binding by human TAF15 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Maruthi; Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-11-27

    Human TATA binding protein associated factor 2 N (TAF15) and Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are nucleic acid binding proteins belonging to the conserved FET family of proteins. They are involved in diverse processes such as pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA transport, and DNA binding. The absence of information regarding the structural mechanism employed by the FET family in recognizing and discriminating their cognate and non-cognate RNA targets has hampered the attainment of consensus on modes of protein-RNA binding for this family. Our study provides a molecular basis of this RNA recognition using a combination of solution-state NMR spectroscopy, calorimetry, docking and molecular dynamics simulation. Analysis of TAF15-RRM solution structure and its binding with stem-loop RNA has yielded conclusive evidence of a non-canonical mode of RNA recognition. Rather than classical stacking interactions that occur across nitrogen bases and aromatic amino acids on ribonucleoprotein sites, moderate-affinity hydrogen bonding network between the nitrogen bases in the stem-loop RNA and a concave face on the RRM surface primarily mediate TAF15-RRM RNA interaction. We have compared the binding affinities across a set of single-stranded RNA oligonucleotides to conclusively establish that RNA binding is dependent upon structural elements in the RNA rather than sequence.

  13. Crystal structure of cyclic nucleotide-binding-like protein from Brucella abortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zheng; Gao, Yuan; Dong, Jing; Ke, Yuehua; Li, Xuemei; Chen, Zeliang; Zhang, Xuejun C

    2015-12-25

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB)-like protein (CNB-L) from Brucella abortus shares sequence homology with CNB domain-containing proteins. We determined the crystal structure of CNB-L at 2.0 Å resolution in the absence of its C-terminal helix and nucleotide. The 3D structure of CNB-L is in a two-fold symmetric form. Each protomer shows high structure similarity to that of cGMP-binding domain-containing proteins, and likely mimics their nucleotide-free conformation. A key residue, Glu17, mediates the dimerization and prevents binding of cNMP to the canonical ligand-pocket. The structurally observed dimer of CNB-L is stable in solution, and thus is likely to be biologically relevant.

  14. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Capra

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/.

  15. Predicting protein ligand binding sites by combining evolutionary sequence conservation and 3D structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, John A; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M; Singh, Mona; Funkhouser, Thomas A

    2009-12-01

    Identifying a protein's functional sites is an important step towards characterizing its molecular function. Numerous structure- and sequence-based methods have been developed for this problem. Here we introduce ConCavity, a small molecule binding site prediction algorithm that integrates evolutionary sequence conservation estimates with structure-based methods for identifying protein surface cavities. In large-scale testing on a diverse set of single- and multi-chain protein structures, we show that ConCavity substantially outperforms existing methods for identifying both 3D ligand binding pockets and individual ligand binding residues. As part of our testing, we perform one of the first direct comparisons of conservation-based and structure-based methods. We find that the two approaches provide largely complementary information, which can be combined to improve upon either approach alone. We also demonstrate that ConCavity has state-of-the-art performance in predicting catalytic sites and drug binding pockets. Overall, the algorithms and analysis presented here significantly improve our ability to identify ligand binding sites and further advance our understanding of the relationship between evolutionary sequence conservation and structural and functional attributes of proteins. Data, source code, and prediction visualizations are available on the ConCavity web site (http://compbio.cs.princeton.edu/concavity/).

  16. Phosphorus Binding Sites in Proteins: Structural Preorganization and Coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gruber, Mathias Felix; Greisen, Per Junior; Junker, Märta Caroline;

    2014-01-01

    by the characteristics of the phosphorus compound and by the presence of cobound cations. The second shell, which supports the coordinating residues in the first shell, is found to consist mainly of protein backbone groups. Our results show how the second shell residue distribution is dictated mainly by the first shell...

  17. Recognition of anesthetic barbiturates by a protein binding site: a high resolution structural analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oakley

    Full Text Available Barbiturates potentiate GABA actions at the GABA(A receptor and act as central nervous system depressants that can induce effects ranging from sedation to general anesthesia. No structural information has been available about how barbiturates are recognized by their protein targets. For this reason, we tested whether these drugs were able to bind specifically to horse spleen apoferritin, a model protein that has previously been shown to bind many anesthetic agents with affinities that are closely correlated with anesthetic potency. Thiopental, pentobarbital, and phenobarbital were all found to bind to apoferritin with affinities ranging from 10-500 µM, approximately matching the concentrations required to produce anesthetic and GABAergic responses. X-ray crystal structures were determined for the complexes of apoferritin with thiopental and pentobarbital at resolutions of 1.9 and 2.0 Å, respectively. These structures reveal that the barbiturates bind to a cavity in the apoferritin shell that also binds haloalkanes, halogenated ethers, and propofol. Unlike these other general anesthetics, however, which rely entirely upon van der Waals interactions and the hydrophobic effect for recognition, the barbiturates are recognized in the apoferritin site using a mixture of both polar and nonpolar interactions. These results suggest that any protein binding site that is able to recognize and respond to the chemically and structurally diverse set of compounds used as general anesthetics is likely to include a versatile mixture of both polar and hydrophobic elements.

  18. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröpper, Kevin; Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M; Pohl, Ehmke; Usón, Isabel

    2014-06-01

    Protein-DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein-DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein-DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein-DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  19. Visualisation of variable binding pockets on protein surfaces by probabilistic analysis of related structure sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashford Paul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structures provide a valuable resource for rational drug design. For a protein with no known ligand, computational tools can predict surface pockets that are of suitable size and shape to accommodate a complementary small-molecule drug. However, pocket prediction against single static structures may miss features of pockets that arise from proteins' dynamic behaviour. In particular, ligand-binding conformations can be observed as transiently populated states of the apo protein, so it is possible to gain insight into ligand-bound forms by considering conformational variation in apo proteins. This variation can be explored by considering sets of related structures: computationally generated conformers, solution NMR ensembles, multiple crystal structures, homologues or homology models. It is non-trivial to compare pockets, either from different programs or across sets of structures. For a single structure, difficulties arise in defining particular pocket's boundaries. For a set of conformationally distinct structures the challenge is how to make reasonable comparisons between them given that a perfect structural alignment is not possible. Results We have developed a computational method, Provar, that provides a consistent representation of predicted binding pockets across sets of related protein structures. The outputs are probabilities that each atom or residue of the protein borders a predicted pocket. These probabilities can be readily visualised on a protein using existing molecular graphics software. We show how Provar simplifies comparison of the outputs of different pocket prediction algorithms, of pockets across multiple simulated conformations and between homologous structures. We demonstrate the benefits of use of multiple structures for protein-ligand and protein-protein interface analysis on a set of complexes and consider three case studies in detail: i analysis of a kinase superfamily highlights the

  20. Structural insight into DNA binding and oligomerization of the multifunctional Cox protein of bacteriophage P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P-A; Odegrip, Richard; Sehlén, Wilhelmina; Skaar, Karin; Svensson, Linda M; Massad, Tariq; Högbom, Martin; Haggård-Ljungquist, Elisabeth; Stenmark, Pål

    2014-02-01

    The Cox protein from bacteriophage P2 is a small multifunctional DNA-binding protein. It is involved in site-specific recombination leading to P2 prophage excision and functions as a transcriptional repressor of the P2 Pc promoter. Furthermore, it transcriptionally activates the unrelated, defective prophage P4 that depends on phage P2 late gene products for lytic growth. In this article, we have investigated the structural determinants to understand how P2 Cox performs these different functions. We have solved the structure of P2 Cox to 2.4 Å resolution. Interestingly, P2 Cox crystallized in a continuous oligomeric spiral with its DNA-binding helix and wing positioned outwards. The extended C-terminal part of P2 Cox is largely responsible for the oligomerization in the structure. The spacing between the repeating DNA-binding elements along the helical P2 Cox filament is consistent with DNA binding along the filament. Functional analyses of alanine mutants in P2 Cox argue for the importance of key residues for protein function. We here present the first structure from the Cox protein family and, together with previous biochemical observations, propose that P2 Cox achieves its various functions by specific binding of DNA while wrapping the DNA around its helical oligomer.

  1. Regulation of Structural Dynamics within a Signal Recognition Particle Promotes Binding of Protein Targeting Substrates*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kight, Alicia D.; Henderson, Rory; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Patel, Parth; Murchison, Marissa; Sharma, Priyanka; Goforth, Robyn L.; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh; Henry, Ralph L.; Heyes, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein targeting is critical in all living organisms and involves a signal recognition particle (SRP), an SRP receptor, and a translocase. In co-translational targeting, interactions among these proteins are mediated by the ribosome. In chloroplasts, the light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein (LHCP) in the thylakoid membrane is targeted post-translationally without a ribosome. A multidomain chloroplast-specific subunit of the SRP, cpSRP43, is proposed to take on the role of coordinating the sequence of targeting events. Here, we demonstrate that cpSRP43 exhibits significant interdomain dynamics that are reduced upon binding its SRP binding partner, cpSRP54. We showed that the affinity of cpSRP43 for the binding motif of LHCP (L18) increases when cpSRP43 is complexed to the binding motif of cpSRP54 (cpSRP54pep). These results support the conclusion that substrate binding to the chloroplast SRP is modulated by protein structural dynamics in which a major role of cpSRP54 is to improve substrate binding efficiency to the cpSRP. PMID:25918165

  2. Structural and functional features of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the mussel byssus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Michael H; Gertz, Melanie; Steegborn, Clemens; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-26

    Blue mussels adhere to surfaces by the byssus, a holdfast structure composed of individual threads representing a collagen fibre reinforced composite. Here, we present the crystal structure and function of one of its matrix proteins, the proximal thread matrix protein 1, which is present in the proximal section of the byssus. The structure reveals two von Willebrand factor type A domains linked by a two-β-stranded linker yielding a novel structural arrangement. In vitro, the protein binds heterologous collagens with high affinity and affects collagen assembly, morphology and arrangement of its fibrils. By providing charged surface clusters as well as insufficiently coordinated metal ions, the proximal thread matrix protein 1 might interconnect other byssal proteins and thereby contribute to the integrity of the byssal threads in vivo. Moreover, the protein could be used for adjusting the mechanical properties of collagen materials, a function likely important in the natural byssus.

  3. Predicting the Effect of Mutations on Protein-Protein Binding Interactions through Structure-Based Interface Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brender, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Yang

    2015-10-01

    The formation of protein-protein complexes is essential for proteins to perform their physiological functions in the cell. Mutations that prevent the proper formation of the correct complexes can have serious consequences for the associated cellular processes. Since experimental determination of protein-protein binding affinity remains difficult when performed on a large scale, computational methods for predicting the consequences of mutations on binding affinity are highly desirable. We show that a scoring function based on interface structure profiles collected from analogous protein-protein interactions in the PDB is a powerful predictor of protein binding affinity changes upon mutation. As a standalone feature, the differences between the interface profile score of the mutant and wild-type proteins has an accuracy equivalent to the best all-atom potentials, despite being two orders of magnitude faster once the profile has been constructed. Due to its unique sensitivity in collecting the evolutionary profiles of analogous binding interactions and the high speed of calculation, the interface profile score has additional advantages as a complementary feature to combine with physics-based potentials for improving the accuracy of composite scoring approaches. By incorporating the sequence-derived and residue-level coarse-grained potentials with the interface structure profile score, a composite model was constructed through the random forest training, which generates a Pearson correlation coefficient >0.8 between the predicted and observed binding free-energy changes upon mutation. This accuracy is comparable to, or outperforms in most cases, the current best methods, but does not require high-resolution full-atomic models of the mutant structures. The binding interface profiling approach should find useful application in human-disease mutation recognition and protein interface design studies.

  4. Structure solution of DNA-binding proteins and complexes with ARCIMBOLDO libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Meindl, Kathrin; Sammito, Massimo [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, (Germany); Pohl, Ehmke, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Durham University, (United Kingdom); Usón, Isabel, E-mail: ehmke.pohl@durham.ac.uk [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB-CSIC), (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); University of Göttingen, (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    The structure solution of DNA-binding protein structures and complexes based on the combination of location of DNA-binding protein motif fragments with density modification in a multi-solution frame is described. Protein–DNA interactions play a major role in all aspects of genetic activity within an organism, such as transcription, packaging, rearrangement, replication and repair. The molecular detail of protein–DNA interactions can be best visualized through crystallography, and structures emphasizing insight into the principles of binding and base-sequence recognition are essential to understanding the subtleties of the underlying mechanisms. An increasing number of high-quality DNA-binding protein structure determinations have been witnessed despite the fact that the crystallographic particularities of nucleic acids tend to pose specific challenges to methods primarily developed for proteins. Crystallographic structure solution of protein–DNA complexes therefore remains a challenging area that is in need of optimized experimental and computational methods. The potential of the structure-solution program ARCIMBOLDO for the solution of protein–DNA complexes has therefore been assessed. The method is based on the combination of locating small, very accurate fragments using the program Phaser and density modification with the program SHELXE. Whereas for typical proteins main-chain α-helices provide the ideal, almost ubiquitous, small fragments to start searches, in the case of DNA complexes the binding motifs and DNA double helix constitute suitable search fragments. The aim of this work is to provide an effective library of search fragments as well as to determine the optimal ARCIMBOLDO strategy for the solution of this class of structures.

  5. Solution structure of an archaeal DNA binding protein with an eukaryotic zinc finger fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Guillière

    Full Text Available While the basal transcription machinery in archaea is eukaryal-like, transcription factors in archaea and their viruses are usually related to bacterial transcription factors. Nevertheless, some of these organisms show predicted classical zinc fingers motifs of the C2H2 type, which are almost exclusively found in proteins of eukaryotes and most often associated with transcription regulators. In this work, we focused on the protein AFV1p06 from the hyperthermophilic archaeal virus AFV1. The sequence of the protein consists of the classical eukaryotic C2H2 motif with the fourth histidine coordinating zinc missing, as well as of N- and C-terminal extensions. We showed that the protein AFV1p06 binds zinc and solved its solution structure by NMR. AFV1p06 displays a zinc finger fold with a novel structure extension and disordered N- and C-termini. Structure calculations show that a glutamic acid residue that coordinates zinc replaces the fourth histidine of the C2H2 motif. Electromobility gel shift assays indicate that the protein binds to DNA with different affinities depending on the DNA sequence. AFV1p06 is the first experimentally characterised archaeal zinc finger protein with a DNA binding activity. The AFV1p06 protein family has homologues in diverse viruses of hyperthermophilic archaea. A phylogenetic analysis points out a common origin of archaeal and eukaryotic C2H2 zinc fingers.

  6. AH-DB: collecting protein structure pairs before and after binding

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the Apo–Holo DataBase (AH-DB, http://ahdb.ee.ncku.edu.tw/ and http://ahdb.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/), which provides corresponding pairs of protein structures before and after binding. Conformational transitions are commonly observed in various protein interactions that are involved in important biological functions. For example, copper–zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), which destroys free superoxide radicals in the body, undergoes a large conformational transition from an ‘open’ st...

  7. Crystal structures of multidrug binding protein TtgR in complex with antibiotics and plant antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alguel, Yilmaz; Meng, Cuixiang; Terán, Wilson; Krell, Tino; Ramos, Juan L; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2007-06-08

    Antibiotic resistance is a widely spread phenomenon. One major mechanism that underlies antibiotic resistance in bacteria is the active extrusion of toxic compounds through the membrane-bound efflux pumps that are often regulated at the transcriptional level. TtgR represses the transcription of TtgABC, a key efflux pump in Pseudomonas putida, which is highly resistant to antibiotics, solvents and toxic plant secondary products. Previously we showed that TtgR is the only reported repressor that binds to different classes of natural antimicrobial compounds, which are also extruded by the efflux pump. We report here five high-resolution crystal structures of TtgR from the solvent-tolerant strain DOT-T1E, including TtgR in complex with common antibiotics and plant secondary metabolites. We provide structural basis for the unique ligand binding properties of TtgR. We identify two distinct and overlapping ligand binding sites; the first one is broader and consists of mainly hydrophobic residues, whereas the second one is deeper and contains more polar residues including Arg176, a unique residue present in the DOT-T1E strain but not in other Pseudomonas strains. Phloretin, a plant antimicrobial, can bind to both binding sites with distinct binding affinities and stoichiometries. Results on ligand binding properties of native and mutant TtgR proteins using isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the binding affinities and stoichiometries, and suggest a potential positive cooperativity between the two binding sites. The importance of Arg176 in phloretin binding was further confirmed by the reduced ability of phloretin in releasing the mutant TtgR from bound DNA compared to the native protein. The results presented here highlight the importance and versatility of regulatory systems in bacterial antibiotic resistance and open up new avenues for novel antimicrobial development.

  8. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA-binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  9. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  10. Structure of armadillo ACBP: a new member of the acyl-CoA-binding protein family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costabel, Marcelo D., E-mail: costabel@criba.edu.ar [Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ermácora, Mario R. [Departamento de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Bernal (Argentina); Santomé, José A. [Instituto de Química y Fisicoquímica Biológicas (IQUIFYB), Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica (UBA-CONICET), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alzari, Pedro M. [Unité de Biochimie Structurale, Institut Pasteur, Paris (France); Guérin, Diego M. A. [Unidad de Biofisica (CSIC-UPV/EHU), PO Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Grupo de Biofísica, Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2006-10-01

    The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. The X-ray structure of the tetragonal form of apo acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from the Harderian gland of the South American armadillo Chaetophractus villosus has been solved. ACBP is a carrier for activated long-chain fatty acids and has been associated with many aspects of lipid metabolism. Its secondary structure is highly similar to that of the corresponding form of bovine ACBP and exhibits the unique flattened α-helical bundle (up–down–down–up) motif reported for animal, yeast and insect ACBPs. Conformational differences are located in loops and turns, although these structural differences do not suffice to account for features that could be related to the unusual biochemistry and lipid metabolism of the Harderian gland.

  11. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by ~70° between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into phosphonate uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise phosphonate biosensors based both on coupled small molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins. PMID:22019591

  12. Structure of the Escherichia coli Phosphonate Binding Protein PhnD and Rationally Optimized Phosphonate Biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alicea, Ismael; Marvin, Jonathan S.; Miklos, Aleksandr E.; Ellington, Andrew D.; Looger, Loren L.; Schreiter, Eric R. (Puerto Rico); (HHMI); (Texas)

    2012-09-17

    The phnD gene of Escherichia coli encodes the periplasmic binding protein of the phosphonate (Pn) uptake and utilization pathway. We have crystallized and determined structures of E. coli PhnD (EcPhnD) in the absence of ligand and in complex with the environmentally abundant 2-aminoethylphosphonate (2AEP). Similar to other bacterial periplasmic binding proteins, 2AEP binds near the center of mass of EcPhnD in a cleft formed between two lobes. Comparison of the open, unliganded structure with the closed 2AEP-bound structure shows that the two lobes pivot around a hinge by {approx}70{sup o} between the two states. Extensive hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions stabilize 2AEP, which binds to EcPhnD with low nanomolar affinity. These structures provide insight into Pn uptake by bacteria and facilitated the rational design of high signal-to-noise Pn biosensors based on both coupled small-molecule dyes and autocatalytic fluorescent proteins.

  13. Protein Structural Memory Influences Ligand Binding Mode(s) and Unbinding Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Caflisch, Amedeo; Hamm, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The binding of small molecules (e.g., natural ligands, metabolites, and drugs) to proteins governs most biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the unbinding of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) from two distinct states of a small rotamase enzyme, the FK506-binding protein (FKBP). These states correspond to the FKBP protein relaxed with and without DMSO in the active site. Since the time scale of ligand unbinding (2-20 ns) is faster than protein relaxation (100 ns), a novel methodology is introduced to relax the protein without having to introduce an artificial constraint. The simulation results show that the unbinding time is an order of magnitude longer for dissociation from the DMSO-bound state (holo-relaxed). That is, the actual rate of unbinding depends on the state of the protein, with the protein having a long-lived memory. The rate thus depends on the concentration of the ligand as the apo and holo states reflect low and high concentrations of DMSO, respectively. Moreover, there are multiple binding modes in the apo-relaxed state, while a single binding mode dominates the holo-relaxed state in which DMSO acts as hydrogen bond acceptor from the backbone NH of Ile56, as in the crystal structure of the DMSO/FKBP complex. The solvent relaxes very fast (∼1 ns) close to the NH of Ile56 and with the same time scale of the protein far away from the active site. These results have implications for high-throughput docking, which makes use of a rigid structure of the protein target.

  14. Crystal Structure of Okadaic Acid Binding Protein 2.1: A Sponge Protein Implicated in Cytotoxin Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehara, Haruhiko; Makino, Marie; Kodama, Koichiro; Konoki, Keiichi; Ito, Takuhiro; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2015-07-06

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a marine polyether cytotoxin that was first isolated from the marine sponge Halichondria okadai. OA is a potent inhibitor of protein serine/threonine phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A, and the structural basis of phosphatase inhibition has been well investigated. However, the role and mechanism of OA retention in the marine sponge have remained elusive. We have solved the crystal structure of okadaic acid binding protein 2.1 (OABP2.1) isolated from H. okadai; it has strong affinity for OA and limited sequence homology to other proteins. The structure revealed that OABP2.1 consists of two α-helical domains, with the OA molecule deeply buried inside the protein. In addition, the global fold of OABP2.1 was unexpectedly similar to that of aequorin, a jellyfish photoprotein. The presence of structural homologues suggested that, by using similar protein scaffolds, marine invertebrates have developed diverse survival systems adapted to their living environments.

  15. Structure and DNA-binding of meiosis-specific protein Hop2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Donghua; Moktan, Hem; Pezza, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Here we report structure elucidation of the DNA binding domain of homologous pairing protein 2 (Hop2), which is important to gene diversity when sperms and eggs are produced. Together with another protein Mnd1, Hop2 enhances the strand invasion activity of recombinase Dmc1 by over 30 times, facilitating proper synapsis of homologous chromosomes. However, the structural and biochemical bases for the function of Hop2 and Mnd1 have not been well understood. As a first step toward such understanding, we recently solved the structure for the N-terminus of Hop2 (1-84) using solution NMR. This fragment shows a typical winged-head conformation with recognized DNA binding activity. DNA interacting sites were then investigated by chemical shift perturbations in a titration experiment. Information of these sites was used to guide protein-DNA docking with MD simulation, revealing that helix 3 is stably lodged in the DNA major groove and that wing 1 (connecting strands 2 and 3) transiently comes in contact with the minor groove in nanosecond time scale. Mutagenesis analysis further confirmed the DNA binding sites in this fragment of the protein.

  16. Subfamily-specific adaptations in the structures of two penicillin-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil M Prigozhin

    Full Text Available Beta-lactam antibiotics target penicillin-binding proteins including several enzyme classes essential for bacterial cell-wall homeostasis. To better understand the functional and inhibitor-binding specificities of penicillin-binding proteins from the pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we carried out structural and phylogenetic analysis of two predicted D,D-carboxypeptidases, Rv2911 and Rv3330. Optimization of Rv2911 for crystallization using directed evolution and the GFP folding reporter method yielded a soluble quadruple mutant. Structures of optimized Rv2911 bound to phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and Rv3330 bound to meropenem show that, in contrast to the nonspecific inhibitor, meropenem forms an extended interaction with the enzyme along a conserved surface. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Rv2911 and Rv3330 belong to different clades that emerged in Actinobacteria and are not represented in model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Clade-specific adaptations allow these enzymes to fulfill distinct physiological roles despite strict conservation of core catalytic residues. The characteristic differences include potential protein-protein interaction surfaces and specificity-determining residues surrounding the catalytic site. Overall, these structural insights lay the groundwork to develop improved beta-lactam therapeutics for tuberculosis.

  17. Structure-Based Design of a Periplasmic Binding Protein Antagonist that Prevents Domain Closure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrok, M. Jack; Zhu, Yimin; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.; (UW)

    2009-07-31

    Many receptors undergo ligand-induced conformational changes to initiate signal transduction. Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) are bacterial receptors that exhibit dramatic conformational changes upon ligand binding. These proteins mediate a wide variety of fundamental processes including transport, chemotaxis, and quorum sensing. Despite the importance of these receptors, no PBP antagonists have been identified and characterized. In this study, we identify 3-O-methyl-D-glucose as an antagonist of glucose/galactose-binding protein and demonstrate that it inhibits glucose chemotaxis in E. coli. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray crystallography, we show that this antagonist acts as a wedge. It prevents the large-scale domain closure that gives rise to the active signaling state. Guided by these results and the structures of open and closed glucose/galactose-binding protein, we designed and synthesized an antagonist composed of two linked glucose residues. These findings provide a blueprint for the design of new bacterial PBP inhibitors. Given the key role of PBPs in microbial physiology, we anticipate that PBP antagonists will have widespread uses as probes and antimicrobial agents.

  18. The complex interplay between ligand binding and conformational structure of the folate binding protein (folate receptor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Hansen, Steen I.

    2015-01-01

    , and the binding induces a conformational change with formation of hydrophilic and stable holo-FBP. Holo-FBP exhibits a ligand-mediated concentration-dependent self-association into multimers of great thermal and chemical stability due to strong intermolecular forces. Both ligand and FBP are thus protected against...

  19. Structural insights into alginate binding by bacterial cell-surface protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtrirath, Kanate; Murata, Kousaku; Hashimoto, Wataru

    2015-03-02

    A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. strain A1 inducibly forms a mouth-like pit on the cell surface in the presence of alginate and directly incorporates polymers into the cytoplasm via the pit and ABC transporter. Among the bacterial proteins involved in import of alginate, a cell-surface EfeO-like Algp7 shows an ability to bind alginate, suggesting its contribution to accumulate alginate in the pit. Here, we show identification of its positively charged cluster involved in alginate binding using X-ray crystallography, docking simulation, and site-directed mutagenesis. The tertiary structure of Algp7 was determined at a high resolution (1.99Å) by molecular replacement, although no alginates were included in the structure. Thus, an in silico model of Algp7/oligoalginate was constructed by docking simulation using atomic coordinates of Algp7 and alginate oligosaccharides, where some charged residues were found to be potential candidates for alginate binding. Site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and five purified mutants K68A, K69A, E194A, N221A, and K68A/K69A were subjected to a binding assay. UV absorption difference spectroscopy along with differential scanning fluorimetry analysis indicated that K68A/K69A exhibited a significant reduction in binding affinity with alginate than wild-type Algp7. Based on these data, Lys68/Lys69 residues of Algp7 probably play an important role in binding alginate.

  20. AH-DB: collecting protein structure pairs before and after binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Darby Tien-Hao; Yao, Tsung-Ju; Fan, Chen-Yu; Chiang, Chih-Yun; Bai, Yi-Han

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the Apo-Holo DataBase (AH-DB, http://ahdb.ee.ncku.edu.tw/ and http://ahdb.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/), which provides corresponding pairs of protein structures before and after binding. Conformational transitions are commonly observed in various protein interactions that are involved in important biological functions. For example, copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1), which destroys free superoxide radicals in the body, undergoes a large conformational transition from an 'open' state (apo structure) to a 'closed' state (holo structure). Many studies have utilized collections of apo-holo structure pairs to investigate the conformational transitions and critical residues. However, the collection process is usually complicated, varies from study to study and produces a small-scale data set. AH-DB is designed to provide an easy and unified way to prepare such data, which is generated by identifying/mapping molecules in different Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries. Conformational transitions are identified based on a refined alignment scheme to overcome the challenge that many structures in the PDB database are only protein fragments and not complete proteins. There are 746,314 apo-holo pairs in AH-DB, which is about 30 times those in the second largest collection of similar data. AH-DB provides sophisticated interfaces for searching apo-holo structure pairs and exploring conformational transitions from apo structures to the corresponding holo structures.

  1. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhani Nagpal

    Full Text Available Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS. Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  2. Decoding Structural Properties of a Partially Unfolded Protein Substrate: En Route to Chaperone Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Suhani; Tiwari, Satyam; Mapa, Koyeli; Thukral, Lipi

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins comprising of complex topologies require molecular chaperones to achieve their unique three-dimensional folded structure. The E.coli chaperone, GroEL binds with a large number of unfolded and partially folded proteins, to facilitate proper folding and prevent misfolding and aggregation. Although the major structural components of GroEL are well defined, scaffolds of the non-native substrates that determine chaperone-mediated folding have been difficult to recognize. Here we performed all-atomistic and replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations to dissect non-native ensemble of an obligate GroEL folder, DapA. Thermodynamics analyses of unfolding simulations revealed populated intermediates with distinct structural characteristics. We found that surface exposed hydrophobic patches are significantly increased, primarily contributed from native and non-native β-sheet elements. We validate the structural properties of these conformers using experimental data, including circular dichroism (CD), 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (ANS) binding measurements and previously reported hydrogen-deutrium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). Further, we constructed network graphs to elucidate long-range intra-protein connectivity of native and intermediate topologies, demonstrating regions that serve as central "hubs". Overall, our results implicate that genomic variations (or mutations) in the distinct regions of protein structures might disrupt these topological signatures disabling chaperone-mediated folding, leading to formation of aggregates.

  3. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  4. Effects of Different Comsteep Liquids on Structure of Starch and Protein Binding in Corn Endosperm

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Yan; Xinhua Li; Xiaojun Qi

    2015-01-01

    The changes in the structures of corn endosperms immersed in different reagents were studied, in order to preliminarily determine the mode of binding of starch and protein in the endosperm. The corn endosperm was immersed in Sulfurous acid, NaOH, ethanol, L-cysteine and morel berry, respectively. The dissociated starch content was analyzed using water as the reference. The results of the treatment were analyzed by the dissociated starch content, optical microscopy and scanning electron micros...

  5. Effects of Different Comsteep Liquids on Structure of Starch and Protein Binding in Corn Endosperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Yan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The changes in the structures of corn endosperms immersed in different reagents were studied, in order to preliminarily determine the mode of binding of starch and protein in the endosperm. The corn endosperm was immersed in Sulfurous acid, NaOH, ethanol, L-cysteine and morel berry, respectively. The dissociated starch content was analyzed using water as the reference. The results of the treatment were analyzed by the dissociated starch content, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The test results showed that by immersing in NaOH solution, the protein matrix was effectively decomposed, the protein in the endosperm was dissolved and the highest amount of starch granules were released. Sulfurous acid and L-cysteine solution could make the protein matrix into pieces by destroying intermolecular disulfide bridge and the starch granules would be released. There were some holes on the surface of starch granules after L-cysteine steeping. Immersed in the morel berry, there were holes on the protein matrix surface and the water absorption of corn endosperm was improved. In case of the sample immersed in ethanol, the zein was dissolved, whereas the matrix protein was still intact with the starch grains that still bound to it. By analysis of the microscopic structure and morphological change of starch and protein in corn endospers in different comsteep liquor, it is demonstrated that the main reason which the starch grains were tightly wrapped by Glutenin is the intermolecular disulfide bonds in glutelin. In addition, a part of the protein combined with starch granules directly. The study provided a reference for exploring the structure of binding of starch and protein and their interaction in corn.

  6. Structure prediction and binding sites analysis of curcin protein of Jatropha curcas using computational approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mugdha; Gupta, Shishir K; Abhilash, P C; Singh, Nandita

    2012-07-01

    Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs) are defense proteins in a number of higher-plant species that are directly targeted toward herbivores. Jatropha curcas is one of the biodiesel plants having RIPs. The Jatropha seed meal, after extraction of oil, is rich in curcin, a highly toxic RIP similar to ricin, which makes it unsuitable for animal feed. Although the toxicity of curcin is well documented in the literature, the detailed toxic properties and the 3D structure of curcin has not been determined by X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy or any in silico techniques to date. In this pursuit, the structure of curcin was modeled by a composite approach of 3D structure prediction using threading and ab initio modeling. Assessment of model quality was assessed by methods which include Ramachandran plot analysis and Qmean score estimation. Further, we applied the protein-ligand docking approach to identify the r-RNA binding residue of curcin. The present work provides the first structural insight into the binding mode of r-RNA adenine to the curcin protein and forms the basis for designing future inhibitors of curcin. Cloning of a future peptide inhibitor within J. curcas can produce non-toxic varieties of J. curcas, which would make the seed-cake suitable as animal feed without curcin detoxification.

  7. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  8. Structures of Adnectin/Protein Complexes Reveal an Expanded Binding Footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramamurthy, Vidhyashankar; Krystek, Jr., Stanley R.; Bush, Alexander; Wei, Anzhi; Emanuel, Stuart L.; Gupta, Ruchira Das; Janjua, Ahsen; Cheng, Lin; Murdock, Melissa; Abramczyk, Bozena; Cohen, Daniel; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul; Davis, Jonathan H.; Dabritz, Michael; McLaughlin, Douglas C.; Russo, Katie A.; Chao, Ginger; Wright, Martin C.; Jenny, Victoria A.; Engle, Linda J.; Furfine, Eric; Sheriff, Steven (BMS)

    2014-10-02

    Adnectins are targeted biologics derived from the tenth type III domain of human fibronectin ({sup 10}Fn3), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. Target-specific binders are selected from libraries generated by diversifying the three {sup 10}Fn3 loops that are analogous to the complementarity determining regions of antibodies. The crystal structures of two Adnectins were determined, each in complex with its therapeutic target, EGFR or IL-23. Both Adnectins bind different epitopes than those bound by known monoclonal antibodies. Molecular modeling suggests that some of these epitopes might not be accessible to antibodies because of the size and concave shape of the antibody combining site. In addition to interactions from the Adnectin diversified loops, residues from the N terminus and/or the {beta} strands interact with the target proteins in both complexes. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis confirmed the calculated binding energies of these {beta} strand interactions, indicating that these nonloop residues can expand the available binding footprint.

  9. Myosin binding protein C:Structural abnormalities in familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The muscle protein myosin binding protein C (MyBPC) is a large multi-domain protein whose role in the sarcomere is complex and not yet fully understood. Mutations in MyBPC are strongly associated with the heart disease familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) and these experiments of nature have provided some insight into the intricate workings of this protein in the heart. While some regions of the MyBPC molecule have been assigned a function in the regulation of muscle contraction, the interaction of other regions with various parts of the myosin molecule and the sarcomeric proteins, actin and titin, remain obscure. In additic n, several intra-domain interactions between adjacent MyBPC molecules have been identified. Although the basic structure of the molecule (a series of immunoglobulin and fibronectin domains) has been elucidated, the assembly of MyBPC in the sarcomere is a topic for debate. By analysing the MyBPC sequence with respect to FHC-causing mutations it is possible to identify individual residues or regions of each domain that may be important either for binding or regulation. This review looks at the current literature, in concert with alignments and the structural models of MyBPC, in an attempt to understand how FHC mutations may lead to the disease state.

  10. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffatt Barbara A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. Results The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192 in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Conclusions Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure.

  11. Structure and Synaptic Function of Metal Binding to the Amyloid Precursor Protein and its Proteolytic Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Klemens; August, Alexander; Pietrzik, Claus U.; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is ultimately linked to the amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, current research reveals an important synaptic function of APP and APP-like proteins (APLP1 and 2). In this context various neurotrophic and neuroprotective functions have been reported for the APP proteolytic fragments sAPPα, sAPPβ and the monomeric amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ). APP is a metalloprotein and binds copper and zinc ions. Synaptic activity correlates with a release of these ions into the synaptic cleft and dysregulation of their homeostasis is linked to different neurodegenerative diseases. Metal binding to APP or its fragments affects its structure and its proteolytic cleavage and therefore its physiological function at the synapse. Here, we summarize the current data supporting this hypothesis and provide a model of how these different mechanisms might be intertwined with each other. PMID:28197076

  12. Structural and functional analyses of the putrescine binding protein PotF from Xanthomonas citri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana, L.D.F.; Balan, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias - LNBIO, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The focus of our group is to determinate the role of ABC transporters in the physiology and growth of Xanthomonas citri, a phytopathogenic bacteria that infects citrus plants causing significant losses for the economy. One of the ABC transporters identified in the X. citri genome and that was showed to be active during the infection in Citrus sinensis plants was the putrescine transporter. This transporter consists of two internal membrane proteins PotG and PotH that form a pore, a cytoplasmic protein that gives energy for the transport and the periplasmic-binding protein PotF, which is responsible for the affinity and specificity of the system. Its function is associated to the microbial carcinogenesis, biofilm formation, escape from phagolysosomes, bacteriocin production, toxin activity and protection from oxidative and acid stress. In this work, we show for the first time, the expression, purification, functional and structural analyses of the X. citri PotF protein. The PotF was expressed from Escherichia coli cells strain Arctic, as a 40 kDa soluble protein, after induction of IPTG for twenty four hours at thirteen deg C. Using immobilized metal affinity chromatography for purification, the protein was eluted in the fractions with 10-500 mM of imidazole. To test the folding and cability to bind putrescine, spectroscopic analyses were performed using circular dichroism and intrinsic fluorescence. The data showed that PotF suffers conformational changes in presence of ligands and in different pH, suggesting a possible interaction with the tested ligand. Moreover, based on bioinformatics studies and molecular modeling analyses, we showed that X. citri PotF is highly conserved when compared to orthologs present in other bacteria, including the residues that form the ligand-binding site. The production of PotF in a soluble and stable form will allow us to start the crystallization trials in attempt to solve its structure. (author)

  13. The quaternary structure of the recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein is modulated by chemical denaturants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Stepanenko

    Full Text Available A large group of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs has attracted great scientific interest as promising building blocks in constructing optical biosensors for dangerous substances, such as toxic and explosive molecules. Native tissue-extracted bovine OBP (bOBP has a unique dimer folding pattern that involves crossing the α-helical domain in each monomer over the other monomer's β-barrel. In contrast, recombinant bOBP maintaining the high level of stability inherent to native tissue bOBP is produced in a stable native-like state with a decreased tendency for dimerization and is a mixture of monomers and dimers in a buffered solution. This work is focused on the study of the quaternary structure and the folding-unfolding processes of the recombinant bOBP in the absence and in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl. Our results show that the recombinant bOBP native dimer is only formed at elevated GdnHCl concentrations (1.5 M. This process requires re-organizing the protein structure by progressing through the formation of an intermediate state. The bOBP dimerization process appears to be irreversible and it occurs before the protein unfolds. Though the observed structural changes for recombinant bOBP at pre-denaturing GdnHCl concentrations show a local character and the overall protein structure is maintained, such changes should be considered where the protein is used as a sensitive element in a biosensor system.

  14. Structural and dynamical characterization of a biologically active unfolded fibronectin-binding protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkett, C J; Redfield, C; Jones, J A; Dodd, I; Hubbard, J; Smith, R A; Smith, L J; Dobson, C M

    1998-12-01

    A 130-residue fragment (D1-D4) taken from a fibronectin-binding protein of Staphylococcus aureus, which contains four fibronectin-binding repeats and is unfolded but biologically active at neutral pH, has been studied extensively by NMR spectroscopy. Using heteronuclear multidimensional techniques, the conformational properties of D1-D4 have been defined at both a global and a local level. Diffusion studies give an average effective radius of 26.2 +/- 0.1 A, approximately 75% larger than that expected for a globular protein of this size. Analysis of chemical shift, 3JHNalpha coupling constant, and NOE data show that the experimental parameters agree well overall with values measured in short model peptides and with predictions from a statistical model for a random coil. Sequences where specific features give deviations from these predictions for a random coil have however been identified. These arise from clustering of hydrophobic side chains and electrostatic interactions between charged groups. 15N relaxation studies demonstrate that local fluctuations of the chain are the dominant motional process that gives rise to relaxation of the 15N nuclei, with a persistence length of approximately 7-10 residues for the segmental motion. The consequences of the structural and dynamical properties of this unfolded protein for its biological role of binding to fibronectin have been considered. It is found that the regions of the sequence involved in binding have a high propensity for populating extended conformations, a feature that would allow a number of both charged and hydrophobic groups to be presented to fibronectin for highly specific binding.

  15. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility.

  16. Structural basis for antagonism of human interleukin 18 by poxvirus interleukin 18-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumm, Brian; Meng, Xiangzhi; Li, Yongchao; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng (Texas-HSC); (OKLU)

    2009-07-10

    Human interleukin-18 (hIL-18) is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation and host defense against microbes. Its activity is regulated in vivo by a naturally occurring antagonist, the human IL-18-binding protein (IL-18BP). Functional homologs of human IL-18BP are encoded by all orthopoxviruses, including variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox. They contribute to virulence by suppressing IL-18-mediated immune responses. Here, we describe the 2.0-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of an orthopoxvirus IL-18BP, ectromelia virus IL-18BP (ectvIL-18BP), in complex with hIL-18. The hIL-18 structure in the complex shows significant conformational change at the binding interface compared with the structure of ligand-free hIL-18, indicating that the binding is mediated by an induced-fit mechanism. EctvIL-18BP adopts a canonical Ig fold and interacts via one edge of its {beta}-sandwich with 3 cavities on the hIL-18 surface through extensive hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. Most of the ectvIL-18BP residues that participate in these interactions are conserved in both human and viral homologs, explaining their functional equivalence despite limited sequence homology. EctvIL-18BP blocks a putative receptor-binding site on IL-18, thus preventing IL-18 from engaging its receptor. Our structure provides insights into how IL-18BPs modulate hIL-18 activity. The revealed binding interface provides the basis for rational design of inhibitors against orthopoxvirus IL-18BP (for treating orthopoxvirus infection) or hIL-18 (for treating certain inflammatory and autoimmune diseases).

  17. Ligand binding mechanics of maltose binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertz, Morten; Rief, Matthias

    2009-11-13

    In the past decade, single-molecule force spectroscopy has provided new insights into the key interactions stabilizing folded proteins. A few recent studies probing the effects of ligand binding on mechanical protein stability have come to quite different conclusions. While some proteins seem to be stabilized considerably by a bound ligand, others appear to be unaffected. Since force acts as a vector in space, it is conceivable that mechanical stabilization by ligand binding is dependent on the direction of force application. In this study, we vary the direction of the force to investigate the effect of ligand binding on the stability of maltose binding protein (MBP). MBP consists of two lobes connected by a hinge region that move from an open to a closed conformation when the ligand maltose binds. Previous mechanical experiments, where load was applied to the N and C termini, have demonstrated that MBP is built up of four building blocks (unfoldons) that sequentially detach from the folded structure. In this study, we design the pulling direction so that force application moves the two MBP lobes apart along the hinge axis. Mechanical unfolding in this geometry proceeds via an intermediate state whose boundaries coincide with previously reported MBP unfoldons. We find that in contrast to N-C-terminal pulling experiments, the mechanical stability of MBP is increased by ligand binding when load is applied to the two lobes and force breaks the protein-ligand interactions directly. Contour length measurements indicate that MBP is forced into an open conformation before unfolding even if ligand is bound. Using mutagenesis experiments, we demonstrate that the mechanical stabilization effect is due to only a few key interactions of the protein with its ligand. This work illustrates how varying the direction of the applied force allows revealing important details about the ligand binding mechanics of a large protein.

  18. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses.

  19. Exploiting structural and topological information to improve prediction of RNA-protein binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-protein interactions are important for a wide range of biological processes. Current computational methods to predict interacting residues in RNA-protein interfaces predominately rely on sequence data. It is, however, known that interface residue propensity is closely correlated with structural properties. In this paper we systematically study information obtained from sequences and structures and compare their contributions in this prediction problem. Particularly, different geometrical and network topological properties of protein structures are evaluated to improve interface residue prediction accuracy. Results We have quantified the impact of structural information on the prediction accuracy in comparison to the purely sequence based approach using two machine learning techniques: Naïve Bayes classifiers and Support Vector Machines. The highest AUC of 0.83 was achieved by a Support Vector Machine, exploiting PSI-BLAST profile, accessible surface area, betweenness-centrality and retention coefficient as input features. Taking into account that our results are based on a larger non-redundant data set, the prediction accuracy is considerably higher than reported in previous, comparable studies. A protein-RNA interface predictor (PRIP and the data set have been made available at http://www.qfab.org/PRIP. Conclusion Graph-theoretic properties of residue contact maps derived from protein structures such as betweenness-centrality can supplement sequence or structure features to improve the prediction accuracy for binding residues in RNA-protein interactions. While Support Vector Machines perform better on this task, Naïve Bayes classifiers also have been found to achieve good prediction accuracies but require much less training time and are an attractive choice for large scale predictions.

  20. Crystal structure of YrrB: a TPR protein with an unusual peptide-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dohyun; Oh, Jongkil; Kim, Kyunggon; Lim, Hyosun; Kim, Youngsoo

    2007-09-01

    YrrB is a hypothetical protein containing a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain from a Gram-positive bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. We determined YrrB structure in the C2 space group to 2.5A resolution, which is the first TPR structure of the Gram-positive bacterium B. subtilis. In contrast to other known TPR structures, the concave surface of the YrrB TPR domain is composed of the putative peptide-binding pocket lined with positively-charged residues. This unique charge distribution reveals that YrrB can interact with partner proteins via an unusual TPR-mediated interaction mode, compared to that of other TPR-containing structures. Functional annotation using genomics analysis suggested that YrrB may be an interacting mediator in the complex formation among RNA sulfuration components. No proteins containing a TPR domain have been identified in the biosynthesis of sulfur-containing biomolecules. Thus, YrrB could play a new role as a connecting module among those proteins in the conserved gene cluster for RNA sulfuration.

  1. Solution structure of FK506-binding protein 12 from Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Shin, Joon; Nguyen, Quoc Toan; Harikishore, Amaravadhi; Baek, Kwanghee; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2012-10-01

    Dengue remains one of the major public concerns as the virus eludes the immune response. Currently, no vaccines or antiviral therapeutics are available for dengue prevention or treatment. Immunosuppressive drug FK506 shows an antimalarial activity, and its molecular target, FK506-binding protein (FKBP), was identified in human Plasmodium parasites. Likewise, a conserved FKBP family protein has also been identified in Aedes aegypti (AaFKBP12), which is expected to play a similar role in the life cycle of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector of dengue virus infection. As FKBPs belong to a highly conserved class of immunophilin family and are involved in key biological regulations, they are considered as attractive pharmacological targets. In this study, we have determined the nuclear magnetic resonance solution structure of AaFKBP12, a novel FKBP member from Aedes aegypti, and presented its structural features, which may facilitate the design of potential inhibitory ligands against the dengue-transmitting mosquitoes.

