WorldWideScience

Sample records for binding protein regulated

  1. The Actin Binding Protein Adseverin Regulates Osteoclastogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W. P.; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesi...

  2. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Siavash; Jiang, Hongwei; Wang, Yongqiang; Kuiper, Johannes W P; Glogauer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Adseverin (Ads), a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin) strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG). Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL) stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW) macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion. PMID:25275604

  3. The actin binding protein adseverin regulates osteoclastogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavash Hassanpour

    Full Text Available Adseverin (Ads, a member of the Gelsolin superfamily of actin binding proteins, regulates the actin cytoskeleton architecture by severing and capping existing filamentous actin (F-actin strands and nucleating the assembly of new F-actin filaments. Ads has been implicated in cellular secretion, exocytosis and has also been shown to regulate chondrogenesis and megakaryoblastic leukemia cell differentiation. Here we report for the first time that Ads is involved in regulating osteoclastogenesis (OCG. Ads is induced during OCG downstream of RANK-ligand (RANKL stimulation and is highly expressed in mature osteoclasts. The D5 isoform of Ads is not involved in regulating OCG, as its expression is not induced in response to RANKL. Three clonal Ads knockdown RAW264.7 (RAW macrophage cell lines with varying degrees of Ads expression and OCG deficiency were generated. The most drastic OCG defect was noted in the clonal cell line with the greatest degree of Ads knockdown as indicated by a lack of TRAcP staining and multinucleation. RNAi mediated knockdown of Ads in osteoclast precursors resulted in distinct morphological changes characterized by altered F-actin distribution and increased filopodia formation. Ads knockdown precursor cells experienced enhanced migration while fusion of knockdown precursors cells was limited. Transient reintroduction of de novo Ads back into the knockdown system was capable of rescuing TRAcP expression but not osteoclast multinucleation most likely due to the transient nature of Ads expression. This preliminary study allows us to conclude that Ads is a RANKL induced early regulator of OCG with a potential role in pre-osteoclast differentiation and fusion.

  4. Binding-regulated click ligation for selective detection of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ya; Han, Peng; Wang, Zhuxin; Chen, Weiwei; Shu, Yongqian; Xiang, Yang

    2016-04-15

    Herein, a binding-regulated click ligation (BRCL) strategy for endowing selective detection of proteins is developed with the incorporation of small-molecule ligand and clickable DNA probes. The fundamental principle underlying the strategy is the regulating capability of specific protein-ligand binding against the ligation between clickable DNA probes, which could efficiently combine the detection of particular protein with enormous DNA-based sensing technologies. In this work, the feasibly of the BRCL strategy is first verified through agarose gel electrophoresis and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements, and then confirmed by transferring it to a nanomaterial-assisted fluorescence assay. Significantly, the BRCL strategy-based assay is able to respond to target protein with desirable selectivity, attributing to the specific recognition between small-molecule ligand and its target. Further experiments validate the general applicability of the sensing method by tailoring the ligand toward different proteins (i.e., avidin and folate receptor), and demonstrate its usability in complex biological samples. To our knowledge, this work pioneers the practice of click chemistry in probing specific small-molecule ligand-protein binding, and therefore may pave a new way for selective detection of proteins. PMID:26599478

  5. Autoinhibition of Mint1 adaptor protein regulates amyloid precursor protein binding and processing

    OpenAIRE

    Matos, Maria F.; Xu, Yibin; Dulubova, Irina; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Richardson, John M.; Tomchick, Diana R.; Rizo, Josep; Ho, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Mint adaptor proteins bind to the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and regulate APP processing associated with Alzheimer’s disease; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Mint regulation in APP binding and processing remain unclear. Biochemical, biophysical, and cellular experiments now show that the Mint1 phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain that binds to APP is intramolecularly inhibited by the adjacent C-terminal linker region. The crystal structure of a C-terminally extended Mint1 PT...

  6. Regulation of RNA binding proteins in trypanosomatid protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniuk, María Albertina; Cervini, Gabriela; Cassola, Alejandro

    2016-02-26

    Posttranscriptional mechanisms have a critical role in the overall outcome of gene expression. These mechanisms are especially relevant in protozoa from the genus Trypanosoma, which is composed by death threatening parasites affecting people in Sub-saharan Africa or in the Americas. In these parasites the classic view of regulation of transcription initiation to modulate the products of a given gene cannot be applied. This is due to the presence of transcription start sites that give rise to long polycistronic units that need to be processed costranscriptionally by trans-splicing and polyadenylation to give mature monocistronic mRNAs. Posttranscriptional mechanisms such as mRNA degradation and translational repression are responsible for the final synthesis of the required protein products. In this context, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) in trypanosomes have a relevant role as modulators of mRNA abundance and translational repression by associating to the 3' untranslated regions in mRNA. Many different RBPs have been proposed to modulate cohorts of mRNAs in trypanosomes. However, the current understanding of their functions lacks a dynamic view on the different steps at which these RBPs are regulated. Here, we discuss different evidences to propose regulatory events for different RBPs in these parasites. These events vary from regulated developmental expression, to biogenesis of cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes in the nucleus, and condensation of RBPs and mRNA into large cytoplasmic granules. Finally, we discuss how newly identified posttranslational modifications of RBPs and mRNA metabolism-related proteins could have an enormous impact on the modulation of mRNA abundance. To understand these modifications is especially relevant in these parasites due to the fact that the enzymes involved could be interesting targets for drug therapy. PMID:26981203

  7. Human pentraxin 3 binds to the complement regulator c4b-binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Braunschweig

    Full Text Available The long pentraxin 3 (PTX3 is a soluble recognition molecule with multiple functions including innate immune defense against certain microbes and the clearance of apoptotic cells. PTX3 interacts with recognition molecules of the classical and lectin complement pathways and thus initiates complement activation. In addition, binding of PTX3 to the alternative complement pathway regulator factor H was shown. Here, we show that PTX3 binds to the classical and lectin pathway regulator C4b-binding protein (C4BP. A PTX3-binding site was identified within short consensus repeats 1-3 of the C4BP α-chain. PTX3 did not interfere with the cofactor activity of C4BP in the fluid phase and C4BP maintained its complement regulatory activity when bound to PTX3 on surfaces. While C4BP and factor H did not compete for PTX3 binding, the interaction of C4BP with PTX3 was inhibited by C1q and by L-ficolin. PTX3 bound to human fibroblast- and endothelial cell-derived extracellular matrices and recruited functionally active C4BP to these surfaces. Whereas PTX3 enhanced the activation of the classical/lectin pathway and caused enhanced C3 deposition on extracellular matrix, deposition of terminal pathway components and the generation of the inflammatory mediator C5a were not increased. Furthermore, PTX3 enhanced the binding of C4BP to late apoptotic cells, which resulted in an increased rate of inactivation of cell surface bound C4b and a reduction in the deposition of C5b-9. Thus, in addition to complement activators, PTX3 interacts with complement inhibitors including C4BP. This balanced interaction on extracellular matrix and on apoptotic cells may prevent excessive local complement activation that would otherwise lead to inflammation and host tissue damage.

  8. Unusual Heme Binding in the Bacterial Iron Response Regulator Protein (Irr): Spectral Characterization of Heme Binding to Heme Regulatory Motif

    OpenAIRE

    Ishikawa, Haruto; Nakagaki, Megumi; Bamba, Ai; Uchida, Takeshi; Hori, Hiroshi; O'Brian, Mark R.; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2011-01-01

    We characterized heme binding in the bacterial iron response regulator (Irr) protein, which is a simple heme-regulated protein having a single “heme-regulatory motif”, HRM, and plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of a nitrogen fixing bacterium. The heme titration to wild-type and mutant Irr clearly showed that Irr has two heme binding sites: one of the heme binding sites is in the HRM, where 29Cys is the axial ligand, and the other one, the secondary heme binding site, is located outside...

  9. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  10. Lipid-regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes by oxysterol-binding protein homologues

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz, Timothy A.; Choi, Mal-Gi; Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Mears, Jason A.; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Hinshaw, Jenny E.; Prinz, William A.

    2009-01-01

    Sterols are transferred between cellular membranes by vesicular and poorly understood nonvesicular pathways. Oxysterol-binding protein–related proteins (ORPs) have been implicated in sterol sensing and nonvesicular transport. In this study, we show that yeast ORPs use a novel mechanism that allows regulated sterol transfer between closely apposed membranes, such as organelle contact sites. We find that the core lipid-binding domain found in all ORPs can simultaneously bind two membranes. Usin...

  11. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I; Cheng, C Yan

    2016-03-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis, since the onset of meiosis and spermiogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular, at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin-binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  12. Hormone response element binding proteins: novel regulators of vitamin D and estrogen signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Lisse, Thomas S.; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Insights from vitamin D-resistant New World primates and their human homologues as models of natural and pathological insensitivity to sterol/steroid action have uncovered a family of novel intracellular vitamin D and estrogen regulatory proteins involved in hormone action. The proteins, known as “vitamin D or estrogen response element-binding proteins”, behave as potent cis-acting, transdominant regulators to inhibit steroid receptor binding to DNA response elements and is responsible for vi...

  13. Diacylglycerol kinase theta and zeta isoforms: regulation of activity, protein binding partners and physiological functions

    OpenAIRE

    Los, Alrik Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) yielding phosphatidic acid (PA). In this thesis, we investigated which structural domains of DGKtheta are required for DGK activity. Furthermore, we showed that DGKzeta binds to and is activated by the Retinoblastoma tumour suppressor protein (pRB) and the pRB-related proteins p107 and p130, key regulators of the cell-cycle, differentiation and apoptosis. The interaction between pRB and DGKzeta is regulated ...

  14. Complex regulation of CREB-binding protein by homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2

    KAUST Repository

    Kovács, Krisztián A.

    2015-11-01

    CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300 are transcriptional coactivators involved in numerous biological processes that affect cell growth, transformation, differentiation, and development. In this study, we provide evidence of the involvement of homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) in the regulation of CBP activity. We show that HIPK2 interacts with and phosphorylates several regions of CBP. We demonstrate that serines 2361, 2363, 2371, 2376, and 2381 are responsible for the HIPK2-induced mobility shift of CBP C-terminal activation domain. Moreover, we show that HIPK2 strongly potentiates the transcriptional activity of CBP. However, our data suggest that HIPK2 activates CBP mainly by counteracting the repressive action of cell cycle regulatory domain 1 (CRD1), located between amino acids 977 and 1076, independently of CBP phosphorylation. Our findings thus highlight a complex regulation of CBP activity by HIPK2, which might be relevant for the control of specific sets of target genes involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Role of the RNA-binding Protein Tristetraprolin in Glucocorticoid-mediated Gene Regulation1

    OpenAIRE

    Ishmael, Faoud T.; Fang, Xi; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Atasoy, Ulus; Rigby, William F C; Gorospe, Myriam; Cheadle, Chris; Stellato, Cristiana

    2008-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are the mainstay of anti-inflammatory therapy. Modulation of post-transcriptional regulation (PTR) of gene expression by GCs is a relevant yet poorly characterized mechanism of their action. The RNA-binding protein tristetraprolin (TTP) plays a central role in PTR by binding to AU-rich elements in the 3’untranslated region of proinflammatory transcripts and accelerating their decay. We found that GCs induce TTP expression in primary and immortalized human bronchial epith...

  16. PTPRT regulates the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1 through dephosphorylation of specific tyrosine residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •PTPRT is a brain-specific, expressed, protein tyrosine phosphatase. •PTPRT regulated the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT dephosphorylated the specific tyrosine residue of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. •Dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1. •PTPRT appears to regulate the fusion of synaptic vesicle through dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: PTPRT (protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor T), a brain-specific tyrosine phosphatase, has been found to regulate synaptic formation and development of hippocampal neurons, but its regulation mechanism is not yet fully understood. Here, Syntaxin-binding protein 1, a key component of synaptic vesicle fusion machinery, was identified as a possible interaction partner and an endogenous substrate of PTPRT. PTPRT interacted with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in rat synaptosome, and co-localized with Syntaxin-binding protein 1 in cultured hippocampal neurons. PTPRT dephosphorylated tyrosine 145 located around the linker between domain 1 and 2 of Syntaxin-binding protein 1. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 directly binds to Syntaxin 1, a t-SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) protein, and plays a role as catalysts of SNARE complex formation. Syntaxin-binding protein 1 mutant mimicking non-phosphorylation (Y145F) enhanced the interaction with Syntaxin 1 compared to wild type, and therefore, dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 appeared to be important for SNARE-complex formation. In conclusion, PTPRT could regulate the interaction of Syntaxin-binding protein 1 with Syntaxin 1, and as a result, the synaptic vesicle fusion appeared to be controlled through dephosphorylation of Syntaxin-binding protein 1

  17. Poly(A)-binding-protein-mediated regulation of hDcp2 decapping in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Khanna, Richie; Kiledjian, Megerditch

    2004-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA decapping is a critical determinant for gene expression. We demonstrate that the poly(A) tail-mediated regulation of mRNA decapping observed in humans can be recapitulated in vitro by the cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein PABP through a direct and specific binding to the 5′ end of capped mRNA. The specific association of PABP with the cap occurred only within the context of the RNA whereby a cap attached to an RNA moiety served as the high-affinity substrate but not the c...

  18. Translational regulation of acetylcholinesterase by the RNA-binding protein Pumilio-2 at the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Emilio; Rossi, Susana G; Darr, Andrew; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Rotundo, Richard L

    2011-10-21

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is highly expressed at sites of nerve-muscle contact where it is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation is incomplete, but they appear to involve both translational and post-translational events as well. Here, we show that Pumilio-2 (PUM2), an RNA binding translational repressor, is highly localized at the neuromuscular junction where AChE mRNA concentrates. Immunoprecipitation of muscle cell extracts with a PUM2 specific antibody precipitated AChE mRNA, suggesting that PUM2 binds to the AChE transcripts in a complex. Gel shift assays using a bacterially expressed PUM2 RNA binding domain showed specific binding using wild type AChE 3'-UTR RNA segment that was abrogated by mutation of the consensus recognition site. Transfecting skeletal muscle cells with shRNAs specific for PUM2 up-regulated AChE expression, whereas overexpression of PUM2 decreased AChE activity. We conclude that PUM2 binds to AChE mRNA and regulates AChE expression translationally at the neuromuscular synapse. Finally, we found that PUM2 is regulated by the motor nerve suggesting a trans-synaptic mechanism for locally regulating translation of specific proteins involved in modulating synaptic transmission, analogous to CNS synapses. PMID:21865157

  19. Translational Regulation of Acetylcholinesterase by the RNA-binding Protein Pumilio-2 at the Neuromuscular Synapse*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Emilio; Rossi, Susana G.; Darr, Andrew; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Rotundo, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is highly expressed at sites of nerve-muscle contact where it is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation is incomplete, but they appear to involve both translational and post-translational events as well. Here, we show that Pumilio-2 (PUM2), an RNA binding translational repressor, is highly localized at the neuromuscular junction where AChE mRNA concentrates. Immunoprecipitation of muscle cell extracts with a PUM2 specific antibody precipitated AChE mRNA, suggesting that PUM2 binds to the AChE transcripts in a complex. Gel shift assays using a bacterially expressed PUM2 RNA binding domain showed specific binding using wild type AChE 3′-UTR RNA segment that was abrogated by mutation of the consensus recognition site. Transfecting skeletal muscle cells with shRNAs specific for PUM2 up-regulated AChE expression, whereas overexpression of PUM2 decreased AChE activity. We conclude that PUM2 binds to AChE mRNA and regulates AChE expression translationally at the neuromuscular synapse. Finally, we found that PUM2 is regulated by the motor nerve suggesting a trans-synaptic mechanism for locally regulating translation of specific proteins involved in modulating synaptic transmission, analogous to CNS synapses. PMID:21865157

  20. Polypyrimidine tract binding protein functions as a negative regulator of feline calicivirus translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Karakasiliotis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Positive strand RNA viruses rely heavily on host cell RNA binding proteins for various aspects of their life cycle. Such proteins interact with sequences usually present at the 5' or 3' extremities of the viral RNA genome, to regulate viral translation and/or replication. We have previously reported that the well characterized host RNA binding protein polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB interacts with the 5'end of the feline calicivirus (FCV genomic and subgenomic RNAs, playing a role in the FCV life cycle. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have demonstrated that PTB interacts with at least two binding sites within the 5'end of the FCV genome. In vitro translation indicated that PTB may function as a negative regulator of FCV translation and this was subsequently confirmed as the translation of the viral subgenomic RNA in PTB siRNA treated cells was stimulated under conditions in which RNA replication could not occur. We also observed that PTB redistributes from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during FCV infection, partially localizing to viral replication complexes, suggesting that PTB binding may be involved in the switch from translation to replication. Reverse genetics studies demonstrated that synonymous mutations in the PTB binding sites result in a cell-type specific defect in FCV replication. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicates that PTB may function to negatively regulate FCV translation initiation. To reconcile this with efficient virus replication in cells, we propose a putative model for the function of PTB in the FCV life cycle. It is possible that during the early stages of infection, viral RNA is translated in the absence of PTB, however, as the levels of viral proteins increase, the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of PTB is altered, increasing the cytoplasmic levels of PTB, inhibiting viral translation. Whether PTB acts directly to repress translation initiation or via the recruitment of other factors remains to be determined but

  1. Conformational dynamics of a G-protein α subunit is tightly regulated by nucleotide binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goricanec, David; Stehle, Ralf; Egloff, Pascal; Grigoriu, Simina; Plückthun, Andreas; Wagner, Gerhard; Hagn, Franz

    2016-06-28

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a pivotal role in the signal-transduction pathways initiated by G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation. Agonist-receptor binding causes GDP-to-GTP exchange and dissociation of the Gα subunit from the heterotrimeric G protein, leading to downstream signaling. Here, we studied the internal mobility of a G-protein α subunit in its apo and nucleotide-bound forms and characterized their dynamical features at multiple time scales using solution NMR, small-angle X-ray scattering, and molecular dynamics simulations. We find that binding of GTP analogs leads to a rigid and closed arrangement of the Gα subdomain, whereas the apo and GDP-bound forms are considerably more open and dynamic. Furthermore, we were able to detect two conformational states of the Gα Ras domain in slow exchange whose populations are regulated by binding to nucleotides and a GPCR. One of these conformational states, the open state, binds to the GPCR; the second conformation, the closed state, shows no interaction with the receptor. Binding to the GPCR stabilizes the open state. This study provides an in-depth analysis of the conformational landscape and the switching function of a G-protein α subunit and the influence of a GPCR in that landscape. PMID:27298341

  2. Rho, nuclear actin, and actin-binding proteins in the regulation of transcription and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajakylä, Eeva Kaisa; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2014-01-01

    Actin cytoskeleton is one of the main targets of Rho GTPases, which act as molecular switches on many signaling pathways. During the past decade, actin has emerged as an important regulator of gene expression. Nuclear actin plays a key role in transcription, chromatin remodeling, and pre-mRNA processing. In addition, the "status" of the actin cytoskeleton is used as a signaling intermediate by at least the MKL1-SRF and Hippo-pathways, which culminate in the transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal and growth-promoting genes, respectively. Rho GTPases may therefore regulate gene expression by controlling either cytoplasmic or nuclear actin dynamics. Although the regulation of nuclear actin polymerization is still poorly understood, many actin-binding proteins, which are downstream effectors of Rho, are found in the nuclear compartment. In this review, we discuss the possible mechanisms and key proteins that may mediate the transcriptional regulation by Rho GTPases through actin. PMID:24603113

  3. RNA-binding protein hnRNPLL as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xing

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins orchestrate posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, such as messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing, RNA stability regulation, and translation regulation. Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding proteins (hnRNPs) refer to a collection of unrelated RNA-binding proteins predominantly located in the nucleus (Han et al. Biochem J 2010, 430:379-392). Although canonical functions of hnRNPs are to promote pre-mRNA splicing, they are involved in all the processes of RNA metabolism through recognizing specific cis-elements on RNA (Dreyfuss et al. Annu Rev Biochem 1993, 62:289-321; Huelga et al. Cell Rep 2012, 1:167-178; Krecic and Swanson. Curr Opin Cell Biol 1999, 11:363-371). Heterogeneous nuclear RNA-binding protein L like (hnRNPLL) is a tissue-specific hnRNP, which was identified as a regulator of CD45RA to CD45RO switching during memory T-cell development (Oberdoerffer et al. Science 2008, 321:686-691; Topp et al. RNA 2008, 14:2038-2049; Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875). Since then, hnRNPLL has emerged as a critical regulator of lymphocyte homeostasis and terminal differentiation, controlling alternative splicing or expression of critical genes for the lymphocytes development (Wu et al. Immunity 2008, 29:863-875; Chang et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2015, 112:E1888-E1897). This review will summarize recent advances in understanding the functions of hnRNPLL, focusing on its biochemical functions and physiological roles in lymphocyte differentiation and homeostasis. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:295-302. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1335 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26821996

  4. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein regulates desaturase alternative splicing and PUFA composition

    OpenAIRE

    Reardon, Holly T; Park, Woo Jung; Zhang, Jimmy; Lawrence, Peter; Kothapalli, Kumar S. D.; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The Δ6 desaturase, encoded by FADS2, plays a crucial role in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid synthesis. These fatty acids are essential components of the central nervous system, and they act as precursors for eicosanoid signaling molecules and as direct modulators of gene expression. The polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB or hnRNP I) is a splicing factor that regulates alternative pre-mRNA splicing. Here, PTB is shown to bind an exonic splicing silencer element and repress alternative s...

  5. Posttranscriptional Regulation of p53 and Its Targets by RNA-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xinbin

    2008-01-01

    p53 tumor suppressor plays a pivotal role in maintaining genomic integrity and preventing cancer development. The importance of p53 in tumor suppression is illustrated by the observation that about 50% human tumor cells have a dysfunctional p53 pathway. Although it has been well accepted that the activity of p53 is mainly controlled through post-translational modifications, recent studies have revealed that posttranscriptional regulations of p53 by various RNA-binding proteins also play a cru...

  6. The RNA binding protein CPEB regulates dendrite morphogenesis and neuronal circuit assembly in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bestman, Jennifer E.; Cline, Hollis T.

    2008-01-01

    Visual system development requires experience-dependent mechanisms that regulate neuronal structure and function, including dendritic arbor growth, synapse formation, and stabilization. Although RNA binding proteins have been shown to affect some forms of synaptic plasticity in adult animals, their role in the development of neuronal structure and functional circuitry is not clear. Using two-photon time-lapse in vivo imaging and electrophysiology combined with morpholino-mediated knockdown an...

  7. Poly(A)-binding proteins: structure, domain organization, and activity regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliseeva, I A; Lyabin, D N; Ovchinnikov, L P

    2013-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins are of vital importance for mRNA functioning. Among these, poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are of special interest due to their participation in virtually all mRNA-dependent events that is caused by their high affinity for A-rich mRNA sequences. Apart from mRNAs, PABPs interact with many proteins, thus promoting their involvement in cellular events. In the nucleus, PABPs play a role in polyadenylation, determine the length of the poly(A) tail, and may be involved in mRNA export. In the cytoplasm, they participate in regulation of translation initiation and either protect mRNAs from decay through binding to their poly(A) tails or stimulate this decay by promoting mRNA interactions with deadenylase complex proteins. This review presents modern notions of the role of PABPs in mRNA-dependent events; peculiarities of regulation of PABP amount in the cell and activities are also discussed. PMID:24490729

  8. Protein kinase C regulates the phosphorylation and oligomerization of ERM binding phosphoprotein 50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50, a.k.a. NHERF-1) is a scaffold protein essential for the localization and coordinated activity of apical transporters, enzymes and receptors in epithelial cells. EBP50 acts via multiple protein binding interactions, including oligomerization through interactions of its PSD95-Dlg-ZO1 (PDZ) domains. EBP50 can be phosphorylated on multiple sites and phosphorylation of specific sites modulates the extent of oligomerization. The aim of the present study was to test the capacity of protein kinase C (PKC) to phosphorylate EBP50 and to regulate its oligomerization. In vitro experiments showed that the catalytic subunit of PKC directly phosphorylates EBP50. In HEK-293 cells transfected with rat EBP50 cDNA, a treatment with 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced a translocation of PKCα and β isoforms to the membrane and increased 32P incorporation into EBP50. In co-transfection/co-precipitation studies, PMA treatment stimulated EBP50 oligomerization. Mass spectrometry analysis of full-length EBP50 and phosphorylation analyses of specific domains, and of mutated or truncated forms of EBP50, indicated that PKC-induced phosphorylation of EBP50 occurred on the Ser337/Ser338 residue within the carboxyl-tail domain of the protein. Truncation of Ser337/Ser338 also diminished PKC-induced oligomerization of EBP50. These results suggest the PKC signaling pathway can impact EBP50-dependent cellular functions by regulating EBP50 oligomerization

  9. SLOB, a SLOWPOKE channel binding protein, regulates insulin pathway signaling and metabolism in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Sheldon

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that ion channel modulation by accessory proteins within a macromolecular complex can regulate channel activity and thereby impact neuronal excitability. However, the downstream consequences of ion channel modulation remain largely undetermined. The Drosophila melanogaster large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO undergoes modulation via its binding partner SLO-binding protein (SLOB. Regulation of SLO by SLOB influences the voltage dependence of SLO activation and modulates synaptic transmission. SLO and SLOB are expressed especially prominently in median neurosecretory cells (mNSCs in the pars intercerebralis (PI region of the brain; these cells also express and secrete Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs. Previously, we found that flies lacking SLOB exhibit increased resistance to starvation, and we reasoned that SLOB may regulate aspects of insulin signaling and metabolism. Here we investigate the role of SLOB in metabolism and find that slob null flies exhibit changes in energy storage and insulin pathway signaling. In addition, slob null flies have decreased levels of dilp3 and increased levels of takeout, a gene known to be involved in feeding and metabolism. Targeted expression of SLOB to mNSCs rescues these alterations in gene expression, as well as the metabolic phenotypes. Analysis of fly lines mutant for both slob and slo indicate that the effect of SLOB on metabolism and gene expression is via SLO. We propose that modulation of SLO by SLOB regulates neurotransmission in mNSCs, influencing downstream insulin pathway signaling and metabolism.

  10. Structure of noncoding RNA is a determinant of function of RNA binding proteins in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyoshi Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of the noncoding regions of mammalian genomes have been found to be transcribed to generate noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, resulting in intense interest in their biological roles. During the past decade, numerous ncRNAs and aptamers have been identified as regulators of transcription. 6S RNA, first described as a ncRNA in E. coli, mimics an open promoter structure, which has a large bulge with two hairpin/stalk structures that regulate transcription through interactions with RNA polymerase. B2 RNA, which has stem-loops and unstructured single-stranded regions, represses transcription of mRNA in response to various stresses, including heat shock in mouse cells. The interaction of TLS (translocated in liposarcoma with CBP/p300 was induced by ncRNAs that bind to TLS, and this in turn results in inhibition of CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity in human cells. Transcription regulator EWS (Ewing's sarcoma, which is highly related to TLS, and TLS specifically bind to G-quadruplex structures in vitro. The carboxy terminus containing the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG repeat domains in these proteins are necessary for cis-repression of transcription activation and HAT activity by the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain. Especially, the RGG domain in the carboxy terminus of EWS is important for the G-quadruplex specific binding. Together, these data suggest that functions of EWS and TLS are modulated by specific structures of ncRNAs.

  11. Regulation of B cell differentiation by the ubiquitin-binding protein TAX1BP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Nobuko; Suzuki, Midori; Ikebe, Emi; Nagashima, Shun; Inatome, Ryoko; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Matsushita, Masayuki; Kondo, Eisaku; Iha, Hidekatsu; Yanagi, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Tax1-binding protein 1 (TAX1BP1) is a ubiquitin-binding protein that restricts nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation and facilitates the termination of aberrant inflammation. However, its roles in B-cell activation and differentiation are poorly understood. To evaluate the function of TAX1BP1 in B cells, we established TAX1BP1-deficient DT40 B cells that are hyper-responsive to CD40-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation signaling, exhibit prolonged and exaggerated ERK phosphorylation and show enhanced B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1; a transcription factor inducing plasma cell differentiation) expression that is ERK-dependent. Furthermore, TAX1BP1-deficient cells exhibit significantly decreased surface IgM expression and increased IgM secretion. Moreover, TAX1BP1-deficient mice display reduced germinal center formation and antigen-specific antibody production. These findings show that TAX1BP1 restricts ERK activation and Blimp-1 expression and regulates germinal center formation. PMID:27515252

  12. Regulation of mRNA stability via BRF1 and other AU-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidlin-Stalder, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Steady state levels of mRNAs are determined by the rate of synthesis and degradation. A well-known cis-element conferring instability to mRNA is the so-called AU-rich element (ARE), which is present in the 3’ untranslated region (3’UTR) of many cytokines, chemokines, growth factors or proto-oncogenes. The ARE is recognized by a variety of ARE-binding proteins (AUBPs), which decide about the fate of the RNA. Multiple signaling cascades regulate the activity of the AUBPs. Butyrate response fact...

  13. A Varp-Binding Protein, RACK1, Regulates Dendrite Outgrowth through Stabilization of Varp Protein in Mouse Melanocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubashi, Soujiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2016-08-01

    Varp (VPS9-ankyrin repeat protein) in melanocytes is thought to function as a key player in the pigmentation of mammals. Varp regulates two different melanocyte functions: (i) transport of melanogenic enzymes to melanosomes by functioning as a Rab32/38 effector and (ii) promotion of dendrite outgrowth by functioning as a Rab21-guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The Varp protein level has recently been shown to be negatively regulated by proteasomal degradation through interaction of the ankyrin repeat 2 (ANKR2) domain of Varp with Rab40C. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Varp escapes from Rab40C and retains its own expression level remain completely unknown. Here, we identified RACK1 (receptor of activated protein kinase C 1) as a Varp-ANKR2 binding partner and investigated its involvement in Varp stabilization in mouse melanocytes. The results showed that knockdown of endogenous RACK1 in melanocytes caused dramatic reduction of the Varp protein level and inhibition of dendrite outgrowth, and intriguingly, overexpression of RACK1 inhibited the interaction between Varp and Rab40C and counteracted the negative effect of Rab40C on dendrite outgrowth. These findings indicated that RACK1 competes with Rab40C for binding to the ANKR2 domain of Varp and regulates dendrite outgrowth through stabilization of Varp in mouse melanocytes. PMID:27066885

  14. Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4b binding protein to group A streptococcal strains isolated from tonsillar tissue and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvilehto, Jari; Jarva, Hanna; Seppänen, Mikko; Siljander, Tuula; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Meri, Seppo

    2008-06-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is the most common pathogen causing bacterial pharyngitis. We isolated streptococcal strains from tonsils removed from patients with tonsillar disease (n=202) and studied their ability to bind the complement regulators factor H (FH) and C4b binding protein (C4BP) using 125 I-labeled proteins. Blood isolates of GAS (n=10) were obtained from patients with bacteraemia. Streptococci were isolated from 21% of the tonsillitis patients. The emm and T types of the GAS strains were determined. Of the 26 GAS strains studied, only six could bind FH and/or C4BP above the threshold levels. The fraction of the offered radioactive protein bound ranged between 6-12% for FH and 19-56% for C4BP. The clinical course of the tonsillar disease was not related to the binding of FH or C4BP by GAS. The binding strains were mostly of the T4M4 or T28M28 type. From the invasive strains (n=10), three bound FH (binding level: 8-11%) and two C4BP (36-39%). The binding correlated only partially to M-protein (emm) type suggesting that the binding was not exclusively due to M-protein. The results indicate that complement regulator binding by GAS is only partially related to pathogenicity and not a universal property of all group A streptococci. PMID:18538613

  15. Stem-loop binding protein is a multifaceted cellular regulator of HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Tucker, Lynne D; Asara, John M; Cheruiyot, Collins K; Lu, Huafei; Wu, Zhijin J; Newstein, Michael C; Dooner, Mark S; Friedman, Jennifer; Lally, Michelle A; Ramratnam, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    A rare subset of HIV-1-infected individuals is able to maintain plasma viral load (VL) at low levels without antiretroviral treatment. Identifying the mechanisms underlying this atypical response to infection may lead to therapeutic advances for treating HIV-1. Here, we developed a proteomic analysis to compare peripheral blood cell proteomes in 20 HIV-1-infected individuals who maintained either high or low VL with the aim of identifying host factors that impact HIV-1 replication. We determined that the levels of multiple histone proteins were markedly decreased in cohorts of individuals with high VL. This reduction was correlated with lower levels of stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which is known to control histone metabolism. Depletion of cellular SLBP increased promoter engagement with the chromatin structures of the host gene high mobility group protein A1 (HMGA1) and viral long terminal repeat (LTR), which led to higher levels of HIV-1 genomic integration and proviral transcription. Further, we determined that TNF-α regulates expression of SLBP and observed that plasma TNF-α levels in HIV-1-infected individuals correlated directly with VL levels and inversely with cellular SLBP levels. Our findings identify SLBP as a potentially important cellular regulator of HIV-1, thereby establishing a link between histone metabolism, inflammation, and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27454292

  16. The Arabidopsis RNA-Binding Protein AtRGGA Regulates Tolerance to Salt and Drought Stress

    KAUST Repository

    Ambrosone, Alfredo

    2015-03-17

    Salt and drought stress severely reduce plant growth and crop productivity worldwide. The identification of genes underlying stress response and tolerance is the subject of intense research in plant biology. Through microarray analyses, we previously identified in potato (Solanum tuberosum) StRGGA, coding for an Arginine Glycine Glycine (RGG) box-containing RNA-binding protein, whose expression was specifically induced in potato cell cultures gradually exposed to osmotic stress. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ortholog, AtRGGA, is a functional RNA-binding protein required for a proper response to osmotic stress. AtRGGA gene expression was up-regulated in seedlings after long-term exposure to abscisic acid (ABA) and polyethylene glycol, while treatments with NaCl resulted in AtRGGA down-regulation. AtRGGA promoter analysis showed activity in several tissues, including stomata, the organs controlling transpiration. Fusion of AtRGGA with yellow fluorescent protein indicated that AtRGGA is localized in the cytoplasm and the cytoplasmic perinuclear region. In addition, the rgga knockout mutant was hypersensitive to ABA in root growth and survival tests and to salt stress during germination and at the vegetative stage. AtRGGA-overexpressing plants showed higher tolerance to ABA and salt stress on plates and in soil, accumulating lower levels of proline when exposed to drought stress. Finally, a global analysis of gene expression revealed extensive alterations in the transcriptome under salt stress, including several genes such as ASCORBATE PEROXIDASE2, GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE TAU9, and several SMALL AUXIN UPREGULATED RNA-like genes showing opposite expression behavior in transgenic and knockout plants. Taken together, our results reveal an important role of AtRGGA in the mechanisms of plant response and adaptation to stress.

  17. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  18. Nuclear matrix binding protein SMAR1 regulates T-cell differentiation and allergic airway disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemmannur, S V; Badhwar, A J; Mirlekar, B; Malonia, S K; Gupta, M; Wadhwa, N; Bopanna, R; Mabalirajan, U; Majumdar, S; Ghosh, B; Chattopadhyay, S

    2015-11-01

    Asthma is a complex airway allergic disease involving the interplay of various cell types, cytokines, and transcriptional factors. Though many factors contribute to disease etiology, the molecular control of disease phenotype and responsiveness is not well understood. Here we report an essential role of the matrix attachment region (MAR)-binding protein SMAR1 in regulating immune response during allergic airway disease. Conditional knockout of SMAR1 in T cells rendered the mice resistant to eosinophilic airway inflammation against ovalbumin (OVA) allergen with low immunoglobulin E (IgE) and interleukin-5 (IL-5) levels. Moreover, a lower IgE/IgG2a ratio and higher interferon-γ (IFN-γ) response suggested aberrant skewing of T-cell differentiation toward type 1 helper T cell (Th1) response. We show that SMAR1 functions as a negative regulator of Th1 and Th17 differentiation by interacting with two potential and similar MAR regions present on the promoters of T-bet and IL-17. Thus, we present SMAR1 as a regulator of T-cell differentiation that favors the establishment of Th2 cells by modulating Th1 and Th17 responses. PMID:25736456

  19. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca2+-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number

  20. Dictyostelium calcium-binding protein 4a interacts with nucleomorphin, a BRCT-domain protein that regulates nuclear number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2004-09-17

    Nucleomorphin from Dictyostelium discoideum is a nuclear calmodulin-binding protein that is a member of the BRCT-domain containing cell cycle checkpoint proteins. Two differentially expressed isoforms, NumA and NumB, share an extensive acidic domain (DEED) that when deleted produces highly multinucleated cells. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen of a Dictyostelium cDNA library using NumA as bait. Here we show that nucleomorphin interacts with calcium-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Further deletion analysis suggests this interaction requires residues found within the DEED domain. NumA and CBP4a mRNAs are expressed at the same stages of development. CBP4a belongs to a large family of Dictyostelium CBPs, for which no cellular or developmental functions had previously been determined. Since the interaction of CBP4a with nucleomorphin requires the DEED domain, this suggests that CBP4a may respond to Ca(2+)-signalling through modulating factors that might function in concert to regulate nuclear number. PMID:15325281

  1. Conserved Cysteine Residue in the DNA-Binding Domain of the Bovine Papillomavirus Type 1 E2 Protein Confers Redox Regulation of the DNA- Binding Activity in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Alison A.; Klausner, Richard D.; Howley, Peter M.

    1992-08-01

    The bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 open reading frame encodes three proteins involved in viral DNA replication and transcriptional regulation. These polypeptides share a carboxyl-terminal domain with a specific DNA-binding activity; through this domain the E2 polypeptides form dimers. In this study, we demonstrate the inhibition of E2 DNA binding in vitro by reagents that oxidize or otherwise chemically modify the free sulfydryl groups of reactive cysteine residues. However, these reagents had no effect on DNA-binding activity when the E2 polypeptide was first bound to DNA, suggesting that the free sulfydryl group(s) may be protected by DNA binding. Sensitivity to sulfydryl modification was mapped to a cysteine residue at position 340 in the E2 DNA-binding domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved among the E2 proteins of different papillomaviruses. Replacement of this residue with other amino acids abrogated the sensitivity to oxidation-reduction changes but did not affect the DNA-binding property of the E2 protein. These results suggest that papillomavirus DNA replication and transcriptional regulation could be modulated through the E2 proteins by changes in the intracellular redox environment. Furthermore, a motif consisting of a reactive cysteine residue carboxyl-terminal to a lysine residue in a basic region of the DNA-binding domain is a feature common to a number of transcriptional regulatory proteins that, like E2, are subject to redox regulation. Thus, posttranslational regulation of the activity of these proteins by the intracellular redox environment may be a general phenomenon.

  2. APUM5, encoding a Pumilio RNA binding protein, negatively regulates abiotic stress responsive gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Background A mutant screening was carried out previously to look for new genes related to the Cucumber mosaic virus infection response in Arabidopsis. A Pumilio RNA binding protein-coding gene, Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 (APUM5), was obtained from this screening. Results APUM5 transcriptional profiling was carried out using a bioinformatics tool. We found that APUM5 was associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, bacterial and fungal pathogen infection su...

  3. Regulation of activity of the yeast TATA-binding protein through intra-molecular interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Perumal Vanathi; Anurag Kumar Mishra; Purnima Bhargava

    2003-06-01

    Dimerization is proposed to be a regulatory mechanism for TATA-binding protein (TBP) activity both in vitro and in vivo. The reversible dimer-monomer transition of TBP is influenced by the buffer conditions in vitro. Using in vitro chemical cross-linking, we found yeast TBP (yTBP) to be largely monomeric in the presence of the divalent cation Mg2+, even at high salt concentrations. Apparent molecular mass of yTBP at high salt with Mg2+, run through a gel filtration column, was close to that of monomeric yTBP. Lowering the monovalent ionic concentration in the absence of Mg2+, resulted in dimerization of TBP. Effect of Mg2+ was seen at two different levels: at higher TBP concentrations, it suppressed the TBP dimerization and at lower TBP levels, it helped keep TBP monomers in active conformation (competent for binding TATA box), resulting in enhanced TBP-TATA complex formation in the presence of increasing Mg2+. At both the levels, activity of the full-length TBP in the presence of Mg2+ was like that reported for the truncated C-terminal domain of TBP from which the N-terminus is removed. Therefore for full-length TBP, intra-molecular interactions can regulate its activity via a similar mechanism.

  4. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil, E-mail: hyunil74@hotmail.com; Lee, Zang Hee, E-mail: zang1959@snu.ac.kr

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  5. G-patch domain and KOW motifs-containing protein, GPKOW; a nuclear RNA-binding protein regulated by protein kinase A

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Post-transcriptional processing of pre-mRNA takes place in several steps and requires involvement of a number of RNA-binding proteins. How pre-mRNA processing is regulated is in large enigmatic. The catalytic (C) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) is a serine/threonine kinase, which regulates numerous cellular processes including pre-mRNA splicing. Despite that a significant fraction of the C subunit is found in splicing factor compartments in the nucleus, there are no indications ...

  6. Phosphorylation Regulates Binding of the Human Papillomavirus Type 8 E2 Protein to Host Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Sekhar, Vandana; Alison A McBride

    2012-01-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are indispensable for the viral life cycle, and their functions are subject to tight regulation. The E2 proteins undergo posttranslational modifications that regulate their properties and roles in viral transcription, replication, and genome maintenance. During persistent infection, the E2 proteins from many papillomaviruses act as molecular bridges that tether the viral genomes to host chromosomes to retain them within the host nucleus and to partition them to ...

  7. Binding of the human papillomavirus E1 origin-recognition protein is regulated through complex formation with the E2 enhancer-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Frattini, M G; Laimins, L A

    1994-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 and E2 proteins form heteromeric complexes and individually bind specific sequences within the viral origin of replication. The mechanism by which these proteins are recruited to the origin and the role of the E1/E2 complex in replication remain undefined. To examine the interplay of these replication proteins, we have analyzed the binding of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 31b E1 and E2 proteins to the origin of replication. Binding of E1 to the origin was increased by ...

  8. The RNA binding protein Larp1 regulates cell division, apoptosis and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Carla; Abd Latip, Normala; Lam, Sarah-Jane; Carpenter, Lee; Sawicka, Kirsty; Tzolovsky, George; Gabra, Hani; Bushell, Martin; Glover, David M; Willis, Anne E; Blagden, Sarah P

    2010-09-01

    The RNA binding protein Larp1 was originally shown to be involved in spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and cell-cycle progression in Drosophila. Our data show that mammalian Larp1 is found in a complex with poly A binding protein and eukaryote initiation factor 4E and is associated with 60S and 80S ribosomal subunits. A reduction in Larp1 expression by siRNA inhibits global protein synthesis rates and results in mitotic arrest and delayed cell migration. Consistent with these data we show that Larp1 protein is present at the leading edge of migrating cells and interacts directly with cytoskeletal components. Taken together, these data suggest a role for Larp1 in facilitating the synthesis of proteins required for cellular remodelling and migration. PMID:20430826

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Regulates Aberrant Expression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 3

    OpenAIRE

    TAKAOKA, MUNENORI; Harada, Hideki; Andl, Claudia D; Oyama, Kenji; Naomoto, Yoshio; Dempsey, Kelly L.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; El-Deiry, Wafik S; GRIMBERG, ADDA; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in esophageal carcinoma and its precursor lesions. To gain insights into how EGFR overexpression affects cellular functions in primary human esophageal cells, we performed gene expression profiling and identified insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 as the most up-regulated gene. IGFBP-3 regulates cell proliferation through both insulin-like growth factor-dependent and independent mechanisms. We found that IGF...

  10. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  11. REGULATION OF RETINOL BINDING PROTEIN 4 EXPRESSION AND ITS RELATION TO ADIPOGENESIS IN BOVINE ADIPOCYTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Eldaim Mabrouk Attia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipogenesis is of great importance in beef cattle. Recent findings indicate that glucose, a substrate for fatty acid biosynthesis and retinoic acid enhance adipogenesis in bovine intramuscular adipocytes. However, other recent findings indicate that Retinol-Binding Protein 4 (RBP4 interferes with glucose uptake and utilization by rodents’ adipocytes. In this study we examined the regulation of RBP4 expression and its relation to adipogenesis in bovine adipocytes. Stromal vascular cells were prepared by collagenase digestion from subcutaneous and intramuscular adipose tissues of Japanese black steers. RT-PCR revealed that RBP4 mRNA was expressed in bovine adipose tissue. Northern and Western Blot analysis showed that RBP4 was highly expressed and secreted from bovine preadipocytes. However, RBP4 expression and secretion were significantly reduced by induction of the adipogenic differentiation of preadipocytes into mature adipocytes. Glucose and retinoic acid have a suppressive effect on RBP4 expression and secretion from intramuscular adipocytes. Retinoic acid significantly decreased RBP4 expression in Japanese black steer subcutaneous adipocytes. Retinoic acid itself had no effect on lipid accumulation in subcutaneous adipocytes however, retinoic acid enhanced lipid accumulation in these adipocytes after addition of acetate, a substrate for fatty acid biosynthesis in subcutaneous adipocytes. This study indicated a negative correlation between adipogenesis and RBP4 expression in bovine adipocytes and suggests possible inhibitory effect of RBP4 on adipogenesis.

  12. The trp RNA-binding attenuation protein of Bacillus subtilis regulates translation of the tryptophan transport gene trpP (yhaG) by blocking ribosome binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnin, Helen; Zhang, Hong; Yakhnin, Alexander V; Babitzke, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Expression of the Bacillus subtilis tryptophan biosynthetic genes (trpEDCFBA and pabA [trpG]) is regulated in response to tryptophan by TRAP, the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein. TRAP-mediated regulation of the tryptophan biosynthetic genes includes a transcription attenuation and two distinct translation control mechanisms. TRAP also regulates translation of trpP (yhaG), a single-gene operon that encodes a putative tryptophan transporter. Its translation initiation region contains triplet repeats typical of TRAP-regulated mRNAs. We found that regulation of trpP and pabA is unaltered in a rho mutant strain. Results from filter binding and gel mobility shift assays demonstrated that TRAP binds specifically to a segment of the trpP transcript that includes the untranslated leader and translation initiation region. While the affinities of TRAP for the trpP and pabA transcripts are similar, TRAP-mediated translation control of trpP is much more extensive than for pabA. RNA footprinting revealed that the trpP TRAP binding site consists of nine triplet repeats (five GAG, three UAG, and one AAG) that surround and overlap the trpP Shine-Dalgarno (S-D) sequence and translation start codon. Results from toeprint and RNA-directed cell-free translation experiments indicated that tryptophan-activated TRAP inhibits TrpP synthesis by preventing binding of a 30S ribosomal subunit. Taken together, our results establish that TRAP regulates translation of trpP by blocking ribosome binding. Thus, TRAP coordinately regulates tryptophan synthesis and transport by three distinct mechanisms: attenuation transcription of the trpEDCFBA operon, promoting formation of the trpE S-D blocking hairpin, and blocking ribosome binding to the pabA and trpP transcripts. PMID:14702295

  13. Regulation of water flow by actin-binding protein-induced actin gelatin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, T.; Suzuki, A.; Stossel, T. P.

    1992-01-01

    Actin filaments inhibit osmotically driven water flow (Ito, T., K.S. Zaner, and T.P. Stossel. 1987. Biophys. J. 51: 745-753). Here we show that the actin gelation protein, actin-binding protein (ABP), impedes both osmotic shrinkage and swelling of an actin filament solution and reduces markedly the concentration of actin filaments required for this inhibition. These effects depend on actin filament immobilization, because the ABP concentration that causes initial impairment of water flow by a...

  14. Computational Identification of Post Translational Modification Regulated RNA Binding Protein Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew S. Brown; Mohanty, Bidyut K.; Howe, Philip H.

    2015-01-01

    RNA and its associated RNA binding proteins (RBPs) mitigate a diverse array of cellular functions and phenotypes. The interactions between RNA and RBPs are implicated in many roles of biochemical processing by the cell such as localization, protein translation, and RNA stability. Recent discoveries of novel mechanisms that are of significant evolutionary advantage between RBPs and RNA include the interaction of the RBP with the 3’ and 5’ untranslated region (UTR) of target mRNA. These mechani...

  15. Regulation of transcription attenuation and translation initiation by allosteric control of an RNA-binding protein: the Bacillus subtilis TRAP protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babitzke, Paul

    2004-04-01

    Tryptophan allosterically controls the 11-subunit trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) of Bacillus subtilis. When activated by tryptophan, TRAP binds to multiple trinucleotide repeats in target transcripts. TRAP is responsible for the decision to terminate transcription in the leader region of the trpEDCFBA operon or to allow transcription to proceed into the structural genes. TRAP also regulates translation of trpE by promoting formation of an RNA structure that prevents ribosome binding. In addition, bound TRAP regulates translation initiation of pabA, trpP and ycbK by directly blocking ribosome binding. The anti-TRAP protein inhibits TRAP activity by competing with RNA for the RNA binding surface of TRAP. PMID:15063849

  16. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  17. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, Gisela K. (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  18. Agitation down-regulates immunoglobulin binding protein EibG expression in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Kuczius

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC carrying eibG synthesize Escherichia coli immunoglobulin binding protein (EibG. EibG nonspecifically binds to immunoglobulins and tends to aggregate in multimers but is poorly expressed in wild-type strains. To study synthesis of the proteins and their regulation in the pathogens, we identified natural growth conditions that increased EibG synthesis. EibG proteins as well as corresponding mRNA were highly expressed under static growth conditions while shearing stress created by agitation during growth repressed protein synthesis. Further regulation effects were driven by reduced oxygen tension, and pH up-regulated EibG expression, but to a lesser extent than growth conditions while decreased temperature down-regulated EibG. Bacteria with increased EibG expression during static growth conditions showed a distinct phenotype with chain formation and biofilm generation, which disappeared with motion. High and low EibG expression was reversible indicating a process with up- and down-regulation of the protein expression. Our findings indicate that shear stress represses EibG expression and might reduce bacterial attachments to cells and surfaces.

  19. Regulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-ARegulation of IGF binding protein proteolysis by pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaidamauskas, Ervinas

    During his PhD studies, Ervinas Gaidamauskas researched the proteins pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) and its homologue PAPP-A2 in vitro. As suggested by its name, PAPP-A plays an important role in pregnancy and fetal development. Additionally, recent studies indicate a newly...

  20. Plasmid regulation and temperature-sensitive behavior of the Yersinia pestis penicillin-binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, R. C.; Park, J. T.; Ferreira, L. C.

    1994-01-01

    Six major bands corresponding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) with molecular weights ranging from 43,000 to 97,000 were detected in cell envelopes of Yersinia pestis EV76 grown at 28 degrees C. When cells were transferred to 37 degrees C and incubated for extended periods of time, the amounts of all PBPs, except for PBP2, were gradually reduced in cell envelopes of a strain carrying a 75-kb virulence-associated plasmid (as measured by penicillin-binding capacity), whereas in a strain cu...

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein production and regulation in fetal rat lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, W A; Moats-Staats, B M; D'Ercole, A J; Stiles, A D

    1993-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are expressed in lung from early in gestation and may modulate IGF-stimulated fetal lung cell proliferation and/or differentiation. To begin to define IGFBP production and regulation in lung cells during development, we prepared primary cultures of 19 day gestation fetal rat lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells and identified IGFBPs secreted into medium. Ligand blot analysis of conditioned media (CM) from both cell types demonstrated IGFBP bands of approximately 39,000-45,000, 32,000, 24,000, and 22,000 M(r). These migration characteristics allowed the identification of the 39,000-45,000 M(r) bands as IGFBP-3 and the 24,000 M(r) band as IGFBP-4, while Western immunoblot analyses localized IGFBP-2 to the 32,000 M(r) band and IGFBP-5 to the 22,000 M(r) band. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of cDNAs generated by reverse transcription of fibroblast and epithelial cell RNA using specific oligodeoxynucleotide primers for IGFBPs 1 through 6, demonstrated the presence of amplified products for IGFBP-2, -3, -4, -5, and -6. In both cell types, IGFBP-2 and -3 production was sustained during 48 h of incubation in serum-free medium, whereas IGFBP-4 abundance increased only during the first 6 to 12 h of incubation. CM from fibroblasts and epithelial cells plated at low densities contained a high abundance of IGFBP-2 per microgram cellular DNA compared with cells at higher densities. In contrast, IGFBP-3 and -4 abundance normalized to cell DNA did not change with differing cell densities.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7682822

  2. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and implications in catabolic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Björn

    1997-01-01

    This thesis has studied the regulation of IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1), which is one factor regulating the bioavailability of IGF-I with special interest how IGFBP-1 is regulated in vitro and in humans, especially in diabetes and catabolic conditions. The IGFBP-1 cDNA was cloned and used for studies in human hepatoma cells, HepG2, which showed that both insulin and IGF-I could decrease IGFBP-1 in the cell conditioned medium. IGF-I inhibited also IGF...

  3. Characterization of upstream sequences of the LIM2 gene that bind developmentally regulated and lens-specific proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HSU Heng; Robert L. CHURCH

    2004-01-01

    During lens development, lens epithelial cells differentiate into fiber cells. To date, four major lens fiber cell intrinsic membrane proteins (MIP) ranging in size from 70 kD to 19 kD have been characterized. The second most abundant lens fiber cell intrinsic membrane protein is MP19. This protein probably is involved with lens cell communication and relates with cataractogenesis. The aim of this research is to characterize upstream sequences of the MP19 (also called LIM2) gene that bind developmentally regulated and lens-specific proteins. We have used the gel mobility assays and corresponding competition experiments to identify and characterize cis elements within approximately 500 bases of LIM2 upstream sequences. Our studies locate the positions of some cis elements, including a "CA" repeat, a methylation Hha I island, an FnuD II site, an Ap1 and an Ap2 consensus sequences, and identify some specific cis elements which relate to lens-specific transcription of LIM2. Our experiments also preliminarily identify trans factors which bind to specific cis elements of the LIM2 promoter and/or regulate transcription of LIM2. We conclude that developmental regulation and coordination of the MP 19 gene in ocular lens fiber cells is controlled by the presence of specific cis elements that bind regulatory trans factors that affect LIM2 gene expression. DNA methylation is one mechanism of controlling LIM2 gene expression during lens development.

  4. The conserved protein kinase Ipl1 regulates microtubule binding to kinetochores in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Biggins, Sue; Fedor F. Severin; Bhalla, Needhi; Sassoon, Ingrid; Hyman, Anthony A.; Murray, Andrew W.

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome segregation depends on kinetochores, the structures that mediate chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle. We isolated mutants in IPL1, which encodes a protein kinase, in a screen for budding yeast mutants that have defects in sister chromatid separation and segregation. Cytological tests show that ipl1 mutants can separate sister chromatids but are defective in chromosome segregation. Kinetochores assembled in extracts from ipl1 mutants show altered binding to microtubules. Ip...

  5. A potential role for guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the regulation of endosomal proton transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Gurich, R W; Codina, J; DuBose, T D

    1991-01-01

    The effects of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) and GTP-gamma-S, known activators of GTP binding proteins, on proton transport were investigated in endosome-enriched vesicles (endosomes). Endosomes were prepared from rabbit renal cortex following the intravenous injection of FITC-dextran. The rate of intravesicular acidification was determined by measuring changes in fluorescence of FITC-dextran. Both GTP and GTP-gamma-S stimulated significantly the initial rate of proton transport. In contras...

  6. Glucose regulates fatty acid binding protein interaction with lipids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    OpenAIRE

    Hostetler, Heather A.; Balanarasimha, Madhumitha; Huang, Huan; Kelzer, Matthew S.; Kaliappan, Alagammai; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2010-01-01

    Although the pathophysiology of diabetes is characterized by elevated levels of glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), nuclear mechanisms linking glucose and LCFA metabolism are poorly understood. As the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) shuttles LCFA to the nucleus, where L-FABP directly interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), the effect of glucose on these processes was examined. In vitro studies showed that L-FABP strongly bound glucose and glucose-...

