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Sample records for binding potential bpnd

  1. Postpartum and Depression Status are Associated With Lower [11C]raclopride BPND in Reproductive-Age Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses-Kolko, Eydie L; Price, Julie C; Wisner, Katherine L; Hanusa, Barbara H; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Berga, Sarah L; Grace, Anthony A; di Scalea, Teresa Lanza; Kaye, Walter H; Becker, Carl; Drevets, Wayne C

    2012-01-01

    The early postpartum period is associated with increased risk for affective and psychotic disorders. Because maternal dopaminergic reward system function is altered with perinatal status, dopaminergic system dysregulation may be an important mechanism of postpartum psychiatric disorders. Subjects included were non-postpartum healthy (n=13), postpartum healthy (n=13), non-postpartum unipolar depressed (n=10), non-postpartum bipolar depressed (n=7), postpartum unipolar (n=13), and postpartum bipolar depressed (n=7) women. Subjects underwent 60 min of [11C]raclopride–positron emission tomography imaging to determine the nondisplaceable striatal D2/3 receptor binding potential (BPND). Postpartum status and unipolar depression were associated with lower striatal D2/3 receptor BPND in the whole striatum (p=0.05 and p=0.02, respectively) that reached a maximum of 7–8% in anteroventral striatum for postpartum status (p=0.02). Unipolar depression showed a nonsignificant trend toward being associated with 5% lower BPND in dorsal striatum (p=0.06). D2/3 receptor BPND did not differ significantly between unipolar depressed and healthy postpartum women or between bipolar and healthy subjects; however, D2/3 receptor BPND was higher in dorsal striatal regions in bipolar relative to unipolar depressives (p=0.02). In conclusion, lower striatal D2/3 receptor BPND in postpartum and unipolar depressed women, primarily in ventral striatum, and higher dorsal striatal D2/3 receptor BPND in bipolar relative to unipolar depressives reveal a potential role for the dopamine (DA) system in the physiology of these states. Further studies delineating the mechanisms underlying these differences in D2/3 receptor BPND, including study of DA system responsivity to rewarding stimuli, and increasing power to assess unipolar vs bipolar-related differences, are needed to better understand the affective role of the DA system in postpartum and depressed women. PMID:22257897

  2. PET imaging of mu- and delta-opioid receptor binding in alcohol dependent and healthy control subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerts, Elise M.; Wand, Gary S.; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Munro, Cynthia A.; Dannals, Robert F.; Hilton, John; Frost, J. James; McCaul, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous opioid system plays a significant role in alcohol dependence. The goal of the current study was to investigate regional brain mu opioid receptor (MOR) and delta opioid receptor (DOR) availability in recently abstinent alcohol-dependent and age-matched healthy control men and women with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging. Methods Alcohol dependent subjects completed an inpatient protocol, which included medically supervised withdrawal and PET imaging on day 5 of abstinence. Control subjects completed PET imaging following an overnight stay. PET scans with the MOR selective ligand [11C]carfentanil (CFN) were completed in 25 alcohol dependent and 30 control subjects. Most of these same subjects (20 alcohol dependent and 18 controls) also completed PET scans with the DOR selective ligand [11C]methyl-naltrindole (MeNTL). Results Volume of interest and statistical parametric mapping analyses indicated that alcohol dependent subjects had significantly higher [11C]CFN binding potential (BPND) than healthy controls in multiple brain regions including the ventral striatum when adjusting for age, gender and smoking status. There was an inverse relationship between [11C]CFN BPND and craving in several brain regions in alcohol dependent subjects. Groups did not differ in [11C]MeNTL BPND; however, [11C]MeNTL BPND in caudate was positively correlated with recent alcohol drinking in alcohol dependent subjects. Conclusions Our observation of higher [11C]CFN BPND in alcohol dependent subjects can result from up regulation of MOR and/or reduction in endogenous opioid peptides following long-term alcohol consumption, dependence and/or withdrawal. Alternatively, the higher [11C]CFN BPND in alcohol dependent subjects may be an etiological difference that predisposed these individuals to alcohol dependence or may have developed as a result of increased exposure to childhood adversity, stress and other environmental factors known to increase MOR. Although

  3. HEAVY QUARK POTENTIALS AND QUARKONIA BINDING.

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    PETRECZKY,P.

    2004-11-04

    The author reviews recent progress in studying in-medium modification of inter-quark forces at finite temperature in lattice QCD. Some applications to the problem of quarkonium binding in potential models is also discussed.

  4. Parametric Imaging and Test-Retest Variability of ¹¹C-(+)-PHNO Binding to D₂/D₃ Dopamine Receptors in Humans on the High-Resolution Research Tomograph PET Scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Zheng, Ming-Qiang; Lim, Keunpoong; Lin, Shu-fei; Labaree, David; Matuskey, David; Huang, Yiyun; Ding, Yu-Shin; Carson, Richard E; Malison, Robert T

    2014-06-01

    (11)C-(+)-4-propyl-9-hydroxynaphthoxazine ((11)C-(+)-PHNO) is an agonist radioligand for imaging dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in the human brain with PET. In this study we evaluated the reproducibility of (11)C-(+)-PHNO binding parameters using a within-day design and assessed parametric imaging methods. Repeated studies were performed in 8 subjects, with simultaneous measurement of the arterial input function and plasma free fraction. Two (11)C-(+)-PHNO scans for the same subject were separated by 5.4 ± 0.7 h. After compartment models were evaluated, (11)C-(+)-PHNO volumes of distribution (V(T)) and binding potentials relative to the concentration of tracer in plasma (BP(P)), nondisplaceable tracer in tissue (BP(ND)), and free tracer in tissue (BP(F)) were quantified using the multilinear analysis MA1 method, with the cerebellum as the reference region. Parametric images of BP(ND) were also computed using the simplified reference tissue model (SRTM) and SRTM2. The test-retest variability of (11)C-(+)-PHNO BP(ND) was 9% in D2-rich regions (caudate and putamen). Among D3-rich regions, variability was low in the pallidum (6%) but higher in substantia nigra (19%), thalamus (14%), and hypothalamus (21%). No significant mass carry-over effect was observed in D3-rich regions, although a trend in BP(ND) was present in the substantia nigra (-14% ± 15%). Because of the relatively fast kinetics, low-noise BP(ND) parametric images were obtained with both SRTM and SRTM2 without spatial smoothing. (11)C-(+)-PHNO can be used to compute low-noise parametric images in both D2- and D3-rich regions in humans. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding

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    Han-Gue eJo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP, which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with twenty mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  6. Relationships between Serotonin Transporter Binding in the Raphe Nuclei, Basal Ganglia, and Hippocampus with Clinical Symptoms in Cervical Dystonia: A [11C]DASB Positron Emission Tomography Study

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    Marenka Smit

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available PurposeAlterations of the central serotonergic system have been implicated in the pathophysiology of dystonia. In this molecular imaging study, we assessed whether altered presynaptic serotonin transporter (SERT binding contributes to the pathophysiology of cervical dystonia (CD, concerning both motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS.MethodsWe assessed the non-displaceable binding potential (BPND using the selective SERT tracer [11C]DASB and positron emission tomography (PET in 14 CD patients and 12 age- and gender-matched controls. Severity of motor symptoms was scored using the Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale and Clinical Global Impression jerks/tremor scale. NMS for depressive symptoms, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbances were assessed with quantitative rating scales. The relationship between SERT binding and clinical patient characteristics was analyzed with the Spearman’s rho test and multiple regression.ResultsWhen comparing the CD patients with controls, no significant differences in BPND were found. Higher BPND in the dorsal raphe nucleus was statistically significantly correlated (p < 0.001 with motor symptom severity (rs = 0.65, pain (rs = 0.73, and sleep disturbances (rs = 0.73, with motor symptom severity being the most important predictor of SERT binding. Furthermore, fatigue was negatively associated with the BPND in the medial raphe nucleus (rs = −0.61, p = 0.045, and sleep disorders were positively associated with the BPND in the caudate nucleus (rs = 0.58, p = 0.03 and the hippocampus (rs = 0.56, p = 0.02.ConclusionMotor symptoms, as well as pain, sleep disturbances, and fatigue in CD showed a significant relationship with SERT binding in the raphe nuclei. Moreover, fatigue showed a significant relationship with the medial raphe nucleus and sleep disorders with the caudate nucleus and hippocampus. These findings suggest that an altered serotonergic signaling in

  7. Plasma Aβ and PET PiB binding are inversely related in mild cognitive impairment.

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    Devanand, D P; Schupf, N; Stern, Y; Parsey, R; Pelton, G H; Mehta, P; Mayeux, R

    2011-07-12

    To evaluate the relations between PET Pittsburgh compound B (PiB-PET) binding (amyloid imaging) and plasma Aβ in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and similarly aged controls. In 20 patients with MCI and 19 cognitively intact controls (case-control study), PiB binding potential (BP(nd)) was assessed in 4 regions, and total brain excluding cerebellum, referenced to cerebellar binding. The mean of plasma Aβ levels measured in duplicate was analyzed. Plasma Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was decreased in MCI compared to controls (mean 0.15 SD 0.04 vs mean 0.19 SD 0.07, p = 0.03) but Aβ40 (p = 0.3) and Aβ42 (p = 0.06) levels did not differ between the 2 groups. PiB BP(nd) was increased in MCI compared to controls in the cingulate (p = 0.02), parietal (p = 0.02), and total brain (p = 0.03), but not in prefrontal cortex (p = 0.08) or parahippocampal gyrus (p = 0.07). Linear regression analyses adjusting for age, sex, and cognitive test scores showed that low Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio was associated with high cingulate, parietal, and total brain PiB binding (0.01PiB binding and the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio were strongest in PiB-positive subjects and within the MCI group. Though cross-sectional, the findings support the "sink" hypothesis that increased brain Aβ is accompanied by lower peripheral levels of Aβ, particularly the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio in patients with MCI. The association between PiB binding and the plasma Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio suggests possible use of plasma Aβ combined with PiB binding as a risk biomarker with potential clinical application.

  8. Reduced 5-HT(1B) receptor binding in the dorsal brain stem after cognitive behavioural therapy of major depressive disorder.

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    Tiger, Mikael; Rück, Christian; Forsberg, Anton; Varrone, Andrea; Lindefors, Nils; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Lundberg, Johan

    2014-08-30

    Major depression is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease, and its pathophysiology is largely unknown. The serotonin hypothesis is, however, the model with most supporting data, although the details are only worked out to some extent. Recent clinical imaging measurements indeed imply a role in major depressive disorder (MDD) for the inhibitory serotonin autoreceptor 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (5-HT1B). The aim of the current study was to examine 5-HT1B receptor binding in the brain of MDD patients before and after psychotherapy. Ten patients with an ongoing untreated moderate depressive episode were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) and the 5-HT1B receptor selective radioligand [(11)C]AZ10419369, before and after treatment with internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. All of the patients examined responded to treatment, and 70% were in remission by the time of the second PET measurement. A statistically significant 33% reduction of binding potential (BPND) was found in the dorsal brain stem (DBS) after treatment. No other significant changes in BPND were found. The DBS contains the raphe nuclei, which regulate the serotonin system. This study gives support for the importance of serotonin and the 5-HT1B receptor in the biological response to psychological treatment of MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain Serotonin Transporter Binding In a Minipig Model of Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Glud, Andreas Nørgaard; Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann

    minipigs were implanted in the cisterna magna with a catheter connected to a subcutaneous titanium injection port under sterile conditions. Six-eight weeks after recovery from the catheter implant, and after injections of sterile saline alone to verify patency, minipigs were scanned at baseline with [11C......]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile (11C-DASB), a label of SERT availability. Four pigs then received eight weekly injections of lactacystin dissolved in sterile saline, and one pig received saline alone, directly into the CSF through the access port. They were scanned...... with DASB again after a cumulative dose of 200μg lactacystin. PET data were registered to an average minipig MRI atlas and processed using PMOD software. The binding potential (BPND) of DASB was obtained with the Logan graphical analysis and cerebellum activity as a region of non-displaceable binding...

  10. Effects of serotonin-2A receptor binding and gender on personality traits and suicidal behavior in borderline personality disorder.

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    Soloff, Paul H; Chiappetta, Laurel; Mason, Neale Scott; Becker, Carl; Price, Julie C

    2014-06-30

    Impulsivity and aggressiveness are personality traits associated with a vulnerability to suicidal behavior. Behavioral expression of these traits differs by gender and has been related to central serotonergic function. We assessed the relationships between serotonin-2A receptor function, gender, and personality traits in borderline personality disorder (BPD), a disorder characterized by impulsive-aggression and recurrent suicidal behavior. Participants, who included 33 BPD patients and 27 healthy controls (HC), were assessed for Axis I and II disorders with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV and the International Personality Disorders Examination, and with the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients-Revised for BPD. Depressed mood, impulsivity, aggression, and temperament were assessed with standardized measures. Positron emission tomography with [(18)F]altanserin as ligand and arterial blood sampling was used to determine the binding potentials (BPND) of serotonin-2A receptors in 11 regions of interest. Data were analyzed using Logan graphical analysis, controlling for age and non-specific binding. Among BPD subjects, aggression, Cluster B co-morbidity, antisocial PD, and childhood abuse were each related to altanserin binding. BPND values predicted impulsivity and aggression in BPD females (but not BPD males), and in HC males (but not HC females.) Altanserin binding was greater in BPD females than males in every contrast, but it did not discriminate suicide attempters from non-attempters. Region-specific differences in serotonin-2A receptor binding related to diagnosis and gender predicted clinical expression of aggression and impulsivity. Vulnerability to suicidal behavior in BPD may be related to serotonin-2A binding through expression of personality risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. New potential binding determinant for hERG channel inhibitors

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    Saxena, P.; Zangerl-Plessl, E.-M.; Linder, T.; Windisch, A.; Hohaus, A.; Timin, E.; Hering, S.; Stary-Weinzinger, A.

    2016-01-01

    Human ether-à-go-go related gene (hERG) 1 channels conduct the rapid delayed rectifier K+ current (IKr) and are essential for the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. hERG1 inhibition by structurally diverse drugs may lead to life threatening arrhythmia. Putative binding determinants of hERG1 channel blockers include T623, S624 and V625 on the pore helix, and residues G648, Y652 and F656, located on segment S6. We and others have previously hypothesized that additional binding determinants may be located on helix S5, which is in close contact with the S6 segments. In order to test this hypothesis, we performed a detailed investigation combining ionic current measurements with two-microelectrode voltage clamp and molecular modeling techniques. We identified a novel aromatic high affinity binding determinant for blockers located in helix S5, F557, which is equally potent as Y652. Modeling supports a direct interaction with the outer pore helix. PMID:27067805

  12. The metal binding potential of a dairy isolate

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    K. Ramyakrishna

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Excess iron in water resources can lead to health hazards and problems. The ability of lactic acid bacteria to bind iron has not yet been widely studied. In the present study, sorption of iron ions from aqueous solutions onto lactic acid bacterium was determined. Elemental analyses were carried out by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The kinetics of Fe(III biosorption was investigated at different initial concentrations of metal ion. The highest uptake capacity was found to be 16 mg of Fe(III per gram of adsorbent with a contact time of 24 hr and at initial metal ion concentration of 34 mg/L. The uptake capacity of Fe(III ion varied from 83.2 to 46.7% across the range of initial metal ion concentrations. The equilibrium data were evaluated by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and were found to fit better with the latter (R2 = 0.9999. The surface morphology of the biomass and percentage of metal was characterized by using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The functional groups on the cell wall surface of biomass involved in biosorption of heavy metals were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum.

  13. Endotoxin Binding by Sevelamer: Potential Impact on Nutritional Status

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    Natsuki Kubotera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients on hemodialysis (HD have a high burden of chronic inflammation induced associated with multiple comorbidities including poor nutritional status. Endotoxin (ET is a Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component and a potent stimulus for innate immune system activation leading to the transcription of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-6, and TNFα that adversely affect protein metabolism and nutrition. Several cross-sectional observational studies have found that elevated serum ET concentrations in hemodialysis patients are associated with lower serum albumin, higher proinflammatory cytokine, and C-reactive protein concentrations. Possible sources of ET in the systemic circulation are bacterial translocation from the gastrointestinal tract and iron supplementation, potentially leading to intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Sevelamer is a nonabsorbable hydrogel approved for use as a phosphate binder in HD patients. Reductions in serum ET concentrations in hemodialysis patients have been observed with sevelamer therapy in observational studies and the few published interventional studies. Reduction of ET concentrations was associated with concomitant reductions in TNFα, IL-6, and CRP and improvement in serum albumin in the majority of these small studies. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the potential effects of sevelamer treatment on nutritional status in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients with elevated ET.

  14. Identification of potential small molecule binding pockets on Rho family GTPases.

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    Juan Manuel Ortiz-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Rho GTPases are conformational switches that control a wide variety of signaling pathways critical for eukaryotic cell development and proliferation. They represent attractive targets for drug design as their aberrant function and deregulated activity is associated with many human diseases including cancer. Extensive high-resolution structures (>100 and recent mutagenesis studies have laid the foundation for the design of new structure-based chemotherapeutic strategies. Although the inhibition of Rho signaling with drug-like compounds is an active area of current research, very little attention has been devoted to directly inhibiting Rho by targeting potential allosteric non-nucleotide binding sites. By avoiding the nucleotide binding site, compounds may minimize the potential for undesirable off-target interactions with other ubiquitous GTP and ATP binding proteins. Here we describe the application of molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, sequence conservation analysis, and ensemble small-molecule fragment mapping to provide an extensive mapping of potential small-molecule binding pockets on Rho family members. Characterized sites include novel pockets in the vicinity of the conformationaly responsive switch regions as well as distal sites that appear to be related to the conformations of the nucleotide binding region. Furthermore the use of accelerated molecular dynamics simulation, an advanced sampling method that extends the accessible time-scale of conventional simulations, is found to enhance the characterization of novel binding sites when conformational changes are important for the protein mechanism.

  15. Structural insights into Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 mediated prediction of potentially active semiochemicals

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    Tian, Zhen; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Yalin

    2016-03-01

    Given the advantages of behavioral disruption application in pest control and the damage of Cydia pomonella, due progresses have not been made in searching active semiochemicals for codling moth. In this research, 31 candidate semiochemicals were ranked for their binding potential to Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 2 (CpomPBP2) by simulated docking, and this sorted result was confirmed by competitive binding assay. This high predicting accuracy of virtual screening led to the construction of a rapid and viable method for semiochemicals searching. By reference to binding mode analyses, hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interaction were suggested to be two key factors in determining ligand affinity, so is the length of molecule chain. So it is concluded that semiochemicals of appropriate chain length with hydroxyl group or carbonyl group at one head tended to be favored by CpomPBP2. Residues involved in binding with each ligand were pointed out as well, which were verified by computational alanine scanning mutagenesis. Progress made in the present study helps establish an efficient method for predicting potentially active compounds and prepares for the application of high-throughput virtual screening in searching semiochemicals by taking insights into binding mode analyses.

  16. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

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    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  17. Relationship of frontal D2/3 binding potentials to cognition

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    Fagerlund, Birgitte; Pinborg, Lars H; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Studies of in vivo dopamine receptors in schizophrenia have mostly focused on D2 receptors in striatal areas or on D1 receptors in cortex. No previous study has examined the correlation between cortical dopamine D2/3 receptor binding potentials and cognition in schizophrenia patients. The objecti...

  18. Binding and Signaling Studies Disclose a Potential Allosteric Site for Cannabidiol in Cannabinoid CB2Receptors.

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    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Varani, Katia; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Angelats, Edgar; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Ferreiro-Vera, Carlos; Oyarzabal, Julen; Canela, Enric I; Lanciego, José L; Nadal, Xavier; Navarro, Gemma; Borea, Pier Andrea; Franco, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    The mechanism of action of cannabidiol (CBD), the main non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa L., is not completely understood. First assumed that the compound was acting via cannabinoid CB 2 receptors (CB 2 Rs) it is now suggested that it interacts with non-cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs); however, CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of any GPCR. To search for alternative explanations, we tested CBD as a potential allosteric ligand of CB 2 R. Radioligand and non-radioactive homogeneous binding, intracellular cAMP determination and ERK1/2 phosphorylation assays were undertaken in heterologous systems expressing the human version of CB 2 R. Using membrane preparations from CB 2 R-expressing HEK-293T (human embryonic kidney 293T) cells, we confirmed that CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of the human CB 2 R where the synthetic cannabinoid, [ 3 H]-WIN 55,212-2, binds. CBD was, however, able to produce minor but consistent reduction in the homogeneous binding assays in living cells using the fluorophore-conjugated CB 2 R-selective compound, CM-157. The effect on binding to CB 2 R-expressing living cells was different to that exerted by the orthosteric antagonist, SR144528, which decreased the maximum binding without changing the K D . CBD at nanomolar concentrations was also able to significantly reduce the effect of the selective CB 2 R agonist, JWH133, on forskolin-induced intracellular cAMP levels and on activation of the MAP kinase pathway. These results may help to understand CBD mode of action and may serve to revisit its therapeutic possibilities.

  19. Binding and Signaling Studies Disclose a Potential Allosteric Site for Cannabidiol in Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors

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    Eva Martínez-Pinilla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of action of cannabidiol (CBD, the main non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa L., is not completely understood. First assumed that the compound was acting via cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2Rs it is now suggested that it interacts with non-cannabinoid G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs; however, CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of any GPCR. To search for alternative explanations, we tested CBD as a potential allosteric ligand of CB2R. Radioligand and non-radioactive homogeneous binding, intracellular cAMP determination and ERK1/2 phosphorylation assays were undertaken in heterologous systems expressing the human version of CB2R. Using membrane preparations from CB2R-expressing HEK-293T (human embryonic kidney 293T cells, we confirmed that CBD does not bind with high affinity to the orthosteric site of the human CB2R where the synthetic cannabinoid, [3H]-WIN 55,212-2, binds. CBD was, however, able to produce minor but consistent reduction in the homogeneous binding assays in living cells using the fluorophore-conjugated CB2R-selective compound, CM-157. The effect on binding to CB2R-expressing living cells was different to that exerted by the orthosteric antagonist, SR144528, which decreased the maximum binding without changing the KD. CBD at nanomolar concentrations was also able to significantly reduce the effect of the selective CB2R agonist, JWH133, on forskolin-induced intracellular cAMP levels and on activation of the MAP kinase pathway. These results may help to understand CBD mode of action and may serve to revisit its therapeutic possibilities.

  20. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

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    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  1. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    OpenAIRE

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wav...

  2. Potential toxicity of sulfanilamide antibiotic: Binding of sulfamethazine to human serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jiabin [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Zhou, Xuefei [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment for Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Zhang, Yalei, E-mail: zhangyalei2003@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Gao, Haiping [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment for Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai, 200092 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Antibiotics are widely used in daily life but their abuse has posed a potential threat to human health. The interaction between human serum albumin (HSA) and sulfamethazine (SMZ) was investigated by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrometry, and circular dichroism. The binding constant and site were determined to be 1.09 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} and 1.14 at 309.5 K. The thermodynamic determination indicated that the interaction was driven by enthalpy change, where the electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond were the dominant binding force. The binding distance between SMZ and tryptophan residue of HSA was obtained to be 3.07 nm according to Foerster non-radioactive energy transfer theory. The site marker competition revealed that SMZ bound into subdomain IIA of HSA. The binding of SMZ induced the unfolding of the polypeptides of HSA and transferred the secondary conformation of HSA. The equilibrium dialysis showed that only 0.13 mM SMZ decreased vitamin B{sub 2} by 38% transported on the HSA. This work provides a new quantitative evaluation method for antibiotics to cause the protein damage. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Various techniques characterized the interactions between SMZ and HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bond dominated in the interaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SMZ induced the conformation change of HSA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SMZ affected the transportation function of HSA.

  3. Phloem RNA-binding proteins as potential components of the long-distance RNA transport system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICENTE ePALLAS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available RNA-binding proteins (RBPs govern a myriad of different essential processes in eukaryotic cells. Recent evidence reveals that apart from playing critical roles in RNA metabolism and RNA transport, RBPs perform a key function in plant adaption to various environmental conditions. Long distance RNA transport occurs in land plants through the phloem, a conducting tissue that integrates the wide range of signalling pathways required to regulate plant development and response to stress processes. The macromolecules in the phloem pathway vary greatly and include defence proteins, transcription factors, chaperones acting in long distance trafficking, and RNAs (mRNAs, siRNAs and miRNAs. How these RNA molecules translocate through the phloem is not well understood, but recent evidence indicates the presence of translocatable RNA-binding proteins in the phloem, which act as potential components of long distance RNA transport system. This review updates our knowledge on the characteristics and functions of RBPs present in the phloem.

  4. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-03-26

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients' Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process.

  5. Pathway Analysis Revealed Potential Diverse Health Impacts of Flavonoids that Bind Estrogen Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Ng, Hui Wen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Ge, Weigong; Perkins, Roger; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids are frequently used as dietary supplements in the absence of research evidence regarding health benefits or toxicity. Furthermore, ingested doses could far exceed those received from diet in the course of normal living. Some flavonoids exhibit binding to estrogen receptors (ERs) with consequential vigilance by regulatory authorities at the U.S. EPA and FDA. Regulatory authorities must consider both beneficial claims and potential adverse effects, warranting the increases in research that has spanned almost two decades. Here, we report pathway enrichment of 14 targets from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) and the Herbal Ingredients’ Targets (HIT) database for 22 flavonoids that bind ERs. The selected flavonoids are confirmed ER binders from our earlier studies, and were here found in mainly involved in three types of biological processes, ER regulation, estrogen metabolism and synthesis, and apoptosis. Besides cancers, we conjecture that the flavonoids may affect several diseases via apoptosis pathways. Diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, viral myocarditis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease could be implicated. More generally, apoptosis processes may be importantly evolved biological functions of flavonoids that bind ERs and high dose ingestion of those flavonoids could adversely disrupt the cellular apoptosis process. PMID:27023590

  6. Benzo- and cyclohexanomazindol analogues as potential inhibitors of the cocaine binding site at the dopamine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, William J; Ahmad, Umer F; Koletar, Judith; Kelly, Lawrence; Brand, Leonard; Kopajtic, Theresa A

    2002-09-12

    A series of mazindol (1), homomazindol (2), and bishomomazindol (3) derivatives with a benzo or cyclohexano ring fused at various sites were prepared as part of an SAR study to determine the effect of increased aliphatic and aromatic lipophilicity on selected in vitro assays used to identify potential cocaine-like and cocaine antagonism activity. Very good (IC(50) = 2-3 nM) inhibition of [(3)H] WIN 35,428 and [(125)I] RTI-55 binding on rat or guinea pig striatal membranes and HEK cells expressing cDNA for the human dopamine transporter (HEK-hDAT) was shown by the 8,9-benzomazindol 25 and 9,10-benzohomomazindol 28. All new compounds were weaker inhibitors of [(3)H] DA uptake in HEK-hDAT cells than 1 and 2. No improvement in the binding selectivity ratio (SERT/DAT and NET/DAT) was found when compared to 2. Compounds 25and 28 showed a considerable increase versus 1 in uptake/binding discrimination ratios at the DAT (311.0 and 182.1 vs 0.9), SERT (33.6 and 127.3 vs 1.9), and NET (7.3 and 10.0 vs 0.3).

  7. Binding and release of glutamate from overoxidized polypyrrole via an applied potential for application as a molecular switch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Hauff, Elizabeth; Meteleva-Fischer, Yulia; Parisi, Jueirgen; Weiler, Reto

    2008-01-01

    The controlled binding and release of glutamate from overoxidized polypyrrole (PPy) films via a variable potential was investigated. Glutamate-doped PPy films were electrochemically deposited from aqueous sodium glutamate electrolytes containing the pyrrole monomer. The resulting polymer films were

  8. COMT Val(158) met genotype and striatal D(2/3) receptor binding in adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boot, Erik

    2011-09-01

    Although catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity evidently affects dopamine function in prefrontal cortex, the contribution is assumed less significant in striatum. We studied whether a functional polymorphism in the COMT gene (Val(158) Met) influences striatal D(2\\/3) R binding ratios (D(2\\/3) R BP(ND) ) in 15 adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome and hemizygous for this gene, using single photon emission computed tomography and the selective D(2\\/3) radioligand [(123) I]IBZM. Met hemizygotes had significantly lower mean D(2\\/3) R BPND than Val hemizygotes. These preliminary data suggest that low COMT activity may affect dopamine levels in striatum in humans and this may have implications for understanding the contribution of COMT activity to psychiatric disorders.

  9. RXP-E: A CX43-BINDING PEPTIDE THAT PREVENTS ACTION POTENTIAL PROPAGATION BLOCK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi; Coombs, Wanda; Jalife, Jose; Nielsen, Morten S.; Taffet, Steven M.; Delmar, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) provide a low-resistance pathway for cardiac electrical propagation. The role of GJ regulation in arrhythmia is unclear, partly due to limited availability of pharmacological tools. Recently, we showed that a peptide called “RXP-E” binds to the carboxyl terminal of connexin43 (Cx43) and prevents chemically-induced uncoupling in Cx43-expressing N2a cells. Here, pull-down experiments show RXP-E binding to adult cardiac Cx43. Patch-clamp studies revealed that RXP-E prevented heptanol-induced and acidification-induced uncoupling in pairs of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVM’s). Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential (AP) propagation was assessed by high resolution optical mapping in monolayers of NRVM’s, containing ~20% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, AP propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pHi=6.2) caused a loss of AP propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E treated cells, though at a slower rate. Patch clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2.1/Kir2.3 currents. RXP-E is the first synthetic molecule known to: (1) bind cardiac Cx43; (2) prevent heptanol and acidification-induced uncoupling of cardiac GJ’s and 3) preserve AP propagation among cardiac myocytes. RXP-E can be used to characterize the role of GJs in the function of multicellular systems, including the heart. PMID:18669919

  10. Atomistic modeling of zirconium hydride precipitation: methodology for deriving a tight-binding potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufresne, Alice

    2014-01-01

    The zirconium-hydrogen system is of nuclear safety interest, as the hydride precipitation leads to the cladding embrittlement, which is made of zirconium-based alloys. The cladding is the first safety barrier confining the radioactive products: its integrity shall be kept during the entire fuel-assemblies life, in reactor, including accidental situation, and post-operation (transport and storage). Many uncertainties remain regarding the hydrides precipitation kinetics and the local stress impact on their precipitation. The atomic scale modeling of this system would bring clarifications on the relevant mechanisms. The usual atomistic modeling methods are based on thermo-statistic approaches, whose precision and reliability depend on the interatomic potential used. However, there was no potential allowing a rigorous study of the Zr-H system. The present work has indeed addressed this issue: a new tight-binding potential for zirconium hydrides modeling is now available. Moreover, this thesis provides a detailed manual for deriving such potentials accounting for spd hybridization, and fitted here on DFT results. This guidebook has be written in light of modeling a pure transition metal followed by a metal-covalent coupling (metallic carbides, nitrides and silicides). (author)

  11. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S; Pogue, Brian W

    2014-10-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error pixel-by-pixel normalization of tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach.

  12. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach. PMID:25360349

  13. L-ferritin binding to scara5: a new iron traffic pathway potentially implicated in retinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Mendes-Jorge

    Full Text Available Iron is essential in the retina because the heme-containing enzyme guanylate cyclase modulates phototransduction in rods and cones. Transferrin endocytosis is the classical pathway for obtaining iron from the blood circulation in the retina. However, the iron storage protein ferritin has been also recently proposed as an iron carrier. In this study, the presence of Scara5 and its binding to L-ferritin was investigated in the retina. Our results showed that Scara5, the specific receptor for L-ferritin, was expressed in mouse and human retinas in many cell types, including endothelial cells. Furthermore, we showed that intravenously injected ferritin crossed the blood retinal barrier through L-ferritin binding to Scara5 in endothelial cells. Thus, suggesting the existence of a new pathway for iron delivery and trafficking in the retina. In a murine model of photoreceptor degeneration, Scara5 was downregulated, pointing out this receptor as a potential player implicated in retinopathy and also as a possible therapeutic target.

  14. Theoretical investigations on the structure and potential binding sites of antineoplaston A10 and experimental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, D

    1990-01-01

    The essential biological importance of antineoplastons has motivated the present theoretical and experimental studies on the structure and potential binding sites of Antineoplaston A10, 3-phenylacetylamino-2,6-piperidinedione. Semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations SCF-LCAO-MO were performed using the MNDO method. The calculated molecular geometry of A10 is in very good agreement with the recently obtained X-ray structure of synthetic A10. Experimental investigations of the Raman spectra of A10 and its N,N-dideuterated derivative confirm the theoretical predictions concerning the structure and hydrogen bonding of A10. Analysis of calculated charge distribution reveals that the negative charges are localized on the ring nitrogen and on the exocyclic oxygen atoms of A10 and are similar to the corresponding charges computed for some pyrimidine bases. This indicates that Antineoplaston A10 may have similar binding sites. It is concluded that the mechanism of action of Antineoplaston A10 may in part be related to its structural and chemical resemblance with deoxythymidine and uridine. A10 may act as a nucleoside antagonist and interact very closely with adenosine units in nucleic acids and enzymes, which may interfere with protein synthesis in neoplastic cells.

  15. The potentiation of myeloperoxidase activity by the glycosaminoglycan-dependent binding of myeloperoxidase to proteins of the extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Lukáš; Kolářová, Hana; Víteček, Jan; Kremserová, Silvie; Klinke, Anna; Lau, Denise; Chapman, Anna L P; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P

    2013-10-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an abundant hemoprotein expressed by neutrophil granulocytes that is recognized to play an important role in the development of vascular diseases. Upon degranulation from circulating neutrophil granulocytes, MPO binds to the surface of endothelial cells in an electrostatic-dependent manner and undergoes transcytotic migration to the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the mechanisms governing the binding of MPO to subendothelial ECM proteins, and whether this binding modulates its enzymatic functions are not well understood. We investigated MPO binding to ECM derived from aortic endothelial cells, aortic smooth muscle cells, and fibroblasts, and to purified ECM proteins, and the modulation of these associations by glycosaminoglycans. The oxidizing and chlorinating potential of MPO upon binding to ECM proteins was tested. MPO binds to the ECM proteins collagen IV and fibronectin, and this association is enhanced by the pre-incubation of these proteins with glycosaminoglycans. Correspondingly, an excess of glycosaminoglycans in solution during incubation inhibits the binding of MPO to collagen IV and fibronectin. These observations were confirmed with cell-derived ECM. The oxidizing and chlorinating potential of MPO was preserved upon binding to collagen IV and fibronectin; even the potentiation of MPO activity in the presence of collagen IV and fibronectin was observed. Collectively, the data reveal that MPO binds to ECM proteins on the basis of electrostatic interactions, and MPO chlorinating and oxidizing activity is potentiated upon association with these proteins. Our findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction of MPO with ECM proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Serotonin 2A receptor agonist binding in the human brain with [(11)C]Cimbi-36: Test-retest reproducibility and head-to-head comparison with the antagonist [(18)F]altanserin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettrup, Anders; Svarer, Claus; McMahon, Brenda; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Lehel, Szabolcs; Møller, Kirsten; Dyssegaard, Agnete; Ganz, Melanie; Beliveau, Vincent; Jørgensen, Louise Møller; Gillings, Nic; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2016-04-15

    [(11)C]Cimbi-36 is a recently developed serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor agonist positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand that has been successfully applied for human neuroimaging. Here, we investigate the test-retest variability of cerebral [(11)C]Cimbi-36 PET and compare [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist [(18)F]altanserin. Sixteen healthy volunteers (mean age 23.9 ± 6.4years, 6 males) were scanned twice with a high resolution research tomography PET scanner. All subjects were scanned after a bolus of [(11)C]Cimbi-36; eight were scanned twice to determine test-retest variability in [(11)C]Cimbi-36 binding measures, and another eight were scanned after a bolus plus constant infusion with [(18)F]altanserin. Regional differences in the brain distribution of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 and [(18)F]altanserin were assessed with a correlation of regional binding measures and with voxel-based analysis. Test-retest variability of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 non-displaceable binding potential (BPND) was consistently test-retest reproducibility highlights the potential of [(11)C]Cimbi-36 for PET imaging of 5-HT2A receptor agonist binding in vivo. Our data suggest that Cimbi-36 and altanserin both bind to 5-HT2A receptors, but in regions with high 5-HT2C receptor density, choroid plexus and hippocampus, the [(11)C]Cimbi-36 binding likely represents binding to both 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cellulose Nanocrystals Obtained from Rice By-Products and Their Binding Potential to Metallic Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L. Albernaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to develop and optimize a method to obtain cellulose nanocrystals from the agricultural by-products rice husk and straw and to evaluate their electrostructural modifications in the presence of metallic ions. First, different particle formation conditions and routes were tested and analyzed by spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering (DLS, and Zeta potential measurements. Then, electrostructural effects of ions Na(I, Cd(II, and Al(III on the optimized nanoparticles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and electrical conductivity (EC assessments. The produced cellulose nanocrystals adopted a rod-like shape. AFM height distribution and EC data indicated that the nanocrystals have more affinity in binding with Na(I > Al(III > Cd(II. These data suggest that the use of these cellulose nanocrystals in the bioremediation field is promising, both in metal sorption from wastewater and as an alternative for water desalination.

  18. PATTERN BASED DETECTION OF POTENTIALLY DRUGGABLE BINDING SITES BY LIGAND SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uttam Pal

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes an innovative way of finding the potentially druggable sites on a target protein, which can be used for orthosteric and allosteric lead detection in a single virtual screening setup. Druggability estimation for an alternate binding site other than the canonical ligand-binding pocket of an enzyme is rewarding for several inherent benefits. Allostery is a direct and efficient way of regulating biomacromolecule function. The allosteric modulators can fine-tune protein mechanics. Besides, allosteric sites are evolutionarily less conserved/more diverse even in very similarly related proteins, thus, provides high degree of specificity in targeting a particular protein. Therefore, targeting of allosteric sites is gaining attention as an emerging strategy in rational drug design. However, the experimental approaches provide a limited degree of characterization of new allosteric sites. Computational approaches are useful to analyze and select potential allosteric sites for drug discovery. Here, the use of molecular docking, which has become an integral part of the drug discovery process, has been discussed to predict the druggability of novel allosteric sites as well as the active site on target proteins by ligand screening. Genetic algorithm was used for docking and the whole protein was placed in the search space. For each ligand in the library of small molecules, the genetic algorithm was run for multiple times to populate all the druggable sites in the target protein, which was then translated into two dimensional density maps or “patterns”. High density clusters were observed for lead like molecules in these pattern diagrams. Each cluster in such a pattern diagram indicated a plausible binding site and the density gave its druggability score in terms of weighted probabilities. The patterns were filtered to find the leads for each of the druggable sites on the target protein. Such a novel pattern based analysis of the

  19. Free energy profiles of cocaine esterase-cocaine binding process by molecular dynamics and potential of mean force simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Han, Keli; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-11-25

    The combined molecular dynamics (MD) and potential of mean force (PMF) simulations have been performed to determine the free energy profile of the CocE)-(+)-cocaine binding process in comparison with that of the corresponding CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process. According to the MD simulations, the equilibrium CocE-(+)-cocaine binding mode is similar to the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding mode. However, based on the simulated free energy profiles, a significant free energy barrier (∼5 kcal/mol) exists in the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process whereas no obvious free energy barrier exists in the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process, although the free energy barrier of ∼5 kcal/mol is not high enough to really slow down the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process. In addition, the obtained free energy profiles also demonstrate that (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine have very close binding free energies with CocE, with a negligible difference (∼0.2 kcal/mol), which is qualitatively consistent with the nearly same experimental K M values of the CocE enzyme for (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine. The consistency between the computational results and available experimental data suggests that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study are reasonable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Balas QA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Qosay A Al-Balas,1 Mohammad A Hassan,1 Nizar A Al-Shar’i,1 Nizar M Mhaidat,2 Ammar M Almaaytah,3 Fatima M Al-Mahasneh,1 Israa H Isawi1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Background: The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs.Methods: Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I.Results: Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM.Conclusion: We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may

  1. High level theoretical study of binding and of the potential energy surface in benzene-hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coletti, Cecilia, E-mail: ccoletti@unich.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Re, Nazzareno [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: In-plane minimum geometries for benzene-H{sup -} non-covalent adducts: linear adduct (left) with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to one aromatic hydrogen; bifurcated adduct (right), with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to two adjacent aromatic hydrogens. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical study on covalent and non-covalent binding in benzene-hydride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two non-covalent stable adducts were characterized in the in-plane geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant sections of the potential energy surface were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of a very stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion upon covalent binding to carbon. - Abstract: High level ab initio calculations were performed on the interaction of the hydride anion with benzene, a system of potential interest for modelling the interactions occurring in hydrogen rich planetary atmospheres. We investigated both non-covalent and covalent binding, exploring the complete basis set limit using highly correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Two non-covalent minima on the potential energy surface have been characterized, and found to correspond to moderately strong hydrogen bonding interactions. To gain further insight on the nature of binding, the total interaction energy was decomposed into its physically meaningful components and selected sections of the potential energy surface were calculated. Moreover, we found that H{sup -} can easily covalently bind to one of the carbon atoms of benzene to form a stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion, a global minimum on the potential energy surface, characterized by a puckered geometry, with a carbon atom bending out of the benzene plane. A slightly less stable planar C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} structure was also identified, corresponding to the transition state for the flipping motion of the puckered species.

  2. [(11)C]Raclopride binding in the striatum of minimally restrained and free-walking awake mice in a positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Jun; Ikoma, Yoko; Tokunaga, Masaki; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Uchida, Shouko; Kanno, Iwao; Taniguchi, Junko; Ito, Hiroshi; Higuchi, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Anesthesia and restraint stress have profound impacts on brain functions, including neural activity and cerebrovascular function, possibly influencing functional and neurochemical positron emission tomography (PET) imaging data. For circumventing this effect, we developed an experimental system enabling PET imaging of free-walking awake mice with minimal restraints by fixing the head to a holder. The applicability of this system was investigated by performing PET imaging of D2 dopamine receptors with [(11)C]raclopride under the following three different conditions: (1) free-walking awake state; (2) 1.5% isoflurane anesthesia; and (3) whole-body restraint without anesthesia. [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP(ND)) values under isoflurane anesthesia and restrained awake state were significantly lower than under free-walking awake state (P transmissions could be sensitively captured by PET imaging of free-walking awake mice. We concluded that our system is of utility as an in vivo assaying platform for studies of brain functions and neurotransmission elements in small animals, such as those modeling neuropsychiatric disorders. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A Potential Structural Switch for Regulating DNA-Binding by TEAD Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Sun; Vonrhein, Clemens; Albarado, Diana; Raman, C S; Veeraraghavan, Sudha

    2016-06-19

    TEA domain (TEAD) transcription factors are essential for the normal development of eukaryotes and are the downstream effectors of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. Whereas our earlier work established the three-dimensional structure of the highly conserved DNA-binding domain using solution NMR spectroscopy, the structural basis for regulating the DNA-binding activity remains unknown. Here, we present the X-ray crystallographic structure and activity of a TEAD mutant containing a truncated L1 loop, ΔL1 TEAD DBD. Unexpectedly, the three-dimensional structure of the ΔL1 TEAD DBD reveals a helix-swapped homodimer wherein helix 1 is swapped between monomers. Furthermore, each three-helix bundle in the domain-swapped dimer is a structural homolog of MYB-like domains. Our investigations of the DNA-binding activity reveal that although the formation of the three-helix bundle by the ΔL1 TEAD DBD is sufficient for binding to an isolated M-CAT-like DNA element, multimeric forms are deficient for cooperative binding to tandemly duplicated elements, indicating that the L1 loop contributes to the DNA-binding activity of TEAD. These results suggest that switching between monomeric and domain-swapped forms may regulate DNA selectivity of TEAD proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of hypoglycin A binding adsorbents as potential preventive measures in co-grazers of atypical myopathy affected horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krägeloh, T; Cavalleri, J M V; Ziegler, J; Sander, J; Terhardt, M; Breves, G; Cehak, A

    2018-03-01

    Intestinal absorption of hypoglycin A (HGA) and its metabolism are considered major prerequisites for atypical myopathy (AM). The increasing incidence and the high mortality rate of AM urgently necessitate new therapeutic and/or preventative approaches. To identify a substance for oral administration capable of binding HGA in the intestinal lumen and effectively reducing the intestinal absorption of the toxin. Experimental in vitro study. Substances commonly used in equine practice (activated charcoal composition, di-tri-octahedral smectite, mineral oil and activated charcoal) were tested for their binding capacity for HGA using an in vitro incubation method. The substance most effective in binding HGA was subsequently tested for its potential to reduce intestinal HGA absorption. Jejunal tissues of 6 horses were incubated in Ussing chambers to determine mucosal uptake, tissue accumulation, and serosal release of HGA in the presence and absence of the target substance. Potential intestinal metabolism in methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid (MCPA)-conjugates was investigated by analysing their concentrations in samples from the Ussing chambers. Activated charcoal composition and activated charcoal were identified as potent HGA binding substances with dose and pH dependent binding capacity. There was no evidence of intestinal HGA metabolism. Binding capacity of adsorbents was tested in vitro using aqueous solutions, and in vivo factors such as transit time and composition of intestinal content, may affect adsorption capacity after oral administration. For the first time, this study identifies substances capable of reducing HGA intestinal absorption. This might have major implications as a preventive measure in cograzers of AM affected horses but also in horses at an early stage of intoxication. © 2017 EVJ Ltd.

  5. Changes in electrostatic surface potential of Na+/K+-ATPase cytoplasmic headpiece induced by cytoplasmic ligand(s) binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Martin; Grycova, Lenka; Lansky, Zdenek; Sklenovsky, Petr; Janovska, Marika; Otyepka, Michal; Teisinger, Jan

    2009-09-16

    A set of single-tryptophan mutants of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase isolated, large cytoplasmic loop connecting transmembrane helices M4 and M5 (C45) was prepared to monitor effects of the natural cytoplasmic ligands (i.e., Mg(2+) and/or ATP) binding. We introduced a novel method for the monitoring of the changes in the electrostatic surface potential (ESP) induced by ligand binding, using the quenching of the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide or iodide. This approach opens a new way to understanding the interactions within the proteins. Our experiments revealed that the C45 conformation in the presence of the ATP (without magnesium) substantially differed from the conformation in the presence of Mg(2+) or MgATP or in the absence of any ligand not only in the sense of geometry but also in the sense of the ESP. Notably, the set of ESP-sensitive residues was different from the set of geometry-sensitive residues. Moreover, our data indicate that the effect of the ligand binding is not restricted only to the close environment of the binding site and that the information is in fact transmitted also to the distal parts of the molecule. This property could be important for the communication between the cytoplasmic headpiece and the cation binding sites located within the transmembrane domain.

  6. Halogenated mazindol analogs as potential inhibitors of the cocaine binding site at the dopamine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, W J; Boja, J W; Parrino, V A; Kopajtic, T A; Kuhar, M J

    1996-12-06

    A series of halogenated (F, Cl, Br, I), pyrimido and diazepino homologs of mazindol were prepared and evaluated for their ability to displace [3H]WIN 35,428 binding and to inhibit uptake of [3H]dopamine (DA) in rat striatal tissue. All of the compounds except for the 2'-chloro (6) and 2'-bromo (16) analogs of mazindol displaced [3H]WIN 35,428 binding and inhibited [3H]DA uptake more effectively than (R)-cocaine. Structure-activity studies indicated that best inhibition of [3H]WIN 35,428 binding occurred in the imidazo series with compounds containing one or two Cl or Br atoms in the 3'- or 4'-position of the free phenyl group. Replacement of the imidazo ring by a pyrimido or diazepino ring enhanced binding inhibition. The most potent inhibitors of [3H]WIN 35,428 binding and [3H]DA uptake were 6-(3'-chlorophenyl)-2,3,4,6-tetrahydropyrimido[2,1-alpha]isoind ol-6-ol (23; IC50 1.0 nM; 8 x mazindol) and 7-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7H-diazepino[2,1-alpha ]isoindol-7-ol (28; IC50 0.26 nM; 32 x mazindol), respectively. No significant differences was found between binding and uptake inhibition. Mazindol and the pyrimido and diazepino homologs 24 and 27 showed a selectivity for the DA uptake over the serotonin (5-HT) uptake site of 5-, 250-, and 465-fold, respectively, and displayed weak or no affinity for a variety of neurotransmitter receptor sites.

  7. Metallomics investigations on potential binding partners of methylmercury in tuna fish muscle tissue using complementary mass spectrometric techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutscher, Daniel J; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Bettmer, Jörg

    2012-08-01

    In this study, the binding behaviour of methylmercury (MeHg(+)) towards proteins is investigated. Free sulfhydryl groups in cysteine residues are known to be the most likely binding partners, due to the high affinity of mercury to sulphur. However, detailed knowledge about discrete binding sites in living organisms has been so far scarce. A metallomics approach using different methods like size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as well as complementary mass spectrometric techniques (electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry, ESI-MS/MS) are combined to sequence and identify possible target proteins or peptides after enzymatic digestion. Potential targets for MeHg(+) in tuna fish muscle tissue are investigated using the certified reference material CRM464 as a model tissue. Different extraction procedures appropriate for the extraction of proteins are evaluated for their efficiency using isotope dilution analysis for the determination of total Hg in the extracts. Due to the high chemical stability of the mercury-sulphur bond, the bioconjugate can be quantitatively extracted with a combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (TRIS) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). Using different separation techniques such as SEC and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) it can be shown that major binding occurs to a high-molecular weight protein (M(w) > 200 kDa). A potential target protein, skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain, could be identified after tryptic digestion and capillary LC-ESI-MS/MS.

  8. Identification of potential inhibitors of Fasciola gigantica thioredoxin1: computational screening, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rohit; Shukla, Harish; Kalita, Parismita; Sonkar, Amit; Pandey, Tripti; Singh, Dev Bukhsh; Kumar, Awanish; Tripathi, Timir

    2017-07-04

    Fasciola gigantica is the causative organism of fascioliasis and is responsible for major economic losses in livestock production globally. F. gigantica thioredoxin1 (FgTrx1) is an important redox-active enzyme involved in maintaining the redox homeostasis in the cell. To identify a potential anti-fasciolid compound, we conducted a structure-based virtual screening of natural compounds from the ZINC database (n = 1,67,740) against the FgTrx1 structure. The ligands were docked against FgTrx1 and 309 ligands were found to have better docking score. These compounds were evaluated for Lipinski and ADMET prediction, and 30 compounds were found to fit well for re-docking studies. After refinement by molecular docking and drug-likeness analysis, three potential inhibitors (ZINC15970091, ZINC9312362, and ZINC9312661) were identified. These three ligands were further subjected to molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to compare the dynamics and stability of the protein structure after binding of the ligands. The binding free energy analyses were calculated to determine the intermolecular interactions. The results suggested that the two compounds had a binding free energy of -82.237, and -109.52 kJ.mol -1 for compounds with IDs ZINC9312362 and ZINC9312661, respectively. These predicted compounds displayed considerable pharmacological and structural properties to be drug candidates. We concluded that these two compounds could be potential drug candidates to fight against F. gigantica parasites.

  9. Functional analysis of a potential regulatory K+-binding site in the Na+, K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase functions by actively transporting 3 Na+ ions out of and 2 K+ ions into the cell, thereby creating ion gradients crucial for many physiological processes. Recently, a combined structural and functional study of the closely related Ca2+-ATPase indicated the presence...... of a regulatory K+-binding site in the P-domain of the enzyme, identifying E732 as being of particular importance (Sorensen, Clausen et al. 2004). In addition, P709 is thought to play a significant role in the structural organization of this site. Both E732 and P709 are highly conserved among P-type ATPases (E732...... is present as either glutamic acid or aspartic acid), which supports their importance and additionally raises the question whether this site may play a general role among P-type ATPases. In Na+, K+-ATPase, K+ functions directly as a substrate for membrane binding sites, however, an additional regulatory...

  10. A Rat α-Fetoprotein Binding Activity Prediction Model to Facilitate Assessment of the Endocrine Disruption Potential of Environmental Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huixiao Hong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Endocrine disruptors such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, diethylstilbestrol (DES and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT are agents that interfere with the endocrine system and cause adverse health effects. Huge public health concern about endocrine disruptors has arisen. One of the mechanisms of endocrine disruption is through binding of endocrine disruptors with the hormone receptors in the target cells. Entrance of endocrine disruptors into target cells is the precondition of endocrine disruption. The binding capability of a chemical with proteins in the blood affects its entrance into the target cells and, thus, is very informative for the assessment of potential endocrine disruption of chemicals. α-fetoprotein is one of the major serum proteins that binds to a variety of chemicals such as estrogens. To better facilitate assessment of endocrine disruption of environmental chemicals, we developed a model for α-fetoprotein binding activity prediction using the novel pattern recognition method (Decision Forest and the molecular descriptors calculated from two-dimensional structures by Mold2 software. The predictive capability of the model has been evaluated through internal validation using 125 training chemicals (average balanced accuracy of 69% and external validations using 22 chemicals (balanced accuracy of 71%. Prediction confidence analysis revealed the model performed much better at high prediction confidence. Our results indicate that the model is useful (when predictions are in high confidence in endocrine disruption risk assessment of environmental chemicals though improvement by increasing number of training chemicals is needed.