  2. Structural, vibrational, NMR, quantum chemical, DNA binding and protein docking studies of two flexible imine oximes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    YUNUS KAYA

    2016-09-01

    Two flexible imine oxime molecules, namely, 3-(pyridin-2-ylmethylimino)-butan-2-one oxime (HL¹) and 3-(pyridin-2-ylmethylimino)-pentan-2-one oxime (HL²) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR and NMR techniques. The conformational behavior was investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP method combined with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. As a result of the conformational studies, three stable molecules and the most stable conformer were determined for the both imine oximes. The spectroscopic properties such as vibrational and NMR were calculated for the most stable conformer of the HL¹ and HL². The calculation results were applied to simulate infrared spectra of the title compounds, which show good agreement with observed spectra. In addition, the stable three molecules of the both imine oximes have been used to carry out DNA binding and protein docking studies with DNA and protein structures (downloaded from Protein Data Bank) using Discovery Studio 3.5 to find the most preferred binding mode of the ligands inside the DNA and protein cavity.

  3. Evidence for zinc binding by two structural proteins of Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, C. J.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Workers in our laboratory previously reported the possibility of cation involvement in the in vitro dissociation of the Plodia interpunctella granulosis virus nucleocapsids (K. A. Tweeten, L. A. Bulla, Jr., and R. A. Consigli, J. Virol. 33:866-876, 1980; M. E. Wilson and R. A. Consigli, Virology 143:516-525, 1985). The current study found zinc associated with both granulosis virus nucleocapsids and granulin by atomic absorption analysis. A blotting assay with 65Zn2+ specifically identified the radioactive cation as binding to two viral structural proteins, granulin and VP12. These findings indicate that zinc may have a critical role in maintaining virus stability.

  4. Acyl-CoA binding proteins; structural and functional conservation over 2000 MYA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faergeman, Nils J; Wadum, Majken; Feddersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    -CoA binding protein, ACBP, has been proposed to play a pivotal role in the intracellular trafficking and utilization of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA esters. Depletion of acyl-CoA binding protein in yeast results in aberrant organelle morphology incl. fragmented vacuoles, multi-layered plasma membranes...

  5. Structural and functional studies of conserved nucleotide-binding protein LptB in lipopolysaccharide transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhongshan [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Xiang, Quanju [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); Department of Microbiology, College of Resource and Environment Science, Sichuan Agriculture University, Yaan 625000 (China); Zhu, Xiaofeng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Dong, Haohao [Biomedical Sciences Research Complex, School of Chemistry, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9ST (United Kingdom); He, Chuan [School of Electronics and Information, Wuhan Technical College of Communications, No. 6 Huangjiahu West Road, Hongshan District, Wuhan, Hubei 430065 (China); Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Yizheng [College of Life Sciences, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Wenjian, E-mail: Wenjian166@gmail.com [Laboratory of Department of Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, 58 Zhongshan Road II, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510080 (China); Dong, Changjiang, E-mail: C.Dong@uea.ac.uk [Biomedical Research Centre, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Determination of the structure of the wild-type LptB in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}. • Demonstrated that ATP binding residues are essential for LptB’s ATPase activity and LPS transport. • Dimerization is required for the LptB’s function and LPS transport. • Revealed relationship between activity of the LptB and the vitality of E. coli cells. - Abstract: Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which plays an essential role in protecting the bacteria from harsh conditions and antibiotics. LPS molecules are transported from the inner membrane to the outer membrane by seven LPS transport proteins. LptB is vital in hydrolyzing ATP to provide energy for LPS transport, however this mechanism is not very clear. Here we report wild-type LptB crystal structure in complex with ATP and Mg{sup 2+}, which reveals that its structure is conserved with other nucleotide-binding proteins (NBD). Structural, functional and electron microscopic studies demonstrated that the ATP binding residues, including K42 and T43, are crucial for LptB’s ATPase activity, LPS transport and the vitality of Escherichia coli cells with the exceptions of H195A and Q85A; the H195A mutation does not lower its ATPase activity but impairs LPS transport, and Q85A does not alter ATPase activity but causes cell death. Our data also suggest that two protomers of LptB have to work together for ATP hydrolysis and LPS transport. These results have significant impacts in understanding the LPS transport mechanism and developing new antibiotics.

  6. Structural insights into nonvesicular lipid transport by the oxysterol binding protein homologue family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Junsen; Manik, Mohammad Kawsar; Yang, Huiseon; Im, Young Jun

    2016-08-01

    Sterols such as cholesterol in mammals and ergosterol in fungi are essential membrane components and play a key role in membrane function and in cell signaling. The intracellular distribution and processing of sterols and other phospholipids are in part carried out by oxysterol binding protein-related proteins (ORPs) in eukaryotes. Seven ORPs (Osh1-Osh7 proteins) in yeast have distinct functions in maintaining distribution, metabolism and signaling of intracellular lipids but they share at least one essential function. Significant progress has been made in understanding the ligand specificity and mechanism of non-vesicular lipid transport by ORPs. The unique structural features of Osh proteins explain the diversity and specificity of functions in PI(4)P-coupled lipid transport optimized in membrane contact sites. This review discusses the current advances in structural biology regarding this protein family and its potential functions, introducing them as the key players in the novel pathways of phosphoinositide-coupled directional transport of various lipids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  7. Structure and Conformational Properties of d-Glucose/d-Galactose-Binding Protein in Crowded Milieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Fonin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Conformational changes of d-glucose/d-galactose-binding protein (GGBP were studied under molecular crowding conditions modeled by concentrated solutions of polyethylene glycols (PEG-12000, PEG-4000, and PEG-600, Ficoll-70, and Dextran-70, addition of which induced noticeable structural changes in the GGBP molecule. All PEGs promoted compaction of GGBP and lead to the increase in ordering of its structure. Concentrated solutions of PEG-12000 and PEG-4000 caused GGBP aggregation. Although Ficoll-70 and Dextran-70 also promoted increase in the GGBP ordering, the structural outputs were different for different crowders. For example, in comparison with the GGBP in buffer, the intrinsic fluorescence spectrum of this protein was shifted to short-wave region in the presence of PEGs but was red-shifted in the presence of Ficoll-70 and Dextran-70. It was hypothesized that this difference could be due to the specific interaction of GGBP with the sugar-based polymers (Ficoll-70 and Dextran-70, indicating that protein can adopt different conformations in solutions containing molecular crowders of different chemical nature. It was also shown that all tested crowding agents were able to stabilize GGBP structure shifting the GGBP guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl-induced unfolding curves to higher denaturant concentrations, but their stabilization capabilities did not depend on the hydrodynamic dimensions of the polymers molecules. Refolding of GGBP was complicated by protein aggregation in all tested solutions of crowding agents. The lowest yield of refolded protein was achieved in the highly concentrated solutions of PEG-12000. These data support the previous notion that the influence of macromolecular crowders on proteins is rather complex phenomenon that extends beyond the excluded volume effects.

  8. The Werner syndrome protein is distinguished from the Bloom syndrome protein by its capacity to tightly bind diverse DNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini; Loeb, Lawrence A; Fry, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Loss of Werner syndrome helicase-exonuclease (WRN) or of its homolog Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM) results in different inherited disorders. Whereas Werner syndrome is characterized by premature onset of aging and age-associated diseases, Bloom syndrome involves developmental abnormalities and increased predisposition to diverse malignancies. To identify biochemical differences between WRN and BLM that might contribute to the dissimilar outcomes of their loss, we compared their abilities to unwind and bind in vitro diverse DNA structures. Full-length recombinant WRN and BLM proteins expressed in and purified from Sf9 insect cells unwound to comparable extents and with similar K(m) values partial DNA duplex, splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular quadruplex DNA. However, WRN resolved bubble DNA ∼25-fold more efficiently than BLM. The two enzymes were mainly distinguished by their contrasting abilities to bind DNA. WRN bound partial duplexes, bubble and splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular and G4 four-molecular quadruplexes with dissociation constants of 0.25 to 25 nM. By contrast, BLM formed substantial complexes with only G4 quadruplex DNA while binding only marginally other DNA structures. We raise the possibility that in addition to its enzymatic activities WRN may act as a scaffold for the assembly on DNA of additional DNA processing proteins.

  9. The Werner syndrome protein is distinguished from the Bloom syndrome protein by its capacity to tightly bind diverse DNA structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Kamath-Loeb

    Full Text Available Loss of Werner syndrome helicase-exonuclease (WRN or of its homolog Bloom syndrome helicase (BLM results in different inherited disorders. Whereas Werner syndrome is characterized by premature onset of aging and age-associated diseases, Bloom syndrome involves developmental abnormalities and increased predisposition to diverse malignancies. To identify biochemical differences between WRN and BLM that might contribute to the dissimilar outcomes of their loss, we compared their abilities to unwind and bind in vitro diverse DNA structures. Full-length recombinant WRN and BLM proteins expressed in and purified from Sf9 insect cells unwound to comparable extents and with similar K(m values partial DNA duplex, splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular quadruplex DNA. However, WRN resolved bubble DNA ∼25-fold more efficiently than BLM. The two enzymes were mainly distinguished by their contrasting abilities to bind DNA. WRN bound partial duplexes, bubble and splayed arm DNA and G'2 bimolecular and G4 four-molecular quadruplexes with dissociation constants of 0.25 to 25 nM. By contrast, BLM formed substantial complexes with only G4 quadruplex DNA while binding only marginally other DNA structures. We raise the possibility that in addition to its enzymatic activities WRN may act as a scaffold for the assembly on DNA of additional DNA processing proteins.

  10. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  11. Decorin core protein (decoron shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P R O Orgel

    Full Text Available Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM. With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein and binding sites in the d and e(1 bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1 bands. This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  12. Decorin core protein (decoron) shape complements collagen fibril surface structure and mediates its binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Joseph P R O; Eid, Aya; Antipova, Olga; Bella, Jordi; Scott, John E

    2009-01-01

    Decorin is the archetypal small leucine rich repeat proteoglycan of the vertebrate extracellular matrix (ECM). With its glycosaminoglycuronan chain, it is responsible for stabilizing inter-fibrillar organization. Type I collagen is the predominant member of the fibrillar collagen family, fulfilling both organizational and structural roles in animal ECMs. In this study, interactions between decoron (the decorin core protein) and binding sites in the d and e(1) bands of the type I collagen fibril were investigated through molecular modeling of their respective X-ray diffraction structures. Previously, it was proposed that a model-based, highly curved concave decoron interacts with a single collagen molecule, which would form extensive van der Waals contacts and give rise to strong non-specific binding. However, the large well-ordered aggregate that is the collagen fibril places significant restraints on modes of ligand binding and necessitates multi-collagen molecular contacts. We present here a relatively high-resolution model of the decoron-fibril collagen complex. We find that the respective crystal structures complement each other well, although it is the monomeric form of decoron that shows the most appropriate shape complementarity with the fibril surface and favorable calculated energies of interaction. One molecule of decoron interacts with four to six collagen molecules, and the binding specificity relies on a large number of hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions, primarily with the collagen motifs KXGDRGE and AKGDRGE (d and e(1) bands). This work helps us to understand collagen-decorin interactions and the molecular architecture of the fibrillar ECM in health and disease.

  13. Searching the protein structure database for ligand-binding site similarities using CPASS v.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caprez Adam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent analysis of protein sequences deposited in the NCBI RefSeq database indicates that ~8.5 million protein sequences are encoded in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, where ~30% are explicitly annotated as "hypothetical" or "uncharacterized" protein. Our Comparison of Protein Active-Site Structures (CPASS v.2 database and software compares the sequence and structural characteristics of experimentally determined ligand binding sites to infer a functional relationship in the absence of global sequence or structure similarity. CPASS is an important component of our Functional Annotation Screening Technology by NMR (FAST-NMR protocol and has been successfully applied to aid the annotation of a number of proteins of unknown function. Findings We report a major upgrade to our CPASS software and database that significantly improves its broad utility. CPASS v.2 is designed with a layered architecture to increase flexibility and portability that also enables job distribution over the Open Science Grid (OSG to increase speed. Similarly, the CPASS interface was enhanced to provide more user flexibility in submitting a CPASS query. CPASS v.2 now allows for both automatic and manual definition of ligand-binding sites and permits pair-wise, one versus all, one versus list, or list versus list comparisons. Solvent accessible surface area, ligand root-mean square difference, and Cβ distances have been incorporated into the CPASS similarity function to improve the quality of the results. The CPASS database has also been updated. Conclusions CPASS v.2 is more than an order of magnitude faster than the original implementation, and allows for multiple simultaneous job submissions. Similarly, the CPASS database of ligand-defined binding sites has increased in size by ~ 38%, dramatically increasing the likelihood of a positive search result. The modification to the CPASS similarity function is effective in reducing CPASS similarity scores

  14. SCOWLP update: 3D classification of protein-protein, -peptide, -saccharide and -nucleic acid interactions, and structure-based binding inferences across folds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiber Sven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein interactions are essential for coordinating cellular functions. Proteomic studies have already elucidated a huge amount of protein-protein interactions that require detailed functional analysis. Understanding the structural basis of each individual interaction through their structural determination is necessary, yet an unfeasible task. Therefore, computational tools able to predict protein binding regions and recognition modes are required to rationalize putative molecular functions for proteins. With this aim, we previously created SCOWLP, a structural classification of protein binding regions at protein family level, based on the information obtained from high-resolution 3D protein-protein and protein-peptide complexes. Description We present here a new version of SCOWLP that has been enhanced by the inclusion of protein-nucleic acid and protein-saccharide interactions. SCOWLP takes interfacial solvent into account for a detailed characterization of protein interactions. In addition, the binding regions obtained per protein family have been enriched by the inclusion of predicted binding regions, which have been inferred from structurally related proteins across all existing folds. These inferences might become very useful to suggest novel recognition regions and compare structurally similar interfaces from different families. Conclusions The updated SCOWLP has new functionalities that allow both, detection and comparison of protein regions recognizing different types of ligands, which include other proteins, peptides, nucleic acids and saccharides, within a solvated environment. Currently, SCOWLP allows the analysis of predicted protein binding regions based on structure-based inferences across fold space. These predictions may have a unique potential in assisting protein docking, in providing insights into protein interaction networks, and in guiding rational engineering of protein ligands. The newly designed

  15. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveals Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelihood for RNA-Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.N.; Swaminathan, S.; Burley, S. K.

    2008-12-11

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  16. UPF201 Archaeal Specific Family Members Reveal Structural Similarity to RNA-Binding Proteins but Low Likelyhood for RNA-Binding Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K.; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54) to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40%) and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet and five {alpha}-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  17. UPF201 archaeal specific family members reveal structural similarity to RNA-binding proteins but low likelihood for RNA-binding function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy N Rao

    Full Text Available We have determined X-ray crystal structures of four members of an archaeal specific family of proteins of unknown function (UPF0201; Pfam classification: DUF54 to advance our understanding of the genetic repertoire of archaea. Despite low pairwise amino acid sequence identities (10-40% and the absence of conserved sequence motifs, the three-dimensional structures of these proteins are remarkably similar to one another. Their common polypeptide chain fold, encompassing a five-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and five alpha-helices, proved to be quite unexpectedly similar to that of the RRM-type RNA-binding domain of the ribosomal L5 protein, which is responsible for binding the 5S- rRNA. Structure-based sequence alignments enabled construction of a phylogenetic tree relating UPF0201 family members to L5 ribosomal proteins and other structurally similar RNA binding proteins, thereby expanding our understanding of the evolutionary purview of the RRM superfamily. Analyses of the surfaces of these newly determined UPF0201 structures suggest that they probably do not function as RNA binding proteins, and that this domain specific family of proteins has acquired a novel function in archaebacteria, which awaits experimental elucidation.

  18. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by the Alternate-Splicing Regulator CUG-Binding Protein 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Teplova; J Song; H Gaw; A Teplov; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1) regulates multiple aspects of nuclear and cytoplasmic mRNA processing, with implications for onset of myotonic dystrophy. CUGBP1 harbors three RRM domains and preferentially targets UGU-rich mRNA elements. We describe crystal structures of CUGBP1 RRM1 and tandem RRM1/2 domains bound to RNAs containing tandem UGU(U/G) elements. Both RRM1 in RRM1-RNA and RRM2 in RRM1/2-RNA complexes use similar principles to target UGU(U/G) elements, with recognition mediated by face-to-edge stacking and water-mediated hydrogen-bonding networks. The UG step adopts a left-handed Z-RNA conformation, with the syn guanine recognized through Hoogsteen edge-protein backbone hydrogen-bonding interactions. NMR studies on the RRM1/2-RNA complex establish that both RRM domains target tandem UGUU motifs in solution, whereas filter-binding assays identify a preference for recognition of GU over AU or GC steps. We discuss the implications of CUGBP1-mediated targeting and sequestration of UGU(U/G) elements on pre-mRNA alternative-splicing regulation, translational regulation, and mRNA decay.

  19. Structural Aspects for Evolution of [beta]-Lactamases from Penicillin-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meroueh, Samy O.; Minasov, George; Lee, Wenlin; Shoichet, Brian K.; Mobashery, Shahriar (NWU); (UCSF); (Notre)

    2010-03-08

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), biosynthetic enzymes of bacterial cell wall assembly, and {beta}-lactamases, resistance enzymes to {beta}-lactam antibiotics, are related to each other from an evolutionary point of view. Massova and Mobashery (Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 1998, 42, 1-17) have proposed that for {beta}-lactamases to have become effective at their function as antibiotic resistance enzymes, they would have had to undergo structure alterations such that they would not interact with the peptidoglycan, which is the substrate for PBPs. A cephalosporin analogue, 7{beta}-[N-Acetyl-L-alanyl-{gamma}-D-glutamyl-L-lysine]-3-acetoxymethyl-3-cephem-carboxylic acid (compound 6), was conceived and synthesized to test this notion. The X-ray structure of the complex of this cephalosporin bound to the active site of the deacylation-deficient Q120L/Y150E variant of the class C AmpC {beta}-lactamase from Escherichia coli was solved at 1.71 {angstrom} resolution. This complex revealed that the surface for interaction with the strand of peptidoglycan that acylates the active site, which is present in PBPs, is absent in the {beta}-lactamase active site. Furthermore, insertion of a peptide in the {beta}-lactamase active site at a location where the second strand of peptidoglycan in some PBPs binds has effectively abolished the possibility for such interaction with the {beta}-lactamase. A 2.6 ns dynamics simulation was carried out for the complex, which revealed that the peptidoglycan surrogate (i.e., the active-site-bound ligand) undergoes substantial motion and is not stabilized for binding within the active site. These factors taken together disclose the set of structure modifications in the antibiotic resistance enzyme that prevent it from interacting with the peptidoglycan, en route to achieving catalytic proficiency for their intended function.

  20. Water molecules inside protein structure affect binding of monosaccharides with HIV-1 antibody 2G12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2016-10-05

    Water molecules inside biomolecules constitute integral parts of their structure and participate in the functions of the proteins. Some of the X-ray crystallographic data are insufficient for analyzing a series of ligand-protein complexes in the same condition. We theoretically investigated antibody binding abilities of saccharide ligands and the effects of the inner water molecules of ligand-antibody complexes. Classical molecular dynamics and quantum chemical simulations using a model with possible water molecules inside the protein were performed with saccharide ligands and Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 neutralizing antibody 2G12 complexes to estimate how inner water molecules of the protein affect the dynamics of the complexes as well as the ligand-antibody interaction. Our results indicate the fact that d-fructose's strong affinity to the antibody was partly due to the good retentiveness of solvent water molecules of the ligand and its stability of the ligand's conformation and relative position in the active site. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  2. Secondary Structure Preferences of Mn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Khrustaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used. Major Mn2+ binders are aspartic acid (6.82% of Asp residues, histidine (14.76% of His residues, and glutamic acid (3.51% of Glu residues. We found out that the motif of secondary structure “beta strand-major binder-random coil” is overrepresented around all the three major Mn2+ binders. That motif may be followed by either alpha helix or beta strand. Beta strands near Mn2+ binding residues should be stable because they are enriched by such beta formers as valine and isoleucine, as well as by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues characteristic to beta sheet. In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. On the other hand, the percentage of Mn2+ sites with at least one amino acid in the “beta strand-major binder-random coil” motif of secondary structure (77.88% does not depend on genomic GC-content.

  3. Crystal structure of axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) liver bile acid-binding protein bound to cholic and oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Stefano; Guariento, Mara; Perduca, Massimiliano; Di Pietro, Santiago M; Santomé, José A; Monaco, Hugo L

    2006-07-01

    The family of the liver bile acid-binding proteins (L-BABPs), formerly called liver basic fatty acid-binding proteins (Lb-FABPs) shares fold and sequence similarity with the paralogous liver fatty acid-binding proteins (L-FABPs) but has a different stoichiometry and specificity of ligand binding. This article describes the first X-ray structure of a member of the L-BABP family, axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) L-BABP, bound to two different ligands: cholic and oleic acid. The protein binds one molecule of oleic acid in a position that is significantly different from that of either of the two molecules that bind to rat liver FABP. The stoichiometry of binding of cholate is of two ligands per protein molecule, as observed in chicken L-BABP. The cholate molecule that binds buried most deeply into the internal cavity overlaps well with the analogous bound to chicken L-BABP, whereas the second molecule, which interacts with the first only through hydrophobic contacts, is more external and exposed to the solvent.

  4. Crystal structure of bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Yukie; Ochiai, Akihito [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Mikami, Bunzo [Laboratory of Applied Structural Biology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hashimoto, Wataru [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Murata, Kousaku, E-mail: kmurata@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Basic and Applied Molecular Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Bacterial alginate-binding Algp7 is similar to component EfeO of Fe{sup 2+} transporter. {yields} We determined the crystal structure of Algp7 with a metal-binding motif. {yields} Algp7 consists of two helical bundles formed through duplication of a single bundle. {yields} A deep cleft involved in alginate binding locates around the metal-binding site. {yields} Algp7 may function as a Fe{sup 2+}-chelated alginate-binding protein. -- Abstract: A gram-negative Sphingomonas sp. A1 directly incorporates alginate polysaccharide into the cytoplasm via the cell-surface pit and ABC transporter. A cell-surface alginate-binding protein, Algp7, functions as a concentrator of the polysaccharide in the pit. Based on the primary structure and genetic organization in the bacterial genome, Algp7 was found to be homologous to an M75 peptidase motif-containing EfeO, a component of a ferrous ion transporter. Despite the presence of an M75 peptidase motif with high similarity, the Algp7 protein purified from recombinant Escherichia coli cells was inert on insulin B chain and N-benzoyl-Phe-Val-Arg-p-nitroanilide, both of which are substrates for a typical M75 peptidase, imelysin, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The X-ray crystallographic structure of Algp7 was determined at 2.10 A resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. Although a metal-binding motif, HxxE, conserved in zinc ion-dependent M75 peptidases is also found in Algp7, the crystal structure of Algp7 contains no metal even at the motif. The protein consists of two structurally similar up-and-down helical bundles as the basic scaffold. A deep cleft between the bundles is sufficiently large to accommodate macromolecules such as alginate polysaccharide. This is the first structural report on a bacterial cell-surface alginate-binding protein with an M75 peptidase motif.

  5. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Cotmore, Susan F. [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tattersall, Peter [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Departments of Genetics, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Zhao, Haiyan, E-mail: zhaohy@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Tang, Liang, E-mail: tangl@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  6. Structural Adaptation of a Thermostable Biotin-binding Protein in a Psychrophilic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Amit; Bayer, Edward A.; Livnah, Oded

    2012-01-01

    Shwanavidin is an avidin-like protein from the marine proteobactrium Shewanella denitrificans, which exhibits an innate dimeric structure while maintaining high affinity toward biotin. A unique residue (Phe-43) from the L3,4 loop and a distinctive disulfide bridge were shown to account for the high affinity toward biotin. Phe-43 emulates the function and position of the critical intermonomeric Trp that characterizes the tetrameric avidins but is lacking in shwanavidin. The 18 copies of the apo-monomer revealed distinctive snapshots of L3,4 and Phe-43, providing rare insight into loop flexibility, binding site accessibility, and psychrophilic adaptation. Nevertheless, as in all avidins, shwanavidin also displays high thermostability properties. The unique features of shwanavidin may provide a platform for the design of a long sought after monovalent form of avidin, which would be ideal for novel types of biotechnological application. PMID:22493427

  7. PROCARB: A Database of Known and Modelled Carbohydrate-Binding Protein Structures with Sequence-Based Prediction Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Malik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the three-dimensional structures of proteins that interact with carbohydrates covalently (glycoproteins as well as noncovalently (protein-carbohydrate complexes is essential to many biological processes and plays a significant role in normal and disease-associated functions. It is important to have a central repository of knowledge available about these protein-carbohydrate complexes as well as preprocessed data of predicted structures. This can be significantly enhanced by tools de novo which can predict carbohydrate-binding sites for proteins in the absence of structure of experimentally known binding site. PROCARB is an open-access database comprising three independently working components, namely, (i Core PROCARB module, consisting of three-dimensional structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes taken from Protein Data Bank (PDB, (ii Homology Models module, consisting of manually developed three-dimensional models of N-linked and O-linked glycoproteins of unknown three-dimensional structure, and (iii CBS-Pred prediction module, consisting of web servers to predict carbohydrate-binding sites using single sequence or server-generated PSSM. Several precomputed structural and functional properties of complexes are also included in the database for quick analysis. In particular, information about function, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, hydrogen bonds and literature reference, and so forth, is included. In addition, each protein in the database is mapped to Uniprot, Pfam, PDB, and so forth.

  8. Globin-like proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans: in vivo localization, ligand binding and structural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Doorslaer Sabine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains more than 30 putative globin genes that all are transcribed. Although their translated amino acid sequences fit the globin fold, a variety of amino-acid substitutions and extensions generate a wide structural diversity among the putative globins. No information is available on the physicochemical properties and the in vivo expression. Results We expressed the globins in a bacterial system, characterized the purified proteins by optical and resonance Raman spectroscopy, measured the kinetics and equilibria of O2 binding and determined the crystal structure of GLB-1* (CysGH2 → Ser mutant. Furthermore, we studied the expression patterns of glb-1 (ZK637.13 and glb-26 (T22C1.2 in the worms using green fluorescent protein technology and measured alterations of their transcript abundances under hypoxic conditions.GLB-1* displays the classical three-over-three α-helical sandwich of vertebrate globins, assembled in a homodimer associated through facing E- and F-helices. Within the heme pocket the dioxygen molecule is stabilized by a hydrogen bonded network including TyrB10 and GlnE7.GLB-1 exhibits high ligand affinity, which is, however, lower than in other globins with the same distal TyrB10-GlnE7 amino-acid pair. In the absence of external ligands, the heme ferrous iron of GLB-26 is strongly hexacoordinated with HisE7, which could explain its extremely low affinity for CO. This globin oxidizes instantly to the ferric form in the presence of oxygen and is therefore incapable of reversible oxygen binding. Conclusion The presented data indicate that GLB-1 and GLB-26 belong to two functionally-different globin classes.

  9. Engineering RNA-binding proteins for biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chen,Yu; Varani, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression. Many have modular structures and combine relatively few common domains in various arrangements to recognize RNA sequences and/or structures. Recent progress in engineering the specificity of the PUF class RNA-binding proteins has shown that RNA-binding domains may be combined with various effector or functional domains to regulate the metabolism of targeted RNAs. Designer RNA-binding proteins with tailored sequenc...

  10. Structural diversity in twin-arginine signal peptide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillard, J.; Spronk, C.A.E.M.; Buchanan, G.; Lyall, V.; Richardson, D.J.; Palmer, T.; Vuister, G.W.; Sargent, F.

    2007-01-01

    The twin-arginine transport (Tat) system is dedicated to the translocation of folded proteins across the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Proteins are targeted to the Tat system by signal peptides containing a twin-arginine motif. In Escherichia coli, many Tat substrates bind redox-active cofactors i

  11. Structural interaction fingerprint (SIFt): a novel method for analyzing three-dimensional protein-ligand binding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhan; Chuaqui, Claudio; Singh, Juswinder

    2004-01-15

    Representing and understanding the three-dimensional (3D) structural information of protein-ligand complexes is a critical step in the rational drug discovery process. Traditional analysis methods are proving inadequate and inefficient in dealing with the massive amount of structural information being generated from X-ray crystallography, NMR, and in silico approaches such as structure-based docking experiments. Here, we present SIFt (structural interaction fingerprint), a novel method for representing and analyzing 3D protein-ligand binding interactions. Key to this approach is the generation of an interaction fingerprint that translates 3D structural binding information from a protein-ligand complex into a one-dimensional binary string. Each fingerprint represents the "structural interaction profile" of the complex that can be used to organize, analyze, and visualize the rich amount of information encoded in ligand-receptor complexes and also to assist database mining. We have applied SIFt to tackle three common tasks in structure-based drug design. The first involved the analysis and organization of a typical set of results generated from a docking study. Using SIFt, docking poses with similar binding modes were identified, clustered, and subsequently compared with conventional scoring function information. A second application of SIFt was to analyze approximately 90 known X-ray crystal structures of protein kinase-inhibitor complexes obtained from the Protein Databank. Using SIFt, we were able to organize the structures and reveal striking similarities and diversity between their small molecule binding interactions. Finally, we have shown how SIFt can be used as an effective molecular filter during the virtual chemical library screening process to select molecules with desirable binding mode(s) and/or desirable interaction patterns with the protein target. In summary, SIFt shows promise to fully leverage the wealth of information being generated in rational

  12. Biophysical and structural characterization of a sequence-diverse set of solute-binding proteins for aromatic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Ruth; Zerbs, Sarah; Corgliano, Danielle M; Allaire, Marc; Collart, Frank R; Miller, Lisa M

    2012-07-01

    Rhodopseudomonas palustris metabolizes aromatic compounds derived from lignin degradation products and has the potential for bioremediation of xenobiotic compounds. We recently identified four possible solute-binding proteins in R. palustris that demonstrated binding to aromatic lignin monomers. Characterization of these proteins in the absence and presence of the aromatic ligands will provide unprecedented insights into the specificity and mode of aromatic ligand binding in solute-binding proteins. Here, we report the thermodynamic and structural properties of the proteins with aromatic ligands using isothermal titration calorimetry, small/wide angle x-ray scattering, and theoretical predictions. The proteins exhibit high affinity for the aromatic substrates with dissociation constants in the low micromolar to nanomolar range. The global shapes of the proteins are characterized by flexible ellipsoid-like structures with maximum dimensions in the 80-90-Å range. The data demonstrate that the global shapes remained unaltered in the presence of the aromatic ligands. However, local structural changes were detected in the presence of some ligands, as judged by the observed features in the wide angle x-ray scattering regime at q ~0.20-0.40 Å(-1). The theoretical models confirmed the elongated nature of the proteins and showed that they consist of two domains linked by a hinge. Evaluation of the protein-binding sites showed that the ligands were found in the hinge region and that ligand stabilization was primarily driven by hydrophobic interactions. Taken together, this study shows the capability of identifying solute-binding proteins that interact with lignin degradation products using high throughput genomic and biophysical approaches, which can be extended to other organisms.

  13. Phosphorylation and calcium antagonistically tune myosin-binding protein C's structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previs, Michael J; Mun, Ji Young; Michalek, Arthur J; Previs, Samantha Beck; Gulick, James; Robbins, Jeffrey; Warshaw, David M; Craig, Roger

    2016-03-22

    During each heartbeat, cardiac contractility results from calcium-activated sliding of actin thin filaments toward the centers of myosin thick filaments to shorten cellular length. Cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C) is a component of the thick filament that appears to tune these mechanochemical interactions by its N-terminal domains transiently interacting with actin and/or the myosin S2 domain, sensitizing thin filaments to calcium and governing maximal sliding velocity. Both functional mechanisms are potentially further tunable by phosphorylation of an intrinsically disordered, extensible region of cMyBP-C's N terminus, the M-domain. Using atomic force spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and mutant protein expression, we demonstrate that phosphorylation reduced the M-domain's extensibility and shifted the conformation of the N-terminal domain from an extended structure to a compact configuration. In combination with motility assay data, these structural effects of M-domain phosphorylation suggest a mechanism for diminishing the functional potency of individual cMyBP-C molecules. Interestingly, we found that calcium levels necessary to maximally activate the thin filament mitigated the structural effects of phosphorylation by increasing M-domain extensibility and shifting the phosphorylated N-terminal fragments back to the extended state, as if unphosphorylated. Functionally, the addition of calcium to the motility assays ablated the impact of phosphorylation on maximal sliding velocities, fully restoring cMyBP-C's inhibitory capacity. We conclude that M-domain phosphorylation may have its greatest effect on tuning cMyBP-C's calcium-sensitization of thin filaments at the low calcium levels between contractions. Importantly, calcium levels at the peak of contraction would allow cMyBP-C to remain a potent contractile modulator, regardless of cMyBP-C's phosphorylation state.

  14. Structural basis underlying CAC RNA recognition by the RRM domain of dimeric RNA-binding protein RBPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teplova, Marianna; Farazi, Thalia A; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (designated RBPMS) is a higher vertebrate mRNA-binding protein containing a single RNA recognition motif (RRM). RBPMS has been shown to be involved in mRNA transport, localization and stability, with key roles in axon guidance, smooth muscle plasticity, as well as regulation of cancer cell proliferation and migration. We report on structure-function studies of the RRM domain of RBPMS bound to a CAC-containing single-stranded RNA. These results provide insights into potential topologies of complexes formed by the RBPMS RRM domain and the tandem CAC repeat binding sites as detected by photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation. These studies establish that the RRM domain of RBPMS forms a symmetrical dimer in the free state, with each monomer binding sequence-specifically to all three nucleotides of a CAC segment in the RNA bound state. Structure-guided mutations within the dimerization and RNA-binding interfaces of RBPMS RRM on RNA complex formation resulted in both disruption of dimerization and a decrease in RNA-binding affinity as observed by size exclusion chromatography and isothermal titration calorimetry. As anticipated from biochemical binding studies, over-expression of dimerization or RNA-binding mutants of Flag-HA-tagged RBPMS were no longer able to track with stress granules in HEK293 cells, thereby documenting the deleterious effects of such mutations in vivo.

  15. Crystal structure and conformational flexibility of the unligated FK506-binding protein FKBP12.6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Mustafi, Sourajit M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); LeMaster, David M. [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Li, Zhong [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); Héroux, Annie [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda, E-mail: griselda@wadsworth.org [New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States); University at Albany – SUNY, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12201 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Two crystal forms of unligated FKBP12.6 exhibit multiple conformations in the active site and in the 80s loop, the primary site for known protein-recognition interactions. The previously unreported NMR backbone assignment of FKBP12.6 revealed extensive doubling of amide resonances, which reflects a slow conformational transition centered in the 80s loop. The primary known physiological function of FKBP12.6 involves its role in regulating the RyR2 isoform of ryanodine receptor Ca{sup 2+} channels in cardiac muscle, pancreatic β islets and the central nervous system. With only a single previously reported X-ray structure of FKBP12.6, bound to the immunosuppressant rapamycin, structural inferences for this protein have been drawn from the more extensive studies of the homologous FKBP12. X-ray structures at 1.70 and 1.90 Å resolution from P2{sub 1} and P3{sub 1}21 crystal forms are reported for an unligated cysteine-free variant of FKBP12.6 which exhibit a notable diversity of conformations. In one monomer from the P3{sub 1}21 crystal form, the aromatic ring of Phe59 at the base of the active site is rotated perpendicular to its typical orientation, generating a steric conflict for the immunosuppressant-binding mode. The peptide unit linking Gly89 and Val90 at the tip of the protein-recognition ‘80s loop’ is flipped in the P2{sub 1} crystal form. Unlike the >30 reported FKBP12 structures, the backbone conformation of this loop closely follows that of the first FKBP domain of FKBP51. The NMR resonances for 21 backbone amides of FKBP12.6 are doubled, corresponding to a slow conformational transition centered near the tip of the 80s loop, as recently reported for 31 amides of FKBP12. The comparative absence of doubling for residues along the opposite face of the active-site pocket in FKBP12.6 may in part reflect attenuated structural coupling owing to increased conformational plasticity around the Phe59 ring.

  16. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  17. Solution structure and peptide binding of the PTB domain from the AIDA1 postsynaptic signaling scaffolding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Smirnova

    Full Text Available AIDA1 links persistent chemical signaling events occurring at the neuronal synapse with global changes in gene expression. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein, AIDA1 is composed of several protein-protein interaction domains. Here we report the NMR structure of the carboxy terminally located phosphotyrosine binding domain (PTB that is common to all AIDA1 splice variants. A comprehensive survey of peptides identified a consensus sequence around an NxxY motif that is shared by a number of related neuronal signaling proteins. Using peptide arrays and fluorescence based assays, we determined that the AIDA1 PTB domain binds amyloid protein precursor (APP in a similar manner to the X11/Mint PTB domain, albeit at reduced affinity (∼10 µM that may allow AIDA1 to effectively sample APP, as well as other protein partners in a variety of cellular contexts.

  18. Three-dimensional structure of actin filaments and of an actin gel made with actin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederman, R; Amrein, P C; Hartwig, J

    1983-05-01

    Purified muscle actin and mixtures of actin and actin-binding protein were examined in the transmission electron microscope after fixation, critical point drying, and rotary shadowing. The three-dimensional structure of the protein assemblies was analyzed by a computer-assisted graphic analysis applicable to generalized filament networks. This analysis yielded information concerning the frequency of filament intersections, the filament length between these intersections, the angle at which filaments branch at these intersections, and the concentration of filaments within a defined volume. Purified actin at a concentration of 1 mg/ml assembled into a uniform mass of long filaments which overlap at random angles between 0 degrees and 90 degrees. Actin in the presence of macrophage actin-binding protein assembled into short, straight filaments, organized in a perpendicular branching network. The distance between branch points was inversely related to the molar ratio of actin-binding protein to actin. This distance was what would be predicted if actin filaments grew at right angles off of nucleation sites on the two ends of actin-binding protein dimers, and then annealed. The results suggest that actin in combination with actin-binding protein self-assembles to form a three-dimensional network resembling the peripheral cytoskeleton of motile cells.

  19. Structure of the cobalamin-binding protein of a putative O-demethylase from Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjuts, Hanno; Dunstan, Mark S.; Fisher, Karl; Leys, David, E-mail: david.leys@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    The first crystal structure of the vitamin B12-binding protein from a three-component O-demethylase enzyme system is reported. During O-demethylation methyl groups are transferred from phenyl methyl ethers to tetrahydrofolate via methyl-B12 intermediates. This study describes the identification and the structural and spectroscopic analysis of a cobalamin-binding protein (termed CobDH) implicated in O-demethylation by the organohalide-respiring bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2. The 1.5 Å resolution crystal structure of CobDH is presented in the cobalamin-bound state and reveals that the protein is composed of an N-terminal helix-bundle domain and a C-terminal Rossmann-fold domain, with the cobalamin coordinated in the base-off/His-on conformation similar to other cobalamin-binding domains that catalyse methyl-transfer reactions. EPR spectroscopy of CobDH confirms cobalamin binding and reveals the presence of a cob(III)alamin superoxide, indicating binding of oxygen to the fully oxidized cofactor. These data provide the first structural insights into the methyltransferase reactions that occur during O-demethylation by D. hafniense.

  20. The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants: phylogeny, structural modeling, activity and subcellular localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tam Michael WC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Puf proteins have important roles in controlling gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by promoting RNA decay and repressing translation. The Pumilio homology domain (PUM-HD is a conserved region within Puf proteins that binds to RNA with sequence specificity. Although Puf proteins have been well characterized in animal and fungal systems, little is known about the structural and functional characteristics of Puf-like proteins in plants. Results The Arabidopsis and rice genomes code for 26 and 19 Puf-like proteins, respectively, each possessing eight or fewer Puf repeats in their PUM-HD. Key amino acids in the PUM-HD of several of these proteins are conserved with those of animal and fungal homologs, whereas other plant Puf proteins demonstrate extensive variability in these amino acids. Three-dimensional modeling revealed that the predicted structure of this domain in plant Puf proteins provides a suitable surface for binding RNA. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift experiments showed that the Arabidopsis AtPum2 PUM-HD binds with high affinity to BoxB of the Drosophila Nanos Response Element I (NRE1 RNA, whereas a point mutation in the core of the NRE1 resulted in a significant reduction in binding affinity. Transient expression of several of the Arabidopsis Puf proteins as fluorescent protein fusions revealed a dynamic, punctate cytoplasmic pattern of localization for most of these proteins. The presence of predicted nuclear export signals and accumulation of AtPuf proteins in the nucleus after treatment of cells with leptomycin B demonstrated that shuttling of these proteins between the cytosol and nucleus is common among these proteins. In addition to the cytoplasmically enriched AtPum proteins, two AtPum proteins showed nuclear targeting with enrichment in the nucleolus. Conclusions The Puf family of RNA-binding proteins in plants consists of a greater number of members than any other model species studied to

  1. Structure and thermodynamics of effector molecule binding to the nitrogen signal transduction PII protein GlnZ from Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truan, Daphné; Bjelić, Saša; Li, Xiao-Dan; Winkler, Fritz K

    2014-07-29

    The trimeric PII signal transduction proteins regulate the function of a variety of target proteins predominantly involved in nitrogen metabolism. ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) are key effector molecules influencing PII binding to targets. Studies of PII proteins have established that the 20-residue T-loop plays a central role in effector sensing and target binding. However, the specific effects of effector binding on T-loop conformation have remained poorly documented. We present eight crystal structures of the Azospirillum brasilense PII protein GlnZ, six of which are cocrystallized and liganded with ADP or ATP. We find that interaction with the diphosphate moiety of bound ADP constrains the N-terminal part of the T-loop in a characteristic way that is maintained in ADP-promoted complexes with target proteins. In contrast, the interactions with the triphosphate moiety in ATP complexes are much more variable and no single predominant interaction mode is apparent except for the ternary MgATP/2-OG complex. These conclusions can be extended to most investigated PII proteins of the GlnB/GlnK subfamily. Unlike reported for other PII proteins, microcalorimetry reveals no cooperativity between the three binding sites of GlnZ trimers for any of the three effectors under carefully controlled experimental conditions.

  2. Oxazin-5-Ones as a Novel Class of Penicillin Binding Protein Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Structure Activity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoabedje, Efeturi Abraham; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Okafor, Sunday Nwankwor; Onoabedje, Ufuoma Shalom; Okoro, Uchechukwu Chris

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are normal constituents of bacterial which are absent in mammalian cells. The theoretical binding modes of known oxazin-5-ones toward the protein were used as a guide to synthesis new inhibitors. Structural studies of protein-ligand complexes revealed that conformational discrepancies of the derivatives in the protein’s binding site gave rise to the variation in their inhibition constant which ranged from 68.58 μM to 2.04 mM. Biological assay results further confirmed the antibiotic potencies of the studied compounds. Although the outcome of biological screening does not parallel computational predictions, the results obtained from both methods suggest that the oxazin-5-one derivatives are potential PBP inhibitors, hence interesting antibiotic lead agents. PMID:27749913

  3. Structural insights into Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 mediated prediction of potentially active semiochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-03-01

    Given the advantages of behavioral disruption application in pest control and the damage of Cydia pomonella, due progresses have not been made in searching active semiochemicals for codling moth. In this research, 31 candidate semiochemicals were ranked for their binding potential to Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 (CpomPBP2) by simulated docking, and this sorted result was confirmed by competitive binding assay. This high predicting accuracy of virtual screening led to the construction of a rapid and viable method for semiochemicals searching. By reference to binding mode analyses, hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction were suggested to be two key factors in determining ligand affinity, so is the length of molecule chain. So it is concluded that semiochemicals of appropriate chain length with hydroxyl group or carbonyl group at one head tended to be favored by CpomPBP2. Residues involved in binding with each ligand were pointed out as well, which were verified by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. Progress made in the present study helps establish an efficient method for predicting potentially active compounds and prepares for the application of high-throughput virtual screening in searching semiochemicals by taking insights into binding mode analyses.

  4. Structural basis of nucleic acid recognition by FK506-binding protein 25 (FKBP25), a nuclear immunophilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ajit; Shin, Joon; Rajan, Sreekanth; Yoon, Ho Sup

    2016-04-01

    The nuclear immunophilin FKBP25 interacts with chromatin-related proteins and transcription factors and is suggested to interact with nucleic acids. Currently the structural basis of nucleic acid binding by FKBP25 is unknown. Here we determined the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of full-length human FKBP25 and studied its interaction with DNA. The FKBP25 structure revealed that the N-terminal helix-loop-helix (HLH) domain and C-terminal FK506-binding domain (FKBD) interact with each other and that both of the domains are involved in DNA binding. The HLH domain forms major-groove interactions and the basic FKBD loop cooperates to form interactions with an adjacent minor-groove of DNA. The FKBP25-DNA complex model, supported by NMR and mutational studies, provides structural and mechanistic insights into the nuclear immunophilin-mediated nucleic acid recognition.

  5. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  6. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  7. Structural analysis of the synthetic Duffy Binding Protein (DBP antigen DEKnull relevant for Plasmodium vivax malaria vaccine design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Chen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Plasmodium vivax vaccine candidate Duffy Binding Protein (DBP is a protein necessary for P. vivax invasion of reticulocytes. The polymorphic nature of DBP induces strain-specific immune responses that pose unique challenges for vaccine development. DEKnull is a synthetic DBP based antigen that has been engineered through mutation to enhance induction of blocking inhibitory antibodies. We determined the x-ray crystal structure of DEKnull to identify if any conformational changes had occurred upon mutation. Computational and experimental analyses assessed immunogenicity differences between DBP and DEKnull epitopes. Functional binding assays with monoclonal antibodies were used to interrogate the available epitopes in DEKnull. We demonstrate that DEKnull is structurally similar to the parental Sal1 DBP. The DEKnull mutations do not cause peptide backbone shifts within the polymorphic loop, or at either the DBP dimerization interface or DARC receptor binding pockets, two important structurally conserved protective epitope motifs. All B-cell epitopes, except for the mutated DEK motif, are conserved between DEKnull and DBP. The DEKnull protein retains binding to conformationally dependent inhibitory antibodies. DEKnull is an iterative improvement of DBP as a vaccine candidate. DEKnull has reduced immunogenicity to polymorphic regions responsible for strain-specific immunity while retaining conserved protein folds necessary for induction of strain-transcending blocking inhibitory antibodies.