  7. Nucleomorphin. A novel, acidic, nuclear calmodulin-binding protein from dictyostelium that regulates nuclear number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2002-05-31

    Probing of Dictyostelium discoideum cell extracts after SDS-PAGE using (35)S-recombinant calmodulin (CaM) as a probe has revealed approximately three-dozen Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding proteins. Here, we report the molecular cloning, expression, and subcellular localization of a gene encoding a novel calmodulin-binding protein (CaMBP); we have called nucleomorphin, from D. discoideum. A lambdaZAP cDNA expression library of cells from multicellular development was screened using a recombinant calmodulin probe ((35)S-VU1-CaM). The open reading frame of 1119 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide of 340 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 38.7 kDa and is constitutively expressed throughout the Dictyostelium life cycle. Nucleomorphin contains a highly acidic glutamic/aspartic acid inverted repeat (DEED) with significant similarity to the conserved nucleoplasmin domain and a putative transmembrane domain in the carboxyl-terminal region. Southern blotting reveals that nucleomorphin exists as a single copy gene. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-agarose we show that bacterially expressed nucleomorphin binds to bovine CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Amino-terminal fusion to the green fluorescence protein (GFP) showed that GFP-NumA localized to the nucleus as distinct arc-like patterns similar to heterochromatin regions. GFP-NumA lacking the acidic DEED repeat still showed arc-like accumulations at the nuclear periphery, but the number of nuclei in these cells was increased markedly compared with control cells. Cells expressing GFP-NumA lacking the transmembrane domain localized to the nuclear periphery but did not affect nuclear number or gross morphology. Nucleomorphin is the first nuclear CaMBP to be identified in Dictyostelium. Furthermore, these data present the first identification of a member of the nucleoplasmin family as a calmodulin-binding protein and suggest nucleomorphin has a role in nuclear structure in Dictyostelium. PMID:11919178

  8. Mechanism for pH-dependent gene regulation by amino-terminus-mediated homooligomerization of Bacillus subtilis anti-trp RNA-binding attenuation protein

    OpenAIRE

    Sachleben, Joseph R.; McElroy, Craig A.; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    Anti-TRAP (AT) is a small zinc-binding protein that regulates tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis by binding to tryptophan-bound trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP), thereby preventing it from binding RNA, and allowing transcription and translation of the trpEDCFBA operon. Crystallographic and sedimentation studies have shown that AT can homooligomerize to form a dodecamer, AT12, composed of a tetramer of trimers, AT3. Structural and biochemical studies suggest that only trime...

  9. Regulation of the germinal center gene program by interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 8/IFN consensus sequence-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang Hoon; Melchers, Mark; Wang, Hongsheng; Torrey, Ted A.; Slota, Rebecca; Qi, Chen-Feng; Kim, Ji Young; Lugar, Patricia; Kong, Hee Jeong; Farrington, Lila; van der Zouwen, Boris; ZHOU, JEFF X.; Lougaris, Vassilios; Lipsky, Peter E.; Grammer, Amrie C.

    2006-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) consensus sequence-binding protein/IFN regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) is a transcription factor that regulates the differentiation and function of macrophages, granulocytes, and dendritic cells through activation or repression of target genes. Although IRF8 is also expressed in lymphocytes, its roles in B cell and T cell maturation or function are ill defined, and few transcriptional targets are known. Gene expression profiling of human tonsillar B cells and mouse B cell lymphoma...

  10. JAB1 regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity through protein–protein interaction in human colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3 in the nucleus. •JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. •JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF expressions. •Nuclear JAB1, but not nuclear STAT3, correlated with STAT3 DNA-binding activity. -- Abstract: Recent studies have revealed that unphosphorylated STAT3 forms a dimer, translocates to the nucleus, binds to the STAT3 binding site, and activates the transcription of STAT3 target genes, thereby playing an important role in oncogenesis in addition to phosphorylated STAT3. Among signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3, nuclear translocation and target DNA-binding are the critical steps for its activation. Therefore, elucidating the regulatory mechanism of these signaling steps of unphosphorylated STAT3 is a potential step in the discovery of a novel cancer drug. However, the mechanism of unphosphorylated STAT3 binding to the promoter of target genes remains unclear. In this study, we focused on Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) as a candidate protein that regulates unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Initially, we observed that both unphosphorylated STAT3 and JAB1 existed in the nucleus of human colon cancer cell line COLO205 at the basal state (no cytokine stimulation). On the other hand, phosphorylated STAT3 did not exist in the nucleus of COLO205 cells at the basal state. Immunoprecipitation using nuclear extract of COLO205 cells revealed that JAB1 interacted with unphosphorylated STAT3. To investigate the effect of JAB1 on unphosphorylated STAT3 activity, RNAi studies were performed. Although JAB1 knockdown tended to increase nuclear STAT3 expression, it significantly decreased unphosphorylated STAT3 DNA-binding activity. Subsequently, JAB1 knockdown significantly decreased the expression levels of MDR1, NANOG, and VEGF, which are STAT3 target

  11. Structural and Functional Features of a Developmentally Regulated Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasity, Benjamin C.; Troll, Joshua V.; Lehnert, Erik M.; Hackett, Kathleen T.; Dillard, Joseph P.; Apicella, Michael A.; Goldman, William E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding proteins (LBPs) occur mainly in extracellular fluids and promote LPS delivery to specific host cell receptors. The function of LBPs has been studied principally in the context of host defense; the possible role of LBPs in nonpathogenic host-microbe interactions has not been well characterized. Using the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri model, we analyzed the structure and function of an LBP family protein, E. scolopes LBP1 (EsLBP1), and provide evidence for its role in triggering a symbiont-induced host developmental program. Previous studies showed that, during initial host colonization, the LPS of V. fischeri synergizes with peptidoglycan (PGN) monomer to induce morphogenesis of epithelial tissues of the host animal. Computationally modeled EsLBP1 shares some but not all structural features of mammalian LBPs that are thought important for LPS binding. Similar to human LBP, recombinant EsLBP1 expressed in insect cells bound V. fischeri LPS and Neisseria meningitidis lipooligosaccharide (LOS) with nanomolar or greater affinity but bound Francisella tularensis LPS only weakly and did not bind PGN monomer. Unlike human LBP, EsLBP1 did not bind N. meningitidis LOS:CD14 complexes. The eslbp1 transcript was upregulated ~22-fold by V. fischeri at 24 h postinoculation. Surprisingly, this upregulation was not induced by exposure to LPS but, rather, to the PGN monomer alone. Hybridization chain reaction-fluorescent in situ hybridization (HCR-FISH) and immunocytochemistry (ICC) localized eslbp1 transcript and protein in crypt epithelia, where V. fischeri induces morphogenesis. The data presented here provide a window into the evolution of LBPs and the scope of their roles in animal symbioses. PMID:26463160

  12. Computational Identification of Post Translational Modification Regulated RNA Binding Protein Motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Brown

    Full Text Available RNA and its associated RNA binding proteins (RBPs mitigate a diverse array of cellular functions and phenotypes. The interactions between RNA and RBPs are implicated in many roles of biochemical processing by the cell such as localization, protein translation, and RNA stability. Recent discoveries of novel mechanisms that are of significant evolutionary advantage between RBPs and RNA include the interaction of the RBP with the 3' and 5' untranslated region (UTR of target mRNA. These mechanisms are shown to function through interaction of a trans-factor (RBP and a cis-regulatory element (3' or 5' UTR by the binding of a RBP to a regulatory-consensus nucleic acid motif region that is conserved throughout evolution. Through signal transduction, regulatory RBPs are able to temporarily dissociate from their target sites on mRNAs and induce translation, typically through a post-translational modification (PTM. These small, regulatory motifs located in the UTR of mRNAs are subject to a loss-of-function due to single polymorphisms or other mutations that disrupt the motif and inhibit the ability to associate into the complex with RBPs. The identification of a consensus motif for a given RBP is difficult, time consuming, and requires a significant degree of experimentation to identify each motif-containing gene on a genomic scale. We have developed a computational algorithm to analyze high-throughput genomic arrays that contain differential binding induced by a PTM for a RBP of interest-RBP-PTM Target Scan (RPTS. We demonstrate the ability of this application to accurately predict a PTM-specific binding motif to an RBP that has no antibody capable of distinguishing the PTM of interest, negating the use of in-vitro exonuclease digestion techniques.

  13. The Glomuvenous Malformation Protein Glomulin Binds Rbx1 and Regulates Cullin RING Ligase-Mediated Turnover of Fbw7

    OpenAIRE

    Tron, Adriana E.; Arai, Takehiro; Duda, David M.; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Bahamon, Brittany N.; Signoretti, Sabina; Schulman, Brenda A.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Fbw7, a substrate receptor for Cul1-RING-ligase (CRL1), facilitates the ubiquitination and degradation of several proteins including Cyclin E and c-Myc. In spite of much effort, the mechanisms underlying Fbw7 regulation are mostly unknown. Here we show that Glomulin (Glmn), a protein found mutated in the vascular disorder Glomuvenous Malformation (GVM), binds directly to the RING domain of Rbx1 and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Loss of Glmn in a variety of cells, tissues and GVM ...

  14. Direct regulation of Arp2/3 complex activity and function by the actin binding protein coronin

    OpenAIRE

    Humphries, Christine L.; Balcer, Heath I.; D'Agostino, Jessica L.; Winsor, Barbara; Drubin, David G.; Barnes, Georjana; Andrews, Brenda J.; Goode, Bruce L.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms for activating the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex have been the focus of many recent studies. Here, we identify a novel mode of Arp2/3 complex regulation mediated by the highly conserved actin binding protein coronin. Yeast coronin (Crn1) physically associates with the Arp2/3 complex and inhibits WA- and Abp1-activated actin nucleation in vitro. The inhibition occurs specifically in the absence of preformed actin filaments, suggesting that Crn1 may restrict Arp2/3 compl...

  15. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  16. Rbfox proteins regulate microRNA biogenesis by sequence-specific binding to their precursors and target downstream Dicer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zubovic, Lorena; Yang, Fan; Godin, Katherine; Pavelitz, Tom; Castellanos, Javier; Macchi, Paolo; Varani, Gabriele

    2016-05-19

    Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific splicing by targeting a conserved GCAUG sequence within pre-mRNAs. We report here that sequence-specific binding of the conserved Rbfox RRM to miRNA precursors containing the same sequence motif in their terminal loops, including miR-20b and miR-107, suppresses their nuclear processing. The structure of the complex between precursor miR-20b and Rbfox RRM shows the molecular basis for recognition, and reveals changes in the stem-loop upon protein binding. In mammalian cells, Rbfox2 downregulates mature miR-20b and miR-107 levels and increases the expression of their downstream targets PTEN and Dicer, respectively, suggesting that Rbfox2 indirectly regulates many more cellular miRNAs. Thus, some of the widespread cellular functions of Rbfox2 protein are attributable to regulation of miRNA biogenesis, and might include the mis-regulation of miR-20b and miR-107 in cancer and neurodegeneration. PMID:27001519

  17. Cloning and expression of a queen pheromone-binding protein in the honeybee: an olfactory-specific, developmentally regulated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danty, E; Briand, L; Michard-Vanhée, C; Perez, V; Arnold, G; Gaudemer, O; Huet, D; Huet, J C; Ouali, C; Masson, C; Pernollet, J C

    1999-09-01

    Odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are small abundant extracellular proteins thought to participate in perireceptor events of odor-pheromone detection by carrying, deactivating, and/or selecting odor stimuli. The honeybee queen pheromone is known to play a crucial role in colony organization, in addition to drone sex attraction. We identified, for the first time in a social insect, a binding protein called antennal-specific protein 1 (ASP1), which binds at least one of the major queen pheromone components. ASP1 was characterized by cDNA cloning, expression in Pichia pastoris, and pheromone binding. In situ hybridization showed that it is specifically expressed in the auxiliary cell layer of the antennal olfactory sensilla. The ASP1 sequence revealed it as a divergent member of the insect OBP family. The recombinant protein presented the exact characteristics of the native protein, as shown by mass spectrometry, and N-terminal sequencing and exclusion-diffusion chromatography showed that recombinant ASP1 is dimeric. ASP1 interacts with queen pheromone major components, opposite to another putative honeybee OBP, called ASP2. ASP1 biosynthetic accumulation, followed by nondenaturing electrophoresis during development, starts at day 1 before emergence, in concomitance with the functional maturation of olfactory neurons. The isobar ASP1b isoform appears simultaneously to ASP1a in workers, but only at approximately 2 weeks after emergence in drones. Comparison of in vivo and heterologous expressions suggests that the difference between ASP1 isoforms might be because of dimerization, which might play a physiological role in relation with mate attraction. PMID:10460253

  18. Poly(A) binding protein abundance regulates eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4F assembly in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Caleb; Perez, Cesar; Mohr, Ian

    2012-04-10

    By commandeering cellular translation initiation factors, or destroying those dispensable for viral mRNA translation, viruses often suppress host protein synthesis. In contrast, cellular protein synthesis proceeds in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-infected cells, forcing viral and cellular mRNAs to compete for limiting translation initiation factors. Curiously, inactivating the host translational repressor 4E-BP1 in HCMV-infected cells stimulates synthesis of the cellular poly(A) binding protein (PABP), significantly increasing PABP abundance. Here, we establish that new PABP synthesis is translationally controlled by the HCMV-encoded UL38 mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1-activator. The 5' UTR within the mRNA encoding PABP contains a terminal oligopyrimidine (TOP) element found in mRNAs, the translation of which is stimulated in response to mitogenic, growth, and nutritional stimuli, and proteins encoded by TOP-containing mRNAs accumulated in HCMV-infected cells. Furthermore, UL38 expression was necessary and sufficient to regulate expression of a PABP TOP-containing reporter. Remarkably, preventing the rise in PABP abundance by RNAi impaired eIF4E binding to eIF4G, thereby reducing assembly of the multisubunit initiation factor eIF4F, viral protein production, and replication. This finding demonstrates that viruses can increase host translation initiation factor concentration to foster their replication and defines a unique mechanism whereby control of PABP abundance regulates eIF4F assembly. PMID:22431630

  19. Requirement for the eIF4E binding proteins for the synergistic down-regulation of protein synthesis by hypertonic conditions and mTOR inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Clemens, Michael J.; Elia, Androulla; Morley, Simon J.

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates the phosphorylation and activity of several proteins that have the potential to control translation, including p70S6 kinase and the eIF4E binding proteins 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP2. In spite of this, in exponentially growing cells overall protein synthesis is often resistant to mTOR inhibitors. We report here that sensitivity of wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to mTOR inhibitors can be greatly increased when the cells are ...

  20. A Cyclic di-GMP-binding Adaptor Protein Interacts with Histidine Kinase to Regulate Two-component Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linghui; Venkataramani, Prabhadevi; Ding, Yichen; Liu, Yang; Deng, Yinyue; Yong, Grace Lisi; Xin, Lingyi; Ye, Ruijuan; Zhang, Lianhui; Yang, Liang; Liang, Zhao-Xun

    2016-07-29

    The bacterial messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) binds to a diverse range of effectors to exert its biological effect. Despite the fact that free-standing PilZ proteins are by far the most prevalent c-di-GMP effectors known to date, their physiological function and mechanism of action remain largely unknown. Here we report that the free-standing PilZ protein PA2799 from the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa interacts directly with the hybrid histidine kinase SagS. We show that PA2799 (named as HapZ: histidine kinase associated PilZ) binds directly to the phosphoreceiver (REC) domain of SagS, and that the SagS-HapZ interaction is further enhanced at elevated c-di-GMP concentration. We demonstrate that binding of HapZ to SagS inhibits the phosphotransfer between SagS and the downstream protein HptB in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner. In accordance with the role of SagS as a motile-sessile switch and biofilm growth factor, we show that HapZ impacts surface attachment and biofilm formation most likely by regulating the expression of a large number of genes. The observations suggest a previously unknown mechanism whereby c-di-GMP mediates two-component signaling through a PilZ adaptor protein. PMID:27231351

  1. The GTP- and Phospholipid-Binding Protein TTD14 Regulates Trafficking of the TRPL Ion Channel in Drosophila Photoreceptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Alexander C.; Altendorfer, André; Schopf, Krystina; Baltner, Karla; Maag, Nathalie; Sehn, Elisabeth; Wolfrum, Uwe; Huber, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of signaling proteins is a common phenomenon in diverse signaling pathways. In photoreceptors of Drosophila, light absorption by rhodopsin triggers a phospholipase Cβ-mediated opening of the ion channels transient receptor potential (TRP) and TRP-like (TRPL) and generates the visual response. The signaling proteins are located in a plasma membrane compartment called rhabdomere. The major rhodopsin (Rh1) and TRP are predominantly localized in the rhabdomere in light and darkness. In contrast, TRPL translocates between the rhabdomeral plasma membrane in the dark and a storage compartment in the cell body in the light, from where it can be recycled to the plasma membrane upon subsequent dark adaptation. Here, we identified the gene mutated in trpl translocation defective 14 (ttd14), which is required for both TRPL internalization from the rhabdomere in the light and recycling of TRPL back to the rhabdomere in the dark. TTD14 is highly conserved in invertebrates and binds GTP in vitro. The ttd14 mutation alters a conserved proline residue (P75L) in the GTP-binding domain and abolishes binding to GTP. This indicates that GTP binding is essential for TTD14 function. TTD14 is a cytosolic protein and binds to PtdIns(3)P, a lipid enriched in early endosome membranes, and to phosphatidic acid. In contrast to TRPL, rhabdomeral localization of the membrane proteins Rh1 and TRP is not affected in the ttd14 P75L mutant. The ttd14 P75L mutation results in Rh1-independent photoreceptor degeneration and larval lethality suggesting that other processes are also affected by the ttd14 P75L mutation. In conclusion, TTD14 is a novel regulator of TRPL trafficking, involved in internalization and subsequent sorting of TRPL into the recycling pathway that enables this ion channel to return to the plasma membrane. PMID:26509977

  2. Transition of Plasmodium sporozoites into liver stage-like forms is regulated by the RNA binding protein Pumilio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S S; Braks, Joanna; Prudêncio, Miguel; Carret, Céline; Gomes, Ana Rita; Pain, Arnab; Feltwell, Theresa; Khan, Shahid; Waters, Andrew; Janse, Chris; Mair, Gunnar R; Mota, Maria M

    2011-05-01

    Many eukaryotic developmental and cell fate decisions that are effected post-transcriptionally involve RNA binding proteins as regulators of translation of key mRNAs. In malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), the development of round, non-motile and replicating exo-erythrocytic liver stage forms from slender, motile and cell-cycle arrested sporozoites is believed to depend on environmental changes experienced during the transmission of the parasite from the mosquito vector to the vertebrate host. Here we identify a Plasmodium member of the RNA binding protein family PUF as a key regulator of this transformation. In the absence of Pumilio-2 (Puf2) sporozoites initiate EEF development inside mosquito salivary glands independently of the normal transmission-associated environmental cues. Puf2- sporozoites exhibit genome-wide transcriptional changes that result in loss of gliding motility, cell traversal ability and reduction in infectivity, and, moreover, trigger metamorphosis typical of early Plasmodium intra-hepatic development. These data demonstrate that Puf2 is a key player in regulating sporozoite developmental control, and imply that transformation of salivary gland-resident sporozoites into liver stage-like parasites is regulated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. PMID:21625527

  3. Transition of Plasmodium sporozoites into liver stage-like forms is regulated by the RNA binding protein Pumilio

    KAUST Repository

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S. S.

    2011-05-19

    Many eukaryotic developmental and cell fate decisions that are effected post-transcriptionally involve RNA binding proteins as regulators of translation of key mRNAs. In malaria parasites (Plasmodium spp.), the development of round, non-motile and replicating exo-erythrocytic liver stage forms from slender, motile and cell-cycle arrested sporozoites is believed to depend on environmental changes experienced during the transmission of the parasite from the mosquito vector to the vertebrate host. Here we identify a Plasmodium member of the RNA binding protein family PUF as a key regulator of this transformation. In the absence of Pumilio-2 (Puf2) sporozoites initiate EEF development inside mosquito salivary glands independently of the normal transmission-associated environmental cues. Puf2- sporozoites exhibit genome-wide transcriptional changes that result in loss of gliding motility, cell traversal ability and reduction in infectivity, and, moreover, trigger metamorphosis typical of early Plasmodium intra-hepatic development. These data demonstrate that Puf2 is a key player in regulating sporozoite developmental control, and imply that transformation of salivary gland-resident sporozoites into liver stage-like parasites is regulated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. 2011 Gomes-Santos et al.

  4. The RNA binding protein CsrA controls c-di-GMP metabolism by directly regulating the expression of GGDEF proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Jonas, Kristina; Edwards, Adrianne N.; Simm, Roger; Romeo, Tony; Römling, Ute; Melefors, Öjar

    2008-01-01

    The carbon storage regulator CsrA is an RNA binding protein that controls carbon metabolism, biofilm formation and motility in various eubacteria. Nevertheless, in Escherichia coli only five target mRNAs have been shown to be directly regulated by CsrA at the post-transcriptional level. Here we identified two new direct targets for CsrA, ycdT and ydeH, both of which encode proteins with GGDEF domains. A csrA mutation caused mRNA levels of ycdT and ydeH to increase more than 10-fold. RNA mobil...

  5. The actin-binding ERM protein Moesin directly regulates spindle assembly and function during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmos, Péter; Kristó, Ildikó; Szikora, Szilárd; Jankovics, Ferenc; Lukácsovich, Tamás; Kari, Beáta; Erdélyi, Miklós

    2016-06-01

    Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin proteins are highly conserved, actin-binding cytoskeletal proteins that play an essential role in microvilli formation, T-cell activation, and tumor metastasis by linking actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Recent studies demonstrated that the only Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin protein of Drosophila melanogaster, Moesin, is involved in mitotic spindle function through stabilizing cell shape and microtubules at the cell cortex. We previously observed that Moesin localizes to the mitotic spindle; hence, we tested for the biological significance of this surprising localization and investigated whether it plays a direct role in spindle function. To separate the cortical and spindle functions of Moesin during mitosis we combined cell biological and genetic methods. We used early Drosophila embryos, in which mitosis occurs in the absence of a cell cortex, and found in vivo evidence for the direct requirement of Moesin in mitotic spindle assembly and function. We also found that the accumulation of Moesin precedes the construction of the microtubule spindle, and the fusiform structure formed by Moesin persists even after the microtubules have disassembled. PMID:27006187

  6. HmbR outer membrane receptors of pathogenic Neisseria spp.: iron-regulated, hemoglobin-binding proteins with a high level of primary structure conservation.

    OpenAIRE

    Stojiljkovic, I; Larson, J.; Hwa, V; Anic, S; So, M

    1996-01-01

    We have recently cloned and characterized the hemoglobin receptor gene from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C. N. meningitidis cells expressing HmbR protein were able to bind biotinylated hemoglobin, and the binding was specifically inhibited by unlabeled hemoglobin and not heme. The HmbR-mediated hemoglobin binding activity of N. meningitidis cells was shown to be iron regulated. The presence of hemoglobin but not heme in the growth medium stimulated HmbR-mediated hemoglobin binding activit...

  7. The glomuvenous malformation protein Glomulin binds Rbx1 and regulates cullin RING ligase-mediated turnover of Fbw7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Adriana E; Arai, Takehiro; Duda, David M; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Fujiwara, Yuko; Bahamon, Brittany N; Signoretti, Sabina; Schulman, Brenda A; DeCaprio, James A

    2012-04-13

    Fbw7, a substrate receptor for Cul1-RING-ligase (CRL1), facilitates the ubiquitination and degradation of several proteins, including Cyclin E and c-Myc. In spite of much effort, the mechanisms underlying Fbw7 regulation are mostly unknown. Here, we show that Glomulin (Glmn), a protein found mutated in the vascular disorder glomuvenous malformation (GVM), binds directly to the RING domain of Rbx1 and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Loss of Glmn in a variety of cells, tissues, and GVM lesions results in decreased levels of Fbw7 and increased levels of Cyclin E and c-Myc. The increased turnover of Fbw7 is dependent on CRL and proteasome activity, indicating that Glmn modulates the E3 activity of CRL1(Fbw7). These data reveal an unexpected functional connection between Glmn and Rbx1 and demonstrate that defective regulation of Fbw7 levels contributes to GVM. PMID:22405651

  8. The Glomuvenous Malformation Protein Glomulin Binds Rbx1 and Regulates Cullin RING Ligase-Mediated Turnover of Fbw7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tron, Adriana E.; Arai, Takehiro; Duda, David M.; Kuwabara, Hiroshi; Olszewski, Jennifer L.; Fujiwara, Yuko; Bahamon, Brittany N.; Signoretti, Sabina; Schulman, Brenda A.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fbw7, a substrate receptor for Cul1-RING-ligase (CRL1), facilitates the ubiquitination and degradation of several proteins including Cyclin E and c-Myc. In spite of much effort, the mechanisms underlying Fbw7 regulation are mostly unknown. Here we show that Glomulin (Glmn), a protein found mutated in the vascular disorder Glomuvenous Malformation (GVM), binds directly to the RING domain of Rbx1 and inhibits its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Loss of Glmn in a variety of cells, tissues and GVM lesions results in decreased levels of Fbw7 and increased levels of Cyclin E and c-Myc. The increased turnover of Fbw7 is dependent on CRL and proteasome activity indicating that Glmn modulates the E3 activity of CRL1Fbw7. These data reveal an unexpected functional connection between Glmn and Rbx1 and demonstrate that defective regulation of Fbw7 levels contributes to GVM. PMID:22405651

  9. Regulation of Active DNA Demethylation by a Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation plays crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, active DNA demethylation is initiated by the ROS1 subfamily of 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA glycosylases via a base excision repair mechanism. Recently, IDM1 and IDM2 were shown to be required for the recruitment of ROS1 to some of its target loci. However, the mechanism(s by which IDM1 is targeted to specific genomic loci remains to be determined. Affinity purification of IDM1- and IDM2- associating proteins demonstrated that IDM1 and IDM2 copurify together with two novel components, methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 7 (MBD7 and IDM2-like protein 1 (IDL1. IDL1 encodes an α-crystallin domain protein that shows high sequence similarity with IDM2. MBD7 interacts with IDM2 and IDL1 in vitro and in vivo and they form a protein complex associating with IDM1 in vivo. MBD7 directly binds to the target loci and is required for the H3K18 and H3K23 acetylation in planta. MBD7 dysfunction causes DNA hypermethylation and silencing of reporter genes and a subset of endogenous genes. Our results suggest that a histone acetyltransferase complex functions in active DNA demethylation and in suppression of gene silencing at some loci in Arabidopsis.

  10. Human papillomavirus E5 oncoproteins bind the A4 endoplasmic reticulum protein to regulate proliferative ability upon differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotnik Halavaty, Katarina; Regan, Jennifer; Mehta, Kavi; Laimins, Laimonis, E-mail: l-laimins@northwestern.edu

    2014-03-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect stratified epithelia and link their life cycles to epithelial differentiation. The HPV E5 protein plays a role in the productive phase of the HPV life cycle but its mechanism of action is still unclear. We identify a new binding partner of E5, A4, using a membrane-associated yeast-two hybrid system. The A4 protein co-localizes with HPV 31 E5 in perinuclear regions and forms complexes with E5 and Bap31. In normal keratinocytes, A4 is found primarily in basal cells while in HPV positive cells high levels of A4 are seen in both undifferentiated and differentiated cells. Reduction of A4 expression by shRNAs, enhanced HPV genome amplification and increased cell proliferation ability following differentiation but this was not seen in cells lacking E5. Our studies suggest that the A4 protein is an important E5 binding partner that plays a role in regulating cell proliferation ability upon differentiation. - Highlights: • A4 associates with HPV 31 E5 proteins. • A4 is localized to endoplasmic reticulum. • HPV proteins induce A4 expression in suprabasal layers of stratified epithelium. • E5 is important for proliferation ability of differentiating HPV positive cells.

  11. Functional characterisation of the regulation of CAAT enhancer binding protein alpha by GSK-3 phosphorylation of Threonines 222/226

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hastie CJ

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (GSK3 activity is repressed following insulin treatment of cells. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 mimics the effect of insulin on Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK, Glucose-6 Phosphatase (G6Pase and IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP1 gene expression. CAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα regulates these gene promoters in liver and is phosphorylated on two residues (T222/T226 by GSK3, although the functional outcome of the phosphorylation has not been established. We aimed to establish whether CEBPα is a link between GSK3 and these gene promoters. Results C/EBPα represses the IGFBP1 thymine-rich insulin response element (TIRE, but mutation of T222 or T226 of C/EBPα to non-phosphorylatable alanines has no effect on C/EBPα activity in liver cells (towards the TIRE or a consensus C/EBP binding sequence. Phosphorylation of T222/T226 is decreased by GSK3 inhibition, suggesting GSK3 does phosphorylate T222/226 in intact cells. However, phosphorylation was not altered by treatment of liver cells with insulin. Meanwhile C/EBPα activity in 3T3 L1 preadipocytes was enhanced by mutation of T222/T226 and/or S230 to alanine residues. Finally, we demonstrate that C/EBPα is a very poor substrate for GSK3 in vitro and in cells. Conclusion The work demonstrates an important role for this domain in the regulation of C/EBPα activity in adipocytes but not hepatocytes, however GSK3 phosphorylation of these residues does not mediate regulation of this C/EBP activity. In short, we find no evidence that C/EBPα activity is regulated by direct phosphorylation by GSK3.

  12. Evidence of a Role for Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein (IGFBP)-3 in Metabolic Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, P. M.; Mehta, H. H.; Hwang, D.; Roos, K P; Hevener, A. L.; Lee, K.W.

    2010-01-01

    IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 is a metabolic regulator that has been shown to inhibit insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in murine models. This finding contrasts with epidemiological evidence of decreased serum IGFBP-3 in patients with type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of IGFBP-3 in metabolism. Four-week-old male IGFBP-3−/− and control mice were subjected to a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk. IGFBP-3−/− mice were heavier before the initiation of HFD and at the en...

  13. Selectively enhanced contextual fear conditioning in mice lacking the transcriptional regulator CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ

    OpenAIRE

    Sterneck, Esta; Paylor, Richard; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Libbey, Megan; Przedborski, Serge; Tessarollo, Lino; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Johnson, Peter F.

    1998-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ (C/EBPδ) is a transcriptional regulator implicated in the hepatic acute phase response and in adipogenic and myeloid cell differentiation. We found that C/EBPδ is widely expressed in the peripheral and central nervous systems, including neurons of the hippocampal formation, indicating a role in neural functions. To examine the role of C/EBPδ in vivo, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of the C/EBPδ gene. This mutation does not interfere with normal emb...

  14. Resistance to juvenile hormone and an insect growth regulator in Drosophila is associated with an altered cytosolic juvenile hormone-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Met mutant of Drosophila melanogaster is highly resistant to juvenile hormone III (JH III) or its chemical analog, methoprene, an insect growth regulator. Five major mechanisms of insecticide resistance were examined in Met and susceptible Met+ flies. These two strains showed only minor differences when penetration, excretion, tissue sequestration, or metabolism of [3H]JH III was measured. In contrast, when we examined JH III binding by a cytosolic binding protein from a JH target tissue, Met strains had a 10-fold lower binding affinity than did Met+ strains. Studies using deficiency-bearing chromosomes provide strong evidence that the Met locus controls the binding protein characteristics and may encode the protein. These studies indicate that resistance in Met flies results from reduced binding affinity of a cytosolic binding protein for JH III

  15. Cloning of a down-regulated gene encoding small GTP binding protein in hybrid wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yingyin; NI Zhongfu; CHEN Rongmin; WU Limin; SUN Qixin

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies showed that differential gene expression between wheat hybrids and their parents was responsible for the heterosis. To provide an insight into the molecular basis of wheat heterosis, one cDNA, designated TaRab, was identified from the cDNA library of wheat seedling leaves. The sequence comparison in GenBank revealed that TaRab is homologous to a group of genes encoding Rab-GTP binding protein. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated that TaRab was expressed in all plant tissues examined,but at slightly higher level in leaves. Further analysis exhibited that TaRab displayed lower expression in hybrid than in its patents in both roots and leaves, which was in agreement with the original results of suppression subtractive hybridization. TaRab was located on chromosome 7B and C-7DS5-0.36 by in silico mapping. The relationship between differential expression of TaRab and the molecular basis of wheat heterosis was also discussed.

  16. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Richard; El-Guindy, Ayman; Heston, Lee; Lin, Su-Fang; Yu, Kuan-Ping; Nagy, Mate; Borah, Sumit; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Steitz, Joan; Miller, George

    2014-01-01

    Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC) to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs). During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E), was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors. PMID:24705134

  17. Transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene by octamer-binding proteins Oct-1 and Oct-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusebio Chiefari

    Full Text Available The High-Mobility Group AT-Hook 1 (HMGA1 protein is an architectural transcription factor that binds to AT-rich sequences in the promoter region of DNA and functions as a specific cofactor for gene activation. Previously, we demonstrated that HMGA1 is a key regulator of the insulin receptor (INSR gene and an important downstream target of the INSR signaling cascade. Moreover, from a pathogenic point of view, overexpression of HMGA1 has been associated with human cancer, whereas functional variants of the HMGA1 gene have been recently linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. However, despite of this biological and pathological relevance, the mechanisms that control HMGA1 gene expression remain unknown. In this study, to define the molecular mechanism(s that regulate HMGA1 gene expression, the HMGA1 gene promoter was investigated by transient transfection of different cell lines, either before or after DNA and siRNA cotransfections. An octamer motif was identified as an important element of transcriptional regulation of this gene, the interaction of which with the octamer transcription factors Oct-1 and Oct-2 is crucial in modulating HMGA1 gene and protein expression. Additionally, we demonstrate that HMGA1 binds its own promoter and contributes to its transactivation by Oct-2 (but not Oct-1, supporting its role in an auto-regulatory circuit. Overall, our results provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene, revealing a differential control exerted by both Oct-1 and Oct-2. Furthermore, they consistently support the hypothesis that a putative defect in Oct-1 and/or Oct-2, by affecting HMGA1 expression, may cause INSR dysfunction, leading to defects of the INSR signaling pathway.

  18. t(8;21)(q22;q22) fusion proteins preferentially bind to duplicated AML1/RUNX1 DNA-binding sequences to differentially regulate gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Akiko J.; Peterson, Luke F.; Okumura, Fumihiko; Boyapati, Anita; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities are frequently associated with cancer development. The 8;21(q22;q22) chromosomal translocation is one of the most common chromosome abnormalities identified in leukemia. It generates fusion proteins between AML1 and ETO. Since AML1 is a well-defined DNA-binding protein, AML1-ETO fusion proteins have been recognized as DNA-binding proteins interacting with the same consensus DNA-binding site as AML1. The alteration of AML1 target gene expression due to the presence of ...

  19. Epigenetic Regulation of the IL-13-induced Human Eotaxin-3 Gene by CREB-binding Protein-mediated Histone 3 Acetylation*

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Eun Jin; Lu, Thomas X.; Blanchard, Carine; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of a variety of chronic inflammatory disorders has been attributed to the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Herein, we identified a link between epigenetic regulation and IL-13-driven eotaxin-3 in the pathogenesis of chronic allergic inflammation. We first demonstrated that the cAMP-responsive element (CRE) site in the eotaxin-3 promoter affects IL-13-induced eotaxin-3 promoter activity. Furthermore, the CRE-binding protein-binding protein (CBP), a histone acetylt...

  20. Regulation of steroid 5-{alpha} reductase type 2 (Srd5a2) by sterol regulatory element binding proteins and statin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Young-Kyo [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Zhu, Bing [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0144 (United States); Jeon, Tae-Il [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States); Osborne, Timothy F., E-mail: tfosborn@uci.edu [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, 3244 McGaugh Hall, University of California, UC Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    In this study, we show that sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate expression of Srd5a2, an enzyme that catalyzes the irreversible conversion of testosterone to dihydroxytestosterone in the male reproductive tract and is highly expressed in androgen-sensitive tissues such as the prostate and skin. We show that Srd5a2 is induced in livers and prostate from mice fed a chow diet supplemented with lovastatin plus ezitimibe (L/E), which increases the activity of nuclear SREBP-2. The three fold increase in Srd5a2 mRNA mediated by L/E treatment was accompanied by the induction of SREBP-2 binding to the Srd5a2 promoter detected by a ChIP-chip assay in liver. We identified a SREBP-2 responsive region within the first 300 upstream bases of the mouse Srd5a2 promoter by co-transfection assays which contain a site that bound SREBP-2 in vitro by an EMSA. Srd5a2 protein was also induced in cells over-expressing SREBP-2 in culture. The induction of Srd5a2 through SREBP-2 provides a mechanistic explanation for why even though statin therapy is effective in reducing cholesterol levels in treating hypercholesterolemia it does not compromise androgen production in clinical studies.

  1. MSH1 Is a Plant Organellar DNA Binding and Thylakoid Protein under Precise Spatial Regulation to Alter Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdi, Kamaldeep S; Wamboldt, Yashitola; Kundariya, Hardik; Laurie, John D; Keren, Ido; Kumar, K R Sunil; Block, Anna; Basset, Gilles; Luebker, Steve; Elowsky, Christian; Day, Philip M; Roose, Johnna L; Bricker, Terry M; Elthon, Thomas; Mackenzie, Sally A

    2016-02-01

    As metabolic centers, plant organelles participate in maintenance, defense, and signaling. MSH1 is a plant-specific protein involved in organellar genome stability in mitochondria and plastids. Plastid depletion of MSH1 causes heritable, non-genetic changes in development and DNA methylation. We investigated the msh1 phenotype using hemi-complementation mutants and transgene-null segregants from RNAi suppression lines to sub-compartmentalize MSH1 effects. We show that MSH1 expression is spatially regulated, specifically localizing to plastids within the epidermis and vascular parenchyma. The protein binds DNA and localizes to plastid and mitochondrial nucleoids, but fractionation and protein-protein interactions data indicate that MSH1 also associates with the thylakoid membrane. Plastid MSH1 depletion results in variegation, abiotic stress tolerance, variable growth rate, and delayed maturity. Depletion from mitochondria results in 7%-10% of plants altered in leaf morphology, heat tolerance, and mitochondrial genome stability. MSH1 does not localize within the nucleus directly, but plastid depletion produces non-genetic changes in flowering time, maturation, and growth rate that are heritable independent of MSH1. MSH1 depletion alters non-photoactive redox behavior in plastids and a sub-set of mitochondrially altered lines. Ectopic expression produces deleterious effects, underlining its strict expression control. Unraveling the complexity of the MSH1 effect offers insight into triggers of plant-specific, transgenerational adaptation behaviors. PMID:26584715

  2. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP, a novel XTcf-3 specific target gene regulates neural development in Xenopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedlich Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As nuclear mediators of wnt/β-catenin signaling, Lef/Tcf transcription factors play important roles in development and disease. Although it is well established, that the four vertebrate Lef/Tcfs have unique functional properties, most studies unite Lef-1, Tcf-1, Tcf-3 and Tcf-4 and reduce their function to uniformly transduce wnt/β-catenin signaling for activating wnt target genes. In order to discriminate target genes regulated by XTcf-3 from those regulated by XTcf-4 or Lef/Tcfs in general, we performed a subtractive screen, using neuralized Xenopus animal cap explants. Results We identified cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP as novel XTcf-3 specific target gene. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of XTcf-3 by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide results in a general broadening of the anterior neural tissue. Depletion of XCIRP by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide injection leads to a reduced stability of mRNA and an enlargement of the anterior neural plate similar to the depletion of XTcf-3. Conclusion Distinct steps in neural development are differentially regulated by individual Lef/Tcfs. For proper development of the anterior brain XTcf-3 and the Tcf-subtype specific target XCIRP appear indispensable. Thus, regulation of anterior neural development, at least in part, depends on mRNA stabilization by the novel XTcf-3 target gene XCIRP.

  3. The gene encoding acyl-CoA-binding protein is subject to metabolic regulation by both sterol regulatory element-binding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandberg, Maria B; Bloksgaard, Maria; Duran-Sandoval, Daniel; Duval, Caroline; Staels, Bart; Mandrup, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    The acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10-kDa intracellular lipid-binding protein that transports acylCoA esters. The protein is expressed in most cell types at low levels; however, expression is particularly high in cells with a high turnover of fatty acids. Here we confirm a previous...... observation that ACBP expression in rodent liver is down-regulated by fasting, and we show that insulin but not glucose is the inducer of ACBP expression in primary rat hepatocytes. In keeping with the regulation by insulin, we show that ACBP is a sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) target...... that ACBP expression is significantly lower in livers from PPARalpha knock-out mice than in livers from wild type mice. In conclusion, expression of ACBP in rodent hepatocytes is subject to dual metabolic regulation by PPARalpha and SREBP-1c, which may reflect the need for ACBP during lipogenic as well...

  4. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed

  5. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  6. Diacylglycerol kinase theta and zeta isoforms : regulation of activity, protein binding partners and physiological functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, Alrik Pieter

    2007-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs) phosphorylate the second messenger diacylglycerol (DAG) yielding phosphatidic acid (PA). In this thesis, we investigated which structural domains of DGKtheta are required for DGK activity. Furthermore, we showed that DGKzeta binds to and is activated by the Retinoblasto

  7. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.

  8. Hormonal regulation of liver fatty acid-binding protein in vivo and in vitro: effects of growth hormone and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, L; Nilsson, I; Oscarsson, J

    1998-06-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is an abundant protein in hepatocytes that binds most of the long chain fatty acids present in the cytosol. It is suggested to be of importance for fatty acid uptake and utilization in the hepatocyte. In the present study, the effects of bovine GH (bGH) and other hormones on the expression of LFABP and its messenger RNA (mRNA) were studied in hypophysectomized rats and in vitro using primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. One injection of bGH increased LFABP mRNA levels about 5-fold after 6 h, but there was no effect of this treatment on LFABP levels. However, 7 days of bGH treatment increased both LFABP mRNA and LFABP protein levels 2- to 5-fold. Female rats had higher levels of LFABP than male rats. Hypophysectomy of female rats, but not that of male rats, decreased LFABP levels markedly. Treatment of hypophysectomized rats with bGH for 7 days as two daily injections or as a continuous infusion increased LFABP levels to a similar degree. This finding indicates that the sex difference in the expression of LFABP is not regulated by the sexually dimorphic secretory pattern of GH. Neither insulin nor insulin-like growth factor I treatment of hypophysectomized rats for 6-7 days had any effect on LFABP mRNA or LFABP levels. In vitro, bGH dose-dependently increased the expression of LFABP mRNA, but only in the presence of insulin. Insulin alone had a marked dose-dependent effect on LFABP mRNA levels and was of importance for maintaining the expression of LFABP mRNA during the culture. Incubation with bGH increased LFABP mRNA levels within 3 h. GH had no effect on LFABP mRNA levels in the presence of actinomycin D, indicating a transcriptional effect of GH. Incubation with glucagon in vitro decreased LFABP mRNA levels markedly, indicating that glucagon, in contrast to GH, has an effect opposite that of insulin on LFABP mRNA expression. It is concluded that GH is an important regulator of LFABP in vivo and in vitro. In contrast to

  9. Genomic binding and regulation of gene expression by the thyroid carcinoma-associated PAX8-PPARG fusion protein

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yanxiao; Yu, Jingcheng; Lee, Chee; Xu, Bin; Sartor, Maureen A.; Koenig, Ronald J.

    2015-01-01

    A chromosomal translocation results in production of an oncogenic PAX8-PPARG fusion protein (PPFP) in thyroid carcinomas. PAX8 is a thyroid transcription factor, and PPARG is a transcription factor that plays important roles in adipocytes and macrophages. PPFP retains the DNA binding domains of both proteins; however, the genomic binding sites of PPFP have not been identified, and only limited data exist to characterize gene expression in PPFP thyroid carcinomas. Therefore, the oncogenic func...

  10. Regulation of extracellular copper-binding proteins in copper-resistant and copper-sensitive mutants of Vibrio alginolyticus.

    OpenAIRE

    Harwood, V J; Gordon, A S

    1994-01-01

    Extracellular proteins of wild-type Vibrio alginolyticus were compared with those of copper-resistant and copper-sensitive mutants. One copper-resistant mutant (Cu40B3) constitutively produced an extracellular protein with the same apparent molecular mass (21 kDa) and chromatographic behavior as copper-binding protein (CuBP), a copper-induced supernatant protein which has been implicated in copper detoxification in wild-type V. alginolyticus. Copper-sensitive V. alginolyticus mutants displaye...

  11. AND-34, a novel p130Cas-binding thymic stromal cell protein regulated by adhesion and inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, D; Clayton, L K; Smolyar, A; Lerner, A

    1999-08-15

    We have characterized a novel cDNA whose steady state mRNA levels rise in the thymus 2 to 6 h following the induction of CD4+CD8+ thymocyte apoptosis by in vivo cross-linking of CD3 epsilon. This cDNA, AND-34-1, contains an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a protein with an amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a carboxyl-terminal domain homologous to GDP-exchange factors (GEFs). Northern analysis demonstrates widespread expression of the AND-34 gene. Anti-CD3 epsilon treatment induces up-regulation of the AND-34 mRNA levels in total thymic RNA but not in RNA from purified thymocytes, suggesting that this transcript is derived from a thymic stromal cell population. IL-1 and TNF increase AND-34 transcript levels in thymic cortical reticular, thymic nurse, and fibroblast cell lines. In the thymic cortical reticular cell line, IL-1 and TNF induce a protein of the predicted 93-kDa size reactive with anti-AND-34 peptide antisera. Fifteen minutes of serum stimulation of vanadate-pretreated AND-34-1-transfected NIH3T3 fibroblasts induces tyrosine phosphorylation of AND-34 as well as coprecipitating 95-, 125-, and 130-kDa proteins. One of these tyrosine phosphorylated proteins is identified as p130Cas (Crk-associated substrate), a signaling molecule previously known to bind to a GDP-exchange factor (C3G) and inducibly associate with the focal adhesion complex. Consistent with such an association, AND-34 tyrosine phosphorylation is induced following adherence of trypsinized fibroblasts to fibronectin or poly-L -lysine-coated surfaces. PMID:10438950

  12. RNA binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production and stress tolerance by controlling Gpd1p activity during winemaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Helena; Sepúlveda, Ana; Picazo, Cecilia; Matallana, Emilia; Aranda, Agustín

    2016-06-01

    Glycerol is a key yeast metabolite in winemaking because it contributes to improve the organoleptic properties of wine. It is also a cellular protective molecule that enhances the tolerance of yeasts to osmotic stress and promotes longevity. Thus, its production increases by genetic manipulation, which is of biotechnological and basic interest. Glycerol is produced by diverting glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate through the action of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (coded by genes GPD1 and GPD2). Here, we demonstrate that RNA-binding protein Pub1p regulates glycerol production by controlling Gpd1p activity. Its deletion does not alter GPD1 mRNA levels, but protein levels and enzymatic activity increase, which explains the higher intracellular glycerol concentration and greater tolerance to osmotic stress of the pub1∆ mutant. PUB1 deletion also enhances the activity of nicotinamidase, a longevity-promoting enzyme. Both enzymatic activities are partially located in peroxisomes, and we detected peroxisome formation during wine fermentation. The role of Pub1p in life span control depends on nutrient conditions and is related with the TOR pathway, and a major connection between RNA metabolism and the nutrient signaling response is established. PMID:26846624

  13. A temperature-sensitive trpS mutation interferes with trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulation of trp gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, A I; Sarsero, J P; Yanofsky, C

    1996-01-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) regulates expression of the seven tryptophan biosynthetic genes by binding to specific repeat sequences in the transcripts of the trp operon and of the folate operon, the operon containing trpG. Steinberg observed that strains containing a temperature-sensitive mutant form of tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase, encoded by the trpS1 allele, produced elevated levels of the tryptophan pathway enzymes, when grown ...

  14. Poly(A) RNA and Paip2 act as allosteric regulators of poly(A)-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Hwan; Oh, Jungsic; Park, Jonghyun; Paek, Ki Young; Rho, Sangchul; Jang, Sung Key; Lee, Jong-Bong

    2014-02-01

    When bound to the 3' poly(A) tail of mRNA, poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) modulates mRNA translation and stability through its association with various proteins. By visualizing individual PABP molecules in real time, we found that PABP, containing four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs), adopts a conformation on poly(A) binding in which RRM1 is in proximity to RRM4. This conformational change is due to the bending of the region between RRM2 and RRM3. PABP-interacting protein 2 actively disrupts the bent structure of PABP to the extended structure, resulting in the inhibition of PABP-poly(A) binding. These results suggest that the changes in the configuration of PABP induced by interactions with various effector molecules, such as poly(A) and PABP-interacting protein 2, play pivotal roles in its function. PMID:24293655

  15. The coat protein of prunus necrotic ringspot virus specifically binds to and regulates the conformation of its genomic RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding of coat protein (CP) to the 3' nontranslated region (3'-NTR) of viral RNAs is a crucial requirement to establish the infection of Alfamo- and Ilarviruses. In vitro binding properties of the Prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus (PNRSV) CP to the 3'-NTR of its genomic RNA using purified E. coli- expressed CP and different synthetic peptides corresponding to a 26-residue sequence near the N-terminus were investigated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PNRSV CP bound to, at least, three different sites existing on the 3'-NTR. Moreover, the N-terminal region between amino acid residues 25 to 50 of the protein could function as an independent RNA-binding domain. Single exchange of some arginine residues by alanine eliminated the RNA-interaction capacity of the synthetic peptides, consistent with a crucial role for Arg residues common to many RNA-binding proteins possessing Arg-rich domains. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal CP peptides bind to the viral RNA. Finally, mutational analysis of the 3'-NTR suggested the presence of a pseudoknotted structure at this region on the PNRSV RNA that, when stabilized by the presence of Mg2+, lost its capability to bind the coat protein. The existence of two mutually exclusive conformations for the 3'-NTR of PNRSV strongly suggests a similar regulatory mechanism at the 3'-NTR level in Alfamo- and Ilarvirus genera

  16. Further structural insights into the binding of complement factor H by complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 (CspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B. burgdorferi binds complement factor H using a dimeric surface protein, CspA (BbCRASP-1). Presented here is a new structure of CspA that suggests that there is a degree of flexibility between subunits which may have implications for complement regulator binding. Borrelia burgdorferi has evolved many mechanisms of evading the different immune systems across its range of reservoir hosts, including the capture and presentation of host complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein-1 (FHL-1). Acquisition is mediated by a family of complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), of which the atomic structure of CspA (BbCRASP-1) is known and shows the formation of a homodimeric species which is required for binding. Mutagenesis studies have mapped a putative factor H binding site to a cleft between the two subunits. Presented here is a new atomic structure of CspA which shows a degree of flexibility between the subunits which may be critical for factor H scavenging by increasing access to the binding interface and allows the possibility that the assembly can clamp around the bound complement regulators

  17. Down-regulation of the expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α gene in cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical carcinoma is the second most common cancer and is an important cause of death in women worldwide. CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) are a family of transcription factors that regulate cellular differentiation and proliferation in a variety of tissues. However, the role of C/EBPα gene in cervical cancer is still not clear. We investigated the expression of C/EBPα gene in cervical squamous cell carcinoma. C/EBPα mRNA level was measured by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in cervical cancer tissues and their adjacent normal tissues. C/EBPα protein level was measured by immunohistochemistry. Methylation in the promoter of C/EBPα gene was detected by MALDI TOF MassARRAY. We transfected HeLa cells with C/EBPα expression vector. C/EBPα expression in HeLa cells was examined and HeLa cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay and HeLa cells migration was analyzed by matrigel-coated transwell migration assays. There were significant difference in C/EBPα protein expression between chronic cervicitis and cervical carcinoma (P < 0.001). CEBPα mRNA level was significantly lower in cervical cancer tissues than in normal cervical tissues (P < 0.01). Methylation of the promoter of CEBPα gene in CpG 5, CpG-14.15, CpG-19.20 were significantly higher in cervical cancer than in normal cervical tissues (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, respectively). CEBPα pcDNA3.1 construct transfected into HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and decreased cell migration. Our results indicate that reduced C/EBPα gene expression may play a role in the development of cervical squamous cell carcinoma

  18. Up-Regulation of Telomere-Binding Proteins, TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 Is Related to Telomere Shortening during Human Multistep Hepatocarcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Chanil; Park, Young Nyun

    2005-01-01

    The telomeric repeat-binding factor 1 (TRF1), TRF2, and the TRF1-interacting nuclear protein 2 (TIN2) are involved in telomere maintenance. We describe the regulation of expression of these genes along with their relationship to telomere length in hepatocarcinogenesis. The transcriptional expression of these genes, TRF1 protein, and telomere length was examined in 9 normal livers, 14 chronic hepatitis, 24 liver cirrhosis, 5 large regenerative nodules, 14 low-grade dysplastic nodules (DNs), 7 ...

  19. Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (DmPTB regulates dorso-ventral patterning genes in embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Heimiller

    Full Text Available The Drosophila polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (dmPTB or hephaestus plays an important role during embryogenesis. A loss of function mutation, heph(03429, results in varied defects in embryonic developmental processes, leading to embryonic lethality. However, the suite of molecular functions that are disrupted in the mutant remains unknown. We have used an unbiased high throughput sequencing approach to identify transcripts that are misregulated in this mutant. Misregulated transcripts show evidence of significantly altered patterns of splicing (exon skipping, 5' and 3' splice site switching, alternative 5' ends, and mRNA level changes (up and down regulation. These findings are independently supported by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis and in situ hybridization. We show that a group of genes, such as Zerknüllt, z600 and screw are among the most upregulated in the mutant and have been functionally linked to dorso-ventral patterning and/or dorsal closure processes. Thus, loss of dmPTB function results in specific misregulated transcripts, including those that provide the missing link between the loss of dmPTB function and observed developmental defects in embryogenesis. This study provides the first comprehensive repertoire of genes affected in vivo in the heph mutant in Drosophila and offers insight into the role of dmPTB during embryonic development.

  20. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Colm M.; Kindle, Karin B.; Collins, Hilary M. [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Heery, David M., E-mail: david.heery@nottingham.ac.uk [Gene Regulation Group, Centre for Biomolecular Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBP{Delta}998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  1. Histone demethylase retinoblastoma binding protein 2 regulates the expression of α-smooth muscle actin and vimentin in cirrhotic livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q. [Department of Microbiology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, L.X. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zeng, J.P. [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China); Liu, X.J.; Liang, X.M.; Zhou, Y.B. [Department of Microbiology, Key Laboratory for Experimental Teratology of the Chinese Ministry of Education, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-09-06

    Liver cirrhosis is one of the most common diseases of Chinese patients. Herein, we report the high expression of a newly identified histone 3 lysine 4 demethylase, retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2), and its role in liver cirrhosis in humans. The siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) reduced levels of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and vimentin and decreased the proliferation of HSCs; and overexpression of RBP2 increased α-SMA and vimentin levels. Treatment with transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) upregulated the expression of RBP2, α-SMA, and vimentin, and the siRNA knockdown of RBP2 expression attenuated TGF-β-mediated upregulation of α-SMA and vimentin expression and HSC proliferation. Furthermore, RBP2 was highly expressed in cirrhotic rat livers. Therefore, RBP2 may participate in the pathogenesis of liver cirrhosis by regulating the expression of α-SMA and vimentin. RBP2 may be a useful marker for the diagnosis and treatment of liver cirrhosis.