  11. Hyaluronic acid binding ability of human sperm reflects cellular maturity and fertilizing potential: selection of sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszar, Gabor; Ozkavukcu, Sinan; Jakab, Attila; Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Sati, G Leyla; Cayli, Sevil

    2006-06-01

    The current concepts of sperm biochemical markers and the central role of the HspA2 chaperone protein, a measure of sperm cellular maturity and fertilizing potential, are reviewed. Because HspA2 is a component of the synaptonemal complex, low HspA2 levels and increased frequency of chromosomal aneuploidies are related in diminished maturity sperm. We also suggest a relationship between HspA2 expression in elongating spermatids and events of late spermiogenesis, such as cytoplasmic extrusion and plasma membrane remodeling that aid the formation of the zona pellucida binding and hyaluronic acid binding sites. The presence of hyaluronic acid receptor on the plasma membrane of mature sperm, coupled with hyaluronic acid coated glass or plastic surfaces, facilitates testing of sperm function and selection of single mature sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection. The frequencies of sperm with chromosomal disomy are reduced approximately fourfold to fivefold in hyaluronic acid selected sperm compared with semen sperm, comparable to the increase in such abnormalities in intracytoplasmic sperm injection offspring. Hyaluronic acid binding also excludes immature sperm with cytoplasmic extrusion, persistent histones, and DNA chain breaks. Hyaluronic acid mediated sperm selection is a novel technique that is comparable to sperm zona pellucida binding. Hyaluronic acid selected sperm will also alleviate the risks related to intracytoplasmic sperm injection fertilization with sperm of diminished maturity that currently cause worldwide concern.

  12. Mazindol analogues as potential inhibitors of the cocaine binding site at the dopamine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, William J; Kelly, Lawrence; Pankuch, Jessica; Koletar, Judith; Brand, Leonard; Janowsky, Aaron; Kopajtic, Theresa A

    2002-09-12

    A series of mazindol (2) and homomazindol (3) analogues with a variety of electron-donating and electron-withdrawing groups in the pendant aryl group and the benzo ring C, as well as H, methoxy, and alkyl groups replacing the hydroxyl group were synthesized, and their binding affinities at the dopamine transporter (DAT) on rat or guinea pig striatal membranes were determined. Several active analogues were also evaluated for their ability to block uptake of DA, 5-HT, and NE and inhibit binding of [(125)I] RTI-55 at HEK-hDAT, HEK-hSERT, and HEK-hNET cells. Mazindane (26) was found to be a pro-drug, oxidizing (5-H --> 5-OH) to mazindol on rat striatal membranes and HEK-hDAT cells. The 4',7,8-trichloro analogue (38) of mazindol was the most potent and selective ligand for HEK-hDAT cells (DAT K(i) = 1.1 nM; SERT/DAT = 1283 and NET/DAT = 38). Experimental results strongly favor the cyclic or ol tautomers of 2 and 3 to bind more tightly at the DAT than the corresponding keto tautomers.

  13. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  14. Multifunctional dendritic sialopolymersomes as potential antiviral agents: their lectin binding and drug release properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, Ali; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; Gillies, Elizabeth R

    2013-05-28

    Polymer vesicles, commonly referred to as polymersomes, are self-organized materials that result from the self-assembly of amphiphilic copolymers in solution. Recently, there has been increasing interest in biomedical applications of polymersomes due to the different functions that can be imparted through encapsulation of molecules within the core or membrane or through the introduction of bioactive molecules to the polymersome surface. We describe here the development and study of poly(ethylene oxide)-polycaprolactone polymersomes designed to interact with influenza viruses at two different stages in the infection process. First, the conjugation of the sialic acid N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to the polymersome surface was designed to inhibit the binding of viral hemagglutinin to sialic acids on host cells, thus preventing viral entry. Second, the incorporation of the neuraminidase inhibitor zanamivir into the polymersome core was designed to prevent the release of progeny virus from the host cells, thus inhibiting viral replication. With the aim of maximizing multivalent effects at the polymersome surface, polyester dendrons functionalized with Neu5Ac were synthesized and conjugated to polymersomes. Binding of the resulting dendritic sialopolymersomes to Limax flavus agglutinin was studied and compared to the sialodendron and a monovalent Neu5Ac derivative using an enzyme-linked lectin inhibition assay. It was found that while the sialodendron exhibited a 17-fold enhancement (per sialoside) relative to the small molecule, the dendritic sialopolymersomes resulted in an almost 2000-fold enhancement in binding affinity. It was also demonstrated that encapsulation of zanamivir into the dendritic sialopolymersomes could be performed with the same efficiency as for naked polymersomes to provide a drug loading of ~35 wt %. Drug release rates were similar for both systems with sustained release over a period of 4 days. Overall, these results suggest the promise of

  15. Absence of a Scott correction for the total binding energy of noninteracting fermions in a smooth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxtable, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown, for V in a particular class of smooth functions, that the total binding energy, E(Z), of Z noninteracting Fermions in the potential well Z 4/3 V(Z 1/3 X) obeys E(Z) = c TF (V)Z 7/3 + O(Z 5/3 ) as Z → ∞. Here c TF (V) is the coefficient predicted by Thomas-Fermi theory. This result is consistent with the conjectured Scott correction, which occurs at order Z 2 , to the total binding energy of an atomic number Z. This correction is thought to arise only because V(x)∼ - |x| -1 near x = 0 in the atomic problem, and so V is not a smooth function

  16. The chaperone and potential mannan-binding lectin (MBL) co-receptor calreticulin interacts with MBL through the binding site for MBL-associated serine proteases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagh, Rasmus; Duus, Karen; Laursen, Inga

    2008-01-01

    was immobilized on a solid surface or bound to mannan on a surface. The binding was non-covalent and biphasic with an initial salt-sensitive phase followed by a more stable salt-insensitive interaction. For plasma-derived MBL, known to be complexed with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs), no binding...... with calreticulin. Comparative analysis of MBL with complement component C1q, its counterpart of the classical pathway, revealed that they display similar binding characteristics for calreticulin, providing further indication that calreticulin is a common co-receptor/chaperone for both proteins. In conclusion......The chaperone calreticulin has been suggested to function as a C1q and collectin receptor. The interaction of calreticulin with mannan-binding lectin (MBL) was investigated by solid-phase binding assays. Calreticulin showed saturable and time-dependent binding to recombinant MBL, provided that MBL...

  17. Advantages of a dual-tracer model over reference tissue models for binding potential measurement in tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, K M; Samkoe, K S; Klubben, W S; Hasan, T; Pogue, B W

    2012-01-01

    The quantification of tumor molecular expression in vivo could have a significant impact for informing and monitoring immerging targeted therapies in oncology. Molecular imaging of targeted tracers can be used to quantify receptor expression in the form of a binding potential (BP) if the arterial input curve or a surrogate of it is also measured. However, the assumptions of the most common approaches (reference tissue models) may not be valid for use in tumors. In this study, the validity of reference tissue models is investigated for use in tumors experimentally and in simulations. Three different tumor lines were grown subcutaneously in athymic mice and the mice were injected with a mixture of an epidermal growth factor receptor- (EGFR-) targeted fluorescent tracer and an untargeted fluorescent tracer. A one-compartment plasma input model demonstrated that the transport kinetics of both tracers were significantly different between tumors and all potential reference tissues, and using the reference tissue model resulted in a theoretical underestimation in BP of 50 ± 37%. On the other hand, the targeted and untargeted tracers demonstrated similar transport kinetics, allowing a dual-tracer approach to be employed to accurately estimate binding potential (with a theoretical error of 0.23 ± 9.07%). These findings highlight the potential for using a dual-tracer approach to quantify receptor expression in tumors with abnormal hemodynamics, possibly to inform the choice or progress of molecular cancer therapies. PMID:23022732

  18. Potential New Ligand Systems for Binding Uranyl Ions in Seawater Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-13

    Work began this quarter on a new project involving a combined computational and biosynthetic approach to selective recognition of uranyl ion in aqueous solution. This project exploits the results of computational studies to discover new ligand classes. Synthetic studies will follow to generate target systems for uranyl binding and determination of binding constants. The process will be iterative, with results from computation informing synthesis, and vice versa. The theme of the ligand classes to be examined initially will be biologically based. New phosphonate-containing α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers were used recently to prepare well-defined phosphonate-containing poly-peptides and block copolypeptides. Our first approach is to utilize these phosphate- and phosphonate-containing NCAs for the coordination of uranyl. The work includes the laboratory-scale preparation of a series of NCAs and the full thermodynamic and spectroscopic characterization of the resulting uranyl complexes. We are also evaluating the sequestering activity in different physiological and environmental conditions of these copolymers as well as their biodegradability.

  19. Synthesis, Characterization and DNA Binding Activity of a Potential DNA Intercalator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Norain Harun; Yaakob Razak; Haslina Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    A novel complex, (Ru(dppz) 2 (p-MOPIP)) 2+ (dppz = dipyrido-(3,2-a:20,30-c]phenazine, p-MOPIP = 2-(4-methoxyphenyl) imidazo(4,5-f)(1,10]phenanthroline) has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, 1 H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, Fourier Transform Infrared analysis, Ultra Violet visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. Herein, the complex was designed by adding p-MOPIP as an intercalating ligand and dppz as the ancillary ligand. The DNA binding properties of the complex with Calf Thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated using spectroscopic methods. The UV-visible absorption band observed at 460 nm corresponded to the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) while bands at 358 and 281 nm corresponded to intra-ligand (IL) π-π * transitions of the ligand scaffold in p-MOPIP and dppz. The intrinsic binding constant, K b for this complex was 1.67x10 6 M -1 and this suggested that this complex, (Ru(dppz) 2 (p-MOPIP)) 2+ bound to DNA via the intercalative mode. Interestingly, the interaction of this complex with CT-DNA also had a molecular light switch effect. (author)

  20. Potential role of orexin A binding the receptor 1 for orexins in normal and cryptorchid dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Giovanna; Squillacioti, Caterina; Assisi, Loredana; Pelagalli, Alessandra; Vittoria, Alfredo; Costagliola, Anna; Mirabella, Nicola

    2018-02-27

    Cryptorchidism is one of the most common birth disorders of the male reproductive system identified in dogs and other mammals. This condition is characterised by the absence of one (unilateral) or both (bilateral) gonads from the scrotum. The peptides orexin A (OxA) and B (OxB) were obtained by post-transcriptional proteolytic cleavage of a precursor molecule, called prepro-orexin. These substances bind two types of G-coupled receptors called receptor 1 (OX1R) and 2 (OX2R) for orexins. OX1R is specific to OxA while OX2R binds the two peptides with equal affinity. Orexins modulate a great variety of body functions, such as the reproductive mechanism. The purpose of the present research was to study the presence of OxA and its receptor 1 and their possible involvement in the canine testis under healthy and pathological conditions. This study was performed using adult male normal dogs and male dogs affected by unilateral cryptorchidism. Tissue samples were collected from testes and were divided into three groups: normal, contralateral and cryptic. The samples were used for immunohistochemistry, Western blot and in vitro tests for testosterone evaluation in normal and pathological conditions. OxA-immunoreactivity (IR) was described in interstitial Leydig cells of the normal gonad, and Leydig, Sertoli cells and gonocytes in the cryptic gonad. In the normal testis, OX1R-IR was described in Leydig cells, in pachytene and second spermatocytes and in immature and mature spermatids throughout the stages of the germ developing cycle of the male gonad. In the cryptic testis OX1R-IR was distributed in Leydig and Sertoli cells. The presence of prepro-orexin and OX1R was demonstrated by Western blot analysis. The incubation of fresh testis slices with OxA caused the stimulation of testosterone synthesis in the normal and cryptic gonad while the steroidogenic OxA-induced effect was cancelled by adding the selective OX1R antagonist SB-408124. These results led us to hypothesise

  1. Discovery of MLL1 binding units, their localization to CpG Islands, and their potential function in mitotic chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Minou; Wyss, Phillip; Novorolsky, Elise; Zulkelfi, Noorfatin; Xue, Jing; Price, Randi; Fay, Matthew; Gutmann, Zach; Fogler, Brian; Wang, Daidong

    2013-12-28

    Mixed Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1) is a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila Trithorax. In Drosophila, Trithorax complexes transmit the memory of active genes to daughter cells through interactions with Trithorax Response Elements (TREs). However, despite their functional importance, nothing is known about sequence features that may act as TREs in mammalian genomic DNA. By analyzing results of reported DNA binding assays, we identified several CpG rich motifs as potential MLL1 binding units (defined as morphemes). We find that these morphemes are dispersed within a relatively large collection of human promoter sequences and appear densely packed near transcription start sites of protein-coding genes. Genome wide analyses localized frequent morpheme occurrences to CpG islands. In the human HOX loci, the morphemes are spread across CpG islands and in some cases tail into the surrounding shores and shelves of the islands. By analyzing results of chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we found a connection between morpheme occurrences, CpG islands, and chromatin segments reported to be associated with MLL1. Furthermore, we found a correspondence of reported MLL1-driven "bookmarked" regions in chromatin to frequent occurrences of MLL1 morphemes in CpG islands. Our results implicate the MLL1 morphemes in sequence-features that define the mammalian TREs and provide a novel function for CpG islands. Apparently, our findings offer the first evidence for existence of potential TREs in mammalian genomic DNA and the first evidence for a connection between CpG islands and gene-bookmarking by MLL1 to transmit the memory of highly active genes during mitosis. Our results further suggest a role for overlapping morphemes in producing closely packed and multiple MLL1 binding events in genomic DNA so that MLL1 molecules could interact and reside simultaneously on extended potential transcriptional maintenance elements in human chromosomes to transmit the memory of highly active genes

  2. Comparison of four methods of measurement on [11C]Raclopride  binding potential using regional specificity in the striatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Ericka; Gjedde, Albert; Møller, Arne

    Background: Dopamine transmission in the striatum and especially the ventral striatum (VST), a structure which includes the nucleus  accumbens, ventral caudate, and ventral putamen, plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of psychotic states and the reinforcing effects of virtually all drugs...... of abuse. Objective/Hypotheses: The sensitivity of the measurement of DA transmission using raclopride as the surrogate marker may be affected by the type of analysis of raclopride binding potential (pB) chosen. Here, we compare striatal pB data obtained using three routine analyses of raclopride data...

  3. Comparison of four methods of measurement on [11C]Raclopride  binding potential using regional specificity in the striatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Ericka; Gjedde, Albert; Møller, Arne

    Background: Dopamine transmission in the striatum and especially the ventral striatum (VST), a structure which includes the nucleus  accumbens, ventral caudate, and ventral putamen, plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of psychotic states and the reinforcing  effects of virtually all drugs...... of abuse. Objective/Hypotheses: The sensitivity of the measurement of DA transmission using raclopride  as the surrogate marker may be affected by the type of analysis of raclopride binding potential (pB) chosen. Here, we compare  striatal pB data obtained using three routine analyses of raclopride data...

  4. A tight-binding potential for the simulation of solid and liquid iodine

    CERN Document Server

    Kozlovskii, T

    2003-01-01

    In this work, we suggest an interatomic potential for iodine applicable to the simulation of the condensed phases of the halogen within the temperature and density range accessible to experiments. The potential includes an attractive term that is partitioned into directional chemical bonding with a many-particle character and a pairwise interaction. Despite its simplicity, the potential reproduces the crystal structure of solid iodine, the presence of atomic phases with increasing pressure, and the metallic or insulating character of the solid phases. Finally, we present preliminary simulation results for fluid iodine.

  5. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus: identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Hao; Zarlenga, Dante S; Sestak, Karol; Suo, Siqingaowa; Ren, Xiaofeng

    2013-09-01

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and characterized in more depth. A phage-based immunosorbent assay (phage-ELISA) capable of differentiating TGEV from other coronaviruses was developed using one phage, phTGEV-M7, as antigen. When the phage-ELISA was compared to conventional antibody-based ELISA for detecting infections, phage-ELISA exhibited greater sensitivity. A chemically synthesized, TGEV-M7 peptide (pepTGEV-M7; HALTPIKYIPPG) was evaluated for antiviral activity. Plaque-reduction assays revealed that pepTGEV-M7 was able to prevent TGEV infection in vitro (p<0.01) following pretreatment of the virus with the peptide. Indirect immunofluorescence and real-time RT-PCR confirmed the inhibitory effects of the peptide. These results indicate that pepTGEV-M7 might be utilized for virus-specific diagnostics and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Subtractive Cell-SELEX Selection of DNA Aptamers Binding Specifically and Selectively to Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells with High Metastatic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapse and metastasis are two key risk factors of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC prognosis; thus, it is emergent to develop an early and accurate detection method for prognostic evaluation of HCC after surgery. In this study, we sought to acquire oligonucleotide DNA aptamers that specifically bind to HCC cells with high metastatic potential. Two HCC cell lines derived from the same genetic background but with different metastatic potential were employed: MHCC97L (low metastatic properties as subtractive targets and HCCLM9 (high metastatic properties as screening targets. To mimic a fluid combining environment, initial DNA aptamers library was firstly labelled with magnetic nanoparticles using biotin-streptavidin system and then applied for aptamers selection. Through 10-round selection with subtractive Cell-SELEX, six aptamers, LY-1, LY-13, LY-46, LY-32, LY-27/45, and LY-7/43, display high affinity to HCCLM9 cells and do not bind to MHCC97L cells, as well as other tumor cell lines, including breast cancer, lung cancer, colon adenocarcinoma, gastric cancer, and cervical cancer, suggesting high specificity for HCCLM9 cells. Thus, the aptamers generated here will provide solid basis for identifying new diagnostic targets to detect HCC metastasis and also may provide valuable clues for developing new targeted therapeutics.

  7. RXP-E: a connexin43-binding peptide that prevents action potential propagation block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lewandowski, Rebecca; Procida, Kristina; Vaidyanathan, Ravi

    2008-01-01

    . Separately, RXP-E was concatenated to a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP) for cytoplasmic translocation (CTP-RXP-E). The effect of RXP-E on action potential propagation was assessed by high-resolution optical mapping in monolayers of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, containing approximately 20......% of randomly distributed myofibroblasts. In contrast to control experiments, when heptanol (2 mmol/L) was added to the superfusate of monolayers loaded with CTP-RXP-E, action potential propagation was maintained, albeit at a slower velocity. Similarly, intracellular acidification (pH(i) 6.2) caused a loss...... of action potential propagation in control monolayers; however, propagation was maintained in CTP-RXP-E-treated cells, although at a slower rate. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that RXP-E did not prevent heptanol-induced block of sodium currents, nor did it alter voltage dependence or amplitude of Kir2...

  8. Optical potentials derived from microscopic separable interactions including binding and recoil effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siciliano, E.R.; Walker, G.E.

    1976-01-01

    We first consider a projectile scattering from a nucleon bound in a fixed potential. A separable Galilean invariant projectile-nucleon interaction is adopted. Without using the fixed scatterer approximation or using closure on the intermediate target nucleon states we obtain various forms for the projectile-bound nucleon t matrix. Effects due to intermediate target excitation and nucleon recoil are discussed. By making the further approximations of closure and fixed scatterers we make connection with the work of previous authors. By generalizing to projectile interaction with several bound nucleons and examining the appropriate multiple scattering series we identify the optical potential for projectile elastic scattering from the many-body system. Different optical potentials are obtained for different projectile-bound nucleon t matrices, and we study the differences predicted by these dissimilar optical potentials for elastic scattering. In a model problem, we study pion-nucleus elastic scattering and compare the predictions obtained by adopting procedures used by (1) Landau, Phatak, and Tabakin and (2) Piepho-Walker to the predictions obtained in a less restrictive, but computationally difficult treatment

  9. Characterization of Thermobifida fusca Cutinase-Carbohydrate-Binding Module Fusion Proteins and Their Potential Application in Bioscouring▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Chen, Sheng; Xu, Meng; Cavoco-Paulo, Artur; Wu, Jing; Chen, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Cutinase from Thermobifida fusca is thermally stable and has potential application in the bioscouring of cotton in the textile industry. In the present study, the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from T. fusca cellulase Cel6A (CBMCel6A) and Cellulomonas fimi cellulase CenA (CBMCenA) were fused, separately, to the carboxyl terminus of T. fusca cutinase. Both fusion enzymes, cutinase-CBMCel6A and cutinase-CBMCenA, were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Enzyme characterization showed that both displayed similar catalytic properties and pH stabilities in response to T. fusca cutinase. In addition, both fusion proteins displayed an activity half-life of 53 h at their optimal temperature of 50°C. Compared to T. fusca cutinase, in the absence of pectinase, the binding activity on cotton fiber was enhanced by 2% for cutinase-CBMCel6A and by 28% for cutinase-CBMCenA, whereas in the presence of pectinase, the binding activity was enhanced by 40% for the former and 45% for the latter. Notably, a dramatic increase of up to 3-fold was observed in the amount of released fatty acids from cotton fiber by both cutinase-CBM fusion proteins when acting in concert with pectinase. This is the first report of improving the scouring efficiency of cutinase by fusing it with CBM. The improvement in activity and the strong synergistic effect between the fusion proteins and pectinase suggest that they may have better applications in textile bioscouring than the native cutinase. PMID:20729325

  10. Characterizing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPARγ) ligand binding potential of several major flame retardants, their metabolites, and chemical mixtures in house dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingliang; Webster, Thomas F; Ferguson, P Lee; Stapleton, Heather M

    2015-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that some environmental contaminants can alter adipogenesis and act as obesogens. Many of these contaminants act via the activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) nuclear receptor. Our goal was to determine the PPARγ ligand binding potency of several major flame retardants, including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), halogenated phenols and bisphenols, and their metabolites. Ligand binding activity of indoor dust and its bioactivated extracts were also investigated. We used a commercially available fluorescence polarization ligand binding assay to investigate the binding potency of flame retardants and dust extracts to human PPARγ ligand-binding domain. Rosiglitazone was used as a positive control. Most of the tested compounds exhibited dose-dependent binding to PPARγ. Mono(2-ethylhexyl) tetrabromophthalate, halogenated bisphenols and phenols, and hydroxylated PBDEs were found to be potent PPARγ ligands. The most potent compound was 3-OH-BDE-47, with an IC50 (concentration required to reduce effect by 50%) of 0.24 μM. The extent of halogenation and the position of the hydroxyl group strongly affected binding. In the dust samples, 21 of the 24 samples tested showed significant binding potency at a concentration of 3 mg dust equivalent (DEQ)/mL. A 3-16% increase in PPARγ binding potency was observed following bioactivation of the dust using rat hepatic S9 fractions. Our results suggest that several flame retardants are potential PPARγ ligands and that metabolism may lead to increased binding affinity. The PPARγ binding activity of house dust extracts at levels comparable to human exposure warrants further studies into agonistic or antagonistic activities and their potential health effects.

  11. Discovery of membrane active benzimidazole quinolones-based topoisomerase inhibitors as potential DNA-binding antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Addla, Dinesh; Ponmani, Jeyakkumar; Wang, Ao; Xie, Dan; Wang, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Shao-Lin; Geng, Rong-Xia; Cai, Gui-Xin; Li, Shuo; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2016-03-23

    A series of novel benzimidazole quinolones as potential antimicrobial agents were designed and synthesized. Most of the prepared compounds exhibited good or even stronger antimicrobial activities in comparison with reference drugs. The most potent compound 15m was membrane active and did not trigger the development of resistance in bacteria. It not only inhibited the formation of biofilms but also disrupted the established Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli biofilms. It was able to inhibit the relaxation activity of E. coli topoisomerase IV at 10 μM concentration. Moreover, this compound also showed low toxicity against mammalian cells. Molecular modeling and experimental investigation of compound 15m with DNA suggested that this compound could effectively bind with DNA to form a steady 15m-DNA complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara B Estruch

    Full Text Available Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1 functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1, a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9, a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  13. The oncoprotein BCL11A binds to orphan nuclear receptor TLX and potentiates its transrepressive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Sara B; Buzón, Víctor; Carbó, Laia R; Schorova, Lenka; Lüders, Jens; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX (NR2E1) functions primarily as a transcriptional repressor and its pivotal role in brain development, glioblastoma, mental retardation and retinopathologies make it an attractive drug target. TLX is expressed in the neural stem cells (NSCs) of the subventricular zone and the hippocampus subgranular zone, regions with persistent neurogenesis in the adult brain, and functions as an essential regulator of NSCs maintenance and self-renewal. Little is known about the TLX social network of interactors and only few TLX coregulators are described. To identify and characterize novel TLX-binders and possible coregulators, we performed yeast-two-hybrid (Y2H) screens of a human adult brain cDNA library using different TLX constructs as baits. Our screens identified multiple clones of Atrophin-1 (ATN1), a previously described TLX interactor. In addition, we identified an interaction with the oncoprotein and zinc finger transcription factor BCL11A (CTIP1/Evi9), a key player in the hematopoietic system and in major blood-related malignancies. This interaction was validated by expression and coimmunoprecipitation in human cells. BCL11A potentiated the transrepressive function of TLX in an in vitro reporter gene assay. Our work suggests that BCL11A is a novel TLX coregulator that might be involved in TLX-dependent gene regulation in the brain.

  14. Reproducing kernel potential energy surfaces in biomolecular simulations: Nitric oxide binding to myoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviov, Maksym; Meuwly, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Multidimensional potential energy surfaces based on reproducing kernel-interpolation are employed to explore the energetics and dynamics of free and bound nitric oxide in myoglobin (Mb). Combining a force field description for the majority of degrees of freedom and the higher-accuracy representation for the NO ligand and the Fe out-of-plane motion allows for a simulation approach akin to a mixed quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics treatment. However, the kernel-representation can be evaluated at conventional force-field speed. With the explicit inclusion of the Fe-out-of-plane (Fe-oop) coordinate, the dynamics and structural equilibrium after photodissociation of the ligand are correctly described compared to experiment. Experimentally, the Fe-oop coordinate plays an important role for the ligand dynamics. This is also found here where the isomerization dynamics between the Fe–ON and Fe–NO state is significantly affected whether or not this co-ordinate is explicitly included. Although the Fe–ON conformation is metastable when considering only the bound 2 A state, it may disappear once the 4 A state is included. This explains the absence of the Fe–ON state in previous experimental investigations of MbNO

  15. Fatty-binding protein and galectin of Baylisascaris schroederi: Prokaryotic expression and preliminary evaluation of serodiagnostic potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sun

    Full Text Available Baylisascaris schroederi is a common parasite of captive giant pandas. The diagnosis of this ascariasis is normally carried out by a sedimentation-floatation method or PCR to detect eggs in feces, but neither method is suitable for early diagnosis. Fatty acid-binding protein (FABP and galectin (GAL exist in various animals and participate in important biology of parasites. Because of their good immunogenicity, they are seen as potential antigens for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. In this study, we cloned and expressed recombinant FABP and GAL from B. schroederi (rBs-FABP and rBs-GAL and developed indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs to evaluate their potential for diagnosing ascariasis in giant pandas. Immunolocalization showed that Bs-FABP and Bs-GAL were widely distributed in adult worms. The ELISA based on rBs-FABP showed sensitivity of 95.8% (23/24 and specificity of 100% (12/12, and that based on rBs-GAL had sensitivity of 91.7% (22/24 and specificity of 100% (12/12.

  16. Fatty-binding protein and galectin of Baylisascaris schroederi: Prokaryotic expression and preliminary evaluation of serodiagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Li, Yu; Wu, Yiran; Xiong, Lang; Li, Caiwu; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Lan, Jingchao; Zhang, Zhihe; Jing, Bo; Gu, Xiaobing; Xie, Yue; Lai, Weimin; Peng, Xuerong

    2017-01-01

    Baylisascaris schroederi is a common parasite of captive giant pandas. The diagnosis of this ascariasis is normally carried out by a sedimentation-floatation method or PCR to detect eggs in feces, but neither method is suitable for early diagnosis. Fatty acid-binding protein (FABP) and galectin (GAL) exist in various animals and participate in important biology of parasites. Because of their good immunogenicity, they are seen as potential antigens for the diagnosis of parasitic diseases. In this study, we cloned and expressed recombinant FABP and GAL from B. schroederi (rBs-FABP and rBs-GAL) and developed indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) to evaluate their potential for diagnosing ascariasis in giant pandas. Immunolocalization showed that Bs-FABP and Bs-GAL were widely distributed in adult worms. The ELISA based on rBs-FABP showed sensitivity of 95.8% (23/24) and specificity of 100% (12/12), and that based on rBs-GAL had sensitivity of 91.7% (22/24) and specificity of 100% (12/12). PMID:28750056

  17. Alterations of benzodiazepine receptor binding potential in anxiety and somatoform disorders measured by 123I-iomazenil SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Mari; Ida, Ituro; Mikuni, Masahiko; Higuchi, Teruhiko.

    1997-01-01

    123 I-iomazenil (IMZ), a newly developed radioligand which acts on benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) as a partial inverse agonist, made it possible to evaluate the function of central BZR by single photon emission tomography (SPECT). To examine the alterations of the binding potential (BP) in the anxiety state, 123 I-IMZ SPECT was performed in five patients with anxiety and somatoform disorders, and five epileptic patients without anxiety symptoms served as a reference. The BP of BZR was determined by using a table look-up procedure based on a three-compartment, two-parameter model in the bilateral superior frontal, inferior frontal, temporal, parietal, occipital, and cerebellar cortex. The mean BP of patients with anxiety and somatoform disorders was significantly decreased in the superior frontal, temporal, and parietal cortex, in comparison with that of epileptic patients. A significant correlation was observed between the anxiety levels scored on the Hamilton anxiety scale and BP in the right temporal cortex and left superior frontal cortex. These changes in BZR revealed by SPECT suggest the usefulness of 123 I-IMZ SPECT to objectively evaluate anxiety levels in patients with anxiety symptoms. (author)

  18. Midbrain serotonin transporter binding potential measured with [11C]DASB is affected by serotonin transporter genotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimold, M.; Bares, R.; Reischl, G.; Solbach, C.; Machulla, H.-J.; Smolka, M.N.; Mann, K.; Schumann, G.; Zimmer, A.; Wrase, J.; Hu, X.-Z.; Goldman, D.; Heinz, A.

    2007-01-01

    Homozygote carriers of two long (L) alleles of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT) regulatory region displayed in vitro a twofold increase in 5-HTT expression compared with carriers of one or two short (S) alleles. However, in vivo imaging studies yielded contradictory results. Recently, an A > G exchange leading to differential transcriptional activation of 5-HTT mRNA in lymphobalstoid cell lines was discovered in the 5-HTT regulatory region. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that [ 11 C]DASB, a new 5-HTT ligand offers some advantages over the ligands used in previous studies in measuring 5-HTT density independent of synaptic levels of serotonin. We assessed 5-HTT binding potential (BP 2) in the midbrain of 19 healthy subjects with positron emission tomography and [ 11 C]DASB. Accounting for the hypothesized functional similarity of L G and S in driving 5-HTT transcription, we assessed whether L A L A homozygotes display increased midbrain BP 2 compared with carriers of at least one S allele. BP 2 in the midbrain was significantly increased in L A L A homozygotes compared with carriers of at least one S allele. Interestingly, the genotype effect on the midbrain was significantly different from that on the thalamus and the amygdala where no group differences were detected. This in vivo study provides further evidence that subjects homozygous for the L A allele display increased expression of 5-HTT in the midbrain, the origin of central serotonergic projections. (author)

  19. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  20. Semiquantitative evaluation of 99mTctrodat1 binding potential by two methods of SPECT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Melissa Furlaneto Lellis; Reis, Marilia Alves dos; Oliveira, Cassio Miri; Castiglioni, Mario Luiz Vieira; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca

    2017-01-01

    TRODAT-1 is a radiopharmaceutical derived from tropane and linked to Technetium-99m ([ 99m Tc] TRODAT-1) has been used in studies of dopamine transporter (DAT) in central nervous system. Associated with the SPECT technique of acquisition, is able to detect changes in neurological disorders like Parkinson´s disease, evaluating the binding potential (BP) of DAT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the image reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (OSEM), in BP values at the striatal region in 30 healthy volunteers. Images were analyzed by visual inspection and semi-quantitative analysis. Regions of interest (ROI) were made over striatal areas on both sides. Nonparametric Wilcoxon statistical analysis was performed between the BP values from the FBP and OSEM methods. Our results showed that the reconstruction methods have a statistical significant BP values difference in the total striatum (Z = -2,2787 p = 0.005), right striatum (Z = -2,602 p = 0.009) and left striatum (Z= 2,746 p = 0.006). The effect size was calculated to see if there influence in this test: the 'large effect size' for all measurements was observed (total striatum r= -0.51; right striatum r= -0.48; left striatum r= -0.50). FBP is the usual method of reconstruction for brain SPECT images, and our results showed influence of the OSEM method in BP. It is concluded that the method of image reconstruction adopted should be standardized to avoid incorrect evaluations of BP values using [ 99m Tc]TRODAT-1. (author)

  1. Fatty-acid binding protein 4 gene variants and childhood obesity: potential implications for insulin sensitivity and CRP levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharjee Rakesh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Obesity increases the risk for insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in both adults and children. FABP4 is a member of the intracellular lipid-binding protein family that is predominantly expressed in adipose tissue, and plays an important role in maintaining glucose and lipid homeostasis. The purpose of this study was to measure FABP4 plasma levels, assess FABP4 allelic variants, and explore potential associations with fasting glucose and insulin levels in young school-age children with and without obesity. Methods A total of 309 consecutive children ages 5-7 years were recruited. Children were divided based on BMI z score into Obese (OB; BMI z score >1.65 and non-obese (NOB. Fasting plasma glucose, lipids, insulin, hsCRP, and FABP4 levels were measured. HOMA was used as correlate of insulin sensitivity. Four SNPs of the human FABP4 gene (rs1051231, rs2303519, rs16909233 and rs1054135, corresponding to several critical regions of the encoding FABP4 gene sequence were genotyped. Results Compared to NOB, circulating FABP4 levels were increased in OB, as were LDL, hsCRP and HOMA. FABP4 levels correlated with BMI, and also contributed to the variance of HOMA and hsCRP, but not serum lipids. The frequency of rs1054135 allelic variant was increased in OB, and was associated with increased FABP4 levels, while the presence of rs16909233 variant allele, although similar in OB and NOB, was associated with increased HOMA values. Conclusions Childhood obesity is associated with higher FABP4 levels that may promote cardiometabolic risk. The presence of selective SNPs in the FABP4 gene may account for increased risk for insulin resistance or systemic inflammation in the context of obesity.

  2. Semiquantitative evaluation of {sup 99}mTctrodat1 binding potential by two methods of SPECT image reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Melissa Furlaneto Lellis; Reis, Marilia Alves dos; Oliveira, Cassio Miri; Castiglioni, Mario Luiz Vieira; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca, E-mail: mefurlaneto@hotmail.com, E-mail: rodrigoabressan@gmail.com, E-mail: mario.castiglioni@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    TRODAT-1 is a radiopharmaceutical derived from tropane and linked to Technetium-99m ([{sup 99m}Tc] TRODAT-1) has been used in studies of dopamine transporter (DAT) in central nervous system. Associated with the SPECT technique of acquisition, is able to detect changes in neurological disorders like Parkinson´s disease, evaluating the binding potential (BP) of DAT. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the image reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and iterative reconstruction (OSEM), in BP values at the striatal region in 30 healthy volunteers. Images were analyzed by visual inspection and semi-quantitative analysis. Regions of interest (ROI) were made over striatal areas on both sides. Nonparametric Wilcoxon statistical analysis was performed between the BP values from the FBP and OSEM methods. Our results showed that the reconstruction methods have a statistical significant BP values difference in the total striatum (Z = -2,2787 p = 0.005), right striatum (Z = -2,602 p = 0.009) and left striatum (Z= 2,746 p = 0.006). The effect size was calculated to see if there influence in this test: the 'large effect size' for all measurements was observed (total striatum r= -0.51; right striatum r= -0.48; left striatum r= -0.50). FBP is the usual method of reconstruction for brain SPECT images, and our results showed influence of the OSEM method in BP. It is concluded that the method of image reconstruction adopted should be standardized to avoid incorrect evaluations of BP values using [{sup 99m}Tc]TRODAT-1. (author)

  3. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-01-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n b ) and apparent association constant (K app ) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n b = 23.7 and log K app = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe 2+ sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided

  4. Effect of magnetic field and soft potential barrier on off-axis donor binding energy in a nanotube with two quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Jesus D. [Grupo en Teoria de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta (Colombia); Grupo de Fisica Mesoscopica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Rondano, F.J. [Grupo en Teoria de la Materia Condensada, Universidad del Magdalena, Santa Marta (Colombia); Barba-Ortega, J., E-mail: jjbarbao@unal.edu.co [Grupo de Fisica Mesoscopica, Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-12-15

    We analyze the effect of the magnetic field parallel to the axis and different potential shape on the ground-state binding energy of the off-axis donors in cylindrical nanotubes containing two GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wells (QWs) in a section of the tube layer. We express the wave function as a product of combinations of s and p subband wave functions and an envelope function that depends only on the electron-ion separation. By using the variational principle we derive a differential equation for the envelope function, which we solve numerically. Two peaks in the curves for the dependence of the ground-state binding energies on the donor distance from the axis are presented and it is shown that the increasing the magnetic field increasing the binding energy while the impurity is located in the QW1, whereas the opposite occurs when the impurity is located in the QW2.

  5. Molecular Determinants of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) Binding to Transient Receptor Potential V1 (TRPV1) Channels*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V.; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate. PMID:25425643

  6. Improving the MVA vaccine potential by deleting the viral gene coding for the IL-18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Falivene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA is an attenuated strain of Vaccinia virus (VACV currently employed in many clinical trials against HIV/AIDS and other diseases. MVA still retains genes involved in host immune response evasion, enabling its optimization by removing some of them. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular immune responses (CIR induced by an IL-18 binding protein gene (C12L deleted vector (MVAΔC12L. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized with different doses of MVAΔC12L or MVA wild type (MVAwt, then CIR to VACV epitopes in immunogenic proteins were evaluated in spleen and draining lymph nodes at acute and memory phases (7 and 40 days post-immunization respectively. Compared with parental MVAwt, MVAΔC12L immunization induced a significant increase of two to three-fold in CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cell responses to different VACV epitopes, with increased percentage of anti-VACV cytotoxic CD8(+ T-cells (CD107a/b(+ during the acute phase of the response. Importantly, the immunogenicity enhancement was also observed after MVAΔC12L inoculation with different viral doses and by distinct routes (systemic and mucosal. Potentiation of MVA's CIR was also observed during the memory phase, in correlation with a higher protection against an intranasal challenge with VACV WR. Of note, we could also show a significant increase in the CIR against HIV antigens such as Env, Gag, Pol and Nef from different subtypes expressed from two recombinants of MVAΔC12L during heterologous DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the relevance of IL-18 bp contribution in the immune response evasion during MVA infection. Our findings clearly show that the deletion of the viral IL-18 bp gene is an effective approach to increase MVA vaccine efficacy, as immunogenicity improvements were observed against vector antigens and more importantly to HIV antigens.

  7. Non-invasive assessment of distribution volume ratios and binding potential: tissue heterogeneity and interindividually averaged time-activity curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimold, M.; Mueller-Schauenburg, W.; Dohmen, B.M.; Bares, R. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Tuebingen, Otfried-Mueller-Strasse 14, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany); Becker, G.A. [Nuclear Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Reischl, G. [Radiopharmacy, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Due to the stochastic nature of radioactive decay, any measurement of radioactivity concentration requires spatial averaging. In pharmacokinetic analysis of time-activity curves (TAC), such averaging over heterogeneous tissues may introduce a systematic error (heterogeneity error) but may also improve the accuracy and precision of parameter estimation. In addition to spatial averaging (inevitable due to limited scanner resolution and intended in ROI analysis), interindividual averaging may theoretically be beneficial, too. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of such averaging on the binding potential (BP) calculated with Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis and the ''simplified reference tissue method'' (SRTM) proposed by Lammertsma and Hume, on the basis of simulated and measured positron emission tomography data [{sup 11}C]d-threo-methylphenidate (dMP) and [{sup 11}C]raclopride (RAC) PET. dMP was not quantified with SRTM since the low k {sub 2} (washout rate constant from the first tissue compartment) introduced a high noise sensitivity. Even for considerably different shapes of TAC (dMP PET in parkinsonian patients and healthy controls, [{sup 11}C]raclopride in patients with and without haloperidol medication) and a high variance in the rate constants (e.g. simulated standard deviation of K {sub 1}=25%), the BP obtained from average TAC was close to the mean BP (<5%). However, unfavourably distributed parameters, especially a correlated large variance in two or more parameters, may lead to larger errors. In Monte Carlo simulations, interindividual averaging before quantification reduced the variance from the SRTM (beyond a critical signal to noise ratio) and the bias in Logan's method. Interindividual averaging may further increase accuracy when there is an error term in the reference tissue assumption E=DV {sub 2}-DV ' (DV {sub 2} = distribution volume of the first tissue compartment, DV &apos

  8. Potential energy surface and binding energy in the presence of an external electric field: modulation of anion-π interactions for graphene-based receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-14

    Measuring the binding energy or scanning the potential energy surface (PES) of the charged molecular systems in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) requires a careful evaluation of the origin-dependency of the energy of the system and references. Scanning the PES for charged or purely ionic systems for obtaining the intrinsic energy barriers needs careful analysis of the electric work applied on ions by the EEF. The binding energy in the presence of an EEF is different from that in the absence of an electric field as the binding energy is an anisotropic characteristic which depends on the orientation of molecules with respect to the EEF. In this contribution we discuss various aspects of the PES and the concept of binding energy in the presence of an EEF. In addition, we demonstrate that the anion-π bonding properties can be modulated by applying a uniform EEF, which has a more pronounced effect on the larger, more polarizable π-systems. An analogous behavior is presumed for cation-π systems. We predict that understanding the phenomenon introduced in the present account has enormous potential, for example, for separating charged species on the surface of polarizable two-dimensional materials such as graphene or the surface of carbon nanotubes, in desalination of water.

  9. Recombinant Protein Truncation Strategy for Inducing Bactericidal Antibodies to the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein of Neisseria meningitidis and Circumventing Potential Cross-Reactivity with Human FK506-Binding Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E.; Christodoulides, Myron

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human protein...

  10. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein-iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb=23.7 and log Kapp=4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe(2+) sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. © 2013.

  11. Phage-display for identifying peptides that bind the spike protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and possess diagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spike (S) protein is a key structural protein of coronaviruses including, the porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV). The S protein is a type I membrane glycoprotein located in the viral envelope and is responsible for mediating the binding of viral particles to specific cell recepto...

  12. Organometallic DNA-B12 Conjugates as Potential Oligonucleotide Vectors: Synthesis and Structural and Binding Studies with Human Cobalamin-Transport Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Elena; Hunger, Miriam; Fedosov, Sergey; Nexo, Ebba; Kräutler, Bernhard

    2017-11-16

    The synthesis and structural characterization of Co-(dN) 25 -Cbl (Cbl: cobalamin; dN: deoxynucleotide) and Co-(dN) 39 -Cbl, which are organometallic DNA-B 12 conjugates with single DNA strands consisting of 25 and 39 deoxynucleotides, respectively, and binding studies of these two DNA-Cbl conjugates to three homologous human Cbl transporting proteins, transcobalamin (TC), intrinsic factor (IF), and haptocorrin (HC), are reported. This investigation tests the suitability of such DNA-Cbls for the task of eventual in vivo oligonucleotide delivery. The binding of DNA-Cbl to TC, IF, and HC was investigated in competition with either a fluorescent Cbl derivative and Co-(dN) 25 -Cbl, or radiolabeled vitamin B 12 ( 57 Co-CNCbl) and Co-(dN) 25 -Cbl or Co-(dN) 39 -Cbl. Binding of the new DNA-Cbl conjugates was fast and tight with TC, but poorer with HC and IF, which extends a similar original finding with the simpler DNA-Cbl, Co-(dN) 18 -Cbl. The contrasting affinities of TC versus IF and HC for the DNA-Cbl conjugates are rationalized herein by a stepwise mechanism of Cbl binding. Critical contributions to overall affinity result from gradual conformational adaptations of the Cbl-binding proteins to the DNA-Cbl, which is first bound to the respective β domains. This transition is fast with TC, but slow with IF and HC, with which weaker binding results. The invariably tight interaction of the DNA-Cbl conjugates with TC makes the Cbl moiety a potential natural vector for the specific delivery of oligonucleotide loads from the blood into cells. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Potential use of sugar binding proteins in reactors for regeneration of CO2 fixation acceptor D-Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Sumana

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sugar binding proteins and binders of intermediate sugar metabolites derived from microbes are increasingly being used as reagents in new and expanding areas of biotechnology. The fixation of carbon dioxide at emission source has recently emerged as a technology with potentially significant implications for environmental biotechnology. Carbon dioxide is fixed onto a five carbon sugar D-ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate. We present a review of enzymatic and non-enzymatic binding proteins, for 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA, 3-phosphoglyceraldehyde (3PGAL, dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP, xylulose-5-phosphate (X5P and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP which could be potentially used in reactors regenerating RuBP from 3PGA. A series of reactors combined in a linear fashion has been previously shown to convert 3-PGA, (the product of fixed CO2 on RuBP as starting material into RuBP (Bhattacharya et al., 2004; Bhattacharya, 2001. This was the basis for designing reactors harboring enzyme complexes/mixtures instead of linear combination of single-enzyme reactors for conversion of 3PGA into RuBP. Specific sugars in such enzyme-complex harboring reactors requires removal at key steps and fed to different reactors necessitating reversible sugar binders. In this review we present an account of existing microbial sugar binding proteins and their potential utility in these operations.

  14. Transforming growth factor beta stimulation of biglycan gene expression is potentially mediated by sp1 binding factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Xie, Zhongjian; Young, Marian Frances

    2004-01-01

    Biglycan is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan which is localized in the extracellular matrix of bone and other specialized connective tissues. Both biglycan mRNA and protein are up-regulated by transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) and biglycan appears to influence TGF-beta(1) activity...... promoter upstream from the transcriptional start site, which contained several binding sites for the transcription factor Sp1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays with nuclear extracts from MG-63 cells showed binding of both Sp1 and Sp3 to a site at -216 to -208. When the biglycan promoter construct....... In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which TGF-beta(1), TGF-beta(2) and TGF-beta(3) stimulate biglycan mRNA expression in the osteoblastic cell line MG-63. The cells were transfected with a series of deletional human biglycan promoter constructs and a region in the biglycan 5' DNA was found...

  15. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared...... with daily GH. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. PATIENTS: Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. INTERVENTIONS AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Subjects were...... assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles...

  16. Pt(CN)42- and Au(CN)2-: potential general probes for anion-binding sites of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norne, J.E.; Lilja, H.; Lindman, B.; Einarsson, R.; Zeppezauer, M.

    1975-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic quadrupole relaxation appears to be a general method for studying the binding of anions to proteins. This is shown by the increase in transverse quadrupole relaxation rate of 35 Cl - and 81 Br - in the presence of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase, lysozyme, trypsin, α-chymotrypsin, human carbonic anhydrase, fructose-1.6-biphosphate aldolase and human serum albumin. Of the many possible binding sites at the surface of a protein (e.g. positively charged amino acid side-chains) only a few account for the main part of the relaxation enhancement. This is shown by the decrease in 35 Cl - and 81 Br - relaxation rate on addition of functional ligands. (orig./HK) [de

  17. Blood Group Substances as Potential Therapeutic Agents for the Prevention and Treatment of Infection with Noroviruses Proving Novel Binding Patterns in Human Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Shin; Yokobori, Takehiko; Ueta, Gen; Ide, Munenori; Altan, Bolag; Thongprachum, Aksara; Nishimura, Toyo; Nakajima, Tamiko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Asao, Takayuki; Saniabadi, Abby R.; Furukawa, Kiyoshi; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Le Pendu, Jacques; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Blood group-related glycans determining ABO and Lewis blood groups are known to function as attachment factors for most of the norovirus (NoV) strains. To identify binding specificity of each NoV, recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLPs) and human saliva samples with different ABO, Lewis phenotypes and secretor status have been commonly applied. When binding specificities of VLPs prepared from 16 different genotypes of NoVs in GI and GII genogroups were characterized in samples of human gastric mucosa compared to human saliva based on blood group phenotypes, considerable differences were observed for several strains. Novel binding specificities determined by an ELISA using preparations from human gastric mucosa were also ascertained by immunohistochemical analyses using human jejunal mucosa, widely believed to be susceptible to NoV infection. Further, A, B and O(H) blood group substances prepared from porcine and squid tissues were found to be effective for preventing ABO blood group-specific binding of VLPs to both saliva and mucosa samples. Therefore, these blood group substances might have potential for the prevention and treatment of NoV infection. PMID:24558470

  18. Cerebral histamine H1 receptor binding potential measured with PET under a test dose of olopatadine, an antihistamine, is reduced after repeated administration of olopatadine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Michio; Kubo, Nobuo; Adachi, Kazuhiko; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Matsumoto, Keiichi; Shimizu, Keiji; Tominaga, Hideyuki

    2009-06-01

    Some antihistamine drugs that are used for rhinitis and pollinosis have a sedative effect as they enter the brain and block the H(1) receptor, potentially causing serious accidents. Receptor occupancy has been measured with PET under single-dose administration in humans to classify antihistamines as more sedating or as less sedating (or nonsedating). In this study, the effect of repeated administration of olopatadine, an antihistamine, on the cerebral H(1) receptor was measured with PET. A total of 17 young men with rhinitis underwent dynamic brain PET with (11)C-doxepin at baseline, under an initial single dose of 5 mg of olopatadine (acute scan), and under another 5-mg dose after repeated administration of olopatadine at 10 mg/d for 4 wk (chronic scan). The H(1) receptor binding potential was estimated using Logan graphical analysis with cerebellum as reference region input. The acute scan showed a slight decrease in H(1) receptor binding potential across the cerebral cortex (by 15% in the frontal cortex), but the chronic scan showed a marked decrease (by 45% from the acute scan in the frontal cortex). Behavioral data before and after the PET scans did not reveal any sedative effect. The results may be interpreted as either intracerebral accumulation of olopatadine or H(1) receptor downregulation due to repeated administration. The study shows feasibility and potential value for PET in evaluating the pharmacologic effect of a drug not only after a single dose but also after repeated administration.

  19. The oncogenic EWS-FLI1 protein binds in vivo GGAA microsatellite sequences with potential transcriptional activation function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noëlle Guillon

    Full Text Available The fusion between EWS and ETS family members is a key oncogenic event in Ewing tumors and important EWS-FLI1 target genes have been identified. However, until now, the search for EWS-FLI1 targets has been limited to promoter regions and no genome-wide comprehensive analysis of in vivo EWS-FLI1 binding sites has been undertaken. Using a ChIP-Seq approach to investigate EWS-FLI1-bound DNA sequences in two Ewing cell lines, we show that this chimeric transcription factor preferentially binds two types of sequences including consensus ETS motifs and microsatellite sequences. Most bound sites are found outside promoter regions. Microsatellites containing more than 9 GGAA repeats are very significantly enriched in EWS-FLI1 immunoprecipitates. Moreover, in reporter gene experiments, the transcription activation is highly dependent upon the number of repeats that are included in the construct. Importantly, in vivo EWS-FLI1-bound microsatellites are significantly associated with EWS-FLI1-driven gene activation. Put together, these results point out the likely contribution of microsatellite elements to long-distance transcription regulation and to oncogenesis.

  20. Carbohydrate-binding specificities of potential probiotic Lactobacillus strains in porcine jejunal (IPEC-J2) cells and porcine mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriano, Valerie Diane; Bagon, Bernadette B; Balolong, Marilen P; Kang, Dae-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial lectins are carbohydrate-binding adhesins that recognize glycoreceptors in the gut mucus and epithelium of hosts. In this study, the contribution of lectin-like activities to adhesion of Lactobacillus mucosae LM1 and Lactobacillus johnsonii PF01, which were isolated from swine intestine, were compared to those of the commercial probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Both LM1 and PF01 strains have been reported to have good adhesion ability to crude intestinal mucus of pigs. To confirm this, we quantified their adhesion to porcine gastric mucin and intestinal porcine enterocytes isolated from the jejunum of piglets (IPEC-J2). In addition, we examined their carbohydrate-binding specificities by suspending bacterial cells in carbohydrate solutions prior to adhesion assays. We found that the selected carbohydrates affected the adherences of LM1 to IPEC-J2 cells and of LGG to mucin. In addition, compared to adhesion to IPEC-J2 cells, adhesion to mucin by both LM1 and LGG was characterized by enhanced specific recognition of glycoreceptor components such as galactose, mannose, and N-acetylglucosamine. Hydrophobic interactions might make a greater contribution to adhesion of PF01. A similar adhesin profile between a probiotic and a pathogen, suggest a correlation between shared pathogen-probiotic glycoreceptor recognition and the ability to exclude enteropathogens such as Escherichia coli K88 and Salmonella Typhimurium KCCM 40253. These findings extend our understanding of the mechanisms of the intestinal adhesion and pathogen-inhibition abilities of probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

  1. Predicting treatment response in Schizophrenia: the role of stratal and frontal dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Sanne; Nørbak-Emig, Henrik; Nielsen, Mette Ødegaard

    2014-01-01

    relationship between frontal and striatal dopamine activity. Data also emphasize that there might be gender differences. The data analysis is ongoing. (1) Glenthøj BY, Mackeprang T et al. Frontal dopamine D2/3 receptor binding in drug-naïve first-episode schizophrenic patients correlates with positive...... cortex in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode male schizophrenia patients(1). Preclinical studies suggest an inverse relationship between frontal and striatal dopamine activity. This activity can indirectly be expressed by the BP of dopamine receptors using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT......-up. There was a negative correlation between striatal BP and improvement of the PANSS total score (Rho=-0,553 P=0.009). Furthermore we found a negative correlation between striatal BP and improvement of positive symptoms among the male patients only (P=0.020). The same relationship was found at trend level for the entire...