  8. High Resolution Structures of Periplasmic Glucose-binding Protein of Pseudomonas putida CSV86 Reveal Structural Basis of Its Substrate Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Suman; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S; Bhaumik, Prasenjit

    2016-04-01

    Periplasmic substrate-binding proteins (SBPs) bind to the specific ligand with high affinity and mediate their transport into the cytoplasm via the cognate inner membrane ATP-binding cassette proteins. Because of low sequence identities, understanding the structural basis of substrate recognition by SBPs has remained very challenging. There are several structures available for the ligand-bound sugar SBPs, but very few unliganded structures are reported. No structural data are available for sugar SBPs fromPseudomonassp. to date. This study reports the first high resolution crystal structures of periplasmic glucose-binding protein fromPseudomonas putidaCSV86 (ppGBP) in unliganded form (2.5 Å) and complexed with glucose (1.25 Å) and galactose (1.8 Å). Asymmetric domain closure of ppGBP was observed upon substrate binding. The ppGBP was found to have an affinity of ∼ 0.3 μmfor glucose. The structural analysis showed that the sugars are bound to the protein mainly by hydrogen bonds, and the loss of two strong hydrogen bonds between ppGBP and galactose compared with glucose may be responsible for lowering its affinity toward galactose. The higher stability of ppGBP-glucose complex was also indicated by an 8 °C increase in the melting temperature compared with unliganded form and ppGBP-galactose complex. ppGBP binds to monosaccharide, but the structural features revealed it to have an oligosaccharide-binding protein fold, indicating that during evolution the sugar binding pocket may have undergone structural modulation to accommodate monosaccharide only.

  9. RNA-binding Domain of the Key Structural Protein P7 for the Rice dwarf virus Particle Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-Xiong ZHONG; Yan-Wei SHEN; Toshihiro OMURA

    2005-01-01

    The Rice dwarf virus (RDV) P7 structural protein is the key protein in the RDV particle assembly. The P7 protein was digested partially or completely by Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease and/or Pseudomonas fragi Asp-N protease. The molecular mass and the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the polypeptide fragments of the P7 protein were determined by SDS-PAGE and the Edman degradation method,respectively. Then the polypeptides were located in the deduced amino acid sequence of the RDV P7 protein based on the nucleotide sequence information, with the knowledge of the specific cleavage sites of the Staphylococcus aureus V8 and Pseudomonasfragi Asp-N protease, and the two RNA-binding domains in the P7 protein were identified. Domain 1 was located in the residue 128-249 containing 122 amino acids and domain 2 was located in the residue 325-355 containing 31 amino acids. Thus, these two domains may play an important role in the virus particle assembly by contributing to the packaging of viral dsRNAs inside the particles. The two domains may be novel RNA-binding domains, because no amino acid sequences highly similar to the conservative sequences of known dsRNA-binding domains reported so far. The similarity between the motif of domain 1 and the motif of the DNA-binding protein suggests that the DNA-binding activity of the RDV P7 protein may be due to this sequence. The similarity between the motif of domain 1 and the motif of the RNA polymerase domain suggests that the P7 protein may also play a role in RNA synthesis,besides its function in the assembly and subsequent packaging of viral dsRNA into core particles.

  10. Crystal structures and ligand binding of PurM proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sampei, Gen-Ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    Crystal structures of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) synthetase, also known as PurM, from Thermus thermophilus (Tt) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (Gk) were determined. For TtPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with four dimers in an asymmetric unit. For GkPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with one monomer in asymmetric unit. The biological unit is dimer for both TtPurM and GkPurM and the dimer structures were similar to previously determined structures of PurM in general. For TtPurM, ∼50 residues at the amino terminal were disordered in the crystal structure whereas, for GkPurM, the corresponding region covered the ATP-binding site forming an α helix in part, suggesting that the N-terminal region of PurM changes its conformation upon binding of ligands. FGAM binding site was predicted by the docking simulation followed by the MD simulation based on the SO4 (2-) binding site found in the crystal structure of TtPurM.

  11. Structural determination of functional units of the nucleotide binding domain (NBD94 of the reticulocyte binding protein Py235 of Plasmodium yoelii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardina Grüber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Invasion of the red blood cells (RBC by the merozoite of malaria parasites involves a large number of receptor ligand interactions. The reticulocyte binding protein homologue family (RH plays an important role in erythrocyte recognition as well as virulence. Recently, it has been shown that members of RH in addition to receptor binding may also have a role as ATP/ADP sensor. A 94 kDa region named Nucleotide-Binding Domain 94 (NBD94 of Plasmodium yoelii YM, representative of the putative nucleotide binding region of RH, has been demonstrated to bind ATP and ADP selectively. Binding of ATP or ADP induced nucleotide-dependent structural changes in the C-terminal hinge-region of NBD94, and directly impacted on the RBC binding ability of RH. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to find the smallest structural unit, able to bind nucleotides, and its coupling module, the hinge region, three truncated domains of NBD94 have been generated, termed NBD94(444-547, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793, respectively. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy NBD94(444-547 has been identified to form the smallest nucleotide binding segment, sensitive for ATP and ADP, which became inhibited by 4-Chloro-7-nitrobenzofurazan. The shape of NBD94(444-547 in solution was calculated from small-angle X-ray scattering data, revealing an elongated molecule, comprised of two globular domains, connected by a spiral segment of about 73.1 A in length. The high quality of the constructs, forming the hinge-region, NBD94(566-663 and NBD94(674-793 enabled to determine the first crystallographic and solution structure, respectively. The crystal structure of NBD94(566-663 consists of two helices with 97.8 A and 48.6 A in length, linked by a loop. By comparison, the low resolution structure of NBD94(674-793 in solution represents a chair-like shape with three architectural segments. CONCLUSIONS: These structures give the first insight into how nucleotide binding

  12. Hippocampal expression of synaptic structural proteins and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein in a rat model of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhao; Zhiyong Li; Yali Wang; Qiuxia Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a rat model of vascular dementia induced by chronic cerebral hy-poperfusion through permanent ligation of bilateral common carotid arteries. At 60 days after mod-eling, escape latency and swimming path length during hidden-platform acquisition training in Morris water maze significantly increased in the model group. In addition, the number of accurate crossings over the original platform significantly decreased, hippocampal CA1 synaptophysin and growth-associated protein 43 expression significantly decreased, cAMP response element-binding protein expression remained unchanged, and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein expression significantly decreased. Results suggested that abnormal expression of hippo-campal synaptic structural protein and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation played a role in cognitive impairment following chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

  13. Structural and binding properties of the PASTA domain of PonA2, a key penicillin binding protein from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvanese, Luisa; Falcigno, Lucia; Maglione, Cira; Marasco, Daniela; Ruggiero, Alessia; Squeglia, Flavia; Berisio, Rita; D'Auria, Gabriella

    2014-07-01

    PonA2 is one of the two class A penicillin binding proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis. It plays a complex role in mycobacterial physiology and is spotted as a promising target for inhibitors. PonA2 is involved in adaptation of M. tuberculosis to dormancy, an ability which has been attributed to the presence in its sequence of a C-terminal PASTA domain. Since PASTA modules are typically considered as β-lactam antibiotic binding domains, we determined the solution structure of the PASTA domain from PonA2 and analyzed its binding properties versus a plethora of potential binders, including the β-lactam antibiotics, two typical muropeptide mimics, and polymeric peptidoglycan. We show that, despite a high structural similarity with other PASTA domains, the PASTA domain of PonA2 displays different binding properties, as it is not able to bind muropeptides, or β-lactams, or polymeric peptidoglycan. These results indicate that the role of PASTA domains cannot be generalized, as their specific binding properties strongly depend on surface residues, which are widely variable.

  14. Structural modification of serum vitamin D3-binding protein and immunosuppression in AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R; Srinivasula, S M

    1995-11-01

    A serum glycoprotein, vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), can be converted by beta-galactosidase of stimulated B lymphocytes and sialidase of T lymphocytes to a potent macrophage-activating factor (MAF), a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar moiety. Thus, Gc protein is a precursor for MAF. Treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates an extremely high-titered MAF (GcMAF). When peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages of 46 HIV-infected patients were treated with GcMAF (100 pg/ml), the monocytes/macrophages of all patients were efficiently activated. However, the MAF precursor activity of plasma Gc protein was low in 16 (35%) of of these patients. Loss of the MAF precursor activity appeared to be due to deglycosylation of plasma Gc protein by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase found in the patient blood stream. Levels of plasma alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in individual patients had an inverse correlation with the MAF precursor activity of their plasma Gc protein. Thus, precursor activity of Gc protein and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in patient blood can serve as diagnostic and prognostic indices.

  15. Structural and functional diversification in the teleost S100 family of calcium-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsching Sigrun I

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among the EF-Hand calcium-binding proteins the subgroup of S100 proteins constitute a large family with numerous and diverse functions in calcium-mediated signaling. The evolutionary origin of this family is still uncertain and most studies have examined mammalian family members. Results We have performed an extensive search in several teleost genomes to establish the s100 gene family in fish. We report that the teleost S100 repertoire comprises fourteen different subfamilies which show remarkable similarity across six divergent teleost species. Individual species feature distinctive subsets of thirteen to fourteen genes that result from local gene duplications and gene losses. Eight of the fourteen S100 subfamilies are unique for teleosts, while six are shared with mammalian species and three of those even with cartilaginous fish. Several S100 family members are found in jawless fish already, but none of them are clear orthologs of cartilaginous or bony fish s100 genes. All teleost s100 genes show the expected structural features and are subject to strong negative selection. Many aspects of the genomic arrangement and location of mammalian s100 genes are retained in the teleost s100 gene family, including a completely conserved intron/exon border between the two EF hands. Zebrafish s100 genes exhibit highly specific and characteristic expression patterns, showing both redundancy and divergence in their cellular expression. In larval tissue expression is often restricted to specific cell types like keratinocytes, hair cells, ionocytes and olfactory receptor neurons as demonstrated by in situ hybridization. Conclusion The origin of the S100 family predates at least the segregation of jawed from jawless fish and some extant family members predate the divergence of bony from cartilaginous fish. Despite a complex pattern of gene gains and losses the total repertoire size is remarkably constant between species. On the expression

  16. Penicillin-binding protein 4 of Escherichia coli shows a novel type of primary structure among penicillin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mottl, H.; Terpstra, P.; Keck, W.

    1991-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 1884 bp DNA fragment of E. coli, carrying the gene dacB, was determined. The DNA codes for penicillin-binding protein 4 (PBP4), an enzyme of 477 amino acids, being involved as a DD-carboxypeptidase-endopeptidase in murein metabolism. The enzyme is translated with a cleav

  17. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Burusco, M Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R; Roe, Andrew J; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein-ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male.

  18. Structural Biology of The sequestration & Transport of Heavy Metal Toxins: NMR Structure Determination of Proteins Containing the CYS-X-Y-Metal Binding Motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley J. Opella

    2004-03-10

    The support from the Department of Energy enabled us to initiate research on several proteins from the bacterial mercury detoxification system; in particular, we were able to determine the structures of MerP and related metal binding sequences. We have also worked on the membrane transport proteins MerF and MerT.

  19. Structural Studies of the Alzheimer's Amyloid Precursor Protein Copper-Binding Domain Reveal How It Binds Copper Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, G.K.-W.; Adams, J.J.; Harris, H.H.; Boas, J.F.; Curtain, C.C.; Galatis, D.; Master, C.L.; Barnham, K.J.; McKinstry, W.J.; Cappai, R.; Parker, M.W.; /Sydney U.

    2007-07-09

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major cause of dementia. Amyloid {beta} peptide (A {beta}), generated by proteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is central to AD pathogenesis. APP can function as a metalloprotein and modulate copper (Cu) transport, presumably via its extracellular Cu-binding domain (CuBD). Cu binding to the CuBD reduces A{beta} levels, suggesting that a Cu mimetic may have therapeutic potential. We describe here the atomic structures of apo CuBD from three crystal forms and found they have identical Cu-binding sites despite the different crystal lattices. The structure of Cu[2+]-bound CuBD reveals that the metal ligands are His147, His151, Tyrl68 and two water molecules, which are arranged in a square pyramidal geometry. The site resembles a Type 2 non-blue Cu center and is supported by electron paramagnetic resonance and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies. A previous study suggested that Met170 might be a ligand but we suggest that this residue plays a critical role as an electron donor in CuBDs ability to reduce Cu ions. The structure of Cu[+]-bound CuBD is almost identical to the Cu[2+]-bound structure except for the loss of one of the water ligands. The geometry of the site is unfavorable for Cu[+], thus providing a mechanism by which CuBD could readily transfer Cu ions to other proteins.

  20. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  1. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Burusco, M. Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R.; Roe, Andrew J.; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein–ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male. PMID:26318523

  2. Crystal structure of tetranectin, a trimeric plasminogen-binding protein with an alpha-helical coiled coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, B B; Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H

    1997-01-01

    Tetranectin is a plasminogen kringle 4-binding protein. The crystal structure has been determined at 2.8 A resolution using molecular replacement. Human tetranectin is a homotrimer forming a triple alpha-helical coiled coil. Each monomer consists of a carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) connected...... to a long alpha-helix. Tetranectin has been classified in a distinct group of the C-type lectin superfamily but has structural similarity to the proteins in the group of collectins. Tetranectin has three intramolecular disulfide bridges. Two of these are conserved in the C-type lectin superfamily, whereas...

  3. Structure, tissue distribution and genomic organization of the murine RRM-type RNA binding proteins TIA-1 and TIAR.

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, A.R.; Medley, Q G; O'Brien, S; Anderson, P; Streuli, M

    1996-01-01

    TIA-1 and TIAR are RNA binding proteins of the RNA recognition motif (RRM)/ribonucleoprotein (RNP) family that have been implicated as effectors of apoptotic cell death. We report the structures of murine TIA-1 and TIAR (mTIA-1 and mTIAR) deduced from cDNA cloning, the mRNA and protein tissue distribution of mTIA-1 and mTIAR, and the exon-intron structures of the mTIA-1 and mTIAR genes. Both mTIA-1 and mTIAR are comprised of three approximately 100 amino acid N-terminal RRM domains and a appr...

  4. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B;

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...

  5. The CopC Family: Structural and Bioinformatic Insights into a Diverse Group of Periplasmic Copper Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Thomas J; Kenney, Grace E; Hurley, Joseph D; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-04-19

    The CopC proteins are periplasmic copper binding proteins believed to play a role in bacterial copper homeostasis. Previous studies have focused on CopCs that are part of seven-protein Cop or Pco systems involved in copper resistance. These canonical CopCs contain distinct Cu(I) and Cu(II) binding sites. Mounting evidence suggests that CopCs are more widely distributed, often present only with the CopD inner membrane protein, frequently as a fusion protein, and that the CopC and CopD proteins together function in the uptake of copper to the cytoplasm. In the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, genes encoding a CopCD pair are located adjacent to the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) operon. The CopC from this organism (Mst-CopC) was expressed, purified, and structurally characterized. The 1.46 Å resolution crystal structure of Mst-CopC reveals a single Cu(II) binding site with coordination somewhat different from that in canonical CopCs, and the absence of a Cu(I) binding site. Extensive bioinformatic analyses indicate that the majority of CopCs in fact contain only a Cu(II) site, with just 10% of sequences corresponding to the canonical two-site CopC. Accordingly, a new classification scheme for CopCs was developed, and detailed analyses of the sequences and their genomic neighborhoods reveal new proteins potentially involved in copper homeostasis, providing a framework for expanded models of CopCD function.

  6. Structural and functional studies of a large winged Z-DNA-binding domain of Danio rerio protein kinase PKZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Vinod Kumar; Kim, Doyoun; Yun, Kyunghee; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The Z-DNA-binding domain of PKZ from zebrafish (Danio rerio; drZαPKZ ) contains the largest β-wing among known Z-DNA-binding domains. To elucidate the functional implication of the β-wing, we solved the crystal structure of apo-drZαPKZ . Structural comparison with its Z-DNA-bound form revealed a large conformational change within the β-wing during Z-DNA binding. Biochemical studies of protein mutants revealed that two basic residues in the β-wing are responsible for Z-DNA recognition as well as fast B-Z transition. Therefore, the extra basic residues in the β-wing of drZαPKZ are necessary for the fast B-Z transition activity.

  7. Organometallic B12-DNA conjugate: synthesis, structure analysis, and studies of binding to human B12-transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunger, Miriam; Mutti, Elena; Rieder, Alexander; Enders, Barbara; Nexo, Ebba; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2014-10-06

    Design, synthesis, and structural characterization of a B12-octadecanucleotide are presented herein, a new organometallic B12-DNA conjugate. In such covalent conjugates, the natural B12 moiety may be a versatile vector for controlled in vivo delivery of oligonucleotides to cellular targets in humans and animals, through the endogenous B12 transport systems. Binding of the organometallic B12 octadecanucleotide to the three important human proteins of B12 transport was studied, to examine its structural suitability for the task of eventual in vivo oligonucleotide delivery. Binding was efficient with transcobalamin (TC), but not so efficient with the homologous glycoproteins intrinsic factor and haptocorrin. Binding of the B12 octadecanucleotide to TC suggests the capacity of the B12 moiety to serve as a natural vector for specific transport of single stranded, organometallic oligonucleotide loads from the blood stream into cells.

  8. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure of the nucleic acid-binding domain of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Pedro; Johnson, Margaret A; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W; Joseph, Jeremiah S; Buchmeier, Michael J; Kuhn, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-12-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a globular domain of residues 1071 to 1178 within the previously annotated nucleic acid-binding region (NAB) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has been determined, and N- and C-terminally adjoining polypeptide segments of 37 and 25 residues, respectively, have been shown to form flexibly extended linkers to the preceding globular domain and to the following, as yet uncharacterized domain. This extension of the structural coverage of nsp3 was obtained from NMR studies with an nsp3 construct comprising residues 1066 to 1181 [nsp3(1066-1181)] and the constructs nsp3(1066-1203) and nsp3(1035-1181). A search of the protein structure database indicates that the globular domain of the NAB represents a new fold, with a parallel four-strand beta-sheet holding two alpha-helices of three and four turns that are oriented antiparallel to the beta-strands. Two antiparallel two-strand beta-sheets and two 3(10)-helices are anchored against the surface of this barrel-like molecular core. Chemical shift changes upon the addition of single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) identified a group of residues that form a positively charged patch on the protein surface as the binding site responsible for the previously reported affinity for nucleic acids. This binding site is similar to the ssRNA-binding site of the sterile alpha motif domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vts1p protein, although the two proteins do not share a common globular fold.

  9. The crystal structure of the signature domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein: implications for collagen, glycosaminoglycan and integrin binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Duquette, Mark; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lawler, Jack

    2009-08-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), or thrombospondin-5 (TSP-5), is a secreted glycoprotein that is important for growth plate organization and function. Mutations in COMP cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (EDM1). In this study, we determined the structure of a recombinant protein that contains the last epidermal growth factor repeat, the type 3 repeats and the C-terminal domain (CTD) of COMP to 3.15-A resolution limit by X-ray crystallography. The CTD is a beta-sandwich that is composed of 15 antiparallel beta-strands, and the type 3 repeats are a contiguous series of calcium binding sites that associate with the CTD at multiple points. The crystal packing reveals an exposed potential metal-ion-dependent adhesion site (MIDAS) on one edge of the beta-sandwich that is common to all TSPs and may serve as a binding site for collagens and other ligands. Disease-causing mutations in COMP disrupt calcium binding, disulfide bond formation, intramolecular interactions, or sites for potential ligand binding. The structure presented here and its unique molecular packing in the crystal identify potential interactive sites for glycosaminoglycans, integrins, and collagens, which are key to cartilage structure and function.

  10. Ice-binding site of snow mold fungus antifreeze protein deviates from structural regularity and high conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Hidemasa; Hanada, Yuichi; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Garnham, Christopher P; Davies, Peter L; Tsuda, Sakae

    2012-06-12

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are found in organisms ranging from fish to bacteria, where they serve different functions to facilitate survival of their host. AFPs that protect freeze-intolerant fish and insects from internal ice growth bind to ice using a regular array of well-conserved residues/motifs. Less is known about the role of AFPs in freeze-tolerant species, which might be to beneficially alter the structure of ice in or around the host. Here we report the 0.95-Å high-resolution crystal structure of a 223-residue secreted AFP from the snow mold fungus Typhula ishikariensis. Its main structural element is an irregular β-helix with six loops of 18 or more residues that lies alongside an α-helix. β-Helices have independently evolved as AFPs on several occasions and seem ideally structured to bind to several planes of ice, including the basal plane. A novelty of the β-helical fold is the nonsequential arrangement of loops that places the N- and C termini inside the solenoid of β-helical coils. The ice-binding site (IBS), which could not be predicted from sequence or structure, was located by site-directed mutagenesis to the flattest surface of the protein. It is remarkable for its lack of regularity and its poor conservation in homologs from psychrophilic diatoms and bacteria and other fungi.

  11. Crystal Structure of the Zinc-Binding Transport Protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli Reveals an Unexpected Variation in Metal Coordination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li,H.; Jogl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette transport systems for high-affinity uptake of zinc and manganese use a cluster 9 solute-binding protein. Structures of four cluster 9 transport proteins have been determined previously. However, the structural determinants for discrimination between zinc and manganese remain under discussion. To further investigate the variability of metal binding sites in bacterial transporters, we have determined the structure of the zinc-bound transport protein ZnuA from Escherichia coli to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The overall structure of ZnuA is similar to other solute-binding transporters. A scaffolding {alpha}-helix forms the backbone for two structurally related globular domains. The metal-binding site is located at the domain interface. The bound zinc ion is coordinated by three histidine residues (His78, His161 and His225) and one glutamate residue (Glu77). The functional role of Glu77 for metal binding is unexpected, because this residue is not conserved in previously determined structures of zinc and manganese-specific transport proteins. The observed metal coordination by four protein residues differs significantly from the zinc-binding site in the ZnuA transporter from Synechocystis 6803, which binds zinc via three histidine residues. In addition, the E. coli ZnuA structure reveals the presence of a disulfide bond in the C-terminal globular domain that is not present in previously determined cluster 9 transport protein structures.

  12. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of an IgG-binding domain from protein G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, L.Y.; Yang, J.C.; Derrick, J.P.; Sutcliffe, M.J.; Roberts, G.C.K. (Univ. of Leicester (England)); Murphy, J.P.; Goward, C.R.; Atkinson, T. (PHLS Center for Applied Microbiology and Research, Porton Down, Salisbury (England))

    1991-06-04

    Protein G is a member of a class of cell surface bacterial proteins from Streptococcus that bind IgG with high affinity. A fragment of molecular mass 6,988, which retains IgG-binding activity, has been generated by proteolytic digestion and analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. Two-dimenstional DQF-COSY, TOCSY, and NOESY spectra have been employed to assign the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the peptide. Elements of regular secondary structure have been identified by using nuclear Overhauser enhancement, coupling constant, and amide proton exchange data. The secondary structure consists of a central {alpha}-helix (Ala28-Val44), flanked by two portions of {beta}-sheet (Val5-Val26 and Asp45-Lys62). This is a fundamentally different arrangement of secondary structure from that of protein A, which is made up of three consecutive {alpha}-helics in free solution. The authors conclude that the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of protein A and protein G with IgG are different.

  13. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli; Michael Garavito, R

    2011-04-22

    The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain (∼310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain (∼20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain (∼19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain (∼30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V(0) portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0Å (maltose-free) and 2.15Å (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in protein oligomerization.

  14. Structures of genes encoding TATA box-binding proteins from Trimeresurus gramineus and T. flavoviridis snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S; Ohno, M

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding the Trimeresurus gramineus (Tg; green habu snake) TATA-box-binding protein (TgTBP) was cloned and sequenced. The cDNA encodes a 33-kDa protein with an extensive sequence similarity to those derived from other organisms, except for the N-terminal domain. Genes encoding TgTBP and Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Tf; habu snake) TBP (TfTBP) were isolated using a TgTBP cDNA and their nt sequences were determined. They are the first TBP genes entirely sequenced in higher animals. Both genes span over 15 kb and are constructed from eight exons and seven introns. Comparison of the loci of introns on the aligned amino-acid sequences of TBP from six organisms (Tg, Tf, mouse, Arabidopsis thaliana, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Acanthamoeba castellanii) indicated that there are three highly conserved loci in the C-terminal domain.

  15. Structures and Metal-Binding Properties of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein with a Di-Nuclear Ferroxidase Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yokoyama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56 at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  16. Structure-activity relationship of the peptide binding-motif mediating the BRCA2:RAD51 protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Duncan E; Marsh, May; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-04-01

    RAD51 is a recombinase involved in the homologous recombination of double-strand breaks in DNA. RAD51 forms oligomers by binding to another molecule of RAD51 via an 'FxxA' motif, and the same recognition sequence is similarly utilised to bind BRCA2. We have tabulated the effects of mutation of this sequence, across a variety of experimental methods and from relevant mutations observed in the clinic. We use mutants of a tetrapeptide sequence to probe the binding interaction, using both isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography. Where possible, comparison between our tetrapeptide mutational study and the previously reported mutations is made, discrepancies are discussed and the importance of secondary structure in interpreting alanine scanning and mutational data of this nature is considered.

  17. Structural Insights on PHA Binding Protein PhaP from Aeromonas hydrophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Wei, Hui; Liu, Xi; Yao, Zhenyu; Xu, Manyu; Wei, Daixu; Wang, Jiawei; Wang, Xinquan; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Phasins or PhaPs are a group of amphiphilic proteins that are found attached to the surface of microbial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) granules. They have both structural and regulatory functions and can affect intracellular PHA accumulation and mediate protein folding. The molecular basis for the diverse functions of the PhaPs has not been fully understood due to the lack of the structural knowledge. Here we report the structural and biochemical studies of the PhaP cloned from Aeromonas hydrophila (PhaPAh), which is utilized in protein and tissue engineering. The crystal structure of PhaPAh was revealed to be a tetramer with 8 α-helices adopting a coiled-coil structure. Each monomer has a hydrophobic and a hydrophilic surface, rendering the surfactant properties of the PhaPAh monomer. Based on the crystal structure, we predicted three key amino acid residues and obtained mutants with enhanced stability and improved emulsification properties. The first PhaP crystal structure, as reported in this study, is an important step towards a mechanistic understanding of how PHA is formed in vivo and why PhaP has such unique surfactant properties. At the same time, it will facilitate the study of other PhaP members that may have significant biotechnological potential as bio-surfactants and amphipathic coatings. PMID:28009010

  18. Structure of the Receptor-Binding Protein of Bacteriophage Det7: a Podoviral Tail Spike in a Myovirus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Monika; Fiedler, Christian; Grassl, Renate; Biebl, Manfred; Rachel, Reinhard; Hermo-Parrado, X. Lois; Llamas-Saiz, Antonio L.; Seckler, Robert; Miller, Stefan; van Raaij, Mark J.

    2008-01-01

    A new Salmonella enterica phage, Det7, was isolated from sewage and shown by electron microscopy to belong to the Myoviridae morphogroup of bacteriophages. Det7 contains a 75-kDa protein with 50% overall sequence identity to the tail spike endorhamnosidase of podovirus P22. Adsorption of myoviruses to their bacterial hosts is normally mediated by long and short tail fibers attached to a contractile tail, whereas podoviruses do not contain fibers but attach to host cells through stubby tail spikes attached to a very short, noncontractile tail. The amino-terminal 150 residues of the Det7 protein lack homology to the P22 tail spike and are probably responsible for binding to the base plate of the myoviral tail. Det7 tail spike lacking this putative particle-binding domain was purified from Escherichia coli, and well-diffracting crystals of the protein were obtained. The structure, determined by molecular replacement and refined at a 1.6-Å resolution, is very similar to that of bacteriophage P22 tail spike. Fluorescence titrations with an octasaccharide suggest Det7 tail spike to bind its receptor lipopolysaccharide somewhat less tightly than the P22 tail spike. The Det7 tail spike is even more resistant to thermal unfolding than the already exceptionally stable homologue from P22. Folding and assembly of both trimeric proteins are equally temperature sensitive and equally slow. Despite the close structural, biochemical, and sequence similarities between both proteins, the Det7 tail spike lacks both carboxy-terminal cysteines previously proposed to form a transient disulfide during P22 tail spike assembly. Our data suggest receptor-binding module exchange between podoviruses and myoviruses in the course of bacteriophage evolution. PMID:18077713

  19. Fragile X mental retardation protein recognition of G quadruplex structure per se is sufficient for high affinity binding to RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Medhavi; Menon, Lakshmi; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2008-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation is caused by the expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (fmr1) gene. The abnormal expansion of the CGG repeat causes hypermethylation and subsequent silencing of the fmr1 gene, resulting in the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to use its arginine-glycine-glycine rich region (RGG box) to bind to messenger RNAs that form G quadruplex structures. Several studies reported that the G quadruplex RNA recognition alone is not sufficient for FMRP RGG box binding and that an additional stem and/or a G quadruplex-stem junction region may also be important in recognition. In this study we have used biophysical methods such as fluorescence, UV, CD and NMR spectroscopy to demonstrate that the recognition of the RNA G quadruplex structure per se, in the absence of a stem region, is sufficient for the FMRP high affinity and specific binding. These findings indicate that the presence of a stem structure in some of the FMRP G quadruplex forming mRNAs is not a requirement for protein recognition as previously believed, but rather for the proper formation of the correct RNA G quadruplex structure recognized by FMRP.

  20. Crystal and solution structures of an odorant-binding protein from the southern house mosquito complexed with an oviposition pheromone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mao, Yang; Xu, Xianzhong; Xu, Wei;

    2010-01-01

    to controlling their populations. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the female's antenna play a crucial, if yet imperfectly understood, role in sensing oviposition cues. Here, we report the X-ray crystallography and NMR 3D structures of OBP1 for Culex quinquefasciatus (CquiOBP1) bound to an oviposition...... of the pheromone from an internal binding pocket in a pH-dependent fashion and (ii) detection of a pheromone-induced conformational change in the OBP·pheromone complex. Although CquiOBP1 binds MOP in a pH-dependent fashion, it lacks the C terminus required for the pH-dependent release model. This study shows...

  1. The structural basis of transferrin sequestration by transferrin-binding protein B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmettes, Charles; Alcantara, Joenel; Yu, Rong-Hua; Schryvers, Anthony B.; Moraes, Trevor F. (Toronto); (Calgary)

    2012-03-28

    Neisseria meningitidis, the causative agent of bacterial meningitis, acquires the essential element iron from the host glycoprotein transferrin during infection through a surface transferrin receptor system composed of proteins TbpA and TbpB. Here we present the crystal structures of TbpB from N. meningitidis in its apo form and in complex with human transferrin. The structure reveals how TbpB sequesters and initiates iron release from human transferrin.

  2. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N. (UW)

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  3. Structural and functional characterization of solute binding proteins for aromatic compounds derived from lignin: p-coumaric acid and related aromatic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Landorf, Elizabeth; Mack, Jamey C; Zerbs, Sarah; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Collart, Frank R

    2013-10-01

    Lignin comprises 15-25% of plant biomass and represents a major environmental carbon source for utilization by soil microorganisms. Access to this energy resource requires the action of fungal and bacterial enzymes to break down the lignin polymer into a complex assortment of aromatic compounds that can be transported into the cells. To improve our understanding of the utilization of lignin by microorganisms, we characterized the molecular properties of solute binding proteins of ATP-binding cassette transporter proteins that interact with these compounds. A combination of functional screens and structural studies characterized the binding specificity of the solute binding proteins for aromatic compounds derived from lignin such as p-coumarate, 3-phenylpropionic acid and compounds with more complex ring substitutions. A ligand screen based on thermal stabilization identified several binding protein clusters that exhibit preferences based on the size or number of aromatic ring substituents. Multiple X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes for these clusters identified the molecular basis of the binding specificity for the lignin-derived aromatic compounds. The screens and structural data provide new functional assignments for these solute-binding proteins which can be used to infer their transport specificity. This knowledge of the functional roles and molecular binding specificity of these proteins will support the identification of the specific enzymes and regulatory proteins of peripheral pathways that funnel these compounds to central metabolic pathways and will improve the predictive power of sequence-based functional annotation methods for this family of proteins.

  4. Role of the two structural domains from the periplasmic Escherichia coli histidine-binding protein HisJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Byron C H; DeWolf, Timothy; Vogel, Hans J

    2013-11-01

    Escherichia coli HisJ is a type II periplasmic binding protein that functions to reversibly capture histidine and transfer it to its cognate inner membrane ABC permease. Here, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the structure of apo-HisJ (26.5 kDa) in solution. HisJ is a bilobal protein in which domain 1 (D1) is made up of two noncontiguous subdomains, and domain 2 (D2) is expressed as the inner domain. To better understand the roles of D1 and D2, we have isolated and characterized each domain separately. Structurally, D1 closely resembles its homologous domain in apo- and holo-HisJ, whereas D2 is more similar to the holo-form. NMR relaxation experiments reveal that HisJ becomes more ordered upon ligand binding, whereas isolated D2 experiences a significant reduction in slower (millisecond to microsecond) motions compared with the homologous domain in apo-HisJ. NMR titrations reveal that D1 is able to bind histidine in a similar manner as full-length HisJ, albeit with lower affinity. Unexpectedly, isolated D1 and D2 do not interact with each other in the presence or absence of histidine, which indicates the importance of intact interdomain-connecting elements (i.e. hinge regions) for HisJ functioning. Our results shed light on the binding mechanism of type II periplasmic binding proteins where ligand is initially bound by D1, and D2 plays a supporting role in this dynamic process.

  5. Structure of an odorant-binding protein from the mosquito Aedes aegypti suggests a binding pocket covered by a pH-sensitive "Lid".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ney Ribeiro Leite

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the primary vector for the viruses that cause yellow fever, mostly in tropical regions of Africa and in parts of South America, and human dengue, which infects 100 million people yearly in the tropics and subtropics. A better understanding of the structural biology of olfactory proteins may pave the way for the development of environmentally-friendly mosquito attractants and repellents, which may ultimately contribute to reduction of mosquito biting and disease transmission. METHODOLOGY: Previously, we isolated and cloned a major, female-enriched odorant-binding protein (OBP from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, which was later inadvertently renamed AaegOBP39. We prepared recombinant samples of AaegOBP1 by using an expression system that allows proper formation of disulfide bridges and generates functional OBPs, which are indistinguishable from native OBPs. We crystallized AaegOBP1 and determined its three-dimensional structure at 1.85 A resolution by molecular replacement based on the structure of the malaria mosquito OBP, AgamOBP1, the only mosquito OBP structure known to date. CONCLUSION: The structure of AaegOBP1 ( = AaegOBP39 shares the common fold of insect OBPs with six alpha-helices knitted by three disulfide bonds. A long molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG was built into the electron-density maps identified in a long tunnel formed by a crystallographic dimer of AaegOBP1. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that delipidated AaegOBP1 undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, which may lead to release of odorant at low pH (as in the environment in the vicinity of odorant receptors. A C-terminal loop covers the binding cavity and this "lid" may be opened by disruption of an array of acid-labile hydrogen bonds thus explaining reduced or no binding affinity at low pH.

  6. Large-scale analysis of secondary structure changes in proteins suggests a role for disorder-to-order transitions in nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Adi; Ofran, Yanay; Kliger, Yossef

    2010-02-01

    Conformational changes in proteins often involve secondary structure transitions. Such transitions can be divided into two types: disorder-to-order changes, in which a disordered segment acquires an ordered secondary structure (e.g., disorder to alpha-helix, disorder to beta-strand), and order-to-order changes, where a segment switches from one ordered secondary structure to another (e.g., alpha-helix to beta-strand, alpha-helix to turn). In this study, we explore the distribution of these transitions in the proteome. Using a comprehensive, yet highly conservative method, we compared solved three-dimensional structures of identical protein sequences, looking for differences in the secondary structures with which they were assigned. Protein chains in which such secondary structure transitions were detected, were classified into two sets according to the type of transition that is involved (disorder-to-order or order-to-order), allowing us to characterize each set by examining enrichment of gene ontology terms. The results reveal that the disorder-to-order set is significantly enriched with nucleotide binding proteins, whereas the order-to-order set is more diverse. Remarkably, further examination reveals that >22% of the purine nucleotide binding proteins include segments which undergo disorder-to-order transitions, suggesting that such transitions play an important role in this process.

  7. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jingna; Cui, Jing; Cheng, Jin; Wu, Rongling

    2015-01-01

    Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%-8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein-RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein-RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  8. Structural characterization of a unique interface between carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) and 14-3-3β protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qiang; Huang, Nian; Wynn, R Max; Li, Yang; Du, Xinlin; Miller, Bonnie; Zhang, Hong; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2012-12-07

    Carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is an insulin-independent, glucose-responsive transcription factor that is expressed at high levels in liver hepatocytes where it plays a critical role in converting excess carbohydrates to fat for storage. In response to fluctuating glucose levels, hepatic ChREBP activity is regulated in large part by nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of ChREBP protein via interactions with 14-3-3 proteins. The N-terminal ChREBP regulatory region is necessary and sufficient for glucose-responsive ChREBP nuclear import and export. Here, we report the crystal structure of a complex of 14-3-3β bound to the N-terminal regulatory region of ChREBP at 2.4 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the α2 helix of ChREBP (residues 117-137) adopts a well defined α-helical conformation and binds 14-3-3 in a phosphorylation-independent manner that is different from all previously characterized 14-3-3 and target protein-binding modes. ChREBP α2 interacts with 14-3-3 through both electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, and the binding is partially mediated by a free sulfate or phosphate. Structure-based mutagenesis and binding assays indicated that disrupting the observed 14-3-3 and ChREBP α2 interface resulted in a loss of complex formation, thus validating the novel protein interaction mode in the 14-3-3β·ChREBP α2 complex.

  9. Structural ordering of disordered ligand-binding loops of biotin protein ligase into active conformations as a consequence of dehydration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibha Gupta

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, a dreaded pathogen, has a unique cell envelope composed of high fatty acid content that plays a crucial role in its pathogenesis. Acetyl Coenzyme A Carboxylase (ACC, an important enzyme that catalyzes the first reaction of fatty acid biosynthesis, is biotinylated by biotin acetyl-CoA carboxylase ligase (BirA. The ligand-binding loops in all known apo BirAs to date are disordered and attain an ordered structure only after undergoing a conformational change upon ligand-binding. Here, we report that dehydration of Mtb-BirA crystals traps both the apo and active conformations in its asymmetric unit, and for the first time provides structural evidence of such transformation. Recombinant Mtb-BirA was crystallized at room temperature, and diffraction data was collected at 295 K as well as at 120 K. Transfer of crystals to paraffin and paratone-N oil (cryoprotectants prior to flash-freezing induced lattice shrinkage and enhancement in the resolution of the X-ray diffraction data. Intriguingly, the crystal lattice rearrangement due to shrinkage in the dehydrated Mtb-BirA crystals ensued structural order of otherwise flexible ligand-binding loops L4 and L8 in apo BirA. In addition, crystal dehydration resulted in a shift of approximately 3.5 A in the flexible loop L6, a proline-rich loop unique to Mtb complex as well as around the L11 region. The shift in loop L11 in the C-terminal domain on dehydration emulates the action responsible for the complex formation with its protein ligand biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP domain of ACCA3. This is contrary to the involvement of loop L14 observed in Pyrococcus horikoshii BirA-BCCP complex. Another interesting feature that emerges from this dehydrated structure is that the two subunits A and B, though related by a noncrystallographic twofold symmetry, assemble into an asymmetric dimer representing the ligand-bound and ligand-free states of the protein, respectively. In

  10. Structural analysis of human complement protein H: homology with C4b binding protein, beta 2-glycoprotein I, and the Ba fragment of B2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Torsten; Wetsel, R A; Tack, B F

    1986-01-01

    We report here a partial primary structure for human complement protein H. Tryptic peptides comprising 27% of the H molecule were isolated by conventional techniques and were sequenced (333 amino acid residues). Several mixed-sequence oligonucleotide probes were constructed, based on the peptide ....... Furthermore, the repetitive unit of H shows pronounced homology with the Ba fragment of B, the C4b binding protein, and beta 2-glycoprotein I. Therefore, it seems that at least portions of these proteins have evolved from a common ancestral DNA element...

  11. Structure of a protein-detergent complex: the balance between detergent cohesion and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khao, Jonathan; Arce-Lopera, Jaime; Sturgis, James N; Duneau, Jean-Pierre

    2011-10-01

    Despite the major interest in membrane proteins at functional, genomic, and therapeutic levels, their biochemical and structural study remains challenging, as they require, among other things, solubilization in detergent micelles. The complexity of this task derives from the dependence of membrane protein structure on their anisotropic environment, influenced by a delicate balance between many different physicochemical properties. To study such properties in a small protein-detergent complex, we used fluorescence measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the transmembrane part of glycophorin A (GpAtm) solubilized in micelles of dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) detergent. Fluorescence measurements show that DHPC has limited ability to solubilize the peptide, while MD provides a possible molecular explanation for this. We observe that the detergent molecules are balanced between two different types of interactions: cohesive interactions between detergent molecules that hold the micelle together, and adhesive interactions with the peptide. While the cohesive interactions are detergent mediated, the adhesion to the peptide depends on the specific interactions between the hydrophobic parts of the detergent and the topography of the peptide dictated by the amino acids. The balance between these two parameters results in a certain frustration of the system and rather slow equilibration. These observations suggest how molecular properties of detergents could influence membrane protein stabilization and solubilization.

  12. Structural and Functional Characterization of Cargo-Binding Sites on the μ4-Subunit of Adaptor Protein Complex 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Breyan H.; Lin, Yimo; Corales, Esteban A.; Burgos, Patricia V.; Mardones, Gonzalo A.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptor protein (AP) complexes facilitate protein trafficking by playing key roles in the selection of cargo molecules to be sorted in post-Golgi compartments. Four AP complexes (AP-1 to AP-4) contain a medium-sized subunit (μ1-μ4) that recognizes YXXØ-sequences (Ø is a bulky hydrophobic residue), which are sorting signals in transmembrane proteins. A conserved, canonical region in μ subunits mediates recognition of YXXØ-signals by means of a critical aspartic acid. Recently we found that a non-canonical YXXØ-signal on the cytosolic tail of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein (APP) binds to a distinct region of the μ4 subunit of the AP-4 complex. In this study we aimed to determine the functionality of both binding sites of μ4 on the recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP. We found that substitutions in either binding site abrogated the interaction with the APP-tail in yeast-two hybrid experiments. Further characterization by isothermal titration calorimetry showed instead loss of binding to the APP signal with only the substitution R283D at the non-canonical site, in contrast to a decrease in binding affinity with the substitution D190A at the canonical site. We solved the crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the D190A mutant bound to this non-canonical YXXØ-signal. This structure showed no significant difference compared to that of wild-type μ4. Both differential scanning fluorimetry and limited proteolysis analyses demonstrated that the D190A substitution rendered μ4 less stable, suggesting an explanation for its lower binding affinity to the APP signal. Finally, in contrast to overexpression of the D190A mutant, and acting in a dominant-negative manner, overexpression of μ4 with either a F255A or a R283D substitution at the non-canonical site halted APP transport at the Golgi apparatus. Together, our analyses support that the functional recognition of the non-canonical YXXØ-signal of APP is limited to the non

  13. Crystal and solution structures of an odorant-binding protein from the southern house mosquito complexed with an oviposition pheromone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Yang; Xu, Xianzhong; Xu, Wei; Ishida, Yuko; Leal, Walter S.; Ames, James B.; Clardy, Jon (Harvard-Med); (UCD)

    2010-11-15

    Culex mosquitoes introduce the pathogens responsible for filariasis, West Nile virus, St. Louis encephalitis, and other diseases into humans. Currently, traps baited with oviposition semiochemicals play an important role in detection efforts and could provide an environmentally friendly approach to controlling their populations. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) in the female's antenna play a crucial, if yet imperfectly understood, role in sensing oviposition cues. Here, we report the X-ray crystallography and NMR 3D structures of OBP1 for Culex quinquefasciatus (CquiOBP1) bound to an oviposition pheromone (5R,6S)-6-acetoxy-5-hexadecanolide (MOP). In both studies, CquiOBP1 had the same overall six-helix structure seen in other insect OBPs, but a detailed analysis revealed an important previously undescribed feature. There are two models for OBP-mediated signal transduction: (i) direct release of the pheromone from an internal binding pocket in a pH-dependent fashion and (ii) detection of a pheromone-induced conformational change in the OBP {center_dot} pheromone complex. Although CquiOBP1 binds MOP in a pH-dependent fashion, it lacks the C terminus required for the pH-dependent release model. This study shows that CquiOBP binds MOP in an unprecedented fashion using both a small central cavity for the lactone head group and a long hydrophobic channel for its tail.

  14. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Allingham, John S., E-mail: allinghj@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  15. Structure and functional analysis of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein from the fuscachelin gene cluster of Thermobifida fusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kunhua; Bruner, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Iron acquisition is a complex, multicomponent process critical for most organisms' survival and virulence. Small iron chelating molecules, siderophores, mediate transport as key components of common pathways for iron assimilation in many microorganisms. The chemistry and biology of the extraordinary tight and specific metal binding siderophores is of general interest in terms of host/guest chemistry and is a potential target toward the development of therapeutic treatments for microbial virulence. The siderophore pathway of the moderate thermophile, Thermobifida fusca, is an excellent model system to study the process in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we describe the structure and characterization of the siderophore periplasmic binding protein, FscJ from the fuscachelin gene cluster of T. fusca. The structure shows a di-domain arrangement connected with a long α-helix hinge. Several X-ray structures detail ligand-free conformational changes at different pH values, illustrating complex interdomain flexibility of the siderophore receptors. We demonstrated that FscJ has a unique recognition mechanism and details the binding interaction with ferric-fuscachelin A through ITC and docking analysis. The presented work provides a structural basis for the complex molecular mechanisms of siderophore recognition and transportation.