  2. SUMOylation regulates the nuclear mobility of CREB binding protein and its association with nuclear bodies in live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lysine acetyltransferase CREB binding protein (CBP) is required for chromatin modification and transcription at many gene promoters. In fixed cells, a large proportion of CBP colocalises to PML or nuclear bodies. Using live cell imaging, we show here that YFP-tagged CBP expressed in HEK293 cells undergoes gradual accumulation in nuclear bodies, some of which are mobile and migrate towards the nuclear envelope. Deletion of a short lysine-rich domain that contains the major SUMO acceptor sites of CBP abrogated its ability to be SUMO modified, and prevented its association with endogenous SUMO-1/PML speckles in vivo. This SUMO-defective CBP showed enhanced ability to co-activate AML1-mediated transcription. Deletion mapping revealed that the SUMO-modified region was not sufficient for targeting CBP to PML bodies, as C-terminally truncated mutants containing this domain showed a strong reduction in accumulation at PML bodies. Fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) experiments revealed that YFP-CBPΔ998-1087 had a retarded recovery time in the nucleus, as compared to YFP-CBP. These results indicate that SUMOylation regulates CBP function by influencing its shuttling between nuclear bodies and chromatin microenvironments.

  3. Interaction between the Alzheimer's survival peptide humanin and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 regulates cell survival and apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ikonen, Maaria; LIU, BINGRONG; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Ma, Liqun; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Niikura, Takako; Nishimoto, Ikuo; Cohen, Pinchas

    2003-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) regulates IGF bioactivity and also independently modulates cell growth and survival. By using a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify IGFBP-3-interacting proteins, we cloned humanin (HN) as an IGFBP-3-binding partner. HN is a 24-aa peptide that has been shown to specifically inhibit neuronal cell death induced by familial Alzheimer's disease mutant genes and amyloid-β (Aβ). The physical interaction of HN with IGFBP-3 was determined to be of...

  4. Regulation of GAs-binding protein on dwarfism of rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGPing; CAOXianzu; WUYonghong; LIANGJiansheng

    1994-01-01

    The levels of endogenous hormones (GAs and ABA) in rice seedlings (7d) were measured by gas-liquid chromatography with flame ionization detoctor (GLC-FID) and the GAs-binding protein on meanbrane of young rice shoot was also analysed as dascribed by Chiharu.

  5. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Wheat Amylose and Amylopectin from Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Characterization of Granule-binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guan-Xing; Zhou, Jian-Wen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Han, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wen-Ying; Xu, Yan-Hao; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Waxy starch has an important influence on the qualities of breads. Generally, grain weight and yield in waxy wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are significantly lower than in bread wheat. In this study, we performed the first proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of starch granule-binding proteins by comparing the waxy wheat cultivar Shannong 119 and the bread wheat cultivar Nongda 5181. These results indicate that reduced amylose content does not affect amylopectin synthesis, but it causes significant reduction of total starch biosynthesis, grain size, weight and grain yield. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis identified 40 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots in waxy and non-waxy wheats, which belonged mainly to starch synthase (SS) I, SS IIa and granule-bound SS I. Most DEPs involved in amylopectin synthesis showed a similar expression pattern during grain development, suggesting relatively independent amylose and amylopectin synthesis pathways. Phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-binding proteins, using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS, showed that the total number of phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation levels in ND5181 were significantly higher than in SN119, but proteins controlling amylopectin synthesis had similar phosphorylation levels. Our results revealed the lack of amylose did not affect the expression and phosphorylation of the starch granule-binding proteins involved in amylopectin biosynthesis. PMID:27604546

  6. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  7. The fission yeast RNA binding protein Mmi1 regulates meiotic genes by controlling intron specific splicing and polyadenylation coupled RNA turnover.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Mei Chen

    Full Text Available The polyA tails of mRNAs are monitored by the exosome as a quality control mechanism. We find that fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, adopts this RNA quality control mechanism to regulate a group of 30 or more meiotic genes at the level of both splicing and RNA turnover. In vegetative cells the RNA binding protein Mmi1 binds to the primary transcripts of these genes. We find the novel motif U(U/C/GAAAC highly over-represented in targets of Mmi1. Mmi1 can specifically regulate the splicing of particular introns in a transcript: it inhibits the splicing of introns that are in the vicinity of putative Mmi1 binding sites, while allowing the splicing of other introns that are far from such sites. In addition, binding of Mmi1, particularly near the 3' end, alters 3' processing to promote extremely long polyA tails of up to a kilobase. The hyperadenylated transcripts are then targeted for degradation by the nuclear exonuclease Rrp6. The nuclear polyA binding protein Pab2 assists this hyperadenylation-mediated RNA decay. Rrp6 also targets other hyperadenylated transcripts, which become hyperadenylated in an unknown, but Mmi1-independent way. Thus, hyperadenylation may be a general signal for RNA degradation. In addition, binding of Mmi1 can affect the efficiency of 3' cleavage. Inactivation of Mmi1 in meiosis allows meiotic expression, through splicing and RNA stabilization, of at least 29 target genes, which are apparently constitutively transcribed.

  8. Regulated protein aggregation: stress granules and neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Wolozin Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The protein aggregation that occurs in neurodegenerative diseases is classically thought to occur as an undesirable, nonfunctional byproduct of protein misfolding. This model contrasts with the biology of RNA binding proteins, many of which are linked to neurodegenerative diseases. RNA binding proteins use protein aggregation as part of a normal regulated, physiological mechanism controlling protein synthesis. The process of regulated protein aggregation is most evident in formation ...

  9. The transcriptional activator GAL4-VP16 regulates the intra-molecular interactions of the TATA-binding protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anurag Kumar Mishra; Perumal Vanathi; Purnima Bhargava

    2003-06-01

    Binding characteristics of yeast TATA-binding protein (yTBP) over five oligomers having different TATA variants and lacking a UASGAL, showed that TATA-binding protein (TBP)-TATA complex gets stabilized in the presence of the acidic activator GAL4-VP16. Activator also greatly suppressed the non-specific TBP-DNA complex formation. The effects were more pronounced over weaker TATA boxes. Activator also reduced the TBP dimer levels both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the dimer may be a direct target of transcriptional activators. The transcriptional activator facilitated the dimer to monomer transition and activated monomers further to help TBP bind even the weaker TATA boxes stably. The overall stimulatory effect of the GAL4-VP16 on the TBP-TATA complex formation resembles the known effects of removal of the N-terminus of TBP on its activity, suggesting that the activator directly targets the N-terminus of TBP and facilitates its binding to the TATA box.

  10. Differential tissue regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I content and binding proteins after endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Molina, P E; Gelato, M C; Lang, C H

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the regulation of plasma and tissue levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-1, -2, and -3 (IGFBP-1, -2, and -3) in rats injected with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria. When injected iv into conscious overnight fasted rats, plasma IGF-I levels were initially decreased within 1 h, maximally depressed at 4 h, and still only 35-45% of control values at 24 h. GH levels were reduced as early as 30 min after LPS, averaged 80-90% of control values between 1-4 h, but had returned to basal levels by 24 h. The magnitude and duration of these changes were similar regardless of whether 100 or 10 micrograms/100 g BW (LD20 and LD0, respectively) LPS were injected. Plasma levels of IGFBP-1 and a 28K mol wt BP (BP-28K) were elevated 2- to 3-fold 4 h after LPS treatment, whereas IGFBP-3 and -2 levels were unchanged. The elevation in plasma IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-28K was observed as early as 1 h and was sustained for up to 24 h after LPS treatment. IGF-I levels were decreased 30-50% in liver, pituitary, and skeletal muscle, unchanged in brain, and elevated 5-fold in kidney in response to LPS. Of the tissues sampled, IGFBP-3 and -2 were selectively elevated in liver after LPS treatment. IGFBP-1 was increased in liver, muscle, and kidney in response to LPS. The level of the 28,000 mol wt BP was increased in liver (83%) and not changed in muscle or brain. These data indicate that LPS produces both rapid and sustained alterations in circulating levels of GH, IGF-I, and IGFBPs. Furthermore, there were marked tissue-specific changes in levels of IGF-I and IGFBPs. LPS-induced changes in plasma and tissue IGFBP-3 were not regulated by changes in GH, and changes in insulin could not explain the alterations in IGFBP-1 and -2. These results suggest that after the injection of LPS, changes in IGF-I and IGFBP levels are regulated by a mechanism

  11. The P. aeruginosa Heme Binding Protein PhuS is a Heme Oxygenase Titratable Regulator of Heme Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    O’Neill, Maura J.; Wilks, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa heme utilization (Phu) system encodes several proteins involved in the acquisition of heme as an iron source. Once internalized heme is degraded by the iron-regulated heme oxygenase, HemO to biliverdin (BV) IXδ and β. In vitro studies have shown holo-PhuS transfers heme to the iron-regulated HemO. This protein-protein interaction is specific for HemO as PhuS does not interact with the α-regioselective heme oxygenase, BphO. Bacterial genetics and isotopic labeling...

  12. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Minia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2, and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress.

  13. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minia, Igor; Clayton, Christine

    2016-03-01

    The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2), and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress. PMID:27002830

  14. Regulating a Post-Transcriptional Regulator: Protein Phosphorylation, Degradation and Translational Blockage in Control of the Trypanosome Stress-Response RNA-Binding Protein ZC3H11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minia, Igor; Clayton, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The life cycle of the mammalian pathogen Trypanosoma brucei involves commuting between two markedly different environments: the homeothermic mammalian host and the poikilothermic invertebrate vector. The ability to resist temperature and other stresses is essential for trypanosome survival. Trypanosome gene expression is mainly post-transcriptional, but must nevertheless be adjusted in response to environmental cues, including host-specific physical and chemical stresses. We investigate here the control of ZC3H11, a CCCH zinc finger protein which stabilizes stress response mRNAs. ZC3H11 protein levels increase at least 10-fold when trypanosomes are stressed by heat shock, proteasome inhibitors, ethanol, arsenite, and low doses of puromycin, but not by various other stresses. We found that increases in protein stability and translation efficiency both contribute to ZC3H11 accumulation. ZC3H11 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase 1 isoform 2 (CK1.2), and results from CK1.2 depletion and other experiments suggest that phosphorylation of ZC3H11 can promote its instability in vivo. Results from sucrose density centrifugation indicate that under normal culture conditions translation initiation on the ZC3H11 mRNA is repressed, but after suitable stresses the ZC3H11 mRNA moves to heavy polysomes. The ZC3H11 3'-UTR is sufficient for translation suppression and a region of 71 nucleotides is required for the regulation. Since the control works in both bloodstream forms, where ZC3H11 translation is repressed at 37°C, and in procyclic forms, where ZC3H11 translation is activated at 37°C, we predict that this regulatory RNA sequence is targeted by repressive trans acting factor that is released upon stress. PMID:27002830

  15. Transcriptional modulation of hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion : coordinate regulation of the liver-fatty acid binding protein and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein genes

    OpenAIRE

    Spann, Nathanael J.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic production of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins provides a means to transport essential lipids and fat-soluble nutrients to peripheral tissues for utilization and storage. Liver-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) bind fatty acids and glycerolipids, respectively and facilitate their transfer into the VLDL assembly and secretion pathway. Sequence analysis reveals that the proximal promoter regions of L-FABP and MTP contain...

  16. miR-200c and GATA binding protein 4 regulate human embryonic stem cell renewal and differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ning Huang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are functionally unique for their self-renewal ability and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms giving rise to these properties are not fully understood. hESCs can differentiate into embryoid bodies (EBs containing ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. In the miR-200 family, miR-200c was especially enriched in undifferentiated hESCs and significantly downregulated in EBs. The knockdown of the miR-200c in hESCs downregulated Nanog expression, upregulated GATA binding protein 4 (GATA4 expression, and induced hESC apoptosis. The knockdown of GATA4 rescued hESC apoptosis induced by downregulation of miR-200c. miR-200c directly targeted the 3′-untranslated region of GATA4. Interestingly, the downregulation of GATA4 significantly inhibited EB formation in hESCs. Overexpression of miR-200c inhibited EB formation and repressed the expression of ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm markers, which could partially be rescued by ectopic expression of GATA4. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF and activin A/nodal can sustain hESC renewal in the absence of feeder layer. Inhibition of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β/activin A/nodal signaling by SB431542 treatment downregulated the expression of miR-200c. Overexpression of miR-200c partially rescued the expression of Nanog/phospho-Smad2 that was downregulated by SB431542 treatment. Our observations have uncovered novel functions of miR-200c and GATA4 in regulating hESC renewal and differentiation.

  17. Automethylation of SUV39H2, an oncogenic histone lysine methyltransferase, regulates its binding affinity to substrate proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Lianhua; Nakakido, Makoto; Suzuki, Takehiro; Dohmae, Naoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hamamoto, Ryuji

    2016-04-19

    We previously reported that the histone lysine methyltransferase SUV39H2, which is overexpressed in various types of human cancer, plays a critical role in the DNA repair after double strand breakage, and possesses oncogenic activity. Although its biological significance in tumorigenesis has been elucidated, the regulatory mechanism of SUV39H2 activity through post-translational modification is not well known. In this study, we demonstrate in vitro and in vivo automethylation of SUV39H2 at lysine 392. Automethylation of SUV39H2 led to impairment of its binding affinity to substrate proteins such as histone H3 and LSD1. Furthermore, we observed that hyper-automethylated SUV39H2 reduced methylation activities to substrates through affecting the binding affinity to substrate proteins. Our finding unveils a novel autoregulatory mechanism of SUV39H2 through lysine automethylation. PMID:26988914

  18. Differential regulation of IGF-binding proteins in rabbit costal chondrocytes by IGF-I and dexamethasone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koedam, J A; Hoogerbrugge, C M; Van Buul-Offers, S C

    2000-06-01

    Cartilage is a primary target tissue for the IGFs. The mitogenic activity of these peptides is regulated by a family of high-affinity IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6). We characterized the IGFBPs produced by cultured chondrocytes derived from rib cartilage of prepubertal rabbits. Culture medium, which had been conditioned by these cells for 48 h showed bands of 22 kDa, 24 kDa and a 31/32 kDa doublet by Western ligand blotting with [(125)I]IGF-II. When the cells were grown in the presence of increasing amounts of IGF-I or IGF-II, the 31/32 kDa doublet increased in intensity (reaching a plateau of about 11-fold stimulation between 2 and 10 nM IGF-I). The 22 kDa and 24 kDa bands increased only slightly while a 26 kDa band became faintly visible. By Western immunoblotting the 31/32 kDa doublet was identified as IGFBP-5. An IGF-I analog with reduced affinity for IGFBPs, Long-R3 IGF-I, also induced IGFBP-5, while insulin was less effective (2.2-fold stimulation at 10 nM). IGF-I protected IGFBP-5 against proteolytic degradation by conditioned medium. IGF-I also enhanced the level of IGFBP-5 mRNA. LY294002, a specific inhibitor of the intracellular signaling molecule phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, inhibited stimulation of IGFBP-5 by IGF-I. Dexamethasone suppressed IGFBP-5 (by 70% at 20 nM) but, at the same time, a 39/41 kDa doublet (presumably IGFBP-3) was induced. IGFBP-5 has been shown in several cell types to enhance the mitogenic activity of IGF-I. IGFBP-3 generally acts as a growth inhibitor. Therefore, the differential effects of dexamethasone on these regulatory proteins could account, at least in part, for the growth-arresting effect of this glucocorticoid. PMID:10828839

  19. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama Takayuki; Teratani Takumi; Takayama Tatsuya; Takaoka Naohisa; Mugiya Soichi; Ozono Seiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7), also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC,...

  20. Transition of plasmodium sporozoites into liver stage-like forms is regulated by the RNA binding protein pumilio

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes-Santos, Carina S. S.; Braks, Joanna; Prudêncio, Miguel; Carret, Céline; Gomes, Ana Rita; Pain, Arnab; Feltwell, Theresa; Khan, Shahid; Waters, Andrew; Janse, Chris,; Gunnar R. Mair; Mota, Maria M.

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Injection of Plasmodium sporozoites by Anopheles mosquitoes into the human host initiates malaria infection. Generation of blood stage parasites leading to the onset of disease relies on the successful development of the sporozoite into merozoites in the liver. Here we show that in the rodent malaria model Plasmodium berghei these developmental transformations are controlled by the RNA binding protein Pumilio 2 (Puf2). In the absence of Puf2, sporozoites, while still in the mos...

  1. Role of CCAA Nucleotide Repeats in Regulation of Hemoglobin and Hemoglobin-Haptoglobin Binding Protein Genes of Haemophilus influenzae

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zhen; Jin, Hongfan; Whitby, Paul W.; Morton, Daniel J.; Stull, Terrence L.

    1999-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae utilizes hemoglobin and hemoglobin-haptoglobin as heme sources. The H. influenzae hemoglobin- and hemoglobin-haptoglobin binding protein genes, hgpA, hgpB, and hgpC, contain lengths of tetrameric CCAA repeats. Using an hgpA-lacZ translational gene fusion, we demonstrate phase-variable expression of lacZ associated with alteration in the length of the CCAA repeat region.

  2. Fatty acid binding protein 4 is a target of VEGF and a regulator of cell proliferation in endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Elmasri, Harun; Karaaslan, Cagatay; Teper, Yaroslav; Ghelfi, Elisa; Weng, Meiqian; Ince, Tan A.; Kozakewich, Harry; Bischoff, Joyce; Cataltepe, Sule

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) plays an important role in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis. FABP4 has been primarily regarded as an adipocyte- and macrophage-specific protein, but recent studies suggest that it may be more widely expressed. We found strong FABP4 expression in the endothelial cells (ECs) of capillaries and small veins in several mouse and human tissues, including the heart and kidney. FABP4 was also detected in the ECs of mature human placental vessels and infan...

  3. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.-Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  4. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Regulation of glucose and fat metabolism in the liver by Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and impact of dietary influence

    OpenAIRE

    Elkatry, Haiam Omar Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Deregulationen in der Leberlipidsynthese sind häufig mit Adipositas und Diabetes Typ 2 verbunden und daher ist ein detailliertes Verständnis der beteiligten, regulierenden Stoffwechselwege sehr wichtig, um künftig potentielle therapeutische Targets zu identifizieren. Die Leber ist der wichtigste Ort für den Kohlenhydratstoffwechsel (Glykolyse und Glykogen-Synthese) sowie Triglycerid-Synthese (Lipogenese). Carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) wurden in die Regulation durch ...

  5. ETS1 and ETS2 in p53 regulation: spatial separation of ETS binding sites (EBS) modulate protein: DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venanzoni, M C; Robinson, L R; Hodge, D R; Kola, I; Seth, A

    1996-03-21

    p53 is an extensively studied tumor suppressor gene implicated in the genesis of a large number of varied tumors. However, the pathways of regulation for the wild-type p53 gene and its product are as yet unknown. In situ hybridization analyses of ETS1 and ETS2 expression during mouse embryogenesis, have shown a pattern similar to that of p53 gene expression. Significantly, we have identified several ETS-binding sites (EBS) in the promoter regions of the human and mouse p53 genes. In the human promoter two of these EBS are present in the form of a palindrome, with the two EBS cores being separated by four nucleotides. This report shows that the EBS palindrome of the human p53 promoter has a high affinity for ETS1 and ETS2 and that such binding interaction intracellularly is able to activate the transcription of a CAT reporter gene by 5-10-fold using COS cells. To investigate whether the spacing between the two EBS cores influences the DNA binding activity, we synthesized oligonucleotides with increasing distances (4,12,16, and 20 bases respectively) between the two EBS cores of the palindrome. We observed an inverse correlation between an increasing distance in the two EBS cores of the palindrome and the ETS1 and ETS2 DNA binding activity respectively. Interestingly, optimal DNA binding activity was observed when the distance between the two EBS cores was four bases, identical to that which occurs in the natural promoter. Furthermore we show that the p53 mRNA is expressed at higher levels in NIH3T3 cells overexpressing ETS2 gene product, suggesting that the ETS2 transcription factor is a likely candidate for regulating the expression of p53 in vivo. PMID:8649821

  6. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Rubio-Villena

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS and glycogen phosphorylase (GP. To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6 and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP. We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  7. Analysis of the regulation of fatty acid binding protein 7 expression in human renal carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiyama Takayuki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC will depend on the development of better biomarkers for predicting disease progression and aiding the design of appropriate therapies. One such marker may be fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7, also known as B-FABP and BLBP, which is expressed normally in radial glial cells of the developing central nervous system and cells of the mammary gland. Melanomas, glioblastomas, and several types of carcinomas, including RCC, overexpress FABP7. The abundant expression of FABP7 in primary RCCs compared to certain RCC-derived cell lines may allow the definition of the molecular components of FABP7's regulatory system. Results We determined FABP7 mRNA levels in six RCC cell lines. Two were highly expressed, whereas the other and the embryonic kidney cell line (HEK293 were weakly expressed FABP7 transcripts. Western blot analysis of the cell lines detected strong FABP7 expression only in one RCC cell line. Promoter activity in the RCC cell lines was 3- to 21-fold higher than that of HEK293. Deletion analysis demonstrated that three FABP7 promoter regions contributed to upregulated expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell. Competition analysis of gel shifts indicated that OCT1, OCT6, and nuclear factor I (NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region. Supershift experiments indicated that BRN2 (POU3F2 and NFI bound to the FABP7 promoter region as well. There was an inverse correlation between FABP7 promoter activity and BRN2 mRNA expression. The FABP7-positive cell line's NFI-DNA complex migrated faster than in other cell lines. Levels of NFIA mRNA were higher in the HEK293 cell line than in any of the six RCC cell lines. In contrast, NFIC mRNA expression was lower in the HEK293 cell line than in the six RCC cell lines. Conclusions Three putative FABP7 promoter regions drive reporter gene expression in RCC cell lines, but not in the HEK293 cell line. BRN2 and NFI may be key

  8. Transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha up-regulates microRNA let-7a-1 in lung cancer cells by direct binding

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yani; Zhao, Jian; Hu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Lina; Liang, Liming; Chen, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Aims The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) and microRNA (miRNA) let-7a-1 act as tumor suppressors in many types of cancers including lung cancer. In the present study, we aim to investigate whether let-7a-1 is a novel important target of C/EBPα in lung cancer cells. Methods The DNA sequence of the 2.1 kb let-7a-1 promoter was analyzed with MatInspector 4.1 (http://www.genomatix.de). Human lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299, and human cervical cancer cell line H...

  9. Computational Prediction of RNA-Binding Proteins and Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingna Si

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Proteins and RNA interaction have vital roles in many cellular processes such as protein synthesis, sequence encoding, RNA transfer, and gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Approximately 6%–8% of all proteins are RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. Distinguishing these RBPs or their binding residues is a major aim of structural biology. Previously, a number of experimental methods were developed for the determination of protein–RNA interactions. However, these experimental methods are expensive, time-consuming, and labor-intensive. Alternatively, researchers have developed many computational approaches to predict RBPs and protein–RNA binding sites, by combining various machine learning methods and abundant sequence and/or structural features. There are three kinds of computational approaches, which are prediction from protein sequence, prediction from protein structure, and protein-RNA docking. In this paper, we review all existing studies of predictions of RNA-binding sites and RBPs and complexes, including data sets used in different approaches, sequence and structural features used in several predictors, prediction method classifications, performance comparisons, evaluation methods, and future directions.

  10. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Irina Moater; Cristiana Radulescu; Ionica Ionita

    2011-01-01

    The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ...

  11. The FUSE binding proteins FBP1 and FBP3 are potential c-myc regulators in renal, but not in prostate and bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Hellmuth-Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three far-upstream element (FUSE binding proteins (FBP1, FBP2, and FBP3 belong to an ancient family of single-stranded DNA binding proteins which are required for proper regulation of the c-myc proto-oncogene. Whereas it is known that c-myc alterations play a completely different role in various carcinomas of the urogenital tract, the relevance of FBPs is unclear. Methods FBP1, FBP3 and c-myc expression was studied in 105 renal cell, 95 prostate and 112 urinary bladder carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Results High rates of FBP1 and FBP3 expression were observed in all cancer types. There was a concomitant up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in renal cell and prostate carcinomas (p C-myc expression was detectable in 21% of prostate, 30% of renal and 34% of urothelial carcinomas. Interestingly, strong FBP1 and FBP3 expression was associated with c-myc up-regulation in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (p Conclusion The correlation between FBP1/FBP3, c-myc and high proliferation rate in renal cell carcinoma provides strong in vivo support for the suggested role of FBP1 and FBP3 as activators of c-myc. The frequent up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in urothelial and prostate carcinoma suggests that FBPs also have an important function in gene regulation of these tumors.

  12. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  13. ComA, a phosphorylated response regulator protein of Bacillus subtilis, binds to the promoter region of srfA.

    OpenAIRE

    Roggiani, M; Dubnau, D

    1993-01-01

    ComA is a response regulator protein of Bacillus subtilis which is required for the transcription of several genes which are involved in late-growth expression and in responses to environmental stress. Among these genes are degQ, gsiA, and srfA. The last is an operon needed for the development of genetic competence, surfactin production, and normal sporulation. We show here that partially purified ComA protein, isolated from an overproducing Escherichia coli strain, is phosphorylated in vitro...

  14. Protein Dynamics in an RNA Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Kathleen

    2006-03-01

    Using ^15N NMR relaxation measurements, analyzed with the Lipari-Szabo formalism, we have found that the human U1A RNA binding protein has ps-ns motions in those loops that make contact with RNA. Specific mutations can alter the extent and pattern of motions, and those proteins inevitably lose RNA binding affinity. Proteins with enhanced mobility of loops and termini presumably lose affinity due to increased conformational sampling by those parts of the protein that interact directly with RNA. There is an entropic penalty associated with locking down those elements upon RNA binding, in addition to a loss of binding efficiency caused by the increased number of conformations adopted by the protein. However, in addition to local conformational heterogeneity, analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Reorientational Eigenmode Dynamics reveals that loops of the wild type protein undergo correlated motions that link distal sites across the binding surface. Mutations that disrupt correlated motions result in weaker RNA binding, implying that there is a network of interactions across the surface of the protein. (KBH was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Al Redfield from 1985-1990). This work was supported by the NIH (to KBH) and NSF (SAS).

  15. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myre, Michael A; O'Day, Danton H

    2005-06-24

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD (171EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF195) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48EF49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48EF49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium. PMID:15896312

  16. Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Atshaves, B.P.; Martin, G G; Hostetler, H.A.; McIntosh, A.L.; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F.

    2010-01-01

    While low levels of unesterified long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are normal metabolic intermediates of dietary and endogenous fat, LCFAs are also potent regulators of key receptors/enzymes, and at high levels become toxic detergents within the cell. Elevated levels of LCFAs are associated with diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Consequently, mammals evolved fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind/sequester these potentially toxic free fatty acids in the cytosol and present them f...

  17. Regulation and function of the CD3¿ DxxxLL motif: a binding site for adaptor protein-1 and adaptor protein-2 in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Kastrup, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1997-01-01

    /CD3gamma chimeras; and in vitro by binding CD3gamma peptides to clathrin-coated vesicle adaptor proteins (APs). We find that the CD3gamma D127xxxLL131/132 sequence represents one united motif for binding of both AP-1 and AP-2, and that this motif functions as an active sorting motif in monomeric CD4...... and for AP binding in vitro. Furthermore, we provide evidence indicating that phosphorylation of CD3gamma S126 in the context of the complete TCR induces a conformational change that exposes the DxxxLL sequence for AP binding. Exposure of the DxxxLL motif causes an increase in the TCR internalization...

  18. A KH Domain-Containing Putative RNA-Binding Protein Is Critical for Heat Stress-Responsive Gene Regulation and Thermotolerance in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingmei Guan; Changlong Wen; Haitao Zeng; Jianhua Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Heat stress is a severe environmental factor that significantly reduces plant growth and delays development.Heat stress factors (HSFs) are a class of transcription factors that are synthesized rapidly in response to elevations in temperature and are responsible for the transcription of many heat stress-responsive genes including those encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs).There are 21 HSFs in Arabidopsis,and recent studies have established that the HSFA1 family members are master regulators for the remaining HSFs.However,very little is known about upstream molecular factors that control the expression of HSFA1 genes and other HSF genes under heat stress.Through a forward genetic analysis,we identified RCF3,a K homology (KH) domain-containing nuclear-localized putative RNA-binding protein.RCF3 is a negative regulator of most HSFs,including HSFAla,HSFAlb,and HSFAld.In contrast,RCF3 positively controls the expression of HSFAle,HSFA3,HSFA9,HSFB3,and DREB2C.Consistently with the overall increased accumulation of heat-responsive genes,the rcf3 mutant plants are more tolerant than the wild-type to heat stress.Together,our results suggest that a KH domain-containing putative RNA-binding protein RCF3 is an important upstream regulator for heat stress-responsive gene expression and thermotolerance in Arabidopsis.

  19. Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Promotes Cell Migration and Invasion via Down-Regulation of RNA Binding Motif Protein 38 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaofeng Ding

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR exerts regulatory functions in various biological processes in cancer cells, such as proliferation, apoptosis, mobility, and invasion. We previously found that HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits oncogenic activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role and molecular mechanism of HOTAIR in promoting HCC cell migration and invasion. Firstly, we profiled its gene expression pattern by microarray analysis of HOTAIR loss in Bel-7402 HCC cell line. The results showed that 129 genes were significantly down-regulated, while 167 genes were significantly up-regulated (fold change >2, p < 0.05. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that RNA binding proteins were involved in this biological process. HOTAIR suppression using RNAi strategy with HepG2 and Bel-7402 cells increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of RNA binding motif protein 38 (RBM38. Moreover, the expression levels of RBM38 in HCC specimens were significantly lower than paired adjacent noncancerous tissues. In addition, knockdown of HOTAIR resulted in a decrease of cell migration and invasion, which could be specifically rescued by down-regulation of RBM38. Taken together, HOTAIR could promote migration and invasion of HCC cells by inhibiting RBM38, which indicated critical roles of HOTAIR and RBM38 in HCC progression.

  20. Grafting of protein-protein binding sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A strategy for grafting protein-protein binding sites is described. Firstly, key interaction residues at the interface of ligand protein to be grafted are identified and suitable positions in scaffold protein for grafting these key residues are sought. Secondly, the scaffold proteins are superposed onto the ligand protein based on the corresponding Ca and Cb atoms. The complementarity between the scaffold protein and the receptor protein is evaluated and only matches with high score are accepted. The relative position between scaffold and receptor proteins is adjusted so that the interface has a reasonable packing density. Then the scaffold protein is mutated to corresponding residues in ligand protein at each candidate position. And the residues having bad steric contacts with the receptor proteins, or buried charged residues not involved in the formation of any salt bridge are mutated. Finally, the mutated scaffold protein in complex with receptor protein is co-minimized by Charmm. In addition, we deduce a scoring function to evaluate the affinity between mutated scaffold protein and receptor protein by statistical analysis of rigid binding data sets.

  1. An early ethylene up-regulated gene encoding a calmodulin-binding protein involved in plant senescence and death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    35S-Labeled calmodulin (CaM) was used to screen a tobacco anther cDNA library. A positive clone (NtER1) with high homology to an early ethylene-up-regulated gene (ER66) in tomato, and an Arabidopsis homolog was isolated and characterized. Based on the helical wheel projection, a 25-mer peptide corresponding to the predicted CaM-binding region of NtER1 (amino acids 796-820) was synthesized. The gel-mobility shift assay showed that the peptide formed a stable complex with CaM only in the presence of Ca(2+). CaM binds to NtER1 with high affinity (K(d) approximately 12 nm) in a calcium-dependent manner. Tobacco flowers at different stages of development were treated with ethylene or with 1-methylcyclopropene for 2 h before treating with ethylene. Northern analysis showed that the NtER1 was rapidly induced after 15 min of exposure to ethylene. However, the 2-h 1-methylcyclopropene treatment totally blocked NtER1 expression in flowers at all stages of development, suggesting that NtER1 is an early ethylene-up-regulated gene. The senescing leaves and petals had significantly increased NtER1 induction as compared with young leaves and petals, implying that NtER1 is developmentally regulated and acts as a trigger for senescence and death. This is the first documented evidence for the involvement of Ca(2+)/CaM-mediated signaling in ethylene action.

  2. Identification of Y-box binding protein 1 as a core regulator of MEK/ERK pathway-dependent gene signatures in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Jürchott

    Full Text Available Transcriptional signatures are an indispensible source of correlative information on disease-related molecular alterations on a genome-wide level. Numerous candidate genes involved in disease and in factors of predictive, as well as of prognostic, value have been deduced from such molecular portraits, e.g. in cancer. However, mechanistic insights into the regulatory principles governing global transcriptional changes are lagging behind extensive compilations of deregulated genes. To identify regulators of transcriptome alterations, we used an integrated approach combining transcriptional profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines treated with inhibitors targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, computational prediction of regulatory elements in promoters of co-regulated genes, chromatin-based and functional cellular assays. We identified commonly co-regulated, proliferation-associated target genes that respond to the MAPK pathway. We recognized E2F and NFY transcription factor binding sites as prevalent motifs in those pathway-responsive genes and confirmed the predicted regulatory role of Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1 by reporter gene, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We also validated the MAPK-dependent gene signature in colorectal cancers and provided evidence for the association of YBX1 with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. This suggests that MEK/ERK-dependent, YBX1-regulated target genes are involved in executing malignant properties.

  3. Regulation of Cox-2 by Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Protein in Prostate Cancer: Potential Role for Nexrutine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ghosh

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that NexrutineR, a Phellodendron amurense bark extract, suppresses proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines and tumor development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. Our data also indicate that the antiproliferative effects of NexrutineR are mediated in part by Akt and Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB. Cyclooxygenase (Cox-2, a pro-inflammatory mediator, is a CREB target that induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and suppresses apoptosis. Treatment of LNCaP cells with NexrutineR reduced tumor necrosis factor α-induced enzymatic as well as promoter activities of Cox-2. NexrutineR also reduced the expression and promoter activity of Cox-2 in PC-3 cells that express high constitutive levels of Cox-2. Deletion analysis coupled with mutational analysis of the Cox-2 promoter identified CRE as being sufficient for mediating NexrutineR response. Immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate tumors show increased expression of CREB and DNA binding activity in high-grade tumors (three-fold higher in human prostate tumors compared to normal prostate; P = .01. We have identified CREB-mediated activation of Cox-2 as a potential signaling pathway in prostate cancer which can be blocked with a nontoxic, cost-effective dietary supplement like NexrutineR, demonstrating a prospective for development of NexrutineR for prostate cancer management.

  4. Progestin-inducible EDD E3 ubiquitin ligase binds to α4 phosphoprotein to regulate ubiquitination and degradation of protein phosphatase PP2Ac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, William J; Thomas, Lynn N; Koirala, Samir; Too, Catherine K L

    2014-01-25

    Mammalian α4 phosphoprotein binds to the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) to regulate PP2A activity, and to poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) and progestin-inducible EDD E3 ubiquitin ligase. This study showed induction of the EDD protein by progesterone, 17β-estradiol and prolactin in breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses, using lysates of COS-1 cells transfected with α4-deletion constructs, showed the α4 N-terminus binding to endogenous PP2Ac and PABP, and the C-terminus to EDD. Monoubiquitinated α4 in MCF-7 cells was unaffected by EDD-targeting siRNA (siEDD) nor by non-targetting siNT, thus, EDD does not ubiquitinate α4. PP2Ac is polyubiquitinated, and 36-kDa PP2Ac only was detected in siEDD- or siNT-transfected cells. However, treatment with proteasomal inhibitor MG132 showed polyubiquitinated-PP2Ac molecules (∼65-250kDa) abundantly in siNT controls but low in siEDD-transfectants, implicating PP2Ac as an EDD substrate. Finally, progesterone induction of EDD in MCF-7 cells correlated with decreased PP2Ac levels, further implicating hormone-inducible EDD in PP2Ac turnover. PMID:24145130

  5. NR4A orphan nuclear receptors influence retinoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid signaling via up-regulation of fatty acid binding protein 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volakakis, Nikolaos; Joodmardi, Eliza [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); Perlmann, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.perlmann@licr.ki.se [Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Ltd., Box 240, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden); The Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Karolinska Institute, S-17177 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-12-25

    The orphan nuclear receptor (NR) Nurr1 is expressed in the developing and adult nervous system and is also induced as an immediate early gene in a variety of cell types. In silico analysis of human promoters identified fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5), a protein shown to enhance retinoic acid-mediated PPAR{beta}/{delta} signaling, as a potential Nurr1 target gene. Nurr1 has previously been implicated in retinoid signaling via its heterodimerization partner RXR. Since NRs are commonly involved in cross-regulatory control we decided to further investigate the regulatory relationship between Nurr1 and FABP5. FABP5 expression was up-regulated by Nurr1 and other NR4A NRs in HEK293 cells, and Nurr1 was shown to activate and bind to the FABP5 promoter, supporting that FABP5 is a direct downstream target of NR4A NRs. We also show that the RXR ligand docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can induce nuclear translocation of FABP5. Moreover, via up-regulation of FABP5 Nurr1 can enhance retinoic acid-induced signaling of PPAR{beta}/{delta} and DHA-induced activation of RXR. We also found that other members of the NR4A orphan NRs can up-regulate FABP5. Thus, our findings suggest that NR4A orphan NRs can influence signaling events of other NRs via control of FABP5 expression levels.

  6. Regulation of spindle pole body assembly and cytokinesis by the centrin-binding protein Sfi1 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Ju; Wang, Ning; Hu, Wen; Schott, Kersey; Bähler, Jürg; Giddings, Thomas H; Pringle, John R; Du, Li-Lin; Wu, Jian-Qiu

    2014-09-15

    Centrosomes play critical roles in the cell division cycle and ciliogenesis. Sfi1 is a centrin-binding protein conserved from yeast to humans. Budding yeast Sfi1 is essential for the initiation of spindle pole body (SPB; yeast centrosome) duplication. However, the recruitment and partitioning of Sfi1 to centrosomal structures have never been fully investigated in any organism, and the presumed importance of the conserved tryptophans in the internal repeats of Sfi1 remains untested. Here we report that in fission yeast, instead of doubling abruptly at the initiation of SPB duplication and remaining at a constant level thereafter, Sfi1 is gradually recruited to SPBs throughout the cell cycle. Like an sfi1Δ mutant, a Trp-to-Arg mutant (sfi1-M46) forms monopolar spindles and exhibits mitosis and cytokinesis defects. Sfi1-M46 protein associates preferentially with one of the two daughter SPBs during mitosis, resulting in a failure of new SPB assembly in the SPB receiving insufficient Sfi1. Although all five conserved tryptophans tested are involved in Sfi1 partitioning, the importance of the individual repeats in Sfi1 differs. In summary, our results reveal a link between the conserved tryptophans and Sfi1 partitioning and suggest a revision of the model for SPB assembly. PMID:25031431

  7. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein regulates mucin expression induced by cold temperatures in human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, DanHua; Chen, LingXiu; Xie, WenYue; Xu, Qing; Han, Zhong; Huang, HuaPing; Zhou, XiangDong

    2016-08-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important manifestation of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, however, the mechanisms underlying the association between cold air and mucus overproduction remain unknown. We found that the expression of the cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) was increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the present study, we tested whether CIRP was involved in inflammatory factors and mucin5AC (MUC5AC) expression after cold stimulation and investigated the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that CIRP was highly expressed in the bronchi of COPD patients. The expression of CIRP, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were increased, and the CIRP was localized in cytoplasm after cold stimulation. MUC5AC mRNA and protein expression levels were elevated in a temperature- and time-dependent manner after cold stimulation and were associated with the phosphorylation of ERK and NF-κB, which reflected their activation. These responses were suppressed by knockdown of CIRP with a specific siRNA or the ERK and NF-κB inhibitors. These results demonstrated that CIRP was expressed in the bronchi of human COPD patients and was involved in inflammatory factors and MUC5AC expression after cold stimulation through the ERK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:27184164

  8. OsCCD1, a novel small calcium-binding protein with one EF-hand motif, positively regulates osmotic and salt tolerance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Pei; Zou, Juanzi; Kong, Lin; Hu, Shiqi; Wang, Biying; Yang, Jun; Xie, Guosheng

    2016-06-01

    Calcium-binding proteins play key roles in the signal transduction in the growth and stress response in eukaryotes. However, a subfamily of proteins with one EF-hand motif has not been fully studied in higher plants. Here, a novel small calcium-binding protein with a C-terminal centrin-like domain (CCD1) in rice, OsCCD1, was characterized to show high similarity with a TaCCD1 in wheat. As a result, OsCCD1 can bind Ca(2+) in the in vitro EMSA and the fluorescence staining calcium-binding assays. Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged OsCCD1 in rice protoplasts showed that OsCCD1 was localized in the nucleus and cytosol of rice cells. OsCCD1 transcript levels were transiently induced by osmotic stress and salt stress through the calcium-mediated ABA signal. The rice seedlings of T-DNA mutant lines showed significantly less tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.01). Conversely, its overexpressors can significantly enhance the tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses than wild type plants (p<0.05). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that, OsDREB2B, OsAPX1 and OsP5CS genes are involved in the rice tolerance to osmotic and salt stresses. In sum, OsCCD1 gene probably affects the DREB2B and its downstream genes to positively regulate osmotic and salt tolerance in rice seedlings. PMID:27095404

  9. The RNA Binding Zinc Finger Protein Tristetraprolin Regulates AU-Rich mRNAs Involved in Breast Cancer-Related Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Souhibani, Norah; Al-Ahmadi, Wijdan; Hesketh, John E.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Khabar, Khalid S.A.

    2010-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP or ZFP36) is a tandem CCCH zinc finger RNA binding protein that regulates the stability of certain AU-rich mRNAs. Recent work suggests that TTP is deficient in cancer cells when compared to normal cell types. Here we found that TTP expression was lower in invasive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) compared to normal breast cell lines, MCF12A and MCF-10. TTP targets were probed using a novel approach by expressing the C124R zinc finger TTP mutant that act as dominant negati...

  10. CELF family RNA-binding protein UNC-75 regulates two sets of mutually exclusive exons of the unc-32 gene in neuron-specific manners in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehito Kuroyanagi

    Full Text Available An enormous number of alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns in multicellular organisms are coordinately defined by a limited number of regulatory proteins and cis elements. Mutually exclusive alternative splicing should be strictly regulated and is a challenging model for elucidating regulation mechanisms. Here we provide models of the regulation of two sets of mutually exclusive exons, 4a-4c and 7a-7b, of the Caenorhabditis elegans uncoordinated (unc-32 gene, encoding the a subunit of V0 complex of vacuolar-type H(+-ATPases. We visualize selection patterns of exon 4 and exon 7 in vivo by utilizing a trio and a pair of symmetric fluorescence splicing reporter minigenes, respectively, to demonstrate that they are regulated in tissue-specific manners. Genetic analyses reveal that RBFOX family RNA-binding proteins ASD-1 and FOX-1 and a UGCAUG stretch in intron 7b are involved in the neuron-specific selection of exon 7a. Through further forward genetic screening, we identify UNC-75, a neuron-specific CELF family RNA-binding protein of unknown function, as an essential regulator for the exon 7a selection. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays specify a short fragment in intron 7a as the recognition site for UNC-75 and demonstrate that UNC-75 specifically binds via its three RNA recognition motifs to the element including a UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch. The UUGUUGUGUUGU stretch in the reporter minigenes is actually required for the selection of exon 7a in the nervous system. We compare the amounts of partially spliced RNAs in the wild-type and unc-75 mutant backgrounds and raise a model for the mutually exclusive selection of unc-32 exon 7 by the RBFOX family and UNC-75. The neuron-specific selection of unc-32 exon 4b is also regulated by UNC-75 and the unc-75 mutation suppresses the Unc phenotype of the exon-4b-specific allele of unc-32 mutants. Taken together, UNC-75 is the neuron-specific splicing factor and regulates both sets of the mutually exclusive

  11. Early growth response-1 protein is induced by JC virus infection and binds and regulates the JC virus promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JC virus (JCV) is a human polyomavirus that can emerge from a latent state to cause the cytolytic destruction of oligodendrocytes in the brain resulting in the fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Previous studies described a cis-acting transcriptional regulatory element in the JCV non-coding control region (NCCR) that is involved in the response of JCV to cytokines. This consists of a 23 base pair GGA/C rich sequence (GRS) near the replication origin (5112 to + 4) that contains potential binding sites for Sp1 and Egr-1. Gel shift analysis showed that Egr-1, but not Sp1, bound to GRS. Evidence is presented that the GRS gel shift seen on cellular stimulation is due to Egr-1. Thus, TPA-induced GRS gel shift could be blocked by antibody to Egr-1. Further, the TPA-induced GRS DNA/protein complex was isolated and found to contain Egr-1 by Western blot. No other Egr-1 sites were found in the JCV NCCR. Functionally, Egr-1 was found to stimulate transcription of JCV late promoter but not early promoter reporter constructs. Mutation of the Egr-1 site abrogated Egr-1 binding and virus with the mutated Egr-1 site showed markedly reduced VP1 expression and DNA replication. Infection of primary astrocytes by wild-type JCV induced Egr-1 nuclear expression that was maximal at 5-10 days post-infection. Finally, upregulation of Egr-1 was detected in PML by immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that Egr-1 induction may be important in the life cycle of JCV and PML pathogenesis

  12. Interaptin, an Actin-binding Protein of the α-Actinin Superfamily in Dictyostelium discoideum, Is Developmentally and cAMP-regulated and Associates with Intracellular Membrane Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Francisco; Kuspa, Adam; Brokamp, Regine; Matzner, Monika; Noegel, Angelika A.

    1998-01-01

    In a search for novel members of the α-actinin superfamily, a Dictyostelium discoideum genomic library in yeast artificial chromosomes (YAC) was screened under low stringency conditions using the acting-binding domain of the gelation factor as probe. A new locus was identified and 8.6 kb of genomic DNA were sequenced that encompassed the whole abpD gene. The DNA sequence predicts a protein, interaptin, with a calculated molecular mass of 204,300 D that is constituted by an actin-binding domain, a central coiled-coil rod domain and a membrane-associated domain. In Northern blot analyses a cAMP-stimulated transcript of 5.8 kb is expressed at the stage when cell differentiation occurs. Monoclonal antibodies raised against bacterially expressed interaptin polypeptides recognized a 200-kD developmentally and cAMP-regulated protein and a 160-kD constitutively expressed protein in Western blots. In multicellular structures, interaptin appears to be enriched in anterior-like cells which sort to the upper and lower cups during culmination. The protein is located at the nuclear envelope and ER. In mutants deficient in interaptin development is delayed, but the morphology of the mature fruiting bodies appears normal. When starved in suspension abpD− cells form EDTA-stable aggregates, which, in contrast to wild type, dissociate. Based on its domains and location, interaptin constitutes a potential link between intracellular membrane compartments and the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:9700162

  13. The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP δ is differently regulated by fibrillar and oligomeric forms of the Alzheimer amyloid-β peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lars NG

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBP α, β and δ have been shown to be expressed in brain and to be involved in regulation of inflammatory genes in concert with nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. In general, C/EBPα is down-regulated, whereas both C/EBPβ and δ are up-regulated in response to inflammatory stimuli. In Alzheimer's disease (AD one of the hallmarks is chronic neuroinflammation mediated by astrocytes and microglial cells, most likely induced by the formation of amyloid-β (Aβ deposits. The inflammatory response in AD has been ascribed both beneficial and detrimental roles. It is therefore important to delineate the inflammatory mediators and signaling pathways affected by Aβ deposits with the aim of defining new therapeutic targets. Methods Here we have investigated the effects of Aβ on expression of C/EBP family members with a focus on C/EBPδ in rat primary astro-microglial cultures and in a transgenic mouse model with high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits (tg-ArcSwe by western blot analysis. Effects on DNA binding activity were analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Cross-talk between C/EBPδ and NF-κB was investigated by analyzing binding to a κB site using a biotin streptavidin-agarose pull-down assay. Results We show that exposure to fibril-enriched, but not oligomer-enriched, preparations of Aβ inhibit up-regulation of C/EBPδ expression in interleukin-1β-activated glial cultures. Furthermore, we observed that, in aged transgenic mice, C/EBPα was significantly down-regulated and C/EBPβ was significantly up-regulated. C/EBPδ, on the other hand, was selectively down-regulated in the forebrain, a part of the brain showing high levels of fibrillar Aβ deposits. In contrast, no difference in expression levels of C/EBPδ between wild type and transgenic mice was detected in the relatively spared hindbrain. Finally, we show that interleukin-1β-induced C/EBPδ DNA

  14. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Caitlin L.; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  15. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Caitlin L; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Oksayan, Sibil; Glover, Dominic J; Jans, David A; Moseley, Gregory W

    2016-01-01

    Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5) which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP)-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS), the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD) can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES). However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2), and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P-protein

  16. The pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein PDX-1 regulates the ductal specific keratin 19 through the degradation of MEIS1 and DNA binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes von Burstin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreas organogenesis is the result of well-orchestrated and balanced activities of transcription factors. The homeobox transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role in the development and function of the pancreas, both in the maintenance of progenitor cells and in determination and maintenance of differentiated endocrine cells. However, the activity of homeobox transcription factors requires coordination with co-factors, such as PBX and MEIS proteins. PBX and MEIS proteins belong to the family of three amino acid loop extension (TALE homeodomain proteins. In a previous study we found that PDX-1 negatively regulates the transcriptional activity of the ductal specific keratin 19 (Krt19. In this study, we investigate the role of different domains of PDX-1 and elucidate the functional interplay of PDX-1 and MEIS1 necessary for Krt19 regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that PDX-1 exerts a dual manner of regulation of Krt19 transcriptional activity. Deletion studies highlight that the NH(2-terminus of PDX-1 is functionally relevant for the down-regulation of Krt19, as it is required for DNA binding of PDX-1 to the Krt19 promoter. Moreover, this effect occurs independently of PBX. Second, we provide insight on how PDX-1 regulates the Hox co-factor MEIS1 post-transcriptionally. We find specific binding of MEIS1 and MEIS2 to the Krt19 promoter using IP-EMSA, and siRNA mediated silencing of Meis1, but not Meis2, reduces transcriptional activation of Krt19 in primary pancreatic ductal cells. Over-expression of PDX-1 leads to a decreased level of MEIS1 protein, and this decrease is prevented by inhibition of the proteasome. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our data provide evidence for a dual mechanism of how PDX-1 negatively regulates Krt19 ductal specific gene expression. These findings imply that transcription factors may efficiently regulate target gene expression through diverse, non

  17. The FUSE binding proteins FBP1 and FBP3 are potential c-myc regulators in renal, but not in prostate and bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The three far-upstream element (FUSE) binding proteins (FBP1, FBP2, and FBP3) belong to an ancient family of single-stranded DNA binding proteins which are required for proper regulation of the c-myc proto-oncogene. Whereas it is known that c-myc alterations play a completely different role in various carcinomas of the urogenital tract, the relevance of FBPs is unclear. FBP1, FBP3 and c-myc expression was studied in 105 renal cell, 95 prostate and 112 urinary bladder carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. High rates of FBP1 and FBP3 expression were observed in all cancer types. There was a concomitant up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in renal cell and prostate carcinomas (p < 0.001 both). C-myc expression was detectable in 21% of prostate, 30% of renal and 34% of urothelial carcinomas. Interestingly, strong FBP1 and FBP3 expression was associated with c-myc up-regulation in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (p < 0.001 and 0.09 resp.), but not in bladder or prostate cancer. The correlation between FBP1/FBP3, c-myc and high proliferation rate in renal cell carcinoma provides strong in vivo support for the suggested role of FBP1 and FBP3 as activators of c-myc. The frequent up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in urothelial and prostate carcinoma suggests that FBPs also have an important function in gene regulation of these tumors

  18. Mechanism for pH-dependent gene regulation by amino-terminus-mediated homooligomerization of Bacillus subtilis anti-trp RNA-binding attenuation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachleben, Joseph R; McElroy, Craig A; Gollnick, Paul; Foster, Mark P

    2010-08-31

    Anti-TRAP (AT) is a small zinc-binding protein that regulates tryptophan biosynthesis in Bacillus subtilis by binding to tryptophan-bound trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP), thereby preventing it from binding RNA, and allowing transcription and translation of the trpEDCFBA operon. Crystallographic and sedimentation studies have shown that AT can homooligomerize to form a dodecamer, AT(12), composed of a tetramer of trimers, AT(3). Structural and biochemical studies suggest that only trimeric AT is active for binding to TRAP. Our chromatographic and spectroscopic data revealed that a large fraction of recombinantly overexpressed AT retains the N-formyl group (fAT), presumably due to incomplete N-formyl-methionine processing by peptide deformylase. Hydrodynamic parameters from NMR relaxation and diffusion measurements showed that fAT is exclusively trimeric (AT(3)), while (deformylated) AT exhibits slow exchange between both trimeric and dodecameric forms. We examined this equilibrium using NMR spectroscopy and found that oligomerization of active AT(3) to form inactive AT(12) is linked to protonation of the amino terminus. Global analysis of the pH dependence of the trimer-dodecamer equilibrium revealed a near physiological pK(a) for the N-terminal amine of AT and yielded a pH-dependent oligomerization equilibrium constant. Estimates of excluded volume effects due to molecular crowding suggest the oligomerization equilibrium may be physiologically important. Because deprotonation favors "active" trimeric AT and protonation favors "inactive" dodecameric AT, our findings illuminate a possible mechanism for sensing and responding to changes in cellular pH. PMID:20713740

  19. Microarray analysis of androgen-regulated gene expression in testis: the use of the androgen-binding protein (ABP-transgenic mouse as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Gail

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spermatogenesis is an androgen-dependent process, yet the molecular mechanisms of androgens' actions in testis are poorly understood. Transgenic mice overexpressing rat androgen-binding protein (ABP in their testes have reduced levels of intratesticular androgens and, as a result, show a progressive impairment of spermatogenesis. We used this model to characterize changes in global gene expression in testis in response to reduced bioavailability of androgens. Methods Total RNA was extracted from testes of 30-day old transgenic and wild-type control mice, converted to cRNA, labeled with biotin, and hybridized to oligonucleotide microarrays. Microarray results were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results Three-hundred-eighty-one genes (3.05% of all transcripts represented on the chips were up-regulated and 198 genes (1.59% were down-regulated by at least a factor of 2 in the androgen-deficient animals compared to controls. Genes encoding membrane proteins, intracellular signaling molecules, enzymes, proteins participating in the immune response, and those involved in cytoskeleton organization were significantly overrepresented in the up-regulated group. Among the down-regulated transcripts, those coding for extracellular proteins were overrepresented most dramatically, followed by those related to proteolysis, cell adhesion, immune response, and growth factor, cytokine, and ion channel activities. Transcripts with the greatest potential impact on cellular activities included several transcription factors, intracellular signal transducers, secreted signaling molecules and enzymes, and various cell surface molecules. Major nodes in the up-regulated network were IL-6, AGT, MYC, and A2M, those in the down-regulated network were IL-2, -4, and -10, MAPK8, SOCS1, and CREB1. Conclusion Microarray analysis followed by gene ontology profiling and connectivity analysis identified several functional

  20. The non-octarepeat copper binding site of the prion protein is a key regulator of prion conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giachin, Gabriele; Mai, Phuong Thao; Tran, Thanh Hoa; Salzano, Giulia; Benetti, Federico; Migliorati, Valentina; Arcovito, Alessandro; Longa, Stefano Della; Mancini, Giordano; D'Angelo, Paola; Legname, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    The conversion of the prion protein (PrPC) into prions plays a key role in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. Despite the importance for pathogenesis, the mechanism of prion formation has escaped detailed characterization due to the insoluble nature of prions. PrPC interacts with copper through octarepeat and non-octarepeat binding sites. Copper coordination to the non-octarepeat region has garnered interest due to the possibility that this interaction may impact prion conversion. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to study copper coordination at pH 5.5 and 7.0 in human PrPC constructs, either wild-type (WT) or carrying pathological mutations. We show that mutations and pH cause modifications of copper coordination in the non-octarepeat region. In the WT at pH 5.5, copper is anchored to His96 and His111, while at pH 7 it is coordinated by His111. Pathological point mutations alter the copper coordination at acidic conditions where the metal is anchored to His111. By using in vitro approaches, cell-based and computational techniques, we propose a model whereby PrPC coordinating copper with one His in the non-octarepeat region converts to prions at acidic condition. Thus, the non-octarepeat region may act as the long-sought-after prion switch, critical for disease onset and propagation.