  2. Cyclophilin A potentiates TRIM5α inhibition of HIV-1 nuclear import without promoting TRIM5α binding to the viral capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallori Burse

    Full Text Available The host immunophilin cyclophilin A (CypA binds to the capsid protein (CA of HIV-1 and regulates its infectivity. Depending on the target cell type, CypA can either promote or inhibit HIV-1 infection. The ability of CypA to promote HIV-1 infection has been extensively studied and linked to several steps in early replication including uncoating, reverse transcription and nuclear import. By contrast, the mechanism by which CypA inhibits infection is less well understood. We investigated the mechanism by which CypA potentiates restriction of HIV-1 by the tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5α. Depletion of TRIM5α in the African green monkey cell line Vero, resulted in a loss of inhibition of infection by CypA, demonstrating that inhibition by CypA is mediated by TRIM5α. Complementary genetic and biochemical assays failed to demonstrate an ability of CypA to promote binding of TRIM5α to the viral capsid. TRIM5α inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcription in a proteasome-dependent manner; however, we observed that inhibition of proteasome activity did not reduce the ability of CypA to inhibit infection, suggesting that CypA acts at a step after reverse transcription. Accordingly, we observed a CypA-dependent reduction in the accumulation of nuclear HIV-1 DNA, indicating that CypA specifically promotes TRIM5α inhibition of HIV-1 nuclear import. We also observed that the ability of CypA to inhibit HIV-1 infection is abolished by amino acid substitutions within the conserved CPSF6-binding surface in CA. Our results indicate that CypA inhibits HIV-1 infection in Vero cells not by promoting TRIM5α binding to the capsid but by blocking nuclear import of the HIV-1 preintegration complex.

  3. Reversible Albumin-Binding GH Possesses a Potential Once-Weekly Treatment Profile in Adult Growth Hormone Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Michael Højby; Janukonyté, Jurgita; Klose, Marianne; Marina, Djordje; Tanvig, Mette; Nielsen, Lene F; Höybye, Charlotte; Andersen, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Christiansen, Jens Sandahl

    2016-03-01

    NNC0195-0092 is a reversible, albumin-binding GH derivative, developed for once-weekly administration. The objective of the study was to evaluate safety, local tolerability, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics of multiple, once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092, compared with daily GH. This was a phase 1, randomized, open-label, active-controlled, multiple-dose, dose-escalation trial. Thirty-four GH-treated adult subjects (male, n = 25) with GH deficiency participated in the study. Subjects were sequentially assigned into four cohorts of eight subjects, randomized within each cohort (3:1) to once-weekly NNC0195-0092 (n = 6) for 4 weeks (0.02, 0.04, 0.08, and 0.12 mg/kg) or daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex (n = 2) for 4 weeks with a dose replicating the pretrial dose of somatropin. A safety assessment was performed prior to initiating treatment at the next dose level of NNC0195-0092. Daily GH treatment was discontinued 14 days before the trial start. Blood samples were drawn for assessment of safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics (IGF-1 and IGF-binding protein-3) profiles, and immunogenicity studies. Numbers of adverse events were similar at the dose levels of 0.02, 0.04, and 0.08 mg/kg NNC0195-0092 vs daily injections of Norditropin NordiFlex, whereas the number of adverse events was greater at the highest dose level of NNC0195-0092 (0.12 mg/kg). NNC0195-0092 (area under the curve[0-168h]) and peak plasma concentration) increased in a dose-dependent manner, and a dose-dependent increase in IGF-1 levels was observed. IGF-1 profiles were elevated for at least 1 week, and for the 0.02-mg/kg and 0.04-mg/kg NNC0195-0092 doses, the observed IGF-1 levels were similar to the levels for the active control group. Four once-weekly doses of NNC0195-0092 (dose range 0.02-0.12 mg/kg) administered to adult patients with GH deficiency were well tolerated, and IGF-1 profiles were consistent with a once-weekly treatment profile. No clinically significant safety and

  4. Striatal μ-opioid receptor availability predicts cold pressor pain threshold in healthy human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagelberg, Nora; Aalto, Sargo; Tuominen, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    the potential associations between μ-opioid receptor BP(ND) and psychophysical measures. The results show that striatal μ-opioid receptor BP(ND) predicts cold pressor pain threshold, but not cold pressor pain tolerance or tactile sensitivity. This finding suggests that striatal μ-opioid receptor density......Previous PET studies in healthy humans have shown that brain μ-opioid receptor activation during experimental pain is associated with reductions in the sensory and affective ratings of the individual pain experience. The aim of this study was to find out whether brain μ-opioid receptor binding...... at the resting state, in absence of painful stimulation, can be a long-term predictor of experimental pain sensitivity. We measured μ-opioid receptor binding potential (BP(ND)) with μ-opioid receptor selective radiotracer [(11)C]carfentanil and positron emission tomography (PET) in 12 healthy male subjects...

  5. Synthesis of 2-iodo- and 2-phenyl-[11C]melatonin: potential PET tracers for melatonin binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiajun; Fiehn-Schulze, Brita; Firnau, Guenter; Brough, Paul A.; Snieckus, Victor

    1998-01-01

    Two 11 C-labelled melatonin derivatives, 2-iodo-[ 11 C]melatonin (2-iodo-5-methoxy-N[ 11 C-acetyl]-tryptamine, an agonist) and 2-phenyl-[ 11 C]melatonin (2-phenyl-5-methoxy-N[ 11 C-acetyl]tryptamine, a putative antagonist) were synthesized from [ 11 C]carbon dioxide. The reaction sequence was common to both compounds and consisted of three steps: (i) carbonylation of methyl magnesium bromide with [ 11 C]carbon dioxide, (ii) conversion of the adduct to [ 11 C]acetyl chloride, (iii) acetylation of the amine precursors (2-iodo-5-methoxy-tryptamine or 2-phenyl-5-methoxy-tryptamine) with [ 11 C]acetyl chloride. The precursors were especially prepared. The radiochemical yield was 19% for 2-iodomelatonin and 32% for 2-phenymelatonin, based on [ 11 C]carbon dioxide; the specific activity ranged from 300 to 600 mCi/μmol. Both labelled 2-substituted-melatonins are intended to be used as radiotracers to study melatonin binding sites in man with positron emission tomography

  6. Cytosolic guanine nucledotide binding deficient form of transglutaminase 2 (R580a potentiates cell death in oxygen glucose deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Colak

    Full Text Available Transglutaminase 2 (TG2 is a hypoxia-responsive protein that is a calcium-activated transamidating enzyme, a GTPase and a scaffolding/linker protein. Upon activation TG2 undergoes a large conformational change, which likely affects not only its enzymatic activities but its non-catalytic functions as well. The focus of this study was on the role of transamidating activity, conformation and localization of TG2 in ischemic cell death. Cells expressing a GTP binding deficient form of TG2 (TG2-R580A with high basal transamidation activity and a more extended conformation showed significantly increased cell death in response to oxygen-glucose deprivation; however, targeting TG2-R580A to the nucleus abrogated its detrimental role in oxygen-glucose deprivation. Treatment of cells expressing wild type TG2, TG2-C277S (a transamidating inactive mutant and TG2-R580A with Cp4d, a reversible TG2 inhibitor, did not affect cell death in response to oxygen-glucose deprivation. These findings indicate that the pro-cell death effects of TG2 are dependent on its localization to the cytosol and independent of its transamidation activity. Further, the conformational state of TG2 is likely an important determinant in cell survival and the prominent function of TG2 in ischemic cell death is as a scaffold to modulate cellular processes.

  7. APPL1 potentiates insulin sensitivity by facilitating the binding of IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jiyoon; Galan, Amanda K; Xin, Xiaoban; Dong, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Zhou, Lijun; Wang, Changhua; Li, Cuiling; Holmes, Bekke M; Sloane, Lauren B; Austad, Steven N; Guo, Shaodong; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Deng, Chuxia; White, Morris F; Liu, Feng; Dong, Lily Q

    2014-05-22

    Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) to the insulin receptor (IR) is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. APPL1 Potentiates Insulin Sensitivity by Facilitating the Binding of IRS1/2 to the Insulin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoon Ryu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor (IR is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways.

  9. A self-interaction-free local hybrid functional: Accurate binding energies vis-à-vis accurate ionization potentials from Kohn-Sham eigenvalues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Tobias; Kümmel, Stephan; Kraisler, Eli; Makmal, Adi; Kronik, Leeor

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a new approximation for the exchange-correlation (xc) energy of Kohn-Sham density functional theory. It combines exact exchange with a compatible non-local correlation functional. The functional is by construction free of one-electron self-interaction, respects constraints derived from uniform coordinate scaling, and has the correct asymptotic behavior of the xc energy density. It contains one parameter that is not determined ab initio. We investigate whether it is possible to construct a functional that yields accurate binding energies and affords other advantages, specifically Kohn-Sham eigenvalues that reliably reflect ionization potentials. Tests for a set of atoms and small molecules show that within our local-hybrid form accurate binding energies can be achieved by proper optimization of the free parameter in our functional, along with an improvement in dissociation energy curves and in Kohn-Sham eigenvalues. However, the correspondence of the latter to experimental ionization potentials is not yet satisfactory, and if we choose to optimize their prediction, a rather different value of the functional's parameter is obtained. We put this finding in a larger context by discussing similar observations for other functionals and possible directions for further functional development that our findings suggest

  10. Binding of insecticidal lectin Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) to midgut receptors of Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi provides clues to its insecticidal potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amit; Gupta, Sumanti; Hess, Daniel; Das, Kali Pada; Das, Sampa

    2014-07-01

    The insecticidal potential of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins against hemipterans has been experimentally proven. However, the basis behind the toxicity of these lectins against hemipterans remains elusive. The present study elucidates the molecular basis behind insecticidal efficacy of Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA) against Bemisia tabaci and Lipaphis erysimi. Confocal microscopic analyses highlighted the binding of 25 kDa stable homodimeric lectin to insect midgut. Ligand blots followed by LC MS/MS analyses identified binding partners of CEA as vacuolar ATP synthase and sarcoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum type Ca(2+) ATPase from B. tabaci, and ATP synthase, heat shock protein 70 and clathrin heavy chain assembly protein from L. erysimi. Internalization of CEA into hemolymph was confirmed by Western blotting. Glycoprotein nature of the receptors was identified through glycospecific staining. Deglycosylation assay indicated the interaction of CEA with its receptors to be probably glycan mediated. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed the interaction kinetics between ATP synthase of B. tabaci with CEA. Pathway prediction study based on Drosophila homologs suggested the interaction of CEA with insect receptors that probably led to disruption of cellular processes causing growth retardation and loss of fecundity of target insects. Thus, the present findings strengthen our current understanding of the entomotoxic potentiality of CEA, which will facilitate its future biotechnological applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Plant phenolic volatiles inhibit quorum sensing in pectobacteria and reduce their virulence by potential binding to ExpI and ExpR proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Khazanov, Netaly; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2016-12-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population density-dependent regulatory system in bacteria that couples gene expression to cell density through accumulation of diffusible signaling molecules. Pectobacteria are causal agents of soft rot disease in a range of economically important crops. They rely on QS to coordinate their main virulence factor, production of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs). Plants have evolved an array of antimicrobial compounds to anticipate and cope with pathogens, of which essential oils (EOs) are widely recognized. Here, volatile EOs, carvacrol and eugenol, were shown to specifically interfere with QS, the master regulator of virulence in pectobacteria, resulting in strong inhibition of QS genes, biofilm formation and PCWDEs, thereby leading to impaired infection. Accumulation of the signal molecule N-acylhomoserine lactone declined upon treatment with EOs, suggesting direct interaction of EOs with either homoserine lactone synthase (ExpI) or with the regulatory protein (ExpR). Homology models of both proteins were constructed and docking simulations were performed to test the above hypotheses. The resulting binding modes and docking scores of carvacrol and eugenol support potential binding to ExpI/ExpR, with stronger interactions than previously known inhibitors of both proteins. The results demonstrate the potential involvement of phytochemicals in the control of Pectobacterium.

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in the ruminant uterus: potential endometrial marker and regulator of conceptus elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rebecca M; Erikson, David W; Kim, Jinyoung; Burghardt, Robert C; Bazer, Fuller W; Johnson, Greg A; Spencer, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Establishment of pregnancy in ruminants requires conceptus elongation and production of interferon-tau (IFNT), the pregnancy recognition signal that maintains ovarian progesterone (P4) production. These studies determined temporal and spatial alterations in IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP3 in the ovine and bovine uterus; effects of P4 and IFNT on their expression in the ovine uterus; and effects of IGFBP1 on ovine trophectoderm cell proliferation, migration, and attachment. IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 were studied because they are the only IGFBPs specifically expressed by the endometrial luminal epithelia in sheep. In sheep, IGFBP1 and IGFBP3 expression was coordinate with the period of conceptus elongation, whereas only IGFBP1 expression was coordinate with conceptus elongation in cattle. IGFBP1 mRNA in the ovine endometria was between 5- and 29-fold more abundant between d 12 and 16 of pregnancy compared with the estrous cycle and greater on d 16 of pregnancy than nonpregnancy in the bovine uterus. In sheep, P4 induced and IFNT stimulated expression of IGFBP1 but not IGFBP3; however, the effect of IFNT did not mimic the abundant increase observed in pregnant ewes. Therefore, IGFBP1 expression in the endometrium is regulated by another factor from the conceptus. IGFBP1 did not affect the proliferation of ovine trophectoderm cells in vitro but did stimulate their migration and mediate their attachment. These studies reveal that IGFBP1 is a common endometrial marker of conceptus elongation in sheep and cattle and most likely regulates conceptus elongation by stimulating migration and attachment of the trophectoderm.

  13. A binomial truncation function proposed for the second-moment approximation of tight-binding potential and application in the ternary Ni-Hf-Ti system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J H; Dai, X D; Wang, T L; Liu, B X

    2007-01-01

    We propose a two-parameter binomial truncation function for the second-moment approximation of the tight-binding (TB-SMA) interatomic potential and illustrate in detail the procedure of constructing the potentials for binary and ternary transition metal systems. For the ternary Ni-Hf-Ti system, the lattice constants, cohesion energies, elastic constants and bulk moduli of six binary compounds, i.e. L1 2 Ni 3 Hf, NiHf 3 , Ni 3 Ti, NiTi 3 , Hf 3 Ti and HfTi 3 , are firstly acquired by ab initio calculations and then employed to derive the binomial-truncated TB-SMA Ni-Hf-Ti potential. Applying the ab initio derived Ni-Hf-Ti potential, the lattice constants, cohesive energy, elastic constants and bulk moduli of another six binary compounds, i.e. D0 3 NiHf 3 , NiTi 3 HfTi 3 , and B2 NiHf, NiTi, HfTi, and two ternary compounds, i.e. C1 b NiHfTi, L2 1 Ni 2 HfTi, are calculated, respectively. It is found that, for the eight binary compounds studied, the calculated lattice constants and cohesion energies are in excellent agreement with those directly acquired from ab initio calculations and that the elastic constants and bulk moduli calculated from the potential are also qualitatively consistent with the results from ab initio calculations

  14. Diffusion Monte Carlo determination of the binding energy of the sup 4 He nucleus for model Wigner potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, R.F. (Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. of Science and Technology); Buendia, E. (Granada Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Moderna); Flynn, M.F. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics); Guardiola, R. (Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica y Nuclear)

    1992-02-01

    The diffusion Monte Carlo method is used to integrate the four-body Schroedinger equation corresponding to the {sup 4}He nucleus for several model potentials of Wigner type. Good importance sampling trial functions are used, and the sampling is large enough to obtain the ground-state energy with an error of only 0.01 to 0.02 MeV. (author).

  15. Oct-1 potentiates CREB-driven cyclin D1 promoter activation via a phospho-CREB- and CREB binding protein-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulon, Séverine; Dantonel, Jean-Christophe; Binet, Virginie; Vié, Annick; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Hipskind, Robert A; Philips, Alexandre

    2002-11-01

    Cyclin D1, the regulatory subunit for mid-G(1) cyclin-dependent kinases, controls the expression of numerous cell cycle genes. A cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE), located upstream of the cyclin D1 mRNA start site, integrates mitogenic signals that target the CRE-binding factor CREB, which can recruit the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). We describe an alternative mechanism for CREB-driven cyclin D1 induction that involves the ubiquitous POU domain protein Oct-1. In the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, overexpression of Oct-1 or its POU domain strongly increases transcriptional activation of cyclin D1 and GAL4 reporter genes that is specifically dependent upon CREB but independent of Oct-1 DNA binding. Gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirm that POU forms a complex with CREB bound to the cyclin D1 CRE. In solution, CREB interaction with POU requires the CREB Q2 domain and, notably, occurs with CREB that is not phosphorylated on Ser 133. Accordingly, Oct-1 also potently enhances transcriptional activation mediated by a Ser133Ala CREB mutant. Oct-1/CREB synergy is not diminished by the adenovirus E1A 12S protein, a repressor of CBP coactivator function. In contrast, E1A strongly represses CBP-enhanced transactivation by CREB phosphorylated on Ser 133. Our observation that Oct-1 potentiates CREB-dependent cyclin D1 transcriptional activity independently of Ser 133 phosphorylation and E1A-sensitive coactivator function offers a new paradigm for the regulation of cyclin D1 induction by proliferative signals.

  16. The Arabidopsis Putative Selenium-Binding Protein Family: Expression Study and Characterization of SBP1 as a Potential New Player in Cadmium Detoxification Processes1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Jourdain, Agnès; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the putative selenium-binding protein (SBP) gene family is composed of three members (SBP1–SBP3). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that SBP1 expression was ubiquitous. SBP2 was expressed at a lower level in flowers and roots, whereas SBP3 transcripts were only detected in young seedling tissues. In cadmium (Cd)-treated seedlings, SBP1 level of expression was rapidly increased in roots. In shoots, SBP1 transcripts accumulated later and for higher Cd doses. SBP2 and SBP3 expression showed delayed or no responsiveness to Cd. In addition, luciferase (LUC) activity recorded on Arabidopsis lines expressing the LUC gene under the control of the SBP1 promoter further showed dynamic regulation of SBP1 expression during development and in response to Cd stress. Western-blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies raised against SBP1 showed that SBP1 protein accumulated in Cd-exposed tissues in correlation with SBP1 transcript amount. The sbp1 null mutant displayed no visible phenotype under normal and stress conditions that was explained by the up-regulation of SBP2 expression. SBP1 overexpression enhanced Cd accumulation in roots and reduced sensitivity to Cd in wild type and, more significantly, in Cd-hypersensitive cad mutants that lack phytochelatins. Similarly, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SBP1 expression led to increased Cd tolerance of the Cd-hypersensitive ycf1 mutant. In vitro experiments showed that SBP1 has the ability to bind Cd. These data highlight the importance of maintaining the adequate SBP protein level under healthy and stress conditions and suggest that, during Cd stress, SBP1 accumulation efficiently helps to detoxify Cd potentially through direct binding. PMID:18354042

  17. The sigma-1 receptor modulates dopamine transporter conformation and cocaine binding and may thereby potentiate cocaine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weimin Conrad; Yano, Hideaki; Hiranita, Takato; Chin, Frederick T; McCurdy, Christopher R; Su, Tsung-Ping; Amara, Susan G; Katz, Jonathan L

    2017-07-07

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine (DA) neurotransmission by recapturing DA into the presynaptic terminals and is a principal target of the psychostimulant cocaine. The sigma-1 receptor (σ 1 R) is a molecular chaperone, and its ligands have been shown to modulate DA neuronal signaling, although their effects on DAT activity are unclear. Here, we report that the prototypical σ 1 R agonist (+)-pentazocine potentiated the dose response of cocaine self-administration in rats, consistent with the effects of the σR agonists PRE-084 and DTG (1,3-di- o -tolylguanidine) reported previously. These behavioral effects appeared to be correlated with functional changes of DAT. Preincubation with (+)-pentazocine or PRE-084 increased the B max values of [ 3 H]WIN35428 binding to DAT in rat striatal synaptosomes and transfected cells. A specific interaction between σ 1 R and DAT was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays. Mutational analyses indicated that the transmembrane domain of σ 1 R likely mediated this interaction. Furthermore, cysteine accessibility assays showed that σ 1 R agonist preincubation potentiated cocaine-induced changes in DAT conformation, which were blocked by the specific σ 1 R antagonist CM304. Moreover, σ 1 R ligands had distinct effects on σ 1 R multimerization. CM304 increased the proportion of multimeric σ 1 Rs, whereas (+)-pentazocine increased monomeric σ 1 Rs. Together these results support the hypothesis that σ 1 R agonists promote dissociation of σ 1 R multimers into monomers, which then interact with DAT to stabilize an outward-facing DAT conformation and enhance cocaine binding. We propose that this novel molecular mechanism underlies the behavioral potentiation of cocaine self-administration by σ 1 R agonists in animal models. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Phenylarsine Oxide Binding Reveals Redox-Active and Potential Regulatory Vicinal Thiols on the Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melideo, Scott L.; Healey, Adriana E.; Lucas, Eugene J.; Koval, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Our earlier finding that the activity of protein phosphatase 2A from rat brain is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of the dithiol cross-linking reagent phenylarsine oxide (PAO) has encouraged the hypothesis that the catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) of PP2A contains one or more pairs of closely-spaced (vicinal) thiol pairs that may contribute to regulation of the enzyme. The results of the present study demonstrate using immobilized PAO-affinity chromatography that PP2Ac from rat brain formed stable DTT-sensitive adducts with PAO with or without associated regulatory subunits. In addition, a subset of the PAO-binding vicinal thiols of PP2Ac was readily oxidized to disulfide bonds in vitro. Importantly, a small fraction of PP2Ac was still found to contain disulfide bonds after applying stringent conditions designed to prevent protein disulfide bond formation during homogenization and fractionation of the brains. These findings establish the presence of potentially regulatory and redox-active PAO-binding vicinal thiols on the catalytic subunit of PP2A and suggest that a population of PP2Ac may contain disulfide bonds in vivo. PMID:21080067

  19. IgG and IgA with Potential Microbial-Binding Activity Are Expressed by Normal Human Skin Epidermal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyang Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system of the skin is thought to depend largely on a multi-layered mechanical barrier supplemented by epidermis-derived antimicrobial peptides. To date, there are no reports of antimicrobial antibody secretion by the epidermis. In this study, we report the expression of functional immunoglobulin G (IgG and immunoglobulin A (IgA, previously thought to be only produced by B cells, in normal human epidermal cells and the human keratinocyte line HaCaT. While B cells express a fully diverse Ig, epidermal cell-expressed IgG or IgA showed one or two conservative VHDJH rearrangements in each individual. These unique VDJ rearrangements in epidermal cells were found neither in the B cell-derived Ig VDJ databases published by others nor in our positive controls. IgG and IgA from epidermal cells of the same individual had different VDJ rearrangement patterns. IgG was found primarily in prickle cells, and IgA was mainly detected in basal cells. Both epidermal cell-derived IgG and IgA showed potential antibody activity by binding pathogens like Staphylococcus aureus, the most common pathogenic skin bacteria, but the microbial-binding profile was different. Our data indicates that normal human epidermal cells spontaneously express IgG and IgA, and we speculate that these Igs participate in skin innate immunity.

  20. Binding Energy and Dissociation Barrier: Experimental Determination of the Key Parameters of the Potential Energy Curve of Diethyl Ether on Si(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus; Dürr, Michael; Höfer, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The key parameters of the potential energy curve of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces, binding energy of the intermediate state and dissociation barrier, were experimentally investigated for the model system of diethyl ether (Et2O) on Si(001). Et2O adsorbs via a datively bonded intermediate from which it converts via ether cleavage into a covalently attached final state. This thermally activated conversion into the final state was followed in real-time by means of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) at different temperatures and the associated energy barrier ϵa = 0.38 ± 0.05 eV and pre-exponential factor νa = 10(4±1) s(-1) were determined. From molecular beam experiments on the initial sticking probability, the difference between the desorption energy ϵd and ϵa was extracted and thus the binding energy of the intermediate state was determined (0.62 ± 0.08 eV). The results are discussed in terms of general chemical trends as well as with respect to a wider applicability on adsorbate reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

  1. Evaluation of allergenic potential for rice seed protein components utilizing a rice proteome database and an allergen database in combination with IgE-binding of recombinant proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Kana; Hino, Shingo; Oshima, Kenzi; Nadano, Daita; Urisu, Atsuo; Takaiwa, Fumio; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Among 131 rice endosperm proteins previously identified by MS-based proteomics, most of the proteins showed low or almost no sequence similarity to known allergens in databases, whereas nine proteins did it significantly. The sequence of two proteins showed high overall identity with Hsp70-like hazel tree pollen allergen (Cor a 10) and barley α-amylase (Hor v 16), respectively, whereas the others showed low identity (28-58%) with lemon germin-like protein (Cit l 1), corn zein (Zea m 50 K), wheat chitinase-like xylanase inhibitor (Tri a XI), and kinase-like pollen allergen of Russian thistle (Sal k 1). Immuno-dot blot analysis showed that recombinant proteins for these rice seed homologs were positive in the IgE-binding, but not necessarily similarity dependent, from some allergic patients. These results suggest that utilization of proteome and sequence databases in combination with IgE-binding analysis was effective to screen and evaluate allergenic potential of rice seed protein components.

  2. Synthesis and binding affinity of new 1,4-disubstituted triazoles as potential dopamine D(3) receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insua, Ignacio; Alvarado, Mario; Masaguer, Christian F; Iglesias, Alba; Brea, José; Loza, María I; Carro, Laura

    2013-10-15

    A series of new 1,4-disubstituted triazoles was prepared from appropriate arylacetylenes and aminoalkylazides using click chemistry methodology. These compounds were evaluated as potential ligands on several subtypes of dopamine receptors in in vitro competition assays, showing high affinity for dopamine D3 receptors, lower affinity for D2 and D4, and no affinity for the D1 receptors. Compound 18 displayed the highest affinity at the D3 receptor with a Ki value of 2.7 nM, selectivity over D2 (70-fold) and D4 (200-fold), and behaviour as a competitive antagonist in the low nanomolar range. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.): receptor profiling of lysergic acid amide and other potential psychedelic LSD-like compounds by computational and binding assay approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulke, Alexander; Kremer, Christian; Wunder, Cora; Achenbach, Janosch; Djahanschiri, Bardya; Elias, Anderson; Schwed, J Stefan; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter; Proschak, Ewgenij; Toennes, Stefan W; Stark, Holger

    2013-07-09

    The convolvulacea Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.) is well known as an important medical plant in the traditional Ayurvedic system of medicine and it is used in numerous diseases (e.g. nervousness, bronchitis, tuberculosis, arthritis, and diabetes). Additionally, in the Indian state of Assam and in other regions Argyreia nervosa is part of the traditional tribal medicine (e.g. the Santali people, the Lodhas, and others). In the western hemisphere, Argyreia nervosa has been brought in attention as so called "legal high". In this context, the seeds are used as source of the psychoactive ergotalkaloid lysergic acid amide (LSA), which is considered as the main active ingredient. As the chemical structure of LSA is very similar to that of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), the seeds of Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.) are often considered as natural substitute of LSD. In the present study, LSA and LSD have been compared concerning their potential pharmacological profiles based on the receptor binding affinities since our recent human study with four volunteers on p.o. application of Argyreia nervosa seeds has led to some ambiguous effects. In an initial step computer-aided in silico prediction models on receptor binding were employed to screen for serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, muscarine, and histamine receptor subtypes as potential targets for LSA. In addition, this screening was extended to accompany ergotalkaloids of Argyreia nervosa (Burm. f.). In a verification step, selected LSA screening results were confirmed by in vitro binding assays with some extensions to LSD. In the in silico model LSA exhibited the highest affinity with a pKi of about 8.0 at α1A, and α1B. Clear affinity with pKi>7 was predicted for 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT6, 5-HT7, and D2. From these receptors the 5-HT1D subtype exhibited the highest pKi with 7.98 in the prediction model. From the other ergotalkaloids, agroclavine and festuclavine also seemed to be highly affine to the 5-HT1D

  4. Monetary discounting and ventral striatal dopamine receptor availability in nontreatment-seeking alcoholics and social drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Albrecht, Daniel S; Herring, Christine M; Walters, James W; Hile, Karen L; Kareken, David A; Yoder, Karmen K

    2015-06-01

    Dopamine (DA) in the ventral striatum (VST) has long been implicated in addiction pathologies, yet its role in temporal decision-making is not well-understood. To determine if VST DA D2 receptor availability corresponds with greater impulsive choice in both nontreatment-seeking alcoholics (NTS) and social drinkers (SD). NTS subjects (n = 10) and SD (n = 13) received PET scans at baseline with the D2/D3 radioligand [(11)C]raclopride (RAC). Outside the scanner, subjects performed a delay discounting procedure with monetary rewards. RAC binding potential (BPND) was estimated voxelwise, and correlations were performed to test for relationships between VST BPND and delay discounting performance. Self-reported impulsivity was also tested for correlations with BPND. Across all subjects, greater impulsive choice for $20 correlated with lower BPND in the right VST. NTS showed greater impulsive choice than SD and were more impulsive by self-report. Across all subjects, the capacity of larger rewards to reduce impulsive choice (the magnitude effect) correlated negatively (p = 0.028) with problematic alcohol use (AUDIT) scores. Self-reported impulsivity did not correlate with BPND in VST. Preference for immediate reinforcement may reflect greater endogenous striatal DA or lower D2 number, or both. Alcoholic status did not mediate significant effects on VST BPND, suggesting minimal effects from alcohol exposure. The apparent lack of BPND correlation with self-reported impulsivity highlights the need for objective behavioral assays in the study of the neurochemical substrates of behavior. Finally, our results suggest that the magnitude effect may be more sensitive to alcohol-induced problems than single discounting measures.

  5. Role of surface layer collagen binding protein from indigenous Lactobacillus plantarum 91 in adhesion and its anti-adhesion potential against gut pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ashok Kumar; Tyagi, Ashish; Kaushik, Jai Kumar; Saklani, Asha Chandola; Grover, Sunita; Batish, Virender Kumar

    2013-12-14

    Human feacal isolates were ascertain as genus Lactobacillus using specific primer LbLMA1/R16-1 and further identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with species specific primers Lpl-3/Lpl-2. 25 L. plantarum strains were further assessed for hydrophobicity following the microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) method and colonization potentials based on their adherence to immobilized human collagen type-1. Surface proteins were isolated from selected L. plantarum 91(Lp91) strain. The purified collagen binding protein (Cbp) protein was assessed for its anti-adhesion activity against enteric Escherichia coli 0157:H7 pathogen on immobilized collagen. Four L. plantarum strains displayed high degree of hydrophobicity and significant adhesion to collagen. A 72 kDa protein was purified which reduced 59.71% adhesion of E. coli 0157:H7 on immobilized collagen as compared to control well during adhesion assay. Cbp protein is the major influencing factor in inhibition of E. coli 0157:H7 adhesion with extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Hydrophobicity and adhesion potential are closely linked attributes precipitating in better colonization potential of the lactobacillus strains. Cbp is substantiated as a crucial surface protein contributing in adhesion of lactobacillus strains. The study can very well be the platform for commercialization of indigenous probiotic strain once their functional attributes are clinically explored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. In Vitro Binding Potentials of Bentonite, Yeast Cell Wall and Lactic Acid Bacteria for Aflatoxin B1 and Ochratoxin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damoon Ghofrani Tabari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study intended to assess individual and combined adsorption potentials of three adsorbents (processed bentonite as an inorganic adsorbent, and cell walls of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of the GG strain of Lactobacillus rhamnosus as organic adsorbents for aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A under in vitro conditions. Methods: This study was conducted in Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, Iran in 2106. A pre-test with four treatments of bacteria and yeast (live or dead with five replications was designed and conducted to study the effects of these biotic and abiotic organic adsorbents on toxin adsorption efficiency. The experiment in the main study had seven treatments including two toxins (2 ppm and three adsorbents with five replications using the completely randomized design. Toxin quantities were measured by an HPLC instrument. Results: The various types of dead organic adsorbents were more capable of adsorbing toxins compared to the live ones. The processed bentonite was considerably more efficient in adsorbing aflatoxin B1 (93.51 compared to the other treatment groups (P<0.05. No significant differences were observed between the effects of yeast and bacterial cell walls in adsorbing aflatoxin B1. However, the bacterial cell walls (61.71 had higher adsorption efficiencies in adsorbing ochratoxin A than the processed bentonite and yeast cell walls (P<0.05. Conclusion: Processed bentonite (or montmorillonite and bacterial cell walls are able to adsorb considerable quantities of aflatoxin B1and ochratoxin A, and can be used in multiple mycotoxin contaminations as an effective strategy for preventing or reducing the harmful effects of these toxins.

  7. Theranostic multimodular potential of zinc-doped ferrite-saturated metal-binding protein-loaded novel nanocapsules in cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalapuram, Sishir K; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Roy, Kislay; Chaudhary, Rajneesh; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2016-01-01

    The present study successfully developed orally deliverable multimodular zinc (Zn) iron oxide (Fe3O4)-saturated bovine lactoferrin (bLf)-loaded polymeric nanocapsules (NCs), and evaluated their theranostic potential (antitumor efficacy, magnetophotothermal efficacy and imaging capability) in an in vivo human xenograft CpG-island methylator phenotype (CIMP)-1(+)/CIMP2(-)/chromosome instability-positive colonic adenocarcinoma (Caco2) and claudin-low, triple-negative (ER(-)/PR(-)/HER2(-); MDA-MB-231) breast cancer model. Mice fed orally on the Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet showed downregulation in tumor volume and complete regression in tumor volume after 45 days of feeding. In human xenograft colon cancer, vehicle-control NC diet-group (n=5) mice showed a tumor volume of 52.28±11.55 mm(3), and Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet (n=5)-treated mice had a tumor-volume of 0.10±0.073 mm(3). In the human xenograft breast cancer model, Zn-Fe-bLf NC diet (n=5)-treated mice showed a tumor volume of 0.051±0.062 mm(3) within 40 days of feeding. Live mouse imaging conducted by near-infrared fluorescence imaging of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs showed tumor site-specific localization and regression of colon and breast tumor volume. Ex vivo fluorescence-imaging analysis of the vital organs of mice exhibited sparse localization patterns of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs and also confirmed tumor-specific selective localization patterns of Zn-Fe-bLf NCs. Dual imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography scans revealed an unprecedented theranostic ability of the Zn-Fe-bLf NCs. These observations warrant consideration of multimodular Zn-Fe-bLf NCs for real-time cancer imaging and simultaneous cancer-targeted therapy.

  8. Clinical correlation of the binding potential with {sup 123}I-FP-CIT in de novo idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, Valentina; Pupi, Alberto; Vanzi, Eleonora; Cristofaro, Maria Teresa de; Pellicano, Giannantonio; Mungai, Francesco [University of Florence, Clinical Pathophysiology, Florence (Italy); Ramat, Silvia; Marini, Paolo; Sorbi, Sandro [University of Florence, Neurological and Psychiatric Sciences, Florence (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of different single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction techniques in measuring striatal N-{omega}-fluoropropyl-2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-4-[{sup 123}I]iodophenyl-nortropane ({sup 123}I-FP-CIT) binding in de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, in order to find a correlation with clinical scales of disease severity in the initial phases of disease. Thirty-six de novo PD patients underwent {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT and MRI scan. SPECT data were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP), with an iterative algorithm (ordered subset expected maximization, OSEM) and with a method previously developed in our institution, called least-squares (LS) method. The ratio of specific to non-specific striatal {sup 123}I-FP-CIT binding (binding potential, BP) was used as the outcome measure with all the reconstruction methods (BP{sub FBP}, BP{sub OSEM}, BP{sub LS}). The range of values of striatal BP{sub LS} was significantly greater than BP{sub FBP} and BP{sub OSEM}. For all striatal regions, estimates of BP{sub FBP} correlated well with BP{sub OSEM} (r=0.84) and with BP{sub LS} (r=0.64); BP{sub OSEM} correlated significantly with BP{sub LS} (r=0.76). A good correlation was found between putaminal BP{sub LS} and Hoen and Yahr, Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) and lateralized UPDRS motor scores (r=-0.46, r=-0.42, r=-0.39, respectively). Neither putaminal BP{sub FBP} nor putaminal BP{sub OSEM} correlated with any of these motor scores. In de novo PD patients, {sup 123}I-FP-CIT BP values derived from FBP and OSEM reconstruction techniques do not permit to differentiate PD severity. The LS method instead finds a correlation between striatal BP and disease severity scores. The results of this study support the use of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT BP values estimated with the LS method as a biomarker of PD severity. (orig.)

  9. Dynamics of the HCP/BCC phase transition and of the diffusion in zirconium: a model based on a tight-binding potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willaime, F.

    1991-09-01

    We have developed an N-body interatomic potential, based on the second moment approximation of the tight-binding scheme, by fitting its four adjustable parameters to the cohesive energy, atomic volume, and elastic constants of hcp-Zr. We then showed that various properties of this potential compare favorably with those of zirconium in both the low temperatures hcp phase and the high temperature bcc phase. Such is the case in particular for the elastic constants, the phonon dispersion curves, the thermal expansion, and the melting temperature. We reproduced by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on this potential the hcp/bcc phase transformation in both ways. It indeed occurs following the mechanism predicted by Burgers. We find a vibrational entropy of transformation equal to 0.13 k B . Our calculations suggest that in real zirconium the electronic contribution to the transformation entropy is important. We show that some interatomic potential lead to a higher value of the vibrational entropy in the hcp phase than in the bcc phase. We specified the dynamics of the vacancy migration in the bcc phase. The atomic jumps are almost exclusively nearest neighbour ones. The walk of the vacancy becomes strongly correlated at high temperatures. The vacancy jump frequency is very large and has a perfectly arrhenian behaviour. There is no evicence of a dynamical lowering of the vacancy migration barrier: the static and dynamic values of the vacancy migration energy are almost equal, both being unusually small (0.3 eV). The self diffusion coefficent of our model for the vacancy mechanism reproduces an anomalous fast diffusion close to that measured experimentally in bcc-Zr. In our model at high temperatures the time interval between successive jumps is almost equal to the time of flight. The migration events will therefore influence the formation of the vacancies [fr

  10. Multi-species comparative analysis of the equine ACE gene identifies a highly conserved potential transcription factor binding site in intron 16.

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    Natasha A Hamilton

    Full Text Available Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE is essential for control of blood pressure. The human ACE gene contains an intronic Alu indel (I/D polymorphism that has been associated with variation in serum enzyme levels, although the functional mechanism has not been identified. The polymorphism has also been associated with cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, renal disease and elite athleticism. We have characterized the ACE gene in horses of breeds selected for differing physical abilities. The equine gene has a similar structure to that of all known mammalian ACE genes. Nine common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs discovered in pooled DNA were found to be inherited in nine haplotypes. Three of these SNPs were located in intron 16, homologous to that containing the Alu polymorphism in the human. A highly conserved 18 bp sequence, also within that intron, was identified as being a potential binding site for the transcription factors Oct-1, HFH-1 and HNF-3β, and lies within a larger area of higher than normal homology. This putative regulatory element may contribute to regulation of the documented inter-individual variation in human circulating enzyme levels, for which a functional mechanism is yet to be defined. Two equine SNPs occurred within the conserved area in intron 16, although neither of them disrupted the putative binding site. We propose a possible regulatory mechanism of the ACE gene in mammalian species which was previously unknown. This advance will allow further analysis leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the associations seen between the human Alu polymorphism and enzyme levels, cardiovascular disease states and elite athleticism.

  11. Spermatozoa with high mitochondrial membrane potential and low tyrosine phosphorylation preferentially bind to oviduct explants in the water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraf, Kaustubh Kishor; Kumaresan, Arumugam; Chhillar, Shivani; Nayak, Samiksha; Lathika, Sreela; Datta, Tirtha Kumar; Gahlot, Subhash Chand; Karan, Prabha; Verma, Kiran; Mohanty, Tushar Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Although it is understood that spermatozoa are subjected to selection processes to form a functional sperm reservoir in the oviduct, the mechanism remains obscure. With the aim to understand the sperm selection process in the oviduct, in the present in vitro study, we analyzed mitochondrial membrane potential and tyrosine phosphorylation status in oviduct-explants bound and unbound spermatozoa. Frozen semen from Murrah buffalo bulls (n=10) used under progeny testing programme were utilized for the study. Oviduct explants were prepared by overnight culture of epithelial cells in TCM- 199 and washed spermatozoa were added to the oviduct explants and incubated for 4h. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and tyrosine phosphorylation status of bound and unbound spermatozoa were assessed at 1h and 4h of incubation. The proportion of spermatozoa with high MMP was significantly higher (Pspermatozoa (range 84.67-96.56%) compared to unbound (range 8.70-21.03%) spermatozoa. The proportion of tyrosine phosphorylated spermatozoa was significantly higher (Pspermatozoa displaying tyrosine phosphorylation at acrosomal area was significantly (Pspermatozoa with high MMP and low tyrosine phosphorylation were preferred for oviduct-explants binding in the buffalo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Epithelial separation theory for post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage: evidence in a mouse model and potential heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Daniel M; Santa Maria, Chloe; Ayoub, Noel F; Capasso, Robson; Santa Maria, Peter Luke

    2018-02-01

    To provide histological evidence to investigate a theory for post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage (PTH) in a mouse model and to evaluate the potential for heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) treatment on wound healing in this model. A prospective randomized single-blinded cohort study. A uniform tongue wound was created in 84 mice (day 0). Mice were randomized to HB-EGF (treatment, n = 42) or saline (control, n = 42). In treatment mice, HB-EGF 5 µg/ml was administered intramuscularly into the wound daily (days 0-14). In control mice, normal saline was administered daily. Three mice from each group were sacrificed daily through day 14 and the wounds evaluated histologically by blinded reviewers. Key stages of wound healing, including keratinocyte proliferation and migration, wound contraction, epithelial separation, and neoangiogenesis, are defined with implications for post-tonsillectomy wound healing. Epithelial separation (59 vs. 100%, p = 0.003) and wound reopening (8 vs. 48%, p < 0.001) were reduced with HB-EGF. Epithelial thickness (220 vs. 30 µm, p = 0.04) was greater with HB-EGF. Wound closure (days 4-5 vs. day 6, p = 0.01) occurred earlier with HB-EGF. In healing of oral keratinocytes on muscle epithelial separation secondary to muscle, contraction occurs concurrently with neoangiogenesis in the base of the wound, increasing the risk of hemorrhage. This potentially explains why post-tonsillectomy secondary hemorrhage occurs and its timing. HB-EGF-treated wounds showed greater epithelial thickness, less frequent epithelial separation and wound reopening, and earlier wound closure prior to neovascularization, suggesting that HB-EGF may be a potential preventative therapy for PTH. NA-animal studies or basic research.

  13. DNA binding domains and nuclear localization signal of LEDGF: contribution of two helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like domains and a stretch of 58 amino acids of the N-terminal to the trans-activation potential of LEDGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhirendra P; Kubo, E; Takamura, Y; Shinohara, T; Kumar, A; Chylack, Leo T; Fatma, N

    2006-01-20

    Lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF), a nuclear protein, plays a role in regulating the transcription of stress-associated genes such as heat shock proteins by binding to consensus core DNA sequences nAGGn or nGAAn or their repeats, and in doing so helps to provide cyto-protection. However, additional information is required to identify the specific structural features of LEDGF involved in gene transcription. Here we have investigated the functional domains activating and repressing DNA-binding modules, by using a DNA binding assay and trans-activation experiments performed by analyzing proteins prepared from deletion constructs. The results disclosed the DNA-binding domain of N-terminal LEDGF mapped between amino acid residues 5 and 62, a 58 amino acid residue stretch PWWP domain which binds to stress response elements (STRE; A/TGGGGA/T). C-terminal LEDGF contains activation domains, an extensive loop-region (aa 418-530) with two helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like domains, and binds to a heat shock element (HSE; nGAAn). A trans-activation assay using Hsp27 promoter revealed that both HTH domains contribute in a cooperative manner to the trans-activation potential of LEDGF. Interestingly, removal of N-terminal LEDGF (aa 1-187) significantly enhances the gene activation potential of C-terminal LEDGF (aa 199-530); thus the N-terminal domain (aa 5-62), exhibits auto-transcriptional repression activity. It appears that this domain is involved in stabilizing the LEDGF-DNA binding complex. Collectively, our results demonstrate that LEDGF contains three DNA-binding domains, which regulate gene expression depending on cellular microenvironment and thus modify the physiology of cells to maintain cellular homeostasis.

  14. Investigation of naphthofuran moiety as potential dual inhibitor against BACE-1 and GSK-3β: molecular dynamics simulations, binding energy, and network analysis to identify first-in-class dual inhibitors against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akhil; Srivastava, Gaurava; Srivastava, Swati; Verma, Seema; Negi, Arvind S; Sharma, Ashok

    2017-08-01

    BACE-1 and GSK-3β are potential therapeutic drug targets for Alzheimer's disease. Recently, both the targets received attention for designing dual inhibitors for Alzheimer's disease. Until now, only two-scaffold triazinone and curcumin have been reported as BACE-1 and GSK-3β dual inhibitors. Docking, molecular dynamics, clustering, binding energy, and network analysis of triazinone derivatives with BACE-1 and GSK-3β was performed to get molecular insight into the first reported dual inhibitor. Further, we designed and evaluated a naphthofuran series for its ability to inhibit BACE-1 and GSK-3β with the computational approaches. Docking study of naphthofuran series showed a good binding affinity towards both the targets. Molecular dynamics, binding energy, and network analysis were performed to compare their binding with the targets and amino acids responsible for binding. Naphthofuran series derivatives showed good interaction within the active site residues of both of the targets. Hydrogen bond occupancy and binding energy suggested strong binding with the targets. Dual-inhibitor binding was mostly governed by the hydrophobic interactions for both of the targets. Per residue energy decomposition and network analysis identified the key residues involved in the binding and inhibiting BACE-1 and GSK-3β. The results indicated that naphthofuran series derivative 11 may be a promising first-in-class dual inhibitor against BACE-1 and GSK-3β. This naphthofuran series may be further explored to design better dual inhibitors. Graphical abstract Naphthofuran derivative as a dual inhibitor for BACE-1 and GSK-3β.

  15. Lobular Distribution and Variability in Hepatic ATP Binding Cassette Protein B1 (ABCB1, P-gp: Ontogenetic Differences and Potential for Toxicity

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    Ngu Njei Abanda

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ATP Binding Cassette B1 (ABCB1 transporter has critical roles in endo- and xenobiotic efficacy and toxicity. To understand population variability in hepatic transport we determined ABCB1 mRNA and protein levels in total liver lysates sampled from 8 pre-defined sites (n = 24, 18–69 years, and in S9 from randomly acquired samples (n = 87, 7 days–87 years. ABCB1 levels did not differ significantly throughout individual livers and showed 4.4-fold protein variation between subjects. Neither mRNA nor protein levels varied with sex, ethnicity, obesity or triglycerides in lysates or S9 (that showed the same relationships, but protein levels were lower in pediatric S9 (p < 0.0001, with 76% of adult ABCB1 present at birth and predicted to mature in 5 years. Pediatric total liver lysates were not available. In summary, opportunistic collection for studying human hepatic ABCB1 is acceptable. Additionally, ABCB1 may be lower in children, indicating differential potential for toxicity and response to therapy in this special population.

  16. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ray, R.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-04-15

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP{sub ND} or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [{sup 11}C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP{sub ND} than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP{sub ND} difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  17. Human Mu Opioid Receptor (OPRM1A118G) polymorphism is associated with brain mu- opioid receptor binding potential in smokers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, R.; Logan, J.; Ruparel, K.; Newberg, A.; Wileyto, E.P.; Loughead, J.W.; Divgi, C.; Blendy, J.A.; Logan, J.; Zubieta, J.-K.; Lerman, C.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence points to the endogenous opioid system, and the mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in particular, in mediating the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse, including nicotine. A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the human MOR gene (OPRM1 A118G) has been shown to alter receptor protein level in preclinical models and smoking behavior in humans. To clarify the underlying mechanisms for these associations, we conducted an in vivo investigation of the effects of OPRM1 A118G genotype on MOR binding potential (BP ND or receptor availability). Twenty-two smokers prescreened for genotype (12 A/A, 10 */G) completed two [ 11 C] carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) imaging sessions following overnight abstinence and exposure to a nicotine-containing cigarette and a denicotinized cigarette. Independent of session, smokers homozygous for the wild-type OPRM1 A allele exhibited significantly higher levels of MOR BP ND than smokers carrying the G allele in bilateral amygdala, left thalamus, and left anterior cingulate cortex. Among G allele carriers, the extent of subjective reward difference (denicotinized versus nicotine cigarette) was associated significantly with MOR BP ND difference in right amygdala, caudate, anterior cingulate cortex, and thalamus. Future translational investigations can elucidate the role of MORs in nicotine addiction, which may lead to development of novel therapeutics.

  18. Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein Potentiates Toxic Lipids-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Macrophages via Inhibition of Janus Kinase 2-dependent Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoo, Ruby L C; Shu, Lingling; Cheng, Kenneth K Y; Wu, Xiaoping; Liao, Boya; Wu, Donghai; Zhou, Zhiguang; Xu, Aimin

    2017-01-17

    Lipotoxicity is implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-related inflammatory complications by promoting macrophage infiltration and activation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) play key roles in obesity and mediate inflammatory activity through similar signaling pathways. However, little is known about their interplay in lipid-induced inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that prolonged treatment of palmitic acid (PA) increased ER stress and expression of A-FABP, which was accompanied by reduced autophagic flux in macrophages. Over-expression of A-FABP impaired PA-induced autophagy associating with enhanced ER stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, while genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of A-FABP reversed the conditions. PA-induced expression of autophagy-related protein (Atg)7 was attenuated in A-FABP over-expressed macrophages, but was elevated in A-FABP-deficient macrophages. Mechanistically, A-FABP potentiated the effects of PA by inhibition of Janus Kinase (JAK)2 activity, thus diminished PA-induced Atg7 expression contributing to impaired autophagy and further augmentation of ER stress. These findings suggest that A-FABP acts as autophagy inhibitor to instigate toxic lipids-induced ER stress through inhibition of JAK2-dependent autophagy, which in turn triggers inflammatory responses in macrophages. A-FABP-JAK2 axis may represent an important pathological pathway contributing to obesity-related inflammatory diseases.

  19. Candidate SNP markers of reproductive potential are predicted by a significant change in the affinity of TATA-binding protein for human gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadaeva, Irina V; Ponomarenko, Petr M; Rasskazov, Dmitry A; Sharypova, Ekaterina B; Kashina, Elena V; Zhechev, Dmitry A; Drachkova, Irina A; Arkova, Olga V; Savinkova, Ludmila K; Ponomarenko, Mikhail P; Kolchanov, Nikolay A; Osadchuk, Ludmila V; Osadchuk, Alexandr V

    2018-02-09

    The progress of medicine, science, technology, education, and culture improves, year by year, quality of life and life expectancy of the populace. The modern human has a chance to further improve the quality and duration of his/her life and the lives of his/her loved ones by bringing their lifestyle in line with their sequenced individual genomes. With this in mind, one of genome-based developments at the junction of personalized medicine and bioinformatics will be considered in this work, where we used two Web services: (i) SNP_TATA_Comparator to search for alleles with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) that alters the affinity of TATA-binding protein (TBP) for the TATA boxes of human gene promoters and (ii) PubMed to look for retrospective clinical reviews on changes in physiological indicators of reproductive potential in carriers of these alleles. A total of 126 SNP markers of female reproductive potential, capable of altering the affinity of TBP for gene promoters, were found using the two above-mentioned Web services. For example, 10 candidate SNP markers of thrombosis (e.g., rs563763767) can cause overproduction of coagulation inducers. In pregnant women, Hughes syndrome provokes thrombosis with a fatal outcome although this syndrome can be diagnosed and eliminated even at the earliest stages of its development. Thus, in women carrying any of the above SNPs, preventive treatment of this syndrome before a planned pregnancy can reduce the risk of death. Similarly, seven SNP markers predicted here (e.g., rs774688955) can elevate the risk of myocardial infarction. In line with Bowles' lifespan theory, women carrying any of these SNPs may modify their lifestyle to improve their longevity if they can take under advisement that risks of myocardial infarction increase with age of the mother, total number of pregnancies, in multiple pregnancies, pregnancies under the age of 20, hypertension, preeclampsia, menstrual cycle irregularity, and in women smokers

  20. Recombinant Protein Truncation Strategy for Inducing Bactericidal Antibodies to the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator Protein of Neisseria meningitidis and Circumventing Potential Cross-Reactivity with Human FK506-Binding Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Magdalena K.; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (−LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines. PMID:25452551

  1. Recombinant protein truncation strategy for inducing bactericidal antibodies to the macrophage infectivity potentiator protein of Neisseria meningitidis and circumventing potential cross-reactivity with human FK506-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielecka, Magdalena K; Devos, Nathalie; Gilbert, Mélanie; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Weynants, Vincent; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-02-01

    A recombinant macrophage infectivity potentiator (rMIP) protein of Neisseria meningitidis induces significant serum bactericidal antibody production in mice and is a candidate meningococcal vaccine antigen. However, bioinformatics analysis of MIP showed some amino acid sequence similarity to human FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs) in residues 166 to 252 located in the globular domain of the protein. To circumvent the potential concern over generating antibodies that could recognize human proteins, we immunized mice with recombinant truncated type I rMIP proteins that lacked the globular domain and the signal leader peptide (LP) signal sequence (amino acids 1 to 22) and contained the His purification tag at either the N or C terminus (C-term). The immunogenicity of truncated rMIP proteins was compared to that of full (i.e., full-length) rMIP proteins (containing the globular domain) with either an N- or C-terminal His tag and with or without the LP sequence. By comparing the functional murine antibody responses to these various constructs, we determined that C-term His truncated rMIP (-LP) delivered in liposomes induced high levels of antibodies that bound to the surface of wild-type but not Δmip mutant meningococci and showed bactericidal activity against homologous type I MIP (median titers of 128 to 256) and heterologous type II and III (median titers of 256 to 512) strains, thereby providing at least 82% serogroup B strain coverage. In contrast, in constructs lacking the LP, placement of the His tag at the N terminus appeared to abrogate bactericidal activity. The strategy used in this study would obviate any potential concerns regarding the use of MIP antigens for inclusion in bacterial vaccines. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Epigenetic mismatches with mutated transcribing genes at leukemogenic S-phase binding/start sites--potential targets for therapy with enzyme inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prindull, Gregor

    2012-11-01

    This review focuses on gene transcription patterns of leukemogenic S-phases in mitotic cell cycles for identification of enzymatic reactions as potential targets for epigenetics-based drug therapy. Transcription of leukemic genes is triggered by reprogrammed transcription factors (TFs) mediated by chromatin histones. Reprogrammed TFs originate from transcriptional alterations of CpG methylation patterns of mutated epigenetic genes. They preserve memory information of earlier leukemogenic exposures, even transgenerationally via the zygote, through small (e.g. pi)RNA transmitted between cells by exosomes. Normally, reprogrammed TFs are enzymatically silenced and stored as markers in heterochromatic domains. Failure of intra S-phase surveillance (IS) permits the formation and continual operation of DNA replication forks in spite of persisting genotoxic stress. Silenced TFs are re-activated by euchromatin, most likely through leakages of insulator barriers of cis-regulating chromatin modulators (CRM) that normally separate hetero- from euchromatin domains. During transport by sliding nucleosomes, reprogrammed leukemogenic TFs are misplaced at transcription factor binding-/starting-sites (TFBS /TSS) allowing them to interact with and trigger replication of mutated leukemic genes. Interactions of enzymatically reprogrammed TFs, transcribed from mutated epigenetic genes, with replicating leukemic genes at TFBS/TSSs are key driving forces in leukemogenesis. Probably, epigenetic genes, although mutated, still retain their control of replication of leukemic genes. Epigenetics-based enzyme inhibitors must target reprogrammed TFs. Prudently, therapeutic corrections should be introduced within the frame of conventional, cytoreductive treatment protocols. Alternatively, reprogrammed TFs could be replaced by cell populations with regular TF production. Clinically, classification of leukemias should be based on their epigenetic presentation.