  16. A new size-independent score for pairwise protein structure alignment and its application to structure classification and nucleic-acid binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhan, Jian; Zhao, Huiying; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2012-08-01

    A structure alignment program aligns two structures by optimizing a scoring function that measures structural similarity. It is highly desirable that such scoring function is independent of the sizes of proteins in comparison so that the significance of alignment across different sizes of the protein regions aligned is comparable. Here, we developed a new score called SP-score that fixes the cutoff distance at 4 Å and removed the size dependence using a normalization prefactor. We further built a program called SPalign that optimizes SP-score for structure alignment. SPalign was applied to recognize proteins within the same structure fold and having the same function of DNA or RNA binding. For fold discrimination, SPalign improves sensitivity over TMalign for the chain-level comparison by 12% and over DALI for the domain-level comparison by 13% at the same specificity of 99.6%. The difference between TMalign and SPalign at the chain level is due to the inability of TMalign to detect single domain similarity between multidomain proteins. For recognizing nucleic acid binding proteins, SPalign consistently improves over TMalign by 12% and DALI by 31% in average value of Mathews correlation coefficients for four datasets. SPalign with default setting is 14% faster than TMalign. SPalign is expected to be useful for function prediction and comparing structures with or without domains defined. The source code for SPalign and the server are available at http://sparks.informatics.iupui.edu.

  17. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  18. How do ADARs bind RNA? New protein-RNA structures illuminate substrate recognition by the RNA editing ADARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin M; Beal, Peter A

    2017-02-20

    Deamination of adenosine in RNA to form inosine has wide ranging consequences on RNA function including amino acid substitution to give proteins not encoded in the genome. What determines which adenosines in an mRNA are subject to this modification reaction? The answer lies in an understanding of the mechanism and substrate recognition properties of adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs). Our recent publication of X-ray crystal structures of the human ADAR2 deaminase domain bound to RNA editing substrates shed considerable light on how the catalytic domains of these enzymes bind RNA and promote adenosine deamination. Here we review in detail the deaminase domain-RNA contact surfaces and present models of how full length ADARs, bearing double stranded RNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) and deaminase domains, could process naturally occurring substrate RNAs.

  19. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein...... and of the complex with palmitoyl-CoA using NMR spectroscopy. In the four alpha-helix bundle structure, a set of 21 highly conserved residues present in more that 90% of all known sequences of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins constitutes three separate mini-cores. These residues are predominantly located...... at the helix-helix interfaces. From studies of a large set of mutant proteins the role of the conserved residues has been related to structure, function, folding and stability....

  20. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein, ACBP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Birthe Brandt; Knudsen, J.; Poulsen, Flemming

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein...... and of the complex with palmitoyl-CoA using NMR spectroscopy. In the four a-helix bundle structure, a set of 21 highly conserved residues present in more that 90% of all known sequences of acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins constitutes three separate mini-cores. These residues are predominantly located at the helix......-helix interfaces. From studies of a large set of mutant proteins the role of the conserved residues has been related to structure, function, folding and stability....

  1. Crystal structure and biochemical analyses reveal Beclin 1 as a novel membrane binding protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weijiao Huang; Feng-Liang Wang; Haiteng Deng; Lei Liu; Ning Gao; Li Yu; Yigong Shi; Wooyoung Choi; Wanqiu Hu; Na Mi; Qiang Guo; Meisheng Ma; Mei Liu; Yuan Tian; Peilong Lu

    2012-01-01

    The Beclin 1 gene is a haplo-insufficient tumor suppressor and plays an essential role in autophagy.However,the molecular mechanism by which Beclin 1 functions remains largely unknown.Here we report the crystal structure of the evolutionarily conserved domain(ECD)of Beclin 1 at 1.6(A)resolution.Beclin 1 ECD exhibits a previously unreported fold,with three structural repeats arranged symmetrically around a central axis.Beclin 1 ECD defines a novel class of membrane-binding domain,with a strong preference for lipid membrane enriched with cardiolipin.The tip of a surface loop in Beclin 1 ECD,comprising three aromatic amino acids,acts as a hydrophobic finger to associate with lipid membrane,consequently resulting in the deformation of membrane and liposomes.Mutation of these aromatic residues rendered Beclin 1 unable to stably associate with lipid membrane in vitro and unable to fully rescue autophagy in Beclin 1-knockdown cells in vivo.These observations form an important framework for deciphering the biological functions of Beclin 1.

  2. Crystal structure of an ACh-binding protein reveals the ligand-binding domain of nicotinic receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brejc, K.; Dijk, van W.J.; Klaassen, R.V.; Schuurmans, M.; Oost, van der J.; Smit, A.B.; Sixma, T.K.

    2001-01-01

    Pentameric ligand gated ion-channels, or Cys-loop receptors, mediate rapid chemical transmission of signals. This superfamily of allosteric transmembrane proteins includes the nicotinic acetylcholine (nAChR), serotonin 5-HT3, -aminobutyric-acid (GABAA and GABAC) and glycine receptors. Biochemical an

  3. Structural analysis of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University (United States); Michael Garavito, R., E-mail: garavito@msu.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University (United States)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Crystal structure of the intracellular domain of (pro)renin receptor (PRR-IC) as MBP fusion protein at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). {yields} MBP fusion protein is a dimer in crystals in the presence and absence of maltose. {yields} PRR-IC domain is responsible for the dimerization of the fusion protein. {yields} Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermolecular interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR-IC domain in PRR dimerization. -- Abstract: The (pro)renin receptor (PRR) is an important component of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates blood pressure and cardiovascular function. The integral membrane protein PRR contains a large extracellular domain ({approx}310 amino acids), a single transmembrane domain ({approx}20 amino acids) and an intracellular domain ({approx}19 amino acids). Although short, the intracellular (IC) domain of the PRR has functionally important roles in a number of signal transduction pathways activated by (pro)renin binding. Meanwhile, together with the transmembrane domain and a small portion of the extracellular domain ({approx}30 amino acids), the IC domain is also involved in assembly of V{sub 0} portion of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase (V-ATPase). To better understand structural and multifunctional roles of the PRR-IC, we report the crystal structure of the PRR-IC domain as maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion proteins at 2.0 A (maltose-free) and 2.15 A (maltose-bound). In the two separate crystal forms having significantly different unit-cell dimensions and molecular packing, MBP-PRR-IC fusion protein was found to be a dimer, which is different with the natural monomer of native MBP. The PRR-IC domain appears as a relatively flexible loop and is responsible for the dimerization of MBP fusion protein. Residues in the PRR-IC domain, particularly two tyrosines, dominate the intermonomer interactions, suggesting a role for the PRR

  4. Periplasmic binding proteins: a versatile superfamily for protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Mary A; Hellinga, Homme W

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of biological function, ligand binding, conformational changes and structural adaptability of the periplasmic binding protein superfamily have been exploited to engineer biosensors, allosteric control elements, biologically active receptors and enzymes using a combination of techniques, including computational design. Extensively redesigned periplasmic binding proteins have been re-introduced into bacteria to function in synthetic signal transduction pathways that respond to extracellular ligands and as biologically active enzymes.

  5. Solution structure of the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus p9 protein: a rationalization of its different ALIX binding requirements compared to the analogous HIV-p6 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henklein Peter

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The equine infection anemia virus (EIAV p9 Gag protein contains the late (L- domain required for efficient virus release of nascent virions from the cell membrane of infected cell. Results In the present study the p9 protein and N- and C-terminal fragments (residues 1-21 and 22-51, respectively were chemically synthesized and used for structural analyses. Circular dichroism and 1H-NMR spectroscopy provide the first molecular insight into the secondary structure and folding of this 51-amino acid protein under different solution conditions. Qualitative 1H-chemical shift and NOE data indicate that in a pure aqueous environment p9 favors an unstructured state. In its most structured state under hydrophobic conditions, p9 adopts a stable helical structure within the C-terminus. Quantitative NOE data further revealed that this α-helix extends from Ser-27 to Ser-48, while the N-terminal residues remain unstructured. The structural elements identified for p9 differ substantially from that of the functional homologous HIV-1 p6 protein. Conclusions These structural differences are discussed in the context of the different types of L-domains regulating distinct cellular pathways in virus budding. EIAV p9 mediates virus release by recruiting the ALG2-interacting protein X (ALIX via the YPDL-motif to the site of virus budding, the counterpart of the YPXnL-motif found in p6. However, p6 contains an additional PTAP L-domain that promotes HIV-1 release by binding to the tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. The notion that structures found in p9 differ form that of p6 further support the idea that different mechanisms regulate binding of ALIX to primary versus secondary L-domains types.

  6. Predicting where small molecules bind at protein-protein interfaces.

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    Peter Walter

    Full Text Available Small molecules that bind at protein-protein interfaces may either block or stabilize protein-protein interactions in cells. Thus, some of these binding interfaces may turn into prospective targets for drug design. Here, we collected 175 pairs of protein-protein (PP complexes and protein-ligand (PL complexes with known three-dimensional structures for which (1 one protein from the PP complex shares at least 40% sequence identity with the protein from the PL complex, and (2 the interface regions of these proteins overlap at least partially with each other. We found that those residues of the interfaces that may bind the other protein as well as the small molecule are evolutionary more conserved on average, have a higher tendency of being located in pockets and expose a smaller fraction of their surface area to the solvent than the remaining protein-protein interface region. Based on these findings we derived a statistical classifier that predicts patches at binding interfaces that have a higher tendency to bind small molecules. We applied this new prediction method to more than 10,000 interfaces from the protein data bank. For several complexes related to apoptosis the predicted binding patches were in direct contact to co-crystallized small molecules.

  7. The helical structure of DNA facilitates binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Otto G.; Mahmutovic, Anel; Marklund, Emil; Elf, Johan

    2016-09-01

    The helical structure of DNA imposes constraints on the rate of diffusion-limited protein binding. Here we solve the reaction-diffusion equations for DNA-like geometries and extend with simulations when necessary. We find that the helical structure can make binding to the DNA more than twice as fast compared to a case where DNA would be reactive only along one side. We also find that this rate advantage remains when the contributions from steric constraints and rotational diffusion of the DNA-binding protein are included. Furthermore, we find that the association rate is insensitive to changes in the steric constraints on the DNA in the helix geometry, while it is much more dependent on the steric constraints on the DNA-binding protein. We conclude that the helical structure of DNA facilitates the nonspecific binding of transcription factors and structural DNA-binding proteins in general.

  8. Positively-charged semi-tunnel is a structural and surface characteristic of polyphosphate-binding proteins: an in-silico study.

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    Zheng Zachory Wei

    Full Text Available Phosphate is essential for all major life processes, especially energy metabolism and signal transduction. A linear phosphate polymer, polyphosphate (polyP, linked by high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds, can interact with various proteins, playing important roles as an energy source and regulatory factor. However, polyP-binding structures are largely unknown. Here we proposed a putative polyP binding site, a positively-charged semi-tunnel (PCST, identified by surface electrostatics analyses in polyP kinases (PPKs and many other polyP-related proteins. We found that the PCSTs in varied proteins were folded in different secondary structure compositions. Molecular docking calculations revealed a significant value for binding affinity to polyP in PCST-containing proteins. Utilizing the PCST identified in the β subunit of PPK3, we predicted the potential polyP-binding domain of PPK3. The discovery of this feature facilitates future searches for polyP-binding proteins and discovery of the mechanisms for polyP-binding activities. This should greatly enhance the understanding of the many physiological functions of protein-bound polyP and the involvement of polyP and polyP-binding proteins in various human diseases.

  9. Nucleic acid binding properties of a helix stabilising nucleoid protein from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius that condenses DNA into compact structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celestina, F; Suryanarayana, T

    1995-12-01

    Helix stabilising nucleoid protein (HSNP-C') from an acidothermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius has been characterised with respect to interaction with nucleic acids by gel retardation assay, binding to nucleic acid columns, fluorescence titrations and electron microscopy. The protein exists in solution as very large multimeric aggregates as indicated by cross-linking studies. The protein binds strongly and co-operatively to double stranded DNA. Electron microscopy of the complexes of the protein with DNA shows compact structures suggesting that the protein condenses DNA.

  10. Structural and Physiological Analyses of the Alkanesulphonate-Binding Protein (SsuA) of the Citrus Pathogen Xanthomonas citri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tófoli de Araújo, Fabiano; Bolanos-Garcia, Victor M.; Pereira, Cristiane T.; Sanches, Mario; Oshiro, Elisa E.; Ferreira, Rita C. C.; Chigardze, Dimitri Y.; Barbosa, João Alexandre Gonçalves; de Souza Ferreira, Luís Carlos; Benedetti, Celso E.; Blundell, Tom L.; Balan, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Background The uptake of sulphur-containing compounds plays a pivotal role in the physiology of bacteria that live in aerobic soils where organosulfur compounds such as sulphonates and sulphate esters represent more than 95% of the available sulphur. Until now, no information has been available on the uptake of sulphonates by bacterial plant pathogens, particularly those of the Xanthomonas genus, which encompasses several pathogenic species. In the present study, we characterised the alkanesulphonate uptake system (Ssu) of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306 strain (X. citri), the etiological agent of citrus canker. Methodology/Principal Findings A single operon-like gene cluster (ssuEDACB) that encodes both the sulphur uptake system and enzymes involved in desulphurisation was detected in the genomes of X. citri and of the closely related species. We characterised X. citri SsuA protein, a periplasmic alkanesulphonate-binding protein that, together with SsuC and SsuB, defines the alkanesulphonate uptake system. The crystal structure of SsuA bound to MOPS, MES and HEPES, which is herein described for the first time, provides evidence for the importance of a conserved dipole in sulphate group coordination, identifies specific amino acids interacting with the sulphate group and shows the presence of a rather large binding pocket that explains the rather wide range of molecules recognised by the protein. Isolation of an isogenic ssuA-knockout derivative of the X. citri 306 strain showed that disruption of alkanesulphonate uptake affects both xanthan gum production and generation of canker lesions in sweet orange leaves. Conclusions/Significance The present study unravels unique structural and functional features of the X. citri SsuA protein and provides the first experimental evidence that an ABC uptake system affects the virulence of this phytopathogen. PMID:24282519

  11. Structural and physiological analyses of the alkanesulphonate-binding protein (SsuA of the citrus pathogen Xanthomonas citri.

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    Fabiano Tófoli de Araújo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uptake of sulphur-containing compounds plays a pivotal role in the physiology of bacteria that live in aerobic soils where organosulfur compounds such as sulphonates and sulphate esters represent more than 95% of the available sulphur. Until now, no information has been available on the uptake of sulphonates by bacterial plant pathogens, particularly those of the Xanthomonas genus, which encompasses several pathogenic species. In the present study, we characterised the alkanesulphonate uptake system (Ssu of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri 306 strain (X. citri, the etiological agent of citrus canker. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A single operon-like gene cluster (ssuEDACB that encodes both the sulphur uptake system and enzymes involved in desulphurisation was detected in the genomes of X. citri and of the closely related species. We characterised X. citri SsuA protein, a periplasmic alkanesulphonate-binding protein that, together with SsuC and SsuB, defines the alkanesulphonate uptake system. The crystal structure of SsuA bound to MOPS, MES and HEPES, which is herein described for the first time, provides evidence for the importance of a conserved dipole in sulphate group coordination, identifies specific amino acids interacting with the sulphate group and shows the presence of a rather large binding pocket that explains the rather wide range of molecules recognised by the protein. Isolation of an isogenic ssuA-knockout derivative of the X. citri 306 strain showed that disruption of alkanesulphonate uptake affects both xanthan gum production and generation of canker lesions in sweet orange leaves. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study unravels unique structural and functional features of the X. citri SsuA protein and provides the first experimental evidence that an ABC uptake system affects the virulence of this phytopathogen.

  12. Structure of the human-heart fatty-acid-binding protein 3 in complex with the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Mika; Sugiyama, Shigeru, E-mail: sugiyama@chem.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ishida, Hanako; Niiyama, Mayumi [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Toshiaki [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Mizohata, Eiichi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Murakami, Satoshi [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagaw 226-8501 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Matsuoka, Shigeru; Murata, Michio [Lipid Active Structure Project, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The crystal structure of human-heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein in complex with anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate was solved at 2.15 Å resolution revealing the detailed binding mechanism of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate. Heart-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP3), which is a cytosolic protein abundantly found in cardiomyocytes, plays a role in trafficking fatty acids throughout cellular compartments by reversibly binding intracellular fatty acids with relatively high affinity. The fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) is extensively utilized for examining the interaction of ligands with fatty-acid-binding proteins. The X-ray structure of FABP3 was determined in the presence of ANS and revealed the detailed ANS-binding mechanism. Furthermore, four water molecules were clearly identified in the binding cavity. Through these water molecules, the bound ANS molecule forms indirect hydrogen-bond interactions with FABP3. The adipocyte-type fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP4) exhibits 67% sequence identity with FABP3 and its crystal structure is almost the same as that of FABP3. However, FABP4 can bind with a higher affinity to ANS than FABP3. To understand the difference in their ligand specificities, a structural comparison was performed between FABP3–ANS and FABP4–ANS complexes. The result revealed that the orientation of ANS binding to FABP3 is completely opposite to that of ANS binding to FABP4, and the substitution of valine in FABP4 to leucine in FABP3 may result in greater steric hindrance between the side-chain of Leu115 and the aniline ring of ANS.

  13. Structure-based rational design of a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 decoy receptor with high binding affinity for a target protein.

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    Jieun Han

    Full Text Available Repeat proteins are increasingly attracting much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural features. Nonetheless, engineering interaction interface and understanding molecular basis for affinity maturation of repeat proteins still remain a challenge. Here, we present a structure-based rational design of a repeat protein with high binding affinity for a target protein. As a model repeat protein, a Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4 decoy receptor composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR modules was used, and its interaction interface was rationally engineered to increase the binding affinity for myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2. Based on the complex crystal structure of the decoy receptor with MD2, we first designed single amino acid substitutions in the decoy receptor, and obtained three variants showing a binding affinity (K(D one-order of magnitude higher than the wild-type decoy receptor. The interacting modes and contributions of individual residues were elucidated by analyzing the crystal structures of the single variants. To further increase the binding affinity, single positive mutations were combined, and two double mutants were shown to have about 3000- and 565-fold higher binding affinities than the wild-type decoy receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations and energetic analysis indicate that an additive effect by two mutations occurring at nearby modules was the major contributor to the remarkable increase in the binding affinities.

  14. Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, Elaine Garbarino

    2007-01-01

    Individual students model specific amino acids and then, through dehydration synthesis, a class of students models a protein. The students clearly learn amino acid structure, primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure in proteins and the nature of the bonds maintaining a protein's shape. This activity is fun, concrete, inexpensive and…

  15. The solution structure of the active domain of CAP18--a lipopolysaccharide binding protein from rabbit leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C; Brock, R; Luh, F; Chou, P J; Larrick, J W; Huang, R F; Huang, T H

    1995-08-14

    We have employed the circular dichroism (CD) technique to characterize the solution structure of CAP18(106-137), a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding, antimicrobial protein, and its interaction with lipid A. Our results revealed that CAP18(106-137) may exist in at least three lipid A concentration-dependent, primarily helix conformations. The 'model' structure of CAP18(106-137) in 30% (v/v) TFE, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, was found to be a complete and very rigid helix. In this conformation, the cationic and hydrophobic groups of CAP18(106-137) are separated into patches and stripes in such a way that it can favorably interact with lipid A through either coulombic interaction with the diphosphoryl groups or hydrophobic interaction with the fatty acyl chains.

  16. Intricate Crystal Structure of Dihydrolipoamide Dehydrogenase (E3) with its Binding Protein: Multiple Copies, Dynamic and Static Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makal, A.; Hong, Y. S.; Potter, R.; Vettaikkorumakankauv, A. K.; Korotchkina, L. G.; Patel, M. S.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Human E3 and binding protein E3BP are two components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. Crystallization of E3 with 221-amino acid fragment of E3BP (E3BPdd) led to crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 2.6 Angstroms. Structure determination involved molecular replacement using a dimer of E3 homolog as a search model and de novo building of the E3BPdd peptide. Solution was achieved by inclusion of one E3 dimer at a time, followed by refinement until five E3 dimers were located. This complete content of E3 provided electron density maps suitable for tracing nine peptide chains of E3BPdd, eight of them being identified with partial occupancies. Final content of the asymmetric unit consists of five E3 dimers, each binding one E3BPdd molecule. In four of these molecular complexes, E3BPdd is in static disorder resulting in E3BPdd binding to either one or the other monomer of the E3 dimer. However, E3BPdd of the fifth E3 dimer forms specific contacts that lock it at one monomer. In addition to this static disorder, E3BPdd reveals high mobility in the limited space of the crystal lattice. Support from NIH and NASA.

  17. Structural Basis of Host Autophagy-related Protein 8 (ATG8) Binding by the Irish Potato Famine Pathogen Effector Protein PexRD54.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Abbas; Hughes, Richard K; Dagdas, Yasin F; Tregidgo, Nicholas; Zess, Erin; Belhaj, Khaoula; Round, Adam; Bozkurt, Tolga O; Kamoun, Sophien; Banfield, Mark J

    2016-09-16

    Filamentous plant pathogens deliver effector proteins to host cells to promote infection. The Phytophthora infestans RXLR-type effector PexRD54 binds potato ATG8 via its ATG8 family-interacting motif (AIM) and perturbs host-selective autophagy. However, the structural basis of this interaction remains unknown. Here, we define the crystal structure of PexRD54, which includes a modular architecture, including five tandem repeat domains, with the AIM sequence presented at the disordered C terminus. To determine the interface between PexRD54 and ATG8, we solved the crystal structure of potato ATG8CL in complex with a peptide comprising the effector's AIM sequence, and we established a model of the full-length PexRD54-ATG8CL complex using small angle x-ray scattering. Structure-informed deletion of the PexRD54 tandem domains reveals retention of ATG8CL binding in vitro and in planta This study offers new insights into structure/function relationships of oomycete RXLR effectors and how these proteins engage with host cell targets to promote disease.

  18. Synthesis, Molecular Structure, DNA/Protein Binding, Cytotoxicity, Apoptosis, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Mitochondrial Membrane Potential of Dibenzoxanthenes Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Hui; Han, Bing-Jie; Li, Wei; Liu, Yun-Jun; Wang, Xiu-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Two dibenzoxanthene isomers 3 and 4 were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structures of the two compounds were solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Binding of two compounds with calf thymus DNA (CT DNA) and BSA (bovine serum albumin) has been thoroughly investigated by UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The DNA-binding constants were determined to be 2.51 (± 0.09) × 10(3) for compound 3 and 4.55 (± 0.10) × 10(3) for compound 4. Two compounds can cleave pBR322 DNA upon irradiation. Significant nuclear damages of BEL-7402 cells were observed with compound treatment in a comet assay. The cytotoxicity in vitro was investigated by MTT method. These compounds have been found to induce nuclear condensation and fragmentation in BEL-7402 cells. The two compounds can enhance intracellular reactive oxygen species and decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. The compounds activated caspase-3 and caspase-7, down-regulated the expression levels of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, and up-regulated the expression levels of pro-apoptotic protein Bax. These compounds induce apoptosis of BEL-7402 cells through an ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway.

  19. Module structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP may provide bases for its complex role in the visual cycle – structure/function study of Xenopus IRBP

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    Ghosh Debashis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein's (IRBP remarkable module structure may be critical to its role in mediating the transport of all-trans and 11-cis retinol, and 11-cis retinal between rods, cones, RPE and Müller cells during the visual cycle. We isolated cDNAs for Xenopus IRBP, and expressed and purified its individual modules, module combinations, and the full-length polypeptide. Binding of all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinal and 9-(9-anthroyloxy stearic acid were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring ligand-fluorescence enhancement, quenching of endogenous protein fluorescence, and energy transfer. Finally, the X-ray crystal structure of module-2 was used to predict the location of the ligand-binding sites, and compare their structures among modules using homology modeling. Results The full-length Xenopus IRBP cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 1,197 amino acid residues beginning with a signal peptide followed by four homologous modules each ~300 amino acid residues in length. Modules 1 and 3 are more closely related to each other than either is to modules 2 and 4. Modules 1 and 4 are most similar to the N- and C-terminal modules of the two module IRBP of teleosts. Our data are consistent with the model that vertebrate IRBPs arose through two genetic duplication events, but that the middle two modules were lost during the evolution of the ray finned fish. The sequence of the expressed full-length IRBP was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP bound all-trans retinol and 11-cis retinaldehyde at 3 to 4 sites with Kd's of 0.2 to 0.3 μM, and was active in protecting all-trans retinol from degradation. Module 2 showed selectivity for all-trans retinol over 11-cis retinaldehyde. The binding data are correlated to the results of docking of all-trans-retinol to the crystal structure of Xenopus module 2 suggesting two ligand-binding sites

  20. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  1. The prion protein binds thiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pineiro, Rolando; Bjorndahl, Trent C; Berjanskii, Mark V; Hau, David; Li, Li; Huang, Alan; Lee, Rose; Gibbs, Ebrima; Ladner, Carol; Dong, Ying Wei; Abera, Ashenafi; Cashman, Neil R; Wishart, David S

    2011-11-01

    Although highly conserved throughout evolution, the exact biological function of the prion protein is still unclear. In an effort to identify the potential biological functions of the prion protein we conducted a small-molecule screening assay using the Syrian hamster prion protein [shPrP(90-232)]. The screen was performed using a library of 149 water-soluble metabolites that are known to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Using a combination of 1D NMR, fluorescence quenching and surface plasmon resonance we identified thiamine (vitamin B1) as a specific prion ligand with a binding constant of ~60 μM. Subsequent studies showed that this interaction is evolutionarily conserved, with similar binding constants being seen for mouse, hamster and human prions. Various protein construct lengths, both with and without the unstructured N-terminal region in the presence and absence of copper, were examined. This indicates that the N-terminus has no influence on the protein's ability to interact with thiamine. In addition to thiamine, the more biologically abundant forms of vitamin B1 (thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate) were also found to bind the prion protein with similar affinity. Heteronuclear NMR experiments were used to determine thiamine's interaction site, which is located between helix 1 and the preceding loop. These data, in conjunction with computer-aided docking and molecular dynamics, were used to model the thiamine-binding pharmacophore and a comparison with other thiamine binding proteins was performed to reveal the common features of interaction.

  2. Structure and dynamics of Type III periplasmic proteins VcFhuD and VcHutB reveal molecular basis of their distinctive ligand binding properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shubhangi; Dey, Sanjay; Ghosh, Biplab; Biswas, Maitree; Dasgupta, Jhimli

    2017-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms of xenosiderophore and heme acquisitions using periplasmic binding protein (PBP) dependent ATP-binding cassette transporters to scavenge the essential nutrient iron are elusive yet in Vibrio cholerae. Our current study delineates the structures, dynamics and ligand binding properties of two Type III PBPs of V. cholerae, VcFhuD and VcHutB. Through crystal structures and fluorescence quenching studies we demonstrate unique features of VcFhuD to bind both hydroxamate and catecholate type xenosiderophores. Like E. coli FhuD, VcFhuD binds ferrichrome and ferri-desferal using conserved Tryptophans and R102. However, unlike EcFhuD, slightly basic ligand binding pocket of VcFhuD could favour ferri-enterobactin binding with plausible participation of R203, along with R102, like it happens in catecholate binding PBPs. Structural studies coupled with spectrophotometric and native PAGE analysis indicated parallel binding of two heme molecules to VcHutB in a pH dependent manner, while mutational analysis established the relative importance of Y65 and H164 in heme binding. MD simulation studies exhibited an unforeseen inter-lobe swinging motion in Type III PBPs, magnitude of which is inversely related to the packing of the linker helix with its neighboring helices. Small inter-lobe movement in VcFhuD or dramatic twisting in VcHutB is found to influence ligand binding.

  3. Holding back the microfilament--structural insights into actin and the actin-monomer-binding proteins of apicomplexan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshina, Maya A; Wong, Wilson; Baum, Jake

    2012-05-01

    Parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa are responsible for several major diseases of man, including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These highly motile protozoa use a conserved actomyosin-based mode of movement to power tissue traversal and host cell invasion. The mode termed as 'gliding motility' relies on the dynamic turnover of actin, whose polymerisation state is controlled by a markedly limited number of identifiable regulators when compared with other eukaryotic cells. Recent studies of apicomplexan actin regulator structure-in particular those of the core triad of monomer-binding proteins, actin-depolymerising factor/cofilin, cyclase-associated protein/Srv2, and profilin-have provided new insights into possible mechanisms of actin regulation in parasite cells, highlighting divergent structural features and functions to regulators from other cellular systems. Furthermore, the unusual nature of apicomplexan actin itself is increasingly coming into the spotlight. Here, we review recent advances in understanding of the structure and function of actin and its regulators in apicomplexan parasites. In particular we explore the paradox between there being an abundance of unpolymerised actin, its having a seemingly increased potential to form filaments relative to vertebrate actin, and the apparent lack of visible, stable filaments in parasite cells.

  4. The effect of structural differences in the reducing terminus of sugars on the binding affinity of carbohydrates and proteins analyzed using photoaffinity labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Isao; Sadakane, Yutaka; Higuchi, Mari; Hada, Noriyasu; Hada, Junko; Kakiuchi, Nobuko; Sakushima, Akiyo

    2011-01-15

    Because carbohydrates and proteins bind with such low affinity, the nature of their interactions is not clear. Photoaffinity labeling with diazirin groups is useful for elucidating the roles of carbohydrates in these binding processes. However, when carbohydrate probes are synthesized according to this conventional method, the reducing terminus of the sugar is opened to provide an acyclic structure. Because greater elucidation of carbohydrate-protein interactions requires a closed-ring carbohydrate in addition to the photoreactive group, we synthesized new molecular tools. The carbohydrate ligands were synthesized in three steps (glycosylation with allyl alcohol, deprotection, and ozonolysis). Specific binding proteins for carbohydrate ligands were obtained by photoaffinity labeling. Closed ring-type carbohydrate ligands, in which the reducing sugar is closed, bound to lectins more strongly than open ring-type sugars. Carbohydrate to protein binding was observed using AFM.

  5. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  6. Flexibility of EF-hand motifs: structural and thermodynamic studies of Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica with Pb2+, Ba2+, and Sr2+

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    Kumar Shivesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EF-hand proteins can be activated by the binding of various heavy metals other than calcium, and such complexes can disturb the calcium-signaling pathway and cause toxicity and disease causing state. So far, no comprehensive study has been done to understand different heavy metals binding to calcium signaling proteins. Results In this work, the flexibility of the EF-hand motifs are examined by crystallographic and thermodynamic studies of binding of Pb2+, Ba2+ and Sr2+ to Calcium Binding Protein-1 from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP1. The structures of the EhCaBP1- heavy metal complexes are found to be overall similar, nevertheless specific differences in metal coordination, and small differences in the coordination distances between the metal and the ligands in the metal binding loop. The largest such distances occur for the Ba2+- EhCaBP1 complex, where two bariums are bound with partial occupancy at the EF2 motif. Thermodynamic studies confirm that EhCaBP1 has five binding sites for Ba2+ compared to four binding sites for the other metals. These structures and thermodynamic studies reveal that the EF-hand motifs can accommodate several heavy atoms with similar binding affinities. The binding of Ca2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites and the binding of Ba2+ to the 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th sites are both enthalpically and entropically driven, whereas the binding of Sr2+ to the 1st, 2nd and 4th sites are simply enthalpy driven, interestingly in agreement with ITC data, Sr2+ do not coordinate with water in this structure. For all the metals, binding to the 3rd site is only entropy driven. Conclusion Energetically, Ca2+ is preferred in three sites, while in one site Ba2+ has better binding energy. The Sr2+-coordination in the EF hand motifs is similar to that of the native Ca2+ bound structure, except for the lack of water coordination. Sr2+ coordination seems to be a pre-formed in nature since all seven coordinating atoms are from the

  7. 1.55 A structure of the ectoine binding protein TeaA of the osmoregulated TRAP-transporter TeaABC from Halomonas elongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, Sonja I; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C; Bienert, Ralf; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Ziegler, Christine

    2008-09-09

    TeaABC from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata belongs to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-T), a family of secondary transporters functioning in conjunction with periplasmic substrate binding proteins. TeaABC facilitates the uptake of the compatible solutes ectoine and hydroxyectoine that are accumulated in the cytoplasm under hyperosmotic stress to protect the cell from dehydration. TeaABC is the only known TRAP-T activated by osmotic stress. Currently, our knowledge on the osmoregulated compatible solute transporter is limited to ABC transporters or conventional secondary transporters. Therefore, this study presents the first detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying substrate recognition of the substrate binding protein of an osmoregulated TRAP-T. In the present study we were able to demonstrate by isothermal titration calorimetry measurements that TeaA is a high-affinity ectoine binding protein ( K d = 0.19 microM) that also has a significant but somewhat lower affinity to hydroxyectoine ( K d = 3.8 microM). Furthermore, we present the structure of TeaA in complex with ectoine at a resolution of 1.55 A and hydroxyectoine at a resolution of 1.80 A. Analysis of the TeaA binding pocket and comparison of its structure to other compatible solute binding proteins from ABC transporters reveal common principles in compatible solute binding but also significant differences like the solvent-mediated specific binding of ectoine to TeaA.

  8. PilN Binding Modulates the Structure and Binding Partners of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IVa Pilus Protein PilM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Matthew; Tammam, Stephanie; Little, Dustin J; Robinson, Howard; Koo, Jason; Shah, Megha; Calmettes, Charles; Moraes, Trevor F; Burrows, Lori L; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-05-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that expresses type IVa pili. The pilus assembly system, which promotes surface-associated twitching motility and virulence, is composed of inner and outer membrane subcomplexes, connected by an alignment subcomplex composed of PilMNOP. PilM binds to the N terminus of PilN, and we hypothesize that this interaction causes functionally significant structural changes in PilM. To characterize this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of PilM and a PilM chimera where PilM was fused to the first 12 residues of PilN (PilM·PilN(1-12)). Structural analysis, multiangle light scattering coupled with size exclusion chromatography, and bacterial two-hybrid data revealed that PilM forms dimers mediated by the binding of a novel conserved motif in the N terminus of PilM, and binding PilN abrogates this binding interface, resulting in PilM monomerization. Structural comparison of PilM with PilM·PilN(1-12) revealed that upon PilN binding, there is a large domain closure in PilM that alters its ATP binding site. Using biolayer interferometry, we found that the association rate of PilN with PilM is higher in the presence of ATP compared with ADP. Bacterial two-hybrid data suggested the connectivity of the cytoplasmic and inner membrane components of the type IVa pilus machinery in P. aeruginosa, with PilM binding to PilB, PilT, and PilC in addition to PilN. Pull-down experiments demonstrated direct interactions of PilM with PilB and PilT. We propose a working model in which dynamic binding of PilN facilitates functionally relevant structural changes in PilM.

  9. Crystal Structure of the Zorbamycin-Binding Protein ZbmA, the Primary Self-Resistance Element in Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolf, Jeffrey D. [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Bigelow, Lance [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chang, Changsoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cuff, Marianne E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lohman, Jeremy R. [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Chang, Chin-Yuan [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Ma, Ming [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Yang, Dong [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States); Clancy, Shonda [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Babnigg, Gyorgy [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Joachimiak, Andrzej [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Phillips, George N. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Shen, Ben [Scripps Research Inst., Jupiter, FL (United States)

    2015-11-17

    The bleomycins (BLMs), tallysomycins (TLMs), phleomycin, and zorbamycin (ZBM) are members of the BLM family of glycopeptide-derived antitumor antibiotics. The BLM-producing Streptomyces verticillus ATCC15003 and the TLM-producing Streptoalloteichus hindustanus E465-94 ATCC31158 both possess at least two self-resistance elements, an N-acetyltransferase and a binding protein. The N-acetyltransferase provides resistance by disrupting the metal-binding domain of the antibiotic that is required for activity, while the binding protein confers resistance by sequestering the metal-bound antibiotic and preventing drug activation via molecular oxygen. We recently established that the ZBM producer, Streptomyces flavoviridis ATCC21892, lacks the N-acetyltransferase resistance gene and that the ZBM-binding protein, ZbmA, is sufficient to confer resistance in the producing strain. To investigate the resistance mechanism attributed to ZbmA, we determined the crystal structures of apo and Cu(II)-ZBM-bound ZbmA at high resolutions of 1.90 and 1.65 angstrom, respectively. A comparison and contrast with other structurally characterized members of the BLM-binding protein family revealed key differences in the protein ligand binding environment that fine-tunes the ability of ZbmA to sequester metal-bound ZBM and supports drug sequestration as the primary resistance mechanism in the producing organisms of the BLM family of antitumor antibiotics.

  10. Complex structure and biochemical characterization of the Staphylococcus aureus cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein PstA, the founding member of a new signal transduction protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeotto, Ivan; Zhang, Yong; Mladenov, Miroslav G; Freemont, Paul S; Gründling, Angelika

    2015-01-30

    Signaling nucleotides are integral parts of signal transduction systems allowing bacteria to cope with and rapidly respond to changes in the environment. The Staphylococcus aureus PII-like signal transduction protein PstA was recently identified as a cyclic diadenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP)-binding protein. Here, we present the crystal structures of the apo- and c-di-AMP-bound PstA protein, which is trimeric in solution as well as in the crystals. The structures combined with detailed bioinformatics analysis revealed that the protein belongs to a new family of proteins with a similar core fold but with distinct features to classical PII proteins, which usually function in nitrogen metabolism pathways in bacteria. The complex structure revealed three identical c-di-AMP-binding sites per trimer with each binding site at a monomer-monomer interface. Although distinctly different from other cyclic-di-nucleotide-binding sites, as the half-binding sites are not symmetrical, the complex structure also highlighted common features for c-di-AMP-binding sites. A comparison between the apo and complex structures revealed a series of conformational changes that result in the ordering of two anti-parallel β-strands that protrude from each monomer and allowed us to propose a mechanism on how the PstA protein functions as a signaling transduction protein.

  11. The six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins : developmental expression and structural aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractInsulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are single chain polypeptides mediating many of the growth promoting effects of growth hormone, as stated in the "somatomedin hypothesis" (Daughaday et al., 1972). IGF-I is a basic protein and consists of 70 AA with a predicted molecular wei

  12. Vaccinia protein F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain and contains a motor binding motif required for virion export.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W Morgan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV uses microtubules for export of virions to the cell surface and this process requires the viral protein F12. Here we show that F12 has structural similarity to kinesin light chain (KLC, a subunit of the kinesin-1 motor that binds cargo. F12 and KLC share similar size, pI, hydropathy and cargo-binding tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs. Moreover, molecular modeling of F12 TPRs upon the crystal structure of KLC2 TPRs showed a striking conservation of structure. We also identified multiple TPRs in VACV proteins E2 and A36. Data presented demonstrate that F12 is critical for recruitment of kinesin-1 to virions and that a conserved tryptophan and aspartic acid (WD motif, which is conserved in the kinesin-1-binding sequence (KBS of the neuronal protein calsyntenin/alcadein and several other cellular kinesin-1 binding proteins, is essential for kinesin-1 recruitment and virion transport. In contrast, mutation of WD motifs in protein A36 revealed they were not required for kinesin-1 recruitment or IEV transport. This report of a viral KLC-like protein containing a KBS that is conserved in several cellular proteins advances our understanding of how VACV recruits the kinesin motor to virions, and exemplifies how viruses use molecular mimicry of cellular components to their advantage.

  13. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  14. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase I: Cyclic nucleotide binding, structural changes, and release of the catalytic subunits

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Stephen B.; White, Hillary D.; Siegel, Jeffrey B.; Krebs, Edwin G.

    1981-01-01

    Type I cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase is composed of a dimeric regulatory subunit (R2) and two catalytic subunits (C subunits). The R2 dimer binds four cAMP molecules to release the two C subunits. To characterize the cAMP binding sites and elucidate their role in the release of the C subunits, the R2 dimer has been studied by equilibrium methods. The cAMP titration of R2 was monitored by endogenous tryptophan fluorescence, and the results suggest one class of binding sites. The t...

  15. Calcium binding promotes prion protein fragment 90-231 conformational change toward a membrane destabilizing and cytotoxic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Sorrentino

    Full Text Available The pathological form of prion protein (PrP(Sc, as other amyloidogenic proteins, causes a marked increase of membrane permeability. PrP(Sc extracted from infected Syrian hamster brains induces a considerable change in membrane ionic conductance, although the contribution of this interaction to the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration process is still controversial. We previously showed that the human PrP fragment 90-231 (hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ increases ionic conductance across artificial lipid bilayer, in a calcium-dependent manner, producing an alteration similar to that observed for PrP(Sc. In the present study we demonstrate that hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁, pre-incubated with 10 mM Ca⁺⁺ and then re-suspended in physiological external solution increases not only membrane conductance but neurotoxicity as well. Furthermore we show the existence of a direct link between these two effects as demonstrated by a highly statistically significant correlation in several experimental conditions. A similar correlation between increased membrane conductance and cell degeneration has been observed assaying hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ bearing pathogenic mutations (D202N and E200K. We also report that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ induces a conformational change based on an alteration of secondary structure characterized by loss of alpha-helix content causing hydrophobic amino acid exposure and proteinase K resistance. These features, either acquired after controlled thermal denaturation or induced by D202N and E200K mutations were previously identified as responsible for hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ cytotoxicity. Finally, by in silico structural analysis, we propose that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ modifies amino acid orientation, in the same way induced by E200K mutation, thus suggesting a pathway for the structural alterations responsible of PrP neurotoxicity.

  16. Calcium binding promotes prion protein fragment 90-231 conformational change toward a membrane destabilizing and cytotoxic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Sacha; Bucciarelli, Tonino; Corsaro, Alessandro; Tosatto, Alessio; Thellung, Stefano; Villa, Valentina; Schininà, M Eugenia; Maras, Bruno; Galeno, Roberta; Scotti, Luca; Creati, Francesco; Marrone, Alessandro; Re, Nazzareno; Aceto, Antonio; Florio, Tullio; Mazzanti, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The pathological form of prion protein (PrP(Sc)), as other amyloidogenic proteins, causes a marked increase of membrane permeability. PrP(Sc) extracted from infected Syrian hamster brains induces a considerable change in membrane ionic conductance, although the contribution of this interaction to the molecular mechanism of neurodegeneration process is still controversial. We previously showed that the human PrP fragment 90-231 (hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁) increases ionic conductance across artificial lipid bilayer, in a calcium-dependent manner, producing an alteration similar to that observed for PrP(Sc). In the present study we demonstrate that hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁, pre-incubated with 10 mM Ca⁺⁺ and then re-suspended in physiological external solution increases not only membrane conductance but neurotoxicity as well. Furthermore we show the existence of a direct link between these two effects as demonstrated by a highly statistically significant correlation in several experimental conditions. A similar correlation between increased membrane conductance and cell degeneration has been observed assaying hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ bearing pathogenic mutations (D202N and E200K). We also report that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ induces a conformational change based on an alteration of secondary structure characterized by loss of alpha-helix content causing hydrophobic amino acid exposure and proteinase K resistance. These features, either acquired after controlled thermal denaturation or induced by D202N and E200K mutations were previously identified as responsible for hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ cytotoxicity. Finally, by in silico structural analysis, we propose that Ca⁺⁺ binding to hPrP₉₀₋₂₃₁ modifies amino acid orientation, in the same way induced by E200K mutation, thus suggesting a pathway for the structural alterations responsible of PrP neurotoxicity.

  17. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... around the phosphorylated residue are important for the binding affinity of ILKAP. We conclude that solid-phase affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures can be applied in phosphoproteomics and systems biology....