  1. Astrocytic CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein δ Regulates Neuronal Viability and Spatial Learning Ability via miR-135a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yu-Yi; Ko, Chiung-Yuan; Wang, Wei-Jan; Wang, Shao-Ming; Gean, Po-Wu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Wang, Ju-Ming

    2016-08-01

    The progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been associated with astrocytes-induced neuroinflammation. However, the detailed mechanism of astrocytes associated with learning impairments and neuronal loss in AD is poorly defined. Here, we provide novel evidences that astrocytic miR-135a is critical for neuronal viability and spatial learning ability in vivo. The AppTg/Cebpd (-/-) mice showed a spatial learning improvement compared with the APPswe/PS1/E9 bigenic (AppTg) mice. miR-135a was found to be a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein δ (CEBPD) responsive miRNA and can repress the transcription of thrombospondin 1 (THBS1) / Thbs1 (mouse) via its 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR). We used different experimental approaches to attenuate the expression of CEBPD/Cebpd (mouse) or miR-135a in astrocytes and found the following results: increase in THBS1/Thbs1 expression, decrease in neuronal apoptosis, and increase in growth of neurites. Importantly, injection of miR-135a antagonist (AM135a) into the brain of AppTg mice was found to prevent neuronal apoptosis and improved the spatial learning ability. Together, our findings demonstrate a critical function for the astrocytic CEBPD, and point to miR-135a antagonist as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26208701

  2. Characterization of the Dictyostelium homolog of chromatin binding protein DET1 suggests a conserved pathway regulating cell type specification and developmental plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Manu J; Kasten, Sonja; Nellen, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    DET1 (De-etiolated 1) is a chromatin binding protein involved in developmental regulation in both plants and animals. DET1 is largely restricted to multicellular eukaryotes, and here we report the characterization of a DET1 homolog from the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. As in other species, Dictyostelium DET1 is nuclear localized. In contrast to other species, where it is an essential protein, loss of DET1 is nonlethal in Dictyostelium, although viability is significantly reduced. The phenotype of the det1(-) mutant is highly pleiotropic and results in a large degree of heterogeneity in developmental parameters. Loss of DET1 results in delayed and abnormal development with enlarged aggregation territories. Mutant slugs displayed cell type patterning with a bias toward the prestalk pathway. A number of DET1-interacting proteins are conserved in Dictyostelium, and the apparently conserved role of DET1 in regulatory pathways involving the bZIP transcription factors DimB, c-Jun, and HY5 suggests a highly conserved mechanism regulating development in multicellular eukaryotes. While the mechanism by which DET1 functions is unclear, it appears that it has a key role in regulation of developmental plasticity and integration of information on environmental conditions into the developmental program of an organism. PMID:21193547

  3. Phytoestrogens regulate mRNA and protein levels of guanine nucleotide-binding protein, beta-1 subunit (GNB1) in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragoni, Srivatcha; Sankella, Shireesha; Harris, Kinesha; Gray, Wesley G

    2009-06-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are non-steroidal ligands, which regulate the expression of number of estrogen receptor-dependent genes responsible for a variety of biological processes. Deciphering the molecular mechanism of action of these compounds is of great importance because it would increase our understanding of the role(s) these bioactive chemicals play in prevention and treatment of estrogen-based diseases. In this study, we applied suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes that are regulated by PEs through either the classic nuclear-based estrogen receptor or membrane-based estrogen receptor pathways. SSH, using mRNA from genistein (GE) treated MCF-7 cells as testers, resulted in a significant increase in GNB1 mRNA expression levels as compared with 10 nM 17beta estradiol or the no treatment control. GNB1 mRNA expression was up regulated two- to fivefold following exposure to 100.0 nM GE. Similarly, GNB1 protein expression was up regulated 12- to 14-fold. GE regulation of GNB1 was estrogen receptor-dependent, in the presence of the anti-estrogen ICI-182,780, both GNB1 mRNA and protein expression were inhibited. Analysis of the GNB1 promoter using ChIP assay showed a PE-dependent association of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and beta (ERbeta) to the GNB1 promoter. This association was specific for ERalpha since association was not observed when the cells were co-incubated with GE and the ERalpha antagonist, ICI. Our data demonstrate that the levels of G-protein, beta-1 subunit are regulated by PEs through an estrogen receptor pathway and further suggest that PEs may control the ratio of alpha-subunit to beta/gamma-subunits of the G-protein complex in cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 219: 584-594, 2009. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:19170076

  4. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  5. Probing protein phosphatase substrate binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlys-Larsen, Kim B.; Sørensen, Kasper Kildegaard; Jensen, Knud Jørgen; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics and high throughput analysis for systems biology can benefit significantly from solid-phase chemical tools for affinity pull-down of proteins from complex mixtures. Here we report the application of solid-phase synthesis of phosphopeptides for pull-down and analysis of the affinity...... profile of the integrin-linked kinase associated phosphatase (ILKAP), a member of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family. Phosphatases can potentially dephosphorylate these phosphopeptide substrates but, interestingly, performing the binding studies at 4 °C allowed efficient binding to phosphopeptides......, without the need for phosphopeptide mimics or phosphatase inhibitors. As no proven ILKAP substrates were available, we selected phosphopeptide substrates among known PP2Cδ substrates including the protein kinases: p38, ATM, Chk1, Chk2 and RSK2 and synthesized directly on PEGA solid supports through a BAL...

  6. Solution Structure and Backbone Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Fatty Acid Binding Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Jun; Lücke, Christian; Chen, Zhongjing; Qiao, Ye; Klimtchuk, Elena; Hamilton, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a cytosolic protein most abundant in liver, is associated with intracellular transport of fatty acids, nuclear signaling, and regulation of intracellular lipolysis. Among the members of the intracellular lipid binding protein family, L-FABP is of particular interest as it can i), bind two fatty acid molecules simultaneously and ii), accommodate a variety of bulkier physiological ligands such as bilirubin and fatty acyl CoA. To better understand the p...

  7. PAB-1, a Caenorhabditis elegans poly(A-binding protein, regulates mRNA metabolism in germline by interacting with CGH-1 and CAR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhee Ko

    Full Text Available Poly(A-binding proteins are highly conserved among eukaryotes and regulate stability of mRNA and translation. Among C. elegans homologues, pab-1 mutants showed defects in germline mitotic proliferation. Unlike pab-1 mutants, pab-1 RNAi at every larval stage caused arrest of germline development at the following stage, indicating that pab-1 is required for the entire postembryonic germline development. This idea is supported by the observations that the mRNA level of pab-1 increased throughout postembryonic development and its protein expression was germline-enriched. PAB-1 localized to P granules and the cytoplasm in the germline. PAB-1 colocalized with CGH-1 and CAR-1 and affected their localization, suggesting that PAB-1 is a component of processing (P-bodies that interacts with them. The mRNA and protein levels of representative germline genes, rec-8, GLP-1, rme-2, and msp-152, were decreased after pab-1 RNAi. Although the mRNA level of msp-152 was increased in cgh-1 mutant, it was also significantly reduced by pab-1 RNAi. Our results suggest that PAB-1 positively regulates the mRNA levels of germline genes, which is likely facilitated by the interaction of PAB-1 with other P-body components, CGH-1 and CAR-1.

  8. RM-04RETINOBLASTOMA BINDING PROTEIN 4 (RBBP4) MODULATES TEMOZOLOMIDE RESPONSE THROUGH REGULATION OF MGMT EXPRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitange, Gaspar; Schroeder, Mark; Sarkaria, Jann

    2014-01-01

    Through shRNA library screen we identified RBBP4 as a modulator of TMZ response in glioblastoma (GBM). Consequently, we investigated the mechanisms whereby RBBP4 modulates TMZ response using shRNA to silence this gene in MGMT-expressing T98G and U138 GBM cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated using fluorescence-based CYQUANT proliferation assay. A total of 4 shRNA constructs significantly suppressed RBBP4 in both T98G and U138. Cells expressing non-specific targeting shRNA (NT-shRNA) were used as control. RBBP4 knockdown significantly sensitized TMZ both in T98G and U138 cells; the relative fluorescence for the TMZ-treated (100 µM) control T98NT-shRNA cells was 1.17 ± 0.15, whereas for T98RBBP4-shRNA clones were 0.54 ± 0.02, 0.29 ± 0.03, 0.36 ± 0.05, and 0.34 ± 0.03, respectively (p < 0.001). Similar sensitization was observed in U138 cells; relative fluorescence for the TMZ-treated (300 µM) control U138NT-shRNA cells was 0.70 ± 0.05 and for U138RBBP4-shRNA clones were 0.42 ± 0.06, 0.27 ± 0.01, 0.28 ± 0.02, and 0.30 ± 0.01, respectively (p < 0.001). Interestingly, knockdown of RBBP4 in T98G was accompanied with a synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition and increased response to TMZ-induced DNA damage, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of KAP1, CHK1 and CHK2. Moreover, phosphorylation of H2AX in response to TMZ treatment was significantly higher in T98RBBP4-shRNA clones. Consistent with deficient homologous recombination (HR), T98RBBP4-shRNA clones significantly expressed less RAD51 compared with the control T98NT-shRNA cells. Even more interesting, RBBP4 knockdown silenced MGMT expression in both T98G and U138, which was accompanied by decreased recruitment of acetylated H3K9 coupled with increased recruitment of tri-methylated H3K9. Moreover, RBBP4 knockdown was coupled with loss of p300 recruitment to bind MGMT promoter region. Collectively, these findings suggest that RBBP4 modulates TMZ response in GBM cells through epigenetic regulation of

  9. Regulation of the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER-BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE genes/microRNA 156 Module by the Homeodomain Proteins PENNYWISE and POUND-FOOLISH in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shruti Lal; Leo Bryan Pacis; Harley M.S. Smith

    2011-01-01

    The morphology of inflorescences is regulated in part by the temporal and spatial events that regulate flower specification.In Arabidopsis,an endogenous flowering time pathway mediated by a subset of SQUAMOSA PROMOTERBINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL) transcription factors,including SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5,function to specify flowers by activating floral meristem identity genes.During shoot development,SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 are post-transcriptionally regulated by microRNA156 (miR156).The photoperiod regulated florigenic signal,FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT),promotes floral induction,in part by activating SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5.In turn,these SPLs function in parallel with FT to specify flower meristems.Two related BELL1-like homeobox genes PENNYWISE (PNY) and POUND-FOOLISH (PNF) expressed in the shoot apical meristem are absolutely required for the specification of floral meristems.Genetic studies show that the floral specification function of FT depends upon PNY and PNF; however,the interplay between these homeodomain proteins and SPLs is not known.In this manuscript,we show that the photoperiodic floral induction of SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 is dependent upon PNY and PNF.Further,PNY and PNF also control SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 expression by negatively regulating miR156.Lastly,ectopic expression of SPL4 partially rescues the pny pnf non-flower-producing phenotype,while overexpression of SPL3 or SPL5 in pny pnf plants was unable to restore flower specification.These results suggest that:(1) SPL3,SPL4,and SPL5 function is dependent upon PNY and PNF,or (2) expression of multiple SPLs is required for floral specification in pny pnf plants.

  10. (S)-Lacosamide Binding to Collapsin Response Mediator Protein 2 (CRMP2) Regulates CaV2.2 Activity by Subverting Its Phosphorylation by Cdk5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutal, Aubin; François-Moutal, Liberty; Perez-Miller, Samantha; Cottier, Karissa; Chew, Lindsey Anne; Yeon, Seul Ki; Dai, Jixun; Park, Ki Duk; Khanna, May; Khanna, Rajesh

    2016-04-01

    The neuronal circuit remodels during development as well as in human neuropathologies such as epilepsy. Neurite outgrowth is an obligatory step in these events. We recently reported that alterations in the phosphorylation state of an axon specification/guidance protein, the collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2), play a major role in the activity-dependent regulation of neurite outgrowth. We also identified (S)-LCM, an inactive stereoisomer of the clinically used antiepileptic drug (R)-LCM (Vimpat®), as a novel tool for preferentially targeting CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth. Here, we investigated the mechanism by which (S)-LCM affects CRMP2 phosphorylation by two key kinases, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β). (S)-LCM application to embryonic cortical neurons resulted in reduced levels of Cdk5- and GSK-3β-phosphorylated CRMP2. Mechanistically, (S)-LCM increased CRMP2 binding to both Cdk5- and GSK-3β without affecting binding of CRMP2 to its canonical partner tubulin. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) experiments demonstrated direct binding of (S)-LCM to CRMP2. Using an in vitro luminescent kinase assay, we observed that (S)-LCM specifically inhibited Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of CRMP2. Cross-linking experiments and analytical ultracentrifugation showed no effect of (S)-LCM on the oligomerization state of CRMP2. The increased association between Cdk5-phosphorylated CRMP2 and CaV2.2 was reduced by (S)-LCM in vitro and in vivo. This reduction translated into a decrease of calcium influx via CaV2.2 in (S)-LCM-treated neurons compared to controls. (S)-LCM, to our knowledge, is the first molecule described to directly inhibit CRMP2 phosphorylation and may be useful for delineating CRMP2-facilitated functions. PMID:25846820

  11. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta is a critical regulator of insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Billiard, J.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; McCarthy, T. L.; Rotwein, P.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a major role in promoting skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. Prostaglandin E2 and other agents that induce cAMP production enhance IGF-I gene transcription in cultured rat osteoblasts through a DNA element termed HS3D, located in the proximal part of the major rat IGF-I promoter. We previously determined that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (C/EBPdelta) is the key cAMP-stimulated regulator of IGF-I transcription in these cells and showed that it transactivates the rat IGF-I promoter through the HS3D site. We now have defined the physical-chemical properties and functional consequences of the interactions between C/EBPdelta and HS3D. C/EBPdelta, expressed in COS-7 cells or purified as a recombinant protein from Escherichia coli, bound to HS3D with an affinity at least equivalent to that of the albumin D-site, a known high affinity C/EBP binding sequence, and both DNA elements competed equally for C/EBPdelta. C/EBPdelta bound to HS3D as a dimer, with protein-DNA contact points located on guanine residues on both DNA strands within and just adjacent to the core C/EBP half-site, GCAAT, as determined by methylation interference footprinting. C/EBPdelta also formed protein-protein dimers in the absence of interactions with its DNA binding site, as indicated by results of glutaraldehyde cross-linking studies. As established by competition gel-mobility shift experiments, the conserved HS3D sequence from rat, human, and chicken also bound C/EBPdelta with similar affinity. We also found that prostaglandin E2-induced expression of reporter genes containing human IGF-I promoter 1 or four tandem copies of the human HS3D element fused to a minimal promoter and show that these effects were enhanced by a co-transfected C/EBPdelta expression plasmid. Taken together, our results provide evidence that C/EBPdelta is a critical activator of IGF-I gene transcription in osteoblasts and potentially in

  12. Up-regulation of telomere-binding proteins, TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 is related to telomere shortening during human multistep hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Bong-Kyeong; Kim, Young-Joo; Park, Chanil; Park, Young Nyun

    2005-01-01

    The telomeric repeat-binding factor 1 (TRF1), TRF2, and the TRF1-interacting nuclear protein 2 (TIN2) are involved in telomere maintenance. We describe the regulation of expression of these genes along with their relationship to telomere length in hepatocarcinogenesis. The transcriptional expression of these genes, TRF1 protein, and telomere length was examined in 9 normal livers, 14 chronic hepatitis, 24 liver cirrhosis, 5 large regenerative nodules, 14 low-grade dysplastic nodules (DNs), 7 high-grade DNs, 10 DNs with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) foci, and 31 HCCs. The expression of TRF1, TRF2, TIN2 mRNA, and TRF1 protein was gradually increased according to the progression of hepatocarcinogenesis with a marked increase in high-grade DNs and DNs with HCC foci and a further increase in HCCs. There was a gradual shortening of telomere during hepatocarcinogenesis with a significant reduction in length in DNs. Most nodular lesions (52 of 67) had shorter telomeres than their adjacent chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis, and the telomere lengths were inversely correlated with the mRNA level of these genes (P HCC foci. In conclusion, TRF1, TRF2, and TIN2 might be involved in multistep hepatocarcinogenesis by playing crucial roles in telomere shortening. PMID:15632001

  13. Regulation of vesicular traffic by a GTP-binding protein on the cytoplasmic surface of secretory vesicles in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesicular transport is an important mechanism for the intracellular traffic of proteins and lipids in eukaryotic cells. Vesicles mediate the passage of proteins between the various organelles of the secretory pathway and the exocytic release of these proteins into the extracellular environment. Vesicles also mediate the uptake of proteins and fluid from the external environment, delivering them to endosomes. Despite the generality of the vesicular transport mechanism, the process is not yet understood at a molecular level. The key questions that are addressed are (1) How are vesicles formed from the membrane of the donor organelle? (2) How are these vesicles transported? (3) How do the vesicles recognize the membrane of the target (acceptor) organelle? (4) How is membrane fusion accomplished? The genetic flexibility of yeast has been exploited to identify components of the cellular machinery required for vesicular transport

  14. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  15. Alternative interactions between the Tn7 transposase and the Tn7 target DNA binding protein regulate target immunity and transposition

    OpenAIRE

    Skelding, Zachary; Queen-Baker, Jennie; Craig, Nancy L

    2003-01-01

    The Tn7 transposon avoids inserting into a target DNA that contains a pre-existing copy of Tn7. This phenomenon, known as ‘target immunity’, is established when TnsB, a Tn7 transposase subunit, binds to Tn7 sequences in the target DNA and mediates displacement of TnsC, a critical transposase activator, from the DNA. Paradoxically, TnsB–TnsC interactions are also required to promote transposon insertion. We have probed Tn7 target immunity by isolating TnsB mutants that mediate more frequent in...

  16. Alternative polyadenylation and RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erson-Bensan, Ayse Elif

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of the extent of microRNA-based gene regulation has expanded in an impressive pace over the past decade. Now, we are beginning to better appreciate the role of 3'-UTR (untranslated region) cis-elements which harbor not only microRNA but also RNA-binding protein (RBP) binding sites that have significant effect on the stability and translational rate of mRNAs. To add further complexity, alternative polyadenylation (APA) emerges as a widespread mechanism to regulate gene expression by producing shorter or longer mRNA isoforms that differ in the length of their 3'-UTRs or even coding sequences. Resulting shorter mRNA isoforms generally lack cis-elements where trans-acting factors bind, and hence are differentially regulated compared with the longer isoforms. This review focuses on the RBPs involved in APA regulation and their action mechanisms on APA-generated isoforms. A better understanding of the complex interactions between APA and RBPs is promising for mechanistic and clinical implications including biomarker discovery and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27208003

  17. Retromer Binds the FANSHY Sorting Motif in SorLA to Regulate Amyloid Precursor Protein Sorting and Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjorback, Anja W; Seaman, Matthew; Gustafsen, Camilla;

    2012-01-01

    levels of retromer proteins are altered in AD. Here we report that sorLA and retromer functionally interact in neurons to control trafficking and amyloidogenic processing of APP. We have identified a sequence (FANSHY) in the cytoplasmic domain of sorLA that is recognized by the VPS26 subunit of the......sorLA is a sorting receptor for amyloid precursor protein (APP) genetically linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Retromer, an adaptor complex in the endosome-to-Golgi retrieval pathway, has been implicated in APP transport because retromer deficiency leads to aberrant APP sorting and processing and...

  18. Serine 77 in the PDZ domain of PICK1 is a protein kinase Cα phosphorylation site regulated by lipid membrane binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Gether, Ulrik;

    2012-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal protein binding PDZ domain and a C-terminal lipid binding BAR domain. PICK1 plays a key role in several physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms governing the a...... lipid binding and/or polymerization capacity. We propose that PICK1 is phosphorylated at Ser77 by PKCα preferentially when bound to membrane vesicles and that this phosphorylation in turn modulates its cellular distribution....

  19. Involvement of RNA-binding protein Hfq in the osmotic-response regulation of invE gene expression in Shigella sonnei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishihama Akira

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of Type III secretion system (TTSS in Shigella is regulated in response to changes in environmental osmolarity and temperature. Temperature-dependent regulation of virF, the master regulator of TTSS synthesis, is believed to occur at the transcriptional level. We recently demonstrated, however, that TTSS synthesis also involves post-transcriptional regulation of the synthesis of InvE, a target of virF and key regulator of TTSS synthesis. The mRNA levels of invE (virB are stable at 37°C, but mRNA stability markedly decreases at low temperatures where the TTSS synthesis is tightly repressed. Deletion of hfq, which encodes an RNA chaperone in Gram-negative bacteria, results in the restoration of expression of invE and other TTSS genes at low temperature due to an increase in the stability of invE mRNA. To date, the molecular details of the regulation of TTSS expression in response to osmotic pressure are not known. In the current study, we investigated the mechanism of regulation of TTSS by osmotic pressure. Results Transcription of virF, which encodes the master regulator of TTSS expression, was partially repressed under low osmotic conditions. Several lines of evidence indicated that osmolarity-dependent changes in TTSS synthesis are controlled at the post-transcriptional level, through the regulation of InvE synthesis. First, the expression InvE protein was tightly repressed under low osmotic growth conditions, even though invE mRNA transcripts were readily detectable. Second, under low osmotic conditions, invE mRNA was rapidly degraded, whereas deletion of hfq, which encodes an RNA chaperone, resulted in increased invE mRNA stability and the production of InvE protein. Third, the binding of purified Hfq in vitro to invE RNA was stronger in low-salt buffer, as assessed by gel-shift analysis and surface plasmon resonance (Biacore analysis. Conclusion Osmolarity-dependent changes in TTSS synthesis in Shigella

  20. A Zinc Finger Transcription Factor, αA-Crystallin Binding Protein 1, Is a Negative Regulator of the Chondrocyte-Specific Enhancer of the α1(II) Collagen Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Nakatani, Fumihiko; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Yamada, Yoshihiko

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of the type II collagen gene (Col2a1) is regulated by multiple cis-acting sites. The enhancer element, which is located in the first intron, is necessary for high-level and cartilage-specific expression of Col2a1. A mouse limb bud cDNA expression library was screened by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae one-hybrid screening method to identify protein factors bound to the enhancer. A zinc finger protein, αA-crystallin binding protein 1 (CRYBP1), which had been reported to bind to the ...

  1. The RNA binding protein HuR differentially regulates unique subsets of mRNAs in estrogen receptor negative and estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discordance between steady-state levels of mRNAs and protein has been attributed to posttranscriptional control mechanisms affecting mRNA stability and translation. Traditional methods of genome wide microarray analysis, profiling steady-state levels of mRNA, may miss important mRNA targets owing to significant posttranscriptional gene regulation by RNA binding proteins (RBPs). The ribonomic approach, utilizing RNA immunoprecipitation hybridized to microarray (RIP-Chip), provides global identification of putative endogenous mRNA targets of different RBPs. HuR is an RBP that binds to the AU-rich elements (ARE) of labile mRNAs, such as proto-oncogenes, facilitating their translation into protein. HuR has been shown to play a role in cancer progression and elevated levels of cytoplasmic HuR directly correlate with increased invasiveness and poor prognosis for many cancers, including those of the breast. HuR has been described to control genes in several of the acquired capabilities of cancer and has been hypothesized to be a tumor-maintenance gene, allowing for cancers to proliferate once they are established. We used HuR RIP-Chip as a comprehensive and systematic method to survey breast cancer target genes in both MCF-7 (estrogen receptor positive, ER+) and MDA-MB-231 (estrogen receptor negative, ER-) breast cancer cell lines. We identified unique subsets of HuR-associated mRNAs found individually or in both cell types. Two novel HuR targets, CD9 and CALM2 mRNAs, were identified and validated by quantitative RT-PCR and biotin pull-down analysis. This is the first report of a side-by-side genome-wide comparison of HuR-associated targets in wild type ER+ and ER- breast cancer. We found distinct, differentially expressed subsets of cancer related genes in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines, and noted that the differential regulation of two cancer-related genes by HuR was contingent upon the cellular environment

  2. The Hepatitis C Virus-induced NLRP3 Inflammasome Activates the Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) and Regulates Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Steven; Iqbal, Jawed; Sarkar-Dutta, Mehuli; Lane, Samantha; Nagaraj, Abhiram; Ali, Naushad; Waris, Gulam

    2016-02-12

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) relies on host lipids and lipid droplets for replication and morphogenesis. The accumulation of lipid droplets in infected hepatocytes manifests as hepatosteatosis, a common pathology observed in chronic hepatitis C patients. One way by which HCV promotes the accumulation of intracellular lipids is through enhancing de novo lipogenesis by activating the sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs). In general, activation of SREBPs occurs during cholesterol depletion. Interestingly, during HCV infection, the activation of SREBPs occurs under normal cholesterol levels, but the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. Our previous study has demonstrated the activation of the inflammasome complex in HCV-infected human hepatoma cells. In this study, we elucidate the potential link between chronic hepatitis C-associated inflammation and alteration of lipid homeostasis in infected cells. Our results reveal that the HCV-activated NLRP3 inflammasome is required for the up-regulation of lipogenic genes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase, fatty acid synthase, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase. Using pharmacological inhibitors and siRNA against the inflammasome components (NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD, and caspase-1), we further show that the activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in lipid droplet formation. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in HCV-infected cells enables caspase-1-mediated degradation of insulin-induced gene proteins. This subsequently leads to the transport of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein·SREBP complex from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, followed by proteolytic activation of SREBPs by S1P and S2P in the Golgi. Typically, inflammasome activation leads to viral clearance. Paradoxically, here we demonstrate how HCV exploits the NLRP3 inflammasome to activate SREBPs and host lipid metabolism, leading to liver disease pathogenesis associated with

  3. Hypoxia regulates the expression and localization of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α by hypoxia inducible factor-1α in bladder transitional carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Mei; Li, Xu; Chen, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is overexpressed in various types of solid tumor in humans, including bladder cancer. HIF-1α regulates the expression of a series of genes, which are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, angiogenesis, migration and invasion and represents a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of human cancer. Despite extensive investigation of the effects of HIF-1α in the progression and metastasis of bladder cancer, the possible regulatory mechanisms underlying the effects of HIF-1α on bladder cancer cell proliferation and differentiation remain to be elucidated. It has been suggested that the transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) acts as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer cell, which are involved in regulating cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. The present study confirmed that, in bladder cancer cells, the expression and localization of C/EBPα was regulated by hypoxia through an HIF-1α -dependent mechanism, which may be significant in bladder cancer cell proliferation and differentiation. The 5637 and T24 bladder cancer cell lines were incubated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The expression levels of HIF-1α and C/EBPα were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis. The results revealed that, under hypoxic conditions, the protein expression levels of HIF-1α were markedly upregulated, but the mRNA levels were not altered. However, the mRNA and protein levels of C/EBPα were significantly reduced. The present study further analyzed the subcellular localization of C/EBPα, which was markedly decreased in the nuclei under hypoxic conditions. Following HIF-1α small interference RNA silencing of HIF-1α, downregulation of C/EBPα was prevented in the bladder cancer cells cultured under hypoxic conditions. In addition, groups of cells treated with 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl

  4. RNA-Binding Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis: Atypical Multifunctional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Figueroa-Angulo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron homeostasis is highly regulated in vertebrates through a regulatory system mediated by RNA-protein interactions between the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs that interact with an iron responsive element (IRE located in certain mRNAs, dubbed the IRE-IRP regulatory system. Trichomonas vaginalis, the causal agent of trichomoniasis, presents high iron dependency to regulate its growth, metabolism, and virulence properties. Although T. vaginalis lacks IRPs or proteins with aconitase activity, possesses gene expression mechanisms of iron regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. However, only one gene with iron regulation at the transcriptional level has been described. Recently, our research group described an iron posttranscriptional regulatory mechanism in the T. vaginalis tvcp4 and tvcp12 cysteine proteinase mRNAs. The tvcp4 and tvcp12 mRNAs have a stem-loop structure in the 5'-coding region or in the 3'-UTR, respectively that interacts with T. vaginalis multifunctional proteins HSP70, α-Actinin, and Actin under iron starvation condition, causing translation inhibition or mRNA stabilization similar to the previously characterized IRE-IRP system in eukaryotes. Herein, we summarize recent progress and shed some light on atypical RNA-binding proteins that may participate in the iron posttranscriptional regulation in T. vaginalis.

  5. G1/S-regulated E2F-containing protein complexes bind to the mouse thymidine kinase gene promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Q P; Zhao, S; Levin, A H;

    1994-01-01

    complexes were also investigated. Studies using specific antibodies revealed that p107, a retinoblastoma-like protein, was present in both E2F-G0/G1 and E2F.S, whereas cyclin E.cyclin A.cdk2 were only present in E2F.S complex(es). These data suggest that removal of the p107-containing E2F.G0/G1 complex, a...

  6. Regulation of Yeast Nutrient Permease Endocytosis by ATP-binding Cassette Transporters and a Seven-transmembrane Protein, RSB1*

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Soraya S.; Hanson, Pamela K.; Manoharlal, Raman; Brice, Sarah E.; Cowart, L. Ashley; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Ceramide is produced by the condensation of a long chain base with a very long chain fatty acid. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the two major long chain bases is called phytosphingosine (PHS). PHS has been shown to cause toxicity in tryptophan auxotrophic strains of yeast because this bioactive ceramide precursor causes diversion of the high affinity tryptophan permease Tat2 to the vacuole rather than the plasma membrane. Loss of the integral membrane protein Rsb1 increased PHS sensitivi...

  7. Protein 4.1R binds to CLASP2 and regulates dynamics,organization and attachment of microtubules to the cell cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ruiz-Saenz (Ana); J. van Haren (Jeffrey); C.L. Sayas (C. Laura); L. Rangel (Laura); J.A.A. Demmers (Jeroen); J. Millán (Jaime); M.A. Alonso (Miguel); N.J. Galjart (Niels); J.M. Correas

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton is essential for many cellular processes, including cell polarity and migration. Cortical platforms, formed by a subset of MT plus-end-tracking proteins, such as CLASP2, and non-MT binding proteins such as LL5b, attach distal ends of MTs to the cell cort

  8. Molecular cloning and expression of a novel keratinocyte protein (psoriasis-associated fatty acid-binding protein [PA-FABP]) that is highly up-regulated in psoriatic skin and that shares similarity to fatty acid-binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H; Leffers, H;

    1992-01-01

    as MRP 14, L1, or calprotectin; calgranulin A or MRP 8; and cystatin A or stefin A. Here, we have cloned and sequenced the cDNA (clone 1592) encoding a new member of this group of low-molecular-weight proteins [isoelectric focusing (IEF) SSP 3007 in the keratinocyte 2D gel protein database] that we...

  9. Regulation of a Drosophila cGMP-PDE by prenylation and interaction with a prenyl-binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Day, Jonathan P.; Cleghon, Vaughn; Houslay, Miles Douglas; Davies, Shireen A.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Post-translational modification by isoprenylation is a pivotal process for the correct functioning of many signalling proteins. The Drosophila melanogaster cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase, DmPDE5/6, possesses a CaaX-box prenylation signal-motif, as do several novel cGMP-PDEs from insect and echinoid species. DmPDE5/6 is prenylated in vivo at Cys1128 and is localised to the plasma membrane when expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. Site-directed mutagenesis of the prenylated c...

  10. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  11. Down-regulation of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein does not improve hypothermic growth of Chinese hamster ovary cells producing erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jong Kwang; Kim, Yeon-Gu; Yoon, Sung Kwan; Lee, Gyun Min

    2007-03-01

    Discovery of the cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) in mouse fibroblasts suggests that growth suppression at hypothermic conditions is due to an active response by the cell rather than due to passive thermal effects. To determine the effect of down-regulated CIRP expression on cell growth and erythropoietin (EPO) production in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells at low culture temperature, stable CHO cell clones with reduced CIRP expression level were established by transfecting (rCHO) cells with the CIRP siRNA vector with a target sequence of TCGTCCTTCCATGGCTGTA. For comparison of the degree of specific growth rate (micro) reduction at low culture temperature, three CIRP-reduced clones with different mu and three control clones transfected with null vector were cultivated at two different temperatures, 32 degrees C and 37 degrees C. Unlike mouse fibroblasts, alleviation of hypothermic growth arrest of rCHO cells by CIRP down-regulation was insignificant, as shown by statistical analysis using the t-test (P<0.18, n=3). The ratios of mu at 32 degrees C to micro at 37 degrees C of CIRP-reduced clones and control clones were 0.29+/-0.03 and 0.25+/-0.03 on an average, respectively. Furthermore, it was also found that overexpression of CIRP did not inhibit rCHO cell growth significantly at 37 degrees C. Taken together, the data obtained show that down-regulation of only CIRP in rCHO cells, unlike mouse fibroblasts, is not sufficient to recover growth arrest at low-temperature culture (32 degrees C). PMID:17239640

  12. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.;

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology of...

  13. Differential tissue regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in experimental diabetes mellitus in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, M C; Alexander, D; Marsh, K

    1992-12-01

    The expression and regulation of IGF-I is tissue-specific in diabetes mellitus in the rat. These studies were designed to examine if similar tissue specificity exists for IGF-BPs in the diabetic milieu. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single i.p. injection of STZ (100 mg/kg body weight). Rats were treated with either vehicle--insulin, vanadate, or phlorizin for 7-14 days. Tissues were analyzed for IGF-BPs by ligand blotting and by affinity cross-linking and immunoprecipitation. In liver tissue from nondiabetic control rats, multiple forms of IGF-BPs were noted, ranging from 48,000 to 25,000 M(r). In diabetic rat liver tissue, the 25,000-M(r) form was unchanged, whereas the higher M(r) forms (48,000-42,000 M(r)) were decreased, and the 30,000-M(r) form was increased. Insulin therapy of diabetic rats decreased all forms to below control levels. In the kidney tissue of control rats, faint IGF-BP bands were seen at 30,000 and 25,000 M(r). In diabetic rat kidney tissue, the 30,000-M(r) form again was increased (as in liver) and restored to control levels with insulin therapy. In contrast, only a 30,000-M(r) band was seen in control pituitary tissue, which was slightly increased in the diabetic rats and also was decreased below control levels by insulin. In hypothalamus and cerebral cortex tissue, bands at 30,000 and 25,000 M(r) were noted, and neither was altered by diabetes or insulin treatment. Treatment of diabetic rats with vanadate and phlorizin resulted in comparable blood glucose levels, which were only slightly higher than those achieved with insulin therapy.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1280236

  14. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (Mecp2 Regulates Sensory Function through Sema5b and Robo2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Ying eLeong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding the MECP2 underlies Rett syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder in young females. Although reduced pain sensitivity in Rett syndrome patients and in partial MeCP2 deficient mice had been reported, these previous studies focused predominantly on motor impairments. Therefore, it is still unknown how MeCP2 is involved in these sensory defects. In addition, the human disease manifestations where males with mutations in MECP2 gene normally do not survive and females show typical neurological symptoms only after 18 months of age, is profoundly different in MeCP2-deficient mouse where all animals survived, and males but not females displayed Rett syndrome phenotypes at an early age. Thus, the mecp2-deficient zebrafish serves as an additional animal model to aid in deciphering the role and mechanisms of Mecp2 in neurodevelopment. Here, we used 2 independent methods of silencing expression of Mecp2 in zebrafish to uncover a novel role of Mecp2 in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons during the embryonic development. mecp2-null mutation and morpholino-mediated silencing of Mecp2 in the zebrafish embryos resulted in defects in peripheral innervation of trigeminal sensory neurons and consequently affecting the sensory function. These defects were demonstrated to be dependent on the expression of Sema5b and Robo2. The expression of both proteins together could better overcome the defects caused by Mecp2 deficiency as compared to the expression of either Sema5b or Robo2 alone. Sema5b and Robo2 were downregulated upon Mecp2 silencing or in mecp2-null embryos, and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assay using antibody against Mecp2 was able to pull down specific regions of both Sema5b and Robo2 promoters, showing interaction between Mecp2 and the promoters of both genes. In addition, cell-specific expression of Mecp2 can overcome the innervation and sensory response defects in Mecp2 morphants indicating that these MeCP2-mediated

  15. Structural analysis of DNA binding by C.Csp231I, a member of a novel class of R-M controller proteins regulating gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevtsov, M. B.; Streeter, S. D.; Thresh, S.-J.; Swiderska, A.; McGeehan, J. E.; Kneale, G. G., E-mail: geoff.kneale@port.ac.uk [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 2DY (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    The structure of the new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence is presented, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins is discussed. An unusual extended spacer between the dimer binding sites suggests a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers. In a wide variety of bacterial restriction–modification systems, a regulatory ‘controller’ protein (or C-protein) is required for effective transcription of its own gene and for transcription of the endonuclease gene found on the same operon. We have recently turned our attention to a new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) that have quite novel features, including a much larger DNA-binding site with an 18 bp (∼60 Å) spacer between the two palindromic DNA-binding sequences and a very different recognition sequence from the canonical GACT/AGTC. Using X-ray crystallography, the structure of the protein in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence was solved to 1.8 Å resolution, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins was elucidated. An unusual aspect of the promoter sequence is the extended spacer between the dimer binding sites, suggesting a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers when bound to both recognition sites correctly spaced on the DNA. A U-bend model is proposed for this tetrameric complex, based on the results of gel-mobility assays, hydrodynamic analysis and the observation of key contacts at the interface between dimers in the crystal.

  16. Structural analysis of DNA binding by C.Csp231I, a member of a novel class of R-M controller proteins regulating gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence is presented, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins is discussed. An unusual extended spacer between the dimer binding sites suggests a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers. In a wide variety of bacterial restriction–modification systems, a regulatory ‘controller’ protein (or C-protein) is required for effective transcription of its own gene and for transcription of the endonuclease gene found on the same operon. We have recently turned our attention to a new class of controller proteins (exemplified by C.Csp231I) that have quite novel features, including a much larger DNA-binding site with an 18 bp (∼60 Å) spacer between the two palindromic DNA-binding sequences and a very different recognition sequence from the canonical GACT/AGTC. Using X-ray crystallography, the structure of the protein in complex with its 21 bp DNA-recognition sequence was solved to 1.8 Å resolution, and the molecular basis of sequence recognition in this class of proteins was elucidated. An unusual aspect of the promoter sequence is the extended spacer between the dimer binding sites, suggesting a novel interaction between the two C-protein dimers when bound to both recognition sites correctly spaced on the DNA. A U-bend model is proposed for this tetrameric complex, based on the results of gel-mobility assays, hydrodynamic analysis and the observation of key contacts at the interface between dimers in the crystal

  17. Evolution of Metal(Loid) Binding Sites in Transcriptional Regulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez, E.; Thiyagarajan, S.; Cook, J.D.; Stemmler, T.L.; Gil, J.A.; Mateos, L.M.; Rosen, B.P.

    2009-05-22

    Expression of the genes for resistance to heavy metals and metalloids is transcriptionally regulated by the toxic ions themselves. Members of the ArsR/SmtB family of small metalloregulatory proteins respond to transition metals, heavy metals, and metalloids, including As(III), Sb(III), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Co(II), and Ni(II). These homodimeric repressors bind to DNA in the absence of inducing metal(loid) ion and dissociate from the DNA when inducer is bound. The regulatory sites are often three- or four-coordinate metal binding sites composed of cysteine thiolates. Surprisingly, in two different As(III)-responsive regulators, the metalloid binding sites were in different locations in the repressor, and the Cd(II) binding sites were in two different locations in two Cd(II)-responsive regulators. We hypothesize that ArsR/SmtB repressors have a common backbone structure, that of a winged helix DNA-binding protein, but have considerable plasticity in the location of inducer binding sites. Here we show that an As(III)-responsive member of the family, CgArsR1 from Corynebacterium glutamicum, binds As(III) to a cysteine triad composed of Cys{sup 15}, Cys{sup 16}, and Cys{sup 55}. This binding site is clearly unrelated to the binding sites of other characterized ArsR/SmtB family members. This is consistent with our hypothesis that metal(loid) binding sites in DNA binding proteins evolve convergently in response to persistent environmental pressures.

  18. Advances on Plant Pathogenic Mycotoxin Binding Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chao-hua; DONG Jin-gao

    2002-01-01

    Toxin-binding protein is one of the key subjects in plant pathogenic mycotoxin research. In this paper, new advances in toxin-binding proteins of 10 kinds of plant pathogenic mycotoxins belonging to Helminthosporium ,Alternaria ,Fusicoccum ,Verticillium were reviewed, especially the techniques and methods of toxin-binding proteins of HS-toxin, HV-toxin, HMT-toxin, HC-toxin. It was proposed that the isotope-labeling technique and immunological chemistry technique should be combined together in research of toxin-binding protein, which will be significant to study the molecular recognition mechanism between host and pathogenic fungus.

  19. The actin-binding proteins eps8 and gelsolin have complementary roles in regulating the growth and stability of mechanosensory hair bundles of mammalian cochlear outer hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Olt

    Full Text Available Sound transduction depends upon mechanosensitive channels localized on the hair-like bundles that project from the apical surface of cochlear hair cells. Hair bundles show a stair-case structure composed of rows of stereocilia, and each stereocilium contains a core of tightly-packed and uniformly-polarized actin filaments. The growth and maintenance of the stereociliary actin core are dynamically regulated. Recently, it was shown that the actin-binding protein gelsolin is expressed in the stereocilia of outer hair cells (OHCs and in its absence they become long and straggly. Gelsolin is part of a whirlin scaffolding protein complex at the stereocilia tip, which has been shown to interact with other actin regulatory molecules such as Eps8. Here we investigated the physiological effects associated with the absence of gelsolin and its possible overlapping role with Eps8. We found that, in contrast to Eps8, gelsolin does not affect mechanoelectrical transduction during immature stages of development. Moreover, OHCs from gelsolin knockout mice were able to mature into fully functional sensory receptors as judged by the normal resting membrane potential and basolateral membrane currents. Mechanoelectrical transducer current in gelsolin-Eps8 double knockout mice showed a profile similar to that observed in the single mutants for Eps8. We propose that gelsolin has a non-overlapping role with Eps8. While Eps8 is mainly involved in the initial growth of stereocilia in both inner hair cells (IHCs and OHCs, gelsolin is required for the maintenance of mature hair bundles of low-frequency OHCs after the onset of hearing.

  20. Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) membrane recruitment 3, a member of the APC membrane recruitment family of APC-binding proteins, is a positive regulator of Wnt-β-catenin signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauburger, Katharina; Akyildiz, Senem; Ruppert, Jan G; Graeb, Michael; Bernkopf, Dominic B; Hadjihannas, Michel V; Behrens, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) membrane recruitment (Amer) family proteins Amer1/Wilms tumour gene on the X chromosome and Amer2 are binding partners of the APC tumour suppressor protein, and act as negative regulators in the Wnt signalling cascade. So far, nothing has been known about the third member of the family, Amer3. Here we show that Amer3 binds to the armadillo repeat domain of APC, similarly to Amer1 and Amer2. Amer3 also binds to the Wnt pathway regulator conductin/axin2. Furthermore, we identified Amer1 as binding partner of Amer3. Whereas Amer1 and Amer2 are linked to the plasma membrane by an N-terminal membrane localization domain, Amer3 lacks this domain. Amer3 localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus of epithelial cells, and this is dependent on specific nuclear import and export sequences. Functionally, exogenous Amer3 enhances the expression of a β-catenin/T-cell factor-dependent reporter gene, and knockdown of endogenous Amer3 reduces Wnt target gene expression in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, Amer3 acts as an activator of Wnt signalling, in contrast to Amer1 and Amer2, which are inhibitors, suggesting a nonredundant role of Amer proteins in the regulation of this pathway. Our data, together with those of previous studies, provide a comprehensive picture of similarities and differences within the Amer protein family. PMID:24251807

  1. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  2. CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein α Is a Crucial Regulator of Human Fat Mass and Obesity Associated Gene Transcription and Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ren

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several susceptibility loci have been reported associated with obesity and T2DM in GWAS. Fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO is the first gene associated with body mass index (BMI and risk for diabetes in diverse patient populations. FTO is highly expressed in the brain and pancreas, and is involved in regulating dietary intake and energy expenditure. While much is known about the epigenetic mutations contributing to obesity and T2DM, less is certain with the expression regulation of FTO gene. In this study, a highly conserved canonical C/EBPα binding site was located around position −45~−54 bp relative to the human FTO gene transcriptional start site. Site-directed mutagenesis of the putative C/EBPα binding sites decreased FTO promoter activity. Overexpression and RNAi studies also indicated that C/EBPα was required for the expression of FTO. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiment was carried out and the result shows direct binding of C/EBPα to the putative binding regions in the FTO promoter. Collectively, our data suggest that C/EBPα may act as a positive regulator binding to FTO promoter and consequently, activates the gene transcription.

  3. AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 4 is involved in the Ca2+/auxin-regulated expression of ZCAX3 gene in maize (Zea mays)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jurišić-Knežev, Dejana; Bergougnoux, Véronique; Milde, D.; Fellner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 5 (2014), s. 332-339. ISSN 1916-2790 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05ME792 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : auxin-binding protein * ABP4 * AtCAX1 Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.278, year: 2014

  4. Penicillin-Binding Protein Imaging Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Kocaoglu, Ozden; Carlson, Erin E.

    2013-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are membrane-associated proteins involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan (PG), the main component of bacterial cell walls. These proteins were discovered and named for their affinity to bind the β-lactam antibiotic penicillin. The importance of the PBPs has long been appreciated; however, the apparent functional redundancy of the ~5–15 proteins that most bacteria possess makes determination of their individual roles difficult. Existing techniques to st...

  5. The Moraxella catarrhalis immunoglobulin D-binding protein MID has conserved sequences and is regulated by a mechanism corresponding to phase variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möllenkvist, Andrea; Nordström, Therése; Halldén, Christer; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Forsgren, Arne; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2003-04-01

    The prevalence of the Moraxella catarrhalis immunoglobulin D (IgD)-binding outer membrane protein MID and its gene was determined in 91 clinical isolates and in 7 culture collection strains. Eighty-four percent of the clinical Moraxella strains expressed MID-dependent IgD binding. The mid gene was detected in all strains as revealed by homology of the signal peptide sequence and a conserved area in the 3' end of the gene. When MID proteins from five different strains were compared, an identity of 65.3 to 85.0% and a similarity of 71.2 to 89.1% were detected. Gene analyses showed several amino acid repeat motifs in the open reading frames, and MID could be called a putative autotransport protein. Interestingly, homopolymeric [polyguanine [poly(G)

  6. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer's disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer's disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer's disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  7. Guardian of Genetic Messenger-RNA-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Anji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA in cells is always associated with RNA-binding proteins that regulate all aspects of RNA metabolism including RNA splicing, export from the nucleus, RNA localization, mRNA turn-over as well as translation. Given their diverse functions, cells express a variety of RNA-binding proteins, which play important roles in the pathologies of a number of diseases. In this review we focus on the effect of alcohol on different RNA-binding proteins and their possible contribution to alcohol-related disorders, and discuss the role of these proteins in the development of neurological diseases and cancer. We further discuss the conventional methods and newer techniques that are employed to identify RNA-binding proteins.

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Ingrid; Nowag, Sebastian; Koch, Kathrin; Hubrich, Thomas; Bollmann, Franziska; Henke, Jenny; Schmitz, Katja; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pautz, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Affinity purification using the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the human inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA identified the cytosolic poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) as a protein interacting with the human iNOS 3'-UTR. Downregulation of PABP expression by RNA interference resulted in a marked reduction of cytokine-induced iNOS mRNA expression without changes in the expression of mRNAs coding for the major subunit of the RNA polymerase II (Pol 2A) or β2-microglobuline (β2M). Along with the mRNA also iNOS protein expression was reduced by siPABP-treatment, whereas in the same cells protein expression of STAT-1α, NF-κB p65, or GAPDH was not altered. Reporter gene analyses showed no change of the inducibility of the human 16kb iNOS promoter in siPABP cells. In contrast, the siPABP-mediated decline of iNOS expression correlated with a reduction in the stability of the iNOS mRNA. As the stability of the Pol 2A and β2M mRNA was not changed, siPABP-treatment seems to have a specific effect on iNOS mRNA decay. UV-crosslinking experiments revealed that PABP interacts with one binding site in the 5'-UTR and two different binding sites in the 3'-UTR of the human iNOS mRNA. Mutation or deletion of the binding site in the 5'-UTR but not in the 3'-UTR reduced luciferase expression in DLD-1 cells transfected with iNOS-5'-UTR or iNOS-3'-UTR luciferase reporter constructs. In summary, our data demonstrate that PABP by binding to specific sequence elements in the 5'-UTR post-transcriptionally enhances human iNOS mRNA stability and thereby iNOS expression. PMID:23711718

  9. Platycodon grandiflorum extract represses up-regulated adipocyte fatty acid binding protein triggered by a high fat feeding in obese rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoon Shin Park; Yoosik Yoon; Hong Seok Ahn

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Platycodon grandiflorum extract (PGE) on lipid metabolism and FABP mRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue of high fat diet-induced obese rats.METHODS: PGE was treated to investigate the inhibitory effect on the pre-adipocyte 3T3-L1 differentiation and pancreatic lipase activity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats with an average weight of 439.03 ± 7.61 g were divided into four groups: the control groups that fed an experimental diet alone (C and H group) and PGE treatment groups that administered PGE along with a control diet or HFD at a concentration of 150 mg/kg body weight (C + PGE and H + PGE group, respectively) for 7 wk. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and triglycerol (TG) concentrations were measured from the tail vein of rats. Adipocyte cell area was measured from subcutaneous adipose tissue and the fatty acid binding protein (FABP) mRNA expression was analyzed by northern blot analysis.RESULTS: PGE treatment inhibited 3T3-L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation and fat accumulation, and also decreased pancreatic lipase activity. In this experiment, PGE significantly reduced plasma TC and TG concentrations as well as body weight and subcutaneous adipose tissue weight. PGE also significantly decreased the size of subcutaneous adipocytes. Furthermore, it significantly repressed the up-regulation of FABP mRNA expression induced by a high-fat feeding in subcutaneous adipose tissue.CONCLUSION: PGE has a plasma lipid lowering-effect and anti-obesity effect in obese rats fed a high fat diet.From these results, we can suggest the possibility that PGE can be used as a food ingredient or drug component to therapeutically control obesity.

  10. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  11. Binding of the global response regulator protein CovR to the sag promoter of Streptococcus pyogenes reveals a new mode of CovR-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinxin; Gusa, Asiya A; Scott, June R; Churchward, Gordon

    2005-11-25

    CovR (CsrR) is a response regulator of gene expression in Streptococcus pyogenes. It regulates approximately 15% of the genome, including the genes encoding several streptococcal virulence factors, and acts primarily as a repressor rather than an activator of transcription. We showed that in vitro, CovR is sufficient to repress transcription from the sag promoter, which directs the expression of streptolysin S, a hemolysin that can damage the membranes of eukaryotic cells and subcellular organelles. Repression was stimulated 10-fold by phosphorylation of CovR with acetyl phosphate. In contrast to binding at the has and cov promoters, which direct the expression of genes involved in capsule biosynthesis and of CovR itself, binding of CovR to Psag was highly cooperative. CovR bound to two extended regions of Psag, an upstream region overlapping the -35 and -10 promoter elements and a downstream region overlapping the translation initiation signals of the sagA gene. Each of these regions contains only a single consensus CovR binding sequence, ATTARA, which at the has promoter defines individual sites to which CovR binds non-cooperatively. At Phas and Pcov the T residues in the sequence ATTARA are important for CovR binding. However, using uracil interference experiments we find that although the ATTARA sequence in the Psag upstream region contains thymine residues important for CovR binding, important thymine residues in the Psag downstream region are located outside this sequence. Furthermore, again in contrast to its behavior at the has and cov promoters where phosphorylation of CovR leads to a 2-3-fold increase in DNA binding affinity, binding of CovR to the sag promoter was stimulated 8-32-fold by phosphorylation. We suggest that these differences in CovR binding mean that individual promoters will be repressed at different intracellular levels of phosphorylated CovR, permitting differences in the response of members of the CovR regulon to environmental and

  12. Immunoselection of cDNAs to avian intestinal calcium binding protein 28K and a novel calmodulin-like protein: assessment of mRNA regulation by the Vitamin D hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium's role in a variety of cellular processes has been well documented. The storage, distribution, and delivery of calcium are regulated by a family of binding proteins including troponin C, calmodulin, parvalbumin, and vitamin D dependent calcium binding protein (CaBP-28), all of which have evolved from a common ancestral gene. To evaluate vitamin D regulation of gene transcription, a CaBP-28 cDNA (767 base pairs) was isolated from a chicken intestine λgt11 library utilizing a polyvalent CaBP-28 antibody as a probe. Coincident with the identification of the CaBP-28 cDNA, a group of cDNAs also was isolated (with the anti-CaBP-28 antibody) that demonstrated 84% nucleotide homology and 99% deduced amino acid homology with chicken brain calmodulin (CaM). This new CaM-like cDNA was named neoCaM. There is little nucleotide homology between the CaBP-28 cDNA and neoCaM. The CaBP-28 cDNA hybridizes with three transcripts of 2000, 2900, and 3300 bases which are dramatically induced by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], while the neoCaM cDNA recognizes three distinct (from CaBP-28) transcripts. Two of these mRNAs are 1400 and 1800 bases as described for brain CaM, but another large 4000-base transcript is detected with neoCaM. Neither the CaM nor the neoCaM transcript reveals any modulation by 1,25(OH)2D3. Herein, the authors discuss the possible significance of not only the isolation of both cDNAs with a single antibody but also the relation of neoCaM to other well-characterized CaM cDNAs

  13. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 is required for the regulation of rat oval cell proliferation and differentiation in the 2AAF/PHX model

    OpenAIRE

    Steiger-Luther, Nicole C; Darwiche, Houda; Oh, Seh-Hoon; Williams, Jennifer M.; PETERSEN, BRYON E.

    2010-01-01

    Oval cell-mediated liver regeneration is a highly complex process that involves the coordination of several signaling factors, chemokines and cytokines to allow for proper maintenance of the liver architecture. When hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited, an hepatic stem cell population, often referred to as “oval cells”, is activated to aid in liver regeneration. The function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) during this process of oval cell activation is of particular...

  14. Insulin-Like Growth Factor (IGF) Binding Protein-4 Is Both a Positive and Negative Regulator of IGF Activity in Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Ning, Yun; Schuller, Alwin G. P.; Conover, Cheryl A.; Pintar, John E.

    2008-01-01

    IGFs are required for normal prenatal and postnatal growth. Although actions of IGFs can be modulated by a family of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) in vitro, these studies have identified a complicated pattern of stimulatory and inhibitory IGFBP effects, so that understanding relevant aspects of IGFBP action in vivo has been limited. Here we have produced a null mutation of one specific IGFBP, IGFBP-4, which is coexpressed with IGF-II early in development. Surprisingly, mutation of IGFBP-4, be...

  15. Neuroendocrine Cancer-Specific Up-Regulating Mechanism of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-2 in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yazawa, Takuya; Sato, Hanako; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Woo, Tetsukan; Tajiri, Michihiko; Ogura, Takashi; Ogawa, Nobuo; Suzuki, Takehisa; Mitsui, Hideaki; Ishii, Jun; Miyata, Chie; Sakaeda, Masashi; Goto, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Korehito

    2009-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) exhibits insulin-like growth factor-dependent growth. SCLC is the most aggressive among known in vivo lung cancers, whereas in vitro growth of SCLC is paradoxically slow as compared with that of non-SCLC (NSCLC). In this study, we demonstrate that SCLC cells overexpress insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 via NeuroD, a neuroendocrine cell-specific transcription factor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, electrophoretic mobility shift, and IGFBP-2 pro...