  3. Progesterone stimulates adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c gene expression. potential mechanism for the lipogenic effect of progesterone in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasa, D; Le Liepvre, X; Ferre, P; Dugail, I

    2001-04-13

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS), a nutritionally regulated lipogenic enzyme, is transcriptionally controlled by ADD1/SREBP1c (adipocyte determination and differentiation 1/sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c), through insulin-mediated stimulation of ADD1/SREBP1c expression. Progesterone exerts lipogenic effects on adipocytes, and FAS is highly induced in breast tumor cell lines upon progesterone treatment. We show here that progesterone up-regulates ADD1/SREBP1c expression in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line and the primary cultured preadipocyte from rat parametrial adipose tissue. In MCF7, progesterone induced ADD1/SREBP1c and Metallothionein II (a well known progesterone-regulated gene) mRNAs, with comparable potency. In preadipocytes, progesterone increased ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA dose-dependently, but not SREBP1a or SREBP2. Run-on experiments demonstrated that progesterone action on ADD1/SREBP1c was primarily at the transcriptional level. The membrane-bound and mature nuclear forms of ADD1/SREBP1 protein accumulated in preadipocytes cultured with progesterone, and FAS induction could be abolished by adenovirus-mediated overexpression of a dominant negative form of ADD1/SREBP1 in these cells. Finally, in the presence of insulin, progesterone was unable to up-regulate ADD1/SREBP1c mRNA in preadipocytes, whereas its effect was restored after 24 h of insulin deprivation. Together these results demonstrate that ADD1/SREBP1c is controlled by progesterone, which, like insulin, acts by increasing ADD1/SREBP1c gene transcription. This provides a potential mechanism for the lipogenic actions of progesterone on adipose tissue.

  4. Early intervention with psychostimulants or antidepressants to increase methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) expressions: a potential therapy for Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chia-Ho; Tsai, Shihjen

    2012-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe X-linked postnatal neurodevelopmental disorder. The syndrome is caused primarily by mutations in the methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) gene on Xq28. Most individuals with RTT are female, and female RTT is normally heterozygous for mutations in MeCP2. Patients with RTT display a normal period of development prior to the onset of symptoms, at which point they undergo a period of regression. Currently, no effective medication is available for this disorder, although animal studies have suggested that RTT symptoms are potentially reversible. For females with RTT, the severity of symptoms and progression of the disease varies a great deal, despite its homogenous genetic origin. These differences could be attributed to differences in the mutation points of MeCP2 and the skew caused by X-chromosome inactivation. Thus, the increased expression in the normal MeCP2 gene could decrease the severity of the disease. Based on findings from studies on animals indicating that fluoxetine (an antidepressant) and cocaine (a psychostimulant) can increase MeCP2 expression in the brain, it is suggested that early intervention with antidepressants or psychostimulants could increase the normal MeCP2 expression in females with RTT, who are normally heterozygous. This therapeutic hypothesis could be tested in an RTT animal model. Following the identification of the antidepressants or psychostimulants with the greatest influence on MeCP2 expression, a combination of early detection of the disorder with early intervention may result in improved therapeutic outcomes. Furthermore, a trial investigating the effects of antidepressants or psychostimulants on MeCP2 expression in lymphocyte culture from patients with RTT is suggested for clinical therapeutic prediction.

  5. The monoclonal antibody 26 raised against tetanus toxoid also recognizes tetanus toxin and b2-glycoprotein I – its binding properties in vitro and potential applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDRA B. INIĆ-KANADA

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A murine monoclonal IgG1 antibody, marked as MAb26, specific for tetanus toxoid has been immunochemically characterized. By performing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs and western blot analyses, it was demonstrated that MAb26 reacted with tetanus toxoid, tetanus toxin and b2-glycoprotein I (b2GPI. According to the results, MAb26 recognized the sequential epitope on the tetanus heavy chain. The affinity constant, calculated from Scatchard plots of MAb26 binding to tetanus toxoid, was 1.145´108 M-1 and the measurement of the relative affinity of MAb26 by ELISA using thiocyanate elution showed a significantly higher affinity of MAb26 to the toxoid (p = 0.0012 in comparison to the toxin. Additionally, the reactivity of MAb26 toward the toxoid forms increased when the tetanus toxin was detoxified using 8 mM and higher formaldehyde concentrations. The similarity of the tetanus toxoid to several sera proteins, either at the level of its conformation (IL-1a or at the level of peptide sequences (b2GPI, laminin favors its role in autoimmunity by the mechanism of molecular mimicry. As the induction of an autoimmune disease is dependent on the breakdown of tolerance, which could be the result of an overt hyperstimulation, the control of the presence and concentration of self-reactive epitopes in vaccine preparations is a prerequisite. In this study, it was shown that MAb26 can: 1 discriminate between the tetanus toxin and different toxoid forms, which makes it a good candidate for antibody control during vaccine preparation; 2 due to its cross-reactivity with b2GPI, it could provide information on the presence of a potentially dangerous sequential epitope expressed at the protein surface.

  6. Analysis of the complement sensitivity of oral treponemes and the potential influence of FH binding, FH cleavage and dentilisin activity on the pathogenesis of periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D P; McDowell, J V; Bell, J K; Goetting-Minesky, M P; Fenno, J C; Marconi, R T

    2014-10-01

    Treponema denticola, a periopathogen, evades complement-mediated killing by binding the negative complement regulatory protein factor H (FH) to its surface via the FhbB protein. Paradoxically, bound FH is cleaved by T. denticola's dentilisin protease, a process hypothesized to trigger localized dysregulation of complement activation in periodontal pockets. The ability of other oral treponemes to evade complement-mediated killing and bind and cleave FH has not been assessed. In this report, we demonstrate that representative isolates of Treponema socranskii, Treponema medium, Treponema pectinovorum and Treponema maltophilum are also serum resistant, whereas Treponema vincentii and Treponema amylovorum are serum sensitive. Although T. denticola's ability to evade complement-mediated killing is strictly dependent on FH binding, other serum-resistant treponemal species lack FhbB and do not bind FH, indicating an FH-independent mechanism of complement evasion. To assess the influence of FhbB sequence variation on FH binding and cleavage by T. denticola, fhbB sequences were determined for 30 isolates. Three distinct phyletic types were identified. All T. denticola strains bound FH and were serum resistant, but differences in binding kinetics, dentilisin activity and FH cleavage ability were observed. Based on these analyses, we hypothesize that the composition of the T. denticola population is a determining factor that influences the progression and severity of periodontal disease. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Assessment of Density-Functional Tight-Binding Ionization Potentials and Electron Affinities of Molecules of Interest for Organic Solar Cells Against First-Principles GW Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Aldin M. H. M. Darghouth

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ionization potentials (IPs and electron affinities (EAs are important quantities input into most models for calculating the open-circuit voltage (Voc of organic solar cells. We assess the semi-empirical density-functional tight-binding (DFTB method with the third-order self-consistent charge (SCC correction and the 3ob parameter set (the third-order DFTB (DFTB3 organic and biochemistry parameter set against experiments (for smaller molecules and against first-principles GW (Green’s function, G, times the screened potential, W calculations (for larger molecules of interest in organic electronics for the calculation of IPs and EAs. Since GW calculations are relatively new for molecules of this size, we have also taken care to validate these calculations against experiments. As expected, DFTB is found to behave very much like density-functional theory (DFT, but with some loss of accuracy in predicting IPs and EAs. For small molecules, the best results were found with ΔSCF (Δ self-consistent field SCC-DFTB calculations for first IPs (good to ± 0.649 eV. When considering several IPs of the same molecule, it is convenient to use the negative of the orbital energies (which we refer to as Koopmans’ theorem (KT IPs as an indication of trends. Linear regression analysis shows that KT SCC-DFTB IPs are nearly as accurate as ΔSCF SCC-DFTB eigenvalues (± 0.852 eV for first IPs, but ± 0.706 eV for all of the IPs considered here for small molecules. For larger molecules, SCC-DFTB was also the ideal choice with IP/EA errors of ± 0.489/0.740 eV from ΔSCF calculations and of ± 0.326/0.458 eV from (KT orbital energies. Interestingly, the linear least squares fit for the KT IPs of the larger molecules also proves to have good predictive value for the lower energy KT IPs of smaller molecules, with significant deviations appearing only for IPs of 15–20 eV or larger. We believe that this quantitative analysis of errors in SCC-DFTB IPs and EAs may be of

  8. PDGF suppresses the sulfation of CD44v and potentiates CD44v-mediated binding of colon carcinoma cells to fibrin under flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina S Alves

    Full Text Available Fibrin(ogen mediates sustained tumor cell adhesion and survival in the pulmonary vasculature, thereby facilitating the metastatic dissemination of tumor cells. CD44 is the major functional fibrin receptor on colon carcinoma cells. Growth factors, such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, induce post-translational protein modifications, which modulate ligand binding activity. In view of the roles of PDGF, fibrin(ogen and CD44 in cancer metastasis, we aimed to delineate the effect of PDGF on CD44-fibrin recognition. By immunoprecipitating CD44 from PDGF-treated and untreated LS174T colon carcinoma cells, which express primarily CD44v, we demonstrate that PDGF enhances the adhesion of CD44v-coated beads to immobilized fibrin. Enzymatic inhibition studies coupled with flow-based adhesion assays and autoradiography reveal that PDGF augments the binding of CD44v to fibrin by significantly attenuating the extent of CD44 sulfation primarily on chondroitin and dermatan sulfate chains. Surface plasmon resonance assays confirm that PDGF enhances the affinity of CD44v-fibrin binding by markedly reducing its dissociation rate while modestly increasing the association rate. PDGF mildly reduces the affinity of CD44v-hyaluronan binding without affecting selectin-CD44v recognition. The latter is attributed to the fact that CD44v binds to selectins via sialofucosylated O-linked residues independent of heparan, dermatan and chondroitin sulfates. Interestingly, PDGF moderately reduces the sulfation of CD44s and CD44s-fibrin recognition. Collectively, these data offer a novel perspective into the mechanism by which PGDF regulates CD44-dependent binding of metastatic colon carcinoma cells to fibrin(ogen.

  9. The potential of the {beta}-Microprobe, an intracerebral radiosensitive probe, to monitor the [{sup 18}F]MPPF binding in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, L. [CERMEP Biomedical Cyclotron, 59 Boulevard Pinel, 69003 Lyon (France); INSERM U512, Neuropharmacologie et Neurochimie University Lyon I, Lyon (France); Pain, F.; Mastrippolito, R.; Laniece, P. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, University Paris XI, Orsay (France); Mauger, G.; Le Bars, D.; Pujol, J.F. [CERMEP Biomedical Cyclotron, 59 Boulevard Pinel, 69003 Lyon (France); Plenevaux, A. [Cyclotron Research Center, Liege University, Liege (Belgium); Renaud, B. [INSERM U512, Neuropharmacologie et Neurochimie University Lyon I, Lyon (France)

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the ability of a recently developed {beta}{sup +}-range sensitive intracerebral probe ({beta}-Microprobe) to measure the binding kinetics of [{sup 18}F]MPPF, a well-documented 5-HT{sub 1A} serotoninergic receptor ligand, in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of the anaesthetised rat. This midbrain nucleus presents a high concentration of 5-HT{sub 1A} receptors known to be implicated in the effects of antidepressants. The difficulty confronting this study lay in the fact that the dimensions of the DRN are smaller than the detection volume of the {beta}-Microprobe. In the first part of the study, we studied the feasibility of this measurement from a theoretical point of view by autoradiography and a Monte Carlo simulation. We determined the optimal {beta}-Microprobe location close to the DRN and verified that this configuration allowed accurate determination of [{sup 18}F]MPPF specific binding in the nucleus. In the second part of our study, we measured the in vivo time-concentration curves of [{sup 18}F]MPPF binding in the DRN in comparison with the cerebellum. The specificity of [{sup 18}F]MPPF binding in the DRN was confirmed by its displacement after non-labelled 5-HT{sub 1A}antagonist injection (MPPF or WAY-100635). Moreover, we verified the feasibility of using {beta}-Microprobe monitoring and simultaneous validation by microdialysis to study the effect of an increase in extracellular serotonin, induced by fenfluramine injection, on [ {sup 18}F]MPPF binding in the DRN. Our theoretical simulations, confirmed by our experimental results, demonstrate the ability of this new device to monitor in vivo the binding of [ {sup 18}F]MPPF in the DRN of anaesthetised rodents. (orig.)

  10. Performance of 11C-Pittsburgh Compound B PET Binding Potential Images in the Detection of Amyloid Deposits on Equivocal Static Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Chisa; Ishii, Kazunari; Kimura, Yuichi; Hyodo, Tomoko; Hosono, Makoto; Sakaguchi, Kenta; Usami, Kimio; Shimamoto, Kenji; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Murakami, Takamichi

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to clarify whether binding potential (BP) images using (11)C-Pittsburgh compound B ((11)C-PiB) and dynamic PET can reliably detect cortical amyloid deposits for patients whose (11)C-PiB PET static images are ambiguous and whether visual ratings are affected by white matter retention. Static and BP images were constructed for 85 consecutive patients with cognitive impairment after (11)C-PiB dynamic PET. Cortical uptake was visually assessed as positive, negative, or equivocal for both types of images. Quantitatively, the standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) from the static image, the nondisplaceable BP from the dynamic image for mean gray matter uptake, and the ratio of gray matter uptake to white matter retention were compared among (11)C-PiB-positive, (11)C-PiB-equivocal, and (11)C-PiB-negative groups. Forty-three scans were visually assessed as (11)C-PiB-positive in both the static and the BP images. Ten scans were (11)C-PiB-equivocal in the static images. In 8 of them, the BP images were (11)C-PiB-positive, whereas the other 2 were (11)C-PiB-equivocal. Thirty-two scans were assessed as (11)C-PiB-negative in the static images. In the BP images, 4 were (11)C-PiB-positive and 2 were (11)C-PiB-equivocal. The mean gray matter uptake of (11)C-PiB in SUVR and nondisplaceable BP, respectively, showed statistically significant differences among the (11)C-PiB-positive, (11)C-PiB-equivocal, and (11)C-PiB-negative groups. The ratio of gray matter uptake to white matter retention was lower in the BP images than static images from the (11)C-PiB-negative and (11)C-PiB-equivocal groups, whereas it was higher in the (11)C-PiB-positive group. (11)C-PiB PET BP images can clarify visual interpretation of clinical static (11)C-PiB-equivocal images by reducing the interference of nonspecific white matter retention. We conclude that (11)C-PiB-equivocal PET findings on static images reflect cortical amyloid deposits, which can be verified using BP images

  11. Screening of transgenic proteins expressed in transgenic food crops for the presence of short amino acid sequences identical to potential, IgE – binding linear epitopes of allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleter, Gijs A; Peijnenburg, Ad ACM

    2002-01-01

    Background Transgenic proteins expressed by genetically modified food crops are evaluated for their potential allergenic properties prior to marketing, among others by identification of short identical amino acid sequences that occur both in the transgenic protein and allergenic proteins. A strategy is proposed, in which the positive outcomes of the sequence comparison with a minimal length of six amino acids are further screened for the presence of potential linear IgE-epitopes. This double track approach involves the use of literature data on IgE-epitopes and an antigenicity prediction algorithm. Results Thirty-three transgenic proteins have been screened for identities of at least six contiguous amino acids shared with allergenic proteins. Twenty-two transgenic proteins showed positive results of six- or seven-contiguous amino acids length. Only a limited number of identical stretches shared by transgenic proteins (papaya ringspot virus coat protein, acetolactate synthase GH50, and glyphosate oxidoreductase) and allergenic proteins could be identified as (part of) potential linear epitopes. Conclusion Many transgenic proteins have identical stretches of six or seven amino acids in common with allergenic proteins. Most identical stretches are likely to be false positives. As shown in this study, identical stretches can be further screened for relevance by comparison with linear IgE-binding epitopes described in literature. In the absence of literature data on epitopes, antigenicity prediction by computer aids to select potential antibody binding sites that will need verification of IgE binding by sera binding tests. Finally, the positive outcomes of this approach warrant further clinical testing for potential allergenicity. PMID:12477382

  12. Screening of transgenic proteins expressed in transgenic food crops for the presence of short amino acid sequences identical to potential, IgE – binding linear epitopes of allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peijnenburg Ad ACM

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic proteins expressed by genetically modified food crops are evaluated for their potential allergenic properties prior to marketing, among others by identification of short identical amino acid sequences that occur both in the transgenic protein and allergenic proteins. A strategy is proposed, in which the positive outcomes of the sequence comparison with a minimal length of six amino acids are further screened for the presence of potential linear IgE-epitopes. This double track approach involves the use of literature data on IgE-epitopes and an antigenicity prediction algorithm. Results Thirty-three transgenic proteins have been screened for identities of at least six contiguous amino acids shared with allergenic proteins. Twenty-two transgenic proteins showed positive results of six- or seven-contiguous amino acids length. Only a limited number of identical stretches shared by transgenic proteins (papaya ringspot virus coat protein, acetolactate synthase GH50, and glyphosate oxidoreductase and allergenic proteins could be identified as (part of potential linear epitopes. Conclusion Many transgenic proteins have identical stretches of six or seven amino acids in common with allergenic proteins. Most identical stretches are likely to be false positives. As shown in this study, identical stretches can be further screened for relevance by comparison with linear IgE-binding epitopes described in literature. In the absence of literature data on epitopes, antigenicity prediction by computer aids to select potential antibody binding sites that will need verification of IgE binding by sera binding tests. Finally, the positive outcomes of this approach warrant further clinical testing for potential allergenicity.

  13. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  14. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  15. Influence of scanning time window on the binding potentials of dopamine transporter in the brain of healthy volunteers with 11C-CFT PET imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Chun; Zuo Chuantao; Zhang Zhengwei; Wu Ping; Zhang Huiwei; Guan Yihui

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To find the optimal scanning time window and then set up the normal binding potentials (BPs) of 2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-fluorophenyl)-(N- 11 C-methyl) tropane ( 11 C-CFT) DAT PET/CT imaging. Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers (20 males, 11 females, average age: (55.7±2.3) years), who all gave written informed consent, were divided into three age and gender-matched groups according to block randomization. Each group underwent static PET/CT scan in different time windows from 40-60 min, 60-80 min to 80-100 min after 11 C-CFT injection. To determine the best scanning time window, the ratios of caudate and putamen of all volunteers were analyzed using automatic ROI method (caudate (putamen)/parieto-occipital cotex-1) and compared by one-way analysis of variance and the least significant difference (LSD) t test. The ratio of the same area between different age-groups and gender-groups was compared with independent two-sample t test. Results: Ratios of left caudate (2.08±0.06, 1.75±0.07 and 1.77±0.12 respectively), right anterior putamen (2.33±0.06, 1.95±0.09 and 2.08±0.12 respectively) and bilateral posterior putamen (left: 1.88±0.66, 1.55±0.88 and 1.72±0.09; right: 1.98±0.07, 1.61±0.09 and 1.69±0.12) were all different in three time windows (F=3.588, 3.345, 4.479, 3.557, all P<0.05). There were significant differences in ratios of left caudate, right anterior and bilateral posterior putamen between 40-60 min and the 60-80 min (all P<0.05), as well as the ratios of left caudate between 40-60 min and the 80-100 min group (P<0.05). While no valid differences in ratios of those areas were shown between the groups of 60-80 min and 80-100 min scanning time window (all P>0.05). DAT densities in right and left side of caudate, anterior and posterior putamen were significantly lower in the group over 60 years of age than those under 60 years (t=-3.260, -3.090, -3.270, -3.190, -2.270, -3.110, all P<0.05), but were not different between gender

  16. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Autoantibodies Are Potential Early Indicators of Cardiac Dysfunction and Patient Outcome in Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Lynch, IVPhD

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The degradation and release of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C upon cardiac damage may stimulate an inflammatory response and autoantibody (AAb production. We determined whether the presence of cMyBP-C-AAbs associated with adverse cardiac function in cardiovascular disease patients. Importantly, cMyBP-C-AAbs were significantly detected in acute coronary syndrome patient sera upon arrival to the emergency department, particularly in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients. Patients positive for cMyBP-C-AAbs had reduced left ventricular ejection fraction and elevated levels of clinical biomarkers of myocardial infarction. We conclude that cMyBP-C-AAbs may serve as early predictive indicators of deteriorating cardiac function and patient outcome in acute coronary syndrome patients prior to the infarction. Key Words: acute myocardial infarction, autoantibodies, cardiac myosin binding protein-c, cardiomyopathy

  17. Isolation of an inhibitory insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from bone cell-conditioned medium: A potential local regulator of IGF action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, S.; Bautista, C.M.; Wergedal, J.; Baylink, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Inhibitory insulin-like growth factor binding protein (In-IGF-BP) has been purified to homogeneity from medium conditioned by TE89 human osteosarcoma cells by two different methods using Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, FPLC Mono Q ion-exchange, HPLC C 4 reverse-phase, HPLC CN reverse-phase and affinity chromatographies. In-IGF-BP thus purified appeared to be homogeneous and unique by the following criteria. (i) N-terminal sequence analysis yielded a unique sequence (Asp-Glu-Ala-Ile-His-Cys-Pro-Pro-Glu-Ser-Glu-Ala-Lys-Leu-Ala). (ii) Amino acid composition of In-IGF-BP revealed marked differences with the amino acid compositions of other known PBs. (iii) In-IGF-BP exhibited a single band with molecular mass of 25 kDa under reducing conditions on sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gels. IGF-I and IGF-II but not insulin displaced the binding of 125 I-labeled IGF-I or 125 I-labeled IGF-II binding to In-IGF-BP. In-IGF-BP inhibited basal, IGF-stimulated bone cell proliferation and serum-stimulated bone cell proliferation. Forskolin increases synthesis of In-IGF-BP in TE85 human osteosarcoma cells in a dose-dependent manner. Based on these findings, the authors conclude that In-IGF-BP is a protein that has a unique sequence and significant biological actions on bone cells

  18. Global decrease of serotonin-1A receptor binding after electroconvulsive therapy in major depression measured by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzenberger, R; Baldinger, P; Hahn, A; Ungersboeck, J; Mitterhauser, M; Winkler, D; Micskei, Z; Stein, P; Karanikas, G; Wadsak, W; Kasper, S; Frey, R

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent therapy in severe treatment-refractory depression. Although commonly applied in psychiatric clinical routine since decades, the exact neurobiological mechanism regarding its efficacy remains unclear. Results from preclinical and clinical studies emphasize a crucial involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1A) in the mode of action of antidepressant treatment. This includes associations between treatment response and changes in 5-HT1A function and density by antidepressants. Further, alterations of the 5-HT1A receptor are consistently reported in depression. To elucidate the effect of ECT on 5-HT1A receptor binding, 12 subjects with severe treatment-resistant major depression underwent three positron emission tomography (PET) measurements using the highly selective radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY100635, twice before (test–retest variability) and once after 10.08±2.35 ECT sessions. Ten patients (∼83%) were responders to ECT. The voxel-wise comparison of the 5-HT1A receptor binding (BPND) before and after ECT revealed a widespread reduction in cortical and subcortical regions (P<0.05 corrected), except for the occipital cortex and the cerebellum. Strongest reductions were found in regions consistently reported to be altered in major depression and involved in emotion regulation, such as the subgenual part of the anterior cingulate cortex (−27.5%), the orbitofrontal cortex (−30.1%), the amygdala (−31.8%), the hippocampus (−30.6%) and the insula (−28.9%). No significant change was found in the raphe nuclei. There was no significant difference in receptor binding in any region comparing the first two PET scans conducted before ECT. This PET study proposes a global involvement of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor binding in the effect of ECT. PMID:22751491

  19. Identification of an RNA-binding protein that is phosphorylated by PTH and potentially mediates PTH-induced destabilization of Npt2a mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rebecca D; Merchant, Michael L; Hardin, Ericka; Clark, Barbara; Khundmiri, Syed J; Lederer, Eleanor D

    2016-02-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of the expression and function of the type IIa sodium-phosphate cotransporter (Npt2a), the protein responsible for regulated renal phosphate reabsorption. We previously showed that PTH induces rapid decay of Npt2a mRNA through posttranscriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that PTH-induced changes in RNA-binding protein (RBP) activity mediate the degradation of Npt2a mRNA. To address this aim, we treated opossum kidney (OK) cells, a PTH-sensitive proximal tubule cell culture model, with 100 nM PTH for 30 min and 2 h, followed by mass spectrometry characterization of the PTH-stimulated phosphoproteome. We identified 1,182 proteins differentially phosphorylated in response to PTH, including 68 RBPs. Preliminary analysis identified a phospho-RBP, hnRNPK-homology-type-splicing regulatory protein (KSRP), with predicted binding sites for the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of Npt2a mRNA. Western blot analysis confirmed expression of KSRP in OK cells and showed PTH-dependent translocation to the nucleus. Immunoprecipitation of KSRP from control and PTH-treated cells followed by RNA isolation and RT-quantitative PCR analysis identified Npt2a mRNA from both control and PTH-treated KSRP pulldowns. Knockdown of KSRP followed by PTH treatment showed that KSRP is required for mediating PTH-stimulated reduction in sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3 mRNA, but not Npt2a mRNA. We conclude that 1) PTH is a major regulator of both transcription and translation, and 2) KSRP binds Npt2a mRNA but its role in PTH regulation of Npt2a mRNA is not clear.

  20. DNA-Binding Studies of Some Potential Antitumor 2,2'-bipyridine Pt(II)/Pd(II) Complexes of piperidinedithiocarbamate. Their Synthesis, Spectroscopy and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan; Eslami-Moghadam, Mahboube; Divsalar, Adeleh; Saboury, Ali-Akbar

    2011-12-01

    In this study two platinum(II) and palladium(II) complexes of the type [M(bpy)(pip-dtc)]NO3 (where M=Pt(II) or Pd(II), bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, pip-dtc=piperidinedithiocarbamate) were synthesized by reaction between diaquo-2,2'-bipyridine Pt(II)/Pd(II) nitrate and sodium salt of dithiocarbamate. These cationic water soluble complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance, IR, electronic and 1H NMR spectroscopic studies. The cyclic dithiocarbamate was found to coordinate as bidentate fasion with Pt(II) or Pd(II) center. Their biological activities were tested against chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, K562, at micromolar concentration. The obtained cytotoxic concentration (IC50) values were much lower than cisplatin. The interaction of these complexes with highly polymerized calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) was extensively studied by means of electronic absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism and other measurements. The experimental results, thermodynamic and binding parameters, suggested that these complexes cooperatively bind to DNA presumably via intercalation. Moreover, the tendency of the Pt(II) complex to interact with DNA was more than that of Pd(II) complex.

  1. The FUSE binding proteins FBP1 and FBP3 are potential c-myc regulators in renal, but not in prostate and bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Hellmuth-Alexander

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The three far-upstream element (FUSE binding proteins (FBP1, FBP2, and FBP3 belong to an ancient family of single-stranded DNA binding proteins which are required for proper regulation of the c-myc proto-oncogene. Whereas it is known that c-myc alterations play a completely different role in various carcinomas of the urogenital tract, the relevance of FBPs is unclear. Methods FBP1, FBP3 and c-myc expression was studied in 105 renal cell, 95 prostate and 112 urinary bladder carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. Results High rates of FBP1 and FBP3 expression were observed in all cancer types. There was a concomitant up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in renal cell and prostate carcinomas (p C-myc expression was detectable in 21% of prostate, 30% of renal and 34% of urothelial carcinomas. Interestingly, strong FBP1 and FBP3 expression was associated with c-myc up-regulation in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (p Conclusion The correlation between FBP1/FBP3, c-myc and high proliferation rate in renal cell carcinoma provides strong in vivo support for the suggested role of FBP1 and FBP3 as activators of c-myc. The frequent up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in urothelial and prostate carcinoma suggests that FBPs also have an important function in gene regulation of these tumors.

  2. Cationic Au Nanoparticle Binding with Plasma Membrane-like Lipid Bilayers: Potential Mechanism for Spontaneous Permeation to Cells Revealed by Atomistic Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, E.; Martinez-Seara, H.; Gurtovenko, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Au nanoparticles interacting with realistic membranes and explicit solvent using a model system that comprises two cellular compartments, extracellular and cytosolic, divided by two asymmetric lipid bilayers. The membrane-AuNP+ binding and membrane reorganization processes are discovered...... to be governed by cooperative effects where AuNP+, counterions, water, and the two membrane leaflets all contribute. On the extracellular side, we find that the nanoparticle has to cross a free energy barrier of about 5 k(B)T prior forming a stable contact with the membrane. This results in a rearrangement......Despite being chemically inert as a bulk material, nanoscale gold can pose harmful side effects to living organisms. In particular, cationic Au nanoparticles (AuNP+) of 2 nm diameter or less permeate readily through plasma membranes and induce cell death. We report atomistic simulations of cationic...

  3. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein-C Autoantibodies are Potential Early Indicators of Cardiac Dysfunction and Patient Outcome in Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Thomas L; Kuster, Diederik W D; Gonzalez, Beverly; Balasubramanian, Neelam; Nair, Nandini; Day, Sharlene; Calvino, Jenna E; Tan, Yanli; Liebetrau, Christoph; Troidl, Christian; Hamm, Christian W; Güçlü, Ahmet; McDonough, Barbara; Marian, Ali J; van der Velden, Jolanda; Seidman, Christine E; Huggins, Gordon S; Sadayappan, Sakthivel

    2017-04-01

    The degradation and release of cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) upon cardiac damage may stimulate an inflammatory response and autoantibody (AAb) production. We determined whether the presence of cMyBP-C-AAbs associated with adverse cardiac function in CVD patients. Importantly, cMyBP-C-AAbs were significantly detected in ACS patient sera upon arrival to the emergency department, particularly in STEMI patients. Patients positive for cMyBP-C-AAbs had a reduced LVEF and elevated levels of clinical biomarkers of MI. We conclude that cMyBP-C-AAbs may serve as early predictive indicators of deteriorating cardiac function and patient outcome in ACS patients prior to the infarction.

  4. Study on potential antitumor mechanism of a novel Schiff base copper(II) complex: synthesis, crystal structure, DNA binding, cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xin; Ma, Zhong-Ying; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Xue, Fei; Zhang, Yan-Wen; Xu, Jing-Yuan; Qiang, Zhao-Yan; Lou, Jian-Shi; Chen, Gong-Jun; Yan, Shi-Ping

    2011-05-01

    A new cytotoxic copper(II) complex with Schiff base ligand [Cu(II)(5-Cl-pap)(OAc)(H(2)O)]·2H(2)O (1) (5-Cl-pap=N-2-pyridiylmethylidene-2-hydroxy-5-chloro-phenylamine), was synthesized and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. Single-crystal analysis revealed that the copper atom shows a 4+1 pyramidal coordination, a water oxygen appears in the apical position, and three of the basal positions are occupied by the NNO tridentate ligand and the fourth by an acetate oxygen. The interaction of Schiff base copper(II) complex 1 with DNA was investigated by UV-visible spectra, fluorescence spectra and agarose gel electrophoresis. The apparent binding constant (K(app)) value of 6.40×10(5) M(-1) for 1 with DNA suggests moderate intercalative binding mode. This copper(II) complex displayed efficient oxidative cleavage of supercoiled DNA, which might indicate that the underlying mechanism involve hydroxyl radical, singlet oxygen-like species, and hydrogen peroxide as reactive oxygen species. In addition, our present work showed the antitumor effect of 1 on cell cycle and apoptosis. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that HeLa cells were arrested in the S phase after treatment with 1. Fluorescence microscopic observation indicated that complex 1 can induce apoptosis of HeLa cells, whose process was mediated by intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic pathway owing to the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mucosal Infections and Invasive Potential of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Are Enhanced by Oligopeptide Binding Proteins AliC and AliD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Bradshaw

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp is an emerging human pathogen that colonizes the nasopharynx and is associated with noninvasive diseases such as otitis media (OM, conjunctivitis, and nonbacteremic pneumonia. Since capsule expression was previously thought to be necessary for establishment of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD, serotype-specific polysaccharide capsules are targeted by currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines. Yet, NESp expressing oligopeptide binding proteins AliC and AliD have been isolated during IPD. Thus, we hypothesize AliC and AliD are major NESp virulence determinants that facilitate persistence and development of IPD. Our study reveals that NESp expressing AliC and AliD have intensified virulence compared to isogenic mutants. Specifically, we demonstrate AliC and AliD enhance murine nasopharyngeal colonization and pulmonary infection and are required for OM in a chinchilla model. Furthermore, AliC and AliD increase pneumococcal survival in chinchilla whole blood and aid in resistance to killing by human leukocytes. Comparative proteome analysis revealed significant alterations in protein levels when AliC and AliD were absent. Virulence-associated proteins, including a pneumococcal surface protein C variant (CbpAC, were significantly downregulated, while starvation response indicators were upregulated in the double mutant relative to wild-type levels. We also reveal that differentially expressed CbpAC was essential for NESp adherence to epithelial cells, virulence during OM, reduction of C3b deposition on the NESp surface, and binding to nonspecific IgA. Altogether, the rise in NESp prevalence urges the need to understand how NESp establishes disease and persists in a host. This study highlights the roles of AliC, AliD, and CbpAC in the pathogenesis of NESp.

  6. The FUSE binding proteins FBP1 and FBP3 are potential c-myc regulators in renal, but not in prostate and bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Achim; Moch, Holger; Kristiansen, Glen; Kristiansen, Ilka; Johannsen, Manfred; Oelrich, Beibei; Scholmann, Katharina; Gunia, Sven; May, Matthias; Meyer, Hellmuth-Alexander; Behnke, Silvia

    2008-01-01

    The three far-upstream element (FUSE) binding proteins (FBP1, FBP2, and FBP3) belong to an ancient family of single-stranded DNA binding proteins which are required for proper regulation of the c-myc proto-oncogene. Whereas it is known that c-myc alterations play a completely different role in various carcinomas of the urogenital tract, the relevance of FBPs is unclear. FBP1, FBP3 and c-myc expression was studied in 105 renal cell, 95 prostate and 112 urinary bladder carcinomas by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarrays. High rates of FBP1 and FBP3 expression were observed in all cancer types. There was a concomitant up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in renal cell and prostate carcinomas (p < 0.001 both). C-myc expression was detectable in 21% of prostate, 30% of renal and 34% of urothelial carcinomas. Interestingly, strong FBP1 and FBP3 expression was associated with c-myc up-regulation in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (p < 0.001 and 0.09 resp.), but not in bladder or prostate cancer. The correlation between FBP1/FBP3, c-myc and high proliferation rate in renal cell carcinoma provides strong in vivo support for the suggested role of FBP1 and FBP3 as activators of c-myc. The frequent up-regulation of FBP1 and FBP3 in urothelial and prostate carcinoma suggests that FBPs also have an important function in gene regulation of these tumors

  7. Analysis of the key elements of FFAT-like motifs identifies new proteins that potentially bind VAP on the ER, including two AKAPs and FAPP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mikitova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Two phenylalanines (FF in an acidic tract (FFAT-motifs were originally described as having seven elements: an acidic flanking region followed by 6 residues (EFFDA-E. Such motifs are found in several lipid transfer protein (LTP families, and they interact with a protein on the cytosolic face of the ER called vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP. Mutation of which causes ER stress and motor neuron disease, making it important to determine which proteins bind VAP. Among other proteins that bind VAP, some contain FFAT-like motifs that are missing one or more of the seven elements. Defining how much variation is tolerated in FFAT-like motifs is a preliminary step prior to the identification of the full range of VAP interactors. RESULTS: We used a quantifiable in vivo system that measured ER targeting in a reporter yeast strain that over-expressed VAP to study the effect of substituting different elements of FFAT-like motifs in turn. By defining FFAT-like motifs more widely than before, we found them in novel proteins the functions of which had not previously been directly linked to the ER, including: two PKA anchoring proteins, AKAP220 and AKAP110; a family of plant LTPs; and the glycolipid LTP phosphatidylinositol-four-phosphate adaptor-protein-2 (FAPP-2. CONCLUSION: All of the seven essential elements of a FFAT motif tolerate variation, and weak targeting to the ER via VAP is still detected if two elements are substituted. In addition to the strong FFAT motifs already known, there are additional proteins with weaker FFAT-like motifs, which might be functionally important VAP interactors.

  8. Tight-binding study of the hole subband structure properties of p-type delta-doped quantum wells in Si by using a Thomas-Fermi-Dirac potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Vargas, I; Madrigal-Melchor, J; Vlaev, S J, E-mail: isaac@planck.reduaz.m [Unidad Academica de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, ZAC. (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    We present the hole subband structure of p-type delta-doped single, double, multiple and superlattice quantum wells in Si. We use the first neighbors sp{sup 3}s' tight-binding approximation including spin for the hole level structure analysis. The parameters of the tight-binding hamiltonian were taken from Klimeck et al. [Klimeck G, Bowen R C, Boykin T B, Salazar-Lazaro C, Cwik T A and Stoica A 2000 Superlattice. Microst. 27 77], first neighbors parameters that give realiable results for the valence band of Si. The calculations are based on a scheme previously proposed and applied to delta-doped quantum well systems [Vlaev S J and Gaggero-Sager L M 1998 Phys. Rev. B 58 1142]. The scheme relies on the incorporation of the delta-doped quantum well potential in the diagonal terms of the tight-binding hamiltonian. We give a detail description of the delta-doped quantum well structures, this is, we study the hole subband structure behavior as a function of the impurity density, the interwell distance of the doped planes and the superlattice period. We also compare our results with the available theoretical and experimental data, obtaining a reasonable agreement.

  9. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SG); (Wellcome)

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  10. In vitro assessment of zinc binding to protein foods as a potential index of zinc bioavailability. Comparison of in vitro and in vivo data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, A.O.L.; Fox, M.R.S.; Fry, B.E. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    An in vitro equilibrium dialysis test for estimating the strength of zinc binding to protein foods was developed for predicting zinc bioavailability. Soy flour, soy concentrate, casein, and dried egg white were labeled with 65 ZnCl 2 before dialysis. The conditions included 24-h dialysis at pH 7.4 against 0.05 M tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane buffer (Tris), Tris plus 0.01 M L-histidine hydrochloride (Tris-His), and Tris plus 0.01 M Na 2 EDTA (Tris-EDTA). Dialyzate and retentate 65 Zn were measured. The protein foods retained 65 Zn in the following decreasing order according to treatment: Tris > Tris-His > Tris-EDTA. The bioavailability of residual 65 Zn in casein, egg white, soy concentrate, and soy flour after each buffer treatment was determined by giving single doses of the protein foods to young Japanese quail. For these protein foods, the best agreement between in vitro and in vivo data was with Tris-His-dialyzable 65 Zn values and the whole-body 65 Zn retentions from the labeled casein and egg white (no treatment). The data suggest that this in vitro test could be useful for preliminary assessment of zinc bioavailability of protein foods

  11. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of nonretinoid retinol binding protein 4 antagonists for the potential treatment of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioffi, Christopher L; Dobri, Nicoleta; Freeman, Emily E; Conlon, Michael P; Chen, Ping; Stafford, Douglas G; Schwarz, Daniel M C; Golden, Kathy C; Zhu, Lei; Kitchen, Douglas B; Barnes, Keith D; Racz, Boglarka; Qin, Qiong; Michelotti, Enrique; Cywin, Charles L; Martin, William H; Pearson, Paul G; Johnson, Graham; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2014-09-25

    Accumulation of lipofuscin in the retina is associated with pathogenesis of atrophic age-related macular degeneration and Stargardt disease. Lipofuscin bisretinoids (exemplified by N-retinylidene-N-retinylethanolamine) seem to mediate lipofuscin toxicity. Synthesis of lipofuscin bisretinoids depends on the influx of retinol from serum to the retina. Compounds antagonizing the retinol-dependent interaction of retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) with transthyretin in the serum would reduce serum RBP4 and retinol and inhibit bisretinoid formation. We recently showed that A1120 (3), a potent carboxylic acid based RBP4 antagonist, can significantly reduce lipofuscin bisretinoid formation in the retinas of Abca4(-/-) mice. As part of the NIH Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network project we undertook the in vitro exploration to identify novel conformationally flexible and constrained RBP4 antagonists with improved potency and metabolic stability. We also demonstrate that upon acute and chronic dosing in rats, 43, a potent cyclopentyl fused pyrrolidine antagonist, reduced circulating plasma RBP4 protein levels by approximately 60%.

  12. The role of apolipoprotein N-acyl transferase, Lnt, in the lipidation of factor H binding protein of Neisseria meningitidis strain MC58 and its potential as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R A G; Churchward, C P; Karlyshev, A V; Eleftheriadou, O; Snabaitis, A K; Longman, M R; Ryan, A; Griffin, R

    2017-07-01

    The level of cell surface expression of the meningococcal vaccine antigen, Factor H binding protein (FHbp) varies between and within strains and this limits the breadth of strains that can be targeted by FHbp-based vaccines. The molecular pathway controlling expression of FHbp at the cell surface, including its lipidation, sorting to the outer membrane and export, and the potential regulation of this pathway have not been investigated until now. This knowledge will aid our evaluation of FHbp vaccines. A meningococcal transposon library was screened by whole cell immuno-dot blotting using an anti-FHbp antibody to identify a mutant with reduced binding and the disrupted gene was determined. In a mutant with markedly reduced binding, the transposon was located in the lnt gene which encodes apolipoprotein N-acyl transferase, Lnt, responsible for the addition of the third fatty acid to apolipoproteins prior to their sorting to the outer membrane. We provide data indicating that in the Lnt mutant, FHbp is diacylated and its expression within the cell is reduced 10 fold, partly due to inhibition of transcription. Furthermore the Lnt mutant showed 64 fold and 16 fold increase in susceptibility to rifampicin and ciprofloxacin respectively. We speculate that the inefficient sorting of diacylated FHbp in the meningococcus results in its accumulation in the periplasm inducing an envelope stress response to down-regulate its expression. We propose Lnt as a potential novel drug target for combination therapy with antibiotics. This article is part of a themed section on Drug Metabolism and Antibiotic Resistance in Micro-organisms. To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v174.14/issuetoc. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. An accurate, residue-level, pair potential of mean force for folding and binding based on the distance-scaled, ideal-gas reference state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Liu, Song; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2004-02-01

    Structure prediction on a genomic scale requires a simplified energy function that can efficiently sample the conformational space of polypeptide chains. A good energy function at minimum should discriminate native structures against decoys. Here, we show that a recently developed, residue-specific, all-atom knowledge-based potential (167 atomic types) based on distance-scaled, finite ideal-gas reference state (DFIRE-all-atom) can be substantially simplified to 20 residue types located at side-chain center of mass (DFIRE-SCM) without a significant change in its capability of structure discrimination. Using 96 standard multiple decoy sets, we show that there is only a small reduction (from 80% to 78%) in success rate of ranking native structures as the top 1. The success rate is higher than two previously developed, all-atom distance-dependent statistical pair potentials. Applied to structure selections of 21 docking decoys without modification, the DFIRE-SCM potential is 29% more successful in recognizing native complex structures than an all-atom statistical potential trained by a database of dimeric interfaces. The potential also achieves 92% accuracy in distinguishing true dimeric interfaces from artificial crystal interfaces. In addition, the DFIRE potential with the C(alpha) positions as the interaction centers recognizes 123 native structures out of a comprehensive 125-protein TOUCHSTONE decoy set in which each protein has 24,000 decoys with only C(alpha) positions. Furthermore, the performance by DFIRE-SCM on newly established 25 monomeric and 31 docking Rosetta-decoy sets is comparable to (or better than in the case of monomeric decoy sets) that of a recently developed, all-atom Rosetta energy function enhanced with an orientation-dependent hydrogen bonding potential.

  14. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Theoretical insight into the binding energy and detonation performance of ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with β-HMX, FOX-7, and DMF in different molar ratios, as well as electrostatic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Rui-Zhi; Zhang, Shu-Hai; Ren, Fu-de; Gou, Rui-Jun; Gao, Li

    2016-06-01

    Molecular dynamics method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes of the ε-, γ-, β-conformation 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (ε-, γ-, β-CL-20) cocrystal explosives with 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), 1,3,5,7-tetranitro- 1,3,5,7-tetrazacyclooctane with β-conformation (β-HMX) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) in different molar ratios. The oxygen balance, density, detonation velocity, detonation pressure, and surface electrostatic potential were analyzed. The results indicate that the binding energies E b (*) and stabilities are in the order of 1:1 > 2:1 > 3:1 > 5:1 > 8:1 (CL-20:FOX-7/β-HMX/DMF). The values of E b (*) and stabilities of the energetic-nonenergetic CL-20/DMF cocrystals are far larger than those of the energetic-energetic CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, and those of CL-20/β-HMX are the smallest. For CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX, the largest E b (*) appears in the cocrystals with the 1:1, 1:2 or 1:3 molar ratio, and the stabilities of the cocrystals with the excess ratio of CL-20 are weaker than those in the cocrystals with the excess ratio of FOX-7 or β-HMX. In CL-20/FOX-7, CL-20 prefers adopting the γ-form, and ε-CL-20 is the preference in CL-20/β-HMX, and ε-CL-20 and β-CL-20 can be found in CL-20/DMF. The CL-20/FOX-7 and CL-20/β-HMX cocrystals with low molar ratios can meet the requirements of low sensitive high energetic materials. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change upon the cocrystal formation. Graphical Abstract MD method was employed to study the binding energies on the selected crystal planes in the ε-, γ-, β-CL-20 cocrystals with FOX-7, β-HMX and DMF in different molar ratios. Surface electrostatic potential reveals the nature of the sensitivity change in cocrystals.

  16. Characteristics of novel polymer based on pseudo-polyamino acids GluLa-DPG-PEG600: binding of albumin, biocompatibility, biodistribution and potential crossing the blood-brain barrier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. O. Chekh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to study biological properties of the polymer based on pseudo-polyamino acids GluLa-DPG-PEG600, its ability to bind albumin, as well as its localization in rat body and influence on physio­logical and functional state of rat kidneys and liver. We have found the ability of GluLa-DPG-PEG600 to bind bovine serum albumin (BSA using electrophoresis in 5% polyacrylamide gel. Structural and functional state of the liver and kidneys of rats after injections of polymer were investigated by histological analysis of organs and determination the activities of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase and content of cholesterol and creatinine in blood. Our results showed little toxic effect of GluLa-DPG-PEG600 on rat body. Using fluorescent microscopy we have studied polymer in complex with BSA distribution in rat body: after intravenous injection polymer are localized in kidneys and spleen, and after intramuscular – in liver and brain. It has been shown that polymer passed through the blood-brain barrier and are localized in the immune organ – spleen, indicating GluLa-DPG-PEG600 as a potential drug transporter.

  17. Unbinding pathway energy of glyphosate from the EPSPs enzyme binding site characterized by Steered Molecular Dynamics and Potential of Mean Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Moacir F; Franca, Eduardo F; Leite, Fábio L

    2017-03-01

    The quantification of herbicides in the environment, like glyphosate, is extremely important to prevent contamination. Nanobiosensors stands out in the quantization process, because of the high selectivity, sensitivity and short response time of the method. In order to emulate the detection of glyphosate using a specific nanobiossensor through an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), this work carried out Steered Molecular Dynamics simulations (SMD) in which the herbicide was unbinded from the active site of the enzyme 5- enolpyruvylshikimate 3 phosphate synthase (EPSPS) along three different directions.After the simulations, Potential of Mean Force calculations were carried, from a cumulant expansion of Jarzynski's equation to obtain the profile of free energy of interaction between the herbicide and the active site of the enzyme in the presence of shikimate-3 substrate phosphate (S3P). The set of values for external work, had a Gaussian distribution. The PMF values ranged according to the directions of the unbindong pahway of each simulation, displaying energy values of 10.7, 14.7 and 19.5KJmol -1 . The results provide a theoretical support in order to assist the construction of a specific nanobiossensor to quantify the glyphosate herbicide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of age/sex and the regional distribution of mGluR5 availability in the healthy human brain measured by high-resolution [(11)C]ABP688 PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, Jonathan M; Rousset, Olivier G; Rowley, Jared; Porras-Betancourt, Manuel; Reader, Andrew J; Labbe, Aurelie; Massarweh, Gassan; Soucy, Jean-Paul; Rosa-Neto, Pedro; Kobayashi, Eliane

    2016-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) is a G protein-coupled receptor that has been implicated in several psychiatric and neurological diseases. The radiopharmaceutical [(11)C]ABP688 allows for in vivo quantification of mGluR5 availability using positron emission tomography (PET). In this study, we aimed to detail the regional distribution of [(11)C]ABP688 binding potential (BPND) and the existence of age/sex effects in healthy individuals. Thirty-one healthy individuals aged 20 to 77 years (men, n = 18, 45.3 ± 18.2 years; females, n = 13, 41.5 ± 19.6 years) underwent imaging with [(11)C]ABP688 using the high-resolution research tomograph (HRRT). We developed an advanced partial volume correction (PVC) method using surface-based analysis in order to accurately estimate the regional variation of radioactivity. BPND was calculated using the simplified reference tissue model, with the cerebellum as the reference region. Surface-based and volume-based analyses were performed for 39 cortical and subcortical regions of interest per hemisphere. We found the highest [(11)C]ABP688 BPND in the lateral prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. The lowest [(11)C]ABP688 BPND was observed in the pre- and post-central gyri as well as the occipital lobes and the thalami. No sex effect was observed. Associations between age and [(11)C]ABP688 BPND without PVC were observed in the right amygdala and left putamen, but were not significant after multiple comparisons correction. The present results highlight complexities underlying brain adaptations during the aging process, and support the notion that certain aspects of neurotransmission remain stable during the adult life span.

  19. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence.