  18. Structural and Functional Difference of Pheromone Binding Proteins in Discriminating Chemicals in the Gypsy Moth, Lymantria Dispar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxue Yu, Fei Ma, Yixia Cao, Junhua Zhang, Yongan Zhang, Shengnan Duan, Yadong Wei, Shuifang Zhu, Naizhong Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pheromone-binding proteins (PBPs of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar L., play an important role in olfaction. Here structures of PBPs were first built by Homology Modeling, and each model of PBPs had seven α-helices and a large hydrophobic cavity including 25 residues for PBP1 and 30 residues for PBP2. Three potential semiochemicals were first screened by CDOCKER program based on the PBP models and chemical database. These chemicals were Palmitic acid n-butyl ester (Pal, Bis(3,4-epoxycyclohexylmethyl adipate (Bis, L-trans-epoxysuccinyl-isoleucyl-proline methyl ester propylamide (CA-074. The analysis of chemicals docking the proteins showed one hydrogen bond was established between the residues Lys94 and (+-Disparlure ((+-D, and л-л interactions were present between Phe36 of PBP1 and (+-D. The Lys94 of PBP1 formed two and three hydrogen bonds with Bis and CA-074, respectively. There was no residue of PBP2 interacting with these four chemicals except Bis forming one hydrogen bond with Lys121. After simulating the conformational changes of LdisPBPs at pH7.3 and 5.5 by constant pH molecular dynamics simulation in implicit solvent, the N-terminal sequences of PBPs was unfolded, only having five α-helices, and PBP2 had larger binding pocket at 7.3 than PBP1. To investigate the changes of α-helices at different pH, far-UV and near-UV circular dichroism showed PBPs consist of α-helices, and the tertiary structures of PBP1 and PBP2 were influenced at pH7.3 and 5.5. The fluorescence binding assay indicated that PBP1 and PBP2 have similarly binding affinity to (+-D at pH 5.5 and 7.3, respectively. At pH 5.5, the dissociation constant of the complex between PBP1 and 2-decyl-1-oxaspiro [2.2] pentane (OXP1 was 0.68±0.01μM, for (+-D was 5.32±0.11μM, while PBP2 with OXP1 and (+-D were 1.88±0.02μM and 5.54±0.04μM, respectively. Three chemicals screened had higher affinity to PBP1 than (+-D except Pal at pH5.5, and had lower affinity than (+-D at p

  19. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  20. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  1. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  2. New insights into metal interactions with the prion protein: EXAFS analysis and structure calculations of copper binding to a single octarepeat from the prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Alex; Pushie, M Jake; Millhauser, Glenn L; George, Graham N

    2013-11-07

    Copper coordination to the prion protein (PrP) has garnered considerable interest for almost 20 years, due in part to the possibility that this interaction may be part of the normal function of PrP. The most characterized form of copper binding to PrP has been Cu(2+) interaction with the conserved tandem repeats in the N-terminal domain of PrP, termed the octarepeats, with many studies focusing on single and multiple repeats of PHGGGWGQ. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been used in several previous instances to characterize the solution structure of Cu(2+) binding into the peptide backbone in the HGGG portion of the octarepeats. All previous EXAFS studies, however, have benefitted from crystallographic structure information for [Cu(II) (Ac-HGGGW-NH2)(-2H)] but have not conclusively demonstrated that the complex EXAFS spectrum represents the same coordination environment for Cu(2+) bound to the peptide backbone. Density functional structure calculations as well as full multiple scattering EXAFS curve fitting analysis are brought to bear on the predominant coordination mode for Cu(2+) with the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH2 peptide at physiological pH, under high Cu(2+) occupancy conditions. In addition to the structure calculations, which provide a thermodynamic link to structural information, methods are also presented for extensive deconvolution of the EXAFS spectrum. We demonstrate how the EXAFS data can be analyzed to extract the maximum structural information and arrive at a structural model that is significantly improved over previous EXAFS characterizations. The EXAFS spectrum for the chemically reduced form of copper binding to the Ac-PHGGGWGQ-NH2 peptide is presented, which is best modeled as a linear two-coordinate species with a single His imidazole ligand and a water molecule. The extent of in situ photoreduction of the copper center during standard data collection is also presented, and EXAFS curve fitting of the photoreduced species

  3. Structural characterisation of the native fetuin-binding protein Scilla campanulata agglutinin: a novel two-domain lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, L M; Reynolds, C D; Rizkallah, P J; Allen, A K; Van Damme, E J; Donovan, M J; Peumans, W J

    2000-02-18

    The three-dimensional structure of a 244-residue, multivalent, fetuin-binding lectin, SCAfet, isolated from bluebell (Scilla campanulata) bulbs, has been solved at 3.3 A resolution by molecular replacement using the coordinates of the 119-residue, mannose-binding lectin, SCAman, also from bluebell bulbs. Unlike most monocot mannose-binding lectins, such as Galanthus nivalis agglutinin from snowdrop bulbs, which fold into a single domain, SCAfet contains two domains with approximately 55% sequence identity, joined by a linker peptide. Both domains are made up of a 12-stranded beta-prism II fold, with three putative carbohydrate-binding sites, one on each subdomain. SCAfet binds to the complex saccharides of various animal glycoproteins but not to simple sugars.

  4. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense.

  5. Structural Basis for the Binding of the Neutralizing Antibody, 7D11, to the Poxvirus L1 Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    protein, antigen binding, anti- pox drugs, therapeutics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 11 19a...Ankara ( MVA ) elicit robust long-term protection. Virology 341 (1), 91–101. Davies, D.R., Padlan, E., Sheriff, S., 1990. Antibody–antigen complexes. Annu

  6. Conserved residues and their role in the structure, function, and stability of acyl-coenzyme A binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Poulsen, K; Andersen, K V;

    1999-01-01

    measured by the extent of binding of the ligand dodecanoyl-CoA using isothermal titration calorimetry, and effects on protein stability were measured with chemical denaturation followed by intrinsic tryptophan and tyrosine fluorescence. The sequence sites that have been conserved for direct functional...

  7. Structural dynamics of E. coli single-stranded DNA binding protein reveal DNA wrapping and unwrapping pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksombat, Sukrit; Khafizov, Rustem; Kozlov, Alexander G; Lohman, Timothy M; Chemla, Yann R

    2015-08-25

    Escherichia coli single-stranded (ss)DNA binding (SSB) protein mediates genome maintenance processes by regulating access to ssDNA. This homotetrameric protein wraps ssDNA in multiple distinct binding modes that may be used selectively in different DNA processes, and whose detailed wrapping topologies remain speculative. Here, we used single-molecule force and fluorescence spectroscopy to investigate E. coli SSB binding to ssDNA. Stretching a single ssDNA-SSB complex reveals discrete states that correlate with known binding modes, the likely ssDNA conformations and diffusion dynamics in each, and the kinetic pathways by which the protein wraps ssDNA and is dissociated. The data allow us to construct an energy landscape for the ssDNA-SSB complex, revealing that unwrapping energy costs increase the more ssDNA is unraveled. Our findings provide insights into the mechanism by which proteins gain access to ssDNA bound by SSB, as demonstrated by experiments in which SSB is displaced by the E. coli recombinase RecA.

  8. The structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein and the role of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate in its membrane binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prchal, Jan; Srb, Pavel; Hunter, Eric; Ruml, Tomáš; Hrabal, Richard

    2012-10-26

    We determined the solution structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein by NMR spectroscopy. The myristoyl group is buried inside the protein and causes a slight reorientation of the helices. This reorientation leads to the creation of a binding site for phosphatidylinositols. The interaction between the matrix protein and phosphatidylinositols carrying C(8) fatty acid chains was monitored by observation of concentration-dependent chemical shift changes of the affected amino acid residues, a saturation transfer difference experiment and changes in (31)P chemical shifts. No differences in the binding mode or affinity were observed with differently phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols. The structure of the matrix protein-phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] complex was then calculated with HADDOCK software based on the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement contacts between the ligand and the matrix protein obtained from a (13)C-filtered/(13)C-edited nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiment. PI(4,5)P(2) binding was not strong enough for triggering of the myristoyl-switch. The structural changes of the myristoylated matrix protein were also found to result in a drop in the oligomerization capacity of the protein.

  9. The crystal structure of UehA in complex with ectoine-A comparison with other TRAP-T binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecher, Justin; Pittelkow, Marco; Zobel, Silke; Bursy, Jan; Bönig, Tobias; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz; Bremer, Erhard

    2009-05-29

    Substrate-binding proteins or extracellular solute receptors (ESRs) are components of both ABC (ATP binding cassette) and TRAP-T (tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporter). The TRAP-T system UehABC from Silicibacter pomeroyi DSS-3 imports the compatible solutes ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine as nutrients. UehA, the ESR of the UehABC operon, binds both ectoine and 5-hydroxyectoine with high affinity (K(d) values of 1.4+/-0.1 and 1.1+/-0.1 microM, respectively) and delivers them to the TRAP-T complex. The crystal structure of UehA in complex with ectoine was determined at 2.9-A resolution and revealed an overall fold common for all ESR proteins from TRAP systems determined so far. A comparison of the recently described structure of TeaA from Halomonas elongata and an ectoine-binding protein (EhuB) from an ABC transporter revealed a conserved ligand binding mode that involves both directed and cation-pi interactions. Furthermore, a comparison with other known TRAP-T ESRs revealed a helix that might act as a selectivity filter imposing restraints on the ESRs that fine-tune ligand recognition and binding and finally might determine the selection of the cognate substrate.

  10. Structural consequences of binding of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} to apo-transferrin: Can this protein account for entry of uranium into human cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidaud, C [CEA Valrho, DSV, DIEP, Service de Biochimie Post Genomique and Toxicologie Nucleaire, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze (France); Vidaud, C.; Gourion-Arsiquaud, S; Rollin-Genetet, F; Torne-Celer, C; Plantevin, S; Pible, O; Quemeneur, E; Berthomieu, C. [CEA Cadarache, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique Cellulaire and Laboratoire des Interactions Proteine-Metal, DSV/DEVM, UMR 6191 CNRS-CEA-Universite Aix-Marseille II, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2007-02-15

    It has been established that transferrin binds a variety of metals. These include toxic uranyl ions which form rather stable uranyl-transferrin derivatives. We determined the extent to which the iron binding sites might accommodate the peculiar topographic profile of the uranyl ion and the consequences of its binding on protein conformation. Indeed, metal intake via endocytosis of the transferrin/transferrin receptor depends on the adequate coordination of the metal in its site, which controls protein conformation and receptor binding. Using UV-vis and Fourier transform infrared difference spectroscopy coupled to a micro-dialysis system, we showed that at both metal binding sites two tyrosines are uranyl ligands, while histidine does not participate with its coordination sphere. Analysis by circular dichroism and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed major differences between structural changes associated with interactions of iron or uranyl with apo-transferrin. Uranyl coordination reduces the level of protein stabilization compared to iron, but this may be simply related to partial lobe closure. The lack of interaction between uranyl-TF and its receptor was shown by flow cytometry using Alexa 488-labeled holo-transferrin. We propose a structural model summarizing our conclusion that the uranyl-TF complex adopts an open conformation that is not appropriate for optimal binding to the transferrin receptor. (authors)

  11. Structural characterization of S100A15 reveals a novel zinc coordination site among S100 proteins and altered surface chemistry with functional implications for receptor binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Jill I

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S100 proteins are a family of small, EF-hand containing calcium-binding signaling proteins that are implicated in many cancers. While the majority of human S100 proteins share 25-65% sequence similarity, S100A7 and its recently identified paralog, S100A15, display 93% sequence identity. Intriguingly, however, S100A7 and S100A15 serve distinct roles in inflammatory skin disease; S100A7 signals through the receptor for advanced glycation products (RAGE in a zinc-dependent manner, while S100A15 signals through a yet unidentified G-protein coupled receptor in a zinc-independent manner. Of the seven divergent residues that differentiate S100A7 and S100A15, four cluster in a zinc-binding region and the remaining three localize to a predicted receptor-binding surface. Results To investigate the structural and functional consequences of these divergent clusters, we report the X-ray crystal structures of S100A15 and S100A7D24G, a hybrid variant where the zinc ligand Asp24 of S100A7 has been substituted with the glycine of S100A15, to 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Remarkably, despite replacement of the Asp ligand, zinc binding is retained at the S100A15 dimer interface with distorted tetrahedral geometry and a chloride ion serving as an exogenous fourth ligand. Zinc binding was confirmed using anomalous difference maps and solution binding studies that revealed similar affinities of zinc for S100A15 and S100A7. Additionally, the predicted receptor-binding surface on S100A7 is substantially more basic in S100A15 without incurring structural rearrangement. Conclusions Here we demonstrate that S100A15 retains the ability to coordinate zinc through incorporation of an exogenous ligand resulting in a unique zinc-binding site among S100 proteins. The altered surface chemistry between S100A7 and S100A15 that localizes to the predicted receptor binding site is likely responsible for the differential recognition of distinct

  12. Purification and subunit structure of a putative K+-channel protein identified by its binding properties for dendrotoxin I.

    OpenAIRE

    Rehm, H; Lazdunski, M

    1988-01-01

    The binding protein for the K+-channel toxin dendrotoxin I was purified from a detergent extract of rat brain membranes. The purification procedure utilized chromatography on DEAE-Trisacryl, affinity chromatography on a dendrotoxin-I-Aca 22 column, and wheat germ agglutinin-Affigel 10 with a final 3800- to 4600-fold enrichment and a recovery of 8-16%. The high affinity (Kd, 40-100 pM) and specificity of the binding site are retained throughout the purification procedure. Analysis of the purif...

  13. Protein binding assay for hyaluronate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, B.E.; Underhill, C.B.

    1986-11-01

    A relatively quick and simple assay for hyaluronate was developed using the specific binding protein, hyaluronectin. The hyaluronectin was obtained by homogenizing the brains of Sprague-Dawley rats, and then centrifuging the homogenate. The resulting supernatant was used as a source of crude hyaluronectin. In the binding assay, the hyaluronectin was mixed with (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate, followed by an equal volume of saturated (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, which precipitated the hyaluronectin and any (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate associated with it, but left free (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in solution. The mixture was then centrifuged, and the amount of bound (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate in the precipitate was determined. Using this assay, the authors found that hyaluronectin specifically bound hyaluronate, since other glycosaminoglycans failed to compete for the binding protein. In addition, the interaction between hyaluronectin and hyaluronate was of relatively high affinity, and the size of the hyaluronate did not appear to substantially alter the amount of binding. To determine the amount of hyaluronate in an unknown sample, they used a competition assay in which the binding of a set amount of (/sup 3/H)hyaluronate was blocked by the addition of unlabeled hyaluronate. By comparing the degree of competition of the unknown samples with that of known amounts of hyaluronate, it was possible to determine the amount of hyaluronate in the unknowns. They have found that this method is sensitive to 1 ..mu..g or less of hyaluronate, and is unaffected by the presence of proteins.

  14. Embryonic neural inducing factor churchill is not a DNA-binding zinc finger protein: solution structure reveals a solvent-exposed beta-sheet and zinc binuclear cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian M; Buck-Koehntop, Bethany A; Martinez-Yamout, Maria A; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2007-08-31

    Churchill is a zinc-containing protein that is involved in neural induction during embryogenesis. At the time of its discovery, it was thought on the basis of sequence alignment to contain two zinc fingers of the C4 type. Further, binding of an N-terminal GST-Churchill fusion protein to a particular DNA sequence was demonstrated by immunoprecipitation selection assay, suggesting that Churchill may function as a transcriptional regulator by sequence-specific DNA binding. We show by NMR solution structure determination that, far from containing canonical C4 zinc fingers, the protein contains three bound zinc ions in novel coordination sites, including an unusual binuclear zinc cluster. The secondary structure of Churchill is also unusual, consisting of a highly solvent-exposed single-layer beta-sheet. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange and backbone relaxation measurements reveal that Churchill is unusually dynamic on a number of time scales, with the exception of regions surrounding the zinc coordinating sites, which serve to stabilize the otherwise unstructured N terminus and the single-layer beta-sheet. No binding of Churchill to the previously identified DNA sequence could be detected, and extensive searches using DNA sequence selection techniques could find no other DNA sequence that was bound by Churchill. Since the N-terminal amino acids of Churchill form part of the zinc-binding motif, the addition of a fusion protein at the N terminus causes loss of zinc and unfolding of Churchill. This observation most likely explains the published DNA-binding results, which would arise due to non-specific interaction of the unfolded protein in the immunoprecipitation selection assay. Since Churchill does not appear to bind DNA, we suggest that it may function in embryogenesis as a protein-interaction factor.

  15. Crystal structure of a periplasmic solute binding protein in metal-free, intermediate and metal-bound states from Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Nidhi; Selvakumar, Purushotham; Bhose, Sumit; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Kumar, Pravindra; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-03-01

    The Znu system, a member of ABC transporter family, is critical for survival and pathogenesis of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLA). Two homologues of this system have been identified in CLA. Here, we report high resolution crystal structure of a periplasmic solute binding protein from second of the two gene clusters of Znu system in CLA (CLas-ZnuA2) in metal-free, intermediate and metal-bound states. CLas-ZnuA2 showed maximum sequence identity to the Mn/Fe-specific solute binding proteins (SBPs) of cluster A-I family. The overall fold of CLas-ZnuA2 is similar to the related cluster A-I family SBPs. The sequence and structure analysis revealed the unique features of CLas-ZnuA2. The comparison of CLas-ZnuA2 structure in three states showed that metal binding and release is facilitated by a large displacement along with a change in orientation of the side chain for one of the metal binding residue (His39) flipped away from metal binding site in metal-free form. The crystal structure captured in intermediate state of metal binding revealed the changes in conformation and interaction of the loop hosting His39 during the metal binding. A rigid body movement of C-domain along with partial unfolding of linker helix at its C-terminal during metal binding, as reported for PsaA, was not observed in CLas-ZnuA2. The present results suggest that despite showing maximum sequence identity to the Mn/Fe-specific SBPs, the mechanistic resemblance of CLas-ZnuA2 seems to be closer to Zn-specific SBPs of cluster A-I family.

  16. Structure based design towards the identification of novel binding sites and inhibitors for the chikungunya virus envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashad, Adel A; Keller, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging arbovirus that is widespread in tropical regions and is spreading quickly to temperate climates with recent epidemics in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. It is having an increasingly major impact on humans with potentially life-threatening and debilitating arthritis. Thus far, neither vaccines nor medications are available to treat or control the virus and therefore, the development of medicinal chemistry is a vital and immediate issue that needs to be addressed. The viral envelope proteins play a major role during infection through mediation of binding and fusion with the infected cell surfaces. The possible binding target sites of the chikungunya virus envelope proteins have not previously been investigated; we describe here for the first time the identification of novel sites for potential binding on the chikungunya glycoprotein complexes and the identification of possible antagonists for these sites through virtual screening using two successive docking scores; FRED docking for fast precise screening, with the top hits then subjected to a ranking scoring using the AUTODOCK algorithm. Both the immature and the mature forms of the chikungunya envelope proteins were included in the study to increase the probability of finding positive and reliable hits. Some small molecules have been identified as good in silico chikungunya virus envelope proteins inhibitors and these could be good templates for drug design targeting this virus.

  17. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  18. Development of a glucose binding protein biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dweik, M.; Milanick, M.; Grant, S.

    2007-09-01

    Glucose binding protein (GBP) is a monomeric periplasmic protein. It is synthesized in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli which functions as a receptor for transport D-glucose. GBP binds glucose with high affinity. The binding mechanism is based on a hinge motion due to the protein conformational change. This change was utilized as an optical sensing mechanism by applying Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The wild-type GBP lacks cysteine in its structure, but by introducing a single cysteine at a specific site by site-directed mutagenesis, this ensured single-label attachment at specific sites with a fluorescent probe. The other sites were amino sites, which were labeled with second fluorophore. The near IR FRET pair, Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680) and Alexa Fluor 750(AF750), was utilized. The AF680 targeted the amine sites, which was the donor fluorophore, while the AF750 labeled the single cysteine site, which was the acceptor fluorophore. The sensing system strategy was based on the fluorescence changes of the probe as the protein undergoes a structural change upon binding. This biosensor had the ability to detect down to 10 uM concentrations of glucose. Next the probes were uploaded into red blood cells via hypo osmotic dialysis. The sensor responded to glucose while encapsulated with the red cells. These results showed the feasibility of an intracellular glucose biosensor.

  19. Structural analysis of DNA binding by C.Csp231I, a member of a novel class of R-M controller proteins regulating gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, M. B.; Streeter, S. D.; Thresh, S.-J.; Swiderska, A.; McGeehan, J. E.; Kneale, G. G., E-mail: geoff.kneale@port.ac.uk [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The structure of the new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence is presented, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins is discussed. An unusual extended spacer between the dimer binding sites suggests a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers. In a wide variety of bacterial restriction–modification systems, a regulatory ‘controller’ protein (or C-protein) is required for effective transcription of its own gene and for transcription of the endonuclease gene found on the same operon. We have recently turned our attention to a new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) that have quite novel features, including a much larger DNA-binding site with an 18 bp (∼60 Å) spacer between the two palindromic DNA-binding sequences and a very different recognition sequence from the canonical GACT/AGTC. Using X-ray crystallography, the structure of the protein in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence was solved to 1.8 Å resolution, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins was elucidated. An unusual aspect of the promoter sequence is the extended spacer between the dimer binding sites, suggesting a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers when bound to both recognition sites correctly spaced on the DNA. A U-bend model is proposed for this tetrameric complex, based on the results of gel-mobility assays, hydrodynamic analysis and the observation of key contacts at the interface between dimers in the crystal.

  20. Information flow through calcium binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Ji Hyun; Bialek, William

    2013-03-01

    Calcium signaling is a ubiquitous mode of biological communication, which regulates a great variety of vital processes in living systems. Such a signal typically begins with an elementary event, in which calcium ions bind to a protein, inducing a change in the protein's structure. Information can only be lost, from what was conveyed through this initial event, as the signal is further transduced through the downstream networks. In the present work we analyze and optimize the information flow in the calcium binding process. We explicitly calculate the mutual information between the calcium concentration and the states of the protein, using a simple model for allosteric regulation in a dimeric protein. The optimal solution depends on the dynamic range of the input as well as on the timescale of signal integration. According to our result, the optimizing strategy involves allowing the calcium-binding protein to be ``activated'' by a partial occupation of its sites, and tuning independently the strengths of cooperative interactions in the binding and unbinding processes.

  1. Markov State Models Reveal a Two-Step Mechanism of miRNA Loading into the Human Argonaute Protein: Selective Binding followed by Structural Re-arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Hanlun

    2015-07-16

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs) are central components in RNA interference, which is a key cellular mechanism for sequence-specific gene silencing. Despite intensive studies, molecular mechanisms of how Ago recognizes miRNA remain largely elusive. In this study, we propose a two-step mechanism for this molecular recognition: selective binding followed by structural re-arrangement. Our model is based on the results of a combination of Markov State Models (MSMs), large-scale protein-RNA docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Using MSMs, we identify an open state of apo human Ago-2 in fast equilibrium with partially open and closed states. Conformations in this open state are distinguished by their largely exposed binding grooves that can geometrically accommodate miRNA as indicated in our protein-RNA docking studies. miRNA may then selectively bind to these open conformations. Upon the initial binding, the complex may perform further structural re-arrangement as shown in our MD simulations and eventually reach the stable binary complex structure. Our results provide novel insights in Ago-miRNA recognition mechanisms and our methodology holds great potential to be widely applied in the studies of other important molecular recognition systems.

  2. Protein function annotation by local binding site surface similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Russell; Cleves, Ann E; Varela, Rocco; Jain, Ajay N

    2014-04-01

    Hundreds of protein crystal structures exist for proteins whose function cannot be confidently determined from sequence similarity. Surflex-PSIM, a previously reported surface-based protein similarity algorithm, provides an alternative method for hypothesizing function for such proteins. The method now supports fully automatic binding site detection and is fast enough to screen comprehensive databases of protein binding sites. The binding site detection methodology was validated on apo/holo cognate protein pairs, correctly identifying 91% of ligand binding sites in holo structures and 88% in apo structures where corresponding sites existed. For correctly detected apo binding sites, the cognate holo site was the most similar binding site 87% of the time. PSIM was used to screen a set of proteins that had poorly characterized functions at the time of crystallization, but were later biochemically annotated. Using a fully automated protocol, this set of 8 proteins was screened against ∼60,000 ligand binding sites from the PDB. PSIM correctly identified functional matches that predated query protein biochemical annotation for five out of the eight query proteins. A panel of 12 currently unannotated proteins was also screened, resulting in a large number of statistically significant binding site matches, some of which suggest likely functions for the poorly characterized proteins.

  3. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  4. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  5. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  6. Web-based toolkits for topology prediction of transmembrane helical proteins, fold recognition, structure and binding scoring, folding-kinetics analysis and comparative analysis of domain combinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2005-07-01

    We have developed the following web servers for protein structural modeling and analysis at http://theory.med.buffalo.edu: THUMBUP, UMDHMM(TMHP) and TUPS, predictors of transmembrane helical protein topology based on a mean-burial-propensity scale of amino acid residues (THUMBUP), hidden Markov model (UMDHMM(TMHP)) and their combinations (TUPS); SPARKS 2.0 and SP3, two profile-profile alignment methods, that match input query sequence(s) to structural templates by integrating sequence profile with knowledge-based structural score (SPARKS 2.0) and structure-derived profile (SP3); DFIRE, a knowledge-based potential for scoring free energy of monomers (DMONOMER), loop conformations (DLOOP), mutant stability (DMUTANT) and binding affinity of protein-protein/peptide/DNA complexes (DCOMPLEX & DDNA); TCD, a program for protein-folding rate and transition-state analysis of small globular proteins; and DOGMA, a web-server that allows comparative analysis of domain combinations between plant and other 55 organisms. These servers provide tools for prediction and/or analysis of proteins on the secondary structure, tertiary structure and interaction levels, respectively.

  7. Structural Characterization of the E2 Domain of APL-1, a C. Elegans Homolog of Human Amyloid Precursor Protein, and its Heparin Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopes, J.; Liu, X; Xu, X; Demeler, B; Folta-Stogniew, E; Li, C; Ha, Y

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid {beta}-peptide deposit found in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer disease is derived from a large heparin-binding protein precursor APP. The biological function of APP and its homologs is not precisely known. Here we report the x-ray structure of the E2 domain of APL-1, an APP homolog in Caenorhabditis elegans, and compare it to the human APP structure. We also describe the structure of APL-1 E2 in complex with sucrose octasulfate, a highly negatively charged disaccharide, which reveals an unexpected binding pocket between the two halves of E2. Based on the crystal structure, we are able to map, using site-directed mutagenesis, a surface groove on E2 to which heparin may bind. Our biochemical data also indicate that the affinity of E2 for heparin is influenced by pH: at pH 5, the binding appears to be much stronger than that at neutral pH. This property is likely caused by histidine residues in the vicinity of the mapped heparin binding site and could be important for the proposed adhesive function of APL-1.

  8. The structure of an LIM-only protein 4 (LMO4 and Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1 complex reveals a common mode of binding to LMO4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Joseph

    Full Text Available LIM-domain only protein 4 (LMO4 is a widely expressed protein with important roles in embryonic development and breast cancer. It has been reported to bind many partners, including the transcription factor Deformed epidermal autoregulatory factor-1 (DEAF1, with which LMO4 shares many biological parallels. We used yeast two-hybrid assays to show that DEAF1 binds both LIM domains of LMO4 and that DEAF1 binds the same face on LMO4 as two other LMO4-binding partners, namely LIM domain binding protein 1 (LDB1 and C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP/RBBP8. Mutagenic screening analysed by the same method, indicates that the key residues in the interaction lie in LMO4LIM2 and the N-terminal half of the LMO4-binding domain in DEAF1. We generated a stable LMO4LIM2-DEAF1 complex and determined the solution structure of that complex. Although the LMO4-binding domain from DEAF1 is intrinsically disordered, it becomes structured on binding. The structure confirms that LDB1, CtIP and DEAF1 all bind to the same face on LMO4. LMO4 appears to form a hub in protein-protein interaction networks, linking numerous pathways within cells. Competitive binding for LMO4 therefore most likely provides a level of regulation between those different pathways.

  9. A β-hairpin-binding protein for three different disease-related amyloidogenic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaykhalishahi, Hamed; Mirecka, Ewa A; Gauhar, Aziz; Grüning, Clara S R; Willbold, Dieter; Härd, Torleif; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Amyloidogenic proteins share a propensity to convert to the β-structure-rich amyloid state that is associated with the progression of several protein-misfolding disorders. Here we show that a single engineered β-hairpin-binding protein, the β-wrapin AS10, binds monomers of three different amyloidogenic proteins, that is, amyloid-β peptide, α-synuclein, and islet amyloid polypeptide, with sub-micromolar affinity. AS10 binding inhibits the aggregation and toxicity of all three proteins. The results demonstrate common conformational preferences and related binding sites in a subset of the amyloidogenic proteins. These commonalities enable the generation of multispecific monomer-binding agents.

  10. Modification of potato starch granule structure and morphology in planta by expression of starch binding domain fusion proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, X.

    2010-01-01

    Producing starches with altered composition, structure and novel physico-chemical properties in planta by manipulating the enzymes which are involved in starch metabolism or (over)expressing heterologous enzymes has huge advantages such as broadening the range of starch applications and reducing the costs of the post-harvest starch modification. The starch binding domain (SBD) technology has been extensively explored in our lab for modifying starch in planta and producing so-called “tailored ...

  11. Specific recognition of the collagen triple helix by chaperone HSP47. II. The HSP47-binding structural motif in collagens and related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Takaki; Nishikawa, Yoshimi; Asada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Chisato M; Takahara, Yoshifumi; Homma, Daisuke L; Otaka, Akira; Ohtani, Katsuki; Wakamiya, Nobutaka; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Kitagawa, Kouki

    2006-04-21

    The endoplasmic reticulum-resident chaperone heat-shock protein 47 (HSP47) plays an essential role in procollagen biosynthesis. The function of HSP47 relies on its specific interaction with correctly folded triple-helical regions comprised of Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeats, and Arg residues at Yaa positions have been shown to be important for this interaction. The amino acid at the Yaa position (Yaa(-3)) in the N-terminal-adjoining triplet containing the critical Arg (defined as Arg(0)) was also suggested to be directly recognized by HSP47 (Koide, T., Asada, S., Takahara, Y., Nishikawa, Y., Nagata, K., and Kitagawa, K. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 3432-3438). Based on this finding, we examined the relationship between the structure of Yaa(-3) and HSP47 binding using synthetic collagenous peptides. The results obtained indicated that the structure of Yaa(-3) determined the binding affinity for HSP47. Maximal binding was observed when Yaa(-3) was Thr. Moreover, the required relative spatial arrangement of these key residues in the triple helix was analyzed by taking advantage of heterotrimeric collagen-model peptides, each of which contains one Thr(-3) and one Arg(0). The results revealed that HSP47 recognizes the Yaa(-3) and Arg(0) residues only when they are on the same peptide strand. Taken together, the data obtained led us to define the HSP47-binding structural epitope in the collagen triple helix and also define the HSP47-binding motif in the primary structure. A motif search against human protein database predicted candidate clients for this molecular chaperone. The search result indicated that not all collagen family proteins require the chaperoning by HSP47.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of the Nucleic Acid-Binding Domain of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Nonstructural Protein 3▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Pedro; Johnson, Margaret A.; Chatterjee, Amarnath; Neuman, Benjamin W.; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Kuhn, Peter; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of a globular domain of residues 1071 to 1178 within the previously annotated nucleic acid-binding region (NAB) of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus nonstructural protein 3 (nsp3) has been determined, and N- and C-terminally adjoining polypeptide segments of 37 and 25 residues, respectively, have been shown to form flexibly extended linkers to the preceding globular domain and to the following, as yet uncharacterized domain. This extension of the structural coverage of nsp3 was obtained from NMR studies with an nsp3 construct comprising residues 1066 to 1181 [nsp3(1066-1181)] and the constructs nsp3(1066-1203) and nsp3(1035-1181). A search of the protein structure database indicates that the globular domain of the NAB represents a new fold, with a parallel four-strand β-sheet holding two α-helices of three and four turns that are oriented antiparallel to the β-strands. Two antiparallel two-strand β-sheets and two 310-helices are anchored against the surface of this barrel-like molecular core. Chemical shift changes upon the addition of single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) identified a group of residues that form a positively charged patch on the protein surface as the binding site responsible for the previously reported affinity for nucleic acids. This binding site is similar to the ssRNA-binding site of the sterile alpha motif domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Vts1p protein, although the two proteins do not share a common globular fold. PMID:19828617

  13. Topological Analyses of Protein-Ligand Binding: a Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be conveniently represented as networks of interacting residues, thus allowing the study of several network parameters that can shed light onto several of their structural and functional aspects. With respect to the binding of ligands, which are central for the function of many proteins, network analysis may constitute a possible route to assist the identification of binding sites. As the bulk of this review illustrates, this has generally been easier for enzymes than for non-enzyme proteins, perhaps due to the different topological nature of the binding sites of the former over those of the latter. The article also illustrates how network representations of binding sites can be used to search PDB structures in order to identify proteins that bind similar molecules and, lastly, how codifying proteins as networks can assist the analysis of the conformational changes consequent to ligand binding.

  14. Crystal structure of TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori in active form reveals the intrinsic molecular flexibility for unique DNA-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Gao

    Full Text Available Tipα (TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori is a carcinogenic effector. Studies on this protein revealed that a homodimer linked by a pair of intermolecular disulfide bridges (Cys25-Cys25 and Cys27-Cys27 was absolutely necessary for its biological functions. The activities of Tipα would be abolished when both disulfide bridges were disrupted. The crystal structures of Tipα reported to date, however, were based on inactive, monomeric mutants with their N-terminal, including residues Cys25 and Cys27, truncated. Here we report the crystal structure of H. pylori Tipα protein, TipαN(25, at 2.2Å resolution, in which Cys25 and Cys27 form a pair of inter-chain disulfide bridges linking an active dimer. The disulfide bridges exhibit structural flexibility in the present structure. A series of structure-based mutagenesis, biochemical assays and molecular dynamic simulations on DNA-Tipα interactions reveal that Tipα utilizes the dimeric interface as the DNA-binding site and that residues His60, Arg77 and Arg81 located at the interface are crucial for DNA binding. Tipα could bind to one ssDNA, two ssDNA or one dsDNA in experiments, respectively, in the native or mutant states. The unique DNA-binding activities of Tipα indicate that the intrinsic flexible nature of disulfide bridges could endow certain elasticity to the Tipα dimer for its unique bioactivities. The results shed light on the possible structural mechanism for the functional performances of Tipα.

  15. Transient structure formation in unfolded acyl-coenzyme A-binding protein observed by site-directed spin labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Kragelund, Birthe B; Poulsen, Flemming M

    2002-01-01

    are not affected in the native folded structure. It is suggested that the experiment is recording the formation of many discrete and transient structures in the polypeptide chain in the preface of protein folding. Analysis of secondary chemical shifts shows a high propensity for alpha-helix formation in the C......-terminal part of the polypeptide chain, which forms an alpha-helix in the native structure and a high propensity for turn formation in two regions of the polypeptide that form turns in the native structure. The results contribute to the idea that native-like structural elements form transiently in the unfolded...

  16. Crystal structures of the staphylococcal toxin SSL5 in complex with sialyl Lewis X reveal a conserved binding site that shares common features with viral and bacterial sialic acid binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Heather M; Basu, Indira; Chung, Matthew C; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Fraser, John D; Baker, Edward N

    2007-12-14

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  17. Crystal Structures of the Staphylococcal Toxin SSL5 in Complex With Sialyl-Lewis X Reveal a Conserved Binding Site That Shares Common Features With Viral And Bacterial Sialic Acid-Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, H.M.; Basu, I.; Chung, M.C.; Caradoc-Davies, T.; Fraser, J.D.; Baker, E.N.

    2009-06-02

    Staphylococcus aureus is a significant human pathogen. Among its large repertoire of secreted toxins is a group of staphylococcal superantigen-like proteins (SSLs). These are homologous to superantigens but do not have the same activity. SSL5 is shown here to bind to human granulocytes and to the cell surface receptors for human IgA (Fc alphaRI) and P-selectin [P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1)] in a sialic acid (Sia)-dependent manner. Co-crystallization of SSL5 with the tetrasaccharide sialyl Lewis X (sLe(X)), a key determinant of PSGL-1 binding to P-selectin, led to crystal structures of the SSL5-sLe(X) complex at resolutions of 1.65 and 2.75 A for crystals at two pH values. In both structures, sLe(X) bound to a specific site on the surface of the C-terminal domain of SSL5 in a conformation identical with that bound by P-selectin. Conservation of the key carbohydrate binding residues indicates that this ability to bind human glycans is shared by a substantial subgroup of the SSLs, including SSL2, SSL3, SSL4, SSL5, SSL6, and SSL11. This indicates that the ability to target human glycans is an important property of this group of toxins. Structural comparisons also showed that the Sia binding site in SSL5 contains a substructure that is shared by other Sia binding proteins from bacteria as well as viruses and represents a common binding motif.

  18. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors.

  19. Structural analysis of the STING adaptor protein reveals a hydrophobic dimer interface and mode of cyclic di-GMP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Songying; Song, Xianqiang; Wang, Yaya; Ru, Heng; Shaw, Neil; Jiang, Yan; Niu, Fengfeng; Zhu, Yanping; Qiu, Weicheng; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Li, Yang; Zhang, Rongguang; Cheng, Genhong; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2012-06-29

    STING is an essential signaling molecule for DNA and cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-mediated type I interferon (IFN) production via TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) pathway. It contains an N-terminal transmembrane region and a cytosolic C-terminal domain (CTD). Here, we describe crystal structures of STING CTD alone and complexed with c-di-GMP in a unique binding mode. The strictly conserved aa 153-173 region was shown to be cytosolic and participated in dimerization via hydrophobic interactions. The STING CTD functions as a dimer and the dimerization was independent of posttranslational modifications. Binding of c-di-GMP enhanced interaction of a shorter construct of STING CTD (residues 139-344) with TBK1. This suggests an extra TBK1 binding site, other than serine 358. This study provides a glimpse into the unique architecture of STING and sheds light on the mechanism of c-di-GMP-mediated TBK1 signaling.

  20. Identification of the structural features that mediate binding specificity in the recognition of STAT proteins by dual-specificity phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Christophe; Sticht, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins is regulated by dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) with high substrate specificity. Although experiments have provided useful information about the phosphatase activity and the specificity for STATs, there is up-to-date no data at a molecular level to explain the specific recognition of STAT substrates by this subfamily of phosphatases. Here, a combined approach of molecular modeling, docking and molecular dynamics simulations was used to address the binding between DSPs and their STAT substrates. We identified a binding interface at the protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) domain of the DSP VHR that interacts with the SH2-domain of STAT5. This finding is consistent with previous mutational data and supports a "two-step" mechanism for the dephosphorylation event. Application of the same approach suggests the presence of a similar interface between the viral DSP VH1 and STAT1. Furthermore, the interaction network at this interface provides an explanation for the specificity of the DSP-STAT recognition.

  1. Structural analyses of the CRISPR protein Csc2 reveal the RNA-binding interface of the type I-D Cas7 family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrle, Ajla; Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Sharma, Kundan; Ebert, Judith; Basquin, Claire; Urlaub, Henning; Marchfelder, Anita; Conti, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Upon pathogen invasion, bacteria and archaea activate an RNA-interference-like mechanism termed CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats). A large family of Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins mediates the different stages of this sophisticated immune response. Bioinformatic studies have classified the Cas proteins into families, according to their sequences and respective functions. These range from the insertion of the foreign genetic elements into the host genome to the activation of the interference machinery as well as target degradation upon attack. Cas7 family proteins are central to the type I and type III interference machineries as they constitute the backbone of the large interference complexes. Here we report the crystal structure of Thermofilum pendens Csc2, a Cas7 family protein of type I-D. We found that Csc2 forms a core RRM-like domain, flanked by three peripheral insertion domains: a lid domain, a Zinc-binding domain and a helical domain. Comparison with other Cas7 family proteins reveals a set of similar structural features both in the core and in the peripheral domains, despite the absence of significant sequence similarity. T. pendens Csc2 binds single-stranded RNA in vitro in a sequence-independent manner. Using a crosslinking - mass-spectrometry approach, we mapped the RNA-binding surface to a positively charged surface patch on T. pendens Csc2. Thus our analysis of the key structural and functional features of T. pendens Csc2 highlights recurring themes and evolutionary relationships in type I and type III Cas proteins.

  2. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  3. A loose domain swapping organization confers a remarkable stability to the dimeric structure of the arginine binding protein from Thermotoga maritima.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Ruggiero

    Full Text Available The arginine binding protein from Thermatoga maritima (TmArgBP, a substrate binding protein (SBP involved in the ABC system of solute transport, presents a number of remarkable properties. These include an extraordinary stability to temperature and chemical denaturants and the tendency to form multimeric structures, an uncommon feature among SBPs involved in solute transport. Here we report a biophysical and structural characterization of the TmArgBP dimer. Our data indicate that the dimer of the protein is endowed with a remarkable stability since its full dissociation requires high temperature as well as SDS and urea at high concentrations. In order to elucidate the atomic level structural properties of this intriguing protein, we determined the crystallographic structures of the apo and the arginine-bound forms of TmArgBP using MAD and SAD methods, respectively. The comparison of the liganded and unliganded models demonstrates that TmArgBP tertiary structure undergoes a very large structural re-organization upon arginine binding. This transition follows the Venus Fly-trap mechanism, although the entity of the re-organization observed in TmArgBP is larger than that observed in homologous proteins. Intriguingly, TmArgBP dimerizes through the swapping of the C-terminal helix. This dimer is stabilized exclusively by the interactions established by the swapping helix. Therefore, the TmArgBP dimer combines a high level of stability and conformational freedom. The structure of the TmArgBP dimer represents an uncommon example of large tertiary structure variations amplified at quaternary structure level by domain swapping. Although the biological relevance of the dimer needs further assessments, molecular modelling suggests that the two TmArgBP subunits may simultaneously interact with two distinct ABC transporters. Moreover, the present protein structures provide some clues about the determinants of the extraordinary stability of the biomolecule

  4. C. elegans RNA-binding protein GLD-1 recognizes its multiple targets using sequence, context, and structural information to repress translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Jung H; Jung, Yuchae; Reinke, Valerie; Lee, Min-Ho

    2013-10-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans GLD-1, a maxi-KH motif containing RNA-binding protein, has various functions mainly during female germ cell development, suggesting that it likely controls the expression of a selective group of maternal mRNAs. To gain an insight into how GLD-1 specifically recognizes these mRNA targets, we identified 38 biochemically proven GLD-1 binding regions from multiple mRNA targets that are among over 100 putative targets co-immunoprecipitated with GLD-1. The sequence information of these regions revealed three over-represented and phylogenetically conserved sequence motifs. We found that two of the motifs, one of which is novel, are important for GLD-1 binding in several GLD-1 binding regions but not in other regions. Further analyses indicate that the importance of one of the sequence motifs is dependent on two aspects: (1) surrounding sequence information, likely acting as an accessory feature for GLD-1 to efficiently select the sequence motif and (2) RNA secondary structural environment where the sequence motif resides, which likely provides "binding-site accessibility" for GLD-1 to effectively recognize its targets. Our data suggest some mRNAs recruit GLD-1 by a distinct mechanism, which involves more than one sequence motif that needs to be embedded in the correct context and structural environment.

  5. Structural Basis for Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein Binding to the Parathyroid Hormone Receptor and Design of Conformation-selective Peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Gardella, Thomas J.; Xu, H. Eric; (Van Andel); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2009-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and PTH-related protein (PTHrP) are two related peptides that control calcium/phosphate homeostasis and bone development, respectively, through activation of the PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTH1R), a class B G protein-coupled receptor. Both peptides hold clinical interest for their capacities to stimulate bone formation. PTH and PTHrP display different selectivity for two distinct PTH1R conformations, but how their binding to the receptor differs is unclear. The high resolution crystal structure of PTHrP bound to the extracellular domain (ECD) of PTH1R reveals that PTHrP binds as an amphipathic {alpha}-helix to the same hydrophobic groove in the ECD as occupied by PTH, but in contrast to a straight, continuous PTH helix, the PTHrP helix is gently curved and C-terminally 'unwound.' The receptor accommodates the altered binding modes by shifting the side chain conformations of two residues within the binding groove: Leu-41 and Ile-115, the former acting as a rotamer toggle switch to accommodate PTH/PTHrP sequence divergence, and the latter adapting to the PTHrP curvature. Binding studies performed with PTH/PTHrP hybrid ligands having reciprocal exchanges of residues involved in different contacts confirmed functional consequences for the altered interactions and enabled the design of altered PTH and PTHrP peptides that adopt the ECD-binding mode of the opposite peptide. Hybrid peptides that bound the ECD poorly were selective for the G protein-coupled PTH1R conformation. These results establish a molecular model for better understanding of how two biologically distinct ligands can act through a single receptor and provide a template for designing better PTH/PTHrP therapeutics.

  6. Lead-Binding Proteins: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harvey C. Gonick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead-binding proteins are a series of low molecular weight proteins, analogous to metallothionein, which segregate lead in a nontoxic form in several organs (kidney, brain, lung, liver, erythrocyte. Whether the lead-binding proteins in every organ are identical or different remains to be determined. In the erythrocyte, delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD isoforms have commanded the greatest attention as proteins and enzymes that are both inhibitable and inducible by lead. ALAD-2, although it binds lead to a greater degree than ALAD-1, appears to bind lead in a less toxic form. What may be of greater significance is that a low molecular weight lead-binding protein, approximately 10 kDa, appears in the erythrocyte once blood lead exceeds 39 μg/dL and eventually surpasses the lead-binding capacity of ALAD. In brain and kidney of environmentally exposed humans and animals, a cytoplasmic lead-binding protein has been identified as thymosin β4, a 5 kDa protein. In kidney, but not brain, another lead-binding protein has been identified as acyl-CoA binding protein, a 9 kDa protein. Each of these proteins, when coincubated with liver ALAD and titrated with lead, diminishes the inhibition of ALAD by lead, verifying their ability to segregate lead in a nontoxic form.

  7. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  8. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  9. Mechanism of Iron-Dependent Repressor (IdeR Activation and DNA Binding: A Molecular Dynamics and Protein Structure Network Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Ghosh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metalloproteins form a major class of enzymes in the living system that are involved in crucial biological functions such as catalysis, redox reactions and as 'switches' in signal transductions. Iron dependent repressor (IdeR is a metal-sensing transcription factor that regulates free iron concentration in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. IdeR is also known to promote bacterial virulence, making it an important target in the field of therapeutics. Mechanistic details of how iron ions modulate IdeR such that it dimerizes and binds to DNA is not understood clearly. In this study, we have performed molecular dynamic simulations and integrated it with protein structure networks to study the influence of iron on IdeR structure and function. A significant structural variation between the metallated and the non-metallated system is observed. Our simulations clearly indicate the importance of iron in stabilizing its monomeric subunit, which in turn promotes dimerization. However, the most striking results are obtained from the simulations of IdeR-DNA complex in the absence of metals, where at the end of 100ns simulations, the protein subunits are seen to rapidly dissociate away from the DNA, thereby forming an excellent resource to investigate the mechanism of DNA binding. We have also investigated the role of iron as an allosteric regulator of IdeR that positively induces IdeR-DNA complex formation. Based on this study, a mechanistic model of IdeR activation and DNA binding has been proposed.

  10. Helical propensity in an intrinsically disordered protein accelerates ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per;

    2014-01-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins fold upon binding to other macromolecules. The secondary structure present in the well-ordered complex is often formed transiently in the unbound state. The consequence of such transient structure for the binding process is, however, not clear. The activatio...