  16. The effect of down-regulation of mitochondrial RNA-binding proteins MRP1 and MRP2 on respiratory complexes in procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zíková, Alena; Horáková, Eva; Jirků, Milan; Dunajčíková, P.; Lukeš, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 149, č. 1 (2006), s. 65-73. ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5022302; GA ČR GA204/06/1558 Grant ostatní: National Institutes of Health(US) 5R03TW6445-2 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : RNA -binding protein * RNA interference * mitochondrial respiratory chain Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.641, year: 2006

  17. The autism-associated gene chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 8 (CHD8) regulates noncoding RNAs and autism-related genes

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, B; Grepo, N; Thompson, B. L.; Kim, J.; K. Wang; Evgrafov, O V; Lu, W; Knowles, J A; Campbell, D B

    2015-01-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 8 (CHD8) was identified as a leading autism spectrum disorder (ASD) candidate gene by whole-exome sequencing and subsequent targeted-sequencing studies. De novo loss-of-function mutations were identified in 12 individuals with ASD and zero controls, accounting for a highly significant association. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CHD8 in human neural progenitor cells followed by RNA sequencing revealed that CHD8 insufficiency results in alt...

  18. Interaction of Adipocyte Fatty Acid-binding Protein (AFABP) and JAK2: AFABP/aP2 AS A REGULATOR OF JAK2 SIGNALING*

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Brian R.; Mazurkiewicz-Muñoz, Anna M.; Suttles, Jill; Carter-Su, Christin; Bernlohr, David A

    2009-01-01

    Adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein (AFABP/aP2) facilitates the intracellular solubilization and trafficking of lipids within the aqueous environment of the cell. Studies in the AFABP/aP2 knock-out mouse suggest that the protein may have roles in cellular processes broader than lipid transport. We present herein the finding that AFABP/aP2 interacts with JAK2 in a fatty acid-dependent manner. This interaction was established using yeast two-hybrid analysis, co-immunopr...

  19. Posttranslational regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in normal and transformed human fibroblasts. Insulin-like growth factor dependence and biological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, C A; Kiefer, M C; Zapf, J

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) is a 24-26-kD protein expressed by a variety of cell types in vivo and in vitro. Treatment of normal adult human fibroblasts with 10 nM insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) for 24 h resulted in an 85% decrease in endogenous IGFBP-4, as assessed by Western ligand blot analysis of the conditioned medium. Incubation of human fibroblast-conditioned medium (HFCM) with IGF-II under cell-free conditions led to a similar loss of IGFBP-4. This p...

  20. Regulation of cyclic AMP response-element binding-protein (CREB) by Gq/11-protein-coupled receptors in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R.A. John

    2008-01-01

    Human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells have been used to investigate mechanisms involved in CREB phosphorylation after activation of two endogenously expressed Gq/11-protein-coupled receptors, the M3 muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) and B2 bradykinin receptors. Stimulation with either methacholine or bradykinin resulted in maximal increases in CREB phosphorylation within 1 min, with either a rapid subsequent decrease (bradykinin) to basal levels, or a sustained response (methacholine). Inhibitor st...

  1. Phytoestrogens Regulate mRNA and Protein Levels of Guanine Nucleotide-Binding Protein, Beta-1 Subunit (GNB1) in MCF-7 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Naragoni, Srivatcha; Sankella, Shireesha; Harris, Kinesha; Gray, Wesley G.

    2009-01-01

    Phytoestrogens (PEs) are non-steroidal ligands which regulate the expression of number of estrogen receptor-dependent genes responsible for a variety of biological processes. Deciphering the molecular mechanism of action of these compounds is of great importance because it would increase our understanding of the role(s) these bioactive chemicals play in prevention and treatment of estrogen-based diseases. In this study, we applied suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify genes ...

  2. Mining the characteristic interaction patterns on protein-protein binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Zhihai; Han, Li; Li, Chengke; Wang, Renxiao

    2013-09-23

    Protein-protein interactions are observed in various biological processes. They are important for understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms and can be potential targets for developing small-molecule regulators of such processes. Previous studies suggest that certain residues on protein-protein binding interfaces are "hot spots". As an extension to this concept, we have developed a residue-based method to identify the characteristic interaction patterns (CIPs) on protein-protein binding interfaces, in which each pattern is a cluster of four contacting residues. Systematic analysis was conducted on a nonredundant set of 1,222 protein-protein binding interfaces selected out of the entire Protein Data Bank. Favored interaction patterns across different protein-protein binding interfaces were retrieved by considering both geometrical and chemical conservations. As demonstrated on two test tests, our method was able to predict hot spot residues on protein-protein binding interfaces with good recall scores and acceptable precision scores. By analyzing the function annotations and the evolutionary tree of the protein-protein complexes in our data set, we also observed that protein-protein interfaces sharing common characteristic interaction patterns are normally associated with identical or similar biological functions. PMID:23930922

  3. Hepatitis B virus X protein regulates the mEZH2 promoter via the E2F1-binding site in AML12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Zhou, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Jian-Sheng; Guo, Ze-kun; Huang, Pei-Tang

    2011-01-01

    Histone lysine methyltransferase EZH2 has been reported to be frequently overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues and associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the exact mechanism of EZH2 up-regulation in HCC has not been determined. In this study, we used murine hepatocyte AML12 cells to investigate the role of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in regulating the expression of mEZH2. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of mEZH2 protein in AML12 cel...

  4. Fatty acids and hypolipidemic drugs regulate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors α- and γ-mediated gene expression via liver fatty acid binding protein: A signaling path to the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfrum, Christian; Borrmann, Carola M.; Börchers, Torsten; Spener, Friedrich

    2001-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is a key regulator of lipid homeostasis in hepatocytes and target for fatty acids and hypolipidemic drugs. How these signaling molecules reach the nuclear receptor is not known; however, similarities in ligand specificity suggest the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) as a possible candidate. In localization studies using laser-scanning microscopy, we show that L-FABP and PPARα colocalize in the nucleus of...

  5. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  6. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  7. Effects of Cu(II) and cisplatin on the stability of Specific protein 1 (Sp1)-DNA binding: Insights into the regulation of copper homeostasis and platinum drug transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dong; Aiba, Isamu; Chen, Helen H W; Kuo, Macus Tien

    2016-08-01

    The human high-affinity copper transporter 1 (hCtr1) transports both Cu(I) and cisplatin (cDDP). Because Cu deficiency is lethal yet Cu overload is poisonous, hCtr1 expression is transcriptionally upregulated in response to Cu deficiency but is downregulated under Cu replete conditions in controlling Cu homeostasis. The up- and down-regulation of hCtr1 is regulated by Specific protein 1 (Sp1), which itself is also correspondingly regulated under these Cu conditions. hCtr1 expression is also upregulated by cDDP via upregulation of Sp1. The underlying mechanisms of these regulations are unknown. Using gel-electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrated here that Sp1-DNA binding affinity is reduced under Cu replete conditions but increased under reduced Cu conditions. Similarly, Sp1-DNA binding affinity is increased by cDDP treatment. This in vitro system demonstrated, for the first time, that regulation of Sp1/hCtr1 expression by these agents is modulated by the stability of Sp1-DNA binding, the first step in the Sp1-mediated transcriptional regulation process. PMID:27172866

  8. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chia Cheng,1,2,* Chiung-Fang Huang,3,4,* Ai-Sheng Ho,5 Cheng-Liang Peng,6 Chun-Chao Chang,7,8 Fu-Der Mai,1,9 Ling-Yun Chen,10 Tsai-Yueh Luo,2 Jungshan Chang1,11,121Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 3School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 4Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, 6Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 10Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 11Neuroscience Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 12Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Increased expression of cellular membrane bound glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 is considered to be one of the biomarkers for gastric cancers. Therefore, peptides or molecules with specific recognition to GRP78 can act as a guiding probe to direct conjugated imaging agents to localized cancers. Based on this rationale, GRP78-guided polymeric micelles were designed and manufactured for nuclear imaging detection of tumors. Thiolated GRP78 binding peptide (GRP78BP was first labeled with maleimide-terminated poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone and then mixed with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA-linked poly(ethylene glycol–poly(ε-caprolactone to form DTPA/GRP78BP-conjugated micelles. The coupling efficiency of micelles with

  9. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is an RNA-binding protein that modulates the mRNA turnover properties of late-exponential and stationary phase Staphylococcus aureus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Morrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of mRNA turnover is gaining recognition as a mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus regulates gene expression, but the factors that orchestrate alterations in transcript degradation are poorly understood. In that regard, we previously found that 138 mRNA species, including the virulence factors protein A (spa and collagen binding protein (cna, are stabilized in a sarA-dependent manner during exponential phase growth, suggesting that SarA protein may directly or indirectly effect the RNA turnover properties of these transcripts. Herein, we expanded our characterization of the effects of sarA on mRNA turnover during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Results revealed that the locus affects the RNA degradation properties of cells during both growth phases. Further, using gel mobility shift assays and RIP-ChIP, it was found that SarA protein is capable of binding mRNA species that it stabilizes both in vitro and within bacterial cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SarA post-transcriptionally regulates S. aureus gene expression in a manner that involves binding to and consequently altering the mRNA turnover properties of target transcripts.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 is required for the regulation of rat oval cell proliferation and differentiation in the 2AAF/PHX model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole C Steiger-Luther

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Nicole C Steiger-Luther1, Houda Darwiche1, Seh-Hoon Oh1, Jennifer M Williams1, Bryon E Petersen1,21Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, 2Program in Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Oval cell-mediated liver regeneration is a highly complex process that involves the coordination of several signaling factors, chemokines and cytokines to allow for proper maintenance of the liver architecture. When hepatocyte proliferation is inhibited, an hepatic stem cell population, often referred to as “oval cells”, is activated to aid in liver regeneration. The function of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3 during this process of oval cell activation is of particular interest because it is produced in liver and has been shown to induce migration and differentiation of other stem cell populations both in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, IGFBP-3 production has been linked to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β superfamily, a pathway known to be induced during oval cell proliferation. In this study, we set out to determine whether IGFBP-3 plays a role in oval cell proliferation, migration and differentiation during this specific type of regeneration. Through activation of the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration in a rat model, we found that IGFBP-3 is elevated in the liver and serum of animals during peak days of oval cell activation and proliferation. Furthermore, in vitro assays found that WB-344 cells, a liver stem cell line similar to oval cells, were induced to migrate in the presence of IGFBP-3. When expression of IGFBP-3 was knocked down during oval cell activation in vivo, we found that oval cell proliferation was increased and observed the appearance of numerous atypical ductular structures, which were OV-6 and Ki67-positive. Finally, quantitative realtime PCR analysis of liver tissue from IGFBP-3 small interfering

  11. Promoter- and cell-specific epigenetic regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN by Methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarzenbach Heidi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the involvement of methyl-CpG binding proteins (MBDs and histone modifications on the regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN in different cellular contexts such as the prostate cancer cells DU145 and LNCaP, and the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Since global chromatin changes have been shown to occur in tumours and regions of tumour-associated genes are affected by epigenetic modifications, these may constitute important regulatory mechanisms for the pathogenesis of malignant transformation. Methods In DU145, LNCaP and MCF-7 cells mRNA expression levels of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN were determined by quantitative RT-PCR at the basal status as well as after treatment with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A. Furthermore, genomic DNA was bisulfite-converted and sequenced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with the stimulated and unstimulated cells using antibodies for MBD1, MBD2 and MeCP2 as well as 17 different histone antibodies. Results Comparison of the different promoters showed that MeCP2 and MBD2a repressed promoter-specifically Cyclin D2 in all cell lines, whereas in MCF-7 cells MeCP2 repressed cell-specifically all methylated promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that all methylated promoters associated with at least one MBD. Treatment of the cells by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR caused dissociation of the MBDs from the promoters. Only MBD1v1 bound and repressed methylation-independently all promoters. Real-time amplification of DNA immunoprecipitated by 17 different antibodies showed a preferential enrichment for methylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 at the particular promoters. Notably, the silent promoters were associated with unmodified histones which were acetylated following treatment by 5-aza-CdR. Conclusions This study is one

  12. Promoter- and cell-specific epigenetic regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN by Methyl-CpG binding proteins and histone modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the current study was to analyze the involvement of methyl-CpG binding proteins (MBDs) and histone modifications on the regulation of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN in different cellular contexts such as the prostate cancer cells DU145 and LNCaP, and the breast cancer cells MCF-7. Since global chromatin changes have been shown to occur in tumours and regions of tumour-associated genes are affected by epigenetic modifications, these may constitute important regulatory mechanisms for the pathogenesis of malignant transformation. In DU145, LNCaP and MCF-7 cells mRNA expression levels of CD44, Cyclin D2, GLIPR1 and PTEN were determined by quantitative RT-PCR at the basal status as well as after treatment with demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and/or histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A. Furthermore, genomic DNA was bisulfite-converted and sequenced. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was performed with the stimulated and unstimulated cells using antibodies for MBD1, MBD2 and MeCP2 as well as 17 different histone antibodies. Comparison of the different promoters showed that MeCP2 and MBD2a repressed promoter-specifically Cyclin D2 in all cell lines, whereas in MCF-7 cells MeCP2 repressed cell-specifically all methylated promoters. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that all methylated promoters associated with at least one MBD. Treatment of the cells by the demethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) caused dissociation of the MBDs from the promoters. Only MBD1v1 bound and repressed methylation-independently all promoters. Real-time amplification of DNA immunoprecipitated by 17 different antibodies showed a preferential enrichment for methylated lysine of histone H3 (H3K4me1, H3K4me2 and H3K4me3) at the particular promoters. Notably, the silent promoters were associated with unmodified histones which were acetylated following treatment by 5-aza-CdR. This study is one of the first to reveal the histone code and MBD profile

  13. Regulation of inositol phospholipid binding and signaling through syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Vogt, Susan; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Lim, Yangmi; Oh, Eok-Soo; Prestwich, Glenn D; Theibert, Anne; Lee, Weontae; Woods, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Syndecan-4 is a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan that can regulate cell-matrix interactions and is enriched in focal adhesions. Its cytoplasmic domain contains a central region unlike that of any other vertebrate or invertebrate syndecan core protein with a cationic motif that binds......-regulated in activity by the combination of syndecan-4 and PtdIns(4,5)P(2), with all other isoforms tested showing minimal response. This is consistent with the codistribution of syndecan-4 with the alpha isoform of protein kinase C in focal adhesions....

  14. Puf3p, a Pumilio family RNA binding protein, localizes to mitochondria and regulates mitochondrial biogenesis and motility in budding yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; Gay, Anna Card; Pon, Liza A.

    2007-01-01

    Puf3p binds preferentially to messenger RNAs (mRNAs) for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. We find that Puf3p localizes to the cytosolic face of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Overexpression of PUF3 results in reduced mitochondrial respiratory activity and reduced levels of Pet123p, a protein encoded by a Puf3p-binding mRNA. Puf3p levels are reduced during the diauxic shift and growth on a nonfermentable carbon source, conditions that stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis. These findings support a role for Puf3p in mitochondrial biogenesis through effects on mRNA interactions. In addition, Puf3p links the mitochore, a complex required for mitochondrial–cytoskeletal interactions, to the Arp2/3 complex, the force generator for actin-dependent, bud-directed mitochondrial movement. Puf3p, the mitochore, and the Arp2/3 complex coimmunoprecipitate and have two-hybrid interactions. Moreover, deletion of PUF3 results in reduced interaction between the mitochore and the Arp2/3 complex and defects in mitochondrial morphology and motility similar to those observed in Arp2/3 complex mutants. Thus, Puf3p is a mitochondrial protein that contributes to the biogenesis and motility of the organelle. PMID:17210948

  15. Calcineurin homologous protein: a multifunctional Ca2+-binding protein family

    OpenAIRE

    Di Sole, Francesca; Vadnagara, Komal; MOE, ORSON W.; Babich, Victor

    2012-01-01

    The calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) belongs to an evolutionarily conserved Ca2+-binding protein subfamily. The CHP subfamily is composed of CHP1, CHP2, and CHP3, which in vertebrates share significant homology at the protein level with each other and between other Ca2+-binding proteins. The CHP structure consists of two globular domains containing from one to four EF-hand structural motifs (calcium-binding regions composed of two helixes, E and F, joined by a loop), the myristoylation, a...

  16. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan;

    2005-01-01

    to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is...

  17. CCAAT/Enhancer-Binding Protein \\(\\gamma\\) Is a Critical Regulator of IL-1\\(\\beta\\)-Induced IL-6 Production in Alveolar Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chunguang Yan; Ximo Wang; Jay Cao; Min Wu; Hongwei Gao

    2012-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer binding protein \\(\\gamma\\) (C/EBPγ) is a member of the C/EBP family of transcription factors, which lacks known activation domains. C/EBP\\(\\gamma\\) was originally described as an inhibitor of C/EBP transactivation potential. However, previous study demonstrates that C/EBP\\(\\gamma\\) augments the C/EBP\\(\\beta\\) stimulatory activity in lipopolysaccharide induction of IL-6 promoter in a B lymphoblast cell line. These data indicate a complexing functional role for C/EBP\\(\\gamma\\) in...

  18. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) isoform balance as a regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Yuka; Hagiwara, Natsumi [Department of Bioscience, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Hyogo, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda 669-1337 Japan (Japan); Radisky, Derek C. [Department of Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32225 (United States); Hirai, Yohei, E-mail: y-hirai@kwansei.ac.jp [Department of Bioscience, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Hyogo, 2-1 Gakuen, Sanda 669-1337 Japan (Japan)

    2014-09-10

    Activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program promotes cell invasion and metastasis, and is reversed through mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) after formation of distant metastases. Here, we show that an imbalance of gene products encoded by the transcriptional factor C/EBPβ, LAP (liver-enriched activating protein) and LIP (liver-enriched inhibitory protein), can regulate both EMT- and MET-like phenotypic changes in mouse mammary epithelial cells. By using tetracycline repressive LIP expression constructs, we found that SCp2 cells, a clonal epithelial line of COMMA1-D cells, expressed EMT markers, lost the ability to undergo alveolar-like morphogenesis in 3D Matrigel, and acquired properties of benign adenoma cells. Conversely, we found that inducible expression of LAP in SCg6 cells, a clonal fibroblastic line of COMMA1-D cells, began to express epithelial keratins with suppression of proliferation. The overexpression of the C/EBPβ gene products in these COMMA1-D derivatives was suppressed by long-term cultivation on tissue culture plastic, but gene expression was maintained in cells grown on Matrigel or exposed to proteasome inhibitors. Thus, imbalances of C/EBPβ gene products in mouse mammary epithelial cells, which are affected by contact with basement membrane, are defined as a potential regulator of metastatic potential. - Highlights: • We created a temporal imbalance of C/EBPβ gene products in the mammary model cells. • The temporal up-regulation of LIP protein induced EMT-like cell behaviors. • The temporal up-regulation of LAP protein induced MET-like cell behaviors. • Excess amount of C/EBPβ gene products were eliminated by proteasomal-degradation. • Basement membrane components attenuated proteasome-triggered protein elimination.

  19. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) isoform balance as a regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program promotes cell invasion and metastasis, and is reversed through mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) after formation of distant metastases. Here, we show that an imbalance of gene products encoded by the transcriptional factor C/EBPβ, LAP (liver-enriched activating protein) and LIP (liver-enriched inhibitory protein), can regulate both EMT- and MET-like phenotypic changes in mouse mammary epithelial cells. By using tetracycline repressive LIP expression constructs, we found that SCp2 cells, a clonal epithelial line of COMMA1-D cells, expressed EMT markers, lost the ability to undergo alveolar-like morphogenesis in 3D Matrigel, and acquired properties of benign adenoma cells. Conversely, we found that inducible expression of LAP in SCg6 cells, a clonal fibroblastic line of COMMA1-D cells, began to express epithelial keratins with suppression of proliferation. The overexpression of the C/EBPβ gene products in these COMMA1-D derivatives was suppressed by long-term cultivation on tissue culture plastic, but gene expression was maintained in cells grown on Matrigel or exposed to proteasome inhibitors. Thus, imbalances of C/EBPβ gene products in mouse mammary epithelial cells, which are affected by contact with basement membrane, are defined as a potential regulator of metastatic potential. - Highlights: • We created a temporal imbalance of C/EBPβ gene products in the mammary model cells. • The temporal up-regulation of LIP protein induced EMT-like cell behaviors. • The temporal up-regulation of LAP protein induced MET-like cell behaviors. • Excess amount of C/EBPβ gene products were eliminated by proteasomal-degradation. • Basement membrane components attenuated proteasome-triggered protein elimination

  20. Affinity purification of proteins binding to GST fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaffield, J C; Johnston, S A

    2001-05-01

    This unit describes the use of proteins fused to glutathione-S-transferase (GST fusion proteins) to affinity purify other proteins, a technique also known as GST pulldown purification. The describes a strategy in which a GST fusion protein is bound to agarose affinity beads and the complex is then used to assay the binding of a specific test protein that has been labeled with [35S]methionine by in vitro translation. However, this method can be adapted for use with other types of fusion proteins; for example, His6, biotin tags, or maltose-binding protein fusions (MBP), and these may offer particular advantages. A describes preparation of an E. coli extract that is added to the reaction mixture with purified test protein to reduce nonspecific binding. PMID:18265191

  1. Runx proteins regulate Foxp3 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno, Ludovica; Mazzarella, Luca; Hoogenkamp, Maarten; Hertweck, Arnulf; Cobb, Bradley S.; Sauer, Stephan; Hadjur, Suzana; Leleu, Marion; Naoe, Yoshinori; Telfer, Janice C.; Bonifer, Constanze; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Fisher, Amanda G; Merkenschlager, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Runx proteins are essential for hematopoiesis and play an important role in T cell development by regulating key target genes, such as CD4 and CD8 as well as lymphokine genes, during the specialization of naive CD4 T cells into distinct T helper subsets. In regulatory T (T reg) cells, the signature transcription factor Foxp3 interacts with and modulates the function of several other DNA binding proteins, including Runx family members, at the protein level. We show that Runx proteins also regu...

  2. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  3. Treponema pallidum Fibronectin-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, Caroline E.; Brown, Elizabeth L.; Kuroiwa, Janelle M. Y.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Brouwer, Nathan L.

    2004-01-01

    Putative adhesins were predicted by computer analysis of the Treponema pallidum genome. Two treponemal proteins, Tp0155 and Tp0483, demonstrated specific attachment to fibronectin, blocked bacterial adherence to fibronectin-coated slides, and supported attachment of fibronectin-producing mammalian cells. These results suggest Tp0155 and Tp0483 are fibronectin-binding proteins mediating T. pallidum-host interactions.

  4. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 synthesis and secretion by progestin and relaxin in long term cultures of human endometrial stromal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decidualized endometrium during the first trimester of pregnancy synthesizes and secretes a 32-kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (termed hIGFBP-1) at high levels. IGFBP-1 is the major soluble protein product of this tissue and is principally localized to the differentiated endometrial stromal cell, the decidual cell. In the present study long term culture of stromal cells from the nonpregnant endometrium have been employed to elucidate the hormonal requirements for IGFBP-1 production. Immunoreactive IGFBP-1 was undetectable in control cultures. However, inclusion of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induced rates of 0.35 +/- 0.09 microgram/0.1 mg cell DNA.day after 20-30 days. In these cultures cells exhibited morphological changes consistent with decidual cell differentiation. In all cultures removal of MPA after exposure for 10-16 days, with or without subsequent inclusion of relaxin (RLX), increased production of IGFBP-1 450- to 4600-fold to rates of 150-710 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day or 26-131 micrograms/10(6) cells.day on days 24-26. The rates tended to be higher with the inclusion of RLX and were sustained in contrast to cultures without RLX, where rates fell by day 30. Individual cultures responded differently to RLX when added from the initiation of culture, with either a response similar to MPA alone or a cyclical change in production, achieving maximal rates of 190-290 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day. Cultures in which RLX alone induced high IGFBP-1 high production were obtained from endometrium during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. In cultures exhibiting high rates of immunoreactive IGFBP-1 production, the protein represented their major secretory protein product. This was confirmed by [35S]methionine incorporation and the presence of IGFBP-1 as the predominant protein in serum-free culture medium

  5. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 synthesis and secretion by progestin and relaxin in long term cultures of human endometrial stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, S.C.; Jackson, J.A.; Ashmore, J.; Zhu, H.H.; Tseng, L. (Univ. of Leicester, (United Kingdom))

    1991-05-01

    The decidualized endometrium during the first trimester of pregnancy synthesizes and secretes a 32-kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (termed hIGFBP-1) at high levels. IGFBP-1 is the major soluble protein product of this tissue and is principally localized to the differentiated endometrial stromal cell, the decidual cell. In the present study long term culture of stromal cells from the nonpregnant endometrium have been employed to elucidate the hormonal requirements for IGFBP-1 production. Immunoreactive IGFBP-1 was undetectable in control cultures. However, inclusion of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induced rates of 0.35 +/- 0.09 microgram/0.1 mg cell DNA.day after 20-30 days. In these cultures cells exhibited morphological changes consistent with decidual cell differentiation. In all cultures removal of MPA after exposure for 10-16 days, with or without subsequent inclusion of relaxin (RLX), increased production of IGFBP-1 450- to 4600-fold to rates of 150-710 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day or 26-131 micrograms/10(6) cells.day on days 24-26. The rates tended to be higher with the inclusion of RLX and were sustained in contrast to cultures without RLX, where rates fell by day 30. Individual cultures responded differently to RLX when added from the initiation of culture, with either a response similar to MPA alone or a cyclical change in production, achieving maximal rates of 190-290 micrograms/0.1 mg cell DNA.day. Cultures in which RLX alone induced high IGFBP-1 high production were obtained from endometrium during the progesterone-dominated luteal phase. In cultures exhibiting high rates of immunoreactive IGFBP-1 production, the protein represented their major secretory protein product. This was confirmed by ({sup 35}S)methionine incorporation and the presence of IGFBP-1 as the predominant protein in serum-free culture medium.

  6. The Vibrio harveyi master quorum-sensing regulator, LuxR, a TetR-type protein is both an activator and a repressor: DNA recognition and binding specificity at target promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeani, Audra J; Irgon, Joseph J; Berger, Michael F; Bulyk, Martha L; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2008-01-01

    Quorum sensing is the process of cell-to-cell communication by which bacteria communicate via secreted signal molecules called autoinducers. As cell population density increases, the accumulation of autoinducers leads to co-ordinated changes in gene expression across the bacterial community. The marine bacterium, Vibrio harveyi, uses three autoinducers to achieve intra-species, intra-genera and inter-species cell–cell communication. The detection of these autoinducers ultimately leads to the production of LuxR, the quorum-sensing master regulator that controls expression of the genes in the quorum-sensing regulon. LuxR is a member of the TetR protein superfamily; however, unlike other TetR repressors that typically repress their own gene expression and that of an adjacent operon, LuxR is capable of activating and repressing a large number of genes. Here, we used protein binding microarrays and a two-layered bioinformatics approach to show that LuxR binds a 21 bp consensus operator with dyad symmetry. In vitro and in vivo analyses of two promoters directly regulated by LuxR allowed us to identify those bases that are critical for LuxR binding. Together, the in silico and biochemical results enabled us to scan the genome and identify novel targets of LuxR in V. harveyi and thus expand the understanding of the quorum-sensing regulon. PMID:18681939

  7. Myristylation alters DNA-binding activity and transactivation of FBR (gag-fos) protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Kamata, N; Jotte, R M; Holt, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    FBR murine sarcoma virus (gag-fos) protein, a virally transduced Fos protein, exhibits decreased gene transactivation in comparison with the cellular Fos protein. Biochemical analysis suggests that myristylation of the virally encoded N-terminal gag region results in decreased DNA binding and transcriptional activation without affecting heterodimerization with Jun protein. These findings demonstrate that protein myristylation can modulate gene regulation by a DNA-binding protein.

  8. Sumoylation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α is implicated in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell development through regulating runx1 in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hao; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Xiaohui; Deng, Min; Zhang, Wenqing; Wen, Zilong; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; de The, Hugues; Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) participates in various cellular processes, including maintenance of genome integrity, nuclear transport, transcription and signal transduction. However, the biological function of sumoylation in hematopoiesis has not been fully explored. We show here that definitive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) are depleted in SUMO-deficient zebrafish embryos. Impairment of sumoylation attenuates HSPC generation and proliferation. The hyposumoylation triggered HSPC defects are CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/ebpα) dependent. Critically, a SUMO-C/ebpα fusion rescues the defective hematopoiesis in SUMO-deficient embryos, at least in part through restored runx1 expression. While C/ebpα-dependent transcription is involved in myeloid differentiation, our studies here reveal that C/ebpα sumoylation is essential for HSPC development during definitive hematopoiesis. PMID:25757417

  9. The human enhancer-binding protein Gata3 binds to several T-cell receptor regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Marine, J; Winoto, A

    1991-01-01

    The tissue-specific developmental regulation of the alpha, beta, gamma and delta T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) genes is controlled by the corresponding distinct enhancers and their enhancer-binding proteins. To find a common TCR regulatory element, we have studied the ability of the newly described enhancer-binding protein Gata3 to bind to the sequence motif (A/T)GATA(G/A) shared between enhancer elements of all four TCR genes. Gata3 was shown in the chicken to be an enhancer-binding protein ...

  10. Characterization of the retinoblastoma binding proteins RBP1 and RBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fattaey, A R; Helin, K; Dembski, M S;

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product, pRB, regulates cell proliferation by binding to and inhibiting the activity of key growth promoting proteins. Several cellular proteins have been shown to bind directly to pRB and the genes encoding a number of them have been isolated. The protein product of one of...

  11. Fatty acid binding protein 10 in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides): characterization and regulation under pH and temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zeng-hua; Liu, Yu-feng; Wang, Wei-Na; Xin, Yu; Xie, Fu-xing; Wang, An-Li

    2012-04-01

    We have isolated and characterized a fatty acid binding protein from the liver of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). Amino acid sequence similarity of the Ec-FABP (E. coioides-FABP) was highest to FABP10s isolated from the livers of catfish, chicken, salamander and iguana. The open-reading frame of the Ec-FABP codes for a protein of 14.0 kDa with a calculated isoelectric point of 8.5. We first expressed a FABP10 protein from orange-spotted grouper (E. coioides) in Pichia pastoris, and then characterized the antioxidative potential of our recombinant Ec-FABP by DCF fluorescence assay. RT-PCR assays showed that endogenous Ec-FABP mRNA is most strongly expressed in liver with the most abundance and intestine. Change in the groupers' blood cells respiratory burst activity was examined during and after exposure to the pH and temperature stress using flow cytometry. Further analysis of Ec-FABP gene expression in liver tissue by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that Ec-FABP transcript levels increased when the fish were exposed to both pH and temperature stress, but the time when its mRNA expression level peaked differed under these stresses. Western blot analyses confirmed that the Ec-FABP protein was strongly expressed in the liver after exposure to the pH and temperature stress. These results suggest that Ec-FABP expression is stimulated by pH and temperature stress and that it may play important roles in general adaptive and antioxidant responses. PMID:22182678

  12. Activating transcription factor 4 and X box binding protein 1 of Litopenaeus vannamei transcriptional regulated white spot syndrome virus genes Wsv023 and Wsv083.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yun Li

    Full Text Available In response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, the signaling pathway termed unfolded protein response (UPR is activated. To investigate the role of UPR in Litopenaeus vannamei immunity, the activating transcription factor 4 (designated as LvATF4 which belonged to a branch of the UPR, the [protein kinase RNA (PKR-like ER kinase, (PERK]-[eukaryotic initiation factor 2 subunit alpha (eIF2α] pathway, was identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LvATF4 was 1972 bp long, with an open reading frame of 1299 bp long that encoded a 432 amino acid protein. LvATF4 was highly expressed in gills, intestines and stomach. For the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV challenge, LvATF4 was upregulated in the gills after 3 hpi and increased by 1.9-fold (96 hpi compared to the mock-treated group. The LvATF4 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in a lower cumulative mortality of L. vannamei under WSSV infection. Reporter gene assays show that LvATF4 could upregulate the expression of the WSSV gene wsv023 based on the activating transcription factor/cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate response element (ATF/CRE. Another transcription factor of L. vannamei, X box binding protein 1 (designated as LvXBP1, has a significant function in [inositol-requiring enzyme-1(IRE1 - (XBP1] pathway. This transcription factor upregulated the expression of the WSSV gene wsv083 based on the UPR element (UPRE. These results suggest that in L. vannamei UPR signaling pathway transcription factors are important for WSSV and might facilitate WSSV infection.

  13. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ isoforms as transcriptional regulators of the pro-invasive CDH3/P-cadherin gene in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Albergaria

    Full Text Available P-cadherin is a cell-cell adhesion molecule codified by the CDH3 gene, which expression is highly associated with undifferentiated cells in normal adult epithelial tissues, as well as with poorly differentiated carcinomas. In breast cancer, P-cadherin is frequently overexpressed in high-grade tumours and is a well-established indicator of aggressive tumour behaviour and poor patient prognosis. However, till now, the mechanisms controlling CDH3 gene activation have been poorly explored. Since we recently described the existence of several CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β (C/EBPβ transcription factor binding sites at the CDH3 promoter, the aim of this study was to assess if the distinct C/EBPβ isoforms were directly involved in the transcriptional activation of the CDH3 gene in breast cancer cells. DNA-protein interactions, mutation analysis and luciferase reporter assay studies have been performed. We demonstrated that C/EBPβ is co-expressed with P-cadherin in breast cancer cells and all the three isoforms function as transcriptional regulators of the CDH3 gene, directly interacting with specific regions of its promoter. Interestingly, this transcriptional activation was only reflected at the P-cadherin protein level concerning the LIP isoform. Taken together, our data show that CDH3 is a newly defined transcriptional target gene of C/EBPβ isoforms in breast cancer, and we also identified the binding sites that are relevant for this activation.

  14. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP3/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation

  15. The cAMP Response Element Binding protein (CREB) is activated by Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuloaga, R. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Fuentes, E.N.; Molina, A. [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile); Valdés, J.A., E-mail: jvaldes@unab.cl [Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Santiago (Chile); Interdisciplinary Center for Aquaculture Research (INCAR), Víctor Lamas 1290, PO Box 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •IGF-1 induces the activation of CREB via IGF-1R/PI3K/PLC signaling pathway. •Calcium dependent signaling pathways regulate myostatin gene expression. •IGF-1 regulates myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription in skeletal myoblast. -- Abstract: Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP{sub 3}/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA–CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation.

  16. The X-linked intellectual disability protein IL1RAPL1 regulates excitatory synapse formation by binding PTPδ and RhoGAP2

    OpenAIRE

    Valnegri, Pamela; Montrasio, Chiara; Brambilla, Dario; Ko, Jaewon; Passafaro, Maria; Sala, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations of the Interleukin-1-receptor accessory protein like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene are associated with cognitive impairment ranging from non-syndromic X-linked mental retardation to autism. IL1RAPL1 belongs to a novel family of IL1/Toll receptors, which is localized at excitatory synapses and interacts with PSD-95. We previously showed that IL1RAPL1 regulates the synaptic localization of PSD-95 by controlling c-Jun N-terminal kinase activity and PSD-95 phosphorylation. Here, we show that the Ig...

  17. The cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) is activated by insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and regulates myostatin gene expression in skeletal myoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuloaga, R; Fuentes, E N; Molina, A; Valdés, J A

    2013-10-18

    Myostatin, a member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, plays an important role as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth and differentiation. We have previously reported that IGF-1 induces a transient myostatin mRNA expression, through the activation of the Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT) in an IP3/calcium-dependent manner. Here we examined the activation of CREB transcription factor as downstream targets of IGF-1 during myoblast differentiation and its role as a regulator of myostatin gene expression. In cultured skeletal myoblast, IGF-1 induced the phosphorylation and transcriptional activation of CREB via IGF-1 Receptor/Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K)/Phospholipase C gamma (PLC γ), signaling pathways. Also, IGF-1 induced calcium-dependent molecules such as Calmodulin Kinase II (CaMK II), Extracellular signal-regulated Kinases (ERK), Protein Kinase C (PKC). Additionally, we examined myostatin mRNA levels and myostatin promoter activity in differentiated myoblasts stimulated with IGF-1. We found a significant increase in mRNA contents of myostatin and its reporter activity after treatment with IGF-1. The expression of myostatin in differentiated myoblast was downregulated by the transfection of siRNA-CREB and by pharmacological inhibitors of the signaling pathways involved in CREB activation. By using pharmacological and genetic approaches together these data demonstrate that IGF-1 regulates the myostatin gene expression via CREB transcription factor during muscle cell differentiation. PMID:24064350

  18. Nickel binding sites in histone proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Peana, Massimiliano Francesco; Solinas, Costantino; Medici, Serenella

    2012-01-01

    Nickel compounds are well known as human carcinogens, though the molecular events that are responsible for this are not well understood. It has been proposed that a crucial element in the mechanism of carcinogenesis is the binding of Ni(II) ions within the cell nucleus. It is known that DNA polymer binds Ni(II) only weakly, leaving the proteins of the cell nucleus as the likely Ni(II) targets. Being histone proteins the most abundant among them, they can be considered the primary sites fo...

  19. Ice-Binding Proteins and Their Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Dolev, Maya; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) are a diverse class of proteins that assist organism survival in the presence of ice in cold climates. They have different origins in many organisms, including bacteria, fungi, algae, diatoms, plants, insects, and fish. This review covers the gamut of IBP structures and functions and the common features they use to bind ice. We discuss mechanisms by which IBPs adsorb to ice and interfere with its growth, evidence for their irreversible association with ice, and methods for enhancing the activity of IBPs. The applications of IBPs in the food industry, in cryopreservation, and in other technologies are vast, and we chart out some possibilities. PMID:27145844

  20. Structural analysis of calmodulin binding to ion channels demonstrates the role of its plasticity in regulation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalevskaya, N.V.; Waterbeemd, M. van de; Bokhovchuk, F.M.; Bate, N.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Vuister, G.W.

    2013-01-01

    The Ca2+-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) is a well-known regulator of ion-channel activity. Consequently, the Protein Data Bank contains many structures of CaM in complex with different fragments of ion channels that together display a variety of binding modes. In addition to the canonical interact

  1. The liver fatty acid binding protein--comparison of cavity properties of intracellular lipid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J; Ory, J; Reese-Wagoner, A; Banaszak, L

    1999-02-01

    The crystal and solution structures of all of the intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) reveal a common beta-barrel framework with only small local perturbations. All existing evidence points to the binding cavity and a poorly delimited 'portal' region as defining the function of each family member. The importance of local structure within the cavity appears to be its influence on binding affinity and specificity for the lipid. The portal region appears to be involved in the regulation of ligand exchange. Within the iLBP family, liver fatty acid binding protein or LFABP, has the unique property of binding two fatty acids within its internalized binding cavity rather than the commonly observed stoichiometry of one. Furthermore, LFABP will bind hydrophobic molecules larger than the ligands which will associate with other iLBPs. The crystal structure of LFABP contains two bound oleate molecules and provides the explanation for its unusual stoichiometry. One of the bound fatty acids is completely internalized and has its carboxylate interacting with an arginine and two serines. The second oleate represents an entirely new binding mode with the carboxylate on the surface of LFABP. The two oleates also interact with each other. Because of this interaction and its inner location, it appears the first oleate must be present before the second more external molecule is bound. PMID:10331654

  2. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca2+ within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind 45Ca2+ and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein

  3. Human neutrophil calmodulin-binding proteins: identification of the calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular events in linking neutrophil activation and ligand binding to specific membrane receptors are mediated in part by an increase in intracellular Ca2+. One mechanism by which Ca2+ may trigger neutrophil activation is through Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-regulated proteins and enzymes. To determine which Ca2+/CaM-regulated enzymes may be present in the neutrophil, they have used Western blotting techniques and 125I-CaM to identify neutrophil CaM-binding proteins. Eleven proteins with molecular weights ranging from 230K to 13.5K bound 125I-CaM in a Ca2+-dependent manner. One predominant region of 125I-Cam binding was to a 59K protein; a protein with an identical mobility was labeled by an antisera against brain CaM-dependent phosphatase. Ca2+-dependent phosphatase activity, which was inhibited by the CaM antagonist trifluoperazine, was detected in a neutrophil extract; a radioimmunoassay for the phosphatase indicated that it was present in the extract at approximately 0.2 μg/mg protein. Most of the CaM-binding proteins, including the 59K protein, were rapidly degraded upon lysis of the neutrophil. There was a close correlation between the degradation of the 59K protein and the loss of Ca2+-dependent phosphatase activity in the neutrophil extract. Thus, human neutrophils contain numerous CaM-binding proteins which are presumably Ca2+/calmodulin-regulated enzymes and proteins; the 59K protein is a CaM-dependent phosphatase

  4. Protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A binds within the oligomerization domain of striatin and regulates the phosphorylation and activation of the mammalian Ste20-Like kinase Mst3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Candace A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Striatin, a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A B-type regulatory subunit, is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that has recently been linked to several diseases including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM, which causes symptoms ranging from headaches to stroke. Striatin association with the PP2A A/C (structural subunit/catalytic subunit heterodimer alters PP2A substrate specificity, but targets and roles of striatin-associated PP2A are not known. In addition to binding the PP2A A/C heterodimer to form a PP2A holoenzyme, striatin associates with cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3 protein, the mammalian Mps one binder (MOB homolog, Mob3/phocein, the mammalian sterile 20-like (Mst kinases, Mst3, Mst4 and STK25, and several other proteins to form a large signaling complex. Little is known about the molecular architecture of the striatin complex and the regulation of these sterile 20-like kinases. Results To help define the molecular organization of striatin complexes and to determine whether Mst3 might be negatively regulated by striatin-associated PP2A, a structure-function analysis of striatin was performed. Two distinct regions of striatin are capable of stably binding directly or indirectly to Mob3--one N-terminal, including the coiled-coil domain, and another more C-terminal, including the WD-repeat domain. In addition, striatin residues 191-344 contain determinants necessary for efficient association of Mst3, Mst4, and CCM3. PP2A associates with the coiled-coil domain of striatin, but unlike Mob3 and Mst3, its binding appears to require striatin oligomerization. Deletion of the caveolin-binding domain on striatin abolishes striatin family oligomerization and PP2A binding. Point mutations in striatin that disrupt PP2A association cause hyperphosphorylation and activation of striatin-associated Mst3. Conclusions Striatin orchestrates the regulation of Mst3 by PP2A. It binds Mst3 likely as a dimer with CCM3 via

  5. Protein kinase A regulates molecular chaperone transcription and protein aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhang

    Full Text Available Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 regulates one of the major pathways of protein quality control and is essential for deterrence of protein-folding disorders, particularly in neuronal cells. However, HSF1 activity declines with age, a change that may open the door to progression of neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease. We have investigated mechanisms of HSF1 regulation that may become compromised with age. HSF1 binds stably to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on at least one regulatory serine residue (S320. We show here that PKA is essential for effective transcription of HSP genes by HSF1. PKA triggers a cascade involving HSF1 binding to the histone acetylase p300 and positive translation elongation factor 1 (p-TEFb and phosphorylation of the c-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, a key mechanism in the downstream steps of HSF1-mediated transcription. This cascade appears to play a key role in protein quality control in neuronal cells expressing aggregation-prone proteins with long poly-glutamine (poly-Q tracts. Such proteins formed inclusion bodies that could be resolved by HSF1 activation during heat shock. Resolution of the inclusions was inhibited by knockdown of HSF1, PKAcα, or the pTEFb component CDK9, indicating a key role for the HSF1-PKA cascade in protein quality control.

  6. Signal transduction by guanine nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, A M

    1987-01-01

    High affinity binding of guanine nucleotides and the ability to hydrolyze bound GTP to GDP are characteristics of an extended family of intracellular proteins. Subsets of this family include cytosolic initiation and elongation factors involved in protein synthesis, and cytoskeletal proteins such as tubulin (Hughes, S.M. (1983) FEBS Lett. 164, 1-8). A distinct subset of guanine nucleotide binding proteins is membrane-associated; members of this subset include the ras gene products (Ellis, R.W. et al. (1981) Nature 292, 506-511) and the heterotrimeric G-proteins (also termed N-proteins) (Gilman, A.G. (1984) Cell 36, 577-579). Substantial evidence indicates that G-proteins act as signal transducers by coupling receptors (R) to effectors (E). A similar function has been suggested but not proven for the ras gene products. Known G-proteins include Gs and Gi, the G-proteins associated with stimulation and inhibition, respectively, of adenylate cyclase; transducin (TD), the G-protein coupling rhodopsin to cGMP phosphodiesterase in rod photoreceptors (Bitensky, M.W. et al. (1981) Curr. Top. Membr. Transp. 15, 237-271; Stryer, L. (1986) Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 9, 87-119), and Go, a G-protein of unknown function that is highly abundant in brain (Sternweis, P.C. and Robishaw, J.D. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 13806-13813; Neer, E.J. et al. (1984) J. Biol. Chem. 259, 14222-14229). G-proteins also participate in other signal transduction pathways, notably that involving phosphoinositide breakdown. In this review, I highlight recent progress in our understanding of the structure, function, and diversity of G-proteins. PMID:2435586

  7. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  8. Odorant-binding proteins in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that mediate chemoreception in insects has been greatly improved after the discovery of olfactory and taste receptor proteins. However, after 50 years of the discovery of first insect sex pheromone from the silkmoth Bombyx mori, it is still unclear how hydrophobic compounds reach the dendrites of sensory neurons in vivo across aqueous space and interact with the sensory receptors. The presence of soluble polypeptides in high concentration in the lymph of chemosensilla still poses unanswered questions. More than two decades after their discovery and despite the wealth of structural and biochemical information available, the physiological function of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) is not well understood. Here, I review the structural properties of different subclasses of insect OBPs and their binding to pheromones and other small ligands. Finally, I discuss current ideas and models on the role of such proteins in insect chemoreception. PMID:20831949

  9. Quantifying drug-protein binding in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) provides precise quantitation of isotope labeled compounds that are bound to biological macromolecules such as DNA or proteins. The sensitivity is high enough to allow for sub-pharmacological (''micro-'') dosing to determine macromolecular targets without inducing toxicities or altering the system under study, whether it is healthy or diseased. We demonstrated an application of AMS in quantifying the physiologic effects of one dosed chemical compound upon the binding level of another compound in vivo at sub-toxic doses [4].We are using tissues left from this study to develop protocols for quantifying specific binding to isolated and identified proteins. We also developed a new technique to quantify nanogram to milligram amounts of isolated protein at precisions that are comparable to those for quantifying the bound compound by AMS

  10. Drug-drug plasma protein binding interactions of ivacaftor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Elena K; Huang, Johnny X; Carbone, Vincenzo; Baker, Mark; Azad, Mohammad A K; Cooper, Matthew A; Li, Jian; Velkov, Tony

    2015-06-01

    Ivacaftor is a novel cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiator that improves the pulmonary function for patients with CF bearing a G551D CFTR-protein mutation. Because ivacaftor is highly bound (>97%) to plasma proteins, there is the strong possibility that co-administered CF drugs may compete for the same plasma protein binding sites and impact the free drug concentration. This, in turn, could lead to drastic changes in the in vivo efficacy of ivacaftor and therapeutic outcomes. This biochemical study compares the binding affinity of ivacaftor and co-administered CF drugs for human serum albumin (HSA) and α1 -acid glycoprotein (AGP) using surface plasmon resonance and fluorimetric binding assays that measure the displacement of site-selective probes. Because of their ability to strongly compete for the ivacaftor binding sites on HSA and AGP, drug-drug interactions between ivacaftor are to be expected with ducosate, montelukast, ibuprofen, dicloxacillin, omeprazole, and loratadine. The significance of these plasma protein drug-drug interactions is also interpreted in terms of molecular docking simulations. This in vitro study provides valuable insights into the plasma protein drug-drug interactions of ivacaftor with co-administered CF drugs. The data may prove useful in future clinical trials for a staggered treatment that aims to maximize the effective free drug concentration and clinical efficacy of ivacaftor. PMID:25707701

  11. Poly(A) tail-mediated gene regulation by opposing roles of Nab2 and Pab2 nuclear poly(A)-binding proteins in pre-mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier St-Sauveur, Valérie; Soucek, Sharon; Corbett, Anita H; Bachand, François

    2013-12-01

    The 3' end of most eukaryotic transcripts is decorated by poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs), which influence the fate of mRNAs throughout gene expression. However, despite the fact that multiple PABPs coexist in the nuclei of most eukaryotes, how functional interplay between these nuclear PABPs controls gene expression remains unclear. By characterizing the ortholog of the Nab2/ZC3H14 zinc finger PABP in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we show here that the two major fission yeast nuclear PABPs, Pab2 and Nab2, have opposing roles in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Notably, we find that Nab2 functions in gene-specific regulation in a manner opposite to that of Pab2. By studying the ribosomal-protein-coding gene rpl30-2, which is negatively regulated by Pab2 via a nuclear pre-mRNA decay pathway that depends on the nuclear exosome subunit Rrp6, we show that Nab2 promotes rpl30-2 expression by acting at the level of the unspliced pre-mRNA. Our data support a model in which Nab2 impedes Pab2/Rrp6-mediated decay by competing with Pab2 for polyadenylated transcripts in the nucleus. The opposing roles of Pab2 and Nab2 reveal that interplay between nuclear PABPs can influence gene regulation. PMID:24081329

  12. Cloning of the cDNA for the TATA-binding protein-associated factorII170 subunit of transcription factor B-TFIID reveals homology to global transcription regulators in yeast and Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Borst, Jan Willem; van der Vliet, Peter C.; Gentz, Reiner; Timmers, H. Th. Marc

    1997-01-01

    The human transcription factor B-TFIID is comprised of TATA-binding protein (TBP) in complex with one TBP-associated factor (TAF) of 170 kDa. We report the isolation of the cDNA for TAFII170. By cofractionation and coprecipitation experiments, we show that the protein encoded by the cDNA encodes the TAF subunit of B-TFIID. Recombinant TAFII170 has (d)ATPase activity. Inspection of its primary structure reveals a striking homology with genes of other organisms, yeast MOT1, and Drosophila moira, which belongs to the Trithorax group. Both homologs were isolated in genetic screens as global regulators of pol II transcription. This supports our classification of B-TFIID as a pol II transcription factor and suggests that specific TBP–TAF complexes perform distinct functions during development. PMID:9342322

  13. The mRNA-binding protein HuR promotes hypoxia-induced chemoresistance through posttranscriptional regulation of the proto-oncogene PIM1 in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, F F; Jimbo, M; Wulfkuhle, J; Gallagher, I; Deng, J; Enyenihi, L; Meisner-Kober, N; Londin, E; Rigoutsos, I; Sawicki, J A; Risbud, M V; Witkiewicz, A K; McCue, P A; Jiang, W; Rui, H; Yeo, C J; Petricoin, E; Winter, J M; Brody, J R

    2016-05-01

    Previously, it has been shown that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) tumors exhibit high levels of hypoxia, characterized by low oxygen pressure (pO2) and decreased O2 intracellular perfusion. Chronic hypoxia is strongly associated with resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy and chemoradiation in an understudied phenomenon known as hypoxia-induced chemoresistance. The hypoxia-inducible, pro-oncogenic, serine-threonine kinase PIM1 (Proviral Integration site for Moloney murine leukemia virus 1) has emerged as a key regulator of hypoxia-induced chemoresistance in PDA and other cancers. Although its role in therapeutic resistance has been described previously, the molecular mechanism behind PIM1 overexpression in PDA is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that cis-acting AU-rich elements (ARE) present within a 38-base pair region of the PIM1 mRNA 3'-untranslated region mediate a regulatory interaction with the mRNA stability factor HuR (Hu antigen R) in the context of tumor hypoxia. Predominantly expressed in the nucleus in PDA cells, HuR translocates to the cytoplasm in response to hypoxic stress and stabilizes the PIM1 mRNA transcript, resulting in PIM1 protein overexpression. A reverse-phase protein array revealed that HuR-mediated regulation of PIM1 protects cells from hypoxic stress through phosphorylation and inactivation of the apoptotic effector BAD and activation of MEK1/2. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of HuR by MS-444 inhibits HuR homodimerization and its cytoplasmic translocation, abrogates hypoxia-induced PIM1 overexpression and markedly enhances PDA cell sensitivity to oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil under physiologic low oxygen conditions. Taken together, these results support the notion that HuR has prosurvival properties in PDA cells by enabling them with growth advantages in stressful tumor microenvironment niches. Accordingly, these studies provide evidence that therapeutic disruption of HuR's regulation of PIM1 may be a key strategy in

  14. Loss of liver FA binding protein significantly alters hepatocyte plasma membrane microdomains[S

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Storey, Stephen M.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Landrock, Danilo; Martin, Gregory G.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    Although lipid-rich microdomains of hepatocyte plasma membranes serve as the major scaffolding regions for cholesterol transport proteins important in cholesterol disposition, little is known regarding intracellular factors regulating cholesterol distribution therein. On the basis of its ability to bind cholesterol and alter hepatic cholesterol accumulation, the cytosolic liver type FA binding protein (L-FABP) was hypothesized to be a candidate protein regulating these microdomains. Compared ...

  15. A structural classification of substrate-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berntsson, Ronnie P. -A.; Smits, Sander H. J.; Schmitt, Lutz; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert; Rydström, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Substrate-binding proteins (SBP) are associated with a wide variety of protein complexes. The proteins are part of ATP-binding cassette transporters for substrate uptake, ion gradient driven transporters, DNA-binding proteins, as well as channels and receptors from both pro-and eukaryotes. A wealth

  16. Novel RNA-binding properties of the MTG chromatin regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchi Nicoletta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The myeloid translocation gene (MTG proteins are non-DNA-binding transcriptional regulators capable of interacting with chromatin modifying proteins. As a consequence of leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, two of the MTG proteins, MTG8 and MTG16, are fused to the DNA-binding domain of AML1, a transcriptional activator crucial for hematopoiesis. The AML1-MTG fusion proteins, as the wild type MTGs, display four conserved homology regions (NHR1-4 related to the Drosophila nervy protein. Structural protein analyses led us to test the hypothesis that specific MTG domains may mediate RNA binding. Results By using an RNA-binding assay based on synthetic RNA homopolymers and a panel of MTG deletion mutants, here we show that all the MTG proteins can bind RNA. The RNA-binding properties can be traced to two regions: the Zinc finger domains in the NHR4, which mediate Zinc-dependent RNA binding, and a novel short basic region (SBR upstream of the NHR2, which mediates Zinc-independent RNA binding. The two AML1-MTG fusion proteins, retaining both the Zinc fingers domains and the SBR, also display RNA-binding properties. Conclusion Evidence has been accumulating that RNA plays a role in transcriptional control. Both wild type MTGs and chimeric AML1-MTG proteins display in vitro RNA-binding properties, thus opening new perspectives on the possible involvement of an RNA component in MTG-mediated chromatin regulation.

  17. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins by tumor necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, J; Char, D; Bagby, G J; Gelato, M C; Lang, C H

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine 1) whether exogenous administration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) alters insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding proteins (BPs) and 2) whether the enhanced endogenous production of TNF mediates the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced changes in the IGF system. The overnight infusion of murine TNF-alpha reduced circulating concentrations of both growth hormone (GH) and IGF-I in fasted rats. Furthermore, TNF-alpha decreased IGF-I content in liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and pituitary. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased IGF-I content in kidney and brain. IGFBP-1 was increased in plasma, liver, and muscle in response to TNF-alpha. In a second study, rats were injected with LPS after treatment with a neutralizing anti-TNF antibody (Ab), and blood and tissues were collected 4 h later. In LPS-treated rats, plasma concentrations of GH and IGF-I were reduced. LPS also decreased the IGF-I content in liver and skeletal muscle and increased plasma, liver, and muscle concentrations of IGFBP-1. Pretreatment with anti-TNF Ab attenuated the LPS-induced reduction in IGF-I and the increased IGFBP-1 in plasma and liver and completely prevented the decrease in IGF-I observed in muscle. In contrast, the LPS-induced decrease in plasma GH and the increased IGFBP-1 observed in muscle were unaltered by the anti-TNF Ab.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7503312

  18. The Effects of Combined Antioxidant Supplementation on Antioxidant Capacity, DNA Single-Strand Breaks and Regulation of Insulin Growth Factor-1/IGF-Binding Protein 3 in the Ferret Model of Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and its major binding protein, IGF binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) are implicated in lung cancer and other malignancies. We have previously shown that the combination of three major antioxidants [beta-carotene (BC), alpha-tocopherol (AT) and ascorbic acid (...