  20. Binding and molecular dynamic studies of sesquiterpenes (2R-acetoxymethyl-1,3,3-trimethyl-4t-(3-methyl-2-buten-1-yl)-1t-cyclohexanol) derived from marine Streptomyces sp. VITJS8 as potential anticancer agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naine, S Jemimah; Devi, C Subathra; Mohanasrinivasan, V; Doss, C George Priya; Kumar, D Thirumal

    2016-03-01

    The main aim of the current study is to explore the bioactive potential of Streptomyces sp. VITJS8 isolated from the marine saltern. The cultural, biochemical, and morphological studies were performed to acquire the characteristic features of the potent isolate VITJS8. The 16Sr DNA sequencing was performed to investigate the phylogenetic relationship between the Streptomyces genera. The structure of the compound was elucidated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), infra-red (IR), and ultra-violet (UV) spectroscopic data analysis. The GC-MS showed the retention time at 22.39 with a single peak indicating the purity of the active compound, and the molecular formula was established as C14H9ONCl2 based on the peak at m/z 277 [M](+). Furthermore, separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), their retention time (t r) 2.761 was observed with the absorption maxima at 310 nm. The active compound showed effective inhibitory potential against four clinical pathogens at 500 μg/mL. The antioxidant activity was found effective at the IC50 value of 500 μg/mL with 90 % inhibition. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-ditetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay revealed the cytotoxicity against HepG2 cells at IC50 of 250 μg/mL. The progression of apoptosis was evidenced by morphological changes by nuclear staining. The DNA fragmentation pattern was observed at 250 μg/mL concentration. Based on flow cytometric analysis, it was evident that the compound was effective in inhibiting the sub-G0/G1 phase of cell cycle. The in vitro findings were also supported by the binding mode molecular docking studies. The active compound revealed minimum binding energy of -7.84 and showed good affinity towards the active region of topoisomerase-2α that could be considered as a suitable inhibitor. Lastly, we performed 30 ns molecular dynamic simulation analysis using GROMACS to aid in better designing of anticancer drugs. Simulation result of root mean square deviation (RMSD

  1. Washout allometric reference method (WARM) for parametric analysis of [11C]PIB in human brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, Anders; Aanerud, Joel; Braendgaard, Hans; Gjedde, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Rapid clearance and disappearance of a tracer from the circulation challenges the determination of the tracer's binding potentials in brain (BPND) by positron emission tomography (PET). This is the case for the analysis of the binding of radiolabeled [11C]Pittsburgh Compound B ([11C]PIB) to amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques in brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). To resolve the issue of rapid clearance from the circulation, we here introduce the flow-independent Washout Allometric Reference Method (WARM) for the analysis of washout and binding of [11C]PIB in two groups of human subjects, healthy aged control subjects (HC), and patients suffering from AD, and we compare the results to the outcome of two conventional analysis methods. We also use the rapid initial clearance to obtain a surrogate measure of the rate of cerebral blood flow (CBF), as well as a method of identifying a suitable reference region directly from the [11C]PIB signal. The difference of average absolute CBF values between the AD and HC groups was highly significant (P PIB binding, the separate estimates of CBF and BPND provide additional information about possible AD. The results demonstrate the importance of data-driven estimation of CBF and BPND, as well as reference region detection from the [11C]PIB signal. We conclude that the WARM method yields stable measures of BPND with relative ease, using only integration for noise reduction and no model regression. The method accounts for relative flow differences in the brain tissue and yields a calibrated measure of absolute CBF directly from the [11C]PIB signal. Compared to conventional methods, WARM optimizes the Aβ plaque load discrimination between patients with AD and healthy controls (P = 0.009). PMID:24348416

  2. Carboplatin binding to histidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanley, Simon W. M. [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Diederichs, Kay [University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Levy, Colin [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Schreurs, Antoine M. M. [Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Helliwell, John R., E-mail: john.helliwell@manchester.ac.uk [University of Manchester, Brunswick Street, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-29

    An X-ray crystal structure showing the binding of purely carboplatin to histidine in a model protein has finally been obtained. This required extensive crystallization trials and various novel crystal structure analyses. Carboplatin is a second-generation platinum anticancer agent used for the treatment of a variety of cancers. Previous X-ray crystallographic studies of carboplatin binding to histidine (in hen egg-white lysozyme; HEWL) showed the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin owing to the high NaCl concentration used in the crystallization conditions. HEWL co-crystallizations with carboplatin in NaBr conditions have now been carried out to confirm whether carboplatin converts to the bromine form and whether this takes place in a similar way to the partial conversion of carboplatin to cisplatin observed previously in NaCl conditions. Here, it is reported that a partial chemical transformation takes place but to a transplatin form. Thus, to attempt to resolve purely carboplatin binding at histidine, this study utilized co-crystallization of HEWL with carboplatin without NaCl to eliminate the partial chemical conversion of carboplatin. Tetragonal HEWL crystals co-crystallized with carboplatin were successfully obtained in four different conditions, each at a different pH value. The structural results obtained show carboplatin bound to either one or both of the N atoms of His15 of HEWL, and this particular variation was dependent on the concentration of anions in the crystallization mixture and the elapsed time, as well as the pH used. The structural details of the bound carboplatin molecule also differed between them. Overall, the most detailed crystal structure showed the majority of the carboplatin atoms bound to the platinum centre; however, the four-carbon ring structure of the cyclobutanedicarboxylate moiety (CBDC) remained elusive. The potential impact of the results for the administration of carboplatin as an anticancer agent are described.

  3. Reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulink, Nienke C; Planting, Robin S; Figee, Martijn; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    Though the dopaminergic system is implicated in Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders (OCRD), the dopaminergic system has never been investigated in-vivo in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). In line with consistent findings of reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), we hypothesized that the dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in the striatum will be lower in patients with BDD in comparison to healthy subjects. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor Binding Potential (BPND) was examined in 12 drug-free BDD patients and 12 control subjects pairwise matched by age, sex, and handedness using [(123)I]iodobenzamide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT; bolus/constant infusion technique). Regions of interest were the caudate nucleus and the putamen. BPND was calculated as the ratio of specific striatal to binding in the occipital cortex (representing nonspecific binding). Compared to controls, dopamine D2/3 receptor BPND was significantly lower in BDD, both in the putamen (p=0.017) and caudate nucleus (p=0.022). This study provides the first evidence of a disturbed dopaminergic system in BDD patients. Although previously BDD was classified as a separate disorder (somatoform disorder), our findings give pathophysiological support for the recent reclassification of BDD to the OCRD in DSM-5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  4. IGF binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2017-12-18

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1-6 bind IGFs but not insulin with high affinity. They were initially identified as serum carriers and passive inhibitors of IGF actions. However, subsequent studies showed that, although IGFBPs inhibit IGF actions in many circumstances, they may also potentiate these actions. IGFBPs are widely expressed in most tissues, and they are flexible endocrine and autocrine/paracrine regulators of IGF activity, which is essential for this important physiological system. More recently, individual IGFBPs have been shown to have IGF-independent actions. Mechanisms underlying these actions include (i) interaction with non-IGF proteins in compartments including the extracellular space and matrix, the cell surface and intracellularly; (ii) interaction with and modulation of other growth factor pathways including EGF, TGF- and VEGF; and (iii) direct or indirect transcriptional effects following nuclear entry of IGFBPs. Through these IGF-dependent and IGF-independent actions, IGFBPs modulate essential cellular processes including proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy and angiogenesis. They have been implicated in a range of disorders including malignant, metabolic, neurological and immune diseases. A more complete understanding of their cellular roles may lead to the development of novel IGFBP-based therapeutic opportunities.

  5. Experimental and computational approaches of a novel methyl (2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl)(4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl)prop-2-enoate: A potential antimicrobial agent and an inhibition of penicillin-binding protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugavel, S.; Vetri velan, V.; Kannan, Damodharan; Bakthadoss, Manickam

    2016-07-01

    The title compound methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl) (4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-chlorophenyl) prop-2-enoate (MFMSC) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies were carried out by using single crystal X-ray diffraction, FT-IR and NMR spectral analysis together with DFT method using GAUSSIAN'03 software. The detailed interpretation of the vibrational spectra has been carried out by VEDA program. NBO analysis, Mulliken charge analysis, HOMO-LUMO, MEP, Global chemical reactivity descriptors and thermodynamic properties have been analyzed. The hyperpolarisability calculation reveals the present material has a reasonably good propensity for nonlinear optical activity. The obtained antimicrobial activity results indicate that the compound shows good to moderate activity against all tested bacterial and fungal pathogens. A computational study was also carried out to predict the drug-likeness and ADMET properties of the title compound. Due to the different potential biological activity of the title compound, molecular docking study is also reported and the compound might exhibit inhibitory activity against penicillin-binding protein PBP-2X.

  6. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  7. Probing ionization potential, electron affinity and self-energy effect on the spectral shape and exciton binding energy of quantum liquid water with self-consistent many-body perturbation theory and Bethe-Salpeter equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2018-04-18

    An accurate theoretical prediction of ionization potential (IP) and electron affinity (EA) is key for understanding of complex photochemical processes in aqueous environments. There have been numerous efforts in literature to accurately predict IP and EA of liquid water, however with often conflicting results depending on the level of theory and the underlying water structures. In a recent study based on hybrid-non-self-consistent many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) Gaiduk et al. [Nature Communications {\\bf 9}, 247 (2018)] predicted an IP of 10.2 eV and EA of 0.2 eV, resulting in an electronic band gap (i.e. electronic gap (IP-EA) as measured by photoelectron spectroscopy) of about 10 eV, redefining the widely cited experimental gap of 8.7 eV in literature. In the present work, we show that GW self-consistency and an implicit vertex correction in MBPT considerably affect recently reported EA value by Gaiduk et al. \\cite{Gaiduk_affinity} by about 1 eV. Furthermore, the choice of pseudo-potential is critical for an accurate determination of the absolute band positions. Consequently, the self-consistent GW approach with an implicit vertex correction based on projector augmented wave (PAW) method on top of quantum water structures predicts an IP of 10.2, an EA of 1.1, a fundamental gap of 9.1 eV and an exciton binding (Eb) energy of 0.9 eV for the first absorption band of liquid water via Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE). Only within such a self-consistent approach a \\textit{simultanously} accurate prediction of IP, EA, Eg, Eb is possible. © 2018 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  8. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  9. Binding thermodynamics of a glutamate transporter homologue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicolas; Oh, SeCheol; Boudker, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyze concentrative uptake of the neurotransmitter into glial cells and neurons. Their transport cycle involves binding and release of the substrate on the extra- and intracellular sides of the plasma membranes, and translocation of the substrate-binding site across the lipid bilayers. The energy of the ionic gradients, mainly sodium, fuels the cycle. Here, we used a cross-linking approach to trap a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii in key conformational states with substrate-binding site facing either the extracellular or intracellular sides of the membrane to study their binding thermodynamics. We show that the chemical potential of sodium ions in solution is exclusively coupled to substrate binding and release, and not to substrate translocation. Despite the structural symmetry, the binding mechanisms are distinct on the opposite sides of the membrane and more complex than the current models suggest. PMID:23563139

  10. Homologous regions of Fen1 and p21Cip1 compete for binding to the same site on PCNA: a potential mechanism to co-ordinate DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warbrick, E; Lane, D P; Glover, D M; Cox, L S

    1997-05-15

    Following genomic damage, the cessation of DNA replication is co-ordinated with onset of DNA repair; this co-ordination is essential to avoid mutation and genomic instability. To investigate these phenomena, we have analysed proteins that interact with PCNA, which is required for both DNA replication and repair. One such protein is p21Cip1, which inhibits DNA replication through its interaction with PCNA, while allowing repair to continue. We have identified an interaction between PCNA and the structure specific nuclease, Fen1, which is involved in DNA replication. Deletion analysis suggests that p21Cip1 and Fen1 bind to the same region of PCNA. Within Fen1 and its homologues a small region (10 amino acids) is sufficient for PCNA binding, which contains an 8 amino acid conserved PCNA-binding motif. This motif shares critical residues with the PCNA-binding region of p21Cip1. A PCNA binding peptide from p21Cip1 competes with Fen1 peptides for binding to PCNA, disrupts the Fen1-PCNA complex in replicating cell extracts, and concomitantly inhibits DNA synthesis. Competition between homologous regions of Fen1 and p21Cip1 for binding to the same site on PCNA may provide a mechanism to co-ordinate the functions of PCNA in DNA replication and repair.

  11. Bioinformatic cis-element analyses performed in Arabidopsis and rice disclose bZIP- and MYB-related binding sites as potential AuxRE-coupling elements in auxin-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendzen, Kenneth W; Weiste, Christoph; Wanke, Dierk; Kilian, Joachim; Harter, Klaus; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang

    2012-08-01

    In higher plants, a diverse array of developmental and growth-related processes is regulated by the plant hormone auxin. Recent publications have proposed that besides the well-characterized Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) that bind Auxin Response Elements (AuxREs), also members of the bZIP- and MYB-transcription factor (TF) families participate in transcriptional control of auxin-regulated genes via bZIP Response Elements (ZREs) or Myb Response Elements (MREs), respectively. Applying a novel bioinformatic algorithm, we demonstrate on a genome-wide scale that singular motifs or composite modules of AuxREs, ZREs, MREs but also of MYC2 related elements are significantly enriched in promoters of auxin-inducible genes. Despite considerable, species-specific differences in the genome structure in terms of the GC content, this enrichment is generally conserved in dicot (Arabidopsis thaliana) and monocot (Oryza sativa) model plants. Moreover, an enrichment of defined composite modules has been observed in selected auxin-related gene families. Consistently, a bipartite module, which encompasses a bZIP-associated G-box Related Element (GRE) and an AuxRE motif, has been found to be highly enriched. Making use of transient reporter studies in protoplasts, these findings were experimentally confirmed, demonstrating that GREs functionally interact with AuxREs in regulating auxin-mediated transcription. Using genome-wide bioinformatic analyses, evolutionary conserved motifs have been defined which potentially function as AuxRE-dependent coupling elements to establish auxin-specific expression patterns. Based on these findings, experimental approaches can be designed to broaden our understanding of combinatorial, auxin-controlled gene regulation.

  12. Characterizing low affinity epibatidine binding to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Person Alexandra M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Along with high affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd1≈10 pM to α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR, low affinity binding of epibatidine (Kd2≈1-10 nM to an independent binding site has been reported. Studying this low affinity binding is important because it might contribute understanding about the structure and synthesis of α4β2 nAChR. The binding behavior of epibatidine and α4β2 AChR raises a question about interpreting binding data from two independent sites with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding, both of which can affect equilibrium binding of [3H]epibatidine and α4β2 nAChR. If modeled incorrectly, ligand depletion and nonspecific binding lead to inaccurate estimates of binding constants. Fitting total equilibrium binding as a function of total ligand accurately characterizes a single site with ligand depletion and nonspecific binding. The goal of this study was to determine whether this approach is sufficient with two independent high and low affinity sites. Results Computer simulations of binding revealed complexities beyond fitting total binding for characterizing the second, low affinity site of α4β2 nAChR. First, distinguishing low-affinity specific binding from nonspecific binding was a potential problem with saturation data. Varying the maximum concentration of [3H]epibatidine, simultaneously fitting independently measured nonspecific binding, and varying α4β2 nAChR concentration were effective remedies. Second, ligand depletion helped identify the low affinity site when nonspecific binding was significant in saturation or competition data, contrary to a common belief that ligand depletion always is detrimental. Third, measuring nonspecific binding without α4β2 nAChR distinguished better between nonspecific binding and low-affinity specific binding under some circumstances of competitive binding than did presuming nonspecific binding to be residual [3H]epibatidine binding after

  13. Longitudinal imaging of Alzheimer pathology using [11C]PIB, [18F]FDDNP and [18F]FDG PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Tolboom, Nelleke; Foster-Dingley, Jessica C; Adriaanse, Sofie F; Boellaard, Ronald; Yaqub, Maqsood; Windhorst, Albert D; Barkhof, Frederik; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2012-06-01

    [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDDNP are PET tracers for in vivo detection of the neuropathology underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD). [(18)F]FDG is a glucose analogue and its uptake reflects metabolic activity. The purpose of this study was to examine longitudinal changes in these tracers in patients with AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in healthy controls. Longitudinal, paired, dynamic [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDDNP (90 min each) and static [(18)F]FDG (15 min) PET scans were obtained in 11 controls, 12 MCI patients and 8 AD patients. The mean interval between baseline and follow-up was 2.5 years (range 2.0-4.0 years). Parametric [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDDNP images of binding potential (BP(ND)) and [(18)F]FDG standardized uptake value ratio (SUVr) images were generated. A significant increase in global cortical [(11)C]PIB BP(ND) was found in MCI patients, but no changes were observed in AD patients or controls. Subsequent regional analysis revealed that this increase in [(11)C]PIB BP(ND) in MCI patients was most prominent in the lateral temporal lobe (p PIB binding (ρ = -0.42, p PIB and [(18)F]FDG track molecular changes in different stages of AD. We found increased amyloid load in MCI patients and progressive metabolic impairment in AD patients. [(18)F]FDDNP seems to be less useful for examining disease progression.

  14. Estimation of the binding modes with important human cytochrome P450 enzymes, drug interaction potential, pharmacokinetics, and hepatotoxicity of ginger components using molecular docking, computational, and pharmacokinetic modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Zhu, Shengrong

    2015-01-01

    Ginger is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines for the treatment of numerous ailments and improvement of body functions. It may be used in combination with prescribed drugs. The coadministration of ginger with therapeutic drugs raises a concern of potential deleterious drug interactions via the modulation of the expression and/or activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, resulting in unfavorable therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to determine the molecular interactions between 12 main active ginger components (6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, 10-gingerol, 6-shogaol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, ar-curcumene, β-bisabolene, β-sesquiphelandrene, 6-gingerdione, (-)-zingiberene, and methyl-6-isogingerol) and human cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and to predict the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) of the 12 ginger components using computational approaches and comprehensive literature search. Docking studies showed that ginger components interacted with a panel of amino acids in the active sites of CYP1A2, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 mainly through hydrogen bond formation, to a lesser extent, via π-π stacking. The pharmacokinetic simulation studies showed that the [I]/[Ki ] value for CYP2C9, 2C19, and 3A4 ranged from 0.0002 to 19.6 and the R value ranged from 1.0002 to 20.6 and that ginger might exhibit a high risk of drug interaction via inhibition of the activity of human CYP2C9 and CYP3A4, but a low risk of drug interaction toward CYP2C19-mediated drug metabolism. Furthermore, it has been evaluated that the 12 ginger components possessed a favorable ADMET profiles with regard to the solubility, absorption, permeability across the blood-brain barrier, interactions with CYP2D6, hepatotoxicity, and plasma protein binding. The validation results showed that there was no remarkable effect of ginger on the metabolism of warfarin in humans, whereas concurrent use of ginger and nifedipine exhibited a

  15. Synthetic LPS-Binding Polymer Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tian

    -bovine serum albumin (BSA) binding, which showed that, different from NPs FITC-LPS interactions, variation of TBAm's content in NPs had very little influence on BSA binding, instead, more cationic NPs with higher content of APM were found to possess higher BSA binding. Additionally, GUA-containing NPs exhibited particularly high BSA binding capacity, especially under low ionic strength conditions. In the current formulations, the aggregation and saturation effects make NPs unsuitable in practical applications. Nevertheless, we anticipate that by attaching NPs onto certain substrates, particles may be effectively separated from each other, and the NPs' LPS binding capacity could potentially be further improved.

  16. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  17. Feature Binding in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Neri

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Binding operations are primarily ascribed to cortex or similarly complex avian structures. My experiments show that the zebrafish, a lower vertebrate lacking cortex, supports visual feature binding of form and motion for the purpose of social behavior. These results challenge the notion that feature binding may require highly evolved neural structures and demonstrate that the nervous system of lower vertebrates can afford unexpectedly complex computations.

  18. Dopamine and opioid neurotransmission in behavioral addictions: A comparative PET study in pathological gambling and binge eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majuri, Joonas; Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Voon, Valerie; Alakurtti, Kati; Parkkola, Riitta; Lahti, Tuuli; Alho, Hannu; Hirvonen, Jussi; Arponen, Eveliina; Forsback, Sarita; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2016-01-01

    Although behavioral addictions share many clinical features with drug addictions, they show strikingly large variation in their behavioral phenotypes (such as in uncontrollable gambling or eating). Neurotransmitter function in behavioral addictions is poorly understood but has important implications in understanding its relationship with substance use disorders and underlying mechanisms of therapeutic efficacy. Here, we compare opioid and dopamine function between two behavioral addiction phenotypes: pathological gambling (PG) and binge eating disorder (BED). Thirty-nine participants (15 PG, 7 BED and 17 controls) were scanned with [11C]carfentanil and [18F]fluorodopa positron emission tomography using a high-resolution scanner. Binding potentials relative to non-displaceable binding (BPND) for [11C]carfentanil and influx rate constant (Ki) values for [18F]fluorodopa were analyzed with region-of-interest and whole-brain voxel-by-voxel analyses. BED subjects showed widespread reductions in [11C]carfentanil BPND in multiple subcortical and cortical brain regions and in striatal [18F]fluorodopa Ki compared with controls. In PG patients, [11C]carfentanil BPND was reduced in the anterior cingulate with no differences in [18F]fluorodopa Ki compared with controls. In the nucleus accumbens, a key region involved in reward processing, [11C]Carfentanil BPND was 30-34% lower and [18F]fluorodopa Ki was 20% lower in BED compared with PG and controls (p<0.002). BED and PG are thus dissociable as a function of dopaminergic and opioidergic neurotransmission. Compared with PG, BED patients show widespread losses of mu-opioid receptor availability together with presynaptic dopaminergic defects. These findings highlight the heterogeneity underlying the subtypes of addiction and indicate differential mechanisms in the expression of pathological behaviors and responses to treatment. PMID:27882998

  19. DNS & Bind Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Cricket

    2011-01-01

    The DNS & BIND Cookbook presents solutions to the many problems faced by network administrators responsible for a name server. Following O'Reilly's popular problem-and-solution cookbook format, this title is an indispensable companion to DNS & BIND, 4th Edition, the definitive guide to the critical task of name server administration. The cookbook contains dozens of code recipes showing solutions to everyday problems, ranging from simple questions, like, "How do I get BIND?" to more advanced topics like providing name service for IPv6 addresses. It's full of BIND configuration files that yo

  20. Is there a relation between novelty seeking, striatal dopamine release and frontal cortical thickness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Jaworska

    Full Text Available Novelty-seeking (NS and impulsive personality traits have been proposed to reflect an interplay between fronto-cortical and limbic systems, including the limbic striatum (LS. Although neuroimaging studies have provided some evidence for this, most are comprised of small samples and many report surprisingly large effects given the challenges of trying to relate a snapshot of brain function or structure to an entity as complex as personality. The current work tested a priori hypotheses about associations between striatal dopamine (DA release, cortical thickness (CT, and NS in a large sample of healthy adults.Fifty-two healthy adults (45M/7F; age: 23.8±4.93 underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [11C]raclopride (specific for striatal DA D2/3 receptors with or without amphetamine (0.3 mg/kg, p.o.. Structural magnetic resonance image scans were acquired, as were Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data. Amphetamine-induced changes in [11C]raclopride binding potential values (ΔBPND were examined in the limbic, sensorimotor (SMS and associative (AST striatum. CT measures, adjusted for whole brain volume, were extracted from the dorsolateral sensorimotor and ventromedial/limbic cortices.BPND values were lower in the amphetamine vs. no-drug sessions, with the largest effect in the LS. When comparing low vs. high LS ΔBPND groups (median split, higher NS2 (impulsiveness scores were found in the high ΔBPND group. Partial correlations (age and gender as covariates yielded a negative relation between ASTS ΔBPND and sensorimotor CT; trends for inverse associations existed between ΔBPND values in other striatal regions and frontal CT. In other words, the greater the amphetamine-induced striatal DA response, the thinner the frontal cortex.These data expand upon previously reported associations between striatal DA release in the LS and both NS related impulsiveness and CT in the largest sample reported to date. The findings add to the

  1. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  2. DNS BIND Server Configuratio

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  3. DNS BIND Server Configuration

    OpenAIRE

    Radu MARSANU

    2011-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the DNS and BIND standard for Unix platforms, the paper presents an application which has a principal objective, the configuring of the DNS BIND 9 server. The general objectives of the application are presented, follow by the description of the details of designing the program.

  4. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  5. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  6. Microwave-assisted synthesis of mixed ligands organotin(IV) complexes of 1,10-phenanthroline and l-proline: Physicochemical characterization, DFT calculations, chemotherapeutic potential validation by in vitro DNA binding and nuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Mala; Mridula; Kumari, Ranjana

    2017-09-01

    Diorganotin(IV) and triphenyltin(IV) derivatives of L-proline (HPro) having general formula R 2 Sn(Pro) 2 (R=n-Bu (1), Ph (2)) and Ph 3 Sn(Pro) (3), respectively, and the mixed ligands di-/triorganotin(IV) derivatives of L-proline and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) with general formula [R 2 Sn(Pro)(Phen)Cl] and [R 3 Sn(Pro)(Phen)] (where R=Me (4 and 7), n-Bu (5 and 8), Ph (6 and 9)), respectively, have been synthesized by microwave-assisted method and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, NMR ( 1 H, 13 C and 119 Sn) and DART-mass spectral studies. The results suggest bicapped tetrahedron or a skew trapezoidal-bipyramid geometry for R 2 Sn(Pro) 2 , a distorted tetrahedral geometry for Ph 3 Sn(Pro) and a distorted octahedral geometry for [R 2 Sn(Pro)(Phen)Cl] and [Ph 3 Sn(Pro)(Phen)] around the Sn atom, and the same has been validated by density functional theory calculations (DFT). In vitro DNA binding studies of 1-9 have been investigated by UV-Vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism titrations, viscosity and DNA melting experiments. The observed hypochromic shift in UV-Vis and fluorescence studies evidenced a partial intercalative mode of binding of complexes to CT-DNA. The binding affinity and quenching ability have been quantified in terms of intrinsic binding constant (K b ) and Stern-Volmer quenching constant (Ksv). The determined values suggest that di- and triorganotin(IV) derivatives of L-proline possess lesser affinity to bind with CT-DNA in comparison to the mixed ligands di-/triorganotin(IV) derivatives of L-proline and 1,10-phenanthroline. The partial intercalative mode of binding of these complexes with CT DNA has also been supported by a change in the viscosity and melting point of DNA as well as a change in the intensity of positive and negative bands in circular dichroism spectra. The cleavage studies by agarose gel electrophoresis indicate effective cleavage of supercoiled plasmid DNA into its nicked form by all the complexes and even to its linear

  7. Reduced basal ganglia μ-opioid receptor availability in trigeminal neuropathic pain: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DosSantos Marcos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although neuroimaging techniques have provided insights into the function of brain regions involved in Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain (TNP in humans, there is little understanding of the molecular mechanisms affected during the course of this disorder. Understanding these processes is crucial to determine the systems involved in the development and persistence of TNP. Findings In this study, we examined the regional μ-opioid receptor (μOR availability in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential BPND of TNP patients with positron emission tomography (PET using the μOR selective radioligand [11C]carfentanil. Four TNP patients and eight gender and age-matched healthy controls were examined with PET. Patients with TNP showed reduced μOR BPND in the left nucleus accumbens (NAc, an area known to be involved in pain modulation and reward/aversive behaviors. In addition, the μOR BPND in the NAc was negatively correlated with the McGill sensory and total pain ratings in the TNP patients. Conclusions Our findings give preliminary evidence that the clinical pain in TNP patients can be related to alterations in the endogenous μ-opioid system, rather than only to the peripheral pathology. The decreased availability of μORs found in TNP patients, and its inverse relationship to clinical pain levels, provide insights into the central mechanisms related to this condition. The results also expand our understanding about the impact of chronic pain on the limbic system.

  8. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  9. Regulation of inositol phospholipid binding and signaling through syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, John R; Vogt, Susan; Lim, Ssang-Taek

    2002-01-01

    inositol phospholipids. In turn, lipid binding stabilizes the syndecan in oligomeric form, with subsequent binding and activation of protein kinase C. The specificity of phospholipid binding and its potential regulation are investigated here. Highest affinity of the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain was seen...... examined. Inositol hexakisphosphate, but not inositol tetrakisphosphate, also had high affinity for the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain and could compete effectively with PtdIns(4,5)P(2). Since inositol hexaphosphate binding to syndecan-4 does not promote oligomer formation, it is a potential down...

  10. Salt modulates the stability and lipid binding affinity of the adipocyte lipid-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, Allyn J.; Ruiz, Carmen R.; Joubert, Allison M.; Yang, Xuemei; LiCata, Vince J.

    2003-01-01

    Adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP or aP2) is an intracellular fatty acid-binding protein that is found in adipocytes and macrophages and binds a large variety of intracellular lipids with high affinity. Although intracellular lipids are frequently charged, biochemical studies of lipid-binding proteins and their interactions often focus most heavily on the hydrophobic aspects of these proteins and their interactions. In this study, we have characterized the effects of KCl on the stability and lipid binding properties of ALBP. We find that added salt dramatically stabilizes ALBP, increasing its Delta G of unfolding by 3-5 kcal/mol. At 37 degrees C salt can more than double the stability of the protein. At the same time, salt inhibits the binding of the fluorescent lipid 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (ANS) to the protein and induces direct displacement of the lipid from the protein. Thermodynamic linkage analysis of the salt inhibition of ANS binding shows a nearly 1:1 reciprocal linkage: i.e. one ion is released from ALBP when ANS binds, and vice versa. Kinetic experiments show that salt reduces the rate of association between ANS and ALBP while simultaneously increasing the dissociation rate of ANS from the protein. We depict and discuss the thermodynamic linkages among stability, lipid binding, and salt effects for ALBP, including the use of these linkages to calculate the affinity of ANS for the denatured state of ALBP and its dependence on salt concentration. We also discuss the potential molecular origins and potential intracellular consequences of the demonstrated salt linkages to stability and lipid binding in ALBP.

  11. Genetic analysis of Kruppel-like zinc finger 11 variants in 5864 Danish individuals: potential effect on insulin resistance and modified signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 binding by promoter variant -1659G>C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutiérrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Froguel, Philippe; Hamid, Yasmin H

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: The transcription factor Krüppel-like zinc finger 11 (KLF11) has been suggested to contribute to genetic risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Our previous results showed that four KLF11 variants, in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD block including +185 A>G/Gln62Arg and -1659 G>C) were...... study to assess association to T2D and glucose metabolism-related quantitative traits. We studied effects of LD-block variants on KLF11 function and in particular, the effect of -1659G>C on transcriptional regulation of KLF11 using EMSA, chromatin immunoprecipitation, gene reporter assays, and small...... = 0.006, and P = 0.00002, respectively). In addition, binding of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)-3 to the wild-type (-1659G>C) allele stimulated gene transcription, whereas STAT3 did not bind onto the mutant allele. CONCLUSIONS: We showed that KLF11 may interfere with glucose...

  12. Ail Binding to Fibronectin Facilitates Yersinia pestis Binding to Host Cells and Yop Delivery▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tsang, Tiffany M.; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, evades host immune responses and rapidly causes disease. The Y. pestis adhesin Ail mediates host cell binding and is critical for Yop delivery. To identify the Ail receptor(s), Ail was purified following overexpression in Escherichia coli. Ail bound specifically to fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein with the potential to act as a bridge between Ail and host cells. Ail expressed by E. coli also mediated binding to purified fibronectin, ...

  13. Zinc Binding by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna Mrvčić

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is an essential trace element in all organisms. A common method for the prevention of zinc deficiency is pharmacological supplementation, especially in a highly available form of a metalloprotein complex. The potential of different microbes to bind essential and toxic heavy metals has recently been recognized. In this work, biosorption of zinc by lactic acid bacteria (LAB has been investigated. Specific LAB were assessed for their ability to bind zinc from a water solution. Significant amount of zinc ions was bound, and this binding was found to be LAB species-specific. Differences among the species in binding performance at a concentration range between 10–90 mg/L were evaluated with Langmuir model for biosorption. Binding of zinc was a fast process, strongly influenced by ionic strength, pH, biomass concentration, and temperature. The most effective metal-binding LAB species was Leuconostoc mesenteroides (27.10 mg of Zn2+ per gram of dry mass bound at pH=5 and 32 °C, during 24 h. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis and electron microscopy demonstrated that passive adsorption and active uptake of the zinc ions were involved.

  14. Sex hormone binding globulin decrease as potential pathogenetic factor for hirsutism in adolescent girls Disminución de la globulina transportadora de hormonas sexuales como factor patogénico de hirsutismo en la adolescencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Cross

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigated 252 non-obese female subjects aged 13-39 years to evaluate if an exaggerated descent of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG levels during adolescence can play a role in the development of hirsutism. Body hair was assessed according to Ferriman and Gallwey (FG, with a stringent criterion of normality of 4 and controls (FG Se investigaron 252 mujeres con peso normal, de 13 a 39 años de edad, para evaluar si un descenso exagerado en los niveles de la globulina transportadora de hormonas sexuales ("sex hormone binding globulin"; SHBG puede tener un rol en el desarrollo de hirsutismo. Este signo fue evaluado con la escala de Ferriman y Gallwey (FG, empleando un criterio riguroso de normalidad 4 y controles (FG < 4, ciclos menstruales regulares, sin acné. En adolescentes de 15-18 años, los valores de SHBG fueron menores en las "hirsutas", los niveles de FT fueron similares en ambos grupos y el índice de FG correlacionó inversamente con SHBG. En las mujeres de 19-39 años, los niveles de FT fueron mayores en las "hirsutas", los valores de SHBG fueron similares en ambos grupos y FG correlacionó positivamente con FT. Los valores más bajos de SHBG se observaron entre 15 y 18 años, pero la pendiente de disminución a partir de los valores de 13-14 años fue mayor en el grupo de "hirsutas". Los valores de FT se incrementaron progresivamente con la edad, pero el aumento fue mayor en el grupo de "hirsutas". Estos resultados sugieren un rol importante del descenso de SHBG en la adolescencia vs. un incremento más acentuado de los niveles de testosterona en las adultas, como factores que condicionan el desarrollo del hirsutismo en esos dos diferentes periodos de la vida.

  15. binding protein (HABP1)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    adsorbed on carbon coated copper grid (400 mesh) for. 5 min at room temperature. The grids were subsequently .... and inhibition by GAGs and DMA were determined on polystyrene wells of microtitre plates (Costar, ... for binding inhibition assays was carried out by mixing equal volumes of the conjugate and the inhibitor at ...

  16. Quarkeosynthesis Binding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Bill

    2009-05-01

    Quarkeosynthesis shows that the binding energy of a nucleus is the difference between the relativistic kinetic energies of its threesome of Jumbo Quarks and that of its building block quarks from neutrons and protons. There is no involvement of a nuclear strong force or gluon material.

  17. Sequential memory: Binding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Gong, Xue; Rabinovich, Mikhail

    2015-10-01

    Temporal order memories are critical for everyday animal and human functioning. Experiments and our own experience show that the binding or association of various features of an event together and the maintaining of multimodality events in sequential order are the key components of any sequential memories—episodic, semantic, working, etc. We study a robustness of binding sequential dynamics based on our previously introduced model in the form of generalized Lotka-Volterra equations. In the phase space of the model, there exists a multi-dimensional binding heteroclinic network consisting of saddle equilibrium points and heteroclinic trajectories joining them. We prove here the robustness of the binding sequential dynamics, i.e., the feasibility phenomenon for coupled heteroclinic networks: for each collection of successive heteroclinic trajectories inside the unified networks, there is an open set of initial points such that the trajectory going through each of them follows the prescribed collection staying in a small neighborhood of it. We show also that the symbolic complexity function of the system restricted to this neighborhood is a polynomial of degree L - 1, where L is the number of modalities.

  18. binding protein (HABP1)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    of HA in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting its multiligand affinity amongst carbohydrates. rHABP1 shows differential affinity ... site is seen to correspond to the carbohydrate-binding site in E-selectin, which has similarity in the ... adsorbed on carbon coated copper grid (400 mesh) for. 5 min at room temperature.

  19. Detection of secondary binding sites in proteins using fragment screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, R Frederick; Verdonk, Marcel L; Saini, Harpreet K; Tickle, Ian J; Jhoti, Harren

    2015-12-29

    Proteins need to be tightly regulated as they control biological processes in most normal cellular functions. The precise mechanisms of regulation are rarely completely understood but can involve binding of endogenous ligands and/or partner proteins at specific locations on a protein that can modulate function. Often, these additional secondary binding sites appear separate to the primary binding site, which, for example for an enzyme, may bind a substrate. In previous work, we have uncovered several examples in which secondary binding sites were discovered on proteins using fragment screening approaches. In each case, we were able to establish that the newly identified secondary binding site was biologically relevant as it was able to modulate function by the binding of a small molecule. In this study, we investigate how often secondary binding sites are located on proteins by analyzing 24 protein targets for which we have performed a fragment screen using X-ray crystallography. Our analysis shows that, surprisingly, the majority of proteins contain secondary binding sites based on their ability to bind fragments. Furthermore, sequence analysis of these previously unknown sites indicate high conservation, which suggests that they may have a biological function, perhaps via an allosteric mechanism. Comparing the physicochemical properties of the secondary sites with known primary ligand binding sites also shows broad similarities indicating that many of the secondary sites may be druggable in nature with small molecules that could provide new opportunities to modulate potential therapeutic targets.

  20. Mannose-binding geometry of pradimicin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yu; Doi, Takashi; Taketani, Takara; Takegoshi, K; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yukishige

    2013-08-05

    Pradimicins (PRMs) and benanomicins are the only family of non-peptidic natural products with lectin-like properties, that is, they recognize D-mannopyranoside (Man) in the presence of Ca(2+) ions. Coupled with their unique Man binding ability, they exhibit antifungal and anti-HIV activities through binding to Man-containing glycans of pathogens. Notwithstanding the great potential of PRMs as the lectin mimics and therapeutic leads, their molecular basis of Man recognition has yet to be established. Their aggregate-forming propensity has impeded conventional interaction analysis in solution, and the analytical difficulty is exacerbated by the existence of two Man binding sites in PRMs. In this work, we investigated the geometry of the primary Man binding of PRM-A, an original member of PRMs, by the recently developed analytical strategy using the solid aggregate composed of the 1:1 complex of PRM-A and Man. Evaluation of intermolecular distances by solid-state NMR spectroscopy revealed that the C2-C4 region of Man is in close contact with the primary binding site of PRM-A, while the C1 and C6 positions of Man are relatively distant. The binding geometry was further validated by co-precipitation experiments using deoxy-Man derivatives, leading to the proposal that PRM-A binds not only to terminal Man residues at the non-reducing end of glycans, but also to internal 6-substituted Man residues. The present study provides new insights into the molecular basis of Man recognition and glycan specificity of PRM-A. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Alpine ski bindings and injuries. Current findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natri, A; Beynnon, B D; Ettlinger, C F; Johnson, R J; Shealy, J E

    1999-07-01

    In spite of the fact that the overall incidence of alpine ski injuries has decreased during the last 25 years, the incidence of serious knee sprains usually involving the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has risen dramatically since the late 1970s. This trend runs counter to a dramatic reduction in lower leg injuries that began in the early 1970s and to date has lowered the risk of injury below the knee by almost 90%. One of the primary design objectives of modern ski boots and bindings has been to protect the skier from tibia and ankle fractures. So, in that sense, they have done an excellent job. However, despite advances in equipment design, modern ski bindings have not protected the knee from serious ligament trauma. At the present time, we are unaware of any binding design, settings or function that can protect both the knee and lower extremities from serious ligament sprains. No innovative change in binding design appears to be on the horizon that has the potential to reduce the risk of these severe knee injuries. Indeed, only 1 study has demonstrated a means to help reduce this risk of serious knee sprains, and this study involved education of skiers, not ski equipment. Despite the inability of bindings to reduce the risk of severe knee injuries there can be no doubt that improvement in ski bindings has been the most important factor in the marked reduction in incidence of lower leg and ankle injuries during the last 25 years. The authors strongly endorse the application of present International Standards Organisation (ISO) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards concerning mounting, setting and maintaining modern 'state of the art' bindings.

  2. Five of Five VHHs Neutralizing Poliovirus Bind the Receptor-Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Mike; Schotte, Lise; Thys, Bert; Filman, David J; Hogle, James M

    2016-01-13

    Nanobodies, or VHHs, that recognize poliovirus type 1 have previously been selected and characterized as candidates for antiviral agents or reagents for standardization of vaccine quality control. In this study, we present high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of poliovirus with five neutralizing VHHs. All VHHs bind the capsid in the canyon at sites that extensively overlap the poliovirus receptor-binding site. In contrast, the interaction involves a unique (and surprisingly extensive) surface for each of the five VHHs. Five regions of the capsid were found to participate in binding with all five VHHs. Four of these five regions are known to alter during the expansion of the capsid associated with viral entry. Interestingly, binding of one of the VHHs, PVSS21E, resulted in significant changes of the capsid structure and thus seems to trap the virus in an early stage of expansion. We describe the cryo-electron microscopy structures of complexes of five neutralizing VHHs with the Mahoney strain of type 1 poliovirus at resolutions ranging from 3.8 to 6.3Å. All five VHHs bind deep in the virus canyon at similar sites that overlap extensively with the binding site for the receptor (CD155). The binding surfaces on the VHHs are surprisingly extensive, but despite the use of similar binding surfaces on the virus, the binding surface on the VHHs is unique for each VHH. In four of the five complexes, the virus remains essentially unchanged, but for the fifth there are significant changes reminiscent of but smaller in magnitude than the changes associated with cell entry, suggesting that this VHH traps the virus in a previously undescribed early intermediate state. The neutralizing mechanisms of the VHHs and their potential use as quality control agents for the end game of poliovirus eradication are discussed. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Binding site graphs: a new graph theoretical framework for prediction of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E Reddy

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Computational prediction of nucleotide binding specificity for transcription factors remains a fundamental and largely unsolved problem. Determination of binding positions is a prerequisite for research in gene regulation, a major mechanism controlling phenotypic diversity. Furthermore, an accurate determination of binding specificities from high-throughput data sources is necessary to realize the full potential of systems biology. Unfortunately, recently performed independent evaluation showed that more than half the predictions from most widely used algorithms are false. We introduce a graph-theoretical framework to describe local sequence similarity as the pair-wise distances between nucleotides in promoter sequences, and hypothesize that densely connected subgraphs are indicative of transcription factor binding sites. Using a well-established sampling algorithm coupled with simple clustering and scoring schemes, we identify sets of closely related nucleotides and test those for known TF binding activity. Using an independent benchmark, we find our algorithm predicts yeast binding motifs considerably better than currently available techniques and without manual curation. Importantly, we reduce the number of false positive predictions in yeast to less than 30%. We also develop a framework to evaluate the statistical significance of our motif predictions. We show that our approach is robust to the choice of input promoters, and thus can be used in the context of predicting binding positions from noisy experimental data. We apply our method to identify binding sites using data from genome scale ChIP-chip experiments. Results from these experiments are publicly available at http://cagt10.bu.edu/BSG. The graphical framework developed here may be useful when combining predictions from numerous computational and experimental measures. Finally, we discuss how our algorithm can be used to improve the sensitivity of computational predictions of

  4. Mucin Binding Reduces Colistin Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Johnny X.; Blaskovich, Mark A. T.; Pelingon, Ruby; Ramu, Soumya; Kavanagh, Angela; Elliott, Alysha G.; Butler, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Colistin has found increasing use in treating drug-resistant bacterial lung infections, but potential interactions with pulmonary biomolecules have not been investigated. We postulated that colistin, like aminoglycoside antibiotics, may bind to secretory mucin in sputum or epithelial mucin that lines airways, reducing free drug levels. To test this hypothesis, we measured binding of colistin and other antibiotics to porcine mucin, a family of densely glycosylated proteins used as a surrogate for human sputum and airway mucin. Antibiotics were incubated in dialysis tubing with or without mucin, and concentrations of unbound antibiotics able to penetrate the dialysis tubing were measured over time using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The percentage of antibiotic measured in the dialysate after 4 h in the presence of mucin, relative to the amount without mucin, was 15% for colistin, 16% for polymyxin B, 19% for tobramycin, 52% for ciprofloxacin, and 78% for daptomycin. Antibiotics with the strongest mucin binding had an overall polybasic positive charge, whereas those with comparatively little binding were less basic. When comparing MICs measured with or without added mucin, colistin and polymyxin B showed >100-fold increases in MICs for multiple Gram-negative bacteria. Preclinical evaluation of mucin binding should become a standard procedure when considering the potential pulmonary use of new or existing antibiotics, particularly those with a polybasic overall charge. In the airways, mucin binding may reduce the antibacterial efficacy of inhaled or intravenously administered colistin, and the presence of sub-MIC effective antibiotic concentrations could result in the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:26169405

  5. Haptenation: Chemical Reactivity and Protein Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itai Chipinda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Low molecular weight chemical (LMW allergens are commonly referred to as haptens. Haptens must complex with proteins to be recognized by the immune system. The majority of occupationally related haptens are reactive, electrophilic chemicals, or are metabolized to reactive metabolites that form covalent bonds with nucleophilic centers on proteins. Nonelectrophilic protein binding may occur through disulfide exchange, coordinate covalent binding onto metal ions on metalloproteins or of metal allergens, themselves, to the major histocompatibility complex. Recent chemical reactivity kinetic studies suggest that the rate of protein binding is a major determinant of allergenic potency; however, electrophilic strength does not seem to predict the ability of a hapten to skew the response between Th1 and Th2. Modern proteomic mass spectrometry methods that allow detailed delineation of potential differences in protein binding sites may be valuable in predicting if a chemical will stimulate an immediate or delayed hypersensitivity. Chemical aspects related to both reactivity and protein-specific binding are discussed.

  6. DNA binding studies of tartrazine food additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashanian, Soheila; Zeidali, Sahar Heidary

    2011-07-01

    The interaction of native calf thymus DNA with tartrazine in 10 mM Tris-HCl aqueous solution at neutral pH 7.4 was investigated. Tartrazine is a nitrous derivative and may cause allergic reactions, with a potential of toxicological risk. Also, tartrazine induces oxidative stress and DNA damage. Its DNA binding properties were studied by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectra, competitive binding with Hoechst 33258, and viscosity measurements. Tartrazine molecules bind to DNA via groove mode as illustrated by hyperchromism in the UV absorption band of tartrazine, decrease in Hoechst-DNA solution fluorescence, unchanged viscosity of DNA, and conformational changes such as conversion from B-like to C-like in the circular dichroism spectra of DNA. The binding constants (K(b)) of DNA with tartrazine were calculated at different temperatures. Enthalpy and entropy changes were calculated to be +37 and +213 kJ mol(-1), respectively, according to the Van't Hoff equation, which indicated that the reaction is predominantly entropically driven. Also, tartrazine does not cleave plasmid DNA. Tartrazine interacts with calf thymus DNA via a groove interaction mode with an intrinsic binding constant of 3.75 × 10(4) M(-1).

  7. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    to express high levels of megalin, is inhibitable by excess unlabeled FBP and by receptor associated protein, a known inhibitor of binding to megalin. Immortalized rat yolk sac cells, representing an established model for studying megalin-mediated uptake, reveal (125)I-labeled FBP uptake which is inhibited...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  8. Temperament, character and serotonin activity in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, L; Salo, J; Hirvonen, J

    2013-01-01

    The psychobiological model of personality by Cloninger and colleagues originally hypothesized that interindividual variability in the temperament dimension 'harm avoidance' (HA) is explained by differences in the activity of the brain serotonin system. We assessed brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT......-existing Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) scores. A total of 22 subjects free of psychiatric and somatic disorders were included in the matched high- and low-HA groups. The main outcome measure was regional 5-HTT binding potential (BPND) in high- and low-HA groups estimated with PET and [11C]N,N-dimethyl-2...

  9. Binding matrix: a novel approach for binding site recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jan T; Gewehr, Jan E; Martinetz, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    Recognition of protein-DNA binding sites in genomic sequences is a crucial step for discovering biological functions of genomic sequences. Explosive growth in availability of sequence information has resulted in a demand for binding site detection methods with high specificity. The motivation of the work presented here is to address this demand by a systematic approach based on Maximum Likelihood Estimation. A general framework is developed in which a large class of binding site detection methods can be described in a uniform and consistent way. Protein-DNA binding is determined by binding energy, which is an approximately linear function within the space of sequence words. All matrix based binding word detectors can be regarded as different linear classifiers which attempt to estimate the linear separation implied by the binding energy function. The standard approaches of consensus sequences and profile matrices are described using this framework. A maximum likelihood approach for determining this linear separation leads to a novel matrix type, called the binding matrix. The binding matrix is the most specific matrix based classifier which is consistent with the input set of known binding words. It achieves significant improvements in specificity compared to other matrices. This is demonstrated using 95 sets of experimentally determined binding words provided by the TRANSFAC database.

  10. An Electrostatic Funnel in the GABA-Binding Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy S Carpenter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA-R is a major inhibitory neuroreceptor that is activated by the binding of GABA. The structure of the GABAA-R is well characterized, and many of the binding site residues have been identified. However, most of these residues are obscured behind the C-loop that acts as a cover to the binding site. Thus, the mechanism by which the GABA molecule recognizes the binding site, and the pathway it takes to enter the binding site are both unclear. Through the completion and detailed analysis of 100 short, unbiased, independent molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated this phenomenon of GABA entering the binding site. In each system, GABA was placed quasi-randomly near the binding site of a GABAA-R homology model, and atomistic simulations were carried out to observe the behavior of the GABA molecules. GABA fully entered the binding site in 19 of the 100 simulations. The pathway taken by these molecules was consistent and non-random; the GABA molecules approach the binding site from below, before passing up behind the C-loop and into the binding site. This binding pathway is driven by long-range electrostatic interactions, whereby the electrostatic field acts as a 'funnel' that sweeps the GABA molecules towards the binding site, at which point more specific atomic interactions take over. These findings define a nuanced mechanism whereby the GABAA-R uses the general zwitterionic features of the GABA molecule to identify a potential ligand some 2 nm away from the binding site.

  11. Tension-induced binding of semiflexible biopolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benetatos, Panayotis; Heydt, Alice von der; Zippelius, Annette

    2014-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the effect of polymer tension on the collective behavior of reversibly binding cross-links. For this purpose, we employ a model of two weakly bending wormlike chains aligned in parallel by a tensile force, with a sequence of inter-chain binding sites regularly spaced along the contours. Reversible cross-links attach and detach at the sites with an affinity controlled by a chemical potential. In a mean-field approach, we calculate the free energy of the system and find the emergence of a free-energy barrier which controls the reversible (un)binding. The tension affects the conformational entropy of the chains which competes with the binding energy of the cross-links. This competition gives rise to a sudden increase in the fraction of bound sites as the tension increases. We show that this transition is related to the cross-over between weak and strong localization of a directed polymer in a pinning potential. The cross-over to the strongly bound state can be interpreted as a mechanism for force-stiffening which exceeds the capabilities of single-chain elasticity and thus available only to reversibly cross-linked polymers. (paper)

  12. Optical Binding of Nanowires

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simpson, Stephen Hugh; Zemánek, Pavel; Marago, O.M.; Jones, P.H.; Hanna, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 6 (2017), s. 3485-3492 ISSN 1530-6984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) CNR-16-12 Program:Bilaterální spolupráce Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : optical binding nanowires * Brownian motion * self -organization * non-equilibrium thermodynamics * non-equilibrium steady state * spin-orbit coupling * emergent phenomena Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 12.712, year: 2016

  13. Fucosyl neoglycoprotein binds to mouse epididymal spermatozoa and inhibits sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Y S; Ahn, H S; Gye, M C

    2013-12-01

    Glycan epitopes of cellular glycoconjugates act as versatile biochemical signals, and this sugar coding plays an important role in cell-to-cell recognition processes. In this study, our aims were to determine the distribution of sperm receptors with activity for fucosyl- and galactosyl glycans and to address whether monosugar neoglycoproteins functionally mimic the binding between zona pellucida (ZP) glycoproteins and spermatozoa. In mouse epididymal spermatozoa with intact acrosomes, fucopyranosyl bovine serum albumin (BSA-Fuc) bound to the segment of the acrosome, the equatorial segment, and the postacrosome region of the sperm head. Galactosyl BSA (BSA-Gal) binding activity was similar to that of BSA-Fuc, but was weaker. In acrosome-reacted spermatozoa treated with the Ca(2+) ionophore A23187, BSA-zuc binding was lost in the apical segment of the acrosome but remained in the equatorial segment and postacrosome regions. BSA-Gal binding to the equatorial region was increased. In the presence of 2.5 μg ml(-1) BSA-Fuc, in vitro sperm-ZP binding was significantly decreased, indicating that fucosyl BSA functionally mimics ZP glycoproteins during sperm-egg ZP interactions. At the same concentration, BSA-Gal was not effective. Fucosyl BSA that efficiently inhibited the sperm-ZP binding can mimic the ZP glycoconjugate and has potential for use as a sperm fertility control agent in mouse. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. A look at ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claveria-Gimeno, Rafael; Vega, Sonia; Abian, Olga; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    Drug discovery is a challenging endeavor requiring the interplay of many different research areas. Gathering information on ligand binding thermodynamics may help considerably in reducing the risk within a high uncertainty scenario, allowing early rejection of flawed compounds and pushing forward optimal candidates. In particular, the free energy, the enthalpy, and the entropy of binding provide fundamental information on the intermolecular forces driving such interaction. Areas covered: The authors review the current status and recent developments in the application of ligand binding thermodynamics in drug discovery. The thermodynamic binding profile (Gibbs energy, enthalpy, and entropy of binding) can be used for lead selection and optimization (binding enthalpy, selectivity, and adaptability). Expert opinion: Binding thermodynamics provides fundamental information on the forces driving the formation of the drug-target complex. It has been widely accepted that binding thermodynamics may be used as a decision criterion along the ligand optimization process in drug discovery and development. In particular, the binding enthalpy may be used as a guide when selecting and optimizing compounds over a set of potential candidates. However, this has been recently called into question by arguing certain difficulties and in the light of certain experimental examples.

  15. Synthesis and binding characteristics of N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-[{sup 125}I]-iodophenyl)-N'-methylguanidine ([{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261): a potential SPECT agent for imaging NMDA receptor activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owens, Jonathan E-mail: j.owens@clinmed.gla.ac.uk; Tebbutt, Andrew A.; McGregor, Ailsa L.; Kodama, K.; Magar, Sharad S.; Perlman, Michael E.; Robins, David J.; Durant, Graham J.; McCulloch, James

    2000-06-01

    N-(1-Naphthyl)-N'-(3-[{sup 125}I]-iodophenyl)-N'-methylguanidine ([{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261) was synthesized as a potential radioligand to image N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation. [{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261 was prepared by radioiodination of N-(1-naphthyl)-N'-(3-tributylstannylphenyl)-N'-methylguanidine using Na{sup 125}I and peracetic acid. [{sup 125}I]-CNS 1261 uptake in vivo reflected NMDA receptor distribution in normal rat brain, whereas in ischemic rat brain, uptake was markedly increased in areas of NMDA receptor activation. Radiolabeled CNS 1261 appears to be a good candidate for further development as a single photon emission computed tomography tracer in the investigation of NMDA receptor activation in cerebral ischemia.