  11. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  12. Mechanical unfolding of ribose binding protein and its comparison with other periplasmic binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotamarthi, Hema Chandra; Narayan, Satya; Ainavarapu, Sri Rama Koti

    2014-10-01

    Folding and unfolding studies on large, multidomain proteins are still rare despite their high abundance in genomes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Here, we investigate the unfolding properties of a 271 residue, two-domain ribose binding protein (RBP) from the bacterial periplasm using single-molecule force spectroscopy. We observe that RBP predominately unfolds via a two-state pathway with an unfolding force of ∼80 pN and an unfolding contour length of ∼95 nm. Only a small population (∼15%) of RBP follows three-state pathways. The ligand binding neither increases the mechanical stability nor influences the unfolding flux of RBP through different pathways. The kinetic partitioning between two-state and three-state pathways, which has been reported earlier for other periplasmic proteins, is also observed in RBP, albeit to a lesser extent. These results provide important insights into the mechanical stability and unfolding processes of large two-domain proteins and highlight the contrasting features upon ligand binding. Protein structural topology diagrams are used to explain the differences in the mechanical unfolding behavior of RBP with other periplasmic binding proteins.

  13. Structural basis of metallo-β-lactamase, serine-β-lactamase and penicillin-binding protein inhibition by cyclic boronates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brem, Jürgen; Cain, Ricky; Cahill, Samuel; McDonough, Michael A.; Clifton, Ian J.; Jiménez-Castellanos, Juan-Carlos; Avison, Matthew B.; Spencer, James; Fishwick, Colin W. G.; Schofield, Christopher J.

    2016-08-01

    β-Lactamases enable resistance to almost all β-lactam antibiotics. Pioneering work revealed that acyclic boronic acids can act as `transition state analogue' inhibitors of nucleophilic serine enzymes, including serine-β-lactamases. Here we report biochemical and biophysical analyses revealing that cyclic boronates potently inhibit both nucleophilic serine and zinc-dependent β-lactamases by a mechanism involving mimicking of the common tetrahedral intermediate. Cyclic boronates also potently inhibit the non-essential penicillin-binding protein PBP 5 by the same mechanism of action. The results open the way for development of dual action inhibitors effective against both serine- and metallo-β-lactamases, and which could also have antimicrobial activity through inhibition of PBPs.

  14. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  15. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  16. Identification of a Ubiquitin-Binding Structure in the S-Locus F-Box Protein Controlling S-RNase-Based Self-Incompatibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Chen; Bin Zhang; Lijing Liu; Qun Li; Yu'e Zhang; Qi Xie; Yongbiao Xue

    2012-01-01

    In flowering plants,self-incompatibility (SI) serves as an important intraspecific reproductive barrier to promote outbreeding.In species from the Solanaceae,Plantaginaceae and Rosaceae,S-RNase and SLF (S-locus F-box) proteins have been shown to control the female and male specificity of SI,respectively.However,little is known about structure features of the SLF protein apart from its conserved F-box domain.Here we show that the SLF C-terminal region possesses a novel ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) structure conserved among the SLF protein family.By using an ex vivo system of Nicotiana benthamiana,we found that the UBD mediates the SLF protein turnover by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.Furthermore,we detected that the SLF protein was directly involved in S-RNase degradation.Taken together,our results provide a novel insight into the SLF structure and highlight a potential role of SLF protein stability and degradation in S-RNase-based self-incompatibility.

  17. Global discovery of protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-09-01

    Nucleotide-binding proteins, such as protein kinases, ATPases and GTP-binding proteins, are among the most important families of proteins that are involved in a number of pivotal cellular processes. However, global study of the structure, function, and expression level of nucleotide-binding proteins as well as protein-nucleotide interactions can hardly be achieved with the use of conventional approaches owing to enormous diversity of the nucleotide-binding protein family. Recent advances in mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation, coupled with a variety of nucleotide-binding protein enrichment methods, rendered MS-based proteomics a powerful tool for the comprehensive characterizations of the nucleotide-binding proteome, especially the kinome. Here, we review the recent developments in the use of mass spectrometry, together with general and widely used affinity enrichment approaches, for the proteome-wide capture, identification and quantification of nucleotide-binding proteins, including protein kinases, ATPases, GTPases, and other nucleotide-binding proteins. The working principles, advantages, and limitations of each enrichment platform in identifying nucleotide-binding proteins as well as profiling protein-nucleotide interactions are summarized. The perspectives in developing novel MS-based nucleotide-binding protein detection platform are also discussed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 35:601-619, 2016.

  18. Structural and functional insight into how the Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA protein mediates binding to chondroitin sulfate A in placental malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas M; Christoffersen, Stig; Dahlbäck, Madeleine;

    2012-01-01

    that the CSA-binding DBL2X domain is situated in the center of the structure. Mutating classic sulfate-binding sites in VAR2CSA, along with testing dependence of ionic interactions, suggest that the CSA binding is not solely dependent on the sulfated CSA structure. Based on these novel PfEMP1 structure...

  19. Molecular cloning, expression pattern, and 3D structural prediction of the cold inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) in Japanese flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Gao, Jinning; Ma, Liman; Li, Zan; Wang, Wenji; Wang, Zhongkai; Yu, Haiyang; Qi, Jie; Wang, Xubo; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Quanqi

    2015-02-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a kind of RNA binding proteins that plays important roles in many physiological processes. The CIRP has been widely studied in mammals and amphibians since it was first cloned from mammals. On the contrary, there are little reports in teleosts. In this study, the Po CIRP gene of the Japanese flounder was cloned and sequenced. The genomic sequence consists of seven exons and six introns. The putative PoCIRP protein of flounder was 198 amino acid residues long containing the RNA recognition motif (RRM). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the flounder PoCIRP is highly conserved with other teleost CIRPs. The 5' flanking sequence was cloned by genome walking and many transcription factor binding sites were identified. There is a CpGs region located in promoter and exon I region and the methylation state is low. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis uncovered that Po CIRP gene was widely expressed in adult tissues with the highest expression level in the ovary. The mRNA of the Po CIRP was maternally deposited and the expression level of the gene was regulated up during the gastrula and neurula stages. In order to gain the information how the protein interacts with mRNA, we performed the modeling of the 3D structure of the flounder PoCIRP. The results showed a cleft existing the surface of the molecular. Taken together, the results indicate that the CIRP is a multifunctional molecular in teleosts and the findings about the structure provide valuable information for understanding the basis of this protein's function.

  20. Discovery of Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Binding Proteins in the Escherichia coli Proteome Using a Combined Energetic- and Structural-Bioinformatics-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingfei; Shin, Woong-Hee; Zhu, Xiaolei; Park, Sung Hoon; Park, Chiwook; Tao, W Andy; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-02-03

    Protein-ligand interaction plays a critical role in regulating the biochemical functions of proteins. Discovering protein targets for ligands is vital to new drug development. Here, we present a strategy that combines experimental and computational approaches to identify ligand-binding proteins in a proteomic scale. For the experimental part, we coupled pulse proteolysis with filter-assisted sample preparation (FASP) and quantitative mass spectrometry. Under denaturing conditions, ligand binding affected protein stability, which resulted in altered protein abundance after pulse proteolysis. For the computational part, we used the software Patch-Surfer2.0. We applied the integrated approach to identify nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-binding proteins in the Escherichia coli proteome, which has over 4200 proteins. Pulse proteolysis and Patch-Surfer2.0 identified 78 and 36 potential NAD-binding proteins, respectively, including 12 proteins that were consistently detected by the two approaches. Interestingly, the 12 proteins included 8 that are not previously known as NAD binders. Further validation of these eight proteins showed that their binding affinities to NAD computed by AutoDock Vina are higher than their cognate ligands and also that their protein ratios in the pulse proteolysis are consistent with known NAD-binding proteins. These results strongly suggest that these eight proteins are indeed newly identified NAD binders.

  1. Protein structural studies by paramagnetic solid-state NMR spectroscopy aided by a compact cyclen-type Cu(II) binding tag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Ishita; Gao, Min; Arachchige, Rajith J.; Nadaud, Philippe S. [The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States); Cunningham, Timothy F.; Saxena, Sunil [University of Pittsburgh, Department of Chemistry (United States); Schwieters, Charles D. [National Institutes of Health, Center for Information Technology (United States); Jaroniec, Christopher P., E-mail: jaroniec@chemistry.ohio-state.edu [The Ohio State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements (PREs) are a rich source of structural information in protein solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Here we demonstrate that PRE measurements in natively diamagnetic proteins are facilitated by a thiol-reactive compact, cyclen-based, high-affinity Cu{sup 2+} binding tag, 1-[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)ethyl]-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (TETAC), that overcomes the key shortcomings associated with the use of larger, more flexible metal-binding tags. Using the TETAC–Cu{sup 2+} K28C mutant of B1 immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G as a model, we find that amino acid residues located within ∼10 Å of the Cu{sup 2+} center experience considerable transverse PREs leading to severely attenuated resonances in 2D {sup 15}N–{sup 13}C correlation spectra. For more distant residues, electron–nucleus distances are accessible via quantitative measurements of longitudinal PREs, and we demonstrate such measurements for {sup 15}N–Cu{sup 2+} distances up to ∼20 Å.

  2. N-terminal aliphatic residues dictate the structure, stability, assembly, and small molecule binding of the coiled-coil region of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekar, Susheel K; Asnani, Mukta; Limbad, Chandani; Haghpanah, Jennifer S; Hom, Wendy; Barra, Hanna; Nanda, Soumya; Lu, Min; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2009-09-15

    The coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMPcc) assembles into a homopentamer that naturally recognizes the small molecule 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (vit D). To identify the residues critical for the structure, stability, oligomerization, and binding to vit D as well as two other small molecules, all-trans-retinol (ATR) and curcumin (CCM), here we perform an alanine scanning mutagenesis study. Ten residues lining the hydrophobic pocket of COMPcc were mutated into alanine; of the mutated residues, the N-terminal aliphatic residues L37, L44, V47, and L51 are responsible for maintaining the structure and function. Furthermore, two polar residues, T40 and Q54, within the N-terminal region when converted into alanine improve the alpha-helical structure, stability, and self-assembly behavior. Helical stability, oligomerization, and binding appear to be linked in a manner in which mutations that abolish helical structure and assembly bind poorly to vit D, ATR, and CCM. These results provide not only insight into COMPcc and its functional role but also useful guidelines for the design of stable, pentameric coiled-coils capable of selectively storing and delivering various small molecules.

  3. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  4. Synthesis, structure, DNA/protein binding, and cytotoxic activity of a rhodium(III) complex with 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamat-Panah, Roya; Hadadzadeh, Hassan; Farrokhpour, Hossein; Simpson, Jim; Abdolmaleki, Amir; Abyar, Fatemeh

    2017-02-15

    A new mononuclear rhodium(III) complex, [Rh(bzimpy)Cl3] (bzimpy = 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic methods. The molecular structure of the complex was confirmed by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The interaction of the complex with fish sperm DNA (FS-DNA) was investigated by UV spectroscopy, emission titration, and viscosity measurement in order to evaluate the possible DNA-binding mode and to calculate the corresponding DNA-binding constant. The results reveal that the Rh(III) complex interacts with DNA through groove binding mode with a binding affinity on the order of 10(4). In addition, the binding of the Rh(III) complex to bovine serum albumin (BSA) was monitored by UV-Vis and fluorescence emission spectroscopy at different temperatures. The mechanism of the complex interaction was found to be static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG) obtained from the fluorescence spectroscopy data show that van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the binding of the Rh(III) complex to BSA. For the comparison of the DNA- and BSA-binding affinities of the free bzimpy ligand with its Rh(III) complex, the absorbance titration and fluorescence quenching experiments of the free bzimpy ligand with DNA and BSA were carried out. Competitive experiments using eosin Y and ibuprofen as site markers indicated that the complex was mainly located in the hydrophobic cavity of site I of the protein. These experimental results were confirmed by the results of molecular docking. Finally, the in vitro cytotoxicity properties of the Rh(III) complex against the MCF-7, K562, and HT-29 cell lines were evaluated and compared with those of the free ligand (bzimpy). It was found that the complexation process improved the anticancer activity significantly.

  5. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas avirulence protein AvrPphB: A papain-like fold with a distinct substrate binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, M.; Shao, F.; Innes, R.W.; Dixon, J.E.; Xu, Z. (Mighigan); (Michigan); (UCSD)

    2010-03-08

    AvrPphB is an avirulence (Avr) protein from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae that can trigger a disease-resistance response in a number of host plants including Arabidopsis. AvrPphB belongs to a novel family of cysteine proteases with the charter member of this family being the Yersinia effector protein YopT. AvrPphB has a very stringent substrate specificity, catalyzing a single proteolytic cleavage in the Arabidopsis serine/threonine kinase PBS1. We have determined the crystal structure of AvrPphB by x-ray crystallography at 1.35-{angstrom} resolution. The structure is composed of a central antiparallel {beta}-sheet, with {alpha}-helices packing on both sides of the sheet to form a two-lobe structure. The core of this structure resembles the papain-like cysteine proteases. The similarity includes the AvrPphB active site catalytic triad of Cys-98, His-212, and Asp-227 and the oxyanion hole residue Asn-93. Based on analogy with inhibitor complexes of the papain-like proteases, we propose a model for the substrate-binding mechanism of AvrPphB. A deep and positively charged pocket (S2) and a neighboring shallow surface (S3) likely bind to aspartic acid and glycine residues in the substrate located two (P2) and three (P3) residues N terminal to the cleavage site, respectively. Further implications about the specificity of plant pathogen recognition are also discussed.

  6. Influence of the Compatible Solute Ectoine on the Local Water Structure: Implications for the Binding of the Protein G5P to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Marc Benjamin; Solomun, Tihomir; Wellhausen, Robert; Hermann, Sabrina; Seitz, Harald; Meyer, Susann; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Zeman, Johannes; Uhlig, Frank; Smiatek, Jens; Sturm, Heinz

    2015-12-10

    Microorganisms accumulate molar concentrations of compatible solutes like ectoine to prevent proteins from denaturation. Direct structural or spectroscopic information on the mechanism and about the hydration shell around ectoine are scarce. We combined surface plasmon resonance (SPR), confocal Raman spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the local hydration shell around ectoine and its influence on the binding of a gene-5-protein (G5P) to a single-stranded DNA (dT25). Due to the very high hygroscopicity of ectoine, it was possible to analyze the highly stable hydration shell by confocal Raman spectroscopy. Corresponding molecular dynamics simulation results revealed a significant change of the water dielectric constant in the presence of a high molar ectoine concentration as compared to pure water. The SPR data showed that the amount of protein bound to DNA decreases in the presence of ectoine, and hence, the protein-DNA dissociation constant increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Concomitantly, the Raman spectra in terms of the amide I region revealed large changes in the protein secondary structure. Our results indicate that ectoine strongly affects the molecular recognition between the protein and the oligonucleotide, which has important consequences for osmotic regulation mechanisms.

  7. Molecular Cloning, Expression Pattern, and 3D Structural Prediction of the Cold Inducible RNA - Binding Protein (CIRP) in Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao; WANG Zhigang; ZHANG Quanqi; GAO Jinning; MA Liman; LI Zan; WANG Wenji; WANG Zhongkai; YU Haiyang; QI Jie; WANG Xubo

    2015-01-01

    Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) is a kind of RNA binding proteins that plays important roles in many physiological processes. The CIRP has been widely studied in mammals and amphibians since it was first cloned from mammals. On the contrary, there are little reports in teleosts. In this study, the PoCIRP gene of the Japanese flounder was cloned and sequenced. The genomic sequence consists of seven exons and six introns. The putative PoCIRP protein of flounder was 198 amino acid residues long containing the RNA recognition motif (RRM). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the flounder PoCIRP is highly conserved with other teleost CIRPs. The 5’ flanking sequence was cloned by genome walking and many transcription factor binding sites were iden-tified. There is a CpGs region located in promoter and exon I region and the methylation state is low. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis uncovered that PoCIRP gene was widely expressed in adult tissues with the highest expression level in the ovary. The mRNA of the PoCIRP was maternally deposited and the expression level of the gene was regulated up during the gastrula and neu-rula stages. In order to gain the information how the protein interacts with mRNA, we performed the modeling of the 3D structure of the flounder PoCIRP. The results showed a cleft existing the surface of the molecular. Taken together, the results indicate that the CIRP is a multifunctional molecular in teleosts and the findings about the structure provide valuable information for understanding the basis of this protein’s function.

  8. Structure of an Odorant-Vinding Protein form the Mosquito Aedes aegypti Suggests a Binding Pocket Covered by a pH-Sensitive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N Leite; R Krogh; W Xu; Y Ishida; J Iulek; W Leal; G Oliva

    2011-12-31

    The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is the primary vector for the viruses that cause yellow fever, mostly in tropical regions of Africa and in parts of South America, and human dengue, which infects 100 million people yearly in the tropics and subtropics. A better understanding of the structural biology of olfactory proteins may pave the way for the development of environmentally-friendly mosquito attractants and repellents, which may ultimately contribute to reduction of mosquito biting and disease transmission. Previously, we isolated and cloned a major, female-enriched odorant-binding protein (OBP) from the yellow fever mosquito, AaegOBP1, which was later inadvertently renamed AaegOBP39. We prepared recombinant samples of AaegOBP1 by using an expression system that allows proper formation of disulfide bridges and generates functional OBPs, which are indistinguishable from native OBPs. We crystallized AaegOBP1 and determined its three-dimensional structure at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution by molecular replacement based on the structure of the malaria mosquito OBP, AgamOBP1, the only mosquito OBP structure known to date. The structure of AaegOBP1 (= AaegOBP39) shares the common fold of insect OBPs with six {alpha}-helices knitted by three disulfide bonds. A long molecule of polyethylene glycol (PEG) was built into the electron-density maps identified in a long tunnel formed by a crystallographic dimer of AaegOBP1. Circular dichroism analysis indicated that delipidated AaegOBP1 undergoes a pH-dependent conformational change, which may lead to release of odorant at low pH (as in the environment in the vicinity of odorant receptors). A C-terminal loop covers the binding cavity and this 'lid' may be opened by disruption of an array of acid-labile hydrogen bonds thus explaining reduced or no binding affinity at low pH.

  9. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from sever...

  10. Crystal structure and activity of protein L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase from Vibrio cholerae, and the effect of AdoHcy binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Tanaya; Mukherjee, Debadrita; Banerjee, Mousumi; Chatterjee, Barun K; Chakrabarti, Pinak

    2015-10-01

    The repair enzyme Protein L-isoaspartyl-O-methyltransferase (PIMT) is widely distributed in various organisms. PIMT catalyzes S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) dependent methylation of abnormal L-isoaspartyl residues, formed by the deamidation of asparagines and isomerization of aspartates. We report the crystal structure of PIMT of Vibrio cholerae (VcPIMT), the aetiological agent for cholera, complexed with the demethylated cofactor S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine (AdoHcy) to 2.05 Å resolution. A stretch of residues (39-58), lining the substrate-binding site, is disordered. Urea-induced unfolding free energy for apo and VcPIMT-AdoHcy complex reveals greater stability for the cofactor-bound protein. The kinetic parameters for the methyltransferase activity of the recombinant VcPIMT was determined using a continuous spectrophotometric color-based assay using the peptide substrate [VYP(L-isoD)HA]. The enzyme exhibited activity higher than the Escherichia coli enzyme and closer to those from thermophilic bacteria and the mammalian source. The association constant for substrate binding is 2.29 × 10(6) M(-1), quite similar to that for AdoHcy. The crystal structure and the model of the peptide-bound structure indicate that the majority of the interactions used for cofactor/substrate binding are provided by the main-chain atoms. Evolutionary relationships derived based on a phylogenetic tree constructed using the PIMT sequences are in conformity with the crystal structures of nine AdoHcy-bound PIMTs.

  11. Structural diversity of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the byssus of blue mussels upon refolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Michael H; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Blue mussels firmly adhere to a variety of different substrates by the byssus, an extracorporal structure consisting of several protein threads. These threads are mainly composed of fibrillar collagens called preCols which are embedded in a proteinaceous matrix. One of the two so far identified matrix proteins is the Proximal Thread Matrix Protein 1 (PTMP1). PTMP1 comprises two von Willebrand factor type A-like domains (A1 and A2) in a special arrangement. Here, we describe the refolding of recombinant PTMP1 from inclusion bodies. PTMP1 refolded into two distinct monomeric isoforms. Both isomers exhibited alternative intramolecular disulfide bonds. One of these isomers is thermodynamically favored and presumably represents the native form of PTMP1, while the other isoform is kinetically favored but is likely non-native. Oligomerization during refolding was influenced by, but not strictly dependent on disulfide formation. The conformational stability of PTMP1 indicates an influence of intramolecular disulfides on the native state, but not on unfolding intermediates. Monomeric PTMP1 exhibited a high thermal stability, dependent on the pH of the surrounding environment. Especially under acidic conditions the disulfide bonds were critically involved in thermal stability.

  12. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  13. Amphipathic alpha-helices and putative cholesterol binding domains of the influenza virus matrix M1 protein are crucial for virion structure organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsfasman, Tatyana; Kost, Vladimir; Markushin, Stanislav; Lotte, Vera; Koptiaeva, Irina; Bogacheva, Elena; Baratova, Ludmila; Radyukhin, Victor

    2015-12-02

    The influenza virus matrix M1 protein is an amphitropic membrane-associated protein, forming the matrix layer immediately beneath the virus raft membrane, thereby ensuring the proper structure of the influenza virion. The objective of this study was to elucidate M1 fine structural characteristics, which determine amphitropic properties and raft membrane activities of the protein, via 3D in silico modelling with subsequent mutational analysis. Computer simulations suggest the amphipathic nature of the M1 α-helices and the existence of putative cholesterol binding (CRAC) motifs on six amphipathic α-helices. Our finding explains for the first time many features of this protein, particularly the amphitropic properties and raft/cholesterol binding potential. To verify these results, we generated mutants of the A/WSN/33 strain via reverse genetics. The M1 mutations included F32Y in the CRAC of α-helix 2, W45Y and W45F in the CRAC of α-helix 3, Y100S in the CRAC of α-helix 6, M128A and M128S in the CRAC of α-helix 8 and a double L103I/L130I mutation in both a putative cholesterol consensus motif and the nuclear localisation signal. All mutations resulted in viruses with unusual filamentous morphology. Previous experimental data regarding the morphology of M1-gene mutant influenza viruses can now be explained in structural terms and are consistent with the pivotal role of the CRAC-domains and amphipathic α-helices in M1-lipid interactions.

  14. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  15. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins.

  16. Synthesis and Structure of a Ternary Copper(II) Complex with Mixed Ligands of Diethylenetriamine and Picrate: DNA/Protein-Binding Property and In Vitro Anticancer Activity Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ya-Ning; Zheng, Kang; Zhu, Ling; Li, Yan-Tuan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cui-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Based on the importance of the design and synthesis of transition metal complexes with noncovalent DNA/protein-binding abilities in the field of metallo pharmaceuticals, a new mononuclear ternary copper(II) complex with mixed ligands of diethylenetriamine (dien) and picrate anion (pic), identified as [Cu(dien)(pic)](pic), was synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurement, infrared spectrum, electronic spectral studies, and single-crystal X-ray diffractometry. The structure analysis reveals that the copper(II) complex crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21 /c, and the copper(II) ion has a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry. A two-dimensional supramolecular structure is formed through hydrogen bonds. The DNA/bovine serum albumin (BSA)-binding properties of the complex are explored, indicating that the complex can interact with herring sperm DNA via intercalation mode and bind to BSA responsible for quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by static quenching mechanism. The in vitro anticancer activity shows that the copper(II) complex is active against the selected tumor cell lines.

  17. Crystal Structures of Penicillin-Binding Protein 2 From Penicillin-Susceptible And -Resistant Strains of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Reveal An Unexpectedly Subtle Mechanism for Antibiotic Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, A.J.; Tomberg, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Nicholas, R.A.; Davies, C.

    2009-05-21

    Penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from N. gonorrhoeae is the major molecular target for {beta}-lactam antibiotics used to treat gonococcal infections. PBP2 from penicillin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae harbors an aspartate insertion after position 345 (Asp-345a) and 4-8 additional mutations, but how these alter the architecture of the protein is unknown. We have determined the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-susceptible strain FA19, which shows that the likely effect of Asp-345a is to alter a hydrogen-bonding network involving Asp-346 and the SXN triad at the active site. We have also solved the crystal structure of PBP2 derived from the penicillin-resistant strain FA6140 that contains four mutations near the C terminus of the protein. Although these mutations lower the second order rate of acylation for penicillin by 5-fold relative to wild type, comparison of the two structures shows only minor structural differences, with the positions of the conserved residues in the active site essentially the same in both. Kinetic analyses indicate that two mutations, P551S and F504L, are mainly responsible for the decrease in acylation rate. Melting curves show that the four mutations lower the thermal stability of the enzyme. Overall, these data suggest that the molecular mechanism underlying antibiotic resistance contributed by the four mutations is subtle and involves a small but measurable disordering of residues in the active site region that either restricts the binding of antibiotic or impedes conformational changes that are required for acylation by {beta}-lactam antibiotics.

  18. Structure of the HIV-1 Full-Length Capsid Protein in a Conformationally Trapped Unassembled State Induced by Small-Molecule Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Shoucheng; Betts, Laurie; Yang, Ruifeng; Shi, Haibin; Concel, Jason; Ahn, Jinwoo; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun; Yeh, Joanne I. (Pitt); (Vanderbilt); (UNC)

    2012-11-26

    The capsid (CA) protein plays crucial roles in HIV infection and replication, essential to viral maturation. The absence of high-resolution structural data on unassembled CA hinders the development of antivirals effective in inhibiting assembly. Unlike enzymes that have targetable, functional substrate-binding sites, the CA does not have a known site that affects catalytic or other innate activity, which can be more readily targeted in drug development efforts. We report the crystal structure of the HIV-1 CA, revealing the domain organization in the context of the wild-type full-length (FL) unassembled CA. The FL CA adopts an antiparallel dimer configuration, exhibiting a domain organization sterically incompatible with capsid assembly. A small compound, generated in situ during crystallization, is bound tightly at a hinge site ('H site'), indicating that binding at this interdomain region stabilizes the ADP conformation. Electron microscopy studies on nascent crystals reveal both dimeric and hexameric lattices coexisting within a single condition, in agreement with the interconvertibility of oligomeric forms and supporting the feasibility of promoting assembly-incompetent dimeric states. Solution characterization in the presence of the H-site ligand shows predominantly unassembled dimeric CA, even under conditions that promote assembly. Our structure elucidation of the HIV-1 FL CA and characterization of a potential allosteric binding site provides three-dimensional views of an assembly-defective conformation, a state targeted in, and thus directly relevant to, inhibitor development. Based on our findings, we propose an unprecedented means of preventing CA assembly, by 'conformationally trapping' CA in assembly-incompetent conformational states induced by H-site binding.

  19. Organization into Higher Ordered Ring Structures Counteracts Membrane Binding of IM30, a Protein Associated with Inner Membranes in Chloroplasts and Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidrich, Jennifer; Wulf, Verena; Hennig, Raoul; Saur, Michael; Markl, Jürgen; Sönnichsen, Carsten; Schneider, Dirk

    2016-07-15

    The IM30 (inner membrane-associated protein of 30 kDa), also known as the Vipp1 (vesicle-inducing protein in plastids 1), has a crucial role in thylakoid membrane biogenesis and maintenance. Recent results suggest that the protein binds peripherally to membranes containing negatively charged lipids. However, although IM30 monomers interact and assemble into large oligomeric ring complexes with different numbers of monomers, it is still an open question whether ring formation is crucial for membrane interaction. Here we show that binding of IM30 rings to negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol membrane surfaces results in a higher ordered membrane state, both in the head group and in the inner core region of the lipid bilayer. Furthermore, by using gold nanorods covered with phosphatidylglycerol layers and single particle spectroscopy, we show that not only IM30 rings but also lower oligomeric IM30 structures interact with membranes, although with higher affinity. Thus, ring formation is not crucial for, and even counteracts, membrane interaction of IM30.

  20. Diversity of Cyclic Di-GMP-Binding Proteins and Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shan-Ho; Galperin, Michael Y

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) synthetases and hydrolases (GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domains) can be readily identified in bacterial genome sequences by using standard bioinformatic tools. In contrast, identification of c-di-GMP receptors remains a difficult task, and the current list of experimentally characterized c-di-GMP-binding proteins is likely incomplete. Several classes of c-di-GMP-binding proteins have been structurally characterized; for some others, the binding sites have been identified; and for several potential c-di-GMP receptors, the binding sites remain to be determined. We present here a comparative structural analysis of c-di-GMP-protein complexes that aims to discern the common themes in the binding mechanisms that allow c-di-GMP receptors to bind it with (sub)micromolar affinities despite the 1,000-fold excess of GTP. The available structures show that most receptors use their Arg and Asp/Glu residues to bind c-di-GMP monomers, dimers, or tetramers with stacked guanine bases. The only exception is the EAL domains that bind c-di-GMP monomers in an extended conformation. We show that in c-di-GMP-binding signature motifs, Arg residues bind to the O-6 and N-7 atoms at the Hoogsteen edge of the guanine base, while Asp/Glu residues bind the N-1 and N-2 atoms at its Watson-Crick edge. In addition, Arg residues participate in stacking interactions with the guanine bases of c-di-GMP and the aromatic rings of Tyr and Phe residues. This may account for the presence of Arg residues in the active sites of every receptor protein that binds stacked c-di-GMP. We also discuss the implications of these structural data for the improved understanding of the c-di-GMP signaling mechanisms.

  1. Binding Mechanisms of Intrinsically Disordered Proteins: Theory, Simulation, and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Luca; Bessa, Luiza M.; Hanoulle, Xavier; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Blackledge, Martin; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed, e.g., in the “fly-casting” hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit), are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context. PMID:27668217

  2. Crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein 3 (PBP3) from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the apo and cefotaxime-bound forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hisashi; Kawai, Fumihiro; Obayashi, Eiji; Akashi, Satoko; Roper, David I; Tame, Jeremy R H; Park, Sam-Yong

    2012-10-26

    Staphylococcus aureus is a widespread Gram-positive opportunistic pathogen, and a methicillin-resistant form (MRSA) is particularly difficult to treat clinically. We have solved two crystal structures of penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 3 (PBP3) from MRSA, the apo form and a complex with the β-lactam antibiotic cefotaxime, and used electrospray mass spectrometry to measure its sensitivity to a variety of penicillin derivatives. PBP3 is a class B PBP, possessing an N-terminal non-penicillin-binding domain, sometimes called a dimerization domain, and a C-terminal transpeptidase domain. The model shows a different orientation of its two domains compared to earlier models of other class B PBPs and a novel, larger N-domain. Consistent with the nomenclature of "dimerization domain", the N-terminal region forms an apparently tight interaction with a neighboring molecule related by a 2-fold symmetry axis in the crystal structure. This dimer form is predicted to be highly stable in solution by the PISA server, but mass spectrometry and analytical ultracentrifugation provide unequivocal evidence that the protein is a monomer in solution.

  3. CrRNA-Protospacer Recognition during CRISPR- Directed DNA Interference Sulfolobus islandicus REY 15A and Structural Studies of CRISPR Binding Proteins (CBP) of Crenarchaeon Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousaei, Marzieh

    The CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and associated proteins) is one of the important known immune mechanisms in archaea and bacteria. This adaptive immune system degrades invading genetic elements and protects the cell. Amongst 3 main types I, II and III...... of CRISPR system, two types (I and III) are found in archaea. However, in Sulfolobus species, subtypes IA, I-D, and III-B, III-D and rarely III-A are found. The model organism used for interference and structural studies is S. islandicus REY15A which carries subtypes I-A and III-B (α and β). Besides CRISPR...... ribonucleoprotein complex which is involved directly in defense, there are some less- known parts of the system including CPBs (CRISPR repeat-binding proteins) which are suggested to play a role in transcription. In the first part of my thesis, I provide a brief introduction to archaea and viruses that infect...

  4. Fine structure of the sensilla and immunolocalisation of odorant binding proteins in the cerci of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanxue; Zhou, Shuhui; Zhang, Shangan; Zhang, Long

    2011-01-01

    Using light and electron microscopy (both scanning and transmission), we observed the presence of sensilla chaetica and hairs on the cerci of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria L. (Orthoptera: Acrididae). Based on their fine structures, three types of sensilla chaetica were identified: long, medium, and short. Males presented significantly more numbers of medium and short sensilla chaetica than females (pmigratoria (LmigOBP2) and chemosensory protein class I from the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria Forsskål (SgreCSPI) strongly stained the outer lymph of sensilla chaetica of the cerci. The other two types of hairs were never labeled. The results indicate that the cerci might be involved in contact chemoreception processes.

  5. Conformational thermodynamics of metal-ion binding to a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amit; Chakrabarti, J.; Ghosh, Mahua

    2013-08-01

    Conformational changes in proteins induced by metal-ions play extremely important role in various cellular processes and technological applications. Dihedral angles are suitable conformational variables to describe microscopic conformations of a biomacromolecule. Here, we use the histograms of the dihedral angles to study the thermodynamics of conformational changes of a protein upon metal-ion binding. Our method applied to Ca2+ ion binding to an important metalloprotein, Calmodulin, reveals different thermodynamic changes in different metal-binding sites. The ligands coordinating to Ca2+ ions also play different roles in stabilizing the metal-ion coordinated protein-structure. Metal-ion binding induce remarkable thermodynamic changes in distant part of the protein via modification of secondary structural elements.

  6. Glycan masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for probing protein binding function and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Sampath

    Full Text Available Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development.

  7. [Mg2+ ions affect the structure of the central domain of the 18S rRNA in the vicinity of the ribosomal protein S13 binding site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A V; Malygin, A A; Karpova, G G

    2013-01-01

    It is known that Mg2+ ions at high concentrations stabilize the structure of the 16S rRNA in a conformation favorable for binding to the ribosomal proteins in the course of the eubacterial 30S ribosomal subunits assembly in vitro. Effect of Mg2+ on the formation of the 18S rRNA structure at the 40S subunit assembly remains poorly explored. In this paper, we show that the sequentional increase of the Mg2+ concentration from 0.5 mM to 20 mM leads to a significant decrease of the affinity of recombinant human ribosomal protein S13 (rpS13e) to a RNA transcript corresponding to the central domain fragment of the 18S rRNA (18SCD). The regions near the rpS13e binding site in 18SCD (including the nucleotides of helices H20 and H22), whose availabilities to hydroxyl radicals were dependent on the Mg2+ concentration, were determined. It was found that increase of the concentrations of Mg2+ results in the enhanced accessibilities of nucleotides G933-C937 and C1006-A1009 in helix H22 and reduces those of nucleotides A1023, A1024, and A1028-S1026 in the helix H20. Comparison of the results obtained with the crystallographic data on the structure of the central domain of 18S rRNA in the 40S ribosomal subunit led to conclusion that increase of Mg2+ concentrations results in the reorientation of helices H20 and H24 relatively helices H22 and H23 to form a structure, in which these helices are positioned the same way as in 40S subunits. Hence, saturation of the central domain of 18S rRNA with coordinated Mg2+ ions causes the same changes in its structure as rpS13e binding does, and leads to decreasing of this domain affinity to the protein.

  8. Mapping of ligand-binding cavities in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, C David; Chen, Brian Y; Linusson, Anna

    2010-05-01

    The complex interactions between proteins and small organic molecules (ligands) are intensively studied because they play key roles in biological processes and drug activities. Here, we present a novel approach to characterize and map the ligand-binding cavities of proteins without direct geometric comparison of structures, based on Principal Component Analysis of cavity properties (related mainly to size, polarity, and charge). This approach can provide valuable information on the similarities and dissimilarities, of binding cavities due to mutations, between-species differences and flexibility upon ligand-binding. The presented results show that information on ligand-binding cavity variations can complement information on protein similarity obtained from sequence comparisons. The predictive aspect of the method is exemplified by successful predictions of serine proteases that were not included in the model construction. The presented strategy to compare ligand-binding cavities of related and unrelated proteins has many potential applications within protein and medicinal chemistry, for example in the characterization and mapping of "orphan structures", selection of protein structures for docking studies in structure-based design, and identification of proteins for selectivity screens in drug design programs.

  9. Probing binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Nithin, Chandran; Karampudi, Naga Bhushana Rao; Mukherjee, Sunandan; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad

    2016-01-29

    We use evolutionary conservation derived from structure alignment of polypeptide sequences along with structural and physicochemical attributes of protein-RNA interfaces to probe the binding hot spots at protein-RNA recognition sites. We find that the degree of conservation varies across the RNA binding proteins; some evolve rapidly compared to others. Additionally, irrespective of the structural class of the complexes, residues at the RNA binding sites are evolutionary better conserved than those at the solvent exposed surfaces. For recognitions involving duplex RNA, residues interacting with the major groove are better conserved than those interacting with the minor groove. We identify multi-interface residues participating simultaneously in protein-protein and protein-RNA interfaces in complexes where more than one polypeptide is involved in RNA recognition, and show that they are better conserved compared to any other RNA binding residues. We find that the residues at water preservation site are better conserved than those at hydrated or at dehydrated sites. Finally, we develop a Random Forests model using structural and physicochemical attributes for predicting binding hot spots. The model accurately predicts 80% of the instances of experimental ΔΔG values in a particular class, and provides a stepping-stone towards the engineering of protein-RNA recognition sites with desired affinity.

  10. Structural effect of the Asp345a insertion in penicillin-binding protein 2 from penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedarovich, Alena; Cook, Edward; Tomberg, Joshua; Nicholas, Robert A; Davies, Christopher

    2014-12-09

    A hallmark of penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP2) from penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is insertion of an aspartate after position 345. The insertion resides on a loop near the active site and is immediately adjacent to an existing aspartate (Asp346) that forms a functionally important hydrogen bond with Ser363 of the SxN conserved motif. Insertion of other amino acids, including Glu and Asn, can also lower the rate of acylation by penicillin, but these insertions abolish transpeptidase function. Although the kinetic consequences of the Asp insertion are well-established, how it impacts the structure of PBP2 is unknown. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a truncated construct of PBP2 containing all five mutations present in PBP2 from the penicillin-resistant strain 6140, including the Asp insertion. Commensurate with the strict specificity for the Asp insertion over similar amino acids, the insertion does not cause disordering of the structure, but rather induces localized flexibility in the β2c-β2d loop. The crystal structure resolves the ambiguity of whether the insertion is Asp345a or Asp346a (due to the adjacent Asp) because the hydrogen bond between Asp346 and Ser362 is preserved and the insertion is therefore Asp346a. The side chain of Asp346a projects directly toward the β-lactam-binding site near Asn364 of the SxN motif. The Asp insertion may lower the rate of acylation by sterically impeding binding of the antibiotic or by hindering breakage of the β-lactam ring during acylation because of the negative charge of its side chain.

  11. Lipids and lipid binding proteins: a perfect match.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Jan F C

    2015-02-01

    Lipids serve a great variety of functions, ranging from structural components of biological membranes to signaling molecules affecting various cellular functions. Several of these functions are related to the unique physico-chemical properties shared by all lipid species, i.e., their hydrophobicity. The latter, however, is accompanied by a poor solubility in an aqueous environment and thus a severe limitation in the transport of lipids in aqueous compartments such as blood plasma and the cellular soluble cytoplasm. Specific proteins which can reversibly and non-covalently associate with lipids, designated as lipid binding proteins or lipid chaperones, greatly enhance the aqueous solubility of lipids and facilitate their transport between tissues and within tissue cells. Importantly, transport of lipids across biological membranes also is facilitated by specific (membrane-associated) lipid binding proteins. Together, these lipid binding proteins determine the bio-availability of their ligands, and thereby markedly influence the subsequent processing, utilization, or signaling effect of lipids. The bio-availability of specific lipid species thus is governed by the presence of specific lipid binding proteins, the affinity of these proteins for distinct lipid species, and the presence of competing ligands (including pharmaceutical compounds). Recent studies suggest that post-translational modifications of lipid binding proteins may have great impact on lipid-protein interactions. As a result, several levels of regulation exist that together determine the bio-availability of lipid species. This short review discusses the significance of lipid binding proteins and their potential application as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. BindUP: a web server for non-homology-based prediction of DNA and RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Inbal; Kligun, Efrat; Bengad, Barak; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2016-07-08

    Gene expression is a multi-step process involving many layers of regulation. The main regulators of the pathway are DNA and RNA binding proteins. While over the years, a large number of DNA and RNA binding proteins have been identified and extensively studied, it is still expected that many other proteins, some with yet another known function, are awaiting to be discovered. Here we present a new web server, BindUP, freely accessible through the website http://bindup.technion.ac.il/, for predicting DNA and RNA binding proteins using a non-homology-based approach. Our method is based on the electrostatic features of the protein surface and other general properties of the protein. BindUP predicts nucleic acid binding function given the proteins three-dimensional structure or a structural model. Additionally, BindUP provides information on the largest electrostatic surface patches, visualized on the server. The server was tested on several datasets of DNA and RNA binding proteins, including proteins which do not possess DNA or RNA binding domains and have no similarity to known nucleic acid binding proteins, achieving very high accuracy. BindUP is applicable in either single or batch modes and can be applied for testing hundreds of proteins simultaneously in a highly efficient manner.

  13. A new zinc binding fold underlines the versatility of zinc binding modules in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Belinda K; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kwan, Ann H Y; Newton, Anthea; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-05-01

    Many different zinc binding modules have been identified. Their abundance and variety suggests that the formation of zinc binding folds might be relatively common. We have determined the structure of CH1(1), a 27-residue peptide derived from the first cysteine/histidine-rich region (CH1) of CREB binding protein (CBP). This peptide forms a highly ordered zinc-dependent fold that is distinct from known folds. The structure differs from a subsequently determined structure of a larger region from the CH3 region of CBP, and the CH1(1) fold probably represents a nonphysiologically active form. Despite this, the fold is thermostable and tolerant to both multiple alanine mutations and changes in the zinc-ligand spacing. Our data support the idea that zinc binding domains may arise frequently. Additionally, such structures may prove useful as scaffolds for protein design, given their stability and robustness.

  14. New insights into the structure and mode of action of Mo-CBP3, an antifungal chitin-binding protein of Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelina B Batista

    Full Text Available Mo-CBP3 is a chitin-binding protein purified from Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds that displays inhibitory activity against phytopathogenic fungi. This study investigated the structural properties and the antifungal mode of action of this protein. To this end, circular dichroism spectroscopy, antifungal assays, measurements of the production of reactive oxygen species and microscopic analyses were utilized. Mo-CBP3 is composed of 30.3% α-helices, 16.3% β-sheets, 22.3% turns and 30.4% unordered forms. The Mo-CBP3 structure is highly stable and retains its antifungal activity regardless of temperature and pH. Fusarium solani was used as a model organism for studying the mechanisms by which this protein acts as an antifungal agent. Mo-CBP3 significantly inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth at 0.05 mg.mL-1. Mo-CBP3 has both fungistatic and fungicidal effects, depending on the concentration used. Binding of Mo-CBP3 to the fungal cell surface is achieved, at least in part, via electrostatic interactions, as salt was able to reduce its inhibitory effect. Mo-CBP3 induced the production of ROS and caused disorganization of both the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane in F. solani cells. Based on its high stability and specific toxicity, with broad-spectrum efficacy against important phytopathogenic fungi at low inhibitory concentrations but not to human cells, Mo-CBP3 has great potential for the development of new antifungal drugs or transgenic crops with enhanced resistance to phytopathogens.

  15. New insights into the structure and mode of action of Mo-CBP3, an antifungal chitin-binding protein of Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Adelina B; Oliveira, José T A; Gifoni, Juliana M; Pereira, Mirella L; Almeida, Marina G G; Gomes, Valdirene M; Da Cunha, Maura; Ribeiro, Suzanna F F; Dias, Germana B; Beltramini, Leila M; Lopes, José Luiz S; Grangeiro, Thalles B; Vasconcelos, Ilka M

    2014-01-01

    Mo-CBP3 is a chitin-binding protein purified from Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds that displays inhibitory activity against phytopathogenic fungi. This study investigated the structural properties and the antifungal mode of action of this protein. To this end, circular dichroism spectroscopy, antifungal assays, measurements of the production of reactive oxygen species and microscopic analyses were utilized. Mo-CBP3 is composed of 30.3% α-helices, 16.3% β-sheets, 22.3% turns and 30.4% unordered forms. The Mo-CBP3 structure is highly stable and retains its antifungal activity regardless of temperature and pH. Fusarium solani was used as a model organism for studying the mechanisms by which this protein acts as an antifungal agent. Mo-CBP3 significantly inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth at 0.05 mg.mL-1. Mo-CBP3 has both fungistatic and fungicidal effects, depending on the concentration used. Binding of Mo-CBP3 to the fungal cell surface is achieved, at least in part, via electrostatic interactions, as salt was able to reduce its inhibitory effect. Mo-CBP3 induced the production of ROS and caused disorganization of both the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane in F. solani cells. Based on its high stability and specific toxicity, with broad-spectrum efficacy against important phytopathogenic fungi at low inhibitory concentrations but not to human cells, Mo-CBP3 has great potential for the development of new antifungal drugs or transgenic crops with enhanced resistance to phytopathogens.

  16. The crystal structure of the non-liganded 14-3-3σ protein: insights into determinants of isoform specific ligand binding and dimerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne BENZINGER; Grzegorz M. POPOWICZ; Joma K. JOY; Sudipta MAJUMDAR; Tad A. HOLAK; Heiko HERMEKING

    2005-01-01

    Seven different, but highly conserved 14-3-3 proteins are involved in diverse signaling pathways in human cells. It is unclear how the 14-3-3σ isoform, a transcriptional target of p53, exerts its inhibitory effect on the cell cycle in the presence of other 14-3-3 isoforms, which are constitutively expressed at high levels. In order to identify structural differences between the 14-3-3 isoforms, we solved the crystal structure of the human 14-3-3σ protein at a resolution of 2.8 A and compared it to the known structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ. The global architecture of the 14-3-3σ fold is similar to the previously determined structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ: two 14-3-3σ molecules form a cup-shaped dimer. Significant differences between these 14-3-3 isoforms were detected adjacent to the amphipathic groove, which mediates the binding to phosphorylated consensus motifs in 14-3-3-1igands. Another specificity determining region is localized between amino-acids 203 to 215. These differences presumably select for the interaction with specific ligands,which may explain the different biological functions of the respective 14-3-3 isoforms. Furthermore, the two 14-3-3σ molecules forming a dimer differ by the spatial position of the ninth helix, which is shifted to the inside of the ligand interaction surface, thus indicating adaptability of this part of the molecule. In addition, 5 non-conserved residues are located at the interface between two 14-3-3σ proteins forming a dimer and represent candidate determinants of homoand hetero-dimerization specificity. The structural differences among the 14-3-3 isoforms described here presumably contribute to isoform-specific interactions and functions.