  19. Where metal ions bind in proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, M M; Wesson, L.; Eisenman, G.; Eisenberg, D.

    1990-01-01

    The environments of metal ions (Li+, Na+, K+, Ag+, Cs+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Cu2+, Zn2+) in proteins and other metal-host molecules have been examined. Regardless of the metal and its precise pattern of ligation to the protein, there is a common qualitative feature to the binding site: the metal is ligated by a shell of hydrophilic atomic groups (containing oxygen, nitrogen, or sulfur atoms) and this hydrophilic shell is embedded within a larger shell of hydrophobic atomic groups (containing car...

  20. Identification of CP12 as a Novel Calcium-Binding Protein in Chloroplasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostinho Gomes Rocha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium plays an important role in the regulation of several chloroplast processes. However, very little is still understood about the calcium fluxes or calcium-binding proteins present in plastids. Indeed, classical EF-hand containing calcium-binding proteins appears to be mostly absent from plastids. In the present study we analyzed the stroma fraction of Arabidopsis chloroplasts for the presence of novel calcium-binding proteins using 2D-PAGE separation followed by calcium overlay assay. A small acidic protein was identified by mass spectrometry analyses as the chloroplast protein CP12 and the ability of CP12 to bind calcium was confirmed with recombinant proteins. CP12 plays an important role in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle participating in the assembly of a supramolecular complex between phosphoribulokinase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, indicating that calcium signaling could play a role in regulating carbon fixation.

  1. Deoxyribonucleic-binding homeobox proteins are augmented in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Mercurio, A M; Chung, S Y;

    1990-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins that are involved in the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. In this study, we examined the expression of homeobox proteins in human cancer. Antiserum was obtained against a synthetic peptide derived from the...... isolated and used to elicit a rabbit antiserum. In immunostaining, both antisera reacted with the nuclei of cultured tumor cells. In tissue sections of human carcinoma, nuclear immunoreactivity was observed in the tumor cells in 40 of 42 cases examined. Adjacent normal epithelial tissue obtained from the...... presence of the homeobox transcript in human carcinoma was documented by in situ hybridization and RNase protection mapping. These results demonstrate that human cancer is associated with the expression of homeobox proteins. Such homeobox proteins, as well as other regulatory proteins, could be involved in...

  2. Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK)-dependent Phosphorylation of Y-Box-binding Protein 1 (YB-1) Enhances Gene Expression in Granulosa Cells in Response to Follicle-stimulating Hormone (FSH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaubauer, Elyse M; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary E

    2016-06-01

    Within the ovarian follicle, immature oocytes are surrounded and supported by granulosa cells (GCs). Stimulation of GCs by FSH leads to their proliferation and differentiation, events that are necessary for fertility. FSH activates multiple signaling pathways to regulate genes necessary for follicular maturation. Herein, we investigated the role of Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) within GCs. YB-1 is a nucleic acid binding protein that regulates transcription and translation. Our results show that FSH promotes an increase in the phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) within 15 min that is maintained at significantly increased levels until ∼8 h post treatment. FSH-stimulated phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) is prevented by pretreatment of GCs with the PKA-selective inhibitor PKA inhibitor (PKI), the MEK inhibitor PD98059, or the ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK-2) inhibitor BI-D1870. Thus, phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) is PKA-, ERK-, and RSK-2-dependent. However, pretreatment of GCs with the protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) inhibitor tautomycin increased phosphorylation of YB-1(Ser(102)) in the absence of FSH; FSH did not further increase YB-1(Ser(102)) phosphorylation. This result suggests that the major effect of RSK-2 is to inhibit PP1 rather than to directly phosphorylate YB-1 on Ser(102) YB-1 coimmunoprecipitated with PP1β catalytic subunit and RSK-2. Transduction of GCs with the dephospho-adenoviral-YB-1(S102A) mutant prevented the induction by FSH of Egfr, Cyp19a1, Inha, Lhcgr, Cyp11a1, Hsd17b1, and Pappa mRNAs and estradiol-17β production. Collectively, our results reveal that phosphorylation of YB-1 on Ser(102) via the ERK/RSK-2 signaling pathway is necessary for FSH-mediated expression of target genes required for maturation of follicles to a preovulatory phenotype. PMID:27080258

  3. Co-expression of IL-18 binding protein and IL-4 regulates Th1/Th2 cytokine response in murine collagen-induced arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhang Leng; Hangping Yao; Junya Shen; Keyi Wang; Guangchao Zhuo; Ziwei Wang

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a recombinant adenoviral vector containing a murine interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein (mIL-18BP) and murine IL-4 (mIL-4) fusion gene (AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4)and used a gene therapy approach to investigate the role of IL-18BP and IL-4 in modulating the T-helper1 and T-helper2(Th1/Th2) balance in mice with collagen-induced arthritis(CIA). Mice with CIA were intra-articularly injected with 107 pfu/6μl of either AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4, or a control adenovirus,or with the control vehicle (phosphate-buffered saline). After intra-articular gene therapy with AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4, the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), γ-interferon (IFN-γ), IL-4, IL-10, and IL-18 in mice with CIA were assessed by ELISA. IFN-γ-expressing and IL-4-expressing CD4+ T cells from mice splenocytes were monitored by flow cytometry. Mice with CIA at weeks 1, 2, and 4 after intraarticular injection of AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4 showed significantly increased serum concentrations of IL-4 and IL-10 (P<0.01 at all time points=but greatly decreased serum concentrations of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-18 (P<0.01 at all time points=compared to both the control adenovirus and phosphatebuffered saline control groups. The percentage of IFN-γ-producing CD4+ T cells was significantly decreased in response to local AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4 treatment. The percentage of IL-4-producing CD4+ T cells increased significantly at 1 week after local injection of AdmIL-18BP/mIL-4 then returned to normal by week 4. These data indicated the significant modifying effects on the Th1/Th2 imbalance in murine CIA produced by local overexpression of IL-18BP and IL-4. Combination treatment with IL-18BP and IL-4 is a promising potential therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

  4. Damaged DNA-binding protein down-regulates epigenetic mark H3K56Ac through histone deacetylase 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Battu, Aruna; Ray, Alo; Wani, Gulzar; Qian, Jiang; He, Jinshan; Wang, Qi-en [Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Wani, Altaf A., E-mail: wani.2@osu.edu [Department of Radiology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • HDAC1 and HDAC2 co-localize with UV radiation-induced DNA damage sites. • HDAC1 translocation to chromatin is dependent on DDB2 function. • HDAC1 and HDAC2 are involved in H3K56Ac deacetylation. • H3K56Ac deacetylation requires DDB1 and DDB2 but not XPA or XPC functions. • HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination and local γH2AX accumulation. - Abstract: Acetylated histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56Ac) is one of the reversible histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) responsive to DNA damage. We previously described a biphasic decrease and increase of epigenetic mark H3K56Ac in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. Here, we report a new function of UV damaged DNA-binding protein (DDB) in deacetylation of H3K56Ac through specific histone deacetylases (HDACs). We show that simultaneous depletion of HDAC1/2 compromises the deacetylation of H3K56Ac, while depletion of HDAC1 or HDAC2 alone has no effect on H3K56Ac. The H3K56Ac deacetylation does not require functional nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors XPA and XPC, but depends on the function of upstream factors DDB1 and DDB2. UVR enhances the association of DDB2 with HDAC1 and, enforced DDB2 expression leads to translocation of HDAC1 to UVR-damaged chromatin. HDAC1 and HDAC2 are recruited to UVR-induced DNA damage spots, which are visualized by anti-XPC immunofluorescence. Dual HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination, but does not affect the recruitment of DDB2 to DNA damage. By contrast, the local accumulation of γH2AX at UVR-induced DNA damage spots was compromised upon HDAC1 as well as dual HDAC1/2 depletions. Additionally, UVR-induced ATM activation decreased in H12899 cells expressing H3K56Ac-mimicing H3K56Q. These results revealed a novel role of DDB in H3K56Ac deacetylation during early step of NER and the existence of active functional cross-talk between DDB-mediated damage recognition and H3K56Ac deacetylation.

  5. Damaged DNA-binding protein down-regulates epigenetic mark H3K56Ac through histone deacetylase 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • HDAC1 and HDAC2 co-localize with UV radiation-induced DNA damage sites. • HDAC1 translocation to chromatin is dependent on DDB2 function. • HDAC1 and HDAC2 are involved in H3K56Ac deacetylation. • H3K56Ac deacetylation requires DDB1 and DDB2 but not XPA or XPC functions. • HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination and local γH2AX accumulation. - Abstract: Acetylated histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56Ac) is one of the reversible histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) responsive to DNA damage. We previously described a biphasic decrease and increase of epigenetic mark H3K56Ac in response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced DNA damage. Here, we report a new function of UV damaged DNA-binding protein (DDB) in deacetylation of H3K56Ac through specific histone deacetylases (HDACs). We show that simultaneous depletion of HDAC1/2 compromises the deacetylation of H3K56Ac, while depletion of HDAC1 or HDAC2 alone has no effect on H3K56Ac. The H3K56Ac deacetylation does not require functional nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors XPA and XPC, but depends on the function of upstream factors DDB1 and DDB2. UVR enhances the association of DDB2 with HDAC1 and, enforced DDB2 expression leads to translocation of HDAC1 to UVR-damaged chromatin. HDAC1 and HDAC2 are recruited to UVR-induced DNA damage spots, which are visualized by anti-XPC immunofluorescence. Dual HDAC1/2 depletion decreases XPC ubiquitination, but does not affect the recruitment of DDB2 to DNA damage. By contrast, the local accumulation of γH2AX at UVR-induced DNA damage spots was compromised upon HDAC1 as well as dual HDAC1/2 depletions. Additionally, UVR-induced ATM activation decreased in H12899 cells expressing H3K56Ac-mimicing H3K56Q. These results revealed a novel role of DDB in H3K56Ac deacetylation during early step of NER and the existence of active functional cross-talk between DDB-mediated damage recognition and H3K56Ac deacetylation

  6. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook,J.; Bencze, K.; Jankovic, A.; Crater, A.; Busch, C.; Bradley, P.; Stemmler, A.; Spaller, M.; Stemmler, T.

    2006-01-01

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron.

  7. Monomeric Yeast Frataxin is an Iron-Binding Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedreich's ataxia, an autosomal cardio- and neurodegenerative disorder that affects 1 in 50 000 humans, is caused by decreased levels of the protein frataxin. Although frataxin is nuclear-encoded, it is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and necessary for proper regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. Frataxin is required for the cellular production of both heme and iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters. Monomeric frataxin binds with high affinity to ferrochelatase, the enzyme involved in iron insertion into porphyrin during heme production. Monomeric frataxin also binds to Isu, the scaffold protein required for assembly of Fe-S cluster intermediates. These processes (heme and Fe-S cluster assembly) share requirements for iron, suggesting that monomeric frataxin might function as the common iron donor. To provide a molecular basis to better understand frataxin's function, we have characterized the binding properties and metal-site structure of ferrous iron bound to monomeric yeast frataxin. Yeast frataxin is stable as an iron-loaded monomer, and the protein can bind two ferrous iron atoms with micromolar binding affinity. Frataxin amino acids affected by the presence of iron are localized within conserved acidic patches located on the surfaces of both helix-1 and strand-1. Under anaerobic conditions, bound metal is stable in the high-spin ferrous state. The metal-ligand coordination geometry of both metal-binding sites is consistent with a six-coordinate iron-(oxygen/nitrogen) based ligand geometry, surely constructed in part from carboxylate and possibly imidazole side chains coming from residues within these conserved acidic patches on the protein. On the basis of our results, we have developed a model for how we believe yeast frataxin interacts with iron

  8. The RNA binding domain of Pumilio antagonizes poly-adenosine binding protein and accelerates deadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Raynard, Nathan A; Blewett, Nathan H; Van Etten, Jamie; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2014-08-01

    PUF proteins are potent repressors that serve important roles in stem cell maintenance, neurological processes, and embryonic development. These functions are driven by PUF protein recognition of specific binding sites within the 3' untranslated regions of target mRNAs. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of repression by the founding PUF, Drosophila Pumilio, and its human orthologs. Here, we evaluated a previously proposed model wherein the Pumilio RNA binding domain (RBD) binds Argonaute, which in turn blocks the translational activity of the eukaryotic elongation factor 1A. Surprisingly, we found that Argonautes are not necessary for repression elicited by Drosophila and human PUFs in vivo. A second model proposed that the RBD of Pumilio represses by recruiting deadenylases to shorten the mRNA's polyadenosine tail. Indeed, the RBD binds to the Pop2 deadenylase and accelerates deadenylation; however, this activity is not crucial for regulation. Rather, we determined that the poly(A) is necessary for repression by the RBD. Our results reveal that poly(A)-dependent repression by the RBD requires the poly(A) binding protein, pAbp. Furthermore, we show that repression by the human PUM2 RBD requires the pAbp ortholog, PABPC1. Pumilio associates with pAbp but does not disrupt binding of pAbp to the mRNA. Taken together, our data support a model wherein the Pumilio RBD antagonizes the ability of pAbp to promote translation. Thus, the conserved function of the PUF RBD is to bind specific mRNAs, antagonize pAbp function, and promote deadenylation. PMID:24942623

  9. G Proteins and Regulation of Effector Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Dehpour

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors use a variety of membrane signalling mechanisms to translate information encoded in neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors into cellular responses.Collectively these mechanisms are refered to as transmembrane signalling or signal transduction. In the simplest example,the process involves a receptor protein-encompassed ion channel whose conductance is regulated by receptor activation.A second type of transmembrane signalling system involves the coupling of at least three separate components, a receptor protein, a guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein , and an effector mechanism. In some receptor" effector systems the signal transduction pathways is entirely confined to the membrane, in which no intracellular messenger is involved.Alternatively, the activity of an enzyme may be changed to generate a specific intracellular signal molecule or second messenger. Receptors in this latter category may regulate the activity of adenylyl cyclase in a positive manner through a stimulatory G protein( G or in a negative manner through an inhibitory G protein( G. thereby controlling the intracellular level of cAMP. Another membrane- associated enzyme, similar to adenylate cyclase, is phospholipase C which catalizes the hydrolysis of PIP2into IP3and DAG. Phospholipase C coupled receptors are physiologically very important because both products of the reaction act as a second messenger; diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C and IP3 stimulates calcium release from Intracellular stores.

  10. A homeodomain protein binds to. gamma. -globin gene regulatory sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavelle, D.; Ducksworth, J.; Eves, E.; Gomes, G.; Keller, M.; Heller, P.; DeSimone, J. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (United States) Veterans Administration Westside Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1991-08-15

    Developmental regulation of {gamma}-globin gene expression probably occurs through developmental-stage-specific trans-acting factors able to promote the interaction of enhancer elements located in the far upstream locus control region with regulatory elements in the {gamma} gene promoters and 3{prime}{sup A}{gamma} enhancer located in close proximity to the genes. The authors have detected a nuclear protein in K562 and baboon fetal bone marrow nuclear extracts capable of binding to A+T-rich sequences in the locus control region, {gamma} gene promoter, and 3{prime} {sup A}{gamma} enhancer. SDS/polyacrylamide gel analysis of the purified K562 binding activity revealed a single protein of 87 kDa. A K562 cDNA clone was isolated encoding a {beta}-galactosidase fusion protein with a DNA binding specificity identical to that of the K562/fetal bone marrow nuclear protein. The cDNA clone encodes a homeodomain homologous to the Drosophila antennapedia protein.

  11. Comparative study of methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ropers H Hilger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation at CpG dinucleotides in genomic DNA is a fundamental epigenetic mechanism of gene expression control in vertebrates. Proteins with a methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD can bind to single methylated CpGs and most of them are involved in transcription control. So far, five vertebrate MBD proteins have been described as MBD family members: MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, MBD4 and MECP2. Results We performed database searches for new proteins containing an MBD and identified six amino acid sequences which are different from the previously described ones. Here we present a comparison of their MBD sequences, additional protein motifs and the expression of the encoding genes. A calculated unrooted dendrogram indicates the existence of at least four different groups of MBDs within these proteins. Two of these polypeptides, KIAA1461 and KIAA1887, were only present as predicted amino acid sequences based on a partial human cDNA. We investigated their expression by Northern blot analysis and found transcripts of ~8 kb and ~5 kb respectively, in all eight normal tissues studied. Conclusions Eleven polypeptides with a MBD could be identified in mouse and man. The analysis of protein domains suggests a role in transcriptional regulation for most of them. The knowledge of additional existing MBD proteins and their expression pattern is important in the context of Rett syndrome.

  12. Polyamine binding to proteins in oat and Petunia protoplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Y.; Applewhite, P. B.; Galston, A. W.

    1989-01-01

    Previous work (A Apelbaum et al. [1988] Plant Physiol 88: 996-998) has demonstrated binding of labeled spermidine (Spd) to a developmentally regulated 18 kilodalton protein in tobacco tissue cultures derived from thin surface layer explants. To assess the general importance of such Spd-protein complexes, we attempted bulk isolation from protoplasts of Petunia and oat (Avena sativa). In Petunia, as in tobacco, fed radioactive Spd is bound to protein, but in oat, Spd is first converted to 1,3,-diaminopropane (DAP), probably by polyamine oxidase action. In oat, binding of DAP to protein depends on age of donor leaf and conditions of illumination and temperature, and the extraction of the DAP-protein complex depends upon buffer and pH. The yield of the DAP-protein complex was maximized by extraction of frozen-thawed protoplasts with a pH 8.8 carbonate buffer containing SDS. Its molecular size, based on Sephacryl column fractionation of ammonium sulfate precipitated material, exceeded 45 kilodaltons. Bound Spd or DAP can be released from their complexes by the action of Pronase, but not DNAse, RNAse, or strong salt solutions, indicating covalent attachment to protein.

  13. Arabidopsis Pumilio protein APUM5 suppresses Cucumber mosaic virus infection via direct binding of viral RNAs

    OpenAIRE

    Huh, Sung Un; Kim, Min Jung; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Posttranscriptional/translational regulation of gene expression is mediated by diverse RNA binding proteins and plays an important role in development and defense processes. Among the RNA-binding proteins, the mammalian Pumilio RNA-binding family (Puf) acts as posttranscriptional and translational repressors. An Arabidopsis Puf mutant, apum5-D, was isolated during a T-DNA insertional mutant screen for mutants with reduced susceptibility to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) infection. Interestingly,...

  14. Mechanochemical regulations of RPA's binding to ssDNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Le, Shimin; Basu, Anindita; Chazin, Walter J.; Yan, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a ubiquitous eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein that serves to protect ssDNA from degradation and annealing, and as a template for recruitment of many downstream factors in virtually all DNA transactions in cell. During many of these transactions, DNA is tethered and is likely subject to force. Previous studies of RPA's binding behavior on ssDNA were conducted in the absence of force; therefore the RPA-ssDNA conformations regulated by force remain unclear. Here, using a combination of atomic force microscopy imaging and mechanical manipulation of single ssDNA tethers, we show that force mediates a switch of the RPA bound ssDNA from amorphous aggregation to a much more regular extended conformation. Further, we found an interesting non-monotonic dependence of the binding affinity on monovalent salt concentration in the presence of force. In addition, we discovered that zinc in micromolar concentrations drives ssDNA to a unique, highly stiff and more compact state. These results provide new mechanochemical insights into the influences and the mechanisms of action of RPA on large single ssDNA.

  15. Protein and ligand adaptation in a retinoic acid binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanayek, R.; Newcomer, M E

    1999-01-01

    A retinoic acid binding protein isolated from the lumen of the rat epididymis (ERABP) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily. ERABP binds both the all-trans and 9-cis isomers of retinoic acid, as well as the synthetic retinoid (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8)-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2 napthalenyl-1 propenyl]-benzoic acid (TTNPB), a structural analog of all-trans retinoic acid. The structure of ERABP with a mixture of all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid has previously been reported. To elucidate any ...

  16. Dissection of the Critical Binding Determinants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II by Mutagenesis and Fluorescence Binding Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Vasileiou, Chrysoula; Lee, Kin Sing Stephen; Crist, Rachael M.; Vaezeslami, Soheila; Goins, Sarah M.; Geiger, James H.; Borhan, Babak

    2009-01-01

    The binding of retinoic acid to mutants of Cellular Retinoic Acid Binding Protein II (CRABPII) was evaluated to better understand the importance of the direct protein/ligand interactions. The important role of Arg111 for the correct structure and function of the protein was verified and other residues that directly affect retinoic acid binding have been identified. Furthermore, retinoic acid binding to CRABPII mutants that lack all previously identified interacting amino acids was rescued by ...

  17. Changes in GDP binding to brown adipose tissue mitochondria and the uncoupling protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation in vitro of brown adipose tissue (BAT) mitochondria with divalent cations, spermine, or alkaline phosphatase led to a marked increase in the binding of [3H]GDP. The effect of Mg2+ appeared to be the most specific and led to the largest increase in GDP binding. A simplified method was developed for measuring GDP binding to purified uncoupling protein from rat BAT mitochondria. Application of this method indicates that uncoupling protein from cold-acclimated rats binds twice as much GDP as uncoupling protein from cold-acclimated rats that were briefly returned to thermoneutrality, paralleling changes in GDP binding to the mitochondria. Incubation of BAT mitochondria with Mg2+ led to a smaller increase in GDP binding to the subsequently purified uncoupling protein, suggesting that divalent cations may somehow participate in the regulation of the activity of the uncoupling protein

  18. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  19. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  20. Regulation of ryanodine receptor RyR2 by protein-protein interactions: prediction of a PKA binding site on the N-terminal domain of RyR2 and its relation to disease causing mutations [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4tw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Nazan Walpoth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are the key processes responsible for signaling and function in complex networks. Determining the correct binding partners and predicting the ligand binding sites in the absence of experimental data require predictive models. Hybrid models that combine quantitative atomistic calculations with statistical thermodynamics formulations are valuable tools for bioinformatics predictions. We present a hybrid prediction and analysis model for determining putative binding partners and interpreting the resulting correlations in the yet functionally uncharacterized interactions of the ryanodine RyR2 N-terminal domain. Using extensive docking calculations and libraries of hexameric peptides generated from regulator proteins of the RyR2 channel, we show that the residues 318-323 of protein kinase A, PKA, have a very high affinity for the N-terminal of RyR2. Using a coarse grained Elastic Net Model, we show that the binding site lies at the end of a pathway of evolutionarily conserved residues in RyR2. The two disease causing mutations are also on this path. The program for the prediction of the energetically responsive residues by the Elastic Net Model is freely available on request from the corresponding author.

  1. Regulation of the myeloperoxidase enhancer binding proteins Pu1, C-EBP alpha, -beta, and -delta during granulocyte-lineage specification.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, A M; Bennett, C.A; Healy, L E; TOWATARI, M.; Greaves, M F; Enver, T

    1996-01-01

    We have compared the molecular architecture and function of the myeloperoxidase upstream enhancer in multipotential versus granulocyte-committed hematopoietic progenitor cells. We show that the enhancer is accessible in multipotential cell chromatin but functionally incompetent before granulocyte commitment. Multipotential cells contain both Pu1 and C-EBP alpha as enhancer-binding activities. Pu1 is unphosphorylated in both multipotential and granulocyte-committed cells but is phosphorylated ...

  2. Arabidopsis Pumilio protein APUM5 suppresses Cucumber mosaic virus infection via direct binding of viral RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Sung Un; Kim, Min Jung; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Posttranscriptional/translational regulation of gene expression is mediated by diverse RNA binding proteins and plays an important role in development and defense processes. Among the RNA-binding proteins, the mammalian Pumilio RNA-binding family (Puf) acts as posttranscriptional and translational repressors. An Arabidopsis Puf mutant, apum5-D, was isolated during a T-DNA insertional mutant screen for mutants with reduced susceptibility to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) infection. Interestingly, CMV RNA contained putative Pumilio-homology domain binding motifs in its 3' untranslated region (UTR) and internal places in its genome. APUM5 directly bound to the 3' UTR motifs and some internal binding motifs in CMV RNAs in vitro and in vivo. We showed that APUM5 acts as a translational repressor that regulates the 3' UTR of CMV and affects CMV replication. This study uncovered a unique defense system that Arabidopsis APUM5 specifically regulates CMV infection by the direct binding of CMV RNAs. PMID:23269841

  3. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP) transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  4. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Iglesias-Bexiga

    Full Text Available YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling.

  5. Protein kinase A binds and activates heat shock factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Murshid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible transcription factors are regulated through batteries of posttranslational modifications that couple their activity to inducing stimuli. We have studied such regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, a key protein in control of the heat shock response, and a participant in carcinogenisis, neurological health and aging. As the mechanisms involved in the intracellular regulation of HSF1 in good health and its dysregulation in disease are still incomplete we are investigating the role of posttranslational modifications in such regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a proteomic study of HSF1 binding partners, we have discovered its association with the pleiotropic protein kinase A (PKA. HSF1 binds avidly to the catalytic subunit of PKA, (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on a novel serine phosphorylation site within its central regulatory domain (serine 320 or S320, both in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular PKAcα levels and phosphorylation of HSF1 at S320 were both required for HSF1 to be localized to the nucleus, bind to response elements in the promoter of an HSF1 target gene (hsp70.1 and activate hsp70.1 after stress. Reduction in PKAcα levels by small hairpin RNA led to HSF1 exclusion from the nucleus, its exodus from the hsp70.1 promoter and decreased hsp70.1 transcription. Likewise, null mutation of HSF1 at S320 by alanine substitution for serine led to an HSF1 species excluded from the nucleus and deficient in hsp70.1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings of PKA regulation of HSF1 through S320 phosphorylation add to our knowledge of the signaling networks converging on this factor and may contribute to elucidating its complex roles in the stress response and understanding HSF1 dysregulation in disease.

  6. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  7. Interaction between the poly(A)-binding protein Pab1 and the eukaryotic release factor eRF3 regulates translation termination but not mRNA decay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Sylvain; Cerciat, Marie; Gaugué, Isabelle; Mora, Liliana; Floch, Aurélie G; de Zamaroczy, Miklos; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; Kervestin, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic release factor 3 (eRF3) is implicated in translation termination and also interacts with the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP, Pab1 in yeast), a major player in mRNA metabolism. Despite conservation of this interaction, its precise function remains elusive. First, we showed experimentally that yeast eRF3 does not contain any obvious consensus PAM2 (PABP-interacting motif 2). Thus, in yeast this association is different from the well described interaction between the metazoan factors. To gain insight into the exact function of this interaction, we then analyzed the phenotypes resulting from deleting the respective binding domains. Deletion of the Pab1 interaction domain on eRF3 did not affect general mRNA stability or nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway and induced a decrease in translational readthrough. Furthermore, combined deletions of the respective interacting domains on eRF3 and on Pab1 were viable, did not affect Pab1 function in mRNA stability and harbored an antisuppression phenotype. Our results show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the role of the Pab1 C-terminal domain in mRNA stability is independent of eRF3 and the association of these two factors negatively regulates translation termination. PMID:25411355

  8. Novel RNA-binding properties of the MTG chromatin regulatory proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Rossetti (Stefano); L. van Unen (Leontine); N. Sacchi; A.T. Hoogeveen (Andre)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The myeloid translocation gene (MTG) proteins are non-DNA-binding transcriptional regulators capable of interacting with chromatin modifying proteins. As a consequence of leukemia-associated chromosomal translocations, two of the MTG proteins, MTG8 and MTG16, are fused to the

  9. Arabidopsis chloroplast chaperonin 10 is a calmodulin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium regulates diverse cellular activities in plants through the action of calmodulin (CaM). By using (35)S-labeled CaM to screen an Arabidopsis seedling cDNA expression library, a cDNA designated as AtCh-CPN10 (Arabidopsis thaliana chloroplast chaperonin 10) was cloned. Chloroplast CPN10, a nuclear-encoded protein, is a functional homolog of E. coli GroES. It is believed that CPN60 and CPN10 are involved in the assembly of Rubisco, a key enzyme involved in the photosynthetic pathway. Northern analysis revealed that AtCh-CPN10 is highly expressed in green tissues. The recombinant AtCh-CPN10 binds to CaM in a calcium-dependent manner. Deletion mutants revealed that there is only one CaM-binding site in the last 31 amino acids of the AtCh-CPN10 at the C-terminal end. The CaM-binding region in AtCh-CPN10 has higher homology to other chloroplast CPN10s in comparison to GroES and mitochondrial CPN10s, suggesting that CaM may only bind to chloroplast CPN10s. Furthermore, the results also suggest that the calcium/CaM messenger system is involved in regulating Rubisco assembly in the chloroplast, thereby influencing photosynthesis. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  10. Isolation of a Thiamine-binding Protein from Rice Germ and Distribution of Similar Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, M; Yoshida, T; Toda, T; Iwashima, A; Mitsunaga, T

    1996-01-01

    A thiamine-binding protein was purified from rice germ (Oryza sativa L.) by extraction, salting-out with ammonium sulfate, and column chromatography. From the results of molecular mass, Kd and Bmax values for thiamine-binding, binding specificity for thiamine phosphates and analog, the protein was suggested to be identical to the thiamine-binding protein in rice bran. The thiamine-binding protein w as more efficiently purified from rice germ than from rice bran. The protein was rich in glutamic acid (and/or glutamine) and glycine. The protein did not show immunological similarity to thiamine-binding proteins in buckwheat and sesame seeds. However proteins similar to the thiamine-binding protein from rice germ existed in gramineous seeds. They were suggested to have thiamine-binding activity and to be of the same molecular mass as the thiamine-binding protein. PMID:27299548

  11. Identification of Treponema pallidum penicillin-binding proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, T M; Miller, J N; Lovett, M A

    1987-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins of 180, 89, 80, 68, 61, 41, and 38 kilodaltons were identified in Treponema pallidum (Nichols) by their covalent binding of [35S]benzylpenicillin. Penicillin-binding proteins are localized in the plasma membranes of many bacterial species and may serve as useful markers for determining plasma membrane intactness in T. pallidum fractionation studies.

  12. The human fatty acid-binding protein family: Evolutionary divergences and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smathers Rebecca L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are members of the intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP family and are involved in reversibly binding intracellular hydrophobic ligands and trafficking them throughout cellular compartments, including the peroxisomes, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. FABPs are small, structurally conserved cytosolic proteins consisting of a water-filled, interior-binding pocket surrounded by ten anti-parallel beta sheets, forming a beta barrel. At the superior surface, two alpha-helices cap the pocket and are thought to regulate binding. FABPs have broad specificity, including the ability to bind long-chain (C16-C20 fatty acids, eicosanoids, bile salts and peroxisome proliferators. FABPs demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation and are present in a spectrum of species including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, mouse and human. The human genome consists of nine putatively functional protein-coding FABP genes. The most recently identified family member, FABP12, has been less studied.

  13. sarA negatively regulates Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation by modulating expression of 1 MDa extracellular matrix binding protein and autolysis‐dependent release of eDNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christner, Martin; Heinze, Constanze; Busch, Michael;

    2012-01-01

    biofilm formation in mutant 1585ΔsarA. Increased eDNA amounts indirectly resulted from upregulation of metalloprotease SepA, leading to boosted processing of autolysin AtlE, in turn inducing augmented autolysis and release of eDNA. Hence, this study identifies sarA as a negative regulator of Embp‐ and e...

  14. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA) identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51) regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Yuan, Yongze; Wu, Zhi; Li, Na; Chen, Yuanlei; Qin, Tingting; Geng, Hui; Xiong, Li; Liu, Deli

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014) at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH) leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA) in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6) by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA). A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression. PMID:25699519

  15. A novel sterol regulatory element-binding protein gene (sreA identified in penicillium digitatum is required for prochloraz resistance, full virulence and erg11 (cyp51 regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    Full Text Available Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved domain of unknown function (DUF2014 at its carboxyl terminus and a helix-loop-helix (HLH leucine zipper DNA binding domain at its amino terminus, domains that are functionally associated with SREBP transcription factors. The deletion of sreA (ΔsreA in a prochloraz-resistant strain (PdHS-F6 by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation led to increased susceptibility to prochloraz and a significantly lower EC50 value compared with the HS-F6 wild-type or complementation strain (COsreA. A virulence assay showed that the ΔsreA strain was defective in virulence towards citrus fruits, while the complementation of sreA could restore the virulence to a large extent. Further analysis by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that prochloraz-induced expression of cyp51A and cyp51B in PdHS-F6 was completely abolished in the ΔsreA strain. These results demonstrate that sreA is a critical transcription factor gene required for prochloraz resistance and full virulence in P. digitatum and is involved in the regulation of cyp51 expression.

  16. The local expression and abundance of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding proteins in skeletal muscle are regulated by age and gender but not local IGF-I in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, William T; Rosenberger, Judy; Lopez, Rusmely; Gomez, Adam; Cummings, Kathleen K; Fiorotto, Marta L

    2005-12-01

    We wished to determine whether sustained IGF-I production in skeletal muscle increases local IGF binding protein (IGFBP) abundance, thereby mitigating the long-term stimulation of muscle growth by IGF-I. Muscle growth of transgenic mice that overexpress IGF-I in muscle (SIS2) and of wild-type (Wt) mice was compared. At 3, 5, 10, and 20 wk of age, hind-limb muscle weights and IGFBP-3, -4, -5, and -6 mRNA and protein abundances were quantified. Additional mice were injected with IGF-I or LR3-IGF-I, and phosphorylation of the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) was compared. Muscle mass was 20% greater in SIS2 compared with Wt mice by 10 wk of age (P LR3-IGF-I stimulated IGF-1R phosphorylation to a greater extent than IGF-I at both 5 and 10 wk of age (P 0.21). Thus, variations in local IGF-I levels do not appear to regulate muscle IGFBP expression. The age- and gender-specific differences in muscle IGFBP expression are not sufficient to alter the response of the muscle to the IGFs but may impact the IGF-independent effects of these IGFBPs. PMID:16166219

  17. The Cobalamin-binding Protein in Zebrafish is an Intermediate Between the Three Cobalamin-binding Proteins in Human

    OpenAIRE

    Greibe, Eva Holm; Fedosov, Sergey; Nexø, Ebba

    2012-01-01

    In humans, three soluble extracellular cobalamin-binding proteins; transcobalamin (TC), intrinsic factor (IF), and haptocorrin (HC), are involved in the uptake and transport of cobalamin. In this study, we investigate a cobalamin-binding protein from zebrafish (Danio rerio) and summarize current knowledge concerning the phylogenetic evolution of kindred proteins. We identified a cobalamin binding capacity in zebrafish protein extracts (8.2 pmol/fish) and ambient water (13.5 pmol/fish) associa...

  18. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of interphase and mitotic 14-3-3-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meek, Sarah E M; Lane, William S; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2004-07-30

    14-3-3 proteins regulate the cell division cycle and play a pivotal role in blocking cell cycle advancement after activation of the DNA replication and DNA damage checkpoints. Here we describe a global proteomics analysis to identify proteins that bind to 14-3-3s during interphase and mitosis. 14-3-3-binding proteins were purified from extracts of interphase and mitotic HeLa cells using specific peptide elution from 14-3-3 zeta affinity columns. Proteins that specifically bound and eluted from the affinity columns were identified by microcapillary high pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Several known and novel 14-3-3-interacting proteins were identified in this screen. Identified proteins are involved in cell cycle regulation, signaling, metabolism, protein synthesis, nucleic acid binding, chromatin structure, protein folding, proteolysis, nucleolar function, and nuclear transport as well as several other cellular processes. In some cases 14-3-3 binding was cell cycle-dependent, whereas in other cases the binding was shown to be cell cycle-independent. This study adds to the growing list of human 14-3-3-binding proteins and implicates a role for 14-3-3 proteins in a plethora of essential biological processes. PMID:15161933

  19. Nutritional and hormonal regulation of the TOR effector 4E-binding protein (4E-BP) in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Saurabh G.; Raikhel, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Mosquitoes require blood for egg development, and, as a consequence, they transmit pathogens of devastating diseases. Target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling is a key pathway linking blood feeding and egg development in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. We show that the regulation of the TOR effector translational repressor 4E-BP is finely tuned to the nutritional requirements of the female mosquito, and it occurs at transcriptional and post-translational levels. Immediately after blood feeding, 4E-BP ...

  20. IL-6 cooperates with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-ligands to induce liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) up-regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Vida, Margarita; Serrano, Antonia; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Pavón, Francisco J.; González-Rodriguez, Águeda; Gavito, Ana L.; Cuesta, Antonio L.; Valverde, Ángela M.; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Baixeras, Elena

    2013-01-01

    [Background]: LFABP plays a critical role in the uptake and intracellular transport of fatty acids (FA) and other peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) ligands. PPARα activation by PPARα ligands bound to LFABP results in gene expression of FA oxidation enzymes and de novo LFABP. The cytokine IL-6 is involved in regulating liver lipid oxidation. [Aims]: To study the ability of IL-6 to modulate the expression of the LFABP in hepatocytes. Methods: HepG2 and mouse primary hepat...

  1. Glycan masking of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein for probing protein binding function and vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowmya Sampath

    Full Text Available Glycan masking is an emerging vaccine design strategy to focus antibody responses to specific epitopes, but it has mostly been evaluated on the already heavily glycosylated HIV gp120 envelope glycoprotein. Here this approach was used to investigate the binding interaction of Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP and the Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC and to evaluate if glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens would focus the antibody response on key interaction surfaces. Four variants of PVDBPII were generated and probed for function and immunogenicity. Whereas two PvDBPII glycosylation variants with increased glycan surface coverage distant from predicted interaction sites had equivalent binding activity to wild-type protein, one of them elicited slightly better DARC-binding-inhibitory activity than wild-type immunogen. Conversely, the addition of an N-glycosylation site adjacent to a predicted PvDBP interaction site both abolished its interaction with DARC and resulted in weaker inhibitory antibody responses. PvDBP is composed of three subdomains and is thought to function as a dimer; a meta-analysis of published PvDBP mutants and the new DBPII glycosylation variants indicates that critical DARC binding residues are concentrated at the dimer interface and along a relatively flat surface spanning portions of two subdomains. Our findings suggest that DARC-binding-inhibitory antibody epitope(s lie close to the predicted DARC interaction site, and that addition of N-glycan sites distant from this site may augment inhibitory antibodies. Thus, glycan resurfacing is an attractive and feasible tool to investigate protein structure-function, and glycan-masked PvDBPII immunogens might contribute to P. vivax vaccine development.

  2. Allosteric coupling from G protein to the agonist-binding pocket in GPCRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVree, Brian T; Mahoney, Jacob P; Vélez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; Rasmussen, Soren G F; Kuszak, Adam J; Edwald, Elin; Fung, Juan-Jose; Manglik, Aashish; Masureel, Matthieu; Du, Yang; Matt, Rachel A; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K; Sunahara, Roger K

    2016-07-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain the primary conduit by which cells detect environmental stimuli and communicate with each other. Upon activation by extracellular agonists, these seven-transmembrane-domain-containing receptors interact with heterotrimeric G proteins to regulate downstream second messenger and/or protein kinase cascades. Crystallographic evidence from a prototypic GPCR, the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), in complex with its cognate G protein, Gs, has provided a model for how agonist binding promotes conformational changes that propagate through the GPCR and into the nucleotide-binding pocket of the G protein α-subunit to catalyse GDP release, the key step required for GTP binding and activation of G proteins. The structure also offers hints about how G-protein binding may, in turn, allosterically influence ligand binding. Here we provide functional evidence that G-protein coupling to the β2AR stabilizes a ‘closed’ receptor conformation characterized by restricted access to and egress from the hormone-binding site. Surprisingly, the effects of G protein on the hormone-binding site can be observed in the absence of a bound agonist, where G-protein coupling driven by basal receptor activity impedes the association of agonists, partial agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. The ability of bound ligands to dissociate from the receptor is also hindered, providing a structural explanation for the G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity, which has been observed for many GPCR–G-protein pairs. Our data also indicate that, in contrast to agonist binding alone, coupling of a G protein in the absence of an agonist stabilizes large structural changes in a GPCR. The effects of nucleotide-free G protein on ligand-binding kinetics are shared by other members of the superfamily of GPCRs, suggesting that a common mechanism may underlie G-protein-mediated enhancement of agonist affinity. PMID:27362234

  3. STRUCTURAL FEATURES OF PLANT CHITINASES AND CHITIN-BINDING PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    Structural features of plant chitinases and chitin-binding proteins are discussed. Many of these proteins consist of multiple domains,of which the chitin-binding hevein domain is a predominant one. X-ray and NMR structures of representatives of the major classes of these proteins are available now,

  4. The MTA family proteins as novel histone H3 binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Meng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex (Mi2/NRD/NuRD/NURD has a broad role in regulation of transcription, DNA repair and cell cycle. Previous studies have revealed a specific interaction between NURD and histone H3N-terminal tail in vitro that is not observed for another HDAC1/2-containing complex, Sin3A. However, the subunit(s responsible for specific binding of H3 by NURD has not been defined. Results In this study, we show among several class I HDAC-containing corepressor complexes only NURD exhibits a substantial H3 tail-binding activity in vitro. We present the evidence that the MTA family proteins within the NURD complex interact directly with H3 tail. Extensive in vitro binding assays mapped the H3 tail-binding domain to the C-terminal region of MTA1 and MTA2. Significantly, although the MTA1 and MTA2 mutant proteins with deletion of the C-terminal H3 tail binding domain were assembled into the endogenous NURD complex when expressed in mammalian cells, the resulting NURD complexes were deficient in binding H3 tail in vitro, indicating that the MTA family proteins are required for the observed specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD in vitro. However, chromatin fractionation experiments show that the NURD complexes with impaired MTA1/2-H3 tail binding activity remained to be associated with chromatin in cells. Conclusions Together our study reveals a novel histone H3-binding activity for the MTA family proteins and provides evidence that the MTA family proteins mediate the in vitro specific binding of H3 tail peptide by NURD complex. However, multiple mechanisms are likely to contribute to the chromatin association of NURD complex in cells. Our finding also raises the possibility that the MTA family proteins may exert their diverse biological functions at least in part through their direct interaction with H3 tail.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 is a marker for antiestrogen resistant human breast cancer cell lines but is not a major growth regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker-Jensen, A; Lykkesfeldt, A E; Worm, J;

    2006-01-01

    Antiestrogens target the estrogen receptor and counteract the growth stimulatory action of estrogen on human breast cancer. However, acquired resistance to antiestrogens is a major clinical problem in endocrine treatment of breast cancer patients. To mimic acquired resistance, we have used a mode...... resistant cell growth was observed. Thus, we were able to establish IGFBP-2 as a marker for antiestrogen resistant breast cancer cell lines, although IGFBP-2 was not a major contributor to the resistant cell growth.......Antiestrogens target the estrogen receptor and counteract the growth stimulatory action of estrogen on human breast cancer. However, acquired resistance to antiestrogens is a major clinical problem in endocrine treatment of breast cancer patients. To mimic acquired resistance, we have used a model...... system with the antiestrogen sensitive human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and several antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from the parental MCF-7 cell line. This model system was used to study the expression and possible involvement in resistant cell growth of insulin-like growth factor binding...

  6. Untersuchungen zur Regulation des Natrium-Iodid-Symporters (NIS)und der Thyreoperoxidase (TPO) durch die sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs)

    OpenAIRE

    Rauer, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Eine Dysfunktion des Natrium-Iodid-Symporters (NIS) oder der Thyreoperoxidase (TPO) führen zu einer beeinträchtigten Synthese der Schilddrüsenhormone, aus der das klinische Bild der Hypothyreose hervorgeht. Transkriptionell reguliert werden die Gene des NIS und der TPO primär über das Thyreotropin (TSH, Thyreoidea stimulierendes Hormon), jedoch mehren sich die Hinweise, dass die Gene des NIS und der TPO auch einer TSH-unabhängigen Regulation unterliegen. Erste Untersuchungen deuten auf eine m...

  7. ATP and AMP Mutually Influence Their Interaction with the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) at Separate Binding Sites*

    OpenAIRE

    Randak, Christoph O.; Dong, Qian; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Elcock, Adrian H.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel in the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter protein family. In the presence of ATP and physiologically relevant concentrations of AMP, CFTR exhibits adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). Previous studies suggested that the interaction of nucleotide triphosphate with CFTR at ATP-binding site 2 is required for this activity. Two other ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome protein, ...

  8. Role of Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 in virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Un Huh, Sung; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression is mediated by diverse RNA binding proteins which play important roles in development and defense processes. Pumilio/FBF (Puf) protein in mammals functions as a posttranscriptional/translational repressor by binding to the 3′ UTR regions of its target mRNAs. Previous study reported that APUM5 provides protection against CMV infection by directly binding to CMV RNAs in Arabidopsis. CMV RNAs contain putative Pumilio-binding motifs and APUM5 bound to the 3′ UTR and ...

  9. Promoter-distal RNA polymerase II binding discriminates active from inactive CCAAT/ enhancer-binding protein beta binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Daniel; Roberts, Brian S.; Carleton, Julia B.; Partridge, E. Christopher; White, Michael A.; Cohen, Barak A.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to thousands of DNA sequences in mammalian genomes, but most of these binding events appear to have no direct effect on gene expression. It is unclear why only a subset of TF bound sites are actively involved in transcriptional regulation. Moreover, the key genomic features that accurately discriminate between active and inactive TF binding events remain ambiguous. Recent studies have identified promoter-distal RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) binding at enhancer elements, suggesting that these interactions may serve as a marker for active regulatory sequences. Despite these correlative analyses, a thorough functional validation of these genomic co-occupancies is still lacking. To characterize the gene regulatory activity of DNA sequences underlying promoter-distal TF binding events that co-occur with RNAP2 and TF sites devoid of RNAP2 occupancy using a functional reporter assay, we performed cis-regulatory element sequencing (CRE-seq). We tested more than 1000 promoter-distal CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (CEBPB)-bound sites in HepG2 and K562 cells, and found that CEBPB-bound sites co-occurring with RNAP2 were more likely to exhibit enhancer activity. CEBPB-bound sites further maintained substantial cell-type specificity, indicating that local DNA sequence can accurately convey cell-type–specific regulatory information. By comparing our CRE-seq results to a comprehensive set of genome annotations, we identified a variety of genomic features that are strong predictors of regulatory element activity and cell-type–specific activity. Collectively, our functional assay results indicate that RNAP2 occupancy can be used as a key genomic marker that can distinguish active from inactive TF bound sites. PMID:26486725

  10. Cobalamin and folate binding proteins in human tumour tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, K; Bradbury, D A; Davies, J. M.; Ryrie, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    The serum of an 84 year old man with disseminated carcinoma was found to contain extremely high concentrations of cobalamin and of a cobalamin binding protein with trans-cobalamin I characteristics. Tumour tissue samples obtained at necropsy contained considerably higher concentrations of cobalamin binding protein (R-binder) than normal tissues. Tumour tissues also contained increased concentrations of specific folate binding protein. In all tissues studied a close correlation existed between...

  11. Minimalistic predictor of protein binding energy: contribution of solvation factor to protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Mo; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Murphy, Sean; Lucarelli, Dennis; Lofranco, Leo L; Feldman, Andrew; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-02-17

    It has long been known that solvation plays an important role in protein-protein interactions. Here, we use a minimalistic solvation-based model for predicting protein binding energy to estimate quantitatively the contribution of the solvation factor in protein binding. The factor is described by a simple linear combination of buried surface areas according to amino-acid types. Even without structural optimization, our minimalistic model demonstrates a predictive power comparable to more complex methods, making the proposed approach the basis for high throughput applications. Application of the model to a proteomic database shows that receptor-substrate complexes involved in signaling have lower affinities than enzyme-inhibitor and antibody-antigen complexes, and they differ by chemical compositions on interfaces. Also, we found that protein complexes with components that come from the same genes generally have lower affinities than complexes formed by proteins from different genes, but in this case the difference originates from different interface areas. The model was implemented in the software PYTHON, and the source code can be found on the Shakhnovich group webpage: http://faculty.chemistry.harvard.edu/shakhnovich/software. PMID:25692584

  12. Bile salt recognition by human liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Santambrogio, Carlo; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Grandori, Rita; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) act as intracellular carriers of lipid molecules, and play a role in global metabolism regulation. Liver FABP (L-FABP) is prominent among FABPs for its wide ligand repertoire, which includes long-chain fatty acids as well as bile acids (BAs). In this work, we performed a detailed molecular- and atomic-level analysis of the interactions established by human L-FABP with nine BAs to understand the binding specificity for this important class of cholesterol-derived metabolites. Protein-ligand complex formation was monitored using heteronuclear NMR, steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. BAs were found to interact with L-FABP with dissociation constants in the narrow range of 0.6-7 μm; however, the diverse substitution patterns of the sterol nucleus and the presence of side-chain conjugation resulted in complexes endowed with various degrees of conformational heterogeneity. Trihydroxylated BAs formed monomeric complexes in which single ligand molecules occupied similar internal binding sites, based on chemical-shift perturbation data. Analysis of NMR line shapes upon progressive addition of taurocholate indicated that the binding mechanism departed from a simple binary association equilibrium, and instead involved intermediates along the binding path. The co-linear chemical shift behavior observed for L-FABP complexes with cholate derivatives added insight into conformational dynamics in the presence of ligands. The observed spectroscopic features of L-FABP/BA complexes, discussed in relation to ligand chemistry, suggest possible molecular determinants of recognition, with implications regarding intracellular BA transport. Our findings suggest that human L-FABP is a poorly selective, universal BA binder. PMID:25639618

  13. Interactome map uncovers phosphatidylserine transport by oxysterol-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kenji; Anand, Kanchan; Chiapparino, Antonella; Kumar, Arun; Poletto, Mattia; Kaksonen, Marko; Gavin, Anne-Claude

    2013-09-12

    The internal organization of eukaryotic cells into functionally specialized, membrane-delimited organelles of unique composition implies a need for active, regulated lipid transport. Phosphatidylserine (PS), for example, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and then preferentially associates--through mechanisms not fully elucidated--with the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Lipids can travel via transport vesicles. Alternatively, several protein families known as lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs) can extract a variety of specific lipids from biological membranes and transport them, within a hydrophobic pocket, through aqueous phases. Here we report the development of an integrated approach that combines protein fractionation and lipidomics to characterize the LTP-lipid complexes formed in vivo. We applied the procedure to 13 LTPs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: the six Sec14 homology (Sfh) proteins and the seven oxysterol-binding homology (Osh) proteins. We found that Osh6 and Osh7 have an unexpected specificity for PS. In vivo, they participate in PS homeostasis and the transport of this lipid to the plasma membrane. The structure of Osh6 bound to PS reveals unique features that are conserved among other metazoan oxysterol-binding proteins (OSBPs) and are required for PS recognition. Our findings represent the first direct evidence, to our knowledge, for the non-vesicular transfer of PS from its site of biosynthesis (the endoplasmic reticulum) to its site of biological activity (the plasma membrane). We describe a new subfamily of OSBPs, including human ORP5 and ORP10, that transfer PS and propose new mechanisms of action for a protein family that is involved in several human pathologies such as cancer, dyslipidaemia and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23934110

  14. Chronic morphine treatment up-regulates mu opioid receptor binding in cells lacking Filamin A

    OpenAIRE

    Onoprishvili, Irma; Simon, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of morphine and other agonists on the human mu opioid receptor (MOP) expressed in M2 melanoma cells, lacking the actin cytoskeleton protein filamin A and in A7, a sub clone of the M2 melanoma cells, stably transfected with filamin A cDNA. The results of binding experiments showed, that after chronic morphine treatment (24 hr) of A7 cells, MOP binding sites were down-regulated to 63% of control, whereas, unexpectedly, in M2 cells, MOP binding was up-regulated to 188...

  15. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Pyoung-Han [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho-Keun [Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentistry, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Sang-Yun [Department of Alternative Therapy, School of Alternative Medicine and Health Science, Jeonju University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dae-Yeol, E-mail: leedy@chonbuk.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Clinical Medicine, School of Medicine, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-17

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  16. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  17. Inhibition of tristetraprolin deadenylation by poly(A) binding protein

    OpenAIRE

    Rowlett, Robert M.; Chrestensen, Carol A.; Schroeder, Melanie J.; Harp, Mary G.; Pelo, Jared W.; Shabanowitz, Jeffery; DeRose, Robert; Hunt, Donald F.; Sturgill, Thomas W.; Worthington, Mark T.

    2008-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is the prototype for a family of RNA binding proteins that bind the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) messenger RNA AU-rich element (ARE), causing deadenylation of the TNF poly(A) tail, RNA decay, and silencing of TNF protein production. Using mass spectrometry sequencing we identified poly(A) binding proteins-1 and -4 (PABP1 and PABP4) in high abundance and good protein coverage from TTP immunoprecipitates. PABP1 significantly enhanced TNF ARE binding by RNA EMSA and prevente...

  18. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel; Li, Shengting; Fryland, Tue; Børglum, Anders; Bolund, Lars; Nielsen, Anders Lade

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression at...... involved in pathways at the RNA regulatory level with potential to mediate normal and disease-associated functions of the FUS and EWS proteins....

  19. Characterisation of the DNA binding domain of the yeast RAP1 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Y A; Chambers, A.; Tsang, J S; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1990-01-01

    The 827 amino acid yeast RAP1 protein interacts with DNA to regulate gene expression at numerous unrelated loci in the yeast genome. By a combination of amino, carboxy and internal deletions, we have defined an internal 235 amino acid fragment of the yeast RAP1 protein that can bind efficiently to the RAP1 binding site of the PGK Upstream Activation Sequence (UAS). This domain spans residues 361 to 596 of the full length protein and lacks any homology to the DNA binding 'zinc finger' or 'heli...

  20. Differential regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and -2 by insulin in the baboon (Papio anubis endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazleabas Asgerally T

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of insulin on expression and synthesis of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 in the baboon endometrium in vitro. Methods Baboon endometrial explants collected from cycling, ovariectomized, steroid-treated, simulated-pregnant and pregnant animals were cultured for 48 h in the presence or absence of insulin, with or without estradiol, progesterone and hCG. Results Insulin clearly inhibited IGFBP-1 production and mRNA expression in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas IGFBP-2 synthesis was not significantly affected. The inhibitory effects of insulin on IGFBP-1 were more evident in explants of non-pregnant tissue or tissue away from the implantation site. In the absence of insulin, synthesis of IGFBP-1 was induced in explants with low levels of de novo synthesis whereas IGFBP-2 synthesis was inhibited. This effect was potentiated by steroids and hCG in the explant cultures. Conclusion Insulin differentially regulates endometrial IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2 secretion in the baboon.

  1. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  2. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  3. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  4. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor. PMID:8643634

  5. Endogenous 5-HT2C Receptors Phosphorylate the cAMP Response Element Binding Protein via Protein Kinase C-Promoted Activation of Extracellular-Regulated Kinases-1/2 in Hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauffer, Lisa; Glas, Evi; Gudermann, Thomas; Breit, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    Serotonin 5-HT2C receptors (5-HT2CR) activate Gq proteins and are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). 5-HT2CR regulate emotion, feeding, reward, or cognition and may serve as promising drug targets to treat psychiatric disorders or obesity. Owing to technical difficulties in isolating cells from the CNS and the lack of suitable cell lines endogenously expressing 5-HT2CR, our knowledge about this receptor subtype in native environments is rather limited. The hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10 cell line was recently established and resembles appetite-regulating hypothalamic neurons of the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), where 5-HT2CR have been detected in vivo. Therefore, we tested mHypoA-2/10 cells for endogenous 5-HT2CR expression. Serotonin or the 5-HT2CR preferential agonist WAY-161,503 initiated cAMP response element (CRE)-dependent gene transcription with EC50 values of 15.5 ± 9.8 and 1.1 ± 0.9 nM, respectively. Both responses were blocked by two unrelated 5-HT2CR-selective antagonists (SB-242,084, RS-102,221) but not by a 5-HT2AR (EMD-281,014) or 5-HT2BR (RS-127,455) antagonists. By single-cell calcium imaging, we found that serotonin and WAY-161,503 induced robust calcium transients, which were also blunted by both 5-HT2CR antagonists. Additionally we revealed, first, that 5-HT2CR induced CRE activation via protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated engagement of extracellular-regulated kinases-1/2 and, second, that intrinsic activity of WAY-161,503 was in the range of 0.3-0.5 compared with serotonin, defining the frequently used 5-HT2CR agonist as a partial agonist of endogenous 5-HT2CR. In conclusion, we have shown that hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10 cells endogenously express 5-HT2CR and thus are the first cell line in which to analyze 5-HT2CR pharmacology, signaling, and regulation in its natural environment. PMID:27189964

  6. Gangliosides in cell recognition and membrane protein regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez, Pablo H. H.; Schnaar, Ronald L.