  16. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  17. New DNA-binding radioprotectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger

    The normal tissue damage associated with cancer radiotherapy has motivated the development at Peter Mac of a new class of DNA-binding radioprotecting drugs that could be applied top-ically to normal tissues at risk. Methylproamine (MP), the lead compound, reduces radiation induced cell kill at low concentrations. For example, experiments comparing the clonogenic survival of transformed human keratinocytes treated with 30 micromolar MP before and dur-ing various doses of ionising radiation, with the radiation dose response for untreated cells, indicate a dose reduction factor (DRF) of 2. Similar survival curve experiments using various concentrations of MP, with parallel measurements of uptake of MP into cell nuclei, have en-abled the relationship between drug uptake and extent of radioprotection to be established. Radioprotection has also been demonstrated after systemic administration to mice, for three different endpoints, namely lung, jejunum and bone marrow (survival at 30 days post-TBI). The results of pulse radiolysis studies indicated that the drugs act by reduction of transient radiation-induced oxidative species on DNA. This hypothesis was substantiated by the results of experiments in which MP radioprotection of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, assessed as -H2AX foci, in the human keratinocyte cell line. For both endpoints, the extent of radioprotection increased with MP concentration up to a maximal value. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that radioprotection by MP is mediated by attenuation of the extent of initial DNA damage. However, although MP is a potent radioprotector, it becomes cytotoxic at higher concentrations. This limitation has been addressed in an extensive program of lead optimisation and some promising analogues have emerged from which the next lead will be selected. Given the clinical potential of topical radioprotection, the new analogues are being assessed in terms of delivery to mouse oral mucosa. This is

  18. Potential assessment of using fly ash as a binding agent for stabilization and solidification of dredged material; Potentialbedoemning av flygaskor som bindemedelskomponent foer stabilisering och solidifiering (s/s) av muddermassor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsson, Anna; Holm, Goeran; Lagerlund, Johan; Maijala, Aino; Macsik, Josef

    2010-04-15

    Over the next few years, about 200 000-800 000 m3 of contaminated sediments, with a muddy, slimy texture, high water ratio and low strength, shall be dredged annually in the development of ports and maintenance dredging of navigable waterways. Dumping at sea is limited since the dredged materials are contaminated. Land disposal requires transports and land area and is thus high in costs. In the construction of new port areas, large volumes of crushed rock, etc. are normally used as construction filling materials. These materials can be replaced by stabilised and solidified dredged materials, with modified geotechnical properties. The method of stabilising/solidifying (s/s) contaminated dredged materials has been used internationally for a long period of time, and, in more recent years, also in the Nordic countries. In Sweden, for instance, the Port of Gaevle and the Port of Oxeloesund have received permissions to reuse s/s-treated contaminated dredged materials in the port structures. Reuse of the stabilised/solidified masses in a geotechnical structure is supported by the new Framework Directive (2008/98/EC) on waste where great emphasis is placed on recycling. Within the project, fly ashes were inventoried with respect to suitability and availability. Five fly ashes, both individual fly ashes and mixtures of different fly ashes, were investigated in the laboratory as a binder component in a binder mix consisting of 50% cement, 20% Merit 5000 and 30% fly ash. Sediment from the Port of Gaevle were stabilised with a binder mixture amount of 150 kg/m3. Produced samples were examined in terms of strength, permeability and leaching. An assessment of the fly ashes' potential was performed based on technological, environmental and economical aspects, as well as market demand and the acceptance of stabilised and solidified dredged materials as construction material. The results show that fly ash, together in a binder mixture with construction cement and slag cement

  19. Analysis of protein kinase C requirement for exocytosis in permeabilized rat basophilic leukaemia RBL-2H3 cells: a GTP-binding protein(s) as a potential target for protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccione, R; Di Tullio, G; Caretta, M; Marinetti, M R; Bizzarri, C; Francavilla, S; Luini, A; De Matteis, M A

    1994-01-01

    The role of protein kinase C in calcium-dependent exocytosis was investigated in permeabilized rat basophilic leukaemia cells. When protein kinase C was down-regulated by phorbol myristate acetate (1 microM for 3-6 h) or inhibited by pharmacological agents such as calphostin C (1 microM) or a protein kinase C-specific pseudo-substrate peptide inhibitor (100-200 microM), cells lost the ability to secrete in response to 10 microM free Ca2+. In contrast, a short treatment (15 min) with phorbol myristate acetate, which maximally activates protein kinase C, potentiated the effects of calcium. Biochemical analysis of protein kinase C-deprived cells indicated that loss of the Ca(2+)-induced secretory response correlated with disappearance of protein kinase C-alpha. In addition, at the concentrations effective for exocytosis, calcium caused translocation of protein kinase C-alpha to the membrane fraction and stimulated phospholipase C, suggesting that, in permeabilized cells, protein kinase C can be activated by calcium through generation of the phospholipase C metabolite diacylglycerol. The delta, epsilon and zeta Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase C isoenzymes were insensitive to phorbol myristate acetate-induced down-regulation and did not, as expected, translocate to the particulate fraction in response to calcium. Interestingly, secretory competence was restored in cells depleted of protein kinase C or in which protein kinase C itself was inhibited by non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, but not by GTP, suggesting that protein kinase C might regulate the ability of a G protein(s) directly controlling the exocytotic machinery to be activated by endogenous GTP. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8129713

  20. Beyond Thermodynamics: Drug Binding Kinetics Could Influence Epidermal Growth Factor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Mayank; Rizzo, Michael; Schumacher, Frank; Wong, Chung F.

    2009-01-01

    We modeled the kinetics of drug binding to protein kinases in the EGF signaling pathway relevant to non-small cell lung cancer and found that binding kinetics could influence therapeutic potential, that fast binding kinetics was advantageous for most targets with a couple of exceptions, that targeting some protein kinases could enhance rather than attenuate the pathway, and that IC50 could be sensitive to the kinetic parameters of drug binding. PMID:19702309

  1. Ail binding to fibronectin facilitates Yersinia pestis binding to host cells and Yop delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Tiffany M; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S

    2010-08-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, evades host immune responses and rapidly causes disease. The Y. pestis adhesin Ail mediates host cell binding and is critical for Yop delivery. To identify the Ail receptor(s), Ail was purified following overexpression in Escherichia coli. Ail bound specifically to fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein with the potential to act as a bridge between Ail and host cells. Ail expressed by E. coli also mediated binding to purified fibronectin, and Ail-mediated E. coli adhesion to host cells was dependent on fibronectin. Ail expressed by Y. pestis bound purified fibronectin, as did the Y. pestis adhesin plasminogen activator (Pla). However, a KIM5 Delta ail mutant had decreased binding to host cells, while a KIM5 Delta pla mutant had no significant defect in adhesion. Furthermore, treatment with antifibronectin antibodies decreased Ail-mediated adhesion by KIM5 and the KIM5 Delta pla mutant, indicating that the Ail-fibronectin interaction was important for cell binding. Finally, antifibronectin antibodies inhibited the KIM5-mediated cytotoxicity of host cells in an Ail-dependent fashion. These data indicate that Ail is a key adhesin that mediates binding to host cells through interaction with fibronectin on the surface of host cells, and this interaction is important for Yop delivery by Y. pestis.

  2. Ail Binding to Fibronectin Facilitates Yersinia pestis Binding to Host Cells and Yop Delivery▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Tiffany M.; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S.

    2010-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, evades host immune responses and rapidly causes disease. The Y. pestis adhesin Ail mediates host cell binding and is critical for Yop delivery. To identify the Ail receptor(s), Ail was purified following overexpression in Escherichia coli. Ail bound specifically to fibronectin, an extracellular matrix protein with the potential to act as a bridge between Ail and host cells. Ail expressed by E. coli also mediated binding to purified fibronectin, and Ail-mediated E. coli adhesion to host cells was dependent on fibronectin. Ail expressed by Y. pestis bound purified fibronectin, as did the Y. pestis adhesin plasminogen activator (Pla). However, a KIM5 Δail mutant had decreased binding to host cells, while a KIM5 Δpla mutant had no significant defect in adhesion. Furthermore, treatment with antifibronectin antibodies decreased Ail-mediated adhesion by KIM5 and the KIM5 Δpla mutant, indicating that the Ail-fibronectin interaction was important for cell binding. Finally, antifibronectin antibodies inhibited the KIM5-mediated cytotoxicity of host cells in an Ail-dependent fashion. These data indicate that Ail is a key adhesin that mediates binding to host cells through interaction with fibronectin on the surface of host cells, and this interaction is important for Yop delivery by Y. pestis. PMID:20498264

  3. Intentional binding of visual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Miriam; Thomaschke, Roland; Kiesel, Andrea

    2018-04-01

    When an action produces an effect, the effect is perceived earlier in time compared to a stimulus without preceding action. This temporal bias is called intentional binding (IB) and serves as an implicit measure of sense of agency. Typically, IB is investigated by presenting a rotating clock hand while participants execute an action and perceive a resulting tone. Participants are asked to estimate the time point of tone onset by referring to the clock hand position. This time point estimate is compared to a time point estimate of a tone in a condition in which the tone occurs without preceding action. Studies employing this classic clock paradigm employed auditory action effects. We modified this paradigm to investigate potential IB of visual action effects, and, additionally, to investigate how IB differs for visual action effects (Experiment 1) in comparison to auditory action effects (Experiment 2). Our results show that, like the IB of an auditory effect, the time point of a visual action effect is shifted toward the causing action, and that the size of the IB depends on the delay duration of the effect. Comparable to auditory action effects, earlier action effects showed stronger IB compared to later action effects. Yet overall IB of the visual effects was weaker than IB of the auditory effects. As IB is seen as an indicator of sense of agency, this may have important implications for the design of human-machine interfaces.

  4. Pictorial binding: endeavor to classify

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinchenko S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the classification of bindings of the 1-19th centuries with a unique and untypical book binding decoration technique (encaustic, tempera and oil paintings. Analysis of design features, materials and techniques of art decoration made it possible to identify them as a separate type - pictorial bindings and divide them into four groups. The first group consists of Coptic bindings, decorated with icon-painting images in encaustic technique. The second group is made up of leather Western bindings of the 13-14th centuries, which have the decoration and technique of ornamentation close to iconography. The third group involves parchment bindings, ornamentation technique of which is closer to the miniature. The last group comprises bindings of East Slavic origin of the 15-19th centuries, decorated with icon-painting pictures made in the technique of tempera or oil painting. The proposed classification requires further basic research as several specific kinds of bindings have not yet been investigated

  5. Flavonoids with M1 Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Binding Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyyammai Swaminathan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-active compounds have potential for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. In this study, a series of natural and synthetic flavones and flavonols was assayed in vitro for their ability to inhibit radioligand binding at human cloned M1 muscarinic receptors. Several compounds were found to possess competitive binding affinity (Ki = 40–110 µM, comparable to that of acetylcholine (Ki = 59 µM. Despite the fact that these compounds lack a positively-charged ammonium group under physiological conditions, molecular modelling studies suggested that they bind to the orthosteric site of the receptor, mainly through non-polar interactions.

  6. Metal binding by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Ning

    For calcium binding: Electrochemical method (calcium ion selective electrode) combined with quantum mechanical calculations (density functional theory) were used to investigate the calcium binding affinity of the amino acids and small glycine peptides. The effects of the ionic strength and p......, synergistic effect in calcium binding was found for the small glycine peptide rather than amino acids mixtures with the enhanced driving force up to -6 kJ/mol. Such study provides useful information for the future development of calcium supplements. For zinc binding: Isothermal titration calorimetry...... titration calorimetry and quantum mechanical calculations. This is due to the zinc binding affinity of the relatively softer ligands (investigated food components) will become much stronger than citrate or phytate when they present together in aqueous solution. This mechanism indicates these food components...

  7. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  8. Two Unique Ligand-Binding Clamps of Rhizopus oryzae Starch Binding Domain for Helical Structure Disruption of Amylose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Ying; Ci, Yuan-Pei; Chou, Wei-I; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chou, Wei-Yao; Li, Kun-Mou; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2012-01-01

    The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD) has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21) members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs. PMID:22815939

  9. Brain imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in humans with [11C]SB207145-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological stimulation of the serotonin 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor has shown promise for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and major depression. A new selective radioligand, [(11)C]SB207145, for positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify brain 5-HT(4) receptors in sixteen healthy...... is expected to increase competition from endogenous serotonin. Given radiotracer administration at a range of specific activities, we were able to use the individual BP(ND) measurements for population-based estimation of the saturation binding parameters; B(max) ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 nM. B......(max) was in accordance with post-mortem brain studies (Spearman's r=0.83, p=0.04), and the regional binding potentials, BP(ND), were on average 2.6 in striatum, 0.42 in prefrontal cortex, and 0.91 in hippocampus. We found no effect of sex but a decreased binding with age (p=0.046). A power analysis showed that, given...

  10. Tracer Kinetic Analysis of (S)-¹⁸F-THK5117 as a PET Tracer for Assessing Tau Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonasson, My; Wall, Anders; Chiotis, Konstantinos; Saint-Aubert, Laure; Wilking, Helena; Sprycha, Margareta; Borg, Beatrice; Thibblin, Alf; Eriksson, Jonas; Sörensen, Jens; Antoni, Gunnar; Nordberg, Agneta; Lubberink, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Because a correlation between tau pathology and the clinical symptoms of Alzheimer disease (AD) has been hypothesized, there is increasing interest in developing PET tracers that bind specifically to tau protein. The aim of this study was to evaluate tracer kinetic models for quantitative analysis and generation of parametric images for the novel tau ligand (S)-(18)F-THK5117. Nine subjects (5 with AD, 4 with mild cognitive impairment) received a 90-min dynamic (S)-(18)F-THK5117 PET scan. Arterial blood was sampled for measurement of blood radioactivity and metabolite analysis. Volume-of-interest (VOI)-based analysis was performed using plasma-input models; single-tissue and 2-tissue (2TCM) compartment models and plasma-input Logan and reference tissue models; and simplified reference tissue model (SRTM), reference Logan, and SUV ratio (SUVr). Cerebellum gray matter was used as the reference region. Voxel-level analysis was performed using basis function implementations of SRTM, reference Logan, and SUVr. Regionally averaged voxel values were compared with VOI-based values from the optimal reference tissue model, and simulations were made to assess accuracy and precision. In addition to 90 min, initial 40- and 60-min data were analyzed. Plasma-input Logan distribution volume ratio (DVR)-1 values agreed well with 2TCM DVR-1 values (R(2)= 0.99, slope = 0.96). SRTM binding potential (BP(ND)) and reference Logan DVR-1 values were highly correlated with plasma-input Logan DVR-1 (R(2)= 1.00, slope ≈ 1.00) whereas SUVr(70-90)-1 values correlated less well and overestimated binding. Agreement between parametric methods and SRTM was best for reference Logan (R(2)= 0.99, slope = 1.03). SUVr(70-90)-1 values were almost 3 times higher than BP(ND) values in white matter and 1.5 times higher in gray matter. Simulations showed poorer accuracy and precision for SUVr(70-90)-1 values than for the other reference methods. SRTM BP(ND) and reference Logan DVR-1 values were not

  11. Improved Density Functional Tight Binding Potentials for Metalloid Aluminum Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    approach, using solution chemistry methods to grow small metal clusters with a single monolayer of organic ligand on their surface. These may offer the...These liquids are then used for solution growth of larger clusters, which includes a ligand exchange process with, most commonly, cyclopentadienyl...derived in DFT. For the many body problem of a system consisting of nuclei and electrons, the total energy can be written as [3]: ext ee IIE T E

  12. Studies on potential of Portland cement mortar for binding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The investigation of heavy metal leaching and physicochemical properties of cement-solidified waterworks sludge (CMWWS) formed by incorporating waterworks sludge (WWS) into cement mortar was carried out. The chemical composition, compressive strength and other physicochemical properties of the CMWWS cube ...

  13. Studies on potential of Portland cement mortar for binding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paramalinggam Thanalechumi

    3 Construction Research Centre (CRC), Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM),. 81310 Johor Bahru, Johor ... the WWS and CMWWS containing up to 10% WWS can be used as construction material. Keywords. Leaching ..... disposal of drinking water treatment plant residue. In: Pro- ceedings of ...

  14. Studies on potential of Portland cement mortar for binding of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Paramalinggam Thanalechumi

    about constructive approaches of reuse of water treatment sludge in various categories including construction mate- rials. However, option of using the solidification–stabili- sation (S/S) technique, to incorporate Malaysian WWS into cement mortar (CM) to produce a cement mortar-water- works composite referred to as ...

  15. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences.

  16. Pro DNS and BIND 10

    CERN Document Server

    Aitchison, Ron

    2011-01-01

    Pro DNS and BIND 10 guides you through the challenging array of features surrounding DNS with a special focus on the latest release of BIND, the world's most popular DNS implementation. This book unravels the mysteries of DNS, offering insight into origins, evolution, and key concepts like domain names and zone files. This book focuses on running DNS systems based on BIND 10, the first stable release that includes support for the latest DNSSEC standards. Whether you administer a DNS system, are thinking about running one, or you simply want to understand the DNS system, then this book for you.

  17. Protein binding of psychotropic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Based upon fluorescence measurements, protein binding of some psychotropic agents (chlorpromazine, promethazine, and trifluoperazine) to human IgG and HSA was studied in aqueous cacodylate buffer, PH7. The interaction parameters determined from emission quenching of the proteins. The interaction parameters determined include the equilibrium constant (K), calculated from equations derived by Borazan and coworkers, the number of binding sites (n) available to the monomer molecules on a single protein molecule. The results revealed a high level of affinity, as reflected by high values of K, and the existence of specific binding sites, since a limited number of n values are obtained. 39 tabs.; 37 figs.; 83 refs

  18. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potentialBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  19. SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... Syndrome CME. Medscape From Nature Clinical Practice Endocrinology & Metabolism [On-line information]. Available online at http://www. ...

  20. What Happened to the IGF Binding Proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Leon A

    2018-02-01

    Insulinlike growth factor (IGF) binding proteins (IGFBPs) 1 to 6 are high-affinity regulators of IGF activity. They generally inhibit IGF actions by preventing binding to the IGF-I receptor but can also enhance their actions under some conditions. Posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation modulate IGFBP properties, and IGFBP proteolysis results in IGF release. IGFBPs have more recently been shown to have IGF-independent actions. A number of mechanisms are involved, including modulation of other growth factor pathways, nuclear localization and transcriptional regulation, interaction with the sphingolipid pathway, and binding to non-IGF biomolecules in the extracellular space and matrix, on the cell surface and intracellularly. IGFBPs modulate important biological processes, including cell proliferation, survival, migration, senescence, autophagy, and angiogenesis. Their actions have been implicated in growth, metabolism, cancer, stem cell maintenance and differentiation, and immune regulation. Recent studies have shown that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the regulation of IGFBP abundance. A more complete understanding of IGFBP biology is necessary to further define their cellular roles and determine their therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2018 Endocrine Society.

  1. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...... and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...

  2. Further biochemical characterization of Mycobacterium leprae laminin-binding proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.M. Marques

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that the alpha2 chain of laminin-2 present on the surface of Schwann cells is involved in the process of attachment of Mycobacterium leprae to these cells. Searching for M. leprae laminin-binding molecules, in a previous study we isolated and characterized the cationic proteins histone-like protein (Hlp and ribosomal proteins S4 and S5 as potential adhesins involved in M. leprae-Schwann cell interaction. Hlp was shown to bind alpha2-laminins and to greatly enhance the attachment of mycobacteria to ST88-14 Schwann cells. In the present study, we investigated the laminin-binding capacity of the ribosomal proteins S4 and S5. The genes coding for these proteins were PCR amplified and their recombinant products were shown to bind alpha2-laminins in overlay assays. However, when tested in ELISA-based assays and in adhesion assays with ST88-14 cells, in contrast to Hlp, S4 and S5 failed to bind laminin and act as adhesins. The laminin-binding property and adhesin capacity of two basic host-derived proteins were also tested, and only histones, but not cytochrome c, were able to increase bacterial attachment to ST88-14 cells. Our data suggest that the alanine/lysine-rich sequences shared by Hlp and eukaryotic H1 histones might be involved in the binding of these cationic proteins to laminin.

  3. Intrinsic thermodynamics of inhibitor binding to human carbonic anhydrase IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linkuvienė, Vaida; Matulienė, Jurgita; Juozapaitienė, Vaida; Michailovienė, Vilma; Jachno, Jelena; Matulis, Daumantas

    2016-04-01

    Human carbonic anhydrase 9th isoform (CA IX) is an important marker of numerous cancers and is increasingly interesting as a potential anticancer drug target. Various synthetic aromatic sulfonamide-bearing compounds are being designed as potent inhibitors of CA IX. However, sulfonamide compound binding to CA IX is linked to several reactions, the deprotonation of the sulfonamide amino group and the protonation of the CA active site Zn(II)-bound hydroxide. These linked reactions significantly affect the affinities and other thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpies and entropies of binding. The observed and intrinsic affinities of compound binding to CA IX were determined by the fluorescent thermal shift assay. The enthalpies and entropies of binding were determined by the isothermal titration calorimetry. The pKa of CA IX was determined to be 6.8 and the enthalpy of CA IX-Zn(II)-bound hydroxide protonation was -24 kJ/mol. These values enabled the analysis of intrinsic thermodynamics of a library of compounds binding to CA IX. The most strongly binding compounds exhibited the intrinsic affinity of 0.01 nM and the observed affinity of 2 nM. The intrinsic thermodynamic parameters of compound binding to CA IX helped to draw the compound structure to thermodynamics relationship. It is important to distinguish the intrinsic from observed parameters of any disease target protein interaction with its inhibitors as drug candidates when drawing detailed compound structure to thermodynamics correlations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Pressure locking and thermal binding represent potential common mode failure mechanisms that can cause safety-related power-operated gate valves to fail in the closed position, thus rendering redundant safety-related systems incapable of performing their safety functions. Supplement 6 to Generic Letter 89-10, {open_quotes}Safety-Related Motor-Operated Gate Valve Testing and Surveillance,{close_quotes} provided an acceptable approach to addressing pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves. More recently, the NRC has issued Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves,{close_quotes} to request that licensees take certain actions to ensure that safety-related power-operated gate valves that are susceptible to pressure locking or thermal binding are capable of performing their safety functions within the current licensing bases. Over the past two years, several plants in Region I determined that valves in certain systems were potentially susceptible to pressure locking and thermal binding, and have taken various corrective actions. The NRC Region I Systems Engineering Branch has been actively involved in the inspection of licensee actions in response to the pressure locking and thermal binding issue. Region I continues to maintain an active involvement in this area, including participation with the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation in reviewing licensee responses to Generic Letter 95-07.

  5. Using the fast fourier transform in binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Minh, David D L

    2018-04-30

    According to implicit ligand theory, the standard binding free energy is an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF), an exponential average of the interaction energy between the unbound ligand ensemble and a rigid receptor. Here, we use the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to efficiently evaluate BPMFs by calculating interaction energies when rigid ligand configurations from the unbound ensemble are discretely translated across rigid receptor conformations. Results for standard binding free energies between T4 lysozyme and 141 small organic molecules are in good agreement with previous alchemical calculations based on (1) a flexible complex ( R≈0.9 for 24 systems) and (2) flexible ligand with multiple rigid receptor configurations ( R≈0.8 for 141 systems). While the FFT is routinely used for molecular docking, to our knowledge this is the first time that the algorithm has been used for rigorous binding free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  7. Binding of ethyl pyruvate to bovine serum albumin: Calorimetric, spectroscopic and molecular docking studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Mallika [Department of Chemistry, Miranda House, University of Delhi, Delhi 11007 (India); Mishra, Rashmi; Agarwala, Paban K. [Department of Radiation Genetics and Epigenetics, Division of Radioprotective Drug Development Research, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi 110054 (India); Ojha, Himanshu, E-mail: himanshu.drdo@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Genetics and Epigenetics, Division of Radioprotective Drug Development Research, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi 110054 (India); Singh, Bhawna [Department of Radiation Genetics and Epigenetics, Division of Radioprotective Drug Development Research, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi 110054 (India); Singh, Anju; Kukreti, Shrikant [Nucleic Acid Research Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 11007 (India)

    2016-06-10

    Highlights: • ITC study showed binding of ethyl pyruvate with BSA with high binding affinity. • Ethyl pyruvate binding caused conformation alteration of BSA. • Fluorescence quenching mechanism is static in nature. • Electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces involved in binding. • Docking confirmed role of electrostatic, hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic forces. - Abstract: Various in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the anti-inflammatory and anticancer potential role of ethyl pyruvate. Bio-distribution of drugs is significantly influenced by the drug-serum protein binding. Therefore, the binding mechanism of the ethyl pyruvate with bovine serum albumin was investigated using UV–vis absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism, isothermal titration calorimetry and molecular docking techniques. Absorption and fluorescence quenching studies indicated the binding of ethyl pyruvate with protein. Circular dichroism spectra of bovine serum albumin confirmed significant change in the conformation of protein upon binding. Thermodynamic data confirmed that ethyl pyruvate binds to bovine serum albumin at the two different sites with high affinity. Binding of ethyl pyruvate to bovine serum albumin involves hydrogen bonding, van der Waal and hydrophobic interactions. Further, docking studies indicated that ethyl pyruvate could bind significantly at the three binding sites. The results will definitely contribute to the development of ethyl pyruvate as drug.

  8. Building up analgesia in humans via the endogenous μ-opioid system by combining placebo and active tDCS: a preliminary report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F DosSantos

    Full Text Available Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS is a method of non-invasive brain stimulation that has been frequently used in experimental and clinical pain studies. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying tDCS-mediated pain control, and most important its placebo component, are not completely established. In this pilot study, we investigated in vivo the involvement of the endogenous μ-opioid system in the global tDCS-analgesia experience. Nine healthy volunteers went through positron emission tomography (PET scans with [11C]carfentanil, a selective μ-opioid receptor (MOR radiotracer, to measure the central MOR activity during tDCS in vivo (non-displaceable binding potential, BPND--one of the main analgesic mechanisms in the brain. Placebo and real anodal primary motor cortex (M1/2mA tDCS were delivered sequentially for 20 minutes each during the PET scan. The initial placebo tDCS phase induced a decrease in MOR BPND in the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG, precuneus, and thalamus, indicating activation of endogenous μ-opioid neurotransmission, even before the active tDCS. The subsequent real tDCS also induced MOR activation in the PAG and precuneus, which were positively correlated to the changes observed with placebo tDCS. Nonetheless, real tDCS had an additional MOR activation in the left prefrontal cortex. Although significant changes in the MOR BPND occurred with both placebo and real tDCS, significant analgesic effects, measured by improvements in the heat and cold pain thresholds, were only observed after real tDCS, not the placebo tDCS. This study gives preliminary evidence that the analgesic effects reported with M1-tDCS, can be in part related to the recruitment of the same endogenous MOR mechanisms induced by placebo, and that such effects can be purposely optimized by real tDCS.

  9. Striatal dopamine release and genetic variation of the serotonin 2C receptor in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Brian J; Sanford, Benjamin J; Love, Tiffany M; Shen, Pei-Hong; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Stohler, Christian S; Goldman, David; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2012-07-04

    Mesoaccumbal and nigrostriatal projections are sensitive to stress, and heightened stress sensitivity is thought to confer risk for neuropsychiatric disorders. Serotonin 2C (5-HT(2C)) receptors mediate the inhibitory effects of serotonin on dopaminergic circuitry in experimental animals, and preclinical findings have implicated 5-HT(2C) receptors in motivated behaviors and psychotropic drug mechanisms. In humans, a common missense single-nucleotide change (rs6318, Cys23Ser) in the 5-HT(2C) receptor gene (HTR2C) has been associated with altered activity in vitro and with clinical mood disorders. We hypothesized that dopaminergic circuitry would be more sensitive to stress in humans carrying the Ser23 variant. To test this hypothesis, we studied 54 healthy humans using positron emission tomography and the displaceable D(2)/D(3) receptor radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride. Binding potential (BP(ND)) was quantified before and after a standardized stress challenge consisting of 20 min of moderate deep muscular pain, and reduction in BP(ND) served as an index of dopamine release. The Cys23Ser variant was genotyped on a custom array, and ancestry informative markers were used to control for population stratification. We found greater dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, caudate nucleus, and putamen among Ser23 carriers, after controlling for sex, age, and ancestry. Genotype accounted for 12% of the variance in dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. There was no association of Cys23Ser with baseline BP(ND). These findings indicate that a putatively functional HTR2C variant (Ser23) is associated with greater striatal dopamine release during pain in healthy humans. Mesoaccumbal stress sensitivity may mediate the effects of HTR2C variation on risk of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. DNA and RNA Quadruplex-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Brázda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Four-stranded DNA structures were structurally characterized in vitro by NMR, X-ray and Circular Dichroism spectroscopy in detail. Among the different types of quadruplexes (i-Motifs, minor groove quadruplexes, G-quadruplexes, etc., the best described are G-quadruplexes which are featured by Hoogsteen base-paring. Sequences with the potential to form quadruplexes are widely present in genome of all organisms. They are found often in repetitive sequences such as telomeric ones, and also in promoter regions and 5' non-coding sequences. Recently, many proteins with binding affinity to G-quadruplexes have been identified. One of the initially portrayed G-rich regions, the human telomeric sequence (TTAGGGn, is recognized by many proteins which can modulate telomerase activity. Sequences with the potential to form G-quadruplexes are often located in promoter regions of various oncogenes. The NHE III1 region of the c-MYC promoter has been shown to interact with nucleolin protein as well as other G-quadruplex-binding proteins. A number of G-rich sequences are also present in promoter region of estrogen receptor alpha. In addition to DNA quadruplexes, RNA quadruplexes, which are critical in translational regulation, have also been predicted and observed. For example, the RNA quadruplex formation in telomere-repeat-containing RNA is involved in interaction with TRF2 (telomere repeat binding factor 2 and plays key role in telomere regulation. All these fundamental examples suggest the importance of quadruplex structures in cell processes and their understanding may provide better insight into aging and disease development.

  11. A mosquito hemolymph odorant-binding protein family member specifically binds juvenile hormone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Hwan; Pham, Van; Jablonka, Willy; Goodman, Walter G.; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Andersen, John F.

    2017-07-27

    Juvenile hormone (JH) is a key regulator of insect development and reproduction. In adult mosquitoes, it is essential for maturation of the ovary and normal male reproductive behavior, but how JH distribution and activity is regulated after secretion is unclear. Here, we report a new type of specific JH-binding protein, given the name mosquito juvenile hormone-binding protein (mJHBP), which circulates in the hemolymph of pupal and adult Aedes aegypti males and females. mJHBP is a member of the odorant-binding protein (OBP) family, and orthologs are present in the genomes of Aedes, Culex, and Anopheles mosquito species. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that mJHBP specifically binds JH II and JH III but not eicosanoids or JH derivatives. mJHBP was crystallized in the presence of JH III and found to have a double OBP domain structure reminiscent of salivary “long” D7 proteins of mosquitoes. We observed that a single JH III molecule is contained in the N-terminal domain binding pocket that is closed in an apparent conformational change by a C-terminal domain-derived α-helix. The electron density for the ligand indicated a high occupancy of the natural 10R enantiomer of JH III. Of note, mJHBP is structurally unrelated to hemolymph JHBP from lepidopteran insects. A low level of expression of mJHBP in Ae. aegypti larvae suggests that it is primarily active during the adult stage where it could potentially influence the effects of JH on egg development, mating behavior, feeding, or other processes.

  12. Extrastriatal binding of [¹²³I]FP-CIT in the thalamus and pons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Walter; Unterrainer, Marcus; Xiong, Guoming

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Apart from binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT), [(123)I]FP-CIT shows moderate affinity for the serotonin transporter (SERT), allowing imaging of both monoamine transporters in a single imaging session in different brain areas. The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate...... extrastriatal binding (predominantly due to SERT) and its age and gender dependencies in a large cohort of healthy controls. METHODS: SPECT data from 103 healthy controls with well-defined criteria of normality acquired at 13 different imaging centres were analysed for extrastriatal binding using volumes...... of interest analysis for the thalamus and the pons. Data were examined for gender and age effects as well as for potential influence of striatal DAT radiotracer binding. RESULTS: Thalamic binding was significantly higher than pons binding. Partial correlations showed an influence of putaminal DAT binding...

  13. SCOWLP classification: Structural comparison and analysis of protein binding regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detailed information about protein interactions is critical for our understanding of the principles governing protein recognition mechanisms. The structures of many proteins have been experimentally determined in complex with different ligands bound either in the same or different binding regions. Thus, the structural interactome requires the development of tools to classify protein binding regions. A proper classification may provide a general view of the regions that a protein uses to bind others and also facilitate a detailed comparative analysis of the interacting information for specific protein binding regions at atomic level. Such classification might be of potential use for deciphering protein interaction networks, understanding protein function, rational engineering and design. Description Protein binding regions (PBRs might be ideally described as well-defined separated regions that share no interacting residues one another. However, PBRs are often irregular, discontinuous and can share a wide range of interacting residues among them. The criteria to define an individual binding region can be often arbitrary and may differ from other binding regions within a protein family. Therefore, the rational behind protein interface classification should aim to fulfil the requirements of the analysis to be performed. We extract detailed interaction information of protein domains, peptides and interfacial solvent from the SCOWLP database and we classify the PBRs of each domain family. For this purpose, we define a similarity index based on the overlapping of interacting residues mapped in pair-wise structural alignments. We perform our classification with agglomerative hierarchical clustering using the complete-linkage method. Our classification is calculated at different similarity cut-offs to allow flexibility in the analysis of PBRs, feature especially interesting for those protein families with conflictive binding regions

  14. Water binding in legume seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertucci, C. W.; Leopold, A. C.

    1987-01-01

    The physical status of water in seeds has a pivotal role in determining the physiological reactions that can take place in the dry state. Using water sorption isotherms from cotyledon and axis tissue of five leguminous seeds, the strength of water binding and the numbers of binding sites have been estimated using van't Hoff analyses and the D'Arcy/Watt equation. These parameters of water sorption are calculated for each of the three regions of water binding and for a range of temperatures. Water sorption characteristics are reflective of the chemical composition of the biological materials as well as the temperature at which hydration takes place. Changes in the sorption characteristics with temperature and hydration level may suggest hydration-induced structural changes in cellular components.

  15. Pair potentials for fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskes, M.I.; Melius, C.F.

    1979-01-01

    Long-range pair potentials are presented for the fcc metals Ni, Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Cu, and Al. Experimental data considered in deriving the potentials include the sublimination energies and stacking-fault energies as well as the lattice parameters, elastic constants, and vacancy-formation and -migration energies. A volume-dependent energy term has been included in the potentials. By scaling the potentials with respect to lattice spacing and a characteristic binding energy, a striking similarity can be seen between the various potentials. These potentials have been used to calculate a variety of point-defect properties including self-interstitial geometries and migration energies. In addition the migration energy of helium and its binding energy to a vacancy have been calculated

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ji-Long; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Li, Zheng-Qiang; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2012-01-01

    The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA) is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM) from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF) based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest ligand's binding to nicotinamidase/pyrazinamidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Long Zhang

    Full Text Available The research on the binding process of ligand to pyrazinamidase (PncA is crucial for elucidating the inherent relationship between resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and PncA's activity. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD simulation methods were performed to investigate the unbinding process of nicotinamide (NAM from two PncA enzymes, which is the reverse of the corresponding binding process. The calculated potential of mean force (PMF based on the steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations sheds light on an optimal binding/unbinding pathway of the ligand. The comparative analyses between two PncAs clearly exhibit the consistency of the binding/unbinding pathway in the two enzymes, implying the universality of the pathway in all kinds of PncAs. Several important residues dominating the pathway were also determined by the calculation of interaction energies. The structural change of the proteins induced by NAM's unbinding or binding shows the great extent interior motion in some homologous region adjacent to the active sites of the two PncAs. The structure comparison substantiates that this region should be very important for the ligand's binding in all PncAs. Additionally, MD simulations also show that the coordination position of the ligand is displaced by one water molecule in the unliganded enzymes. These results could provide the more penetrating understanding of drug resistance of M. tuberculosis and be helpful for the development of new antituberculosis drugs.

  18. Molecular imaging in the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease: visual assessment of [11C]PIB and [18F]FDDNP PET images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolboom, Nelleke; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Boverhoff, Jolanda; Yaqub, Maqsood; Wattjes, Mike P; Raijmakers, Pieter G; Barkhof, Frederik; Scheltens, Philip; Herholz, Karl; Lammertsma, Adriaan A; van Berckel, Bart N M

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate visual assessment of [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDDNP PET images as potential supportive diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Twenty-one AD patients and 20 controls were included. Parametric [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDDNP global binding potential (BP(ND)) images were visually rated as 'AD' or 'normal.' Data were compared with ratings of [(18)F]FDG PET images and MRI-derived medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) scores. Inter-rater agreement and agreement with clinical diagnosis were assessed for all imaging modalities. In addition, cut-off values for quantitative global [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDDNP BP(ND) were determined. Visual ratings were compared with dichotomised quantitative values. Agreement between readers was excellent for [(11)C]PIB, [(18)F]FDDNP and MTA (Cohen kappa kappa> or =0.85) and moderate for [(18)F]FDG (kappa=0.56). The highest sensitivity was found for [(11)C]PIB and [(18)F]FDG (both 1.0). The highest specificity was found for MTA (0.90) and [(11)C]PIB (0.85). [(18)F]FDDNP had the lowest sensitivity and specificity (0.67 and 0.53, respectively). The cut-off for quantitative [(11)C]PIB BP(ND) was 0.54 (sensitivity and specificity both 0.95) and for [(18)F]FDDNP BP(ND) 0.07 (sensitivity 0.80, specificity 0.73). Agreement between quantitative analyses and visual ratings was excellent for [(11)C]PIB (kappa=0.85) and fair for [(18)F]FDDNP (kappa=0.40). Visual assessment of [(11)C]PIB images was straightforward and accurate, showing promise as a supportive diagnostic marker for AD. Moreover, [(11)C]PIB showed the best combination of sensitivity and specificity. Visual assessment of [(18)F]FDDNP images was insufficient. The quantitative analysis of [(18)F]FDDNP data showed a considerably higher diagnostic value than the visual analysis.

  19. Progress on the application of ligand receptor binding assays in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xue; Qian Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Receptor binding assay is an important drug screening method, which can quickly and inexpensively study the interactions between the targeted receptor and the potential ligands in vitro and provide the information of the relative binding affinity of ligand-receptor. The imaging of many radiopharmaceuticals is based on highly selective radioligand-receptor binding. The technique plays an important role in the design and screening of receptor-targeting radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  20. When is protein binding important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuberger, Jules; Schmidt, Stephan; Derendorf, Hartmut

    2013-09-01

    The present paper is an ode to a classic citation by Benet and Hoener (2002. Clin Pharm Ther 71(3):115-121). The now classic paper had a huge impact on drug development and the way the issue of protein binding is perceived and interpreted. Although the authors very clearly pointed out the limitations and underlying assumptions for their delineations, these are too often overlooked and the classic paper's message is misinterpreted by broadening to cases that were not intended. Some members of the scientific community concluded from the paper that protein binding is not important. This was clearly not intended by the authors, as they finished their paper with a paragraph entitled: "When is protein binding important?" Misinterpretation of the underlying assumptions in the classic work can result in major pitfalls in drug development. Therefore, we revisit the topic of protein binding with the intention of clarifying when clinically relevant changes should be considered during drug development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  2. Thermodynamics of the DNA binding of phenothiazinium dyes toluidine blue O, azure A and azure B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Puja; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • DNA binding of toluidine blue O, azure A and azure B was driven by negative enthalpy and positive entropy changes. • The DNA binding affinity of the dyes varied as toluidine blue O > azure A > azure B. • The small heat capacity changes indicated hydrophobic contribution in the binding process. • The salt dependent study suggested involvement of weak electrostatic interactions. • DNA thermal stabilization varied as toluidine blue O > azure A > azure B. -- Abstract: The DNA binding of toluidine blue O (TBO), azure A and azure B was characterised by isothermal titration calorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and thermal melting studies. The DNA binding affinity of TBO was the highest followed by azure A and azure B. The binding in each case was exothermic with a positive entropy change. The affinity of the binding decreased as the [Na + ] concentration increased. The non electrostatic contribution to the standard Gibbs energy remained the same over the range of (10 to 100) mM [Na + ]. The negative change in heat capacity of the binding revealed a substantial hydrophobic contribution in the DNA binding of these dyes. An enthalpy–entropy compensation was observed in each system. The binding of these dyes stabilised the DNA against thermal strand separation. The energetics of the DNA binding of these dyes correlate well with the structural data that suggest their utility as potential DNA targeting agents

  3. Determining Membrane Protein-Lipid Binding Thermodynamics Using Native Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiao; Liu, Yang; Liu, Wen; Liang, Xiaowen; Russell, David H; Laganowsky, Arthur

    2016-04-06

    Membrane proteins are embedded in the biological membrane where the chemically diverse lipid environment can modulate their structure and function. However, the thermodynamics governing the molecular recognition and interaction of lipids with membrane proteins is poorly understood. Here, we report a method using native mass spectrometry (MS), to determine thermodynamics of individual ligand binding events to proteins. Unlike conventional methods, native MS can resolve individual ligand binding events and, coupled with an apparatus to control the temperature, determine binding thermodynamic parameters, such as for protein-lipid interactions. We validated our approach using three soluble protein-ligand systems (maltose binding protein, lysozyme, and nitrogen regulatory protein) and obtained similar results to those using isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance. We also determined for the first time the thermodynamics of individual lipid binding to the ammonia channel (AmtB), an integral membrane protein from Escherichia coli. Remarkably, we observed distinct thermodynamic signatures for the binding of different lipids and entropy-enthalpy compensation for binding lipids of variable chain length. Additionally, using a mutant form of AmtB that abolishes a specific phosphatidylglycerol (PG) binding site, we observed distinct changes in the thermodynamic signatures for binding PG, implying these signatures can identify key residues involved in specific lipid binding and potentially differentiate between specific lipid binding sites.

  4. Mapping small molecule binding data to structural domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Felix A; Rostom, Raghd; Overington, John P

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale bioactivity/SAR Open Data has recently become available, and this has allowed new analyses and approaches to be developed to help address the productivity and translational gaps of current drug discovery. One of the current limitations of these data is the relative sparsity of reported interactions per protein target, and complexities in establishing clear relationships between bioactivity and targets using bioinformatics tools. We detail in this paper the indexing of targets by the structural domains that bind (or are likely to bind) the ligand within a full-length protein. Specifically, we present a simple heuristic to map small molecule binding to Pfam domains. This profiling can be applied to all proteins within a genome to give some indications of the potential pharmacological modulation and regulation of all proteins. In this implementation of our heuristic, ligand binding to protein targets from the ChEMBL database was mapped to structural domains as defined by profiles contained within the Pfam-A database. Our mapping suggests that the majority of assay targets within the current version of the ChEMBL database bind ligands through a small number of highly prevalent domains, and conversely the majority of Pfam domains sampled by our data play no currently established role in ligand binding. Validation studies, carried out firstly against Uniprot entries with expert binding-site annotation and secondly against entries in the wwPDB repository of crystallographic protein structures, demonstrate that our simple heuristic maps ligand binding to the correct domain in about 90 percent of all assessed cases. Using the mappings obtained with our heuristic, we have assembled ligand sets associated with each Pfam domain. Small molecule binding has been mapped to Pfam-A domains of protein targets in the ChEMBL bioactivity database. The result of this mapping is an enriched annotation of small molecule bioactivity data and a grouping of activity classes

  5. Binding energy and formation heat of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.R. de; Veado, J.T.; Siqueira, M.L. de

    The Born-Haber cycle is utilized for the calculation of the heat of formation of UO 2 , on the assumption that the binding energy is predominantly ionic in character. The ionization potentials of U and the repulsion energy are two critical values that influence calculations. Calculations of the ionization potentials with non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Gaspar-Kohn-Sham approximation are presented [pt

  6. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters mediate chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 secretion from reactive astrocytes: relevance to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, G.; Mizee, M.R.; van Horssen, J.; Reijerkerk, A.; Witte, M.E.; Drexhage, J.A.R.; van der Pol, SM; Van Het Hof, B; Scheffer, G.L.; Scheper, R.J.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van der Valk, P.; de Vries, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette efflux transporters are highly expressed at the blood-brain barrier and actively hinder passage of harmful compounds, thereby maintaining brain homoeostasis. Since, adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporters drive cellular exclusion of potential

  7. MHC class I epitope binding prediction trained on small data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    The identification of potential T-cell epitopes is important for development of new human or vetenary vaccines, both considering single protein/subunit vaccines, and for epitope/peptide vaccines as such. The highly diverse MHC class I alleles bind very different peptides, and accurate binding pre...... in situations where only very limited data are available for training....

  8. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  9. Microtubule binding distinguishes dystrophin from utrophin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanto, Joseph J.; Mader, Tara L.; Eckhoff, Michael D.; Strandjord, Dana M.; Banks, Glen B.; Gardner, Melissa K.; Lowe, Dawn A.; Ervasti, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Dystrophin and utrophin are highly similar proteins that both link cortical actin filaments with a complex of sarcolemmal glycoproteins, yet localize to different subcellular domains within normal muscle cells. In mdx mice and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients, dystrophin is lacking and utrophin is consequently up-regulated and redistributed to locations normally occupied by dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin has been shown to significantly improve aspects of the disease phenotype in the mdx mouse; therefore, utrophin up-regulation is under intense investigation as a potential therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Here we biochemically compared the previously documented microtubule binding activity of dystrophin with utrophin and analyzed several transgenic mouse models to identify phenotypes of the mdx mouse that remain despite transgenic utrophin overexpression. Our in vitro analyses revealed that dystrophin binds microtubules with high affinity and pauses microtubule polymerization, whereas utrophin has no activity in either assay. We also found that transgenic utrophin overexpression does not correct subsarcolemmal microtubule lattice disorganization, loss of torque production after in vivo eccentric contractions, or physical inactivity after mild exercise. Finally, our data suggest that exercise-induced inactivity correlates with loss of sarcolemmal neuronal NOS localization in mdx muscle, whereas loss of in vivo torque production after eccentric contraction-induced injury is associated with microtubule lattice disorganization. PMID:24706788

  10. Ice-Binding Proteins in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Bredow

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sub-zero temperatures put plants at risk of damage associated with the formation of ice crystals in the apoplast. Some freeze-tolerant plants mitigate this risk by expressing ice-binding proteins (IBPs, that adsorb to ice crystals and modify their growth. IBPs are found across several biological kingdoms, with their ice-binding activity and function uniquely suited to the lifestyle they have evolved to protect, be it in fishes, insects or plants. While IBPs from freeze-avoidant species significantly depress the freezing point, plant IBPs typically have a reduced ability to lower the freezing temperature. Nevertheless, they have a superior ability to inhibit the recrystallization of formed ice. This latter activity prevents ice crystals from growing larger at temperatures close to melting. Attempts to engineer frost-hardy plants by the controlled transfer of IBPs from freeze-avoiding fish and insects have been largely unsuccessful. In contrast, the expression of recombinant IBP sequences from freeze-tolerant plants significantly reduced electrolyte leakage and enhanced freezing survival in freeze-sensitive plants. These promising results have spurred additional investigations into plant IBP localization and post-translational modifications, as well as a re-evaluation of IBPs as part of the anti-stress and anti-pathogen axis of freeze-tolerant plants. Here we present an overview of plant freezing stress and adaptation mechanisms and discuss the potential utility of IBPs for the generation of freeze-tolerant crops.

  11. OCD is associated with an altered association between sensorimotor gating and cortical and subcortical 5-HT1b receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Christopher; Adams, Thomas G; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Crowley, Michael J; Nabulsi, Nabeel; James Ropchan; Gao, Hong; Kichuk, Stephen A; Simpson, Ryan; Billingslea, Eileen; Hannestad, Jonas; Bloch, Michael; Mayes, Linda; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Carson, Richard E

    2016-05-15

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by impaired sensorimotor gating, as measured using prepulse inhibition (PPI). This effect may be related to abnormalities in the serotonin (5-HT) system. 5-HT1B agonists can impair PPI, produce OCD-like behaviors in animals, and exacerbate OCD symptoms in humans. We measured 5-HT1B receptor availability using (11)C-P943 positron emission tomography (PET) in unmedicated, non-depressed OCD patients (n=12) and matched healthy controls (HC; n=12). Usable PPI data were obtained from 20 of these subjects (10 from each group). There were no significant main effects of OCD diagnosis on 5-HT1B receptor availability ((11)C-P943 BPND); however, the relationship between PPI and (11)C-P943 BPND differed dramatically and significantly between groups. 5-HT1B receptor availability in the basal ganglia and thalamus correlated positively with PPI in controls; these correlations were lost or even reversed in the OCD group. In cortical regions there were no significant correlations with PPI in controls, but widespread positive correlations in OCD patients. Positive correlations between 5-HT1B receptor availability and PPI were consistent across diagnostic groups only in two structures, the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala. Differential associations of 5-HT1B receptor availability with PPI in patients suggest functionally important alterations in the serotonergic regulation of cortical/subcortical balance in OCD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, W.P.T.; Branch, W.J.; Southgate, D.A.T.

    1978-01-01

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  13. Binding energy of protonium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed

    2009-11-01

    The goal of the present work is to calculate the binding energy of the protonium ions bar PPe+ and bar PPe- using Rayleigh- Ritz variational method. It is indicated that an employment of 21 components of the trial wavefunction yields -0.08793 eV as the ground state energy of these ions. Our result agrees quite well with recently obtained results based on elaborate Monte Carlo approximations. It confirms the possible formation of these ions in laboratory.

  14. Brain imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in humans with [11C]SB207145-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Karine; Erritzoe, David; Baaré, William F C; Svarer, Claus; Hasselbalch, Steen G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2010-04-15

    Pharmacological stimulation of the serotonin 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor has shown promise for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and major depression. A new selective radioligand, [(11)C]SB207145, for positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify brain 5-HT(4) receptors in sixteen healthy subjects (20-45 years, 8 males) using the simplified reference tissue model. We tested within our population the effect of age and other demographic factors on the endpoint. In seven subjects, we tested the vulnerability of radioligand binding to a pharmacolological challenge with citalopram, which is expected to increase competition from endogenous serotonin. Given radiotracer administration at a range of specific activities, we were able to use the individual BP(ND) measurements for population-based estimation of the saturation binding parameters; B(max) ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 nM. B(max) was in accordance with post-mortem brain studies (Spearman's r=0.83, p=0.04), and the regional binding potentials, BP(ND), were on average 2.6 in striatum, 0.42 in prefrontal cortex, and 0.91 in hippocampus. We found no effect of sex but a decreased binding with age (p=0.046). A power analysis showed that, given the low inter-and intrasubject variation, use of the present method will enable detection of a 15% difference in striatum with only 7-13 subjects in a 2-sample test and with only 4-5 subjects in a paired test. The citalopram challenge did not discernibly alter [(11)C]SB207145 binding. In conclusion, the 5-HT(4) receptor binding in human brain can be reliably assessed with [(11)C]SB207145, which is encouraging for future PET studies of drug occupancy or patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  16. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  17. Anion binding in biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feiters, Martin C; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Kuepper, Frithjof C; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P; Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R

    2009-01-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L 3 (2p 3/2 ) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  18. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  19. Domain-based small molecule binding site annotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumontier Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate small molecule binding site information for a protein can facilitate studies in drug docking, drug discovery and function prediction, but small molecule binding site protein sequence annotation is sparse. The Small Molecule Interaction Database (SMID, a database of protein domain-small molecule interactions, was created using structural data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. More importantly it provides a means to predict small molecule binding sites on proteins with a known or unknown structure and unlike prior approaches, removes large numbers of false positive hits arising from transitive alignment errors, non-biologically significant small molecules and crystallographic conditions that overpredict ion binding sites. Description Using a set of co-crystallized protein-small molecule structures as a starting point, SMID interactions were generated by identifying protein domains that bind to small molecules, using NCBI's Reverse Position Specific BLAST (RPS-BLAST algorithm. SMID records are available for viewing at http://smid.blueprint.org. The SMID-BLAST tool provides accurate transitive annotation of small-molecule binding sites for proteins not found in the PDB. Given a protein sequence, SMID-BLAST identifies domains using RPS-BLAST and then lists potential small molecule ligands based on SMID records, as well as their aligned binding sites. A heuristic ligand score is calculated based on E-value, ligand residue identity and domain entropy to assign a level of confidence to hits found. SMID-BLAST predictions were validated against a set of 793 experimental small molecule interactions from the PDB, of which 472 (60% of predicted interactions identically matched the experimental small molecule and of these, 344 had greater than 80% of the binding site residues correctly identified. Further, we estimate that 45% of predictions which were not observed in the PDB validation set may be true positives. Conclusion By

  20. Structural requirements of cholesterol for binding to Vibrio cholerae hemolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikigai, Hajime; Otsuru, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Koichiro; Shimamura, Tadakatsu

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol is necessary for the conversion of Vibrio cholerae hemolysin (VCH) monomers into oligomers in liposome membranes. Using different sterols, we determined the stereochemical structures of the VCH-binding active groups present in cholesterol. The VCH monomers are bound to cholesterol, diosgenin, campesterol, and ergosterol, which have a hydroxyl group at position C-3 (3betaOH) in the A ring and a C-C double bond between positions C-5 and C-6 (C-C Delta(5)) in the B ring. They are not bound to epicholesterol and dihydrocholesterol, which form a covalent link with a 3alphaOH group and a C-C single bond between positions C-5 and C-6, respectively. This result suggests that the 3betaOH group and the C-CDelta(5) bond in cholesterol are required for VCH monomer binding. We further examined VCH oligomer binding to cholesterol. However, this oligomer did not bind to cholesterol, suggesting that the disappearance of the cholesterol-binding potential of the VCH oligomer might be a result of the conformational change caused by the conversion of the monomer into the oligomer. VCH oligomer formation was observed in liposomes containing sterols with the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond, and it correlated with the binding affinity of the monomer to each sterol. Therefore, it seems likely that monomer binding to membrane sterol leads to the assembly of the monomer. However, since oligomer formation was induced by liposomes containing either epicholesterol or dihydrocholesterol, the 3betaOH group and the C-C Delta(5) bond were not essential for conversion into the oligomer.