  17. A specific interdomain interaction preserves the structural and binding properties of the ModA protein from the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri domain interaction and transport in ModA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacruz-Perez, Carolina; Pegos, Vanessa Rodrigues; Honorato, Rodrigo V; Verli, Hugo; Lindahl, Erik; Barbosa, João Alexandre Ribeiro Gonçalves; Balan, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    The periplasmic-binding proteins in ATP-binding cassette systems (ABC Transporters) are responsible for the capture and delivery of ligands to their specific transporters, triggering a series of ATP-driven conformational changes that leads to the transport of the ligand. Structurally consisting of two lobes, the proteins change conformation after interaction with the ligand. The structure of the molybdate-binding protein (ModA) from Xanthomonas citri, bound to molybdate, was previously solved by our group and an interdomain interaction, mediated by a salt bridge between K127 and D59, apparently supports the binding properties and keeps the domains closed. To determinate the importance of this interaction, we built two ModA mutants, K127S and D59A, and analysed their functional and structural properties. Based on a set of spectroscopic experiments, crystallisation trials, structure determination and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we showed that the salt bridge is essential to maintain the structure and binding properties. Additionally, the MD simulations revealed that this mutant adopted a more compact structure that packed down the ligand-binding pocket. From the closed bound to open structure, the positioning of the helices forming the dipole and the salt bridge are essential to induce an intermediate state.

  18. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl......-CoA esters containing more than eight carbon atoms and that the 3'-phosphate of the ribose accounts for almost half of the binding energy. Binding of acyl-CoA esters, with increasing chain length, to ACBP was clearly enthalpically driven with a slightly unfavorable entropic contribution. Accessible surface...... areas derived from the measured enthalpies were compared to those calculated from sets of three-dimensional solution structures and showed reasonable correlation, confirming the enthalphically driven binding. Binding of dodecanoyl-CoA to ACBP was studied at various temperatures and was characterized...

  19. Lipid Binding Proteins from Parasitic Platyhelmithes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela eAlvite

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Two main families of lipid binding proteins have been identified in parasitic Platyhelminthes: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs. Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesise their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms.HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates.Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organisation, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localisation, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  20. Lipid binding proteins from parasitic platyhelminthes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvite, Gabriela; Esteves, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    TWO MAIN FAMILIES OF LIPID BINDING PROTEINS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED IN PARASITIC PLATYHELMINTHES: hydrophobic ligand binding proteins (HLBPs) and fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs). Members of the former family of proteins are specific to the Cestoda class, while FABPs are conserved across a wide range of animal species. Because Platyhelminthes are unable to synthesize their own lipids, these lipid-binding proteins are important molecules in these organisms. HLBPs are a high molecular mass complex of proteins and lipids. They are composed of subunits of low molecular mass proteins and a wide array of lipid molecules ranging from CoA esters to cholesterol. These proteins are excretory-secretory molecules and are key serological tools for diagnosis of diseases caused by cestodes. FABPs are mainly intracellular proteins of low molecular weight. They are also vaccine candidates. Despite that the knowledge of their function is scarce, the differences in their molecular organization, ligand preferences, intra/extracellular localization, evolution, and phylogenetic distribution, suggest that platyhelminths HLBPs and FABPs should play different functions. FABPs might be involved in the removal of fatty acids from the inner surface of the cell membrane and in their subsequent targeting to specific cellular destinations. In contrast, HLBPs might be involved in fatty acid uptake from the host environment.

  1. Structural analysis of ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034) binding to protein kinase A catalytic subunit and rational design of bisubstrate analogue inhibitors of basophilic protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavogina, Darja; Lust, Marje; Viil, Indrek; König, Norbert; Raidaru, Gerda; Rogozina, Jevgenia; Enkvist, Erki; Uri, Asko; Bossemeyer, Dirk

    2009-01-22

    The crystal structure of a complex of the catalytic subunit (type alpha) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA C alpha) with ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034), the presumed lead scaffold of previously reported adenosine-oligo-arginine conjugate-based (ARC-type) inhibitors, was solved. Structural elements important for interaction with the kinase were established with specifically modified derivatives of the lead compound. On the basis of this knowledge, a new generation of inhibitors, conjugates of adenosine-4'-dehydroxymethyl-4'-carboxylic acid moiety and oligo(D-arginine), was developed with inhibitory constants well into the subnanomolar range. The structural determinants of selectivity of the new compounds were established in assays with ROCK-II and PKBgamma.

  2. Being a binding site: characterizing residue composition of binding sites on proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iván, Gábor; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince

    2007-12-30

    The Protein Data Bank contains the description of more than 45,000 three-dimensional protein and nucleic-acid structures today. Started to exist as the computer-readable depository of crystallographic data complementing printed articles, the proper interpretation of the content of the individual files in the PDB still frequently needs the detailed information found in the citing publication. This fact implies that the fully automatic processing of the whole PDB is a very hard task. We first cleaned and re-structured the PDB data, then analyzed the residue composition of the binding sites in the whole PDB for frequency and for hidden association rules. Main results of the paper: (i) the cleaning and repairing algorithm (ii) redundancy elimination from the data (iii) application of association rule mining to the cleaned non-redundant data set. We have found numerous significant relations of the residue-composition of the ligand binding sites on protein surfaces, summarized in two figures. One of the classical data-mining methods for exploring implication-rules, the association-rule mining, is capable to find previously unknown residue-set preferences of bind ligands on protein surfaces. Since protein-ligand binding is a key step in enzymatic mechanisms and in drug discovery, these uncovered preferences in the study of more than 19,500 binding sites may help in identifying new binding protein-ligand pairs.

  3. Crystal structure of FhuD at 1.6 Å resolution: a ferrichrome-binding protein from the animal and human pathogen Staphylococcus pseudintermedius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abate, Francesca; Cozzi, Roberta; Maritan, Martina; Lo Surdo, Paola; Maione, Domenico; Malito, Enrico; Bottomley, Matthew James

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a leading cause of disease in dogs, and zoonosis causes human infections. Methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius strains are emerging, resembling the global health threat of S. aureus. Therefore, it is increasingly important to characterize potential targets for intervention against S. pseudintermedius. Here, FhuD, an S. pseudintermedius surface lipoprotein implicated in iron uptake, was characterized. It was found that FhuD bound ferrichrome in an iron-dependent manner, which increased the thermostability of FhuD by >15 °C. The crystal structure of ferrichrome-free FhuD was determined via molecular replacement at 1.6 Å resolution. FhuD exhibits the class III solute-binding protein (SBP) fold, with a ligand-binding cavity between the N- and C-terminal lobes, which is here occupied by a PEG molecule. The two lobes of FhuD were oriented in a closed conformation. These results provide the first detailed structural characterization of FhuD, a potential therapeutic target of S. pseudintermedius.

  4. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  5. Cooperative binding of copper(I) to the metal binding domains in Menkes disease protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P Y; Bonander, N; Møller, L B;

    1999-01-01

    We have optimised the overexpression and purification of the N-terminal end of the Menkes disease protein expressed in Escherichia coli, containing one, two and six metal binding domains (MBD), respectively. The domain(s) have been characterised using circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence...... spectroscopy, and their copper(I) binding properties have been determined. Structure prediction derived from far-UV CD indicates that the secondary structure is similar in the three proteins and dominated by beta-sheet. The tryptophan fluorescence maximum is blue-shifted in the constructs containing two...... and six MBDs relative to the monomer, suggesting more structurally buried tryptophan(s), compared to the single MBD construct. Copper(I) binding has been studied by equilibrium dialysis under anaerobic conditions. We show that the copper(I) binding to constructs containing two and six domains...

  6. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Chipinda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight chemical (LMW allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed.

  7. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  8. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Calla-Choque, Jaeson S; Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-11-26

    Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE) located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  9. Characterizing the morphology of protein binding patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malod-Dognin, Noël; Bansal, Achin; Cazals, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    Let the patch of a partner in a protein complex be the collection of atoms accounting for the interaction. To improve our understanding of the structure-function relationship, we present a patch model decoupling the topological and geometric properties. While the geometry is classically encoded by the atomic positions, the topology is recorded in a graph encoding the relative position of concentric shells partitioning the interface atoms. The topological-geometric duality provides the basis of a generic dynamic programming-based algorithm comparing patches at the shell level, which may favor topological or geometric features. On the biological side, we address four questions, using 249 cocrystallized heterodimers organized in biological families. First, we dissect the morphology of binding patches and show that Nature enjoyed the topological and geometric degrees of freedom independently while retaining a finite set of qualitatively distinct topological signatures. Second, we argue that our shell-based comparison is effective to perform atomic-level comparisons and show that topological similarity is a less stringent than geometric similarity. We also use the topological versus geometric duality to exhibit topo-rigid patches, whose topology (but not geometry) remains stable upon docking. Third, we use our comparison algorithms to infer specificity-related information amidst a database of complexes. Finally, we exhibit a descriptor outperforming its contenders to predict the binding affinities of the affinity benchmark. The softwares developed with this article are availablefrom http://team.inria.fr/abs/vorpatch_compatch/.

  10. Short arm region of laminin-5 gamma2 chain: structure, mechanism of processing and binding to heparin and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, T; Göhring, W; Mann, K;

    2001-01-01

    Laminin-5 is a typical component of several epithelial tissues and contains a unique gamma2 chain which can be proteolytically processed by BMP-1. This occurs in the N-terminal half of the gamma2 chain (606 residues), which consists of two rod-like tandem arrays of LE modules, LE1-3 and LE4...... in processed laminin-5 showed only a strong binding to fibulin-2. Immunological studies showed a similar partial processing in cell culture and tissues and the persistence of the released fragment in tissues. This indicated that both N-terminal regions of the gamma2 chain may have a function in vivo....

  11. HUMAN LIVER FATTY ACID BINDING PROTEIN (L-FABP) T94A VARIANT ALTERS STRUCTURE, STABILITY, AND INTERACTION WITH FIBRATES

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Although the human L-FABP T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring SNP in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using recombinant human WT T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Non-conse...

  12. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  13. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  14. Exploring Protein-Peptide Binding Specificity through Computational Peptide Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab Bhattacherjee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The binding of short disordered peptide stretches to globular protein domains is important for a wide range of cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein transport, and immune response. The often promiscuous nature of these interactions and the conformational flexibility of the peptide chain, sometimes even when bound, make the binding specificity of this type of protein interaction a challenge to understand. Here we develop and test a Monte Carlo-based procedure for calculating protein-peptide binding thermodynamics for many sequences in a single run. The method explores both peptide sequence and conformational space simultaneously by simulating a joint probability distribution which, in particular, makes searching through peptide sequence space computationally efficient. To test our method, we apply it to 3 different peptide-binding protein domains and test its ability to capture the experimentally determined specificity profiles. Insight into the molecular underpinnings of the observed specificities is obtained by analyzing the peptide conformational ensembles of a large number of binding-competent sequences. We also explore the possibility of using our method to discover new peptide-binding pockets on protein structures.

  15. Crystal Structures of Apo and Metal-Bound Forms of the UreE Protein from Helicobacter pylori: Role of Multiple Metal Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Rong; Munger, Christine; Asinas, Abdalin; Benoit, Stephane L.; Miller, Erica; Matte, Allan; Maier, Robert J.; Cygler, Miroslaw (McGill); (Georgia); (Biotech Res.)

    2010-10-22

    The crystal structure of the urease maturation protein UreE from Helicobacter pylori has been determined in its apo form at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, bound to Cu{sup 2+} at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, and bound to Ni{sup 2+} at 3.1 {angstrom} resolution. Apo UreE forms dimers, while the metal-bound enzymes are arranged as tetramers that consist of a dimer of dimers associated around the metal ion through coordination by His102 residues from each subunit of the tetramer. Comparison of independent subunits from different crystal forms indicates changes in the relative arrangement of the N- and C-terminal domains in response to metal binding. The improved ability of engineered versions of UreE containing hexahistidine sequences at either the N-terminal or C-terminal end to provide Ni{sup 2+} for the final metal sink (urease) is eliminated in the H102A version. Therefore, the ability of the improved Ni{sup 2+}-binding versions to deliver more nickel is likely an effect of an increased local concentration of metal ions that can rapidly replenish transferred ions bound to His102.

  16. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  17. Aspects of Protein, Chemistry, Part II: Oxygen-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    Compares differences in function and behavior of two oxygen-binding proteins, myoglobin found in muscle and hemoglobin found in blood. Describes the mechanism of oxygen-binding and allosteric effect in hemoglobin; also describes the effect of pH on the affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen. (CS)

  18. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor II; recognition sites for receptors and binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Terasawa, H; Kohda, D.; Hatanaka, H; Nagata, K.; Higashihashi, N; Fujiwara, H.; Sakano, K; Inagaki, F.

    1994-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human insulin-like growth factor II was determined at high resolution in aqueous solution by NMR and simulated annealing based calculations. The structure is quite similar to those of insulin and insulin-like growth factor I, which consists of an alpha-helix followed by a turn and a strand in the B-region and two antiparallel alpha-helices in the A-region. However, the regions of Ala1-Glu6, Pro31-Arg40 and Thr62-Glu67 are not well-defined for lack of distanc...

  19. Modification of potato starch granule structure and morphology in planta by expression of starch binding domain fusion proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.

    2010-01-01

    Producing starches with altered composition, structure and novel physico-chemical properties in planta by manipulating the enzymes which are involved in starch metabolism or (over)expressing heterologous enzymes has huge advantages such as broadening the range of starch applications and reducing the

  20. RECOGNITION OF STRUCTURE SIMILARITIES IN PROTEINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Protein fold structure is more conserved than its amino acid sequence and closely associated with biological function,so calculating the similarity of protein structures is a fundamental problem in structural biology and plays a key role in protein fold classification,fold function inference,and protein structure prediction.Large progress has been made in recent years in this field and many methods for considering structural similarity have been proposed,including methods for protein structure compar-ison,retrieval of protein structures from databases,and ligand binding site comparison.Most of those methods can be available on the World Wide Web,but evaluation of all the methods is still a hard problem.This paper summarizes some popular methods and latest methods for structure similarities,including structure alignment,protein structure retrieval,and ligand binding site alignment.

  1. ABP: a novel AMPA receptor binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S; Ziff, E B

    1999-04-30

    We review the cloning of a novel AMPA receptor binding protein (ABP) that interacts with GluR2/3 and is homologous to GRIP. ABP is enriched in the PSD with GluR2 and is localized to the PSD by EM. ABP binds GluR2 via the C-terminal VXI motif through a Class I PDZ interaction. ABP and GRIP can also homo- and heteromultimerize. Thus, ABP and GRIP may be involved in AMPA receptor regulation and localization, by linking it to other cytoskeletal or signaling molecules. We suggest that the ABP/GRIP and PSD-95 families form distinct scaffolds that anchor, respectively, AMPA and NMDA receptors. We are currently investigating proteins that bind ABP and that may regulate the AMPA receptor.

  2. Structural dynamics and ssDNA binding activity of the three N-terminal domains of the large subunit of Replication Protein A from small angle X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretto, Dalyir I.; Tsutakawa, Susan; Brosey, Chris A.; Castillo, Amalchi; Chagot, Marie-Eve; Smith, Jarrod A.; Tainer, John A.; Chazin, Walter J.

    2010-03-11

    Replication Protein A (RPA) is the primary eukaryotic ssDNA binding protein utilized in diverse DNA transactions in the cell. RPA is a heterotrimeric protein with seven globular domains connected by flexible linkers, which enable substantial inter-domain motion that is essential to its function. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments on two multi-domain constructs from the N-terminus of the large subunit (RPA70) were used to examine the structural dynamics of these domains and their response to the binding of ssDNA. The SAXS data combined with molecular dynamics simulations reveal substantial interdomain flexibility for both RPA70AB (the tandem high affinity ssDNA binding domains A and B connected by a 10-residue linker) and RPA70NAB (RPA70AB extended by a 70-residue linker to the RPA70N protein interaction domain). Binding of ssDNA to RPA70NAB reduces the interdomain flexibility between the A and B domains, but has no effect on RPA70N. These studies provide the first direct measurements of changes in orientation of these three RPA domains upon binding ssDNA. The results support a model in which RPA70N remains structurally independent of RPA70AB in the DNA bound state and therefore freely available to serve as a protein recruitment module.

  3. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  4. Thermodynamic analysis of DNA binding by a Bacillus single stranded DNA binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas-Fiss Esther E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSB are essential for DNA replication, repair, and recombination in all organisms. SSB works in concert with a variety of DNA metabolizing enzymes such as DNA polymerase. Results We have cloned and purified SSB from Bacillus anthracis (SSBBA. In the absence of DNA, at concentrations ≤100 μg/ml, SSBBA did not form a stable tetramer and appeared to resemble bacteriophage T4 gene 32 protein. Fluorescence anisotropy studies demonstrated that SSBBA bound ssDNA with high affinity comparable to other prokaryotic SSBs. Thermodynamic analysis indicated both hydrophobic and ionic contributions to ssDNA binding. FRET analysis of oligo(dT70 binding suggested that SSBBA forms a tetrameric assembly upon ssDNA binding. This report provides evidence of a bacterial SSB that utilizes a novel mechanism for DNA binding through the formation of a transient tetrameric structure. Conclusions Unlike other prokaryotic SSB proteins, SSBBA from Bacillus anthracis appeared to be monomeric at concentrations ≤100 μg/ml as determined by SE-HPLC. SSBBA retained its ability to bind ssDNA with very high affinity, comparable to SSB proteins which are tetrameric. In the presence of a long ssDNA template, SSBBA appears to form a transient tetrameric structure. Its unique structure appears to be due to the cumulative effect of multiple key amino acid changes in its sequence during evolution, leading to perturbation of stable dimer and tetramer formation. The structural features of SSBBA could promote facile assembly and disassembly of the protein-DNA complex required in processes such as DNA replication.

  5. The biotin repressor: thermodynamic coupling of corepressor binding, protein assembly, and sequence-specific DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streaker, Emily D; Gupta, Aditi; Beckett, Dorothy

    2002-12-03

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor, an allosteric transcriptional regulator, is activated for binding to the biotin operator by the small molecule biotinyl-5'-AMP. Results of combined thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural studies of the protein have revealed that corepressor binding results in disorder to order transitions in the protein monomer that facilitate tighter dimerization. The enhanced stability of the dimer leads to stabilization of the resulting biotin repressor-biotin operator complex. It is not clear, however, that the allosteric response in the system is transmitted solely through the protein-protein interface. In this work, the allosteric mechanism has been quantitatively probed by measuring the biotin operator binding and dimerization properties of three biotin repressor species: the apo or unliganded form, the biotin-bound form, and the holo or bio-5'-AMP-bound form. Comparisons of the pairwise differences in the bioO binding and dimerization energetics for the apo and holo species reveal that the enhanced DNA binding energetics resulting from adenylate binding track closely with the enhanced assembly energetics. However, when the results for repressor pairs that include the biotin-bound species are compared, no such equivalence is observed.

  6. 1.55 Å Structure of the Ectoine Binding Protein TeaA of the Osmoregulated TRAP-Transporter TeaABC from Halomonas elongata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhlmann, Sonja I.; Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Anke C.; Bienert, Ralf; Kunte, Hans-Jörg; Ziegler, Christine

    2008-01-01

    TeaABC from the moderate halophilic bacterium Halomonas elongata belongs to the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic transporters (TRAP-T), a family of secondary transporters functioning in conjunction with periplasmic substrate binding proteins. TeaABC facilitates the uptake of the compatible sol

  7. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  8. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B; Bench, G; Keating III, G; Palmblad, M; Vogel, J; Grant, P G; Hillegonds, D

    2004-02-17

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS.

  9. Elucidation of haem-binding sites in the actinobacterial protein HbpS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torda, Andrew E; Groves, Matthew R; Wedderhoff, Ina; Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular haem-binding protein from Streptomyces reticuli (HbpS) has been shown to be involved in redox sensing and to bind haem. However, the residues involved in haem coordination are unknown. Structural alignments to distantly related haem-binding proteins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

  10. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  11. Fluorescence properties of porcine odorant binding protein Trp 16 residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albani, Jihad Rene, E-mail: Jihad-Rene.Albani@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Biophysique Moleculaire, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    Summary: The present work deals with fluorescence studies of adult porcine odorant binding protein at pH=7.5. At this pH, the protein is a dimer, each monomer contains one tryptophan residue. Our results show that tryptophan residue displays significant motions and emits with three fluorescence lifetimes. Decay associated spectra showed that the three lifetime's components emanate from sub-structures surrounded by the same microenvironment.

  12. Characterization of flavonoid-protein interactions using fluorescence spectroscopy: Binding of pelargonidin to dairy proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Maya, Izlia J; Campos-Terán, José; Hernández-Arana, Andrés; McClements, David Julian

    2016-12-15

    In this study, the interaction between the flavonoid pelargonidin and dairy proteins: β-lactoglobulin (β-LG), whey protein (WPI), and caseinate (CAS) was investigated. Fluorescence experiments demonstrated that pelargonidin quenched milk proteins fluorescence strongly. However, the protein secondary structure was not significantly affected by pelargonidin, as judged from far-UV circular dichroism. Analysis of fluorescence data indicated that pelargonidin-induced quenching does not arise from a dynamical mechanism, but instead is due to protein-ligand binding. Therefore, quenching data were analyzed using the model of independent binding sites. Both β-LG and CAS, but not WPI, showed hyperbolic binding isotherms indicating that these proteins firmly bound pelargonidin at both pH 7.0 and 3.0 (binding constants ca. 1.0×10(5) at 25.0°C). To investigate the underlying thermodynamics, binding constants were determined at 25.0, 35.0, and 45.0°C. These results pointed to binding processes that depend on the structural conformation of the milk proteins.

  13. Crystal Structures of Covalent Complexes of [beta]-Lactam Antibiotics with Escherichia coli Penicillin-Binding Protein 5: Toward an Understanding of Antibiotic Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicola, George; Tomberg, Joshua; Pratt, R.F.; Nicholas, Robert A.; Davies, Christopher (SC); (UNC); (Wesleyan)

    2010-12-07

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are the molecular targets for the widely used {beta}-lactam class of antibiotics, but how these compounds act at the molecular level is not fully understood. We have determined crystal structures of Escherichia coli PBP 5 as covalent complexes with imipenem, cloxacillin, and cefoxitin. These antibiotics exhibit very different second-order rates of acylation for the enzyme. In all three structures, there is excellent electron density for the central portion of the {beta}-lactam, but weak or absent density for the R1 or R2 side chains. Areas of contact between the antibiotics and PBP 5 do not correlate with the rates of acylation. The same is true for conformational changes, because although a shift of a loop leading to an electrostatic interaction between Arg248 and the {beta}-lactam carboxylate, which occurs completely with cefoxitin and partially with imipenem and is absent with cloxacillin, is consistent with the different rates of acylation, mutagenesis of Arg248 decreased the level of cefoxitin acylation only 2-fold. Together, these data suggest that structures of postcovalent complexes of PBP 5 are unlikely to be useful vehicles for the design of new covalent inhibitors of PBPs. Finally, superimposition of the imipenem-acylated complex with PBP 5 in complex with a boronic acid peptidomimetic shows that the position corresponding to the hydrolytic water molecule is occluded by the ring nitrogen of the {beta}-lactam. Because the ring nitrogen occupies a similar position in all three complexes, this supports the hypothesis that deacylation is blocked by the continued presence of the leaving group after opening of the {beta}-lactam ring.

  14. Polysaccharide structural features that are critical for the binding of sulfated fucans to bindin, the adhesive protein from sea urchin sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1987-10-15

    We have investigated the structural features of sulfated fucose-containing polysaccharides which are responsible for their selective binding to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus bindin. The data presented demonstrate that the sulfate esters and a molecular weight in excess of approximately 15,000 are required for high affinity binding of the fucans to bindin. Desulfation destroys the binding activity of the fucans, which can be fully restored by chemical resulfation. Fucan fragments of an average molecular weight of 15,000 were nearly as active as the starting material (Mr 10(6)). The observed IC50 value for fragments of Mr congruent to 10,000 and Mr congruent to 5,000 were 1 and 2 orders of magnitude higher, respectively. The binding of fucoidan to bindin is stable in high salt (50% at 1.2 M NaCl) whereas the binding of fucoidan to DEAE-cellulose or polylysine is inhibited by the concentrations of salt normally found in sea water (50% at 0.2 and 0.5 M NaCl, respectively). This result suggests that the binding mechanism is not a simple ionic interaction and that hydrogen bonding and cooperativity may also be important determinants of the binding mechanism. We also found that polyvinyl sulfate binds to bindin with high affinity and inhibits the bindin-mediated agglutination of sea urchin eggs. The results of these investigations suggest that the spatial orientation of the sulfate esters plays a critical role in determining the selectivity of sulfated polysaccharide binding and that the polysaccharide backbone does not play a direct role in the binding mechanism.

  15. Mosaic-like structure of penicillin-binding protein 2 Gene (penA) in clinical isolates of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with reduced susceptibility to cefixime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameyama, Satoshi; Onodera, Shoichi; Takahata, Masahiro; Minami, Shinzaburo; Maki, Nobuko; Endo, Katsuhisa; Goto, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Hiroo; Oishi, Yukihiko

    2002-12-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains with reduced susceptibility to cefixime (MICs, 0.25 to 0.5 micro g/ml) were isolated from male urethritis patients in Tokyo, Japan, in 2000 and 2001. The resistance to cephems including cefixime and penicillin was transferred to a susceptible recipient, N. gonorrhoeae ATCC 19424, by transformation of the penicillin-binding protein 2 gene (penA) that had been amplified by PCR from a strain with reduced susceptibility to cefixime (MIC, 0.5 micro g/ml). The sequences of penA in the strains with reduced susceptibilities to cefixime were different from those of other susceptible isolates and did not correspond to the reported N. gonorrhoeae penA gene sequences. Some regions in the transpeptidase-encoding domain in this penA gene were similar to those in the penA genes of Neisseria perflava (N. sicca), Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria flavescens, and Neisseria meningitidis. These results showed that a mosaic-like structure in the penA gene conferred reductions in the levels of susceptibility of N. gonorrhoeae to cephems and penicillin in a manner similar to that found for N. meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  16. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  17. Identification of novel cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Adriana V; De Gaudenzi, Javier G; Mild, Jesica G; Mc Cormack, Bárbara; Pantano, Sergio; Altschuler, Daniel L; Edreira, Martin M

    2014-12-01

    Cyclic AMP has been implicated as second messenger in a wide range of cellular processes. In the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, cAMP is involved in the development of the parasite's life cycle. While cAMP effectors have been widely studied in other eukaryotic cells, little is known about cAMP's mechanism of action in T. cruzi. To date, only a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) has been cloned and characterised in this parasite; however experimental evidence indicates the existence of cAMP-dependent, PKA-independent events. In order to identify new cAMP binding proteins as potential cAMP effectors, we carried out in silico studies using the predicted T. cruzi proteome. Using a combination of search methods 27 proteins with putative cNMP binding domains (CBDs) were identified. Phylogenetic analysis of the CBDs presented a homogeneous distribution, with sequences segregated into two main branches: one containing kinases-like proteins and the other gathering hypothetical proteins with different function or no other known. Comparative modelling of the strongest candidates provides support for the hypothesis that these proteins may give rise to structurally viable cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Pull-down and nucleotide displacement assays strongly suggest that TcCLB.508523.80 could bind cAMP and eventually be a new putative PKA-independent cAMP effector in T. cruzi.

  18. The Relationship between Albumin-Binding Capacity of Recombinant Polypeptide and Changes in the Structure of Albumin-Binding Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormotova, E A; Gupalova, T V

    2015-07-01

    Many bacteria express surface proteins interacting with human serum albumin (HSA). One of these proteins, PAB from anaerobic bacteria, contains an albumin-binding domain consisting of 45 amino acid residues known as GA domain. GA domains are also found in G proteins isolated from human streptococcal strains (groups C and G) and of albumin-binding protein isolated from group G streptococcal strains of animal origin. The GA domain is a left-handed three-helix bundle structure in which amino acid residues of the second and third helixes are involved in albumin binding. We studied the relationship between HSA-binding activity of the recombinant polypeptide isolated from group G streptococcus of animal origin and structure of the GA domain is studied. Structural changes in GA domain significantly attenuated HAS-binding capacity of the recombinant polypeptide. Hence, affinity HSA-binding polypeptide depends on stability of GA domain structure.

  19. Using the telobox to search for plant telomere binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peška, Vratislav; Schrumpfová, Petra Procházková; Fajkus, Jiŕí

    2011-03-01

    Telobox is a Myb-related DNA-binding domain which is present in a number of yeast, plant and animal proteins. Its capacity to bind preferentially double-stranded telomeric DNA has been used in numerous studies to search for candidate telomeric proteins in various organisms, including plants. Here we provide an overview of these studies with a special emphasis on plants, where a specific subfamily of the proteins possessing the N-terminally positioned telobox is present in addition to more common C-terminal telobox proteins. We further demonstrate the presence of a telobox protein (CpTBP1) in Cestrum parqui, a plant lacking typical telomeres and telomerase. The protein shows nuclear localisation and association with chromatin. The role of this protein in ancestral and current telomere structure is discussed in the evolutionary context. Altogether, the present overview shows the importance of the telobox domain in a search for candidate telomere proteins but at the same time warns against oversimplified identification of any telobox protein with telomere structure without appropriate evidence of its telomeric localisation and function.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  1. Polynucleotides encoding TRF1 binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith; Kim, Sahn-Ho

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a novel telomere associated protein (Trf1-interacting nuclear protein 2 "Tin2") that hinders the binding of Trf1 to its specific telomere repeat sequence and mediates the formation of a Tin2-Trf1-telomeric DNA complex that limits telomerase access to the telomere. Also included are the corresponding nucleic acids that encode the Tin2 of the present invention, as well as mutants of Tin2. Methods of making, purifying and using Tin2 of the present invention are described. In addition, drug screening assays to identify drugs that mimic and/or complement the effect of Tin2 are presented.

  2. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6) and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF) located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND) that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP). We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  3. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ting-Ying; Lin, Chih-Kang; Lin, Chih-Wei; Weng, Yi-Zhong; Chen, Chien-Yu; Chang, Darby Tien-Hao

    2012-07-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes can be summarized as a PWM. This technique provides an effective alternative when the chromatin immunoprecipitation data are unavailable for PWM inference. To facilitate the procedure of predicting PWMs based on protein-DNA complexes or even structures of the unbound state, the web server, DBD2BS, is presented in this study. The DBD2BS uses an atom-level knowledge-based potential function to predict PWMs characterizing the sequences to which the query DBD structure can bind. For unbound queries, a list of 1066 DBD-DNA complexes (including 1813 protein chains) is compiled for use as templates for synthesizing bound structures. The DBD2BS provides users with an easy-to-use interface for visualizing the PWMs predicted based on different templates and the spatial relationships of the query protein, the DBDs and the DNAs. The DBD2BS is the first attempt to predict PWMs of DBDs from unbound structures rather than from bound ones. This approach increases the number of existing protein structures that can be exploited when analyzing protein-DNA interactions. In a recent study, the authors showed that the kernel adopted by the DBD2BS can generate PWMs consistent with those obtained from the experimental data. The use of DBD2BS to predict PWMs can be incorporated with sequence-based methods to discover binding sites in genome-wide studies. Available at: http://dbd2bs.csie.ntu.edu.tw/, http://dbd2bs.csbb.ntu.edu.tw/, and http://dbd2bs.ee.ncku.edu.tw.

  4. Essential dynamics of the cellular retinol-binding protein - Evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalten, D.M.F.; Findlay, J.B.C.; Amadei, A; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) is an intracellular retinol carrier protein belonging to a family of hydrophobic ligand-binding proteins, It transports retinol to specific locations in the cell where, for instance, it is esterified for storage, Recently solved crystallographic structures

  5. Periplasmic Binding Proteins in Thermophiles: Characterization and Potential Application of an Arginine-Binding Protein from Thermotoga maritima: A Brief Thermo-Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabato D'Auria

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima is a 27.7 kDa protein possessing the typical two-domain structure of the periplasmic binding proteins family. The protein is characterized by a very high specificity and affinity to bind to arginine, also at high temperatures. Due to its features, this protein could be taken into account as a potential candidate for the design of a biosensor for arginine. It is important to investigate the stability of proteins when they are used for biotechnological applications. In this article, we review the structural and functional features of an arginine-binding protein from the extremophile Thermotoga maritima with a particular eye on its potential biotechnological applications.

  6. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  7. Flexibility of PCNA-protein interface accommodates differential binding partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M Pedley

    Full Text Available The expanding roles of PCNA in functional assembly of DNA replication and repair complexes motivated investigation of the structural and dynamic properties guiding specificity of PCNA-protein interactions. A series of biochemical and computational analyses were combined to evaluate the PIP Box recognition features impacting complex formation. The results indicate subtle differences in topological and molecular descriptors distinguishing both affinity and stoichiometry of binding among PCNA-peptide complexes through cooperative effects. These features were validated using peptide mimics of p85α and Akt, two previously unreported PCNA binding partners. This study characterizes for the first time a reverse PIP Box interaction with PCNA. Small molecule ligand binding at the PIP Box interaction site confirmed the adaptive nature of the protein in dictating overall shape and implicates allosterism in transmitting biological effects.

  8. Discovering structural motifs using a structural alphabet: Application to magnesium-binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Carmay

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many metalloproteins, sequence motifs characteristic of metal-binding sites have not been found or are so short that they would not be expected to be metal-specific. Striking examples of such metalloproteins are those containing Mg2+, one of the most versatile metal cofactors in cellular biochemistry. Even when Mg2+-proteins share insufficient sequence homology to identify Mg2+-specific sequence motifs, they may still share similarity in the Mg2+-binding site structure. However, no structural motifs characteristic of Mg2+-binding sites have been reported. Thus, our aims are (i to develop a general method for discovering structural patterns/motifs characteristic of ligand-binding sites, given the 3D protein structures, and (ii to apply it to Mg2+-proteins sharing 2+-structural motifs are identified as recurring structural patterns. Results The structural alphabet-based motif discovery method has revealed the structural preference of Mg2+-binding sites for certain local/secondary structures: compared to all residues in the Mg2+-proteins, both first and second-shell Mg2+-ligands prefer loops to helices. Even when the Mg2+-proteins share no significant sequence homology, some of them share a similar Mg2+-binding site structure: 4 Mg2+-structural motifs, comprising 21% of the binding sites, were found. In particular, one of the Mg2+-structural motifs found maps to a specific functional group, namely, hydrolases. Furthermore, 2 of the motifs were not found in non metalloproteins or in Ca2+-binding proteins. The structural motifs discovered thus capture some essential biochemical and/or evolutionary properties, and hence may be useful for discovering proteins where Mg2+ plays an important biological role. Conclusion The structural motif discovery method presented herein is general and can be applied to any set of proteins with known 3D structures. This new method is timely considering the increasing number of structures for

  9. Computational characterization of TTHA0379: A potential glycerophosphocholine binding protein of Ugp ATP-binding cassette transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandravanshi, Monika; Gogoi, Prerana; Kanaujia, Shankar Prasad

    2016-11-05

    For the de novo biosynthesis of phospholipids, byproducts such as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P) and glycerophosphocholine (GPC) of glycerophospholipid metabolic pathway are imported inside the cell by an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter known as UgpABCE. Of which, UgpA and UgpE constitutes the transmembrane domains (TMDs), UgpC forms the dimer of ATP-hydrolyzing component and UgpB is the periplasmic substrate binding protein. Structurally, UgpABCE transporter displays similarity to the maltose ABC transporter of Escherichia coli; thus, has been grouped into the CUT1 (Carbohydrate Uptake Transporter-1) family of bacterial ABC transporters. Being a member of CUT1 family, several Ugp (Uptake glycerol phosphate) protein sequences in biological database(s) exhibit sequence and structure similarity to sugar ABC transporters and have been annotated as sugar binding proteins; one of such proteins is TTHA0379 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Here, in this study, we used computational method(s) to distinguish UgpB and sugar binding proteins based on their primary and tertiary structure features. A comprehensive analysis of these proteins indicates that they are evolutionarily related to each other having common conserved features at their primary and tertiary structure levels. However, they display differences at their active sites owing to the dissimilarity in their ligand preferences. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of TTHA0379 along with UgpB and sugar binding proteins reveals that both the groups of proteins forms two distinct clades and TTHA0379 groups with UgpB proteins. Furthermore, analysis of the ligand binding pocket shows that all the essential features of glycerophosphocholine binding protein i.e. UgpB, are conserved in TTHA0379 as well. Combining these features, here, we designate TTHA0379 to be a GPC binding protein.

  10. Protein universe containing a PUA RNA-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrudo, Carolina S; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review current knowledge about pseudouridine synthase and archaeosine transglycosylase (PUA)-domain-containing proteins to illustrate progress in this field. A methodological analysis of the literature about the topic was carried out, together with a 'qualitative comparative analysis' to give a more comprehensive review. Bioinformatics methods for whole-protein or protein-domain identification are commonly based on pairwise protein sequence comparisons; we added comparison of structures to detect the whole universe of proteins containing the PUA domain. We present an update of proteins having this domain, focusing on the specific proteins present in Homo sapiens (dyskerin, MCT1, Nip7, eIF2D and Nsun6), and explore the existence of these in other species. We also analyze the phylogenetic distribution of the PUA domain in different species and proteins. Finally, we performed a structural comparison of the PUA domain through data mining of structural databases, determining a conserved structural motif, despite the differences in the sequence, even among eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria. All data discussed in this review, both bibliographic and analytical, corroborate the functional importance of the PUA domain in RNA-binding proteins.

  11. Mass Spectrometry-based Footprinting Reveals Structural Dynamics of Loop E of the Chlorophyll-binding Protein CP43 during Photosystem II Assembly in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haijun; Chen, Jiawei; Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Weisz, Daniel; Gross, Michael L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2013-01-01

    The PSII repair cycle is required for sustainable photosynthesis in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. In cyanobacteria and higher plants, proteolysis of the precursor D1 protein (pD1) to expose a C-terminal carboxylate group is an essential step leading to coordination of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, the site of water oxidation. Psb27 appears to associate with both pD1- and D1-containing PSII assembly intermediates by closely interacting with CP43. Here, we report that reduced binding affinity between CP43 and Psb27 is triggered by the removal of the C-terminal extension of the pD1 protein. A mass spectrometry-based footprinting strategy was adopted to probe solvent-exposed aspartic and glutamic acid residues on the CP43 protein. By comparing the extent of footprinting between HT3ΔctpAΔ27PSII and HT3ΔctpAPSII, two genetically modified PSII assembly complexes, we found that Psb27 binds to CP43 on the side of Loop E distal to the pseudo-symmetrical D1-D2 axis. By comparing a second pair of PSII assembly complexes, we discovered that Loop E of CP43 undergoes a significant conformational rearrangement due to the removal of the pD1 C-terminal extension, altering the Psb27-CP43 binding interface. The significance of this conformational rearrangement is discussed in the context of recruitment of the PSII lumenal extrinsic proteins and Mn4CaO5 cluster assembly. In addition to CP43's previously known function as one of the core PSII antenna proteins, this work demonstrates that Loop E of CP43 plays an important role in the functional assembly of the Water Oxidizing Center (WOC) during PSII biogenesis. PMID:23546881

  12. Free enthalpies of replacing water molecules in protein binding pockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riniker, Sereina; Barandun, Luzi J.; Diederich, François; Krämer, Oliver; Steffen, Andreas; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2012-12-01

    Water molecules in the binding pocket of a protein and their role in ligand binding have increasingly raised interest in recent years. Displacement of such water molecules by ligand atoms can be either favourable or unfavourable for ligand binding depending on the change in free enthalpy. In this study, we investigate the displacement of water molecules by an apolar probe in the binding pocket of two proteins, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and tRNA-guanine transglycosylase, using the method of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) to obtain free enthalpy differences. In both cases, a ligand core is placed inside the respective pocket and the remaining water molecules are converted to apolar probes, both individually and in pairs. The free enthalpy difference between a water molecule and a CH3 group at the same location in the pocket in comparison to their presence in bulk solution calculated from EDS molecular dynamics simulations corresponds to the binding free enthalpy of CH3 at this location. From the free enthalpy difference and the enthalpy difference, the entropic contribution of the displacement can be obtained too. The overlay of the resulting occupancy volumes of the water molecules with crystal structures of analogous ligands shows qualitative correlation between experimentally measured inhibition constants and the calculated free enthalpy differences. Thus, such an EDS analysis of the water molecules in the binding pocket may give valuable insight for potency optimization in drug design.

  13. Two odorant-binding proteins mediate the behavioural response of aphids to the alarm pheromone (E-ß-farnesene and structural analogues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Feng Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Aphids are agricultural pests of great economical interest. Alternatives to insecticides, using semiochemicals, are of difficult applications. In fact, sex pheromones are of little use as aphids reproduce partenogenetically most of the time. Besides, the alarm pheromone, (E-ß-farnesene for a great number of species, is difficult to synthesize and unstable in the environment. The search for novel semiochemicals to be used in population control can be efficiently approached through the study of the olfactory system at the biochemical level. Recently odorant-binding proteins (OBPs have been shown to play a central role in olfactory recognition, thus becoming the target of choice for designing new semiochemicals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address the question of how the alarm message is recognised at the level of OBPs, we have tested 29 compounds, including (E-ß-farnesene, in binding assays with 6 recombinant proteins and in behaviour experiments. We have found that good repellents bind OBP3 and/or OBP7, while non repellents present different spectra of binding. These results have been verified with two species of aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, both using (E-ß-farnesene as the alarm pheromone. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent further support to the idea (so far convincingly demonstrated only in Drosophila that OBPs are involved in decoding the chemical information of odorants and pheromones, and for the first time provide such evidence in other insect species and using wild-type insects. Moreover, the data offer guidelines and protocols for the discovery of potential alarm pheromones, using ligand-binding assays as a preliminary screening before subjecting selected compounds to behaviour tests.

  14. Two Odorant-Binding Proteins Mediate the Behavioural Response of Aphids to the Alarm Pheromone (E)-ß-farnesene and Structural Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hui Li; Iovinella, Immacolata; Yang, Shao Xiang; Ling, Yun; Riviello, Lea; Battaglia, Donatella; Falabella, Patrizia; Yang, Xin Ling; Pelosi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Background Aphids are agricultural pests of great economical interest. Alternatives to insecticides, using semiochemicals, are of difficult applications. In fact, sex pheromones are of little use as aphids reproduce partenogenetically most of the time. Besides, the alarm pheromone, (E)-ß-farnesene for a great number of species, is difficult to synthesize and unstable in the environment. The search for novel semiochemicals to be used in population control can be efficiently approached through the study of the olfactory system at the biochemical level. Recently odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) have been shown to play a central role in olfactory recognition, thus becoming the target of choice for designing new semiochemicals. Methodology/Principal Findings To address the question of how the alarm message is recognised at the level of OBPs, we have tested 29 compounds, including (E)-ß-farnesene, in binding assays with 6 recombinant proteins and in behaviour experiments. We have found that good repellents bind OBP3 and/or OBP7, while non repellents present different spectra of binding. These results have been verified with two species of aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, both using (E)-ß-farnesene as the alarm pheromone. Conclusions Our results represent further support to the idea (so far convincingly demonstrated only in Drosophila) that OBPs are involved in decoding the chemical information of odorants and pheromones, and for the first time provide such evidence in other insect species and using wild-type insects. Moreover, the data offer guidelines and protocols for the discovery of potential alarm pheromones, using ligand-binding assays as a preliminary screening before subjecting selected compounds to behaviour tests. PMID:22427877

  15. Structure and stability of recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein: III. Peculiarities of the wild type bOBP unfolding in crowded milieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Stepanenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to the majority of the members of the lipocalin family, which are stable monomers with the specific OBP fold (a β-barrel consisting of a 8-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet followed by a short α-helical segment, a ninth β-strand, and a disordered C-terminal tail and a conserved disulfide bond, bovine odorant-binding protein (bOBP does not have such a disulfide bond and forms a domain-swapped dimer that involves crossing the α-helical region from each monomer over the β-barrel of the other monomer. Furthermore, although natural bOBP isolated from bovine tissues exists as a stable domain-swapped dimer, recombinant bOBP has decreased dimerization potential and therefore exists as a mixture of monomeric and dimeric variants. In this article, we investigated the effect model crowding agents of similar chemical nature but different molecular mass on conformational stability of the recombinant bOBP. These experiments were conducted in order to shed light on the potential influence of model crowded environment on the unfolding-refolding equilibrium. To this end, we looked at the influence of PEG-600, PEG-4000, and PEG-12000 in concentrations of 80, 150, and 300 mg/mL on the equilibrium unfolding and refolding transitions induced in the recombinant bOBP by guanidine hydrochloride. We are showing here that the effect of crowding agents on the structure and conformational stability of the recombinant bOBP depends on the size of the crowder, with the smaller crowding agents being more effective in the stabilization of the bOBP native dimeric state against the guanidine hydrochloride denaturing action. This effect of the crowding agents is concentration dependent, with the high concentrations of the agents being more effective.

  16. Metal binding is critical for the folding and function of laminin binding protein, Lmb of Streptococcus agalactiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Ragunathan

    Full Text Available Lmb is a 34 kDa laminin binding surface adhesin of Streptococcus agalactiae. The structure of Lmb reported by us recently has shown that it consists of a metal binding crevice, in which a zinc ion is coordinated to three highly conserved histidines. To elucidate the structural and functional significance of the metal ion in Lmb, these histidines have been mutated to alanine and single, double and triple mutants were generated. These mutations resulted in insolubility of the protein and revealed altered secondary and tertiary structures, as evidenced by circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy studies. The mutations also significantly decreased the binding affinity of Lmb to laminin, implicating the role played by the metal binding residues in maintaining the correct conformation of the protein for its binding to laminin. A highly disordered loop, proposed to be crucial for metal acquisition in homologous structures, was deleted in Lmb by mutation (ΔLmb and its crystal structure was solved at 2.6 Å. The ΔLmb structure was identical to the native Lmb structure with a bound zinc ion and exhibited laminin binding activity similar to wild type protein, suggesting that the loop might not have an important role in metal acquisition or adhesion in Lmb. Targeted mutations of histidine residues confirmed the importance of the zinc binding crevice for the structure and function of the Lmb adhesin.