    2009-01-01

    Gangliosides, sialic acid-bearing glycosphingolipids, are expressed on all vertebrate cells, and are the major glycans on nerve cells. They are anchored to the plasma membrane through their ceramide lipids with their varied glycans extending into the extracellular space. Through sugar-specific interactions with glycan binding proteins on apposing cells, gangliosides function as receptors in cell-cell recognition, regulating natural killer cell cytotoxicity via Siglec-7 binding, myelin-axon in...

  7. The Membrane Receptor for Plasma Retinol Binding Protein, a New Type of Cell-Surface Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Hui; KAWAGUCHI, RIKI

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin A is essential for diverse aspects of life ranging from embryogenesis to the proper functioning of most adult organs. Its derivatives (retinoid) have potent biological activities such as regulating cell growth and differentiation. Plasma retinol binding protein (RBP) is the specific vitamin A carrier protein in the blood that binds to vitamin A with high affinity and delivers it to target organs. A large amount of evidence has accumulated over the past decades supporting the existence...

  8. Human TFDP3, a novel DP protein, inhibits DNA binding and transactivation by E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Huan; Di Stefano, Luisa; Tian, Chan;

    2006-01-01

    The two known DP proteins, TFDP1 and -2, bind E2Fs to form heterodimers essential for high affinity DNA binding and efficient transcriptional activation/repression. Here we report the identification of a new member of the DP family, human TFDP3. Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, TFDP3...... a new DP protein and a novel mechanism whereby E2F function is regulated....

  9. A rapid and simple assay for growth hormone-binding protein activity in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly discovered circulating growth hormone binding proteins dictate a re-evaluation of the state of GH in plasma in health and disease as the binding proteins are known to affect GH metabolism and action. We describe a rapid and simple GH-binding assay that allows determination of free and complexed plasma GH, as well as GH-binding protein activity as an index of GH-binding protein levels, with relative ease. The method is based on incubation of plasma with 125I-GH and separation of bound from free GH on small DEAE-cellulose columns; it can be used on a large scale for routine determinations. The results obtained by this method are comparable to those obtained with the previously used slow and more cumbersome gel filtration technique. Initial data obtained in normal subject and certain disease states show that the bound fraction of plasma GH is similar in men, women and children, is unaffected by pregnancy or acute infection, but is marginally decreased in liver cirrhosis. In acromegaly, binding protein activity also appears normal when allowance is made for partial saturation of the binding proteins by the high prevailing GH levels. The technique we describe should facilitate investigations of normal and abnormal regulation of the GH binding proteins. (author)

  10. Competitive binding of viral E2 protein and mammalian core-binding factor to transcriptional control sequences of human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, H. M.; Steger, G; Pfister, H

    1997-01-01

    The promoter P7535 of human papillomavirus type 8 and the promoter P7185 of bovine papillomavirus type 1 are negatively regulated by viral E2 proteins via the promoter proximal binding sites P2 and BS1, respectively. Mutations of these E2 binding sites can reduce basal promoter activity. This suggests binding of a transcription-stimulating factor and may indicate that repression by E2 is due to competitive binding of viral and cellular proteins. A computer search revealed putative binding sit...

  11. A novel family of katanin-like 2 protein isoforms (KATNAL2), interacting with nucleotide-binding proteins Nubp1 and Nubp2, are key regulators of different MT-based processes in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ververis, Antonis; Christodoulou, Andri; Christoforou, Maria; Kamilari, Christina; Lederer, Carsten W; Santama, Niovi

    2016-01-01

    Katanins are microtubule (MT)-severing AAA proteins with high phylogenetic conservation throughout the eukaryotes. They have been functionally implicated in processes requiring MT remodeling, such as spindle assembly in mitosis and meiosis, assembly/disassembly of flagella and cilia and neuronal morphogenesis. Here, we uncover a novel family of katanin-like 2 proteins (KATNAL2) in mouse, consisting of five alternatively spliced isoforms encoded by the Katnal2 genomic locus. We further demonstrate that in vivo these isoforms are able to interact with themselves, with each other and moreover directly and independently with MRP/MinD-type P-loop NTPases Nubp1 and Nubp2, which are integral components of centrioles, negative regulators of ciliogenesis and implicated in centriole duplication in mammalian cells. We find KATNAL2 localized on interphase MTs, centrioles, mitotic spindle, midbody and the axoneme and basal body of sensory cilia in cultured murine cells. shRNAi of Katnal2 results in inefficient cytokinesis and severe phenotypes of enlarged cells and nuclei, increased numbers of centrioles and the manifestation of aberrant multipolar mitotic spindles, mitotic defects, chromosome bridges, multinuclearity, increased MT acetylation and an altered cell cycle pattern. Silencing or stable overexpression of KATNAL2 isoforms drastically reduces ciliogenesis. In conclusion, KATNAL2s are multitasking enzymes involved in the same cell type in critically important processes affecting cytokinesis, MT dynamics, and ciliogenesis and are also implicated in cell cycle progression. PMID:26153462

  12. Rapid determination of thyroxine binding proteins of human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arima,Terukatsu

    1976-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple method is described for determing thyroxine binding proteins in human serum by electrophoresis at pH 8.6, using cellulose acetate membrane as the supporting medium. The procedure had high reliability in sera of normal subjects, pregnant women and patients with decreased thyroxine binding capacity of thyroxine binding globulin.

  13. Expression and divalent cation binding properties of the novel chemotactic inflammatory protein psoriasin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorum, H; Madsen, Peder; Rasmussen, H H;

    1996-01-01

    Psoriasin is a novel chemotactic inflammatory protein that possesses weak similarity to the S100 family members of Ca(2+)-binding proteins, and that is highly up-regulated in hyperproliferative psoriatic keratinocytes. Here we have used the psoriasin cDNA to express recombinant human (rh) psoriasin...

  14. Protein kinase Cbeta mediates hepatic induction of sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c by insulin

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhisa; Inoue, Noriyuki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Ishigaki, Naomi; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Yatoh, Shigeru; Takahashi, Akimitsu; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yahagi, Naoya; Gotoda, Takanari; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is a transcription factor that controls lipogenesis in the liver. Hepatic SREBP-1c is nutritionally regulated, and its sustained activation causes hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance. Although regulation of SREBP-1c is known to occur at the transcriptional level, the precise mechanism by which insulin signaling activates SREBP-1c promoter remains to be elucidated. Here we show that protein kinase C beta (PKCbeta) is a key mediator o...

  15. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B;

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  16. Calmodulin Binding Proteins and Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Day, Danton H.; Eshak, Kristeen; Myre, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The small, calcium-sensor protein, calmodulin, is ubiquitously expressed and central to cell function in all cell types. Here the literature linking calmodulin to Alzheimer’s disease is reviewed. Several experimentally-verified calmodulin-binding proteins are involved in the formation of amyloid-β plaques including amyloid-β protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin-1, and ADAM10. Many others possess potential calmodulin-binding domains that remain to be verified. Three calmodulin binding proteins are associated with the formation of neurofibrillary tangles: two kinases (CaMKII, CDK5) and one protein phosphatase (PP2B or calcineurin). Many of the genes recently identified by genome wide association studies and other studies encode proteins that contain putative calmodulin-binding domains but only a couple (e.g., APOE, BIN1) have been experimentally confirmed as calmodulin binding proteins. At least two receptors involved in calcium metabolism and linked to Alzheimer’s disease (mAchR; NMDAR) have also been identified as calmodulin-binding proteins. In addition to this, many proteins that are involved in other cellular events intimately associated with Alzheimer’s disease including calcium channel function, cholesterol metabolism, neuroinflammation, endocytosis, cell cycle events, and apoptosis have been tentatively or experimentally verified as calmodulin binding proteins. The use of calmodulin as a potential biomarker and as a therapeutic target is discussed. PMID:25812852

  17. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  18. Salicylic acid binds NPR3 and NPR4 to regulate NPR1-dependent defense responses

    OpenAIRE

    Moreau, Magali; Tian, Miaoying; Klessig, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is widely recognized as a key player in plant immunity. While several proteins have been previously identified as the direct targets of SA, SA-mediated plant defense signaling mechanisms remain unclear. The Nature paper from Xinnian Dong's group demonstrates that the NPR1 paralogues NPR3 and NPR4 directly bind SA, and this binding modulates their interaction with NPR1 and thereby degradation of this key positive regulator of SA-mediated defense, shedding important new insi...

  19. Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 (IGFBP-3) Blocks the Effects of Asthma by Negatively Regulating NF-κB Signaling through IGFBP-3R-mediated Activation of Caspases*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Yong-Chul; Jogie-Brahim, Sherryline; Lee, Dae-Yeol; Han, Jinfeng; Harada, Aki; Murphy, Liam J.; Oh, Youngman

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a multifunctional protein known for modulating mitogenic and metabolic actions of IGFs as well as exerting a variety of biological actions not involving IGFs. Here, we show that IGFBP-3 blocks specific physiological consequences of asthma in an IGF-independent manner in vitro and in vivo. IGFBP-3 treatment effectively reduced all physiological manifestations of asthma examined in vivo (airway hyper-responsiveness, cellular and patholog...

  20. A Novel Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein Gene (sreA) Identified in Penicillium digitatum Is Required for Prochloraz Resistance, Full Virulence and erg11 (cyp51) Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Jing Liu; Yongze Yuan; Zhi Wu; Na Li; Yuanlei Chen; Tingting Qin; Hui Geng; Li Xiong; Deli Liu

    2015-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the most destructive postharvest pathogen of citrus fruits, causing fruit decay and economic loss. Additionally, control of the disease is further complicated by the emergence of drug-resistant strains due to the extensive use of triazole antifungal drugs. In this work, an orthologus gene encoding a putative sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) was identified in the genome of P. digitatum and named sreA. The putative SreA protein contains a conserved doma...

  1. DnaT is a PriC-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Cheng-Yang

    2016-09-01

    DnaT and PriC are replication restart primosomal proteins required for re-initiating chromosomal DNA replication. DnaT is a component of the PriA-dependent primosome, while PriC belongs to the PriC-dependent primosome. Whether DnaT can interact with PriC is still unknown. In this study, we define a direct interaction between PriC, a key initiator protein in PriC-mediated DNA replication restart, and DnaT, a DnaB/C complex loader protein, from Klebsiella pneumoniae. In fluorescence titrations, PriC bound to single-stranded DNA with a binding-site size of approximately 9 nt. Gold nanoparticle assay showed that the solution of DnaT-PriC changed from red to purple, which indicated the protein-protein interactions due to gold nanoparticle aggregate. In addition, this DnaT-PriC complex could be co-purified by the heparin HP column. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that the Kd value of DnaT bound to PriC was 2.9 × 10(-8) M. These results constitute a pioneering study of the DnaT-PriC interaction and present a putative link between the two independent replication restart pathways, namely, PriA- and PriC-dependent primosome assemblies. Further research can directly focus on determining how DnaT binds to the PriC-SSB-DNA tricomplex and regulates the PriC-dependent replication restart. PMID:27387236

  2. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Selvaraj S; Jayaram B; Saranya N; Gromiha M; Fukui Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such...

  3. CD44 Binding to Hyaluronic Acid Is Redox Regulated by a Labile Disulfide Bond in the Hyaluronic Acid Binding Site

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett-Clarke, Helena; Stegmann, Monika; Barclay, A. Neil; Metcalfe, Clive

    2015-01-01

    CD44 is the primary leukocyte cell surface receptor for hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix. Enzymatic post translational cleavage of labile disulfide bonds is a mechanism by which proteins are structurally regulated by imparting an allosteric change and altering activity. We have identified one such disulfide bond in CD44 formed by Cys77 and Cys97 that stabilises the HA binding groove. This bond is labile on the surface of leukocytes treated with chemical and enzyma...

  4. Clinical relevance of drug binding to plasma proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Pallottini, Valentina; Trezza, Viviana

    2014-12-01

    Binding to plasma proteins highly influences drug efficacy, distribution, and disposition. Serum albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, is a monomeric multi-domain macromolecule that displays an extraordinary ligand binding capacity, providing a depot and carrier for many endogenous and exogenous compounds, such as fatty acids and most acidic drugs. α-1-Acid glycoprotein, the second main plasma protein, is a glycoprotein physiologically involved in the acute phase reaction and is the main carrier for basic and neutral drugs. High- and low-density lipoproteins play a limited role in drug binding and are natural drug delivery system only for few lipophilic drugs or lipid-based formulations. Several factors influence drug binding to plasma proteins, such as pathological conditions, concurrent administration of drugs, sex, and age. Any of these factors, in turn, influences drug efficacy and toxicity. Here, biochemical, biomedical, and biotechnological aspects of drug binding to plasma proteins are reviewed.

  5. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Jongerius

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH, a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp, providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups.

  6. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongerius, Ilse; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Lionel; Ruivo, Nicola; Exley, Rachel M; Caesar, Joseph J E; Lea, Susan M; Johnson, Steven; Tang, Christoph M

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH), a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp), providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp) which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups. PMID:23935503

  7. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  8. Role of Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 in virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Un Huh, Sung; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of gene expression is mediated by diverse RNA binding proteins which play important roles in development and defense processes. Pumilio/FBF (Puf) protein in mammals functions as a posttranscriptional/translational repressor by binding to the 3' UTR regions of its target mRNAs. Previous study reported that APUM5 provides protection against CMV infection by directly binding to CMV RNAs in Arabidopsis. CMV RNAs contain putative Pumilio-binding motifs and APUM5 bound to the 3' UTR and some of its internal motifs both in vitro and in vivo. APUM5 works as a negative regulator of the 3' UTR of CMV and it might regulate CMV replication. Our findings suggest that APUM5 acts as a defensive repressor in plants during CMV infection. However, functions of APUM5 and other APUM members are still not clear and more studies are needed to find out the interacting partners and target mRNAs in host plant. PMID:23511198

  9. THE LOCAL EXPRESSION AND ABUNDANCE OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR (IGF) BINDING PROTEINS IN SKELETAL MUSCLE ARE REGULATED BY AGE AND GENDER BUT NOT LOCAL IGF-I "IN VIVO"

    Science.gov (United States)

    We wished to determine whether sustained IGF-I production in skeletal muscle increases local IGF binding protein (IGFBP) abundance, thereby mitigating the long-term stimulation of muscle growth by IGF-I. Muscle growth of transgenic mice that overexpress IGF-I in muscle (SIS2) and of wild-type (Wt) m...

  10. Auxin binding proteins ABP1 and ABP4 are involved in the light- and auxin-induced down-regulation of phytochrome gene PHYB in maize (Zea mays L.) mesocotyl

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bořucká, Jana; Fellner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 3 (2012), s. 503-509. ISSN 0167-6903 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05ME792 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Auxin binding protein * ABP1 * ABP4 Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.670, year: 2012

  11. Posttranscriptional control of the hypoxic response by RNA-binding proteins and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam eGorospe

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian gene expression patterns change profoundly in response to low oxygen levels. These changes in gene expression programs are strongly influenced by post-transcriptional mechanisms mediated by mRNA-binding factors: RNA-binding proteins (RBPs and microRNAs (miRNAs. Here, we review the RBPs and miRNAs that modulate mRNA turnover and translation in response to hypoxic challenge. RBPs such as HuR (human antigen R, PTB (polypyrimidine tract-binding protein, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs, tristetraprolin, nucleolin, iron-response element binding proteins (IRPs, and cytoplasmic polyadenylation-element-binding proteins (CPEBs, selectively bind to numerous hypoxia-regulated transcripts and play a major role in establishing hypoxic gene expression patterns. MiRNAs including miR-210, miR-373, and miR-21 associate with hypoxia-regulated transcripts and further modulate the levels of the encoded proteins to implement the hypoxic gene expression profile. We discuss the potent regulation of hypoxic gene expression by RBPs and miRNAs and their integrated actions in the cellular hypoxic response.

  12. Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding in chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Statistical-mechanical lattice models for protein-DNA binding are well established as a method to describe complex ligand binding equilibria measured in vitro with purified DNA and protein components. Recently, a new field of applications has opened up for this approach since it has become possible to experimentally quantify genome-wide protein occupancies in relation to the DNA sequence. In particular, the organization of the eukaryotic genome by histone proteins into a nucleoprotein complex termed chromatin has been recognized as a key parameter that controls the access of transcription factors to the DNA sequence. New approaches have to be developed to derive statistical-mechanical lattice descriptions of chromatin-associated protein-DNA interactions. Here, we present the theoretical framework for lattice models of histone-DNA interactions in chromatin and investigate the (competitive) DNA binding of other chromosomal proteins and transcription factors. The results have a number of applications for quantitative models for the regulation of gene expression.

  13. Concentration-dependent Cu(II) binding to prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2008-03-01

    The prion protein plays a causative role in several neurodegenerative diseases, including mad cow disease in cattle and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The normal function of the prion protein is unknown, but it has been linked to its ability to bind copper ions. Experimental evidence suggests that copper can be bound in three distinct modes depending on its concentration, but only one of those binding modes has been fully characterized experimentally. Using a newly developed hybrid DFT/DFT method [1], which combines Kohn-Sham DFT with orbital-free DFT, we have examined all the binding modes and obtained their detailed binding geometries and copper ion binding energies. Our results also provide explanation for experiments, which have found that when the copper concentration increases the copper binding mode changes, surprisingly, from a stronger to a weaker one. Overall, our results indicate that prion protein can function as a copper buffer. 1. Hodak, Lu, Bernholc, JCP, in press.

  14. Pumilio Puf domain RNA-binding proteins in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasi, Nazia; Park, Youn-Il; Choi, Sang-Bong

    2011-01-01

    Pumilio proteins are a class of RNA-binding proteins harboring Puf domains (or PUM-HD; Pumilio-Homology Domain), named after the founding members, Pumilio (from Drosophila melanogaster) and FBF (Fem-3 mRNA-Binding Factor from Caenorhabditis elegans). The domains contain multiple tandem repeats each of which recognizes one RNA base and is comprised of 35–39 amino acids. Puf domain proteins have been reported in organisms ranging from single-celled yeast to higher multicellular eukaryotes, such...

  15. Grafting odorant binding proteins on diamond bio-MEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Manai, Raafa; Scorsone, E.; Rousseau, L.; Ghassemi, F.; Possas Abreu, M.; Lissorgues, G.; Tremillon, N.; Ginisty, H; Arnault, J.-C.; Tuccori, E.; Bernabei, M.; Cali, K.; Persaud, K C; Bergonzo, P.

    2014-01-01

    Odorant binding proteins (OBPs) are small soluble proteins found in olfactory systems that are capable of binding several types of odorant molecules. Cantilevers based on polycrystalline diamond surfaces are very promising as chemical transducers. Here two methods were investigated for chemically grafting porcine OBPs on polycrystalline diamond surfaces for biosensor development. The first approach resulted in random orientation of the immobilized proteins over the surface. The second approac...

  16. The clinical significance of fatty acid binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Choromańska; Piotr Myśliwiec; Jacek Dadan; Hady Razak Hady; Adrian Chabowski

    2011-01-01

    Excessive levels of free fatty acids are toxic to cells. The human body has evolved a defense mechanism in the form of small cytoplasmic proteins called fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) that bind long-chain fatty acids (LCFA), and then refer them to appropriate intracellular disposal sites (oxidation in mitochondria and peroxisomes or storage in the endoplasmic reticulum). So far, nine types of these proteins have been described, and their name refers to the place in which they were first ...

  17. Identification of poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a target protein of immunosuppressive agent 15-deoxyspergualin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murahashi, Masataka; Simizu, Siro; Morioka, Masahiko; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2016-08-01

    15-Deoxyspergualin (DSG) is an immunosuppressive agent being clinically used. Unlike tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, it does not inhibit the calcineurin pathway, and its mechanism of action and target molecule have not been elucidated. Therefore, we previously prepared biotinylated derivative of DSG (BDSG) to fish up the target protein. In the present research, we identified poly(rC) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a DSG-binding protein using this probe. DSG was confirmed to bind to PCBP2 by pull-down assay. Intracellular localization of PCBP2 was changed from the nucleus to the cytoplasm by DSG treatment. DSG inhibited the cell growth, and over-expression of PCBP2 reduced the anti-proliferative activity of DSG. PCBP2 is known to regulate various proteins including STAT1/2. Thus, we found PCBP2 as the first target protein of DSG that can explain the immunosuppressive activity. PMID:27261432

  18. Cooperative binding modes of Cu(II) in prion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodak, Miroslav; Chisnell, Robin; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, Jerry

    2007-03-01

    The misfolding of the prion protein, PrP, is responsible for a group of neurodegenerative diseases including mad cow disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. It is known that the PrP can efficiently bind copper ions; four high-affinity binding sites located in the octarepeat region of PrP are now well known. Recent experiments suggest that at low copper concentrations new binding modes, in which one copper ion is shared between two or more binding sites, are possible. Using our hybrid Thomas-Fermi/DFT computational scheme, which is well suited for simulations of biomolecules in solution, we investigate the geometries and energetics of two, three and four binding sites cooperatively binding one copper ion. These geometries are then used as inputs for classical molecular dynamics simulations. We find that copper binding affects the secondary structure of the PrP and that it stabilizes the unstructured (unfolded) part of the protein.

  19. Thermodynamic parameters of the binding of retinol to binding proteins and to membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retinol (vitamin A alcohol) is a hydrophobic compound and distributes in vivo mainly between binding proteins and cellular membranes. To better clarify the nature of the interactions of retinol with these phases which have a high affinity for it, the thermodynamic parameters of these interactions were studied. The temperature-dependence profiles of the binding of retinol to bovine retinol binding protein, bovine serum albumin, unilamellar vesicles of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, and plasma membranes from rat liver were determined. It was found that binding of retinol to retinol binding protein is characterized by a large increase in entropy and no change in enthalpy. Binding to albumin is driven by enthalpy and is accompanied by a decrease in entropy. Partitioning of retinal into unilamellar vesicles and into plasma membranes is stabilized both by enthalpic and by entropic components. The implications of these finding are discussed

  20. RNAcontext: a new method for learning the sequence and structure binding preferences of RNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Kazan

    Full Text Available Metazoan genomes encode hundreds of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs. These proteins regulate post-transcriptional gene expression and have critical roles in numerous cellular processes including mRNA splicing, export, stability and translation. Despite their ubiquity and importance, the binding preferences for most RBPs are not well characterized. In vitro and in vivo studies, using affinity selection-based approaches, have successfully identified RNA sequence associated with specific RBPs; however, it is difficult to infer RBP sequence and structural preferences without specifically designed motif finding methods. In this study, we introduce a new motif-finding method, RNAcontext, designed to elucidate RBP-specific sequence and structural preferences with greater accuracy than existing approaches. We evaluated RNAcontext on recently published in vitro and in vivo RNA affinity selected data and demonstrate that RNAcontext identifies known binding preferences for several control proteins including HuR, PTB, and Vts1p and predicts new RNA structure preferences for SF2/ASF, RBM4, FUSIP1 and SLM2. The predicted preferences for SF2/ASF are consistent with its recently reported in vivo binding sites. RNAcontext is an accurate and efficient motif finding method ideally suited for using large-scale RNA-binding affinity datasets to determine the relative binding preferences of RBPs for a wide range of RNA sequences and structures.

  1. Regulation of intermediary metabolism by protein acetylation

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue

    2010-01-01

    Extensive studies during the past four decades have identified important roles for lysine acetylation in the regulation of nuclear transcription. Recent proteomic analyses on protein acetylation uncovered a large number of acetylated proteins in the cytoplasm and mitochondria, including most enzymes involved in intermediate metabolism. Acetylation regulates metabolic enzymes by multiple mechanisms, including via enzymatic activation or inhibition, and by influencing protein stability. Convers...

  2. Roles of RNA-Binding Proteins in DNA Damage Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Mihoko

    2016-01-01

    Living cells experience DNA damage as a result of replication errors and oxidative metabolism, exposure to environmental agents (e.g., ultraviolet light, ionizing radiation (IR)), and radiation therapies and chemotherapies for cancer treatments. Accumulation of DNA damage can lead to multiple diseases such as neurodegenerative disorders, cancers, immune deficiencies, infertility, and also aging. Cells have evolved elaborate mechanisms to deal with DNA damage. Networks of DNA damage response (DDR) pathways are coordinated to detect and repair DNA damage, regulate cell cycle and transcription, and determine the cell fate. Upstream factors of DNA damage checkpoints and repair, "sensor" proteins, detect DNA damage and send the signals to downstream factors in order to maintain genomic integrity. Unexpectedly, we have discovered that an RNA-processing factor is involved in DNA repair processes. We have identified a gene that contributes to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)'s treatment resistance and recurrence. This gene, RBM14, is known to function in transcription and RNA splicing. RBM14 is also required for maintaining the stem-like state of GBM spheres, and it controls the DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway by interacting with KU80. RBM14 is a RNA-binding protein (RBP) with low complexity domains, called intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs), and it also physically interacts with PARP1. Furthermore, RBM14 is recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent manner (unpublished data). DNA-dependent PARP1 (poly-(ADP) ribose polymerase 1) makes key contributions in the DNA damage response (DDR) network. RBM14 therefore plays an important role in a PARP-dependent DSB repair process. Most recently, it was shown that the other RBPs with intrinsically disordered domains are recruited to DNA damage sites in a PAR-dependent manner, and that these RBPs form liquid compartments (also known as "liquid-demixing"). Among the

  3. Sequence and structural features of binding site residues in protein-protein complexes: comparison with protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj S

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interactions are important for several cellular processes. Understanding the mechanism of protein-protein recognition and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes are long standing goals in molecular and computational biology. Methods We have developed an energy based approach for identifying the binding site residues in protein–protein complexes. The binding site residues have been analyzed with sequence and structure based parameters such as binding propensity, neighboring residues in the vicinity of binding sites, conservation score and conformational switching. Results We observed that the binding propensities of amino acid residues are specific for protein-protein complexes. Further, typical dipeptides and tripeptides showed high preference for binding, which is unique to protein-protein complexes. Most of the binding site residues are highly conserved among homologous sequences. Our analysis showed that 7% of residues changed their conformations upon protein-protein complex formation and it is 9.2% and 6.6% in the binding and non-binding sites, respectively. Specifically, the residues Glu, Lys, Leu and Ser changed their conformation from coil to helix/strand and from helix to coil/strand. Leu, Ser, Thr and Val prefer to change their conformation from strand to coil/helix. Conclusions The results obtained in this study will be helpful for understanding and predicting the binding sites in protein-protein complexes.

  4. Stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi SHEN; Lu WANG; Hui ZHOU; Hui-di JIANG; Lu-shan YU; Su ZENG

    2013-01-01

    Chiral drugs show distinct biochemical and pharmacological behaviors in the human body.The binding of chiral drugs to plasma proteins usually exhibits stereoselectivity,which has a far-reaching influence on their pharmacological activities and pharmacokinetic profiles.In this review,the stereoselective binding of chiral drugs to human serum albumin (HSA),α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP)and lipoprotein,three most important proteins in human plasma,are detailed.Furthermore,the application of AGP variants and recombinant fragments of HSA for studying enantiomer binding properties is also discussed.Apart from the stereoselectivity of enantiomer-protein binding,enantiomer-enantiomer interactions that may induce allosteric effects are also described.Additionally,the techniques and methods used to determine drug-protein binding parameters are briefly reviewed.

  5. Characterization of a zinc finger DNA-binding protein expressed specifically in Petunia petals and seedlings.

    OpenAIRE

    Takatsuji, H; Mori, M; Benfey, P.N.; L Ren; Chua, N H

    1992-01-01

    In Petunia, the expression of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase gene (EPSPS) is tissue-specific and developmentally regulated. Nuclear extracts from Petunia petal contain a factor that interacts with the 5' upstream region of EPSPS. DNase I footprinting experiments revealed four strong binding sites (EP1-EP4) and several weaker sites that appear to bind the same factor. We have isolated a cDNA clone (EPF1) encoding a DNA-binding protein that has similar binding activity to that ...

  6. Borrelia burgdorferi Regulates Expression of Complement Regulator-Acquiring Surface Protein 1 during the Mammal-Tick Infection Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    von Lackum, Kate; Miller, Jennifer C.; Bykowski, Tomasz; Riley, Sean P; Woodman, Michael E.; Brade, Volker; Kraiczy, Peter; Stevenson, Brian; Wallich, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    During the natural mammal-tick infection cycle, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi comes into contact with components of the alternative complement pathway. B. burgdorferi, like many other human pathogens, has evolved the immune evasion strategy of binding two host-derived fluid-phase regulators of complement, factor H and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL-1). The borrelial complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 (CRASP-1) is a surface-exposed lipoprotein that binds both fac...

  7. Regulation of anti-sense transcription by Mot1p and NC2 via removal of TATA-binding protein (TBP) from the 3′-end of genes

    OpenAIRE

    Koster, Maria J. E.; Timmers, H. Th. Marc

    2014-01-01

    The activity and dynamic nature of TATA-binding protein (TBP) crucial to RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription is under control of the Mot1p and NC2 complexes. Here we show that both TBP regulatory factors play ‘hidden’ roles in ensuring transcription fidelity by restricting anti-sense non-coding RNA (ncRNA) synthesis. Production of anti-sense ncRNA transcripts is suppressed by Mot1p- and NC2-mediated release of TBP from binding sites at the 3′-end of genes. In this, Mot1p and NC2 collabor...

  8. DNA binding by Corynebacterium glutamicum TetR-type transcription regulator AmtR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sticht Heinrich

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TetR family member AmtR is the central regulator of nitrogen starvation response in Corynebacterium glutamicum. While the AmtR regulon was physiologically characterized in great detail up to now, mechanistic questions of AmtR binding were not addressed. This study presents a characterization of functionally important amino acids in the DNA binding domain of AmtR and of crucial nucleotides in the AmtR recognition motif. Results Site-directed mutagenesis, the characterization of corresponding mutant proteins by gel retardation assays and surface plasmon resonance and molecular modelling revealed several amino acids, which are directly involved in DNA binding, while others have more structural function. Furthermore, we could show that the spacing of the binding motif half sites is crucial for repression of transcription by AmtR. Conclusion Although the DNA binding domain of TetR-type repressors is highly conserved and a core binding motif was identified for AmtR and TetR(D, the AmtR binding domain shows individual properties compared to other TetR proteins. Besides by distinct amino acids of AmtR, DNA binding is influenced by nucleotides not only of the conserved binding motif but also by spacing nucleotides in C. glutamicum.

  9. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  10. Plant Cytosolic Acyl-CoA-Binding Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zi-Wei; Chye, Mee-Len

    2016-01-01

    A gene family encoding six members of acyl-CoA-binding proteins (ACBP) exists in Arabidopsis and they are designated as AtACBP1-AtACBP6. They have been observed to play pivotal roles in plant lipid metabolism, consistent to the abilities of recombinant AtACBP in binding different medium- and long-chain acyl-CoA esters in vitro. While AtACBP1 and AtACBP2 are membrane-associated proteins with ankyrin repeats and AtACBP3 contains a signaling peptide for targeting to the apoplast, AtACBP4, AtACBP5 and AtACBP6 represent the cytosolic forms in the AtACBP family. They were verified to be subcellularly localized in the cytosol using diverse experimental methods, including cell fractionation followed by western blot analysis, immunoelectron microscopy and confocal laser-scanning microscopy using autofluorescence-tagged fusions. AtACBP4 (73.2 kDa) and AtACBP5 (70.1 kDa) are the largest, while AtACBP6 (10.4 kDa) is the smallest. Their binding affinities to oleoyl-CoA esters suggested that they can potentially transfer oleoyl-CoA esters from the plastids to the endoplasmic reticulum, facilitating the subsequent biosynthesis of non-plastidial membrane lipids in Arabidopsis. Recent studies on ACBP, extended from a dicot (Arabidopsis) to a monocot, revealed that six ACBP are also encoded in rice (Oryza sativa). Interestingly, three small rice ACBP (OsACBP1, OsACBP2 and OsACBP3) are present in the cytosol in comparison to one (AtACBP6) in Arabidopsis. In this review, the combinatory and distinct roles of the cytosolic AtACBP are discussed, including their functions in pollen and seed development, light-dependent regulation and substrate affinities to acyl-CoA esters. PMID:26662549

  11. The Pumilio protein binds RNA through a conserved domain that defines a new class of RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamore, P D; Williamson, J R; Lehmann, R

    1997-01-01

    Translation of hunchback(mat) (hb[mat]) mRNA must be repressed in the posterior of the pre-blastoderm Drosophila embryo to permit formation of abdominal segments. This translational repression requires two copies of the Nanos Response Element (NRE), a 16-nt sequence in the hb[mat] 3' untranslated region. Translational repression also requires the action of two proteins: Pumilio (PUM), a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein; and Nanos, a protein that determines the location of repression. Binding of PUM to the NRE is thought to target hb(mat) mRNA for repression. Here, we show the RNA-binding domain of PUM to be an evolutionarily conserved, 334-amino acid region at the carboxy-terminus of the approximately 158-kDa PUM protein. This contiguous region of PUM retains the RNA-binding specificity of full-length PUM protein. Proteins with sequences homologous to the PUM RNA-binding domain are found in animals, plants, and fungi. The high degree of sequence conservation of the PUM RNA-binding domain in other far-flung species suggests that the domain is an ancient protein motif, and we show that conservation of sequence reflects conservation of function: that is, the homologous region from a human protein binds RNA with sequence specificity related to but distinct from Drosophila PUM. PMID:9404893

  12. Convergent evolution among immunoglobulin G-binding bacterial proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Frick, I M; Wikström, M.; Forsén, S.; Drakenberg, T; Gomi, H.; Sjöbring, U; Björck, L

    1992-01-01

    Protein G, a bacterial cell-wall protein with high affinity for the constant region of IgG (IgGFc) antibodies, contains homologous repeats responsible for the interaction with IgGFc. A synthetic peptide corresponding to an 11-amino acid-long sequence in the COOH-terminal region of the repeats was found to bind to IgGFc and block the interaction with protein G. Moreover, two other IgGFc-binding bacterial proteins (proteins A and H), which do not contain any sequences homologous to the peptide,...

  13. Mitotic Kinesin-Like Protein 2 Binds and Colocalizes with Papillomavirus E2 during Mitosis▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Ting; Peng, Yu-Cai; Androphy, Elliot J.

    2006-01-01

    MKlp2 is a kinesin-like motor protein of the central mitotic spindle required for completion of cytokinesis. Papillomavirus E2 is a sequence specific DNA binding protein that regulates viral transcription and replication and is responsible for partitioning viral episomes into daughter cells during cell division. We demonstrate that MKlp2 specifically associates with the E2 protein during mitosis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show viral genomes are in complex with MKlp2 only within ...

  14. UHRF1 binds G9a and participates in p21 transcriptional regulation in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jong Kyong; Estève, Pierre-Olivier; Jacobsen, Steven E.; Pradhan, Sriharsa

    2008-01-01

    UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, containing PHD and RING finger domains 1) is a multi-domain protein associated with cellular proliferation and epigenetic regulation. The UHRF1 binds to methylated CpG dinucleotides and recruits transcriptional repressors DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) and histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) through its distinct domains. However, the molecular basis of UHRF1-mediated transcriptional regulation via chromatin modifications is yet to be fully understood. Here we show that UHRF1...

  15. Characterization of a cocaine binding protein in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    [3H]-Cocaine binding sites are identified in human placental villus tissue plasma membranes. These binding sites are associated with a protein and show saturable and specific binding of [3H]-cocaine with a high affinity site of 170 fmole/mg protein. The binding is lost with pretreatment with trypsin or heat. The membrane bound protein is solubilized with the detergent 3-(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio-1-propane sulphonate (CHAPS) with retention of its saturable and specific binding of [3H]-cocaine. The detergent-protein complex migrates on a sepharose CL-6B gel chromatography column as a protein with an apparent molecular weight of 75,900. The protein has an S20,w value of 5.1. The binding of this protein to norcocaine, pseudococaine, nomifensine, imipramine, desipramine, amphetamine and dopamine indicates that it shares some, but not all, the properties of the brain cocaine receptor. The physiologic significance of this protein in human placenta is currently unclear

  16. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3: insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, insulin-like growth factor-1 carrier protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 [insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, SomatoKine] is a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) and binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which is the major circulating somatomedin (insulin-like growth factor) binding protein; binding protein-3 regulates the delivery of somatomedin-1 to target tissues. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 has potential as replacement therapy for somatomedin-1 which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure and traumatic injury, resulting in catabolism. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis; diseases associated with protein wasting including chronic renal failure, cachexia and severe trauma; and to attenuate cardiac dysfunction in a variety of disease states, including after severe burn trauma. Combined therapy with somatomedin-1 and somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 would prolong the duration of action of somatomedin-1 and would reduce or eliminate some of the undesirable effects associated with somatomedin-1 monotherapy. Somatomedin-1 is usually linked to binding protein-3 in the normal state of the body, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release somatomedin-1 as needed. Therefore, somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 is a self-dosing system and SomatoKine would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on June 1 2000. Insmed and Avecia, UK, have signed an agreement for the manufacturing of SomatoKine and its components, IGF-1 and binding protein-3. CGMP clinical production of SomatoKine and its components will be done in Avecia's Advanced Biologics Centre, Billingham, UK, which manufactures recombinant-based medicines and vaccines with a capacity of up to 1000 litres. In 2003, manufacturing of SomatoKine is

  17. Electrochemistry of heparin binding to tau protein on Au surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Anionic heparin binds tau protein film on Au • N-terminal of tau protein is critical for heparin binding • Negatively charged heparin binds positively charged tau domains • Heparin binding to tau increases charge transfer resistance - ABSTRACT: The tau protein is a neurodegenerative disease biomarker. The in vitro aggregation of tau is triggered by electrostatic charge imbalance induced by an anionic inducing agent, such as heparin. The binding of the tau-heparin complex is based on electrostatic interactions, but the exact binding mode of heparin to the tau protein has not been fully identified. In this work, the effects of the tau protein orientation on gold (Au) electrode to heparin were explored by the cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. To modulate the accessibility of N-terminal of the tau to heparin, the tau films on Au surfaces were fabricated in two ways: immobilization of tau via the N-terminal of tau protein (N-tau-Au) or by the Cys291/Cys322 residues, located in the R-repeat domains of the tau protein (Cys-tau-Au). The sulfur-Au bonding was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The charge transfer resistance was measured for N-tau-Au and Cys-tau-Au as a function of heparin concentration. The heparin concentration range was varied from 0.2 pM to 216 μM with the optimal binding concentration at 21 nM (the highest charge transfer resistance value). The heparin binding to tau films was investigated in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4− or benzoquinone redox probes. The tau-heparin binding was greater for the Cys-tau-Au surface over N-tau-Au, indicating specific tau domains may be required for optimal heparin binding

  18. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S;

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous...... remarkable correspondence between the structural modules of ACBP/DBI as determined by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the exon-intron architecture of the ACBP/DBI gene. Detailed analyses of transcription of the ACBP/DBI gene in brain and liver were performed to map transcription initiation...

  19. Proteome-wide Identification of Novel Ceramide-binding Proteins by Yeast Surface cDNA Display and Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Ha, Kevin; Lee, Nam-Kyung; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Although the bioactive sphingolipid ceramide is an important cell signaling molecule, relatively few direct ceramide-interacting proteins are known. We used an approach combining yeast surface cDNA display and deep sequencing technology to identify novel proteins binding directly to ceramide. We identified 234 candidate ceramide-binding protein fragments and validated binding for 20. Most (17) bound selectively to ceramide, although a few (3) bound to other lipids as well. Several novel ceramide-binding domains were discovered, including the EF-hand calcium-binding motif, the heat shock chaperonin-binding motif STI1, the SCP2 sterol-binding domain, and the tetratricopeptide repeat region motif. Interestingly, four of the verified ceramide-binding proteins (HPCA, HPCAL1, NCS1, and VSNL1) and an additional three candidate ceramide-binding proteins (NCALD, HPCAL4, and KCNIP3) belong to the neuronal calcium sensor family of EF hand-containing proteins. We used mutagenesis to map the ceramide-binding site in HPCA and to create a mutant HPCA that does not bind to ceramide. We demonstrated selective binding to ceramide by mammalian cell-produced wild type but not mutant HPCA. Intriguingly, we also identified a fragment from prostaglandin D2synthase that binds preferentially to ceramide 1-phosphate. The wide variety of proteins and domains capable of binding to ceramide suggests that many of the signaling functions of ceramide may be regulated by direct binding to these proteins. Based on the deep sequencing data, we estimate that our yeast surface cDNA display library covers ∼60% of the human proteome and our selection/deep sequencing protocol can identify target-interacting protein fragments that are present at extremely low frequency in the starting library. Thus, the yeast surface cDNA display/deep sequencing approach is a rapid, comprehensive, and flexible method for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions, particularly for the study of non-protein ligands. PMID

  20. Coordinate regulation/localization of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP) by two nuclear export signal sites: Discovery of a new leucine-rich nuclear export signal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is responsible for conversion of dietary carbohydrate to storage fat in liver by coordinating expression of the enzymes that channel glycolytic pyruvate into lipogenesis. The activation of ChREBP in response to high glucose is nuclear localization and transcription, and the inactivation of ChREBP under low glucose involves export from the nucleus to the cytosol. Here we report a new nuclear export signal site ('NES1') of ChREBP. Together these signals provide ChREBP with two NES sequences, both the previously reported NES2 and now the new NES1 coordinate to interact together with CRM1 (exportin) for nuclear export of the carbohydrate response element binding protein.

  1. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbo Shi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed.

  2. Cloning of the cDNA for the TATA-binding protein-associated factorII170 subunit of transcription factor B-TFIID reveals homology to global transcription regulators in yeast and Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    van der Knaap, Jan A.; Borst, Jan Willem; van der Vliet, Peter C.; Gentz, Reiner; Timmers, H.Th. Marc

    1997-01-01

    The human transcription factor B-TFIID is comprised of TATA-binding protein (TBP) in complex with one TBP-associated factor (TAF) of 170 kDa. We report the isolation of the cDNA for TAFII170. By cofractionation and coprecipitation experiments, we show that the protein encoded by the cDNA encodes the TAF subunit of B-TFIID. Recombinant TAFII170 has (d)ATPase activity. Inspection of its primary structure reveals a striking homology with genes of other organisms, yeast MOT1, and Drosophila moira...

  3. Structural Determinants of DNA Binding by a P. falciparum ApiAP2 Transcriptional Regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Scott E.; De Silva, Erandi K.; Keck, James L.; Llinás, Manuel (Princeton); (UW-MED)

    2010-11-05

    Putative transcription factors have only recently been identified in the Plasmodium spp., with the major family of regulators comprising the Apicomplexan Apetala2 (AP2) proteins. To better understand the DNA-binding mechanisms of these transcriptional regulators, we characterized the structure and in vitro function of an AP2 DNA-binding domain from a prototypical Apicomplexan AP2 protein, PF14{_}0633 from Plasmodium falciparum. The X-ray crystal structure of the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain bound to DNA reveals a {beta}-sheet fold that binds the DNA major groove through base-specific and backbone contacts; a prominent {alpha}-helix supports the {beta}-sheet structure. Substitution of predicted DNA-binding residues with alanine weakened or eliminated DNA binding in solution. In contrast to plant AP2 domains, the PF14{_}0633 AP2 domain dimerizes upon binding to DNA through a domain-swapping mechanism in which the {alpha}-helices of the AP2 domains pack against the {beta}-sheets of the dimer mates. DNA-induced dimerization of PF14{_}0633 may be important for tethering two distal DNA loci together in the nucleus and/or for inducing functional rearrangements of its domains to facilitate transcriptional regulation. Consistent with a multisite binding mode, at least two copies of the consensus sequence recognized by PF14{_}0633 are present upstream of a previously identified group of sporozoite-stage genes. Taken together, these findings illustrate how Plasmodium has adapted the AP2 DNA-binding domain for genome-wide transcriptional regulation.

  4. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in glucose and lipid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ho-Seong

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 has roles in modulating the effect of IGFs by binding to IGFs and inhibiting cell proliferation in an IGF-independent manner. Although recent studies have been reported that IGFBP-3 has also roles in metabolic regulation, their exact roles in adipose tissue are poorly understood. In this review, we summarized the studies about the biological roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. IGFBP-3 overexpression in transgenic mice suggested that IGFB...

  5. A bacterial ATP-dependent, enhancer binding protein that activates the housekeeping RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, William C.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    A commonly accepted view of gene regulation in bacteria that has emerged over the last decade is that promoters are transcriptionally activated by one of two general mechanisms. The major type involves activator proteins that bind to DNA adjacent to where the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme binds, usually assisting in recruitment of the RNAP to the promoter. This holoenzyme uses the housekeeping ς70 or a related factor, which directs the core RNAP to the promoter and assists in melting the D...

  6. Studies of the silencing of Baculovirus DNA binding protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quadt, I.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Knebel-Morsdorf, D.

    2007-01-01

    Baculovirus DNA binding protein (DBP) binds preferentially single-stranded DNA in vitro and colocalizes with viral DNA replication sites. Here, its putative role as viral replication factor has been addressed by RNA interference. Silencing of DBP in Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovir

  7. Discovering protein-DNA binding sequence patterns using association rule mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kwong-Sak; Wong, Ka-Chun; Chan, Tak-Ming; Wong, Man-Hon; Lee, Kin-Hong; Lau, Chi-Kong; Tsui, Stephen K W

    2010-10-01

    Protein-DNA bindings between transcription factors (TFs) and transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) play an essential role in transcriptional regulation. Over the past decades, significant efforts have been made to study the principles for protein-DNA bindings. However, it is considered that there are no simple one-to-one rules between amino acids and nucleotides. Many methods impose complicated features beyond sequence patterns. Protein-DNA bindings are formed from associated amino acid and nucleotide sequence pairs, which determine many functional characteristics. Therefore, it is desirable to investigate associated sequence patterns between TFs and TFBSs. With increasing computational power, availability of massive experimental databases on DNA and proteins, and mature data mining techniques, we propose a framework to discover associated TF-TFBS binding sequence patterns in the most explicit and interpretable form from TRANSFAC. The framework is based on association rule mining with Apriori algorithm. The patterns found are evaluated by quantitative measurements at several levels on TRANSFAC. With further independent verifications from literatures, Protein Data Bank and homology modeling, there are strong evidences that the patterns discovered reveal real TF-TFBS bindings across different TFs and TFBSs, which can drive for further knowledge to better understand TF-TFBS bindings. PMID:20529874

  8. SH2 Domains Serve as Lipid-Binding Modules for pTyr-Signaling Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Jeong; Sheng, Ren; Silkov, Antonina; Jung, Da-Jung; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Xin, Yao; Kim, Hyunjin; Thiagarajan-Rosenkranz, Pallavi; Song, Seohyeon; Yoon, Youngdae; Nam, Wonhee; Kim, Ilshin; Kim, Eui; Lee, Dong-Gyu; Chen, Yong; Singaram, Indira; Wang, Li; Jang, Myoung Ho; Hwang, Cheol-Sang; Honig, Barry; Ryu, Sungho; Lorieau, Justin; Kim, You-Me; Cho, Wonhwa

    2016-04-01

    The Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain is a protein interaction domain that directs myriad phosphotyrosine (pY)-signaling pathways. Genome-wide screening of human SH2 domains reveals that ∼90% of SH2 domains bind plasma membrane lipids and many have high phosphoinositide specificity. They bind lipids using surface cationic patches separate from pY-binding pockets, thus binding lipids and the pY motif independently. The patches form grooves for specific lipid headgroup recognition or flat surfaces for non-specific membrane binding and both types of interaction are important for cellular function and regulation of SH2 domain-containing proteins. Cellular studies with ZAP70 showed that multiple lipids bind its C-terminal SH2 domain in a spatiotemporally specific manner and thereby exert exquisite spatiotemporal control over its protein binding and signaling activities in T cells. Collectively, this study reveals how lipids control SH2 domain-mediated cellular protein-protein interaction networks and suggest a new strategy for therapeutic modulation of pY-signaling pathways. PMID:27052731

  9. Expected and unexpected features of protein-binding RNA aptamers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Nils; Andreasen, Peter A; Dupont, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    RNA molecules with high affinity to specific proteins can be isolated from libraries of up to 10(16) different RNA sequences by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). These so-called protein-binding RNA aptamers are often interesting, e.g., as modulators of protein...... function for therapeutic use, for probing the conformations of proteins, for studies of basic aspects of nucleic acid-protein interactions, etc. Studies on the interactions between RNA aptamers and proteins display a number of expected and unexpected features, including the chemical nature of the...... interacting RNA-protein surfaces, the conformation of protein-bound aptamer versus free aptamer, the conformation of aptamer-bound protein versus free protein, and the effects of aptamers on protein function. Here, we review current insights into the details of RNA aptamer-protein interactions. For further...

  10. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  11. RNA-binding proteins in mouse male germline stem cells: a mammalian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Huayu

    2016-01-01

    Adult stem cells that reside in particular types of tissues are responsible for tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Cellular functions of adult stem cells are intricately related to the gene expression programs in those cells. Past research has demonstrated that regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level can decisively alter cell fate of stem cells. However, cellular contents of mRNAs are sometimes not equivalent to proteins, the functional units of cells. It is increasingly realized that post-transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression are also fundamental for stem cell functions. Compared to differentiated somatic cells, effects on cellular status manifested by varied expression of RNA-binding proteins and global protein synthesis have been demonstrated in several stem cell systems. Through the cooperation of both cis-elements of mRNAs and trans-acting RNA-binding proteins that are intimately associated with them, regulation of localization, stability, and translational status of mRNAs directly influences the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. Previous studies have uncovered some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the functions of RNA-binding proteins in stem cells in invertebrate species. However, their roles in adult stem cells in mammals are just beginning to be unveiled. This review highlights some of the RNA-binding proteins that play important functions during the maintenance and differentiation of mouse male germline stem cells, the adult stem cells in the male reproductive organ. PMID:26839690

  12. Calmodulin-binding domains in Alzheimer's disease proteins: extending the calcium hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Myre, Michael A

    2004-08-01

    The calcium hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) invokes the disruption of calcium signaling as the underlying cause of neuronal dysfunction and ultimately apoptosis. As a primary calcium signal transducer, calmodulin (CaM) responds to cytosolic calcium fluxes by binding to and regulating the activity of target CaM-binding proteins (CaMBPs). Ca(2+)-dependent CaMBPs primarily contain domains (CaMBDs) that can be classified into motifs based upon variations on the basic amphiphilic alpha-helix domain involving conserved hydrophobic residues at positions 1-10, 1-14 or 1-16. In contrast, an IQ or IQ-like domain often mediates Ca(2+)-independent CaM-binding. Based on these attributes, a search for CaMBDs reveals that many of the proteins intimately linked to AD may be calmodulin-binding proteins, opening new avenues for research on this devastating disease. PMID:15249195

  13. Promoter binding factors regulating cyclin B transcription in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, J D; McBride, B; Katula, K S

    1995-10-01

    Cyclin B is a key regulatory protein of the cell cycle, central to the control of the G2/M transition. In the developing sea urchin embryo, the cyclin B gene is transcriptionally regulated in concert with changing patterns of cell division. In an effort to understand the mechanism controlling cyclin B expression during development, we have conducted an analysis of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus cyclin B gene promoter. DNase I foot-printing of the cyclin B upstream region revealed eight binding regions within 435 bp of the start of transcription; seven of these sites were within 215 bp. Found within these regions were consensus sequences for two CCAAT boxes, TATA, and E-boxes and sequences with some similarity to E2F and octamer binding motifs. Upstream sequences were functionally defined by generating cyclin B-CAT fusion genes, containing deletions and base specific mutations, and testing for relative levels of expression by gene transfer. Both CCAAT boxes were found to be essential for maximal levels of expression. A third binding site (PR7) with no recognizable consensus sequence was also found to act as a positive element. Our results suggest that protein binding to the E2F-like sequences may act to reduce expression. Protein binding was further characterized by gel mobility-shift and methylation interference. The CCAAT boxes were found to bind similar, if not identical, proteins. Sequence comparisons and methylation interference data indicate that the likely protein binding these CCAAT sequences is the characterized CCAAT-binding protein CP1. A probe containing site PR7 formed multiple gel shift complexes that, by methylation interference, appeared to be interrelated. One major complex was formed with an oligonucleotide containing the two E2F-like sequences. Protein binding to this probe was specific and required bases within the E2F-like sequences. Our results indicate that cyclin B is subject to positive and negative regulation, involving multiple factors

  14. Binding of fluorescent lanthanides to rat liver mitochondrial membranes and calcium ion-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, R B; Wallach, D F

    1976-05-21

    (1) Tb3+ binding to mitochondrial membranes can be monitored by enhanced ion fluorescence at 545 nm with excitation at 285 nm. At low protein concentrations (less than 30 mug/ml) no inner filter effects are observed. (2) This binding is localized at the external surface of the inner membrane and is unaffected by inhibitors of respiration or oxidative phosphorylation. (3) A soluble Ca2+ binding protein isolated according to Lehninger, A.L. ((1971) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 42, 312-317) also binds Tb3+ with enhanced ion fluorescence upon excitation at 285 nm. The excitation spectrum of the isolated protein and of the intact mitochondria are indicative of an aromatic amino acid at the cation binding site. (4) Further characterization of the Tb3+-protein interaction revealed that there is more than one binding site per protein molecule and that these sites are clustered (less than 20 A). Neuraminidase treatment or organic solvent extraction of the protein did not affect fluorescent Tb3+ binding. (5) pH dependency studies of Tb3+ binding to the isolated protein or intact mitochondria demonstrated the importance of an ionizable group of pK greater than 6. At pH less than 7.5 the amount of Tb3+ bound to the isolated protein decreased with increase in pH as monitored by Tb3+ fluorescence. With intact mitochondria the opposite occurred with a large increase in Tb3+ fluorescence at higher pH. This increase was not observed when the mitochondria were preincubated with antimycin A and rotenone. PMID:6061

  15. Identification of lectin-binding proteins in Chlamydia species.

    OpenAIRE

    Swanson, A F; Kuo, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Lectin-binding proteins of chlamydiae were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. All three Chlamydia species tested expressed two proteins when whole-elementary-body lysates were reacted with the biotinylated lectin Dolichos biflorus agglutinin. The protein with a molecular mass of 18 kilodaltons (kDa) responded strongly compared with a higher-molecular-mass protein that varied from 27 to 32 kDa with each chlamydia strain tested. Among six l...