  1. Dynamic conformational changes in munc18 prevent syntaxin binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Bar-On

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Sec1/munc18 protein family is essential for vesicle fusion in eukaryotic cells via binding to SNARE proteins. Protein kinase C modulates these interactions by phosphorylating munc18a thereby reducing its affinity to one of the central SNARE members, syntaxin-1a. The established hypothesis is that the reduced affinity of the phosphorylated munc18a to syntaxin-1a is a result of local electrostatic repulsion between the two proteins, which interferes with their compatibility. The current study challenges this paradigm and offers a novel mechanistic explanation by revealing a syntaxin-non-binding conformation of munc18a that is induced by the phosphomimetic mutations. In the present study, using molecular dynamics simulations, we explored the dynamics of the wild-type munc18a versus phosphomimetic mutant munc18a. We focused on the structural changes that occur in the cavity between domains 3a and 1, which serves as the main syntaxin-binding site. The results of the simulations suggest that the free wild-type munc18a exhibits a dynamic equilibrium between several conformations differing in the size of its cavity (the main syntaxin-binding site. The flexibility of the cavity's size might facilitate the binding or unbinding of syntaxin. In silico insertion of phosphomimetic mutations into the munc18a structure induces the formation of a conformation where the syntaxin-binding area is rigid and blocked as a result of interactions between residues located on both sides of the cavity. Therefore, we suggest that the reduced affinity of the phosphomimetic mutant/phosphorylated munc18a is a result of the closed-cavity conformation, which makes syntaxin binding energetically and sterically unfavorable. The current study demonstrates the potential of phosphorylation, an essential biological process, to serve as a driving force for dramatic conformational changes of proteins modulating their affinity to target proteins.

  2. Decomposition of the factors that govern binding site preference in a multiple rotaxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Joseph P; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-06-18

    A particularly interesting class of multiple rotaxanes consists of complexes where one long shaft threads two rings. If the shaft contains three or more potential binding sites for the rings, multiple co-conformations are possible. Such a complex is a molecular topological analogue to an abacus. Here we address the question, how does strength of ring binding to the shaft vary with respect to position on the shaft? Previous studies have found that a shaft with three binding sites exhibits strongest ring binding at the center site. Here a five-binding-site shaft is studied. We employ a novel method to partition the total energy of the system into contributions from intercomponent binding and intracomponent distortion. The method uses the output of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations to determine fitting parameters in a set of coupled equations. The solution of the equations yields the energy partitioning and reveals the influence of long-range intercomponent interactions.

  3. HLA class I binding prediction via convolutional neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vang, Yeeleng S; Xie, Xiaohui

    2017-09-01

    Many biological processes are governed by protein-ligand interactions. One such example is the recognition of self and non-self cells by the immune system. This immune response process is regulated by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein which is encoded by the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex. Understanding the binding potential between MHC and peptides can lead to the design of more potent, peptide-based vaccines and immunotherapies for infectious autoimmune diseases. We apply machine learning techniques from the natural language processing (NLP) domain to address the task of MHC-peptide binding prediction. More specifically, we introduce a new distributed representation of amino acids, name HLA-Vec, that can be used for a variety of downstream proteomic machine learning tasks. We then propose a deep convolutional neural network architecture, name HLA-CNN, for the task of HLA class I-peptide binding prediction. Experimental results show combining the new distributed representation with our HLA-CNN architecture achieves state-of-the-art results in the majority of the latest two Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) weekly automated benchmark datasets. We further apply our model to predict binding on the human genome and identify 15 genes with potential for self binding. Codes to generate the HLA-Vec and HLA-CNN are publicly available at: https://github.com/uci-cbcl/HLA-bind . xhx@ics.uci.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Functional consequences of piceatannol binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszon, Joanna; Serafin, Eligiusz; Buczkowski, Adam; Michlewska, Sylwia; Bielnicki, Jakub Antoni; Rodacka, Aleksandra

    2018-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is one of the key redox-sensitive proteins whose activity is largely affected by oxidative modifications at its highly reactive cysteine residue in the enzyme's active site (Cys149). Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress may cause, inter alia, the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds leading to accumulation of GAPDH aggregates and ultimately to cell death. Recently these anomalies have been linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Novel evidences indicate that low molecular compounds may be effective inhibitors potentially preventing the GAPDH translocation to the nucleus, and inhibiting or slowing down its aggregation and oligomerization. Therefore, we decided to establish the ability of naturally occurring compound, piceatannol, to interact with GAPDH and to reveal its effect on functional properties and selected parameters of the dehydrogenase structure. The obtained data revealed that piceatannol binds to GAPDH. The ITC analysis indicated that one molecule of the tetrameric enzyme may bind up to 8 molecules of polyphenol (7.3 ± 0.9). Potential binding sites of piceatannol to the GAPDH molecule were analyzed using the Ligand Fit algorithm. Conducted analysis detected 11 ligand binding positions. We indicated that piceatannol decreases GAPDH activity. Detailed analysis allowed us to presume that this effect is due to piceatannol ability to assemble a covalent binding with nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys149) which is directly involved in the catalytic reaction. Consequently, our studies strongly indicate that piceatannol would be an exceptional inhibitor thanks to its ability to break the aforementioned pathologic disulfide linkage, and therefore to inhibit GAPDH aggregation. We demonstrated that by binding with GAPDH piceatannol blocks cysteine residue and counteracts its oxidative modifications, that induce oligomerization and GAPDH aggregation.

  5. Functional consequences of piceatannol binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gerszon

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is one of the key redox-sensitive proteins whose activity is largely affected by oxidative modifications at its highly reactive cysteine residue in the enzyme's active site (Cys149. Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress may cause, inter alia, the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds leading to accumulation of GAPDH aggregates and ultimately to cell death. Recently these anomalies have been linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Novel evidences indicate that low molecular compounds may be effective inhibitors potentially preventing the GAPDH translocation to the nucleus, and inhibiting or slowing down its aggregation and oligomerization. Therefore, we decided to establish the ability of naturally occurring compound, piceatannol, to interact with GAPDH and to reveal its effect on functional properties and selected parameters of the dehydrogenase structure. The obtained data revealed that piceatannol binds to GAPDH. The ITC analysis indicated that one molecule of the tetrameric enzyme may bind up to 8 molecules of polyphenol (7.3 ± 0.9. Potential binding sites of piceatannol to the GAPDH molecule were analyzed using the Ligand Fit algorithm. Conducted analysis detected 11 ligand binding positions. We indicated that piceatannol decreases GAPDH activity. Detailed analysis allowed us to presume that this effect is due to piceatannol ability to assemble a covalent binding with nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys149 which is directly involved in the catalytic reaction. Consequently, our studies strongly indicate that piceatannol would be an exceptional inhibitor thanks to its ability to break the aforementioned pathologic disulfide linkage, and therefore to inhibit GAPDH aggregation. We demonstrated that by binding with GAPDH piceatannol blocks cysteine residue and counteracts its oxidative modifications, that induce oligomerization and GAPDH aggregation.

  6. Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

    2011-12-31

    The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

  7. Digestibility and IgE-Binding of Glycosylated Codfish Parvalbumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jongh, Harmen H. J.; Robles, Carlos López; Nordlee, Julie A.; Lee, Poi-Wah; Baumert, Joseph L.; Hamilton, Robert G.; Taylor, Steve L.; Koppelman, Stef J.

    2013-01-01

    Food-processing conditions may alter the allergenicity of food proteins by different means. In this study, the effect of the glycosylation as a result of thermal treatment on the digestibility and IgE-binding of codfish parvalbumin is investigated. Native and glycosylated parvalbumins were digested with pepsin at various conditions relevant for the gastrointestinal tract. Intact proteins and peptides were analysed for apparent molecular weight and IgE-binding. Glycosylation did not substantially affect the digestion. Although the peptides resulting from digestion were relatively large (3 and 4 kDa), the IgE-binding was strongly diminished. However, the glycosylated parvalbumin had a strong propensity to form dimers and tetramers, and these multimers bound IgE intensely, suggesting stronger IgE-binding than monomeric parvalbumin. We conclude that glycosylation of codfish parvalbumin does not affect the digestibility of parvalbumin and that the peptides resulting from this digestion show low IgE-binding, regardless of glycosylation. Glycosylation of parvalbumin leads to the formation of higher order structures that are more potent IgE binders than native, monomeric parvalbumin. Therefore, food-processing conditions applied to fish allergen can potentially lead to increased allergenicity, even while the protein's digestibility is not affected by such processing. PMID:23878817

  8. Digestibility and IgE-Binding of Glycosylated Codfish Parvalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmen H. J. de Jongh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Food-processing conditions may alter the allergenicity of food proteins by different means. In this study, the effect of the glycosylation as a result of thermal treatment on the digestibility and IgE-binding of codfish parvalbumin is investigated. Native and glycosylated parvalbumins were digested with pepsin at various conditions relevant for the gastrointestinal tract. Intact proteins and peptides were analysed for apparent molecular weight and IgE-binding. Glycosylation did not substantially affect the digestion. Although the peptides resulting from digestion were relatively large (3 and 4 kDa, the IgE-binding was strongly diminished. However, the glycosylated parvalbumin had a strong propensity to form dimers and tetramers, and these multimers bound IgE intensely, suggesting stronger IgE-binding than monomeric parvalbumin. We conclude that glycosylation of codfish parvalbumin does not affect the digestibility of parvalbumin and that the peptides resulting from this digestion show low IgE-binding, regardless of glycosylation. Glycosylation of parvalbumin leads to the formation of higher order structures that are more potent IgE binders than native, monomeric parvalbumin. Therefore, food-processing conditions applied to fish allergen can potentially lead to increased allergenicity, even while the protein’s digestibility is not affected by such processing.

  9. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Zing Tsung-Yeh; Shiu, Shin-Han; Tsai, Huai-Kuang

    2015-08-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM) and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS) and DNA structure (DS) properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy) that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  10. Contribution of Sequence Motif, Chromatin State, and DNA Structure Features to Predictive Models of Transcription Factor Binding in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zing Tsung-Yeh Tsai

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor (TF binding is determined by the presence of specific sequence motifs (SM and chromatin accessibility, where the latter is influenced by both chromatin state (CS and DNA structure (DS properties. Although SM, CS, and DS have been used to predict TF binding sites, a predictive model that jointly considers CS and DS has not been developed to predict either TF-specific binding or general binding properties of TFs. Using budding yeast as model, we found that machine learning classifiers trained with either CS or DS features alone perform better in predicting TF-specific binding compared to SM-based classifiers. In addition, simultaneously considering CS and DS further improves the accuracy of the TF binding predictions, indicating the highly complementary nature of these two properties. The contributions of SM, CS, and DS features to binding site predictions differ greatly between TFs, allowing TF-specific predictions and potentially reflecting different TF binding mechanisms. In addition, a "TF-agnostic" predictive model based on three DNA "intrinsic properties" (in silico predicted nucleosome occupancy, major groove geometry, and dinucleotide free energy that can be calculated from genomic sequences alone has performance that rivals the model incorporating experiment-derived data. This intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions not only across TFs, but also across DNA-binding domain families with distinct structural folds. Furthermore, these predicted binding regions can help identify TF binding sites that have a significant impact on target gene expression. Because the intrinsic property model allows prediction of binding regions across DNA-binding domain families, it is TF agnostic and likely describes general binding potential of TFs. Thus, our findings suggest that it is feasible to establish a TF agnostic model for identifying functional regulatory regions in potentially any sequenced genome.

  11. The Feasibility of Using CT-Guided ROI for Semiquantifying Striatal Dopamine Transporter Availability in a Hybrid SPECT/CT System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Chin Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid SPECT/CT system provides accurate coregistration of functional and morphological images. CT-guided region of interest (ROI for semiquantifying striatal dopamine transporter (DAT availability may be a feasible method. We therefore assessed the intra- and interobserver reproducibility of manual SPECT and CT-guided ROI methods and compared their semiquantitative data with data from MRI-guided ROIs. We enrolled twenty-eight patients who underwent Tc-99m TRODAT-1 brain SPECT/CT and brain MRI. ROIs of the striatal, caudate, putamen, and occipital cortex were manually delineated on the SPECT, CT, and MRI. ROIs from CT and MRI were transferred to the coregistered SPECT for semiquantification. The striatal, caudate, and putamen nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND were calculated. Using CT-guided ROIs had higher intra- and interobserver concordance correlation coefficients, closer Bland-Altman biases to zero, and narrower limits of agreement than using manual SPECT ROIs. The correlation coefficients of striatal, caudate, and putamen BPND were good between manual SPECT and MRI-guided ROI methods and even better between CT-guided and MRI-guided ROI methods. Conclusively, CT-guided ROI delineation for semiquantifying striatal DAT availability in a hybrid SPECT/CT system is highly reproducible, and the semiquantitative data correlate well with data from MRI-guided ROIs.

  12. Solute-vacancy binding in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolverton, C.

    2007-01-01

    Previous efforts to understand solute-vacancy binding in aluminum alloys have been hampered by a scarcity of reliable, quantitative experimental measurements. Here, we report a large database of solute-vacancy binding energies determined from first-principles density functional calculations. The calculated binding energies agree well with accurate measurements where available, and provide an accurate predictor of solute-vacancy binding in other systems. We find: (i) some common solutes in commercial Al alloys (e.g., Cu and Mg) possess either very weak (Cu), or even repulsive (Mg), binding energies. Hence, we assert that some previously reported large binding energies for these solutes are erroneous. (ii) Large binding energies are found for Sn, Cd and In, confirming the proposed mechanism for the reduced natural aging in Al-Cu alloys containing microalloying additions of these solutes. (iii) In addition, we predict that similar reduction in natural aging should occur with additions of Si, Ge and Au. (iv) Even larger binding energies are found for other solutes (e.g., Pb, Bi, Sr, Ba), but these solutes possess essentially no solubility in Al. (v) We have explored the physical effects controlling solute-vacancy binding in Al. We find that there is a strong correlation between binding energy and solute size, with larger solute atoms possessing a stronger binding with vacancies. (vi) Most transition-metal 3d solutes do not bind strongly with vacancies, and some are even energetically strongly repelled from vacancies, particularly for the early 3d solutes, Ti and V

  13. Lactoferrin binding molecules in human seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, C J; Vanderpuye, O A; McIntyre, J A; Faulk, W P

    1990-10-01

    During ejaculation, the iron binding protein lactoferrin binds to sperm and forms a major component of sperm-coating antigens. Physicochemical properties of lactoferrin in seminal plasma (SP) and on sperm differ from those of purified lactoferrin. These differences have been attributed to the binding of unknown seminal macromolecules to lactoferrin. We have studied lactoferrin binding molecules in SP. The SP samples were coated onto microtiter plates and tested for binding of biotinylated lactoferrin. SP was found to specifically bind biotinylated lactoferrin. This binding was competitively inhibited by coincubation with unlabeled lactoferrin but was not affected by control incubations done with human IgG or transferrin. Lactoferrin binding molecules in SP were biochemically characterized by using SDS-PAGE and ligand blotting. Biotinylated lactoferrin bound to SP molecules of approximately 120, 60 and 30 kDa. No binding was observed with biotinylated transferrin. The presence of molecules that associate with lactoferrin in SP was further studied by using crossed immunoelectrophoresis. Lactoferrin in SP immunoprecipitated as two peaks, one of which corresponded to purified lactoferrin. These results suggest that some lactoferrin molecules in SP are free and that others are associated with lactoferrin binding molecules. Binding of lactoferrin to lactoferrin binding molecules appears to change its physicochemical properties and thus could influence its biologic activity and its affinity to sperm.

  14. Acyl-coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, B B; Knudsen, J; Poulsen, F M

    1999-01-01

    Acyl-coenzyme A binding proteins are known from a large group of eukaryote species and to bind a long chain length acyl-CoA ester with very high affinity. Detailed biochemical mapping of ligand binding properties has been obtained as well as in-depth structural studies on the bovine apo-protein a...

  15. Polymeric competitive protein binding adsorbents for radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    Serum protein comprising specific binding proteins such as antibodies, B 12 intrinsic factor, thyroxin binding globulin and the like may be copolymerized with globulin constituents of serum by the action of ethylchloroformate to form readily packed insoluble precipitates which, following purification as by washing, are eminently suited for employment as competitive binding protein absorbents in radioassay procedures. 10 claims, no drawings

  16. Structure/Function Studies of the Androgen Receptor DNA-Binding Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2004-01-01

    .... The research goals associated with this study are to characterize the structural and functional aspects of the AR in order to uncover the potential of its domains, and in particular the DNA-binding...

  17. Structure/Function Studies of the Androgen Receptor DNA-Binding Region

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rastinejad, Fraydoon

    2003-01-01

    .... The research goals associated with this study are to characterize the structural and functional aspects of the AR in order to uncover the potential of its domains, and in particular the DNA-binding...

  18. Near relativistic study of binded levels in atoms. Application to alkaline atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varade, A.; Delgado-Barrio, G.; Villarreal, P.

    1985-01-01

    A model is described for the calculation of the atomic binding energies. The Pauli equation has been solved with a local potential. The results for alkaline atoms are reported here and compared with the perturbative calculation and experimental data. (author)

  19. Poor correspondence between predicted and experimental binding of peptides to class I MHC molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Hald; Tan, L.; Søndergaard, Ib

    2000-01-01

    Naturally processed peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules display a characteristic allele specific motif of two or more essential amino acid side chains, the so-called peptide anchor residues, in the context of an 8-10 amino acid long peptide. Knowledge...... of the peptide binding motif of individual class I MHC molecules permits the selection of potential peptide antigens from proteins of infectious organisms that could induce protective T-cell-mediated immunity. Several methods have been developed for the prediction of potential class I MHC binding peptides. One...... of peptide binding motifs for individual class I MHC molecules. The actual binding was compared with the results obtained when analyzing the same peptides by two well-known, publicly available computer algorithms. We conclude that there is no strong correlation between actual and predicted binding when using...

  20. SFS, a Novel Fibronectin-Binding Protein from Streptococcus equi, Inhibits the Binding between Fibronectin and Collagen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindmark, Hans; Guss, Bengt

    1999-01-01

    The obligate parasitic bacterium Streptococcus equi subsp. equi is the causative agent of strangles, a serious disease of the upper respiratory tract in horses. In this study we have, using shotgun phage display, cloned from S. equi subsp. equi and characterized a gene, called sfs, encoding a protein termed SFS, representing a new type of fibronectin (Fn)-binding protein. The sfs gene was found to be present in all 50 isolates of S. equi subsp. equi tested and in 41 of 48 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates tested. The sfs gene is down-regulated during growth in vitro compared to fnz, a previously characterized gene encoding an Fn-binding protein from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Sequence comparisons revealed no similarities to previously characterized Fn-binding proteins, but high scores were obtained against collagen. Besides similarity due to the high content of glycine, serine, and proline residues present in both proteins, there was a nine-residue motif present both in collagen and in the Fn-binding domain of SFS. By searching the Oklahoma S. pyogenes database, we found that this motif is also present in a potential cell surface protein from S. pyogenes. Protein SFS was found to inhibit the binding between Fn and collagen in a concentration-dependent way. PMID:10225899

  1. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Liang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1. However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands.

  2. Surface selective binding of nanoclay particles to polyampholyte protein chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Nisha; Bohidar, H B

    2009-07-28

    Binding of nanoclay (Laponite) to gelatin-A and gelatin-B (both polyampholytes) molecules was investigated at room temperature (25 degrees C) both experimentally and theoretically. The stoichiometric binding ratio between gelatin and Laponite was found to be strongly dependent on the solution ionic strength. Large soluble complexes were formed at higher ionic strengths of the solution, a result supported by data obtained from light scattering, viscosity, and zeta potential measurements. The binding problem was theoretically modeled by choosing a suitable two-body screened Coulomb potential, U(R(+)) = (q(-)/2epsilon)[(Q(-)/R(-))e(-kR(-))-(Q(+)/R(+))e(-kR(+))], where the protein dipole has charges Q(+) and Q(-) that are located at distances R(+) and R(-) from the point Laponite charge q(-) and the dispersion liquid has dielectric constant (epsilon). U(R(+)) accounted for electrostatic interactions between a dipole (protein molecule) and an effective charge (Laponite particle) located at an angular position theta. Gelatin-A and Laponite association was facilitated by a strong attractive interaction potential that led to preferential binding of the biopolymer chains to negatively charged face of Laponite particles. In the case of gelatin-B selective surf ace patch binding dominated the process where the positively charged rim and negatively charged face of the particles were selectively bound to the oppositely charged segments of the biopolymer. The equilibrium separation (R(e)) between the protein and nanoclay particle revealed monovalent salt concentration dependence given by R(e) approximately [NaCl](alpha) where alpha = 0.6+/-0.2 for gelatin-A and alpha = 0.4+/-0.2 for gelatin-B systems. The equilibrium separations were approximately 30% less compared to the gelatin-A system implying preferential short-range ordering of the gelatin-B-nanoclay pair in the solvent.

  3. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug is bound...... per albumin molecule, and binding of the first sulfamethizole molecule is possibly reduced as well. Diazepam binds with equal affinity to the fetal and adult proteins. Among the two main albumin drug-binding functions, for warfarin and diazepam, the former is thus compromised in the newborn infant...

  4. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently.The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3.PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the

  5. Defining the Ail Ligand-Binding Surface: Hydrophobic Residues in Two Extracellular Loops Mediate Cell and Extracellular Matrix Binding To Facilitate Yop Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Tiffany M; Wiese, Jeffrey S; Alhabeil, Jamal A; Usselman, Lisa D; Thomson, Joshua J; Matti, Rafla; Kronshage, Malte; Maricic, Natalie; Williams, Shanedah; Sleiman, Naama H; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S

    2017-04-01

    Yersinia pestis , the causative agent of plague, binds host cells to deliver cytotoxic Yop proteins into the cytoplasm that prevent phagocytosis and generation of proinflammatory cytokines. Ail is an eight-stranded β-barrel outer membrane protein with four extracellular loops that mediates cell binding and resistance to human serum. Following the deletion of each of the four extracellular loops that potentially interact with host cells, the Ail-Δloop 2 and Ail-Δloop 3 mutant proteins had no cell-binding activity while Ail-Δloop 4 maintained cell binding (the Ail-Δloop 1 protein was unstable). Using the codon mutagenesis scheme SWIM (selection without isolation of mutants), we identified individual residues in loops 1, 2, and 3 that contribute to host cell binding. While several residues contributed to the binding of host cells and purified fibronectin and laminin, as well as Yop delivery, three mutations, F80A (loop 2), S128A (loop 3), and F130A (loop 3), produced particularly severe defects in cell binding. Combining these mutations led to an even greater reduction in cell binding and severely impaired Yop delivery with only a slight defect in serum resistance. These findings demonstrate that Y. pestis Ail uses multiple extracellular loops to interact with substrates important for adhesion via polyvalent hydrophobic interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white [extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius] muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding

  7. Insulin binding to individual rat skeletal muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koerker, D.J.; Sweet, I.R.; Baskin, D.G. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Studies of insulin binding to skeletal muscle, performed using sarcolemmal membrane preparations or whole muscle incubations of mixed muscle or typical red (soleus, psoas) or white (extensor digitorum longus (EDL), gastrocnemius) muscle, have suggested that red muscle binds more insulin than white muscle. We have evaluated this hypothesis using cryostat sections of unfixed tissue to measure insulin binding in a broad range of skeletal muscles; many were of similar fiber-type profiles. Insulin binding per square millimeter of skeletal muscle slice was measured by autoradiography and computer-assisted densitometry. We found a 4.5-fold range in specific insulin tracer binding, with heart and predominantly slow-twitch oxidative muscles (SO) at the high end and the predominantly fast-twitch glycolytic (FG) muscles at the low end of the range. This pattern reflects insulin sensitivity. Evaluation of displacement curves for insulin binding yielded linear Scatchard plots. The dissociation constants varied over a ninefold range (0.26-2.06 nM). Binding capacity varied from 12.2 to 82.7 fmol/mm2. Neither binding parameter was correlated with fiber type or insulin sensitivity; e.g., among three muscles of similar fiber-type profile, the EDL had high numbers of low-affinity binding sites, whereas the quadriceps had low numbers of high-affinity sites. In summary, considerable heterogeneity in insulin binding was found among hindlimb muscles of the rat, which can be attributed to heterogeneity in binding affinities and the numbers of binding sites. It can be concluded that a given fiber type is not uniquely associated with a set of insulin binding parameters that result in high or low binding.

  8. Characterization of the Organic Component of Low-Molecular-Weight Chromium-Binding Substance and Its Binding of Chromium123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Watson, Heather M.; Gao, Junjie; Sinha, Sarmistha Halder; Cassady, Carolyn J.; Vincent, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Chromium was proposed to be an essential element over 50 y ago and was shown to have therapeutic potential in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes; however, its mechanism of action at a molecular level is unknown. One chromium-binding biomolecule, low-molecular weight chromium-binding substance (LMWCr or chromodulin), has been found to be biologically active in in vitro assays and proposed as a potential candidate for the in vivo biologically active form of chromium. Characterization of the organic component of LMWCr has proven difficult. Treating bovine LMWCr with trifluoroacetic acid followed by purification on a graphite powder micro-column generates a heptapeptide fragment of LMWCr. The peptide sequence of the fragment was analyzed by MS and tandem MS (MS/MS and MS/MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation and post-source decay. Two candidate sequences, pEEEEGDD and pEEEGEDD (where pE is pyroglutamate), were identified from the MS/MS experiments; additional tandem MS suggests the sequence is pEEEEGDD. The N-terminal glutamate residues explain the inability to sequence LMWCr by the Edman method. Langmuir isotherms and Hill plots were used to analyze the binding constants of chromic ions to synthetic peptides similar in composition to apoLMWCr. The sequence pEEEEGDD was found to bind 4 chromic ions per peptide with nearly identical cooperativity and binding constants to those of apoLMWCr. This work should lead to further studies elucidating or eliminating a potential role for LMWCr in treating the symptoms of type 2 diabetes and other conditions resulting from improper carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. PMID:21593351

  9. Identification of the quinolinedione inhibitor binding site in Cdc25 phosphatase B through docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yushu; van der Kamp, Marc; Malaisree, Maturos; Liu, Dan; Liu, Yi; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2017-11-01

    Cdc25 phosphatase B, a potential target for cancer therapy, is inhibited by a series of quinones. The binding site and mode of quinone inhibitors to Cdc25B remains unclear, whereas this information is important for structure-based drug design. We investigated the potential binding site of NSC663284 [DA3003-1 or 6-chloro-7-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethylamino)-quinoline-5, 8-dione] through docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Of the two main binding sites suggested by docking, the molecular dynamics simulations only support one site for stable binding of the inhibitor. Binding sites in and near the Cdc25B catalytic site that have been suggested previously do not lead to stable binding in 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In contrast, a shallow pocket between the C-terminal helix and the catalytic site provides a favourable binding site that shows high stability. Two similar binding modes featuring protein-inhibitor interactions involving Tyr428, Arg482, Thr547 and Ser549 are identified by clustering analysis of all stable MD trajectories. The relatively flexible C-terminal region of Cdc25B contributes to inhibitor binding. The binding mode of NSC663284, identified through MD simulation, likely prevents the binding of protein substrates to Cdc25B. The present results provide useful information for the design of quinone inhibitors and their mechanism of inhibition.

  10. Human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J S; Rasmussen, H; Nielsen, B B

    1997-01-01

    The recombinant human plasminogen binding protein tetranectin (TN) and the C-type lectin CRD of this protein (TN3) have been crystallized. TN3 crystallizes in the tetragonal space group P4(2)2(1)2 with cell dimensions a = b = 64.0, c = 75.7 A and with one molecule per asymmetric unit. The crystals...... to at least 2.5 A. A full data set has been collected to 3.0 A. The asymmetric unit contains one monomer of TN. Molecular replacement solutions for TN3 and TN have been obtained using the structure of the C-type lectin CRD of rat mannose-binding protein as search model. The rhombohedral space group indicates...... diffract X-rays to at least 2.0 A resolution. A complete diffraction data set has been collected to 2.7 A resolution. The crystals of TN, obtained by the vapour-diffusion reverse salting-in method at 280 K, are rhombohedral, space group R3, with the hexagonal axes a = b = 89.1, c = 75.8 A, and diffract...

  11. Binding of fluorescently labeled cholera toxin subunit B to glycolipids in the human submandibular gland and inhibition of binding by periodate oxidation and by galactose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S

    2016-01-01

    FITC-labeled cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) stained the surfaces of cells of mucous acini in the submandibular gland. CTB, also called choleragenoid, binds to the GM1 glycolipid in the cell membrane. The binding in most acini was inhibited by periodic acid oxidation of the sections, while some acini...... to the internal galactose residue linked to GalNAc, as in the GM1 glycolipid. Inhibition of the GM1 receptor binding to cholera toxin has potential for protection of humans against cholera. Galactose and agents that modify sialic acid inhibit the accessibility of the toxin to the GM1 carbohydrate receptor. Human...

  12. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-01-01

    Sorption of Cd 2+ , Cr 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , Pb 2+ and Zn 2+ onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni 2+ > Cd 2+ > Cu 2+ > Pb 2+ > Zn 2+ > Cr 3+ . The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb 2+ > Cu 2+ > Ni 2+ > Cd 2+ > Zn 2+ > Cr 3+ . The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol -1 for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The ΔG o and ΔH o values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low ΔH o values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  13. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner; Tumen, Fikret

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd(2+), Cr(3+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+) and Zn(2+) onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Cu(2+)>Pb(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb(2+)>Cu(2+)>Ni(2+)>Cd(2+)>Zn(2+)>Cr(3+). The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol(-1) for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The DeltaG degrees and DeltaH degrees values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low DeltaH degrees values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  14. Heavy metals binding properties of esterified lemon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslanoglu, Hasan; Altundogan, Hamdi Soner [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey); Tumen, Fikret, E-mail: ftumen@firat.edu.tr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Firat University, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2009-05-30

    Sorption of Cd{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} onto a carboxyl groups-rich material prepared from lemon was investigated in batch systems. The results revealed that the sorption is highly pH dependent. Sorption kinetic data indicated that the equilibrium was achieved in the range of 30-240 min for different metal ions and sorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second-order model for all metals studied. Relative sorption rate of various metal cations was found to be in the general order of Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Pb{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The binding characteristics of the sorbent for heavy metal ions were analyzed under various conditions and isotherm data was accurately fitted to the Langmuir equation. The metal binding capacity order calculated from Langmuir isotherm was Pb{sup 2+} > Cu{sup 2+} > Ni{sup 2+} > Cd{sup 2+} > Zn{sup 2+} > Cr{sup 3+}. The mean free energy of metal sorption process calculated from Dubinin-Radushkevich parameter and the Polanyi potential was found to be in the range of 8-11 kJ mol{sup -1} for the metals studied showing that the main mechanism governing the sorption process seems to be ion exchange. The basic thermodynamic parameters of metals ion sorption process were calculated by using the Langmuir constants obtained from equilibration study. The {Delta}G{sup o} and {Delta}H{sup o} values for metals ion sorption on the lemon sorbent showed the process to be spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Relatively low {Delta}H{sup o} values revealed that physical adsorption significantly contributed to the mechanism.

  15. Sarcomere lattice geometry influences cooperative myosin binding in muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand C W Tanner

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In muscle, force emerges from myosin binding with actin (forming a cross-bridge. This actomyosin binding depends upon myofilament geometry, kinetics of thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and kinetics of cross-bridge cycling. Binding occurs within a compliant network of protein filaments where there is mechanical coupling between myosins along the thick-filament backbone and between actin monomers along the thin filament. Such mechanical coupling precludes using ordinary differential equation models when examining the effects of lattice geometry, kinetics, or compliance on force production. This study uses two stochastically driven, spatially explicit models to predict levels of cross-bridge binding, force, thin-filament Ca(2+ activation, and ATP utilization. One model incorporates the 2-to-1 ratio of thin to thick filaments of vertebrate striated muscle (multi-filament model, while the other comprises only one thick and one thin filament (two-filament model. Simulations comparing these models show that the multi-filament predictions of force, fractional cross-bridge binding, and cross-bridge turnover are more consistent with published experimental values. Furthermore, the values predicted by the multi-filament model are greater than those values predicted by the two-filament model. These increases are larger than the relative increase of potential inter-filament interactions in the multi-filament model versus the two-filament model. This amplification of coordinated cross-bridge binding and cycling indicates a mechanism of cooperativity that depends on sarcomere lattice geometry, specifically the ratio and arrangement of myofilaments.

  16. CNE, a collagen-binding protein of Streptococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lannergård, Jonas; Frykberg, Lars; Guss, Bengt

    2003-05-16

    Streptococcus equi subspecies equi is an important horse pathogenic bacterium causing a serious disease called strangles. Using bioinformatics we identified a gene denoted cne (gene encoding collagen-binding protein from S. equi) coding for a novel potential virulence factor of this species called protein CNE. The protein is composed of 657 amino acids and has the typical features found in cell surface-anchored proteins in Gram-positive bacteria. CNE displays amino acid sequence similarities to the previously well-studied collagen-binding protein CNA from Staphylococcus aureus, a proven virulence factor in septic arthritis. Based on similarity to CNA the structure of the mature CNE protein can be divided into an N-terminal A domain and a C-terminal B domain. The highest similarity between CNA and CNE is found in the A domains. The A domain in CNA is known to be the collagen-binding domain. Two parts of cne were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and ligated into an expression vector, and recombinant CNE proteins were produced in Escherichia coli. The purified CNE proteins were shown to display collagen-binding activity in a Western ligand blot and to inhibit collagen binding to cells of subsp. equi and to CNE-coated microtitre wells. Furthermore, the A domain of CNE was sufficient for binding collagen, and was shown to compete for the same site on collagen as CNA in inhibition studies. Using PCR, the cne gene was detected in all studied strains of subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

  17. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, Jeffrey A., E-mail: Jeffrey.Mertens@ars.usda.gov [Bioenergy Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, IL 61604 (United States); Hector, Ronald E.; Bowman, Michael J. [Bioenergy Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, IL 61604 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamics of (GalpA){sub n} oligomers binding to an exo-polygalacturonase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energetics of binding (GalpA){sub n} were determined by ITC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic parameters attributable to individual subsites were determined. - Abstract: Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic process that is enthalpically driven and results in extremely tight binding of the substrate to RPG16. Binding energies in combination with prior biochemical data suggests that RPG16 has the potential for five subsites, -1 to +4, with the greatest contribution to binding energies arising from subsite -1/+1. While the enthalpic contribution to binding decreases substantially for subsites +2 to +4, beneficial entropic effects occur in subsites +3 and +4 leading to increased total free energy as the length of oligomer increases. This information will be useful for additional studies in determining the binding contributions of specific amino acids with mutant enzymes.

  18. Binding characteristics of swine erythrocyte insulin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieberg, G.; Bryan, G.S.; Sartin, J.L.; Williams, J.C.; Prince, T.J.; Kemppainen, R.J.

    1985-09-01

    Crossbred gilts had 8.8 +/- 1.1% maximum binding of ( SVI)insulin to insulin receptors on erythrocytes. The number of insulin-binding sites per cell was 137 +/- 19, with a binding affinity ranging from 7.4 X 10(7)M-1 to 11.2 X 10(7)M-1 and mean of 8.8 X 10(7)M-1. Pregnant sows had a significant increase in maximum binding due to an increase in number of receptor sites per cell. Lactating sows fed a high-fiber diet and a low-fiber diet did not develop a significant difference in maximum binding of insulin. Sows fed the low-fiber diet had a significantly higher number of binding sites and a significantly lower binding affinity than did sows fed a high-fiber diet. Receptor-binding affinity was lower in the low-fiber diet group than in cycling gilts, whereas data from sows fed the high-fiber diet did not differ from data for cycling gilts. Data from this study indicated that insulin receptors of swine erythrocytes have binding characteristics similar to those in other species. Pregnancy and diet will alter insulin receptor binding in swine.

  19. ACOG Committee Opinion No. 583: predispute, voluntary, binding arbitration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    : Arbitration is a form of dispute resolution that is an alternative to 'taking a case to court.' Weighing the potential advantages and disadvantages, predispute arbitration may represent a valid alternative dispute resolution strategy for physicians and patients. When correctly prepared, contractual agreements between patients and physicians for predispute, voluntary, binding arbitration can satisfy both individual and societal needs and, at the same time, meet relevant ethical principles.

  20. Actin binding proteins and spermiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruk, Dolores D

    2011-01-01

    Drebrin E, an actin-binding protein lacking intrinsic activity in the regulation of actin dynamics (e.g., polymerization, capping, nucleation, branching, cross-linking, bundling and severing), is known to recruit actin regulatory proteins to a specific cellular site. Herein, we critically evaluate recent findings in the field which illustrate that drebrin E works together with two other actin-binding proteins, namely Arp3 (actin-related protein 3, a component of the Arp2/3 complex that simultaneously controls actin nucleation for polymerization and branching of actin filaments) and Eps8 (epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8 that controls capping of the barbed ends of actin filaments, as well as actin filament bundling) to regulate the homeostasis of F-actin filament bundles at the ectoplasmic specialization (ES), a testis-specific atypical adherens junction (AJ) in the seminiferous epithelium. This is mediated by the strict temporal and spatial expression of these three actin-binding proteins at the apical and basal ES at the Sertoli cell-spermatid (step 8–19) and Sertoli-Sertoli cell interface, respectively, during the seminiferous epithelial cycle of spermatogenesis. In this Commentary, we put forth a possible model by which drebrin E may be acting as a platform upon which proteins (e.g., Arp3) that are needed to alter the conformation of actin filament bundles at the ES can be recruited to the site, thus facilitating changes in cell shape and cell position in the epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. In short, drebrin E may be acting as a “logistic” distribution center to manage different regulatory proteins at the apical ES, thereby regulating the dynamics of actin filament bundles and modulating the plasticity of the apical ES. This would allow adhesion to be altered continuously throughout the epithelial cycle to accommodate spermatid movement in the seminiferous epithelium during spermiogenesis and spermiation. We also

  1. Steric and allosteric factors prevent simultaneous binding of transferrin-binding proteins A and B to transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leslie P; Yu, Rong-hua; Calmettes, Charles; Yang, Xue; Moraes, Trevor F; Schriemer, David C; Schryvers, Anthony B

    2012-06-01

    The ability to acquire iron directly from host Tf (transferrin) is an adaptation common to important bacterial pathogens belonging to the Pasteurellaceae, Moraxellaceae and Neisseriaceae families. A surface receptor comprising an integral outer membrane protein, TbpA (Tf-binding protein A), and a surface-exposed lipoprotein, TbpB (Tf-binding protein B), mediates the iron acquisition process. TbpB is thought to extend from the cell surface for capture of Tf to initiate the process and deliver Tf to TbpA. TbpA functions as a gated channel for the passage of iron into the periplasm. In the present study we have mapped the effect of TbpA from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae on pTf (porcine Tf) using H/DX-MS (hydrogen/deuterium exchange coupled to MS) and compare it with a previously determined binding site for TbpB. The proposed TbpA footprint is adjacent to and potentially overlapping the TbpB-binding site, and induces a structural instability in the TbpB site. This suggests that simultaneous binding to pTf by both receptors would be hindered. We demonstrate that a recombinant TbpB lacking a portion of its anchor peptide is unable to form a stable ternary TbpA-pTf-TbpB complex. This truncated TbpB does not bind to a preformed Tf-TbpA complex, and TbpA removes pTf from a preformed Tf-TbpB complex. Thus the results of the present study support a model whereby TbpB 'hands-off' pTf to TbpA, which completes the iron removal and transport process.

  2. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection....... This method of detection was used to determine the distribution of SHBG phenotypes in healthy controls of both sexes and in five different pathological conditions characterized by changes in the SHBG level or endocrine disturbances (malignant and benign ovarian neoplasms, hirsutism, liver cirrhosis...... on the experimental values. Differences in SHBG phenotypes do not appear to have any clinical significance and no sex difference was found in the SHBG phenotype distribution....

  3. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14, a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 binding partner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Chen; Yao, Guangyin; Zou, Minji; Chen, Guangyu; Wang, Min; Liu, Jingqian; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang

    2007-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, but the mechanism underlying IGF-independent effects is not yet clear. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, IGFBP-3 was used as the bait to screen a human fetal liver cDNA library for it interactors that may potentially mediate IGFBP-3-regulated functions. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14), a member of the GalNAc-Tases family, was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. This interaction involved the ricin-type beta-trefoil domain of GalNAc-T14. The interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 was reconfirmed in vitro and in vivo, using GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays. Our findings may provide new clues for further study on the mechanism behind the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-3 promoting apoptosis. The role of GalNAc-T14 as an intracellular mediator of the effects of IGFBP-3 need to be verified in future studies

  4. Characterization of feline serum-cobalt binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, Amy N; Barger, Anne M; MacNeill, Amy L; Mitchell, Mark M; Solter, Philip

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative stress inhibits albumin's ability to complex with cobalt. Feline serum-cobalt binding has not been described. The objective was to develop a cobalt binding test for use with feline serum, and correlate the results with other biochemical and cellular constituents in blood, and with clinical diseases of cats. A colorimetric test of cobalt binding, based on the oxidation-reduction reaction of Co(+2) and dithiothreitol, was developed using feline serum. The test was used to measure cobalt binding in stored serum from 176 cats presented to the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital for a variety of disease conditions. Time-matched hematology and biochemical data, and clinical information, were obtained from the medical record of each cat and correlated with the serum-cobalt binding results. Serial dilution of feline serum with phosphate-buffered saline resulted in a highly linear decrease in serum-cobalt binding (r(2)  = .9984). Serum-cobalt binding of the clinical samples also correlated with albumin concentrations in a stepwise linear regression model (r(2)  = .425), and both cobalt binding and albumin were significantly decreased in cases of inflammation. Albumin and cobalt binding also shared significant correlations with several erythron variables, and serum concentration of total calcium and bilirubin. The correlation of cobalt binding measured by a colorimetric test with albumin concentration in the clinical samples and with serum dilution is consistent with feline albumin-cobalt complex formation. Hypoalbuminemia is the likely cause of reduced serum-cobalt binding in inflammation and the correlations observed between cobalt binding and other variables. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  5. Binding energy of the barbell exciton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, F. M.; Golub, J. E.

    1991-02-01

    The exciton binding energy in asymmetric coupled double quantum wells is calculated. As the system is electrically tuned from type I to type II, the exciton binding energy decreases from that of a two-dimensional exciton to the binding energy of a spatially separated electron-hole pair, i.e., the barbell exciton.$-- We compare our theoretical results with a recent experiment and find good agreement.

  6. CAP binding proteins associated with the nucleus.

    OpenAIRE

    Patzelt, E; Blaas, D; Kuechler, E

    1983-01-01

    Cap binding proteins of HeLa cells were identified by photo-affinity labelling using the cap analogue gamma-[32P]-[4-(benzoyl-phenyl)methylamido]-7-methylguanosine-5'- triphosphate. Photoreaction with whole cell homogenates resulted in specific labelling of five major polypeptides. The small molecular weight polypeptide appeared to be identical to the 24 000 to 26 000 dalton cap binding protein previously identified in initiation factors. A cap binding protein of 37 000 dalton was found in in...

  7. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Abo

    Full Text Available We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA, revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG, heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  8. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  9. Binding mechanisms of intrinsically disordered proteins: theory, simulation, and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Mollica

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, protein science has been revolutionized by the discovery of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs. In contrast to the classical paradigm that a given protein sequence corresponds to a defined structure and an associated function, we now know that proteins can be functional in the absence of a stable three-dimensional structure. In many cases, disordered proteins or protein regions become structured, at least locally, upon interacting with their physiological partners. Many, sometimes conflicting, hypotheses have been put forward regarding the interaction mechanisms of IDPs and the potential advantages of disorder for protein-protein interactions. Whether disorder may increase, as proposed e.g. in the fly-casting hypothesis, or decrease binding rates, increase or decrease binding specificity, or what role pre-formed structure might play in interactions involving IDPs (conformational selection vs. induced fit, are subjects of intense debate. Experimentally, these questions remain difficult to address. Here, we review experimental studies of binding mechanisms of IDPs using NMR spectroscopy and transient kinetic techniques, as well as the underlying theoretical concepts and numerical methods that can be applied to describe these interactions at the atomic level. The available literature suggests that the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters characterizing interactions involving IDPs can vary widely and that there may be no single common mechanism that can explain the different binding modes observed experimentally. Rather, disordered proteins appear to make combined use of features such as pre-formed structure and flexibility, depending on the individual system and the functional context.

  10. A Unitary Anesthetic Binding Site at High Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Vedula; G Brannigan; N Economou; J Xi; M Hall; R Liu; M Rossi; W Dailey; K Grasty; et. al.

    2011-12-31

    Propofol is the most widely used injectable general anesthetic. Its targets include ligand-gated ion channels such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, but such receptor-channel complexes remain challenging to study at atomic resolution. Until structural biology methods advance to the point of being able to deal with systems such as the GABA{sub A} receptor, it will be necessary to use more tractable surrogates to probe the molecular details of anesthetic recognition. We have previously shown that recognition of inhalational general anesthetics by the model protein apoferritin closely mirrors recognition by more complex and clinically relevant protein targets; here we show that apoferritin also binds propofol and related GABAergic anesthetics, and that the same binding site mediates recognition of both inhalational and injectable anesthetics. Apoferritin binding affinities for a series of propofol analogs were found to be strongly correlated with the ability to potentiate GABA responses at GABA{sub A} receptors, validating this model system for injectable anesthetics. High resolution x-ray crystal structures reveal that, despite the presence of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors, anesthetic recognition is mediated largely by van der Waals forces and the hydrophobic effect. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the ligands undergo considerable fluctuations about their equilibrium positions. Finally, apoferritin displays both structural and dynamic responses to anesthetic binding, which may mimic changes elicited by anesthetics in physiologic targets like ion channels.

  11. Drug binding properties of neonatal albumin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodersen, R; Honoré, B

    1989-01-01

    Neonatal and adult albumin was isolated by gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-300, from adult and umbilical cord serum, respectively. Binding of monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone, warfarin, sulfamethizole, and diazepam was studied by means of equilibrium dialysis and the binding data were analyzed...... by the method of several acceptable fitted curves. It was found that the binding affinity to neonatal albumin is less than to adult albumin for monoacetyl-diamino-diphenyl sulfone and warfarin. Sulfamethizole binding to the neonatal protein is similarly reduced when more than one molecule of the drug is bound...

  12. Parathyroid hormone binding to cultured avian osteoclasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teti, A.; Rizzoli, R.; Zambonin Zallone, A. (Univ. of Bari (Italy))

    1991-02-14

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) increases serum calcium concentration via a controversial cellular mechanism. We investigated whether PTH binds avian osteoclasts. Isolated hypocalcaemic hen osteoclasts were incubated with ({sup 125}I)--bovine PTH (1-84). Specific binding of the hormone to the cells, which reached the equilibrium within 60 min, was observed. Half maximal binding was reached by 10 min. Binding was competitively inhibited by increasing doses of unlabeled PTH, and was about 55% displaced by adding, at the equilibrium, 10(-6) M unlabeled PTH. Autoradiography demonstrated specific label on the osteoclast. The cellular mechanism activated by the hormone remains to be elucidated.

  13. A method for evaluating pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, T.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described to evaluate the susceptibility of gate valves to pressure locking and thermal binding. Binding of the valve disc in the closed position due to high pressure water trapped in the bonnet cavity (pressure locking) or differential thermal expansion of the disk in the seat (thermal binding) represents a potential mechanism that can prevent safety-related systems from functioning when called upon. The method described here provides a general equation that can be applied to a given gate valve design and set of operating conditions to determine the susceptibility of the valve to fail due to disc binding. The paper is organized into three parts. The first part discusses the physical mechanisms that cause disc binding. The second part describes the mathematical equations. The third part discusses the conclusions.

  14. Analysis of single particle diffusion with transient binding using particle filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jason; Fricks, John

    2016-07-21

    Diffusion with transient binding occurs in a variety of biophysical processes, including movement of transmembrane proteins, T cell adhesion, and caging in colloidal fluids. We model diffusion with transient binding as a Brownian particle undergoing Markovian switching between free diffusion when unbound and diffusion in a quadratic potential centered around a binding site when bound. Assuming the binding site is the last position of the particle in the unbound state and Gaussian observational error obscures the true position of the particle, we use particle filtering to predict when the particle is bound and to locate the binding sites. Maximum likelihood estimators of diffusion coefficients, state transition probabilities, and the spring constant in the bound state are computed with a stochastic Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  16. Binding efficiency of recombinant collagen-binding basic fibroblast growth factors (CBD-bFGFs) and their promotion for NIH-3T3 cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenxu; Zhou, Yulai; Chen, Li; Hu, Mingxin; Wang, Yu; Li, Linlong; Wang, Zongliang; Zhang, Peibiao

    2018-03-01

    The recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) containing collagen-binding domain (CBD) has been found to be a potential therapeutic factor in tissue regeneration. However, its binding efficiency and quantification remain uncertain. In this research, massive recombinant bFGFs with good bioactivity for enhancing the proliferation of NIH-3T3 cells were achieved. An ELISA-based quantitative method was set up to investigate the binding efficiency of CBD-bFGFs on collagen films. It indicated that the CBDs significantly increased the collagen-binding ability of bFGF (P < .05), with the optimum binding condition first determined to be in the pH range of 7.5-9.5 (P < .05). Then, the relevant equations to calculate the binding density of bFGF, C-bFGF, and V-bFGF were acquired. Analysis confirmed that the bioactivity of immobilized bFGFs was well correlated with the density of growth factor on collagen films. Based on this research, the density of growth factor is a logical and applicable dosage unit for quantification of binding efficiency of growth factors, rather than traditional concentration of soluble growth factors in tissue engineering applications. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. (BioMega, Inc., Laval, Quebec (Canada))

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  18. Violent Potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Henrik Hvenegaard; Søgaard, Thomas Friis

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the social significance of violence as potentiality and performance among former headhunters. Taking its outset in an ethnographic study of violence and masculinity among the Philippine people known as the Bugkalot, we explore how violence as “performed violent potentiality...... today abandoned headhunting, the potentials for violence and dominance, which the act of headhunting sought to elicit, remains a critical aspect of masculinity. We propose that a focus on the social significance of performative violent potentiality among Bugkalot men can provide general insights...... that can also be used in other contexts to understand how men construct hegemonic masculinity by strategically adopting the interspace of civility and violence....

  19. Lateralization and gender differences in the dopaminergic response to unpredictable reward in the human ventral striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Soelch, Chantal; Szczepanik, Joanna; Nugent, Allison; Barhaghi, Krystle; Rallis, Denise; Herscovitch, Peter; Carson, Richard E; Drevets, Wayne C

    2011-05-01

    Electrophysiological studies have shown that mesostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons increase activity in response to unpredicted rewards. With respect to other functions of the mesostriatal dopaminergic system, dopamine's actions show prominent laterality effects. Whether changes in DA transmission elicited by rewards also are lateralized, however, has not been investigated. Using [¹¹C]raclopride-PET to assess the striatal DA response to unpredictable monetary rewards, we hypothesized that such rewards would induce an asymmetric reduction in [¹¹C]raclopride binding in the ventral striatum, reflecting lateralization of endogenous dopamine release. In 24 healthy volunteers, differences in the regional D₂/₃ receptor binding potential (ΔBP) between an unpredictable reward condition and a sensorimotor control condition were measured using the bolus-plus-constant-infusion [¹¹C]raclopride method. During the reward condition subjects randomly received monetary awards while performing a 'slot-machine' task. The ΔBP between conditions was assessed in striatal regions-of-interest and compared between left and right sides. We found a significant condition × lateralization interaction in the ventral striatum. A significant reduction in binding potential (BP(ND) ) in the reward condition vs. the control condition was found only in the right ventral striatum, and the ΔBP was greater in the right than the left ventral striatum. Unexpectedly, these laterality effects appeared to be partly accounted for by gender differences, as our data showed a significant bilateral BP(ND) reduction in women while in men the reduction reached significance only in the right ventral striatum. These data suggest that DA release in response to unpredictable reward is lateralized in the human ventral striatum, particularly in males. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes with compensation for saturable binding to filters and its implication for binding studies with brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, O.M.; Wood, K.M.; Williams, D.C.

    1984-08-01

    Apparent specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine to human platelet membranes at high concentrations of imipramine showed deviation from that expected of a single binding site, a result consistent with a low-affinity binding site. The deviation was due to displaceable, saturable binding to the glass fibre filters used in the assays. Imipramine, chloripramine, desipramine, and fluoxetine inhibited binding to filters whereas 5-hydroxytryptamine and ethanol were ineffective. Experimental conditions were developed that eliminated filter binding, allowing assay of high- and low-affinity binding to membranes. Failure to correct for filter binding may lead to overestimation of binding parameters, Bmax and KD for high-affinity binding to membranes, and may also be misinterpreted as indicating a low-affinity binding component in both platelet and brain membranes. Low-affinity binding (KD less than 2 microM) of imipramine to human platelet membranes was demonstrated and its significance discussed.