  17. Protein-protein binding before and after photo-modification of albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Glickman, Randolph D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2016-03-01

    Bioeffects of directed-optical-energy encompass a wide range of applications. One aspect of photochemical interactions involves irradiating a photosensitizer with visible light in order to induce protein unfolding and consequent changes in function. In the past, irradiation of several dye-protein combinations has revealed effects on protein structure. Beta lactoglobulin, human serum albumin (HSA) and tubulin have all been photo-modified with meso-tetrakis(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) bound, but only in the case of tubulin has binding caused a verified loss of biological function (loss of ability to form microtubules) as a result of this light-induced structural change. The current work questions if the photo-induced structural changes that occur to HSA, are sufficient to disable its biological function of binding to osteonectin. The albumin-binding protein, osteonectin, is about half the molecular weight of HSA, so the two proteins and their bound product can be separated and quantified by size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography. TSPP was first bound to HSA and irradiated, photo-modifying the structure of HSA. Then native HSA or photo-modified HSA (both with TSPP bound) were compared, to assess loss in HSA's innate binding ability as a result of light-induced structure modification.

  18. Cobalamin and its binding protein in rat milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raaberg, Lasse; Nexø, Ebba; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1989-01-01

    Cobalamin and its binding protein, haptocorrin, are present in rat milk throughout the lactation period. The concentration of cobalamin is approximately 0.3-times the concentration of the unsaturated binding protein. The concentration of the unsaturated cobalamin-binding protein varies between 18...... nmol l-1 and 16 nmol l-1. The binding protein has a Stokes radius of 2.49 nm when saturated with cobalamin and 2.61 nm when unsaturated. It binds cobalamin over a broad range of pH and is able to bind cobinamide also. With immunohistochemistry, we find haptocorrin immunoreactivity in the mammary glands...

  19. Mac-2 binding protein is a cell-adhesive protein of the extracellular matrix which self-assembles into ring-like structures and binds beta1 integrins, collagens and fibronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sasaki, T; Brakebusch, C; Engel, J

    1998-01-01

    in solid-phase assays to collagens IV, V and VI, fibronectin and nidogen, but not to fibrillar collagens I and III or other basement membrane proteins. The protein also mediated adhesion of cell lines at comparable strength with laminin. Adhesion to M2BP was inhibited by antibodies to integrin beta1...

  20. The human YB-1 cold shock domain : structural, dynamical and binding properties of the central nucleic acid binding domain of the human Y-box protein YB-1, a transcription and translation regulating protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloks, Cathelijne Petra Anne Marie

    2003-01-01

    Y-box proteins are a highly conserved group of proteins present in bacteria, plants and animals. They are essential in regulating transcription and translation and the coupling between theses two processes. Their central domain, the so-called cold shock domain (CSD), is responsible for the nucleic a

  1. DING proteins; novel members of a prokaryotic phosphate-binding protein superfamily which extends into the eukaryotic kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berna, Anne; Bernier, François; Chabrière, Eric; Perera, Tekla; Scott, Ken

    2008-01-01

    PstS proteins are the cell-bound phosphate-binding elements of the ubiquitous bacterial ABC phosphate uptake mechanisms. Primary and tertiary structures, characteristic of pstS proteins, are conserved in proteins, which are expressed in secretory operons and induced by phosphate deprivation, in Pseudomonas species. There are two subsets of these proteins; AP proteins, which are alkaline phosphatases, and DING proteins, named for their N-terminal sequence, which are phosphate-binding proteins. Both form elements of a proposed phosphate-scavenging system in pseudomonads. DING proteins have also been isolated from many eukaryotic sources, and are associated with both normal and pathological functions in mammals. Their phosphate-binding function suggests a role in biomineralization, but the ability to bind other ligands may be related to signal transduction in eukaryotes. Though it has been claimed that all such proteins may originate from pseudomonads, many eukaryotic DING proteins have unique features which are incompatible with a bacterial origin.

  2. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  3. Characterization of DNA-binding proteins from pea mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzack, F.A.; Dombrowski, S.; Brennicke, A.;

    1998-01-01

    in competition experiments. Purification by hydroxyapatite, phosphocellulose, and reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography separated two polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 32 and 44 kD. Both proteins bound to conserved structures of the pea atp9 and the heterologous Oenothera berteriana atp......We studied transcription initiation in the mitochondria of higher plants, with particular respect to promoter structures. Conserved elements of these promoters have been successfully identified by in vitro transcription systems in different species, whereas the involved protein components are still...... unknown. Proteins binding to double-stranded oligonucleotides representing different parts of the pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondrial atp9 were analyzed by denaturation-renaturation chromatography and mobility-shift experiments. Two DNA-protein complexes were detected, which appeared to be sequence specific...

  4. Synthesis and Structural Investigation of New Bio-Relevant Complexes of Lanthanides with 5-Hydroxyflavone: DNA Binding and Protein Interaction Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra-Cristina Munteanu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we attempted to develop new metal coordination complexes of the natural flavonoid 5-hydroxyflavone with Sm(III, Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III. The resultant hydroxo complexes have been characterized by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, including fluorescence, FT-IR, UV-Vis, EPR and mass spectral studies. The general chemical formula of the complexes is [Ln(C15H9O33(OH2(H2Ox]·nH2O, where Ln is the lanthanide cation and x = 0 for Sm(III, x = 1 for Eu(III, Gd(III, Tb(III and n = 0 for Sm(III, Gd(III, Tb(III, n = 1 for Eu(III, respectively. The proposed structures of the complexes were optimized by DFT calculations. Theoretical calculations and experimental determinations sustain the proposed structures of the hydroxo complexes, with two molecules of 5-hydroxyflavone acting as monoanionic bidentate chelate ligands. The interaction of the complexes with calf thymus DNA has been explored by fluorescence titration and UV-Vis absorption binding studies, and revealed that the synthesized complexes interact with DNA with binding constants (Kb ~ 104. Human serum albumin (HSA and transferrin (Tf binding studies have also been performed by fluorescence titration techniques (fluorescence quenching studies, synchronous fluorescence spectra. The apparent association constants (Ka and thermodynamic parameters have been calculated from the fluorescence quenching experiment at 299 K, 308 K, and 318 K. The quenching curves indicate that the complexes bind to HSA with smaller affinity than the ligand, but to Tf with higher binding affinities than the ligand.

  5. Identification of actin binding protein, ABP-280, as a binding partner of human Lnk adaptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, X; Li, Y; Schembri-King, J; Jakes, S; Hayashi, J

    2000-08-01

    Human Lnk (hLnk) is an adaptor protein with multiple functional domains that regulates T cell activation signaling. In order to identify cellular Lnk binding partners, a yeast two-hybrid screening of human spleen cDNA library was carried out using human hLnk as bait. A polypeptide sequence identical to the C-terminal segment of the actin binding protein (ABP-280) was identified as a hLnk binding protein. The expressed hLnk and the FLAG tagged C-terminal 673 amino acid residues of ABP-280 or the endogenous ABP-280 in COS-7 cells could be co-immunoprecipitated using antibodies either to hLnk, FLAG or ABP-280, respectively. Furthermore, immunofluorescence confocal microscope showed that hLnk and ABP-280 co-localized at the plasma membrane and at juxtanuclear region of COS-7 cells. In Jurkat cells, the endogenous hLnk also associates with the endogenous ABP-280 indicating that the association of these two proteins is physiological. The interacting domains of both proteins were mapped using yeast two-hybrid assays. Our results indicate that hLnk binds to the residues 2006-2454 (repeats 19-23C) of ABP-280. The domain in hLnk that associates with ABP-280 was mapped to an interdomain region of 56 amino acids between pleckstrin homology and Src homology 2 domains. These results suggest that hLnk may exert its regulatory role through its association with ABP-280.

  6. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  7. High-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding regions mediated by intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs and IDRs) lack stable 3D structure under physiological conditions in-vitro, are common in eukaryotes, and facilitate interactions with RNA, DNA and proteins. Current methods for prediction of IDPs and IDRs do not provide insights into their functions, except for a handful of methods that address predictions of protein-binding regions. We report first-of-its-kind computational method DisoRDPbind for high-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding residues located in IDRs from protein sequences. DisoRDPbind is implemented using a runtime-efficient multi-layered design that utilizes information extracted from physiochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, putative secondary structure and disorder and sequence alignment. Empirical tests demonstrate that it provides accurate predictions that are competitive with other predictors of disorder-mediated protein binding regions and complementary to the methods that predict RNA- and DNA-binding residues annotated based on crystal structures. Application in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes reveals that RNA- and DNA-binding proteins predicted by DisoRDPbind complement and overlap with the corresponding known binding proteins collected from several sources. Also, the number of the putative protein-binding regions predicted with DisoRDPbind correlates with the promiscuity of proteins in the corresponding protein-protein interaction networks. Webserver: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DisoRDPbind/.

  8. Structural definition of a potent macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein with adjuvant activity for antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N

    1996-10-01

    Incubation of human vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), with a mixture of immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, efficiently generated a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase, and isolation of the intermediates with immobilized lectins, revealed that either sequence of hydrolysis of Gc glycoprotein by these glycosidases yields the macrophage-activating factor, implying that Gc protein carries a trisaccharide composed of N-acetylgalactosamine and dibranched galactose and sialic acid termini. A 3 hr incubation of mouse peritoneal macrophages with picomolar amounts of the enzymatically generated macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) resulted in a greatly enhanced phagocytic activity. Administration of a minute amount (10-50 pg/mouse) of GcMAF resulted in a seven- to nine-fold enhanced phagocytic activity of macrophages. Injection of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) along with GcMAF into mice produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days.

  9. Mycobacterial PE_PGRS Proteins Contain Calcium-Binding Motifs with Parallel β-roll Folds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nandita; Bachhawat; Balvinder; Singh

    2007-01-01

    The PE_PGRS family of proteins unique to mycobacteria is demonstrated to con- rain multiple calcium-binding and glycine-rich sequence motifs GGXGXD/NXUX. This sequence repeat constitutes a calcium-binding parallel/3-roll or parallel β-helix structure and is found in RTX toxins secreted by many Gram-negative bacteria. It is predicted that the highly homologous PE_PGRS proteins containing multiple copies of the nona-peptide motif could fold into similar calcium-binding structures. The implication of the predicted calcium-binding property of PE_PGRS proteins in the Ught of macrophage-pathogen interaction and pathogenesis is presented.

  10. The RNA-binding protein Xp54nrb isolated from a Ca²+-dependent screen is expressed in neural structures during Xenopus laevis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neant, Isabelle; Deisig, Nina; Scerbo, Pierluigi; Leclerc, Catherine; Moreau, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In amphibian embryos, calcium (Ca(2+)) signalling is a necessary and sufficient event to induce neural fate. Transient elevations of [Ca(2+)]i are recorded in neural tissue precursor cells in whole embryos during gastrulation. Using a subtractive cDNA library between control ectoderm (animal caps) and ectoderm induced toward a neural fate by Ca(2+) release, we have isolated several Ca(2+)-induced target genes. Among the isolated genes, Xp54nrb encodes a protein which exhibits the RRM domains characteristic of RNA binding proteins, and is implicated in pre-mRNA splicing steps. Here we show that the Xp54nrb transcripts are expressed throughout early developmental stages, specifically in the neural and sensorial territories and that Xp54nrb could be involved in anterior neural patterning.

  11. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  12. Characterization of a Deswapped Triple Mutant Bovine Odorant Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Favilla

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The stability and functionality of GCC-bOBP, a monomeric triple mutant of bovine odorant binding protein, was investigated, in the presence of denaturant and in acidic pH conditions, by both protein and 1-aminoanthracene ligand fluorescence measurements, and compared to that of both bovine and porcine wild type homologues. Complete reversibility of unfolding was observed, though refolding was characterized by hysteresis. Molecular dynamics simulations, performed to detect possible structural changes of the monomeric scaffold related to the presence of the ligand, pointed out the stability of the β-barrel lipocalin scaffold.

  13. Vibrational Softening of a Protein on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Erica [Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; Perahia, David [Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, Cachan, France; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Merzel, Franci [National Institute of Chemistry, Solvenia

    2011-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have demonstrated that binding of the cancer drug methotrexate softens the low-frequency vibrations of its target protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Here, this softening is fully reproduced using atomic detail normal-mode analysis. Decomposition of the vibrational density of states demonstrates that the largest contributions arise from structural elements of DHFR critical to stability and function. Mode-projection analysis reveals an increase of the breathing-like character of the affected vibrational modes consistent with the experimentally observed increased adiabatic compressibility of the protein on complexation.

  14. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  15. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  16. FAD binding by ApbE protein from Salmonella enterica: a new class of FAD-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jeffery M; Endrizzi, James A; Hamilton, Trinity L; Christopherson, Melissa R; Mulder, David W; Downs, Diana M; Peters, John W

    2011-02-01

    The periplasmic protein ApbE was identified through the analysis of several mutants defective in thiamine biosynthesis and was implicated as having a role in iron-sulfur cluster biosynthesis or repair. While mutations in apbE cause decreased activity of several iron-sulfur enzymes in vivo, the specific role of ApbE remains unknown. Members of the AbpE family include NosX and RnfF, which have been implicated in oxidation-reduction associated with nitrous oxide and nitrogen metabolism, respectively. In this work, we show that ApbE binds one FAD molecule per monomeric unit. The structure of ApbE in the presence of bound FAD reveals a new FAD-binding motif. Protein variants that are nonfunctional in vivo were generated by random and targeted mutagenesis. Each variant was substituted in the environment of the FAD and analyzed for FAD binding after reconstitution. The variant that altered a key tyrosine residue involved in FAD binding prevented reconstitution of the protein.

  17. Neuronal calcium-binding proteins and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, D W; McGrath, J J; Reynolds, G P

    2002-09-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CBPs) such as calbindin, parvalbumin and calretinin are used as immunohistochemical markers for discrete neuronal subpopulations. They are particularly useful in identifying the various subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons that control output from prefrontal and cingulate cortices as well as from the hippocampus. The strategic role these interneurons play in regulating output from these three crucial brain regions has made them a focus for neuropathological investigation in schizophrenia. The number of pathological reports detailing subtle changes in these CBP-containing interneurons in patients with schizophrenia is rapidly growing. These proteins however are more than convenient neuronal markers. They confer survival advantages to neurons and can increase the neuron's ability to sustain firing. These properties may be important in the subtle pathophysiology of nondegenerative phenomena such as schizophrenia. The aim of this review is to introduce the reader to the functional properties of CBPs and to examine the emerging literature reporting alterations in these proteins in schizophrenia as well as draw some conclusions about the significance of these findings.

  18. Alignment-free ultra-high-throughput comparison of druggable protein-ligand binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill, Nathanaël; Rognan, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Inferring the biological function of a protein from its three-dimensional structure as well as explaining why a drug may bind to various targets is of crucial importance to modern drug discovery. Here we present a generic 4833-integer vector describing druggable protein-ligand binding sites that can be applied to any protein and any binding cavity. The fingerprint registers counts of pharmacophoric triplets from the Calpha atomic coordinates of binding-site-lining residues. Starting from a customized data set of diverse protein-ligand binding site pairs, the most appropriate metric and a similarity threshold could be defined for similar binding sites. The method (FuzCav) has been used in various scenarios: (i) screening a collection of 6000 binding sites for similarity to different queries; (ii) classifying protein families (serine endopeptidases, protein kinases) by binding site diversity; (iii) discriminating adenine-binding cavities from decoys. The fingerprint generation and comparison supports ultra-high throughput (ca. 1000 measures/s), does not require prior alignment of protein binding sites, and is able to detect local similarity among subpockets. It is thus particularly well suited to the functional annotation of novel genomic structures with low sequence identity to known X-ray templates.

  19. Insights into cellulase-lignin non-specific binding revealed by computational redesign of the surface of green fluorescent protein: Protein Redesign to Lower Protein-lignin Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarmeyer, Carolyn N. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Smith, Matthew D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Chundawat, Shishir P. S. [Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan; Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Piscataway New Jersey; Sammond, Deanne [Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden Colorado; Whitehead, Timothy A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824; Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing Michigan 48824

    2016-11-07

    Biological-mediated conversion of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass to biofuels and biochemicals is a promising avenue towards energy sustainability. However, a critical impediment to the commercialization of cellulosic biofuel production is the high cost of cellulase enzymes needed to deconstruct biomass into fermentable sugars. One major factor driving cost is cellulase adsorption and inactivation in the presence of lignin, yet we currently have a poor understanding of the protein structure-function relationships driving this adsorption. In this work, we have systematically investigated the role of protein surface potential on lignin adsorption using a model monomeric fluorescent protein. We have designed and experimentally characterized 16 model protein variants spanning the physiological range of net charge (-24 to +16 total charges) and total charge density (0.28 to 0.40 charges per sequence length) typical for natural proteins. Protein designs were expressed, purified, and subjected to in silico and in vitro biophysical measurements to evaluate the relationship between protein surface potential and lignin adsorption properties. The designs were comparable to model fluorescent protein in terms of thermostability and heterologous expression yield, although the majority of the designs unexpectedly formed homodimers. Protein adsorption to lignin was studied at two different temperatures using Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring and a subtractive mass balance assay. We found a weak correlation between protein net charge and protein-binding capacity to lignin. No other single characteristic, including apparent melting temperature and 2nd virial coefficient, showed correlation with lignin binding. Analysis of an unrelated cellulase dataset with mutations localized to a family I carbohydrate-binding module showed a similar correlation between net charge and lignin binding capacity. Overall, our study provides strategies to identify highly active

  20. A recombinant triblock protein polymer with dispersant and binding properties for digital printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Min; O'Brien, John P; Yang, Jianjun

    2008-01-01

    A structured triblock protein was designed to explore the potential of engineered peptides to function as high-performance ink dispersants and binders. The protein consists of three functional elements, including a pigment binding domain, a hydrophilic linker, and a printing surface binding domain. To construct such a chimeric protein, a carbon black binding peptide, FHENWPS, and a cellulose binding peptide, THKTSTQRLLAA, were identified from phage display libraries through biopanning, based on their strong and specific binding affinities to carbon black and cellulose. They were used as carbon black and cellulose binding domains, respectively, in a recombinant triblock protein. A linker sequence, PTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTPTP, was adapted from endoglucanase A of the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi, as a small, rigid, and hydrophilic interdomain linker. When incorporated into the triblock structure between the carbon black and cellulose binding sequences, the linker sufficiently isolates these two elements and allows dual binding activity. The structured triblock protein was shown to disperse carbon black particles and attach it to paper surfaces. Thus, the utility of structured proteins having useful dispersant and binding properties for digital printing inks was demonstrated.

  1. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyz...

  2. The Plasminogen-Binding Group A Streptococcal M Protein-Related Protein Prp Binds Plasminogen via Arginine and Histidine Residues▿

    OpenAIRE

    Martina L. Sanderson-Smith; Dowton, Mark; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J.

    2006-01-01

    The migration of the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) from localized to deep tissue sites may result in severe invasive disease, and sequestration of the host zymogen plasminogen appears crucial for virulence. Here, we describe a novel plasminogen-binding M protein, the plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM)-related protein (Prp). Prp is phylogenetically distinct from previously described plasminogen-binding M proteins of group A, C, and G strep...

  3. Yersinia enterocolitica serum resistance proteins YadA and ail bind the complement regulator C4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa Kirjavainen

    Full Text Available Many pathogens are equipped with factors providing resistance against the bactericidal action of complement. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Gram-negative enteric pathogen with invasive properties, efficiently resists the deleterious action of human complement. The major Y. enterocolitica serum resistance determinants include outer membrane proteins YadA and Ail. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS O-antigen (O-ag and outer core (OC do not contribute directly to complement resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible mechanism whereby Y. enterocolitica could inhibit the antibody-mediated classical pathway of complement activation. We show that Y. enterocolitica serotypes O:3, O:8, and O:9 bind C4b-binding protein (C4bp, an inhibitor of both the classical and lectin pathways of complement. To identify the C4bp receptors on Y. enterocolitica serotype O:3 surface, a set of mutants expressing YadA, Ail, O-ag, and OC in different combinations was tested for the ability to bind C4bp. The studies showed that both YadA and Ail acted as C4bp receptors. Ail-mediated C4bp binding, however, was blocked by the O-ag and OC, and could be observed only with mutants lacking these LPS structures. C4bp bound to Y. enterocolitica was functionally active and participated in the factor I-mediated degradation of C4b. These findings show that Y. enterocolitica uses two proteins, YadA and Ail, to bind C4bp. Binding of C4bp could help Y. enterocolitica to evade complement-mediated clearance in the human host.

  4. Methyl-CpG binding proteins in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoping FAN; Leah HUTNICK

    2005-01-01

    Classical methyl-CpG binding proteins contain the conserved DNA binding motif methyl-cytosine binding domain (MBD), which preferentially binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides. These proteins serve as transcriptional repressors,mediating gene silencing via DNA cytosine methylation. Mutations in methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) have been linked to the human mental retardation disorder Rett syndrome, suggesting an important role for methyl-CpG binding proteins in brain development and function. This mini-review summarizes the recent advances in studying the diverse functions of MeCP2 as a prototype for other methyl-CpG binding proteins in the development and function of the vertebrate nervous system.

  5. Gc protein (vitamin D-binding protein): Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Hideko; Uto, Yoshihiro; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Okamura, Natsuko; Murakami, Aya; Kubo, Shinichi; Kirk, Kenneth L; Hori, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    The Gc protein (human group-specific component (Gc), a vitamin D-binding protein or Gc globulin), has important physiological functions that include involvement in vitamin D transport and storage, scavenging of extracellular G-actin, enhancement of the chemotactic activity of C5a for neutrophils in inflammation and macrophage activation (mediated by a GalNAc-modified Gc protein (GcMAF)). In this review, the structure and function of the Gc protein is focused on especially with regard to Gc genotyping and GcMAF precursor activity. A discussion of the research strategy "GcMAF as a target for drug discovery" is included, based on our own research.

  6. Structurally well-defined macrophage activating factor derived from vitamin D3-binding protein has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R

    1998-06-01

    Freund's adjuvant produced severe inflammation that augments development of antibodies. Thus, mixed administration of antigens with adjuvant was not required as long as inflammation was induced in the hosts. Since macrophage activation for phagocytosis and antigen processing is the first step of antibody development, inflammation-primed macrophage activation plays a major role in immune development. Therefore, macrophage activating factor should act as an adjuvant for immunization. The inflammation-primed macrophage activation process is the major macrophage activating cascade that requires participation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein (DBP; human DBP is known as Gc protein) and glycosidases of B and T lymphocytes. Stepwise incubation of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase efficiently generated the most potent macrophage activating factor (designated GcMAF) we have ever encountered. Administration of GcMAF (20 or 100 pg/mouse) resulted in stimulation of the progenitor cells for extensive mitogenesis and activation of macrophages. Administration of GcMAF (100 pg/mouse) along with immunization of mice with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produced a large number of anti-SRBC antibody secreting splenic cells in 2-4 days. Thus, GcMAF has a potent adjuvant activity for immunization. Although malignant tumours are poorly immunogenic, 4 days after GcMAF-primed immunization of mice with heat-killed Ehrlich ascites tumour cells, the ascites tumour was no longer transplantable in these mice.

  7. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. CONCLUSIONS: PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones. ENHANCED VERSION: This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web

  8. ANDROGEN REGULATION OF PROSTATIC STEROID BINDING PROTEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYong-Lian; ZHOUZong-Xun; ZHANGYou-Duan; PARKERMalcolmG

    1989-01-01

    Prostatic steroid binding protein (PSBP) is a major protein secreted in the rat ventral prostate (V.P.) and also one of the components in seminal fluid, The potential importance of this protein in male fertility emerged from its ability of binding cholesterol which might modulate the proportion of phospholipids and cholesterol in sperm making it suitable

  9. Binding of Y-box proteins to RNA: involvement of different protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomery, M; Sommerville, J

    1994-01-01

    Eukaryotic Y-box proteins are reported to interact with a wide variety of nucleic acid structures to act as transcription factors and mRNA masking proteins. The modular structure of Y-box proteins includes a highly conserved N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD, equivalent to the bacterial cold-shock proteins) plus four basic C-terminal domains containing arginine clusters and aromatic residues. In addition, the basic domains are separated by acidic regions which contain several potential sites for serine/threonine phosphorylation. The interaction of Y-box proteins, isolated from Xenopus oocytes (FRGY2 type), with RNA molecules has been studied by UV crosslinking and protein fragmentation. We have identified two distinct binding activities. The CSD interacts preferentially with the polypurines poly(A,G) and poly(G) but not poly(A), this activity being sensitive to 5 mM MgCl2 but not to 5 mM spermidine. In the presence of 1 mM MgCl2 or 1 mM spermidine, the basic domains interact preferentially with poly(C,U), this activity being sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl. Binding of the basic domains is also sensitive to low concentrations of heparin. The basic domains can be crosslinked individually to labelled RNA. These results are discussed with reference to the various specificities noted in the binding of Y-box proteins to RNA and DNA. Images PMID:7530842

  10. DBD2BS: connecting a DNA-binding protein with its binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    By binding to short and highly conserved DNA sequences in genomes, DNA-binding proteins initiate, enhance or repress biological processes. Accurately identifying such binding sites, often represented by position weight matrices (PWMs), is an important step in understanding the control mechanisms of cells. When given coordinates of a DNA-binding domain (DBD) bound with DNA, a potential function can be used to estimate the change of binding affinity after base substitutions, where the changes c...

  11. Solution structure of the Z-DNA binding domain of PKR-like protein kinase from Carassius auratus and quantitative analyses of the intermediate complex during B-Z transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ae-Ree; Park, Chin-Ju; Cheong, Hae-Kap; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Park, Jin-Wan; Kwon, Mun-Young; Lee, Janghyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Choi, Byong-Seok; Lee, Joon-Hwa

    2016-04-07

    Z-DNA binding proteins (ZBPs) play important roles in RNA editing, innate immune response and viral infection. Structural and biophysical studies show that ZBPs initially form an intermediate complex with B-DNA for B-Z conversion. However, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of Z-DNA binding and B-Z transition is still lacking, due to the absence of structural information on the intermediate complex. Here, we report the solution structure of the Zα domain of the ZBP-containing protein kinase from Carassius auratus(caZαPKZ). We quantitatively determined the binding affinity of caZαPKZ for both B-DNA and Z-DNA and characterized its B-Z transition activity, which is modulated by varying the salt concentration. Our results suggest that the intermediate complex formed by caZαPKZ and B-DNA can be used as molecular ruler, to measure the degree to which DNA transitions to the Z isoform.

  12. The telomere binding protein TRF2 induces chromatin compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmaa M Baker

    Full Text Available Mammalian telomeres are specialized chromatin structures that require the telomere binding protein, TRF2, for maintaining chromosome stability. In addition to its ability to modulate DNA repair activities, TRF2 also has direct effects on DNA structure and topology. Given that mammalian telomeric chromatin includes nucleosomes, we investigated the effect of this protein on chromatin structure. TRF2 bound to reconstituted telomeric nucleosomal fibers through both its basic N-terminus and its C-terminal DNA binding domain. Analytical agarose gel electrophoresis (AAGE studies showed that TRF2 promoted the folding of nucleosomal arrays into more compact structures by neutralizing negative surface charge. A construct containing the N-terminal and TRFH domains together altered the charge and radius of nucleosomal arrays similarly to full-length TRF2 suggesting that TRF2-driven changes in global chromatin structure were largely due to these regions. However, the most compact chromatin structures were induced by the isolated basic N-terminal region, as judged by both AAGE and atomic force microscopy. Although the N-terminal region condensed nucleosomal array fibers, the TRFH domain, known to alter DNA topology, was required for stimulation of a strand invasion-like reaction with nucleosomal arrays. Optimal strand invasion also required the C-terminal DNA binding domain. Furthermore, the reaction was not stimulated on linear histone-free DNA. Our data suggest that nucleosomal chromatin has the ability to facilitate this activity of TRF2 which is thought to be involved in stabilizing looped telomere structures.

  13. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  14. DNA-Binding Proteins Essential for Protein-Primed Bacteriophage Φ29 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Margarita; Holguera, Isabel; Redrejo-Rodríguez, Modesto; de Vega, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis phage Φ29 has a linear, double-stranded DNA 19 kb long with an inverted terminal repeat of 6 nucleotides and a protein covalently linked to the 5' ends of the DNA. This protein, called terminal protein (TP), is the primer for the initiation of replication, a reaction catalyzed by the viral DNA polymerase at the two DNA ends. The DNA polymerase further elongates the nascent DNA chain in a processive manner, coupling strand displacement with elongation. The viral protein p5 is a single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) that binds to the single strands generated by strand displacement during the elongation process. Viral protein p6 is a double-stranded DNA binding protein (DBP) that preferentially binds to the origins of replication at the Φ29 DNA ends and is required for the initiation of replication. Both SSB and DBP are essential for Φ29 DNA amplification. This review focuses on the role of these phage DNA-binding proteins in Φ29 DNA replication both in vitro and in vivo, as well as on the implication of several B. subtilis DNA-binding proteins in different processes of the viral cycle. We will revise the enzymatic activities of the Φ29 DNA polymerase: TP-deoxynucleotidylation, processive DNA polymerization coupled to strand displacement, 3'-5' exonucleolysis and pyrophosphorolysis. The resolution of the Φ29 DNA polymerase structure has shed light on the translocation mechanism and the determinants responsible for processivity and strand displacement. These two properties have made Φ29 DNA polymerase one of the main enzymes used in the current DNA amplification technologies. The determination of the structure of Φ29 TP revealed the existence of three domains: the priming domain, where the primer residue Ser232, as well as Phe230, involved in the determination of the initiating nucleotide, are located, the intermediate domain, involved in DNA polymerase binding, and the N-terminal domain, responsible for DNA binding and localization of the

  15. Novel computational methodologies for structural modeling of spacious ligand binding sites of G-protein-coupled receptors: development and application to human leukotriene B4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yoko; Harada, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a novel method to predict the activated structures of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with high accuracy, while aiming for the use of the predicted 3D structures in in silico virtual screening in the future. We propose a new method for modeling GPCR thermal fluctuations, where conformation changes of the proteins are modeled by combining fluctuations on multiple time scales. The core idea of the method is that a molecular dynamics simulation is used to calculate average 3D coordinates of all atoms of a GPCR protein against heat fluctuation on the picosecond or nanosecond time scale, and then evolutionary computation including receptor-ligand docking simulations functions to determine the rotation angle of each helix of a GPCR protein as a movement on a longer time scale. The method was validated using human leukotriene B4 receptor BLT1 as a sample GPCR. Our study demonstrated that the proposed method was able to derive the appropriate 3D structure of the active-state GPCR which docks with its agonists.

  16. Stereoselective synthesis of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide-conjugated carbohydrates for glycoarray fabrication and evaluation of structural effects on protein binding by SPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lingquan; Norberg, Oscar; Uppalapati, Suji; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2011-05-07

    A series of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide (PFPA)-conjugated carbohydrate structures have been synthesized and applied to glycoarray fabrication. The glycoconjugates were structurally varied with respect to anomeric attachment, S-, and O-linked carbohydrates, respectively, as well as linker structure and length. Efficient stereoselective synthetic routes were developed, leading to the formation of the PFPA-conjugated structures in good yields over few steps. The use of glycosyl thiols as donors proved especially efficient and provided the final compounds in up to 70% total yield with high anomeric purities. PFPA-based photochemistry was subsequently used to generate carbohydrate arrays on a polymeric surface, and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was applied for evaluation of carbohydrate-protein interactions using the plant lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) as a probe. The results indicate better performance and equal efficiency of S- and O-linked structures with intermediate linker length.

  17. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  18. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans—A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewski, Marcin; Balsewicz, Jan; Nowak, Marta; Maciejewska, Natalia; Cyranka-Czaja, Anna; Zalewska-Piątek, Beata; Piątek, Rafał; Kur, Józef

    2015-01-01

    Background SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding) proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis. Results This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein). This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity). The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7±1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100°C and melting temperature (Tm) is 100.2°C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Conclusion NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids. PMID:25973760

  19. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein in preterm infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, D; Dembinski, J; Heep, A; Bartmann, P

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To assess serum concentrations of lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) in preterm infants with neonatal bacterial infection (NBI). Methods: Blood samples were analysed of 57 preterm (28+1 to 36+6, median 33+2 weeks gestation) and 17 term infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit within the first 72 hours of life with suspicion of NBI. Samples were obtained at first suspicion of sepsis and after 12 and 24 hours. Diagnosis of NBI was confirmed by raised concentrations of C reactive protein and/or interleukin 6. The influence of gestational age and labour was analysed. Results: Maximum LBP concentrations in infants with NBI were greatly increased compared with infants without NBI (13.0–46.0 µg/ml (median 20.0 µg/ml) v 0.6–17.4 µg/ml (median 4.2 µg/ml)). LBP concentrations in infected infants were not yet significantly raised when NBI was first suspected. The LBP concentrations of preterm infants were comparable to those of term infants. Regression analysis revealed no significant effect of labour or gestational age on LBP. Conclusions: Raised LBP concentrations indicate NBI in preterm and term infants. Preterm infants of > 28 weeks gestation seem to be capable of producing LBP as efficiently as term infants. Neonatal LBP concentrations are not influenced by labour. LBP may be a useful diagnostic marker of NBI in preterm infants. PMID:15499153

  20. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  1. Cloud Computing for Protein-Ligand Binding Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Lun Hung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  2. QSAR Models for the Prediction of Plasma Protein Binding

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    Zeshan Amin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The prediction of plasma protein binding (ppb is of paramount importance in the pharmacokinetics characterization of drugs, as it causes significant changes in volume of distribution, clearance and drug half life. This study utilized Quantitative Structure – Activity Relationships (QSAR for the prediction of plasma protein binding. Methods: Protein binding values for 794 compounds were collated from literature. The data was partitioned into a training set of 662 compounds and an external validation set of 132 compounds. Physicochemical and molecular descriptors were calculated for each compound using ACD labs/logD, MOE (Chemical Computing Group and Symyx QSAR software packages. Several data mining tools were employed for the construction of models. These included stepwise regression analysis, Classification and Regression Trees (CART, Boosted trees and Random Forest. Results: Several predictive models were identified; however, one model in particular produced significantly superior prediction accuracy for the external validation set as measured using mean absolute error and correlation coefficient. The selected model was a boosted regression tree model which had the mean absolute error for training set of 13.25 and for validation set of 14.96. Conclusion: Plasma protein binding can be modeled using simple regression trees or multiple linear regressions with reasonable model accuracies. These interpretable models were able to identify the governing molecular factors for a high ppb that included hydrophobicity, van der Waals surface area parameters, and aromaticity. On the other hand, the more complicated ensemble method of boosted regression trees produced the most accurate ppb estimations for the external validation set.

  3. A robust assay to measure DNA topology-dependent protein binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Tamara R; Solà, Maria; Holt, Ian J; Neuman, Keir C

    2015-04-20

    DNA structure and topology pervasively influence aspects of DNA metabolism including replication, transcription and segregation. However, the effects of DNA topology on DNA-protein interactions have not been systematically explored due to limitations of standard affinity assays. We developed a method to measure protein binding affinity dependence on the topology (topological linking number) of supercoiled DNA. A defined range of DNA topoisomers at equilibrium with a DNA binding protein is separated into free and protein-bound DNA populations using standard nitrocellulose filter binding techniques. Electrophoretic separation and quantification of bound and free topoisomers combined with a simple normalization procedure provide the relative affinity of the protein for the DNA as a function of linking number. Employing this assay we measured topology-dependent DNA binding of a helicase, a type IB topoisomerase, a type IIA topoisomerase, a non-specific mitochondrial DNA binding protein and a type II restriction endonuclease. Most of the proteins preferentially bind negatively supercoiled DNA but the details of the topology-dependent affinity differ among proteins in ways that expose differences in their interactions with DNA. The topology-dependent binding assay provides a robust and easily implemented method to probe topological influences on DNA-protein interactions for a wide range of DNA binding proteins.

  4. Protein binding prodrugs : Synthesis and protein binding studies of didanonsine derivates

    OpenAIRE

    Olberg, Dag Erlend

    2004-01-01

    A novel series of 5 -O-ester prodrugs of the anti-HIV drug 2 ,3 -dideoxyinosine (ddI,didanosine) were synthesized for the purpose of increasing protein binding. Hope was that these derivates would exhibit superior pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties against HIV-infection than the parent drug, didanosine. Ten compounds were synthesized, five fatty acid derivates and five dicarboxylic acid monoester derivates. The fatty acid- and dicarboxylic acid derivates had the sam...

  5. An Experimentally Based Computer Search Identifies Unstructured Membrane-binding Sites in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, Hanna; Guag, Jake; Remmert, Kirsten; Chacko, Susan; Korn, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Programs exist for searching protein sequences for potential membrane-penetrating segments (hydrophobic regions) and for lipid-binding sites with highly defined tertiary structures, such as PH, FERM, C2, ENTH, and other domains. However, a rapidly growing number of membrane-associated proteins (including cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, GTP-binding proteins, and their effectors) bind lipids through less structured regions. Here, we describe the development and testing of a simple computer search program that identifies unstructured potential membrane-binding sites. Initially, we found that both basic and hydrophobic amino acids, irrespective of sequence, contribute to the binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles of synthetic peptides that correspond to the putative membrane-binding domains of Acanthamoeba class I myosins. Based on these results, we modified a hydrophobicity scale giving Arg- and Lys-positive, rather than negative, values. Using this basic and hydrophobic scale with a standard search algorithm, we successfully identified previously determined unstructured membrane-binding sites in all 16 proteins tested. Importantly, basic and hydrophobic searches identified previously unknown potential membrane-binding sites in class I myosins, PAKs and CARMIL (capping protein, Arp2/3, myosin I linker; a membrane-associated cytoskeletal scaffold protein), and synthetic peptides and protein domains containing these newly identified sites bound to acidic phospholipids in vitro. PMID:20018884

  6. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  7. Detection and properties of A-factor-binding protein from Streptomyces griseus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, K.; Horinouchi, S.; Yoshida, M.; Chiba, N.; Mori, K.; Nogawa, N.; Morikawa, N.; Beppu, T. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-08-01

    The optically active form of tritium-labeled A-factor (2-isocapryloyl-3R-hydroxymethyl-gamma-butyrolactone), a pleiotropic autoregulator responsible for streptomycin production, streptomycin resistance, and sporulation in Streptomyces griseus, was chemically synthesized. By using the radioactive A-factor, a binding protein for A-factor was detected in the cytoplasmic fraction of this organism. The binding protein had an apparent molecular weight of approximately 26,000, as determined by gel filtration. Scatchard analysis suggested that A-factor bound the protein in the molar ratio of 1:1 with a binding constant, Kd, of 0.7 nM. The number of the binding protein was roughly estimated to be 37 per genome. The inducing material virginiae butanolide C (VB-C), which has a structure very similar to that of A-factor and is essential for virginiamycin production in Streptomyces virginiae, did not inhibit binding. In addition, no protein capable of specifically binding {sup 3}H-labeled VB-C was found in S. griseus. Together with the observation that VB-C had almost no biological activity on the restoration of streptomycin production or sporulation in an A-factor-deficient mutant of S. griseus, these results indicated that the binding protein had a strict ligand specificity. Examination for an A-factor-binding protein in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and Streptomyces lividans showed the absence of any specifically binding protein.

  8. Towards structure-based protein drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Lai, Luhua

    2011-10-01

    Structure-based drug design for chemical molecules has been widely used in drug discovery in the last 30 years. Many successful applications have been reported, especially in the field of virtual screening based on molecular docking. Recently, there has been much progress in fragment-based as well as de novo drug discovery. As many protein-protein interactions can be used as key targets for drug design, one of the solutions is to design protein drugs based directly on the protein complexes or the target structure. Compared with protein-ligand interactions, protein-protein interactions are more complicated and present more challenges for design. Over the last decade, both sampling efficiency and scoring accuracy of protein-protein docking have increased significantly. We have developed several strategies for structure-based protein drug design. A grafting strategy for key interaction residues has been developed and successfully applied in designing erythropoietin receptor-binding proteins. Similarly to small-molecule design, we also tested de novo protein-binder design and a virtual screen of protein binders using protein-protein docking calculations. In comparison with the development of structure-based small-molecule drug design, we believe that structure-based protein drug design has come of age.

  9. A Venom Gland Extracellular Chitin-Binding-Like Protein from Pupal Endoparasitoid Wasps, Pteromalus Puparum, Selectively Binds Chitin

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    Yu Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chitin-binding proteins (CBPs are present in many species and they act in a variety of biological processes. We analyzed a Pteromalus puparum venom apparatus proteome and transcriptome and identified a partial gene encoding a possible CBP. Here, we report cloning a full-length cDNA of a sequence encoding a chitin-binding-like protein (PpCBP from P. puparum, a pupal endoparasitoid of Pieris rapae. The cDNA encoded a 96-amino-acid protein, including a secretory signal peptide and a chitin-binding peritrophin-A domain. Phylogenetic analysis of chitin binding domains (CBDs of cuticle proteins and peritrophic matrix proteins in selected insects revealed that the CBD of PpCBP clustered with the CBD of Nasonia vitripennis. The PpCBP is specifically expressed in the venom apparatus of P. puparum, mostly in the venom gland. PpCBP expression was highest at day one after adult eclosion and much lower for the following five days. We produced a recombinant PpCBP and binding assays showed the recombinant protein selectively binds chitin but not cellulose in vitro. We infer that PpCBP serves a structural role in the venom reservoir, or may be injected into the host to help wound healing of the host exoskeleton.

  10. Characterization of a small acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) from Helianthus annuus L. and its binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Moreno, Jose A; Venegas-Calerón, Mónica; Du, Zhi-Yan; Garcés, Rafael; Tanner, Julian A; Chye, Mee-Len; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Salas, Joaquín J

    2016-05-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBPs) bind to acyl-CoA esters and promote their interaction with other proteins, lipids and cell structures. Small class I ACBPs have been identified in different plants, such as Arabidopsis thaliana (AtACBP6), Brassica napus (BnACBP) and Oryza sativa (OsACBP1, OsACBP2, OsACBP3), and they are capable of binding to different acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids. Here we characterize HaACBP6, a class I ACBP expressed in sunflower (Helianthus annuus) tissues, studying the specificity of its corresponding recombinant HaACBP6 protein towards various acyl-CoA esters and phospholipids in vitro, particularly using isothermal titration calorimetry and protein phospholipid binding assays. This protein binds with high affinity to de novo synthetized derivatives palmitoly-CoA, stearoyl-CoA and oleoyl-CoA (Kd 0.29, 0.14 and 0.15 μM respectively). On the contrary, it showed lower affinity towards linoleoyl-CoA (Kd 5.6 μM). Moreover, rHaACBP6 binds to different phosphatidylcholine species (dipalmitoyl-PC, dioleoyl-PC and dilinoleoyl-PC), yet it displays no affinity towards other phospholipids like lyso-PC, phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid derivatives. In the light of these results, the possible involvement of this protein in sunflower oil synthesis is considered.

  11. The human fatty acid-binding protein family: Evolutionary divergences and functions

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    Smathers Rebecca L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP family and are involved in reversibly binding intracellular hydrophobic ligands and trafficking them throughout cellular compartments, including the peroxisomes, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. FABPs are small, structurally conserved cytosolic proteins consisting of a water-filled, interior-binding pocket surrounded by ten anti-parallel beta sheets, forming a beta barrel. At the superior surface, two alpha-helices cap the pocket and are thought to regulate binding. FABPs have broad specificity, including the ability to bind long-chain (C16-C20 fatty acids, eicosanoids, bile salts and peroxisome proliferators. FABPs demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation and are present in a spectrum of species including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. The human genome consists of nine putatively functional protein-coding FABP genes. The most recently identified family member, FABP12, has been less studied.

  12. A unique bivalent binding and inhibition mechanism by the yatapoxvirus interleukin 18 binding protein.

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    Brian Krumm

    Full Text Available Interleukin 18 (IL18 is a cytokine that plays an important role in inflammation as well as host defense against microbes. Mammals encode a soluble inhibitor of IL18 termed IL18 binding protein (IL18BP that modulates IL18 activity through a negative feedback mechanism. Many poxviruses encode homologous IL18BPs, which contribute to virulence. Previous structural and functional studies on IL18 and IL18BPs revealed an essential binding hot spot involving a lysine on IL18 and two aromatic residues on IL18BPs. The aromatic residues are conserved among the very diverse mammalian and poxviruses IL18BPs with the notable exception of yatapoxvirus IL18BPs, which lack a critical phenylalanine residue. To understand the mechanism by which yatapoxvirus IL18BPs neutralize IL18, we solved the crystal structure of the Yaba-Like Disease Virus (YLDV IL18BP and IL18 complex at 1.75 Å resolution. YLDV-IL18BP forms a disulfide bonded homo-dimer engaging IL18 in a 2∶2 stoichiometry, in contrast to the 1∶1 complex of ectromelia virus (ECTV IL18BP and IL18. Disruption of the dimer interface resulted in a functional monomer, however with a 3-fold decrease in binding affinity. The overall architecture of the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 complex is similar to that observed in the ECTV-IL18BP:IL18 complex, despite lacking the critical lysine-phenylalanine interaction. Through structural and mutagenesis studies, contact residues that are unique to the YLDV-IL18BP:IL18 binding interface were identified, including Q67, P116 of YLDV-IL18BP and Y1, S105 and D110 of IL18. Overall, our studies show that YLDV-IL18BP is unique among the diverse family of mammalian and poxvirus IL-18BPs in that