  16. Purification and immunochemical characterization of the cytoplasmic androgen-binding protein of rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cytoplasmic androgen-binding (CAB) protein of the male rate liver has been implicated to play a role in the androgen-dependent regulation of α2u-globulin synthesis. The liver of the adult male rat contains about 50 fmol of specific high-affinity androgen-binding activity per milligram of total cytosolic protein. Photoaffinity labeling with [3H]R-1881 followed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography shows that the CAB is a 31-kilodalton protein. By means of DEAE-cellulose chromatography and preparative SCS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the authors have purified the CAB protein to electrophoretic homogeneity and have raised polyclonal rabbit antiserum that is monospecific to this protein. In the sucrose density gradient, the antiserum reacted with the androgen-binding component of the male liver cytosol prelabeled with tritiated dihydrotestosterone. Western blot analysis of the liver cytosol showed that the antiserum recognizes only the 31-kDa androgen-binding component. Such immunoblotting also showed that unlike the young adult, the androgen-insensitive states during prepuberty and senescence are associated with a marked reduction in the hepatic concentration of the immunoreactive CAB protein. No immunochemical cross-reactivity between CAB and another androgen-binding component of Mr 29K was observed. The latter finding favors the possibility that 31- and 29-kDa androgen-binding components may have distinct sequence structure

  17. Optimizing a coarse-grained model for the recognition of protein-protein binding

    OpenAIRE

    Emperador, Agustí; Orozco, Modesto

    2015-01-01

    We are optimizing a force-field to be used with our coarsegrained protein model for the recognition of protein -protein binding. We have found that, apart from ranking correctly the ligand-receptor conformations generated in a protein-protein docking algorithm, our model is able to distinguish binding (experimental structure) from nonbinding (false positive) conformations for many complexes. This suggests us that the model could have a good performance in complete cross-d...

  18. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein (IGFBP) and IGFBP-related Protein Gene Families

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Buel D.; Roalson, Eric H.; Thompson, Cullen

    2007-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) activity is regulated by six high affinity binding proteins (IGFBPs) and possibly by some of the nine IGFBP-related proteins (IGFBP-rPs). To determine the phylogenetic relationship of this proposed gene superfamily, we conducted maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference analyses on a matrix of amino acid sequences from a diversity of vertebrate species. A single most likely phylogram, ML bootstrap, and Bayesian consensus tree of 10,000,000 generations rev...

  19. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF EXTRACTABLE PROTEIN BINDING USING MALEIC ANHYDRIDE COPOLYMER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thirawan Nipithakul; Ladawan Watthanachote; Nanticha Kalapat

    2012-01-01

    A preliminary study of using maleic anhydride copolymer for protein binding has been carried out.The polymeric films were prepared by compression of the purified resin and annealing the film to induce efficient back formation of the anhydride groups.The properties of the film surface were analyzed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements.The protein content was determined by Bradford assay.To obtain optimum conditions,immersion time for protein binding was examined.Results revealed that proteins can be successfully immobilized onto the film surface via covalent linkage.The efficiency of the covalent binding of the extractable protein to maleic anhydride-polyethylene film was estimated at 69.87 μtg/cm2,although the film had low anhydride content (3%) on the surface.

  20. Binding of CCAAT displacement protein CDP to adenovirus packaging sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Ece; Ostapchuk, Philomena; Wells, Susanne I; Yang, Jihong; Gregg, Keqin; Nepveu, Alain; Dudley, Jaquelin P; Hearing, Patrick

    2003-06-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) type 5 DNA packaging is initiated in a polar fashion from the left end of the genome. The packaging process is dependent upon the cis-acting packaging domain located between nucleotides 194 and 380. Seven A/T-rich repeats have been identified within this domain that direct packaging. A1, A2, A5, and A6 are the most important repeats functionally and share a bipartite sequence motif. Several lines of evidence suggest that there is a limiting trans-acting factor(s) that plays a role in packaging. Two cellular activities that bind to minimal packaging domains in vitro have been previously identified. These binding activities are P complex, an uncharacterized protein(s), and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF). In this work, we report that a third cellular protein, octamer-1 protein (Oct-1), binds to minimal packaging domains. In vitro binding analyses and in vivo packaging assays were used to examine the relevance of these DNA binding activities to Ad DNA packaging. The results of these experiments reveal that COUP-TF and Oct-1 binding does not play a functional role in Ad packaging, whereas P-complex binding directly correlates with packaging function. We demonstrate that P complex contains the cellular protein CCAAT displacement protein (CDP) and that full-length CDP is found in purified virus particles. In addition to cellular factors, previous evidence indicates that viral factors play a role in the initiation of viral DNA packaging. We propose that CDP, in conjunction with one or more viral proteins, binds to the packaging sequences of Ad to initiate the encapsidation process. PMID:12743282

  1. Characterization of cap binding proteins associated with the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eucaryotic mRNAs a carry 7-methylguanosine triphosphate residue (called cap structure) at their 5' terminus. The cap plays an important role in RNA recognition. Cap binding proteins (CBP) of HeLa cells were identified by photoaffinity labelling using the cap analogue γ-(32P)-(4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido)-7-methylguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BP-m7GTP). Photoreaction of this cap analogue with HeLa cell initiation factors resulted in specific labelling of two polypeptides of Msub(r) 37000 and 26000. The latter was also labelled in crude initiation factors prepared from reticulocytes and is identical to the cap binding protein CBP I previously identified. These cap binding proteins were also affinity labelled in poliovirus infected cell extracts. Photoaffinity reaction with BP-m7GTP of whole HeLa cell homogenate showed three additional polypeptides with Msub(r) 120000, 89000 and 80000. These cap binding proteins were found to be associated with the nucleus and are therefore referred to as nuclear cap binding proteins, i.e. NCBP 1, NCBP 2 and NCBP 3. They were also present in splicing extracts. Photoaffinity labelling in these nuclear extracts was differentially inhibited by various cap analogues and capped mRNAs. Affinity chromatography on immobilized globin mRNA led to a partial separation of the three nuclear cap binding proteins. Chromatography on m7GTP-Sepharose resulted in a specific binding of NCBP 3. The different behaviour of the cap binding proteins suggests that they are functionally distinct and that they might be involved in different processes requiring cap recognition. (Author)

  2. High-Fidelity DNA Sensing by Protein Binding Fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Tlusty, Tsvi; Libchaber, Albert; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.93.258103

    2010-01-01

    One of the major functions of RecA protein in the cell is to bind single-stranded DNA exposed upon damage, thereby triggering the SOS repair response.We present fluorescence anisotropy measurements at the binding onset, showing enhanced DNA length discrimination induced by adenosine triphosphate consumption. Our model explains the observed DNA length sensing as an outcome of out-of equilibrium binding fluctuations, reminiscent of microtubule dynamic instability. The cascade architecture of the binding fluctuations is a generalization of the kinetic proofreading mechanism. Enhancement of precision by an irreversible multistage pathway is a possible design principle in the noisy biological environment.

  3. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation), UEV [ubiquitin E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme) variant] and NZF (nuclear protein localization gene 4 zinc finger) domain-containing proteins appear to have more specialized functions. Here we discuss functional and structural properties of...

  4. The DNA binding site of the Dof protein NtBBF1 is essential for tissue-specific and auxin-regulated expression of the rolB oncogene in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, K; De Paolis, A; Costantino, P; Gualberti, G

    1999-01-01

    The Dof proteins are a large family of plant transcription factors that share a single highly conserved zinc finger. The tobacco Dof protein NtBBF1 was identified by its ability to bind to regulatory domain B in the promoter of the rolB oncogene. In this study, we show that the ACT T TA target sequence of NtBBF1 in domain B is necessary for tissue-specific expression of rolB. beta-Glucuronidase (GUS) activity of tobacco plants containing a rolB promoter-GUS fusion with a mutated NtBBF1 target sequence within domain B is almost completely suppressed in apical meristems and is severely abated in the vascular system. The ACT T TA motif is shown here also to be one of the cis-regulatory elements involved in auxin induction of rolB. The pattern of NtBBF1 expression in plants is remarkably similar to that of rolB, except in mesophyll cells of mature leaves, in which only NtBBF1 expression could be detected. Ectopic expression of rolB in mesophyll cells was achieved by particle gun delivery if the NtBBF1 binding sequence was intact. These data provide evidence that in the plant, a Dof protein DNA binding sequence acts as a transcriptional regulatory motif, and they point to NtBBF1 as the protein involved in mediating tissue-specific and auxin-inducible expression of rolB. PMID:10072394

  5. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed

  6. Lipid A binding proteins in macrophages detected by ligand blotting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endotoxin (LPS) stimulates a variety of eukaryotic cells. These actions are involved in the pathogenesis of Gram-negative septicemia. The site of action of the LPS toxic moiety, lipid A (LA), is unclear. Their laboratory has previously identified a bioactive LA precursor lipid IV/sub A/, which can be enzymatically labeled with 32P/sub i/ (109 dpm/nmole) and purified (99%). They now show that this ligand binds to specific proteins immobilized on nitrocellulose (NC) from LPS-sensitive RAW 264.7 cultured macrophages. NC blots were incubated with [32P]-IV/sub A/ in a buffer containing BSA, NaCl, polyethylene glycol, and azide. Binding was assessed using autoradiography or scintillation counting. Dot blot binding of the radioligand was inhibited by excess cold IV/sub A/, LA, or ReLPS but not by phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, phosphatidylinositol, or phosphatidic acid. Binding was trypsin-sensitive and dependent on protein concentration. Particulate macrophage proteins were subjected to SDS-PAGE and then electroblotted onto NC. Several discrete binding proteins were observed. Identical treatment of fetal bovine serum or molecular weight standards revealed no detectable binding. By avoiding high nonspecific binding of intact membranes, this ligand blotting assay may be useful in elucidating the molecular actions of LPS

  7. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed as...... production or to increased cleavage by proteases other than MMP-9....

  8. Affinity chromatography reveals RuBisCO as an ecdysteroid-binding protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlík, Ondřej; Kamlar, Marek; Kohout, Ladislav; Ježek, Rudolf; Harmatha, Juraj; Macek, Tomáš

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 14 (2008), s. 1433-1440. ISSN 0039-128X R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M06030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : ecdysteroids * RuBisCO * regulation * binding protein Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2008

  9. Poly(A)-binding proteins and mRNA localization: who rules the roost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nicola K; Hrabálková, Lenka; Scanlon, Jessica P; Smith, Richard W P

    2015-12-01

    RNA-binding proteins are often multifunctional, interact with a variety of protein partners and display complex localizations within cells. Mammalian cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) are multifunctional RNA-binding proteins that regulate multiple aspects of mRNA translation and stability. Although predominantly diffusely cytoplasmic at steady state, they shuttle through the nucleus and can be localized to a variety of cytoplasmic foci, including those associated with mRNA storage and localized translation. Intriguingly, PABP sub-cellular distribution can alter dramatically in response to cellular stress or viral infection, becoming predominantly nuclear and/or being enriched in induced cytoplasmic foci. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms that govern this distribution/relocalization and in many cases PABP functions within specific sites remain unclear. Here we discuss the emerging evidence with respect to these questions in mammals. PMID:26614673

  10. Control of a neuronal morphology program by an RNA-binding zinc finger protein, Unkempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murn, Jernej; Zarnack, Kathi; Yang, Yawei J; Durak, Omer; Murphy, Elisabeth A; Cheloufi, Sihem; Gonzalez, Dilenny M; Teplova, Marianna; Curk, Tomaž; Zuber, Johannes; Patel, Dinshaw J; Ule, Jernej; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Tsai, Li-Huei; Walsh, Christopher A; Shi, Yang

    2015-03-01

    Cellular morphology is an essential determinant of cellular function in all kingdoms of life, yet little is known about how cell shape is controlled. Here we describe a molecular program that controls the early morphology of neurons through a metazoan-specific zinc finger protein, Unkempt. Depletion of Unkempt in mouse embryos disrupts the shape of migrating neurons, while ectopic expression confers neuronal-like morphology to cells of different nonneuronal lineages. We found that Unkempt is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein and identified its precise binding sites within coding regions of mRNAs linked to protein metabolism and trafficking. RNA binding is required for Unkempt-induced remodeling of cellular shape and is directly coupled to a reduced production of the encoded proteins. These findings link post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression with cellular shape and have general implications for the development and disease of multicellular organisms. PMID:25737280

  11. The cobalamin-binding protein in zebrafish is an intermediate between the three cobalamin-binding proteins in human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Greibe

    Full Text Available In humans, three soluble extracellular cobalamin-binding proteins; transcobalamin (TC, intrinsic factor (IF, and haptocorrin (HC, are involved in the uptake and transport of cobalamin. In this study, we investigate a cobalamin-binding protein from zebrafish (Danio rerio and summarize current knowledge concerning the phylogenetic evolution of kindred proteins. We identified a cobalamin binding capacity in zebrafish protein extracts (8.2 pmol/fish and ambient water (13.5 pmol/fish associated with a single protein. The protein showed resistance toward degradation by trypsin and chymotrypsin (like human IF, but unlike human HC and TC. The cobalamin analogue, cobinamide, bound weaker to the zebrafish cobalamin binder than to human HC, but stronger than to human TC and IF. Affinity for another analogue, adenosyl-pseudo-cobalamin was low compared with human HC and TC, but high compared with human IF. The absorbance spectrum of the purified protein in complex with hydroxo-cobalamin resembled those of human HC and IF, but not TC. We searched available databases to further explore the phylogenies of the three cobalamin-binding proteins in higher vertebrates. Apparently, TC-like proteins are the oldest evolutionary derivatives followed by IF and HC (the latter being present only in reptiles and most but not all mammals. Our findings suggest that the only cobalamin-binding protein in zebrafish is an intermediate between the three human cobalamin binders. These findings support the hypothesis about a common ancestral gene for all cobalamin-binding proteins in higher vertebrates.

  12. Distinct microRNA expression profile and targeted biological pathways in functional myeloid-derived suppressor cells induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol in vivo: regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α by microRNA-690.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Venkatesh L; Tomar, Sunil; Jackson, Austin; Rao, Roshni; Yang, Xiaoming; Singh, Udai P; Singh, Narendra P; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2013-12-27

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major bioactive component of marijuana, has been shown to induce functional myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in vivo. Here, we studied the involvement of microRNA (miRNA) in this process. CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) MDSCs were purified from peritoneal exudates of mice administered with THC and used for genome-wide miRNA profiling. Expression of CD31 and Ki-67 confirmed that the THC-MDSCs were immature and proliferating. THC-induced MDSCs exhibited distinct miRNA expression signature relative to various myeloid cells and BM precursors. We identified 13 differentially expressed (>2-fold) miRNA in THC-MDSCs relative to control BM precursors. In silico target prediction for these miRNA and pathway analysis using multiple bioinformatics tools revealed significant overrepresentation of Gene Ontology clusters within hematopoiesis, myeloid cell differentiation, and regulation categories. Insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling involved in cell growth and proliferation, and myeloid differentiation pathways were among the most significantly enriched canonical pathways. Among the differentially expressed, miRNA-690 was highly overexpressed in THC-MDSCs (∼16-fold). Transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) was identified as a potential functional target of miR-690. Supporting this, C/EBPα expression was attenuated in THC-MDSCs as compared with BM precursors and exhibited an inverse relation with miR-690. miR-690 knockdown using peptide nucleic acid-antagomiR was able to unblock and significantly increase C/EBPα expression establishing the functional link. Further, CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(+) and CD11b(+)Ly6G(-)Ly6C(+) purified subtypes showed high levels of miR-690 with attenuated C/EBPα expression. Moreover, EL-4 tumor-elicited MDSCs showed increased miR-690 expression. In conclusion, miRNA are significantly altered during the generation of functional MDSC from BM. Select miRNA such as miR-690 targeting genes involved in

  13. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T;

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...... by a simple two step protocol combining ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Dissociation constants for binding of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, oleoyl-CoA, lysophosphatidic acid and the peroxisomal proliferator bezafibrate to L-FABP have been determined by titration calorimetry. All ligands were...... bound in a 2:1 stoichiometry, the dissociation constants for the first ligand bound were all in the micro molar range. Oleic acid was bound with the highest affinity and a Kd of 0.26 microM. Furthermore, binding of cholesterol to L-FABP was investigated with the Lipidex assay, a liposome binding assay...

  14. Rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordhoff, E; Krogsdam, A M; Jorgensen, H F;

    1999-01-01

    We report a protocol for the rapid identification of DNA-binding proteins. Immobilized DNA probes harboring a specific sequence motif are incubated with cell or nuclear extract. Proteins are analyzed directly off the solid support by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass...

  15. Solid-binding Proteins for Modification of Inorganic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Brandon Laurence

    Robust and simple strategies to directly functionalize graphene- and diamond-based nanostructures with proteins are of considerable interest for biologically driven manufacturing, biosensing and bioimaging. In this work, we identify a new set of carbon binding peptides that vary in overall hydrophobicity and charge, and engineer two of these sequences (Car9 and Car15) within the framework of various proteins to exploit their binding ability. In addition, we conducted a detailed analysis of the mechanisms that underpin the interaction of the fusion proteins with carbon and silicon surfaces. Through these insights, we were able to develop proteins suitable for dispersing graphene flakes and carbon nanotubes in aqueous solutions, while retaining protein activity. Additionally, our investigation into the mechanisms of adhesion for our carbon binding peptides inspired a cheap, disposable protein purification system that is more than 10x cheaper than commonly used His-tag protein purification. Our results emphasize the importance of understanding both bulk and molecular recognition events when exploiting the adhesive properties of solid-binding peptides and proteins in technological applications.

  16. Zeatin-binding proteins in barley leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly labelled tritium-zeatin was used in the work to clarify for the first time a protein factor that is present in cytokinin-sensitive vegetative organs of plants (barley leaves) and which possesses the properties of a cytokinin receptor. Aliquots of tritium-zeatin were mixed with a solution of protein and incubated for several hours in buffer. Following incubation, protein was precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 90% of saturation, and radioactivity of the precipitate was checked in a dioxane scintillator with an efficiency of about 35%. It is shown that the characteristics of interaction of the clarified specific protein sites with cytokinins in regard to a number of criteria correspond to the characteristics expected of receptors of these phytohormones

  17. Zeatin-binding proteins in barley leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, G.A.; Kulaeva, O.N.; Taryan, V.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Highly labelled tritium-zeatin was used in the work to clarify for the first time a protein factor that is present in cytokinin-sensitive vegetative organs of plants (barley leaves) and which possesses the properties of a cytokinin receptor. Aliquots of tritium-zeatin were mixed with a solution of protein and incubated for several hours in buffer. Following incubation, protein was precipitated by ammonium sulfate at 90% of saturation, and radioactivity of the precipitate was checked in a dioxane scintillator with an efficiency of about 35%. It is shown that the characteristics of interaction of the clarified specific protein sites with cytokinins in regard to a number of criteria correspond to the characteristics expected of receptors of these phytohormones.

  18. Relating the shape of protein binding sites to binding affinity profiles: is there an association?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bitter István

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various pattern-based methods exist that use in vitro or in silico affinity profiles for classification and functional examination of proteins. Nevertheless, the connection between the protein affinity profiles and the structural characteristics of the binding sites is still unclear. Our aim was to investigate the association between virtual drug screening results (calculated binding free energy values and the geometry of protein binding sites. Molecular Affinity Fingerprints (MAFs were determined for 154 proteins based on their molecular docking energy results for 1,255 FDA-approved drugs. Protein binding site geometries were characterized by 420 PocketPicker descriptors. The basic underlying component structure of MAFs and binding site geometries, respectively, were examined by principal component analysis; association between principal components extracted from these two sets of variables was then investigated by canonical correlation and redundancy analyses. Results PCA analysis of the MAF variables provided 30 factors which explained 71.4% of the total variance of the energy values while 13 factors were obtained from the PocketPicker descriptors which cumulatively explained 94.1% of the total variance. Canonical correlation analysis resulted in 3 statistically significant canonical factor pairs with correlation values of 0.87, 0.84 and 0.77, respectively. Redundancy analysis indicated that PocketPicker descriptor factors explain 6.9% of the variance of the MAF factor set while MAF factors explain 15.9% of the total variance of PocketPicker descriptor factors. Based on the salient structures of the factor pairs, we identified a clear-cut association between the shape and bulkiness of the drug molecules and the protein binding site descriptors. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate complex multivariate associations between affinity profiles and the geometric properties of protein binding sites. We found that

  19. Lil3 Assembles with Proteins Regulating Chlorophyll Synthesis in Barley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Mork-Jansson

    Full Text Available The light-harvesting-like (LIL proteins are a family of membrane proteins that share a chlorophyll a/b-binding motif with the major light-harvesting antenna proteins of oxygenic photoautotrophs. LIL proteins have been associated with the regulation of tetrapyrrol biosynthesis, and plant responses to light-stress. Here, it was found in a native PAGE approach that chlorophyllide, and chlorophyllide plus geranylgeraniolpyrophosphate trigger assembly of Lil3 in three chlorine binding fluorescent protein bands, termed F1, F2, and F3. It is shown that light and chlorophyllide trigger accumulation of protochlorophyllide-oxidoreductase, and chlorophyll synthase in band F3. Chlorophyllide and chlorophyll esterified to geranylgeraniol were identified as basis of fluorescence recorded from band F3. A direct interaction between Lil3, CHS and POR was confirmed in a split ubiquitin assay. In the presence of light or chlorophyllide, geranylgeraniolpyrophosphate was shown to trigger a loss of the F3 band and accumulation of Lil3 and geranylgeranyl reductase in F1 and F2. No direct interaction between Lil3 and geranylgeraniolreductase was identified in a split ubiquitin assay; however, accumulation of chlorophyll esterified to phytol in F1 and F2 corroborated the enzymes assembly. Chlorophyll esterified to phytol and the reaction center protein psbD of photosystem II were identified to accumulate together with psb29, and APX in the fluorescent band F2. Data show that Lil3 assembles with proteins regulating chlorophyll synthesis in etioplasts from barley (Hordeum vulgare L..

  20. Theoretical studies of binding of mannose-binding protein to monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida-Hyugaji, Sachiko; Takano, Keiko; Takada, Toshikazu; Hosoya, Haruo; Kojima, Naoya; Mizuochi, Tsuguo; Inoue, Yasushi

    2004-11-01

    Binding properties of mannose-binding protein (MBP) to monosaccharides are discussed based on ab initio molecular orbital calculations for cluster models constructed. The calculated binding energies indicate that MBP has an affinity for N-acetyl- D-glucosamine, D-mannose, L-fucose, and D-glucose rather than D-galactose and N-acetyl- D-galactosamine, which is consistent with the biochemical experimental results. Electrostatic potential surfaces at the binding site of four monosaccharides having binding properties matched well with that of MBP. A vacant frontier orbital was found to be localized around the binding site of MBP, suggesting that MBP-monosaccharide interaction may occur through electrostatic and orbital interactions.

  1. Cholesterol-binding viral proteins in virus entry and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    Up to now less than a handful of viral cholesterol-binding proteins have been characterized, in HIV, influenza virus and Semliki Forest virus. These are proteins with roles in virus entry or morphogenesis. In the case of the HIV fusion protein gp41 cholesterol binding is attributed to a cholesterol recognition consensus (CRAC) motif in a flexible domain of the ectodomain preceding the trans-membrane segment. This specific CRAC sequence mediates gp41 binding to a cholesterol affinity column. Mutations in this motif arrest virus fusion at the hemifusion stage and modify the ability of the isolated CRAC peptide to induce segregation of cholesterol in artificial membranes.Influenza A virus M2 protein co-purifies with cholesterol. Its proton translocation activity, responsible for virus uncoating, is not cholesterol-dependent, and the transmembrane channel appears too short for integral raft insertion. Cholesterol binding may be mediated by CRAC motifs in the flexible post-TM domain, which harbours three determinants of binding to membrane rafts. Mutation of the CRAC motif of the WSN strain attenuates virulence for mice. Its affinity to the raft-non-raft interface is predicted to target M2 protein to the periphery of lipid raft microdomains, the sites of virus assembly. Its influence on the morphology of budding virus implicates M2 as factor in virus fission at the raft boundary. Moreover, M2 is an essential factor in sorting the segmented genome into virus particles, indicating that M2 also has a role in priming the outgrowth of virus buds.SFV E1 protein is the first viral type-II fusion protein demonstrated to directly bind cholesterol when the fusion peptide loop locks into the target membrane. Cholesterol binding is modulated by another, proximal loop, which is also important during virus budding and as a host range determinant, as shown by mutational studies. PMID:20213541

  2. Detergent activation of the binding protein in the folate radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A minor cow's whey protein associated with β-lactoglobulin is used as binding protein in the competitive radioassay for serum and erythrocyte folate. Seeking to optimize the assay, we tested the performance of binder solutions of increasing purity. The folate binding protein was isolated from cow's whey by means of CM-Sepharose CL-6B cation-exchange chromatography, and further purified on a methotrexate-AH-Sepharose 4B affinity matrix. In contrast to β-lactoglobulin, the purified protein did not bind folate unless the detergents cetyltrimethylammonium (10 mmol/Ll) or Triton X-100 (1 g/L) were present. Such detergent activation was not needed in the presence of serum. There seems to be a striking analogy between these phenomena and the well-known reactivation of certain purified membrane-derived enzymes by surfactants

  3. Identification, characterization, and developmental regulation of embryonic benzodiazepine binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the identification and characterization of 2 classes of benzodiazepine binding sites in the embryonic chick CNS. Binding was examined by competition and saturation binding experiments, using as radioligands 3H-flunitrazepam, a classical benzodiazepine anxiolytic, and 3H-Ro5-4864, a convulsant benzodiazepine. The results demonstrate that high-affinity (KD = 2.3 nM) 3H-flunitrazepam binding sites (site-A) are present by embryonic day 5 (Hamburger and Hamilton stage 27) and increase throughout development (Bmax = 0.3 and 1.3 pmol/mg protein in 7 and 20 d brain membranes, respectively). When 7 or 20 d brain membranes are photoaffinity-labeled with 3H-flunitrazepam and ultraviolet light, the radioactivity migrates as 2 bands on SDS-PAGE, consistent with Mrs of 48,000 and 51,000. GABA potentiates 3H-flunitrazepam binding at both 7 and 20 d of development, indicating that site-A is coupled to receptors for GABA early in development. Importantly, we have also identified a novel site (site-B) that binds classical benzodiazepine agonists with low affinity (micromolar) but displays high affinity for Ro5-4864 (KD = 41 nM). Site-B displays characteristics expected for a functional receptor, including stereospecificity and sensitivity to inactivation by heat and protease treatment. Saturation binding studies employing 3H-Ro5-4864 indicate that the levels of site-B are similar in 7 and 20 d brain (ca. 2.5 pmol/mg protein). The function of site-B is not known, but its preponderance in 7 d brain, relative to site-A, suggests that it might be important during early embryonic development

  4. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  5. Purification and characterization of native human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6

    OpenAIRE

    Taferner, Andrea; Micutkova, Lucia; Hermann, Martin; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Pircher, Haymo

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are key regulators of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) mediated signal transduction and thereby can profoundly influence cellular phenotypes and cell fate. Whereas IGFBPs are extracellular proteins, intracellular activities were described for several IGFBP family members, such as IGFBP-3, which can be reinternalized by endocytosis and reaches the nucleus through routes that remain to be fully established. Within the family of IGFBPs, IGFBP-...

  6. The Microtubule-Associated Protein END BINDING1 Modulates Membrane Trafficking Pathways in Plant Root Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shahidi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    EB1 protein preferentially binds to the fast growing ends of microtubules where it regulates microtubule dynamics. In addition to microtubules, EB1 interacts with several additional proteins, and through these interactions modulates various cellular processes. Arabidopsis thaliana eb1 mutants have roots that exhibit aberrant responses to touch/gravity cues. Columella cells in the centre of the root cap are polarized and play key roles in these responses by functioning as sensors.I examined th...

  7. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the...

  8. PIG11 protein binds to DNA in sequence-independent manner in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIG11 (p53-induced protein 11), one of early transcriptional targets of tumor suppressor p53, was up-regulated in the induction of apoptosis or cell growth inhibition by multiple chemopreventive agents. However, its biological role remains unclear. Here, we expressed His6-tagged PIG11 protein in Escherichia coli and demonstrated the recombinant His6-tagged PIG11 protein could bind to supercoiled and relaxed closed circular plasmid DNA or linear DNA with different length using gel retardation assays in vitro. The interaction between DNA and PIG11 protein was sequence-independent and related to charge effect. The reducing thiol group in PIG11 protein was involved in the binding activity of PIG11 to DNA. Furthermore, the images of atomic force microscopy directly confirmed the binding of DNA and PIG11 protein and showed the PIG11-DNA complex formed a beads-on-a-string appearance in which PIG11 protein associated with DNA as polymer. These findings suggest that PIG11 protein may play an important role by interaction with other biological molecules in the regulation of apoptosis and provided us a novel angel of view to explore the possible function of PIG11 in vivo

  9. Drug Promiscuity in PDB: Protein Binding Site Similarity Is Key.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Joachim Haupt

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning applies established drugs to new disease indications with increasing success. A pre-requisite for drug repurposing is drug promiscuity (polypharmacology - a drug's ability to bind to several targets. There is a long standing debate on the reasons for drug promiscuity. Based on large compound screens, hydrophobicity and molecular weight have been suggested as key reasons. However, the results are sometimes contradictory and leave space for further analysis. Protein structures offer a structural dimension to explain promiscuity: Can a drug bind multiple targets because the drug is flexible or because the targets are structurally similar or even share similar binding sites? We present a systematic study of drug promiscuity based on structural data of PDB target proteins with a set of 164 promiscuous drugs. We show that there is no correlation between the degree of promiscuity and ligand properties such as hydrophobicity or molecular weight but a weak correlation to conformational flexibility. However, we do find a correlation between promiscuity and structural similarity as well as binding site similarity of protein targets. In particular, 71% of the drugs have at least two targets with similar binding sites. In order to overcome issues in detection of remotely similar binding sites, we employed a score for binding site similarity: LigandRMSD measures the similarity of the aligned ligands and uncovers remote local similarities in proteins. It can be applied to arbitrary structural binding site alignments. Three representative examples, namely the anti-cancer drug methotrexate, the natural product quercetin and the anti-diabetic drug acarbose are discussed in detail. Our findings suggest that global structural and binding site similarity play a more important role to explain the observed drug promiscuity in the PDB than physicochemical drug properties like hydrophobicity or molecular weight. Additionally, we find ligand

  10. Protein-protein binding affinities calculated using the LIE method

    OpenAIRE

    Andberg, Tor Arne Heim

    2011-01-01

    Absolute binding free energies for the third domain of the turkey ovomucoid inhibitor in complex with Streptomyces griseus proteinase B and porcine pancreatic elastase has been calculated using the linear interaction energy method.

  11. The Role Stress Granules and RNA Binding Proteins in Neurodegeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderweyde, Tara; Youmans, Katie; Liu-Yesucevitz, Liqun; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic stress response involves translational suppression of non-housekeeping proteins and the sequestration of unnecessary mRNA transcripts into stress granules (SGs). This process is dependent on mRNA binding proteins (RBPs) that interact with capped mRNA transcripts through RNA recognition motifs, and exhibit reversible aggregation through hydrophobic poly-glycine domains, some of which are homologous to yeast prion proteins. The activity and aggregation of RBPs appears to be impor...

  12. Pentatricopeptide repeats: Modular blocks for building RNA-binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Filipovska, Aleksandra; Rackham, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins control diverse aspects of RNA metabolism across the eukaryotic domain. Recent computational and structural studies have provided new insights into how they recognize RNA, and show that the recognition is sequence-specific and modular. The modular code for RNA-binding by PPR proteins holds great promise for the engineering of new tools to target RNA and identifying RNAs bound by natural PPR proteins.

  13. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  14. Characterization of engineered actin binding proteins that control filament assembly and structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crista M Brawley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cells strictly regulate the structure and assembly of their actin filament networks in response to various stimuli. The actin binding proteins that control filament assembly are therefore attractive targets for those who wish to reorganize actin filaments and reengineer the cytoskeleton. Unfortunately, the naturally occurring actin binding proteins include only a limited set of pointed-end cappers, or proteins that will block polymerization from the slow-growing end of actin filaments. Of the few that are known, most are part of large multimeric complexes that are challenging to manipulate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe here the use of phage display mutagenesis to generate of a new class of binding protein that can be targeted to the pointed-end of actin. These proteins, called synthetic antigen binders (sABs, are based on an antibody-like scaffold where sequence diversity is introduced into the binding loops using a novel "reduced genetic code" phage display library. We describe effective strategies to select and screen for sABs that ensure the generated sABs bind to the pointed-end surface of actin exclusively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: From our set of pointed-end binders, we identify three sABs with particularly useful properties to systematically probe actin dynamics: one protein that caps the pointed end, a second that crosslinks actin filaments, and a third that severs actin filaments and promotes disassembly.

  15. Profiling Protein Kinases and Other ATP Binding Proteins in Arabidopsis Using Acyl-ATP Probes*

    OpenAIRE

    Villamor, J. G.; Kaschani, F.; Colby, T; Oeljeklaus, J.; Zhao, D; Kaiser, M.; Patricelli, M. P.; R. A. L. van der Hoorn

    2013-01-01

    Many protein activities are driven by ATP binding and hydrolysis. Here, we explore the ATP binding proteome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana using acyl-ATP (AcATP)1 probes. These probes target ATP binding sites and covalently label lysine residues in the ATP binding pocket. Gel-based profiling using biotinylated AcATP showed that labeling is dependent on pH and divalent ions and can be competed by nucleotides. The vast majority of these AcATP-labeled proteins are known ATP binding prot...

  16. Natural history of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushegian Arcady R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S-adenosylmethionine is a source of diverse chemical groups used in biosynthesis and modification of virtually every class of biomolecules. The most notable reaction requiring S-adenosylmethionine, transfer of methyl group, is performed by a large class of enzymes, S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases, which have been the focus of considerable structure-function studies. Evolutionary trajectories of these enzymes, and especially of other classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins, nevertheless, remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by computational comparison of sequences and structures of various S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Results Two widespread folds, Rossmann fold and TIM barrel, have been repeatedly used in evolution for diverse types of S-adenosylmethionine conversion. There were also cases of recruitment of other relatively common folds for S-adenosylmethionine binding. Several classes of proteins have unique unrelated folds, specialized for just one type of chemistry and unified by the theme of internal domain duplications. In several cases, functional divergence is evident, when evolutionarily related enzymes have changed the mode of binding and the type of chemical transformation of S-adenosylmethionine. There are also instances of functional convergence, when biochemically similar processes are performed by drastically different classes of S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins. Comparison of remote sequence similarities and analysis of phyletic patterns suggests that the last universal common ancestor of cellular life had between 10 and 20 S-adenosylmethionine-binding proteins from at least 5 fold classes, providing for S-adenosylmethionine formation, polyamine biosynthesis, and methylation of several substrates, including nucleic acids and peptide chain release factor. Conclusion We have observed several novel relationships between families that were not known to be

  17. Quantitative analysis of EGR proteins binding to DNA: assessing additivity in both the binding site and the protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stormo Gary D

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recognition codes for protein-DNA interactions typically assume that the interacting positions contribute additively to the binding energy. While this is known to not be precisely true, an additive model over the DNA positions can be a good approximation, at least for some proteins. Much less information is available about whether the protein positions contribute additively to the interaction. Results Using EGR zinc finger proteins, we measure the binding affinity of six different variants of the protein to each of six different variants of the consensus binding site. Both the protein and binding site variants include single and double mutations that allow us to assess how well additive models can account for the data. For each protein and DNA alone we find that additive models are good approximations, but over the combined set of data there are context effects that limit their accuracy. However, a small modification to the purely additive model, with only three additional parameters, improves the fit significantly. Conclusion The additive model holds very well for every DNA site and every protein included in this study, but clear context dependence in the interactions was detected. A simple modification to the independent model provides a better fit to the complete data.

  18. The expanding universe of ribonucleoproteins: of novel RNA-binding proteins and unconventional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Benedikt M; Castello, Alfredo; Medenbach, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression plays a critical role in almost all cellular processes. Regulation occurs mostly by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) that recognise RNA elements and form ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) to control RNA metabolism from synthesis to decay. Recently, the repertoire of RBPs was significantly expanded owing to methodological advances such as RNA interactome capture. The newly identified RNA binders are involved in diverse biological processes and belong to a broad spectrum of protein families, many of them exhibiting enzymatic activities. This suggests the existence of an extensive crosstalk between RNA biology and other, in principle unrelated, cell functions such as intermediary metabolism. Unexpectedly, hundreds of new RBPs do not contain identifiable RNA-binding domains (RBDs), raising the question of how they interact with RNA. Despite the many functions that have been attributed to RNA, our understanding of RNPs is still mostly governed by a rather protein-centric view, leading to the idea that proteins have evolved to bind to and regulate RNA and not vice versa. However, RNPs formed by an RNA-driven interaction mechanism (RNA-determined RNPs) are abundant and offer an alternative explanation for the surprising lack of classical RBDs in many RNA-interacting proteins. Moreover, RNAs can act as scaffolds to orchestrate and organise protein networks and directly control their activity, suggesting that nucleic acids might play an important regulatory role in many cellular processes, including metabolism. PMID:27165283

  19. New Insights into Functional Roles of the Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Grazia Romanelli

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein (PTB is an intensely studied RNA binding protein involved in several post-transcriptional regulatory events of gene expression. Initially described as a pre-mRNA splicing regulator, PTB is now widely accepted as a multifunctional protein shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm. Accordingly, PTB can interact with selected RNA targets, structural elements and proteins. There is increasing evidence that PTB and its paralog PTBP2 play a major role as repressors of alternatively spliced exons, whose transcription is tissue-regulated. In addition to alternative splicing, PTB is involved in almost all steps of mRNA metabolism, including polyadenylation, mRNA stability and initiation of protein translation. Furthermore, it is well established that PTB recruitment in internal ribosome entry site (IRES activates the translation of picornaviral and cellular proteins. Detailed studies of the structural properties of PTB have contributed to our understanding of the mechanism of RNA binding by RNA Recognition Motif (RRM domains. In the present review, we will describe the structural properties of PTB, its paralogs and co-factors, the role in post-transcriptional regulation and actions in cell differentiation and pathogenesis. Defining the multifunctional roles of PTB will contribute to the understanding of key regulatory events in gene expression.

  20. A Genetic Screen Identifies Putative Targets and Binding Partners of CREB-Binding Protein in the Developing Drosophila Eye

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Jason; Bhandari, Rohan; Kumar, Justin P.

    2005-01-01

    Drosophila CREB-binding protein (dCBP) is a very large multidomain protein, which belongs to the CBP/p300 family of proteins that were first identified by their ability to bind the CREB transcription factor and the adenoviral protein E1. Since then CBP has been shown to bind to >100 additional proteins and functions in a multitude of different developmental contexts. Among other activities, CBP is known to influence development by remodeling chromatin, by serving as a transcriptional coactiva...

  1. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA-binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul;

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  2. Cyanobacteria contain a structural homologue of the Hfq protein with altered RNA binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøggild, Andreas; Overgaard, Martin; Valentin-Hansen, Poul;

    2009-01-01

    regulating mRNA turnover in eukaryotes. However, bacterial Hfq proteins are homohexameric, whereas eukaryotic Sm/Lsm proteins are heteroheptameric. Recently, Hfq proteins with poor sequence conservation were identified in archaea and cyanobacteria. In this article, we describe crystal structures of the Hfq...... proteins from the cyanobacteria Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena PCC 7120 at 1.3 and 2.3 A resolution, respectively, and show that they retain the classic Sm fold despite low sequence conservation. In addition, the intersubunit contacts and RNA-binding site are divergent, and we show biochemically...

  3. Tetrapyrrole binding affinity of the murine and human p22HBP heme-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micaelo, Nuno M; Macedo, Anjos L; Goodfellow, Brian J; Félix, Vítor

    2010-11-01

    We present the first systematic molecular modeling study of the binding properties of murine (mHBP) and human (hHBP) p22HBP protein (heme-binding protein) with four tetrapyrrole ring systems belonging to the heme biosynthetic pathway: iron protoporphyrin IX (HEMIN), protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), coproporphyrin III (CPIII), coproporphyrin I (CPI). The relative binding affinities predicted by our computational study were found to be similar to those observed experimentally, providing a first rational structural analysis of the molecular recognition mechanism, by p22HBP, toward a number of different tetrapyrrole ligands. To probe the structure of these p22HBP protein complexes, docking, molecular dynamics and MM-PBSA methodologies supported by experimental NMR ring current shift data have been employed. The tetrapyrroles studied were found to bind murine p22HBP with the following binding affinity order: HEMIN> PPIX> CPIII> CPI, which ranged from -22.2 to -6.1 kcal/mol. In general, the protein-tetrapyrrole complexes are stabilized by non-bonded interactions between the tetrapyrrole propionate groups and basic residues of the protein, and by the preferential solvation of the complex compared to the unbound components. PMID:20800521

  4. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Castellanos

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq to further elucidate the

  5. The mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julhash U. KAZI

    2011-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family ofserine/threonine protein kinases that plays a central role in transducing extracellular signals into a variety of intracellular responses ranging from cell proliferation to apoptosis.Nine PKC genes have been identified in the human genome,which encode 10 proteins.Each member of this protein kinase family displays distinct biochemical characteristics and is enriched in different cellular and subcellular locations.Activation of PKC has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation.This review summarizes works of the past years in the field of PKC biochemistry that covers regulation and activation mechanism of different PKC isoforms.

  6. Redox regulation of Nox proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Pendyala, Srikanth; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2010-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a major role in endothelial signaling and function. Of the several potential sources of ROS in the vasculature, the endothelial NADPH Oxidase (Nox) family of proteins, Nox1, Nox2, Nox4 and Nox5, are major contributors of ROS. Excess generation of ROS contributes to the development and progression of vascular disease. While hyperoxia stimulates ROS production through Nox proteins, hypoxia appears to involve mitochondrial electron transport ...

  7. Predicting the binding patterns of hub proteins: a study using yeast protein interaction networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson M Andorf

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein-protein interactions are critical to elucidating the role played by individual proteins in important biological pathways. Of particular interest are hub proteins that can interact with large numbers of partners and often play essential roles in cellular control. Depending on the number of binding sites, protein hubs can be classified at a structural level as singlish-interface hubs (SIH with one or two binding sites, or multiple-interface hubs (MIH with three or more binding sites. In terms of kinetics, hub proteins can be classified as date hubs (i.e., interact with different partners at different times or locations or party hubs (i.e., simultaneously interact with multiple partners. METHODOLOGY: Our approach works in 3 phases: Phase I classifies if a protein is likely to bind with another protein. Phase II determines if a protein-binding (PB protein is a hub. Phase III classifies PB proteins as singlish-interface versus multiple-interface hubs and date versus party hubs. At each stage, we use sequence-based predictors trained using several standard machine learning techniques. CONCLUSIONS: Our method is able to predict whether a protein is a protein-binding protein with an accuracy of 94% and a correlation coefficient of 0.87; identify hubs from non-hubs with 100% accuracy for 30% of the data; distinguish date hubs/party hubs with 69% accuracy and area under ROC curve of 0.68; and SIH/MIH with 89% accuracy and area under ROC curve of 0.84. Because our method is based on sequence information alone, it can be used even in settings where reliable protein-protein interaction data or structures of protein-protein complexes are unavailable to obtain useful insights into the functional and evolutionary characteristics of proteins and their interactions. AVAILABILITY: We provide a web server for our three-phase approach: http://hybsvm.gdcb.iastate.edu.

  8. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe;

    2013-01-01

    in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2......(Hb) and, by inference, other Cbp1 and Cbp2 proteins are closely related in structure to homeodomain proteins with linked helix-turn-helix (HTH) domains, in particular the paired domain Pax and Myb family proteins that are involved in eukaryal transcriptional regulation....... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...

  9. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with [3H] -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine ([3H]NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A2 receptor. We call this site the adenosine A2-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A1 receptor. The soluble adenosine A2-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A1 receptor with [3H]-2-chloroadenosine and [3H]NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A1 specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands [3H]-cyclohexyladenosine [3H] cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A1 agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A2-like binding site. The adenosine A2-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 Angstrom. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A2-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine

  10. Characterization of adenosine binding proteins in human placental membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchison, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized two adenosine binding proteins in human placenta. In membranes, one site is detected with ({sup 3}H) -N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (({sup 3}H)NECA). This site is similar to the adenosine A{sub 2} receptor. We call this site the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. In detergent extracts, the second site is detected and has the characteristics of an adenosine A{sub 1} receptor. The soluble adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site cannot be detected without a rapid assay. Binding to the adenosine A{sub 1} receptor with ({sup 3}H)-2-chloroadenosine and ({sup 3}H)NECA is time dependent, saturable, and reversible. Equilibrium displacement analysis with adenosine agonists reveals an A{sub 1} specificity: 2-chloroadenosine > R-phenylisopropyladenosine > 5{prime}-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine. The antagonist potency order is 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine > isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline. Competition analysis of membranes with the A,-selective ligands ({sup 3}H)-cyclohexyladenosine ({sup 3}H) cylopentylxanthine revealed adenosine A{sub 1} agonist and antagonist potency orders. We have purified the adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site is an ubiquitous major cellular protein. It is glycosylated, highly asymmetric, and acidic. The native protein is an homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of 98 kDa. The sedimentation coefficient and partial specific volume of the binding complex are 6.9 s and 0.698 ml/g, respectively. The Stokes' radius is 70 {Angstrom}. The native molecular mass of the detergent-protein complex is 230 kDa. The adenosine A{sub 2}-like binding site has an agonist potency order of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine >> R-phenylisopropyladenosine and an antagonist potency order of isobutylmethylxanthine > theophylline >> 1,3-diethyl-8-phenylxanthine.

  11. Identification of albumin-binding proteins in capillary endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Isolated fat tissue microvessels and lung, whose capillary endothelia express in situ specific binding sites for albumin, were homogenized and subjected to SDS-gel electrophoresis and electroblotting. The nitrocellulose strips were incubated with either albumin-gold (Alb-Au) and directly visualized, or with [125I]albumin (monomeric or polymeric) and autoradiographed. The extracts of both microvascular endothelium and the lung express albumin-binding proteins (ABPs) represented by two pairs of...

  12. Yeast TATA-binding protein TFIID binds to TATA elements with both consensus and nonconsensus DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    S. Hahn; Buratowski, S.; Sharp, P A; Guarente, L

    1989-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the yeast TATA element-binding protein TFIID were investigated. The affinity (apparent equilibrium dissociation constant) of TFIID for the adenovirus major late promoter consensus TATA element is 2 x 10(-9) M, a value similar to the affinity of gene-specific regulatory proteins for their binding sites. TFIID binding is highly specific and recognizes nonspecific sites with approximately 10(5)-fold lower affinity. Despite this specificity, TFIID also binds with hig...

  13. Analysis of Copper-Binding Proteins in Rice Radicles Exposed to Excess Copper and Hydrogen Peroxide Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxiao; Xia, Yan; Chen, Chen; Zhuang, Kai; Song, Yufeng; Shen, Zhenguo

    2016-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient for plants, but excess Cu can inactivate and disturb the protein function due to unavoidable binding to proteins at the cellular level. As a redox-active metal, Cu toxicity is mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cu-binding structural motifs may alleviate Cu-induced damage by decreasing free Cu(2+) activity in cytoplasm or scavenging ROS. The identification of Cu-binding proteins involved in the response of plants to Cu or ROS toxicity may increase our understanding the mechanisms of metal toxicity and tolerance in plants. This study investigated change of Cu-binding proteins in radicles of germinating rice seeds under excess Cu and oxidative stress using immobilized Cu(2+) affinity chromatography, two-dimensional electrophoresis, and mass spectra analysis. Quantitative image analysis revealed that 26 protein spots showed more than a 1.5-fold difference in abundances under Cu or H2O2 treatment compared to the control. The identified Cu-binding proteins were involved in anti-oxidative defense, stress response and detoxification, protein synthesis, protein modification, and metabolism regulation. The present results revealed that 17 out of 24 identified Cu-binding proteins have a similar response to low concentration Cu (20 μM Cu) and H2O2 stress, and 5 out of 24 were increased under low and high concentration Cu (100 μM Cu) but unaffected under H2O2 stress, which hint Cu ions can regulate Cu-binding proteins accumulation by H2O2 or no H2O2 pathway to cope with excess Cu in cell. The change pattern of these Cu-binding proteins and their function analysis warrant to further study the roles of Cu ions in these Cu-binding proteins of plant cells. PMID:27582750

  14. Differential plasma protein binding to metal oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles rapidly interact with the proteins present in biological fluids, such as blood. The proteins that are adsorbed onto the surface potentially dictate the biokinetics of the nanomaterials and their fate in vivo. Using nanoparticles with different sizes and surface characteristics, studies have reported the effects of physicochemical properties on the composition of adsorbed plasma proteins. However, to date, few studies have been conducted focusing on the nanoparticles that are commonly exposed to the general public, such as the metal oxides. Using previously established ultracentrifugation approaches, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, the current study investigated the binding of human plasma proteins to commercially available titanium dioxide, silicon dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles. We found that, despite these particles having similar surface charges in buffer, they bound different plasma proteins. For TiO2, the shape of the nanoparticles was also an important determinant of protein binding. Agglomeration in water was observed for all of the nanoparticles and both TiO2 and ZnO further agglomerated in biological media. This led to an increase in the amount and number of different proteins bound to these nanoparticles. Proteins with important biological functions were identified, including immunoglobulins, lipoproteins, acute-phase proteins and proteins involved in complement pathways and coagulation. These results provide important insights into which human plasma proteins bind to particular metal oxide nanoparticles. Because protein absorption to nanoparticles may determine their interaction with cells and tissues in vivo, understanding how and why plasma proteins are adsorbed to these particles may be important for understanding their biological responses.

  15. Hermes RNA-binding protein targets RNAs-encoding proteins involved in meiotic maturation, early cleavage, and germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hye-Won; Cauffman, Karen; Chan, Agnes P; Zhou, Yi; King, Mary Lou; Etkin, Laurence D; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2007-07-01

    The early development of metazoans is mainly regulated by differential translation and localization of maternal mRNAs in the embryo. In general, these processes are orchestrated by RNA-binding proteins interacting with specific sequence motifs in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of their target RNAs. Hermes is an RNA-binding protein, which contains a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) and is found in various vertebrate species from fish to human. In Xenopus laevis, Hermes mRNA and protein are localized in the vegetal region of oocytes. A subpopulation of Hermes protein is concentrated in a specific structure in the vegetal cortex, called the germ plasm (believed to contain determinants of the germ cell fate) where Hermes protein co-localizes with Xcat2 and RINGO/Spy mRNAs. The level of total Hermes protein decreases during maturation. The precocious depletion of Hermes protein by injection of Hermes antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (HE-MO) accelerates the process of maturation and results in cleavage defects in vegetal blastomeres of the embryo. It is known that several maternal mRNAs including RINGO/Spy and Mos are regulated at the translational level during meiotic maturation and early cleavage in Xenopus. The ectopic expression of RINGO/Spy or Mos causes resumption of meiotic maturation and cleavage arrests, which resemble the loss of Hermes phenotypes. We found that the injection of HE-MO enhances the acceleration of maturation caused by the injection of RINGO/Spy mRNA, and that Hermes protein is present as mRNP complex containing RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs in vivo. We propose that as an RNA-binding protein, Hermes may be involved in maturation, cleavage events at the vegetal pole and germ cell development by negatively regulating the expression of RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs. PMID:17309605

  16. A deep learning framework for modeling structural features of RNA-binding protein targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sai; Zhou, Jingtian; Hu, Hailin; Gong, Haipeng; Chen, Ligong; Cheng, Chao; Zeng, Jianyang

    2016-02-29

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in the post-transcriptional control of RNAs. Identifying RBP binding sites and characterizing RBP binding preferences are key steps toward understanding the basic mechanisms of the post-transcriptional gene regulation. Though numerous computational methods have been developed for modeling RBP binding preferences, discovering a complete structural representation of the RBP targets by integrating their available structural features in all three dimensions is still a challenging task. In this paper, we develop a general and flexible deep learning framework for modeling structural binding preferences and predicting binding sites of RBPs, which takes (predicted) RNA tertiary structural information into account for the first time. Our framework constructs a unified representation that characterizes the structural specificities of RBP targets in all three dimensions, which can be further used to predict novel candidate binding sites and discover potential binding motifs. Through testing on the real CLIP-seq datasets, we have demonstrated that our deep learning framework can automatically extract effective hidden structural features from the encoded raw sequence and structural profiles, and predict accurate RBP binding sites. In addition, we have conducted the first study to show that integrating the additional RNA tertiary structural features can improve the model performance in predicting RBP binding sites, especially for the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), which also provides a new evidence to support the view that RBPs may own specific tertiary structural binding preferences. In particular, the tests on the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) segments yield satisfiable results with experimental support from the literature and further demonstrate the necessity of incorporating RNA tertiary structural information into the prediction model. The source code of our approach can be found in https

  17. Binding dynamics of single-stranded DNA binding proteins to fluctuating bubbles in breathing DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the dynamics of a single local denaturation zone in a DNA molecule, a so-called DNA bubble, in the presence of single-stranded DNA binding proteins (SSBs). In particular, we develop a dynamical description of the process in terms of a two-dimensional master equation for the time evolution of the probability distribution of having a bubble of size m with n bound SSBs, for the case when m and n are the slowest variables in the system. We derive explicit expressions for the equilibrium statistical weights for a given m and n, which depend on the statistical weight u associated with breaking a base-pair interaction, the loop closure exponent c, the cooperativity parameter σ0, the SSB size λ, and binding strength κ. These statistical weights determine, through the detailed balance condition, the transfer coefficient in the master equation. For the case of slow and fast binding dynamics the problem can be reduced to one-dimensional master equations. In the latter case, we perform explicitly the adiabatic elimination of the fast variable n. Furthermore, we find that for the case that the loop closure is neglected and the binding dynamics is vanishing (but with arbitrary σ0) the eigenvalues and the eigenvectors of the master equation can be obtained analytically, using an orthogonal polynomial approach. We solve the general case numerically (i.e., including SSB binding and the loop closure) as a function of statistical weight u, binding protein size λ, and binding strength κ, and compare to the fast and slow binding limits. In particular, we find that the presence of SSBs in general increases the relaxation time, compared to the case when no binding proteins are present. By tuning the parameters, we can drive the system from regular bubble fluctuation in the absence of SSBs to full denaturation, reflecting experimental and in vivo situations

  18. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  19. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras Gout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CFTR gene is unique within the ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein family, predominantly of transporters, by coding a chloride channel. The gating mechanism of ABC proteins has been characterized by the ATP Switch model in terms cycles of dimer formation and dissociation linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. It would be of interest to assess the extent that Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, a functional channel, fits the ATP Switch model for ABC transporters. Additional transporter mechanisms, namely those of Pgp and HlyB, are discussed for perspective. Literature search of databases selected key references in comparing and contrasting the gating mechanism. CFTR is a functional chloride channel facilitating transmembrane anion flow down electrochemical gradients. A dysfunctional CFTR protein results in cystic fibrosis, a fatal pleiotropic disease currently managed symptomatically. Understanding the gating mechanism will help target drug development aimed at alleviating and curing the disease.

  20. The mammalian heterochromatin protein 1 binds diverse nuclear proteins through a common motif that targets the chromoshadow domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HP1 proteins regulate epigenetic gene silencing by promoting and maintaining chromatin condensation. The HP1 chromodomain binds to methylated histone H3. More enigmatic is the chromoshadow domain (CSD), which mediates dimerization, transcription repression, and interaction with multiple nuclear proteins. Here we show that KAP-1, CAF-1 p150, and NIPBL carry a canonical amino acid motif, PxVxL, which binds directly to the CSD with high affinity. We also define a new class of variant PxVxL CSD-binding motifs in Sp100A, LBR, and ATRX. Both canonical and variant motifs recognize a similar surface of the CSD dimer as demonstrated by a panel of CSD mutants. These in vitro binding results were confirmed by the analysis of polypeptides found associated with nuclear HP1 complexes and we provide the first evidence of the NIPBL/delangin protein in human cells, a protein recently implicated in the developmental disorder, Cornelia de Lange syndrome. NIPBL is related to Nipped-B, a factor participating in gene activation by remote enhancers in Drosophila melanogaster. Thus, this spectrum of direct binding partners suggests an expanded role for HP1 as factor participating in promoter-enhancer communication, chromatin remodeling/assembly, and sub-nuclear compartmentalization