  1. Acute treatment with pentobarbital alters the kinetics of in vivo receptor binding in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Yojiro [Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chibashi 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: yojiro.sakiyama@pfizer.com; Saito, Masao [Department of Medical Science, Institute of Medical Electronics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Allied Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of pentobarbital, a sedative-hypnotic barbiturate, on the in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptors in the mouse brain was investigated. Dose-related changes in the apparent binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 ([{sup 3}H]flumazenil) in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla were observed by pretreatment with pentobarbital. For quantification of the kinetic properties of the in vivo binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788, time courses of radioactivity following its injection were examined, and kinetic analysis was performed using the compartment model. The time courses of radioactivity following injection of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 with 3 mg/kg Ro15-1788 were used as input function. In all regions studied, rate constants between input compartment and specific binding compartment were significantly decreased by pentobarbital. However, no significant alterations in the binding potential (BP=K {sub 3}/K {sub 4}) of benzodiazepine receptors by pentobarbital were observed in any of the regions. A saturation experiment indicated that the decrease in the input rate constant (K {sub 3}), which includes both the association rate constant (k {sub on}) and the number of binding sites available (B {sub max}), was mainly due to decrease in k {sub on}. These results suggest that apparent increases in binding at 20 min after tracer injection were due to the decrease in the association and dissociation rates of binding in vivo.

  2. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  3. Thermodynamics of Ligand Binding to Acyl-Coenzyme A Binding Protein Studied by Titration Calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils Joakim; Sigurskjold, Bent Walther; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  4. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  5. 3D-QSAR model of flavonoids binding at benzodiazepine site in GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X; Liu, T; Gu, J; Luo, X; Ji, R; Cao, Y; Xue, H; Wong, J T; Wong, B L; Pei, G; Jiang, H; Chen, K

    2001-06-07

    With flavone as a structural template, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies and ab initio calculations were performed on a series of flavonoids. A reasonable pharmacophore model was built through CoMFA, CoMSIA, and HQSAR analyses and electrostatic potential calculations. A plausible binding mode for flavonoids with GABA(A) receptors was rationalized. On the basis of the commonly recognized binding site, the specific S1 and S2 subsites relating to substituent positions were proposed. The different binding affinities could be explained according to the frontier orbitals and electrostatic potential (ESP) maps. The ESP could be used as a novel starting point for designing more selective BZ-binding-site ligands.

  6. Localization-enhanced biexciton binding in semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    The influence of excitonic localization on the binding energy of biexcitons is investigated for quasi-three-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional AlxGa1-xAs structures. An increase of the biexciton binding energy is observed for localization energies comparable to or larger than the free biexcito...

  7. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  8. Identification of Glossina morsitans morsitans odorant binding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tsetse flies are vectors of trypanosome parasites, causative agents of Trypanosomiasis in humans and animals. Odorant Binding Proteins (OBPs) are critical in insect olfaction as they bind volatile odours from the environment and transport them to receptors within olfactory receptor neurons for processing providing critical ...

  9. Binding of corroded ions to human saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H J

    1985-05-01

    Employing equilibrium dialysis, the binding abilities of Cu, Al, Co and Cr ions from corroded Cu-Al and Co-Cr dental casting alloys towards human saliva and two of its gel chromatographic fractions were determined. Results indicate that both Cu and Co bind to human saliva i.e. 0.045 and 0.027 mg/mg protein, respectively. Besides possessing the largest binding ability, Cu also possessed the largest binding capacity. The saturation of Cu binding was not reached up to the limit of 0.35 mg protein/ml employed in the tests, while Co reached full saturation at about 0.2 mg protein/ml. Chromium showed absolutely no binding to human saliva while Al ions did not pass through the dialysis membranes. Compared to the binding with solutions that were synthetically made up to contain added salivary-type proteins, it is shown that the binding to human saliva is about 1 order of magnitude larger, at least for Cu ions.

  10. Modeling of ligand binding to dopamine D2 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostopovici-Halip Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminic receptors have been for long time the major targets for developing new small molecules with high affinity and selectivity to treat psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration, drug abuse, and other therapeutic areas. In the absence of a 3D structure for the human D2 dopamine (HDD2 receptor, the efforts for discovery and design of new potential drugs rely on comparative models generation, docking and pharmacophore development studies. To get a better understanding of the HDD2 receptor binding site and the ligand-receptor interactions a homology model of HDD2 receptor based on the X-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor has been built and used to dock a set of partial agonists of HDD2 receptor. The main characteristics of the binding mode for the HDD2 partial agonists set are given by the ligand particular folding and a complex network of contacts represented by stacking interactions, salt bridge and hydrogen bond formation. The characterization of the partial agonist binding mode at HDD2 receptor provide the needed information to generate pharmacophore models which represent essential information in the future virtual screening studies in order to identify new potential HDD2 partial agonists.

  11. Binding and lubrication of biomimetic boundary lubricants on articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaroo, Kirk J; Tan, Mingchee; Putnam, David; Bonassar, Lawrence J

    2017-03-01

    The glycoprotein, lubricin, is the primary boundary lubricant of articular cartilage and has been shown to prevent cartilage damage after joint injury. In this study, a library of eight bottle-brush copolymers were synthesized to mimic the structure and function of lubricin. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafted onto a polyacrylic acid (pAA) core mimicked the hydrophilic mucin-like domain of lubricin, and a thiol terminus anchored the polymers to cartilage surfaces much like lubricin's C-terminus. These copolymers, abbreviated as pAA-g-PEG, rapidly bound to cartilage surfaces with binding time constants ranging from 20 to 39 min, and affected lubrication under boundary mode conditions with coefficients of friction ranging from 0.140 ± 0.024 to 0.248 ± 0.030. Binding and lubrication were highly correlated (r 2  = 0.89-0.99), showing that boundary lubrication in this case strongly depends on the binding of the lubricant to the surface. Along with time-dependent and dose-dependent behavior, lubrication and binding of the lubricin-mimetics also depended on copolymer structural parameters including pAA backbone length, PEG side chain length, and PEG:AA brush density. Polymers with larger backbone sizes, brush sizes, or brush densities took longer to bind (p lubricate and protect cartilage in vivo. In copolymers with shorter pAA backbones, increasing hydrodynamic size inhibited lubrication (p lubricating efficacy as recombinant lubricins and as such have potential for in vivo treatment of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:548-557, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. MHC class I epitope binding prediction trained on small data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    The identification of potential T-cell epitopes is important for development of new human or vetenary vaccines, both considering single protein/subunit vaccines, and for epitope/peptide vaccines as such. The highly diverse MHC class I alleles bind very different peptides, and accurate binding...... for predicting peptides binding to specific MHC class I alleles. The method combines advanced automatic scoring matrix generation with empirical position specific differential anchor weighting. The method leads to predictions with a comparable or higher accuracy than other established prediction servers, even...

  13. O2 Binding to Heme is Strongly Facilitated by Near‐Degeneracy of Electronic States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the computed O2 binding to heme, which for the first time explains experimental enthalpies for this process of central importance to bioinorganic chemistry. All four spin states along the relaxed FeO2‐binding curves were optimized using the full heme system with dispersion......, thermodynamic, and scalar‐relativistic corrections, applying several density functionals. When including all these physical terms, the experimental enthalpy of O2 binding (−59 kJ mol−1) is closely reproduced by TPSSh‐D3 (−66 kJ mol−1). Dispersion changes the potential energy surfaces and leads to the correct...

  14. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  15. Factor VIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortoe, G; Sorensen, B B; Petersen, L C

    2005-01-01

    The liver is believed to be the primary clearance organ for coagulation proteases, including factor VIIa (FVIIa). However, at present, clearance mechanisms for FVIIa in liver are unknown. To obtain information on the FVIIa clearance mechanism, we investigated the binding and internalization...... no effect. HEPG2 cells internalized FVIIa with a rate of 10 fmol 10(-5) cells h(-1). In contrast to HEPG2 cells, FVIIa binding to primary rat hepatocytes was completely independent of TF, and excess unlabeled FVIIa partly reduced the binding of 125I-FVIIa to rat hepatocytes. Further, compared with HEPG2...... cells, three- to fourfold more FVIIa bound to rat primary hepatocytes, and the bound FVIIa was internalized at a faster rate. Similar FVIIa binding and internalization profiles were observed in primary human hepatocytes. Plasma inhibitors had no effect on FVIIa binding and internalization in hepatocytes...

  16. (TH) diazepam binding to human granulocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, P.A.; Cundall, R.L.; Rolfe, B.

    1985-07-08

    (TH)-diazepam binds to sites on human granulocyte membranes, with little or no binding to platelets or lymphocytes. These (TH)-diazepam binding sites are of the peripheral type, being strongly inhibited by R05-4864 (Ki=6.23nM) but only weakly by clonazepam (Ki=14 M). Binding of (TH) diazepam at 0 is saturable, specific and stereoselective. Scatchard analysis indicates a single class of sites with Bmax of 109 +/- 17f moles per mg of protein and K/sub D/ of 3.07 +/- 0.53nM. Hill plots of saturation experiments gave straight lines with a mean Hill coefficient of 1.03 +/- 0.014. Binding is time dependent and reversible and it varies linearly with granulocyte protein concentration over the range 0.025-0.300 mg of protein. 11 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  17. Ethylene binding site affinity in ripening apples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, S.M. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Horticultural Science); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Scatchard plots for ethylene binding in apples (Malus domestica Borkh.), which were harvested weekly for 5 weeks to include the ethylene climacteric rise, showed C[sub 50] values (concentration of ethylene needed to occupy 50% of the ethylene binding sites) of 0.10, 0.11, 0.34, 0.40, and 0.57 [mu]l ethylene/liter[sup [minus]1], respectively, for each of the 5 weeks. Higher ethylene concentrations were required to saturate the binding sites during the climacteric rise than at other times. Diffusion of [sup 14]C-ethylene from the binding sites was curvilinear and did not show any indication of multiple binding sites. Ethylene was not metabolized by apple tissue.

  18. Potential Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lukeš, Jaroslav; Netuka, Ivan; Veselý, Jiří

    1988-01-01

    Within the tradition of meetings devoted to potential theory, a conference on potential theory took place in Prague on 19-24, July 1987. The Conference was organized by the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, with the collaboration of the Institute of Mathematics, Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences, the Department of Mathematics, Czech University of Technology, the Union of Czechoslovak Mathematicians and Physicists, the Czechoslovak Scientific and Technical Society, and supported by IMU. During the Conference, 69 scientific communications from different branches of potential theory were presented; the majority of them are in­ cluded in the present volume. (Papers based on survey lectures delivered at the Conference, its program as well as a collection of problems from potential theory will appear in a special volume of the Lecture Notes Series published by Springer-Verlag). Topics of these communications truly reflect the vast scope of contemporary potential theory. Some contributions deal...

  19. Biochemical and biophysical characterization of the selenium-binding and reducing site in Arabidopsis thaliana homologue to mammals selenium-binding protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Florie; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Palencia, Andrés; Cobessi, David; Sarret, Géraldine; Zubieta, Chloé; Jourdain, Agnès; Dumas, Renaud; Forge, Vincent; Testemale, Denis; Bourguignon, Jacques; Hugouvieux, Véronique

    2014-11-14

    The function of selenium-binding protein 1 (SBP1), present in almost all organisms, has not yet been established. In mammals, SBP1 is known to bind the essential element selenium but the binding site has not been identified. In addition, the SBP family has numerous potential metal-binding sites that may play a role in detoxification pathways in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AtSBP1 over-expression increases tolerance to two toxic compounds for plants, selenium and cadmium, often found as soil pollutants. For a better understanding of AtSBP1 function in detoxification mechanisms, we investigated the chelating properties of the protein toward different ligands with a focus on selenium using biochemical and biophysical techniques. Thermal shift assays together with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry revealed that AtSBP1 binds selenium after incubation with selenite (SeO3(2-)) with a ligand to protein molar ratio of 1:1. Isothermal titration calorimetry confirmed the 1:1 stoichiometry and revealed an unexpectedly large value of binding enthalpy suggesting a covalent bond between selenium and AtSBP1. Titration of reduced Cys residues and comparative mass spectrometry on AtSBP1 and the purified selenium-AtSBP1 complex identified Cys(21) and Cys(22) as being responsible for the binding of one selenium. These results were validated by site-directed mutagenesis. Selenium K-edge x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy performed on the selenium-AtSBP1 complex demonstrated that AtSBP1 reduced SeO3(2-) to form a R-S-Se(II)-S-R-type complex. The capacity of AtSBP1 to bind different metals and selenium is discussed with respect to the potential function of AtSBP1 in detoxification mechanisms and selenium metabolism. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Mechanisms of zinc binding to the solute-binding protein AztC and transfer from the metallochaperone AztD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupane, Durga P; Avalos, Dante; Fullam, Stephanie; Roychowdhury, Hridindu; Yukl, Erik T

    2017-10-20

    Bacteria can acquire the essential metal zinc from extremely zinc-limited environments by using ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. These transporters are critical virulence factors, relying on specific and high-affinity binding of zinc by a periplasmic solute-binding protein (SBP). As such, the mechanisms of zinc binding and release among bacterial SBPs are of considerable interest as antibacterial drug targets. Zinc SBPs are characterized by a flexible loop near the high-affinity zinc-binding site. The function of this structure is not always clear, and its flexibility has thus far prevented structural characterization by X-ray crystallography. Here, we present intact structures for the zinc-specific SBP AztC from the bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans in the zinc-bound and apo-states. A comparison of these structures revealed that zinc loss prompts significant structural rearrangements, mediated by the formation of a sodium-binding site in the apo-structure. We further show that the AztC flexible loop has no impact on zinc-binding affinity, stoichiometry, or protein structure, yet is essential for zinc transfer from the metallochaperone AztD. We also found that 3 His residues in the loop appear to temporarily coordinate zinc and then convey it to the high-affinity binding site. Thus, mutation of any of these residues to Ala abrogated zinc transfer from AztD. Our structural and mechanistic findings conclusively identify a role for the AztC flexible loop in zinc acquisition from the metallochaperone AztD, yielding critical insights into metal binding by AztC from both solution and AztD. These proteins are highly conserved in human pathogens, making this work potentially useful for the development of novel antibiotics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Hyper-Binding across Time: Age Differences in the Effect of Temporal Proximity on Paired-Associate Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Karen L.; Trelle, Alexandra; Hasher, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Older adults show hyper- (or excessive) binding effects for simultaneously and sequentially presented distraction. Here, we addressed the potential role of hyper-binding in paired-associate learning. Older and younger adults learned a list of word pairs and then received an associative recognition task in which rearranged pairs were formed from…

  2. The binding sites for benztropines and dopamine in the dopamine transporter overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Heidi Bisgaard; Larsen, M Andreas B; Mazier, Sonia

    2011-01-01

    Analogs of benztropines (BZTs) are potent inhibitors of the dopamine transporter (DAT) but are less effective than cocaine as behavioral stimulants. As a result, there have been efforts to evaluate these compounds as leads for potential medication for cocaine addiction. Here we use computational...... with a larger decrease in the affinity for BZT than for JHW007. Summarized, our data suggest that BZTs display a classical competitive binding mode with binding sites overlapping those of cocaine and dopamine....

  3. Characterization of the Ptychodiscus brevis Polyether Neurotoxin Binding Component in Excitable Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-31

    and a solvent system consisting of CHCl 3 /’MeOH/trifluoroacetic acid (100/10/1). Saxitoxin was obtained from the FDA, batrachotoxin from NIH, and sea...and batrachotoxin benzoate (50-70 nM). Specific binding is saturable and Is relatively membrane- potential independent; there beinq a...their activity by sodium channel activators would be expected. In fact, tritiated batrachotoxin benzoate binding is enhanced up to 5-fold in the

  4. Identification of Lipid Binding Modulators Using the Protein-Lipid Overlay Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tuo-Xian; Xiong, Wen; Finkielstein, Carla V; Capelluto, Daniel G S

    2017-01-01

    The protein-lipid overlay assay is an inexpensive, easy-to-implement, and high-throughput methodology that employs nitrocellulose membranes to immobilize lipids in order to rapid screen and identify protein-lipid interactions. In this chapter, we show how this methodology can identify potential modulators of protein-lipid interactions by screening water-soluble lipid competitors or even the introduction of pH changes during the binding assay to identify pH-dependent lipid binding events.

  5. Computational design of binding proteins to EGFR domain II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Sup Choi

    Full Text Available We developed a process to produce novel interactions between two previously unrelated proteins. This process selects protein scaffolds and designs protein interfaces that bind to a surface patch of interest on a target protein. Scaffolds with shapes complementary to the target surface patch were screened using an exhaustive computational search of the human proteome and optimized by directed evolution using phage display. This method was applied to successfully design scaffolds that bind to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR domain II, the interface of EGFR dimerization, with high reactivity toward the target surface patch of EGFR domain II. One potential application of these tailor-made protein interactions is the development of therapeutic agents against specific protein targets.

  6. Glucose Binding Protein as a Novel Optical Glucose Nanobiosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majed DWEIK

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Development of an in vivo optical sensor requires the utilization of Near Infra Red (NIR fluorophores due to their ability to operate within the biological tissue window. Alexa Fluor 750 (AF750 and Alexa Fluor 680 (AF680 were examined as potential NIR fluorophores for an in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET glucose biosensor. AF680 and AF750 found to be a FRET pair and percent energy transfer was calculated. Next, the tested dye pair was utilized in a competitive binding assay in order to detect glucose. Concanavalin A (Con A and dextran have binding affinity, but in the presence of glucose, glucose displaces dextran due to its higher affinity to Con A than dextran. Finally, the percent signal transfer through porcine skin was examined. The results showed with approximately 4.0 mm porcine skin thickness, 1.98 % of the fluorescence was transmitted and captured by the detector.

  7. Quaternary Benzyltriethylammonium Ion Binding to the Na,K-ATPase: a Tool to Investigate Extracellular K+ Binding Reactions†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluffo, R. Daniel; González-Lebrero, Rodolfo M.; Kaufman, Sergio B.; Kortagere, Sandhya; Orban, Branly; Rossi, Rolando C.; Berlin, Joshua R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined how the quaternary organic ammonium ion, benzyltriethylamine (BTEA), binds to the Na,K-ATPase to produce membrane potential (VM)-dependent inhibition and tested the prediction that such a VM-dependent inhibitor would display electrogenic binding kinetics. BTEA competitively inhibited K+ activation of Na,K-ATPase activity and steady-state 86Rb+ occlusion. The initial rate of 86Rb+ occlusion was decreased by BTEA to a similar degree whether it was added to the enzyme prior to or simultaneously with Rb+, a demonstration that BTEA inhibits the Na,K-ATPase without being occluded. Several BTEA structural analogues reversibly inhibited Na,K-pump current, but none blocked current in a VM-dependent manner except BTEA and its para-nitro derivative, pNBTEA. Under conditions that promoted electroneutral K+-K+ exchange by the Na,K-ATPase, step changes in VM elicited pNBTEA-activated ouabain-sensitive transient currents that had similarities to those produced with the K+ congener, Tl+. pNBTEA- and Tl+-dependent transient currents both displayed saturation of charge moved at extreme negative and positive VM, equivalence of charge moved during and after step changes in VM, and similar apparent valence. The rate constant (ktot) for Tl+-dependent transient current asymptotically approached a minimum value at positive VM. In contrast, ktot for pNBTEA-dependent transient current was a “U”-shaped function of VM with a minimum value near 0 mV. Homology models of the Na,K-ATPase alpha subunit suggested that quaternary amines can bind to two extracellularly-accessible sites, one of them located at K+ binding sites positioned between transmembrane helices 4, 5, and 6. Altogether, these data revealed important information about electrogenic ion binding reactions of the Na,K-ATPase that are not directly measurable during ion transport by this enzyme. PMID:19621894

  8. Engineering bispecificity into a single albumin-binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Nilvebrant

    Full Text Available Bispecific antibodies as well as non-immunoglobulin based bispecific affinity proteins are considered to have a very high potential in future biotherapeutic applications. In this study, we report on a novel approach for generation of extremely small bispecific proteins comprised of only a single structural domain. Binding to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α was engineered into an albumin-binding domain while still retaining the original affinity for albumin, resulting in a bispecific protein composed of merely 46 amino acids. By diversification of the non albumin-binding side of the three-helix bundle domain, followed by display of the resulting library on phage particles, bispecific single-domain proteins were isolated using selections with TNF-α as target. Moreover, based on the obtained sequences from the phage selection, a second-generation library was designed in order to further increase the affinity of the bispecific candidates. Staphylococcal surface display was employed for the affinity maturation, enabling efficient isolation of improved binders as well as multiparameter-based sortings with both TNF-α and albumin as targets in the same selection cycle. Isolated variants were sequenced and the binding to albumin and TNF-α was analyzed. This analysis revealed an affinity for TNF-α below 5 nM for the strongest binders. From the multiparameter sorting that simultaneously targeted TNF-α and albumin, several bispecific candidates were isolated with high affinity to both antigens, suggesting that cell display in combination with fluorescence activated cell sorting is a suitable technology for engineering of bispecificity. To our knowledge, the new binders represent the smallest engineered bispecific proteins reported so far. Possibilities and challenges as well as potential future applications of this novel strategy are discussed.

  9. Potential bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, P.L.; Tomio, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, relativistic confining potential models, endowed with bag constants associated to volume energy terms, are investigated. In contrast to the usual bag model, these potential bags are distinguished by having smeared bag surfaces. Based on the dynamical assumptions underlying the fuzzy bag model, these bag constants are derived from the corresponding energy-momentum tensor. Explicit expressions for the single-quark energies and for the nucleon bag constant are obtained by means of an improved analytical version of the saddle-point variational method for the Dirac equation with confining power-law potentials of the scalar plus vector (S + V) or pure scalar (S) type

  10. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states

  11. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Cho, Christine [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Govindappa, Sowmya [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India); Apicella, Michael A. [Carver College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109 (United States); Ramaswamy, S., E-mail: ramas@instem.res.in [Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, NCBS Campus, GKVK Post, Bangalore, Karnataka 560 065 (India)

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  12. Specific insulin binding in bovine chromaffin cells; demonstration of preferential binding to adrenalin-storing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serck-Hanssen, G.; Soevik, O.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin binding was studied in subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells enriched in adrenalin-producing cells (A-cells) or noradrenalin-producing cells (NA-cells). Binding of 125 I-insulin was carried out at 15 0 C for 3 hrs in the absence or presence of excess unlabeled hormone. Four fractions of cells were obtained by centrifugation on a stepwise bovine serum albumin gradient. The four fractions were all shown to bind insulin in a specific manner and the highest binding was measured in the cell layers of higher densities, containing mainly A-cells. The difference in binding of insulin to the four subpopulations of chromaffin cells seemed to be related to differences in numbers of receptors as opposed to receptor affinities. The authors conclude that bovine chromaffin cells possess high affinity binding sites for insulin and that these binding sites are mainly confined to A-cells. 24 references, 2 figures, 1 table

  13. Thermodynamic binding constants for gallium transferrin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, W.R.; Pecoraro, V.L.

    1983-01-18

    Gallium-67 is widely used as an imaging agent for tumors and inflammatory abscesses. It is well stablished that Ga/sup 3 +/ travels through the circulatory system bound to the serum iron transport protein transferrin and that this protein binding is an essential step in tumor localization. However, there have been conflicting reports on the magnitude of the gallium-transferrin binding constants. Therefore, thermodynamic binding constants for gallium complexation at the two specific metal binding sites of human serum transferrin at pH 7.4 and 5 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ have been determined by UV difference spectroscopy. The conditional constants calculated for 27 mM NaHCO/sub 3/ are log K/sub 1/* = 20.3 and log K/sub 2/* = 19.3. These results are discussed in relation to the thermodynamics of transferrin binding of Fe/sup 3 +/ and to previous reports on gallium binding. The strength of transferrin complexation is also compared to that of a series of low molecular weight ligands by using calculated pM values (pM = -log (Ga(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6/)) to express the effective binding strength at pH 7.4.

  14. Mimicking of Estradiol Binding by Flame Retardants and Their Metabolites: A Crystallographic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Rajendrakumar A.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), used in many types of consumer goods, are being studied because of concerns about possible health effects related to endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and neurotoxicity. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), the most widely used BFR, and human metabolites of certain congeners of polybrominated diphenyl ether (e.g., 3-OH-BDE-47) have been suggested to inhibit estrogen sulfotransferase, potentially affecting estrogen metabolism. Objectives: Our primary goal was to understand the structural mechanism for inhibition of the hormone-metabolizing enzyme estrogen sulfotransferase by certain BFRs. We also sought to understand various factors that facilitate the binding of flame retardants in the enzyme binding pocket. Methods: We used X-ray crystallography to obtain atomic detail of the binding modes of TBBPA and 3-OH-BDE-47 to estrogen sulfotransferase for comparison with binding of the endogenous substrate estradiol. Results: The crystal structures reveal how BFRs mimic estradiol binding as well as the various interactions between the compounds and protein residues that facilitate its binding. In addition, the structures provide insights into the ability of the sulfotransferase substrate binding pocket to accommodate a range of halogenated compounds that satisfy minimal structural criteria. Conclusions: Our results show how BFRs or their metabolites can bind to and inhibit a key hormone-metabolizing enzyme, potentially causing endocrine disruption. Citation: Gosavi RA, Knudsen GA, Birnbaum LS, Pedersen LC. 2013. Mimicking of estradiol binding by flame retardants and their metabolites: a crystallographic analysis. Environ Health Perspect 121:1194–1199; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306902 PMID:23959441

  15. Myeloperoxidase selectively binds and selectively kills microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Robert C; Stephens, Jackson T

    2011-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is reported to selectively bind to bacteria. The present study provides direct evidence of MPO binding selectivity and tests the relationship of selective binding to selective killing. The microbicidal effectiveness of H(2)O(2) and of OCl(-) was compared to that of MPO plus H(2)O(2). Synergistic microbicidal action was investigated by combining Streptococcus sanguinis, a H(2)O(2)-producing microbe showing low MPO binding, with high-MPO-binding Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa without exogenous H(2)O(2), with and without MPO, and with and without erythrocytes (red blood cells [RBCs]). Selectivity of MPO microbicidal action was conventionally measured as the MPO MIC and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) for 82 bacteria including E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus agalactiae, and viridans streptococci. Both H(2)O(2) and OCl(-) destroyed RBCs at submicrobicidal concentrations. Nanomolar concentrations of MPO increased H(2)O(2) microbicidal action 1,000-fold. Streptococci plus MPO produced potent synergistic microbicidal action against all microbes tested, and RBCs caused only a small decrease in potency without erythrocyte damage. MPO directly killed H(2)O(2)-producing S. pyogenes but was ineffective against non-H(2)O(2)-producing E. faecalis. The MPO MICs and MBCs for E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus were significantly lower than those for E. faecalis. The streptococcal studies showed much higher MIC/MBC results, but such testing required lysed horse blood-supplemented medium, thus preventing valid comparison of these results to those for the other microbes. E. faecalis MPO binding is reportedly weak compared to binding of E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus but strong compared to binding of streptococci. Selective MPO binding results in selective killing.

  16. Evaluation of the In Vivo and Ex Vivo Binding of Novel BC1 Cannabinoid Receptor Radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, A.; Gatley, J.; Gifford, A.

    2002-01-01

    The primary active ingredient of marijuana, 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, exerts its psychoactive effects by binding to cannabinoid CB1 receptors. These receptors are found throughout the brain with high concentrations in the hippocampus and cerebellum. The current study was conducted to evaluate the binding of a newly developed putative cannabinoid antagonist, AM630, and a classical cannabinoid 8-tetrahydrocannabinol as potential PET and/or SPECT imaging agents for brain CB1 receptors. For both of these ligands in vivo and ex vivo studies in mice were conducted. AM630 showed good overall brain uptake (as measure by %IA/g) and a moderately rapid clearance from the brain with a half-clearance time of approximately 30 minutes. However, AM630 did not show selective binding to CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Ex vivo autoradiography supported the lack of selective binding seen in the in vivo study. Similar to AM630, 8-tetrahydrocanibol also failed to show selective binding to CB1 receptor rich brain areas. The 8-tetrahydrocanibol showed moderate overall brain uptake and relatively slow brain clearance as compared to AM630. Further studies were done with AM2233, a cannabinoid ligand with a similar structure as AM630. These studies were done to develop an ex vivo binding assay to quantify the displacement of [131I]AM2233 binding by other ligands in Swiss-Webster and CB1 receptor knockout mice. By developing this assay we hoped to determine the identity of an unknown binding site for AM2233 present in the hippocampus of CB1 knockout mice. Using an approach based on incubation of brain slices prepared from mice given intravenous [131I]AM2233 in either the presence or absence of AM2233 (unlabelled) it was possible to demonstrate a significant AM2233-displacable binding in the Swiss-Webster mice. Future studies will determine if this assay is appropriate for identifying the unknown binding site for AM2233 in the CB1 knockout mice.

  17. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittelmann Hans D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/.

  18. Druggability of methyl-lysine binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, C.; Nguyen, K.; Schapira, M.

    2011-12-01

    Structural modules that specifically recognize—or read—methylated or acetylated lysine residues on histone peptides are important components of chromatin-mediated signaling and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Deregulation of epigenetic mechanisms is associated with disease conditions, and antagonists of acetyl-lysine binding bromodomains are efficacious in animal models of cancer and inflammation, but little is known regarding the druggability of methyl-lysine binding modules. We conducted a systematic structural analysis of readers of methyl marks and derived a predictive druggability landscape of methyl-lysine binding modules. We show that these target classes are generally less druggable than bromodomains, but that some proteins stand as notable exceptions.

  19. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  20. Predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptides binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II molecules are crucial for initiation and regulation of immune responses. Predicting peptides that bind to a specific MHC molecule plays an important role in determining potential candidates for vaccines. The binding groove in class II MHC is open at both ends, allowing peptides longer than 9-mer to bind. Finding the consensus motif facilitating the binding of peptides to a MHC class II molecule is difficult because of different lengths of binding peptides and varying location of 9-mer binding core. The level of difficulty increases when the molecule is promiscuous and binds to a large number of low affinity peptides. In this paper, we propose two approaches using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEA for predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. One uses the information from both binders and non-binders for self-discovery of motifs. The other, in addition, uses information from experimentally determined motifs for guided-discovery of motifs. Results The proposed methods are intended for finding peptides binding to MHC class II I-Ag7 molecule – a promiscuous binder to a large number of low affinity peptides. Cross-validation results across experiments on two motifs derived for I-Ag7 datasets demonstrate better generalization abilities and accuracies of the present method over earlier approaches. Further, the proposed method was validated and compared on two publicly available benchmark datasets: (1 an ensemble of qualitative HLA-DRB1*0401 peptide data obtained from five different sources, and (2 quantitative peptide data obtained for sixteen different alleles comprising of three mouse alleles and thirteen HLA alleles. The proposed method outperformed earlier methods on most datasets, indicating that it is well suited for finding peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. Conclusion We present two MOEA-based algorithms for finding motifs

  1. Use of QSPR Modeling to Characterize In Vitro Binding of Drugs to a Gut-Restricted Polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Christine Taylor; Blake, James F; Mistry, Anita; Liu, Fengling; Carreno, Diana; Madsen, Deidre; Mu, YongQi; Mayo, Martha; Stahl, Wilhelm; Matthews, David; Maclean, Derek; Harrison, Steve

    2018-03-08

    Polymeric drugs, including patiromer (Veltassa®), bind target molecules or ions in the gut, allowing fecal elimination. Non-absorbed insoluble polymers, like patiromer, avoid common systemic drug-drug interactions (DDIs). However, the potential for DDI via polymer binding to orally administered drugs during transit of the gastrointestinal tract remains. Here we elucidate the properties correlated with drug-patiromer binding using quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models. We selected 28 drugs to evaluate for binding to patiromer in vitro over a range of pH and ionic conditions intended to mimic the gut environment. Using this in vitro data, we developed QSPR models using step-wise linear regression and analyzed over 100 physiochemical drug descriptors. Four descriptors emerged that account for ~70% of patiromer-drug binding in vitro: the computed surface area of hydrogen bond accepting atoms, ionization potential, electron affinity, and lipophilicity (R 2  = 0.7, Q 2  = 0.6). Further, certain molecular properties are shared by nonbinding, weak, or strong binding compounds. These findings offer insight into drivers of in vitro binding to patiromer and describe a useful approach for assessing potential drug-binding risk of investigational polymeric drugs.

  2. Violent potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Henrik Hvenegaard; Friis Søgaard, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the social significance of violence as potentiality and performance among former headhunters engaged in ritual killings. Taking its outset in an ethnographic study of violence and masculinity among the Philippine people known as the Bugkalot, we explore how violence....... While most Bugkalot men have today abandoned headhunting, the potentials for violence and dominance, which the act of headhunting sought to elicit, remains a critical aspect of masculinity. We propose that a focus on the social significance of performative violent potentiality among Bugkalot men can...... provide general insights that can also be used in other contexts to understand how men construct hegemonic masculinity by strategically adopting the interspace of civility and violence....

  3. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) promoter binding factor, a transcription activator of the Acanthamoeba TBP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W; Bateman, E

    1995-12-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP) gene promoter binding factor (TPBF) is a transactivator which binds to the TBP promoter element (TPE) sequence of the Acanthamoeba TBP gene promoter and stimulates transcription in vitro. We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding TPBF. TPBF is a polypeptide of 327 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 37 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence of TPBF shows no significant homology to other proteins. TPBF has two potential coiled-coil regions, a basic region, a proline-rich region, a histidine-rich N terminus, and a nuclear targeting sequence. The recombinant protein has an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, identical with that of TPBF purified from Acanthamoeba. Recombinant TPBF is able to bind DNA and activate transcription with the same specificity as natural Acanthamoeba TPBF, demonstrating the authenticity of the clone. Mobility shift assays of co-translated TPBF polypeptides and chemical cross-linking demonstrate that TPBF is tetrameric in solution and when bound to DNA. Analyses of TPBF mutants show that Coiled-coil II is essential for DNA binding, but Coiled-coil I and the basic region are also involved. TPBF is thus a novel DNA-binding protein with functional similarity to the tumor suppressor protein p53.

  4. Peptide binding specificity of the chaperone calreticulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandhu, N.; Duus, K.; Jorgensen, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    Calreticulin is a molecular chaperone with specificity for polypeptides and N-linked monoglucosylated glycans. In order to determine the specificity of polypeptide binding, the interaction of calreticulin with polypeptides was investigated using synthetic peptides of different length and composit...

  5. Fatty Acid Binding Proteins in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jett, Marti

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that there is a distinct pattern of fatty acid binding protein (FAEP) expression in prostate cancer vs normal cells and that finding has be confirmed in patient samples of biopsy specimens...

  6. Adjustment of legally binding local plans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvingel, Line Træholt; Aunsborg, Christian; Christensen, Finn Kjær

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, and by law, new urban areas in Denmark are regulated and planned through legally binding local plans. Recently a tendency has occurred: The municipalities make the legally binding local plans quite open for future adjustment, and they are using a substantial amount of ‘empowerment......, which seem to be beyond the scope of the Danish Planning Act. This paper deals with this problem through case studies and a legal analysis of present law. If the combination of the legally binding local plan and subsequent added requirements is misused, it will weaken the legal rights of the citizens...... the considerations of legal rights, the extend of the legal use of empowerment provisions and the combination of the use of legal binding local plans and other legal instruments such as easements and sales agreements....

  7. Binding of plasma proteins to titanium dioxide nanotubes with different diameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Mukta; Flašker, Ajda; Lokar, Maruša; Mrak-Poljšak, Katjuša; Mazare, Anca; Artenjak, Andrej; Čučnik, Saša; Kralj, Slavko; Velikonja, Aljaž; Schmuki, Patrik; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Sodin-Semrl, Snezna; Iglič, Aleš

    2015-01-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are considered to be one of the most applicable materials in medical devices because of their suitable properties, most importantly high corrosion resistance and the specific combination of strength with biocompatibility. In order to improve the biocompatibility of titanium surfaces, the current report initially focuses on specifying the topography of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes (NTs) by electrochemical anodization. The zeta potential (ζ-potential) of NTs showed a negative value and confirmed the agreement between the measured and theoretically predicted dependence of ζ-potential on salt concentration, whereby the absolute value of ζ-potential diminished with increasing salt concentrations. We investigated binding of various plasma proteins with different sizes and charges using the bicinchoninic acid assay and immunofluorescence microscopy. Results showed effective and comparatively higher protein binding to NTs with 100 nm diameters (compared to 50 or 15 nm). We also showed a dose-dependent effect of serum amyloid A protein binding to NTs. These results and theoretical calculations of total available surface area for binding of proteins indicate that the largest surface area (also considering the NT lengths) is available for 100 nm NTs, with decreasing surface area for 50 and 15 nm NTs. These current investigations will have an impact on increasing the binding ability of biomedical devices in the body leading to increased durability of biomedical devices. PMID:25733829

  8. Neuroticism Associates with Cerebral in Vivo Serotonin Transporter Binding Differently in Males and Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, Lauri; Miettunen, Jouko; Cannon, Dara M

    2017-01-01

    scores from 91 healthy males and 56 healthy females. We specifically tested if the association between neuroticism and serotonin transporter is different in females and males. Results: We found that neuroticism and thalamic serotonin transporter binding potentials were associated in both males...... and females, but with opposite directionality. Higher neuroticism associated with higher serotonin transporter binding potential in males (standardized beta 0.292, P=.008), whereas in females, higher neuroticism associated with lower serotonin transporter binding potential (standardized beta -0.288, P=.014......). Conclusions: The finding is in agreement with recent studies showing that the serotonergic system is involved in affective disorders differently in males and females and suggests that contribution of thalamic serotonin transporter to the risk of affective disorders depends on sex....

  9. Aptamers Binding to c-Met Inhibiting Tumor Cell Migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Piater

    Full Text Available The human receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays an important role in the control of critical cellular processes. Since c-Met is frequently over expressed or deregulated in human malignancies, blocking its activation is of special interest for therapy. In normal conditions, the c-Met receptor is activated by its bivalent ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF. Also bivalent antibodies can activate the receptor by cross linking, limiting therapeutic applications. We report the generation of the RNA aptamer CLN64 containing 2'-fluoro pyrimidine modifications by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX. CLN64 and a previously described single-stranded DNA (ssDNA aptamer CLN3 exhibited high specificities and affinities to recombinant and cellular expressed c-Met. Both aptamers effectively inhibited HGF-dependent c-Met activation, signaling and cell migration. We showed that these aptamers did not induce c-Met activation, revealing an advantage over bivalent therapeutic molecules. Both aptamers were shown to bind overlapping epitopes but only CLN3 competed with HGF binding to cMet. In addition to their therapeutic and diagnostic potential, CLN3 and CLN64 aptamers exhibit valuable tools to further understand the structural and functional basis for c-Met activation or inhibition by synthetic ligands and their interplay with HGF binding.

  10. Photoaffinity labeling of the pactamycin binding site on eubacterial ribosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tejedor, F.; Amils, R.; Ballesta, J.P.

    1985-01-01

    Pactamycin, an inhibitor of the initial steps of protein synthesis, has an acetophenone group in its chemical structure that makes the drug a potentially photoreactive molecule. In addition, the presence of a phenolic residue makes it easily susceptible to radioactive labeling. Through iodination, one radioactive derivative of pactamycin has been obtained with biological activities similar to the unmodified drug when tested on in vivo and cell-free systems. With the use of [ 125 I]iodopactamycin, ribosomes of Escherichia coli have been photolabeled under conditions that preserve the activity of the particles and guarantee the specificity of the binding sites. Under these conditions, RNA is preferentially labeled when free, small ribosomal subunits are photolabeled, but proteins are the main target in the whole ribosome. This indicates that an important conformational change takes place in the binding site on association of the two subunits. The major labeled proteins are S2, S4, S18, S21, and L13. These proteins in the pactamycin binding site are probably related to the initiation step of protein synthesis

  11. Presenting Precision Glycomacromolecules on Gold Nanoparticles for Increased Lectin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Boden

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles have great potential as biosensors and as inhibitors due to their increased binding to carbohydrate-recognizing receptors such as the lectins. Here we apply previously developed solid phase polymer synthesis to obtain a series of precision glycomacromolecules that allows for straightforward variation of their chemical structure as well as functionalization of gold nanoparticles by ligand exchange. A novel building block is introduced allowing for the change of spacer building blocks within the macromolecular scaffold going from an ethylene glycol unit to an aliphatic spacer. Furthermore, the valency and overall length of the glycomacromolecule is varied. All glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles show high degree of functionalization along with high stability in buffer solution. Therefore, a series of measurements applying UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS and surface plasmon resonance (SPR were performed studying the aggregation behavior of the glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles in presence of model lectin Concanavalin A. While the multivalent presentation of glycomacromolecules on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs showed a strong increase in binding compared to the free ligands, we also observed an influence of the chemical structure of the ligand such as its valency or hydrophobicity on the resulting lectin interactions. The straightforward variation of the chemical structure of the precision glycomacromolecule thus gives access to tailor-made glyco-gold nanoparticles (glyco-AuNPs and fine-tuning of their lectin binding properties.

  12. Enzyme binding selectivity prediction: alpha-thrombin vs trypsin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlinsek, G; Novic, M; Kotnik, M; Solmajer, T

    2004-01-01

    In the present work we explore the possibility of an in-depth computational analysis of available experimental X-ray structures in the specific case of a series of alpha-thrombin and trypsin complexes with their respective inhibitors for the development of a novel scoring function based on molecular electrostatic potential computed at the contact surface in the enzyme-inhibitor molecular complex. We subsequently employ the chemometrical approach to determine which are the interactions in the large volume of data that determine the resulting experimental binding constant between ligand and receptor. The results of the model evaluated with molecules in the independent validation set show that a reasonable average error of 1.30 log units of the difference between experimental and calculated binding constants was achieved in the system thrombin-trypsin, which is comparable with those of methods from the literature. Furthermore, by a careful preparation of the Kohonen top layer in the artificial neural network approach that is normally perceived as a "black box device", we have been able to follow the implications of the structure of the inhibitor-enzyme complex for the inhibitor's binding constant. The method appears to be suitable for evaluation of selectivity in structurally similar enzymatic systems, which is currently an important problem in drug design. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  13. Identification of two nuclear N-acetylglucosamine-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felin, M; Doyennette-Moyne, M A; Hadj-Sahraoui, Y; Aubery, M; Hubert, J; Sève, A P

    1994-12-01

    Using neoglycoproteins, lectins that recognize different sugars, including N-acetylglucosamine residues, were previously detected in animal cell nuclei. We report herein the isolation of two N-acetylglucosamine-binding proteins from HL60 cell nuclei: i) a 22 kDa polypeptide (CBP22) with an isoelectric point of 4.5 was isolated for the first time and ii) a 70 kDa polypeptide with an isoelectric point of 7.8. This latter protein corresponds to the glucose-binding protein (CBP70) previously isolated, based on the following similarities: i) they have the same molecular mass, ii) they have the same isoelectric point, iii) they are recognized by antibodies raised against CBP70, and iv) both are lectins from the C group of Drickamer's classification. CBP70 appeared to recognize glucose and N-acetylglucosamine; however, its affinity for N-acetylglucosamine was found to be twice that for glucose. The presence in the nucleus of two nuclear N-acetylglucosamine-binding proteins and their potential ligands, such as O-N-acetylglucosamine glycoproteins, strongly argues for possible intranuclear glycoprotein-lectin interactions.

  14. Immobilized sialyloligo-macroligand and its protein binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narla, Satya Nandana; Sun, Xue-Long

    2012-05-14

    We report a chemoenzymatic synthesis of chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers with different linkages and their oriented immobilization for glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor applications. Specifically, O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were synthesized by enzymatic α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation of a lactose-containing glycopolymer that was synthesized by cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization. (1)H NMR showed almost quantitative α2,3- and α2,6-sialylation. The O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers were printed onto amine-functionalized glass slides via isourea bond formation for glycoarray formation. Specific protein binding activity of the arrays was confirmed with α2,3- and α2,6-sialyl specific binding lectins together with inhibition assays. Further, immobilizing O-cyanate chain-end functionalized sialyllactose-containing glycopolymers onto amine-modified SPR chip via isourea bond formation afforded SPR-based glyco-biosensor, which showed specific binding activity for lectins and influenza viral hemagglutinins (HA). These sialyloligo-macroligand derived glycoarray and SPR-based glyco-biosensor are closely to mimic 3D nature presentation of sialyloligosaccharides and will provide important high-throughput tools for virus diagnosis and potential antiviral drug candidates screening applications.

  15. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 +/- 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone.

  16. Antimicrobial activities of heparin-binding peptides.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersson, Emma; Rydengård, Victoria; Sonesson, Andreas; Mörgelin, Matthias; Björck, Lars; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are effector molecules of the innate immune system. We recently showed that the human antimicrobial peptides alpha-defensin and LL-37 bind to glycosaminoglycans (heparin and dermatan sulphate). Here we demonstrate the obverse, i.e. structural motifs associated with heparin affinity (cationicity, amphipaticity, and consensus regions) may confer antimicrobial properties to a given peptide. Thus, heparin-binding peptides derived from laminin isoforms, von Willebrand factor...

  17. Mechanosensitive kinetic preference of actin-binding protein to actin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhiro; Adachi, Taiji

    2016-04-01

    The kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments is altered by external forces on the filament. Such an altered kinetic preference is largely responsible for remodeling the actin cytoskeletal structure in response to intracellular forces. During remodeling, actin-binding proteins and actin filaments interact under isothermal conditions, because the cells are homeostatic. In such a temperature homeostatic state, we can rigorously and thermodynamically link the chemical potential of actin-binding proteins to stresses on the actin filaments. From this relationship, we can construct a physical model that explains the force-dependent kinetic preference of actin-binding proteins to actin filaments. To confirm the model, we have analyzed the mechanosensitive alternation of the kinetic preference of Arp2/3 and cofilin to actin filaments. We show that this model captures the qualitative responses of these actin-binding proteins to the forces, as observed experimentally. Moreover, our theoretical results demonstrate that, depending on the structural parameters of the binding region, actin-binding proteins can show different kinetic responses even to the same mechanical signal tension, in which the double-helix nature of the actin filament also plays a critical role in a stretch-twist coupling of the filament.

  18. Context influences on TALE–DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M.; Barrera, Luis A.; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D.; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE–DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000–20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE–DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design. PMID:26067805

  19. Context influences on TALE-DNA binding revealed by quantitative profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Julia M; Barrera, Luis A; Reyon, Deepak; Sander, Jeffry D; Kellis, Manolis; Joung, J Keith; Bulyk, Martha L

    2015-06-11

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins recognize DNA using a seemingly simple DNA-binding code, which makes them attractive for use in genome engineering technologies that require precise targeting. Although this code is used successfully to design TALEs to target specific sequences, off-target binding has been observed and is difficult to predict. Here we explore TALE-DNA interactions comprehensively by quantitatively assaying the DNA-binding specificities of 21 representative TALEs to ∼5,000-20,000 unique DNA sequences per protein using custom-designed protein-binding microarrays (PBMs). We find that protein context features exert significant influences on binding. Thus, the canonical recognition code does not fully capture the complexity of TALE-DNA binding. We used the PBM data to develop a computational model, Specificity Inference For TAL-Effector Design (SIFTED), to predict the DNA-binding specificity of any TALE. We provide SIFTED as a publicly available web tool that predicts potential genomic off-target sites for improved TALE design.

  20. Calorimetric investigation of diclofenac drug binding to a panel of moderately glycated serum albumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indurthi, Venkata S K; Leclerc, Estelle; Vetter, Stefan W

    2014-08-01

    Glycation alters the drug binding properties of serum proteins and could affect free drug concentrations in diabetic patients with elevated glycation levels. We investigated the effect of bovine serum albumin glycation by eight physiologically relevant glycation reagents (glucose, ribose, carboxymethyllysine, acetoin, methylglyoxal, glyceraldehyde, diacetyl and glycolaldehyde) on diclofenac drug binding. We used this non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac as a paradigm for acidic drugs with high serum binding and because of its potential cardiovascular risks in diabetic patients. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that glycation reduced the binding affinity Ka of serum albumin and diclofenac 2 to 6-fold by reducing structural rigidity of albumin. Glycation affected the number of drug binding sites in a glycation reagent dependent manner and lead to a 25% decrease for most reagent, expect for ribose, with decreased by 60% and for the CML-modification, increased the number of binding sites by 60%. Using isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry we derived the complete thermodynamic characterization of diclofenac binding to all glycated BSA samples. Our results suggest that glycation in diabetic patients could significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of the widely used over-the-counter NSDAI drug diclofenac and with possibly negative implications for patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Selectivity Enhancement in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Binding of Bisphenol A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noof A. Alenazi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA is an estrogen-mimicking chemical that can be selectively detected in water using a chemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs. However, the utility of BPA-MIPs in sensor applications is limited by the presence of non-specific binding sites. This study explored a dual approach to eliminating these sites: optimizing the molar ratio of the template (bisphenol A to functional monomer (methacrylic acid to cross-linker (ethylene glycol dimethacrylate, and esterifying the carboxylic acid residues outside of specific binding sites by treatment with diazomethane. The binding selectivity of treated MIPs and non-treated MIPs for BPA and several potential interferents was compared by capillary electrophoresis with ultraviolet detection. Baclofen, diclofenac and metformin were demonstrated to be good model interferents to test all MIPs for selective binding of BPA. Treated MIPs demonstrated a significant decrease in binding of the interferents while offering high selectivity toward BPA. These results demonstrate that conventional optimization of the molar ratio, together with advanced esterification of non-specific binding sites, effectively minimizes the residual binding of interferents with MIPs to facilitate BPA sensing.

  2. Molecular characterization and functional analysis of pheromone binding protein 1 from Cydia pomonella (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Z; Zhang, Y

    2016-12-01

    A full-length cDNA encoding Cydia pomonella pheromone binding protein 1 (CpomPBP1) was cloned and characterized. CpomPBP1, possessing the typical characteristics of lepidopteran odorant binding proteins, was detected to be specifically expressed in the antennae of male and female moths at the mRNA and protein level. Soluble recombinant CpomPBP1 was subjected to in vitro binding to analyse its binding properties and to search for potentially active semiochemicals. A competitive binding assay showed that three 12-carbon ligands, codlemone, 1-dodecanol and E,E-2,4-dodecadienal, were able to bind to CpomPBP1 in decreasing order of affinity. Moreover, unlike the wild-type CpomPBP1, the C-terminus truncated CpomPBP1 exhibited high affinity to ligands even in an acidic environment, suggesting that the C-terminus plays a role in preventing ligands from binding to CpomPBP1 in a lower pH environment. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  3. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  4. Stability of the Octameric Structure Affects Plasminogen-Binding Capacity of Streptococcal Enolase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Ruby H. P.; Casey, Lachlan W.; Valkov, Eugene; Bertozzi, Carlo; Stamp, Anna; Jovcevski, Blagojce; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Whisstock, James C.; Walker, Mark J.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen). Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN) is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen) on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen) binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen) to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen) binding and activation. PMID:25807546

  5. GenProBiS: web server for mapping of sequence variants to protein binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Skrlj, Blaz; Erzen, Nika; Kunej, Tanja; Janezic, Dusanka

    2017-07-03

    Discovery of potentially deleterious sequence variants is important and has wide implications for research and generation of new hypotheses in human and veterinary medicine, and drug discovery. The GenProBiS web server maps sequence variants to protein structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and further to protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid, protein-compound, and protein-metal ion binding sites. The concept of a protein-compound binding site is understood in the broadest sense, which includes glycosylation and other post-translational modification sites. Binding sites were defined by local structural comparisons of whole protein structures using the Protein Binding Sites (ProBiS) algorithm and transposition of ligands from the similar binding sites found to the query protein using the ProBiS-ligands approach with new improvements introduced in GenProBiS. Binding site surfaces were generated as three-dimensional grids encompassing the space occupied by predicted ligands. The server allows intuitive visual exploration of comprehensively mapped variants, such as human somatic mis-sense mutations related to cancer and non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms from 21 species, within the predicted binding sites regions for about 80 000 PDB protein structures using fast WebGL graphics. The GenProBiS web server is open and free to all users at http://genprobis.insilab.org. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. Structural and functional analysis of the YAP-binding domain of human TEAD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Tomchick, Diana R; Pan, Duojia; Luo, Xuelian

    2010-04-20

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size and suppresses tumorigenesis in metazoans by blocking cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. The TEAD1-4 proteins (which contain a DNA-binding domain but lack an activation domain) interact with YAP (which lacks a DNA-binding domain but contains an activation domain) to form functional heterodimeric transcription factors that activate proliferative and prosurvival gene expression programs. The Hippo pathway inhibits the YAP-TEAD hybrid transcription factors by phosphorylating and promoting cytoplasmic retention of YAP. Here we report the crystal structure of the YAP-binding domain (YBD) of human TEAD2. TEAD2 YBD adopts an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich fold with two extra helix-turn-helix inserts. NMR studies reveal that the TEAD-binding domain of YAP is natively unfolded and that TEAD binding causes localized conformational changes in YAP. In vitro binding and in vivo functional assays define an extensive conserved surface of TEAD2 YBD as the YAP-binding site. Therefore, our studies suggest that a short segment of YAP adopts an extended conformation and forms extensive contacts with a rigid surface of TEAD. Targeting a surface-exposed pocket of TEAD might be an effective strategy to disrupt the YAP-TEAD interaction and to reduce the oncogenic potential of YAP.

  7. The binding study advice in medical education: a 2-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Goorden, Ronald; van den Bosch, Wil; Hopman, Maria T E

    2015-02-01

    To improve the effectiveness of higher education, Dutch universities implemented the binding study advice at medical faculties. Accordingly, medicine students of Radboud University need to gain ≥ 42 out of 60 European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) credits to obtain a positive binding study advice and to continue their study programme. In case of a negative advice, the student is obliged to terminate the study, and he/she cannot register for the same study programme in the Netherlands within the next three years. The purpose of this manuscript is to evaluate the effect of implementation of the binding study advice on study outcomes. First, the binding study advice did not impact on student performance, as the average ECTS credits were comparable before and after its introduction. Second, study progress improved 8 % with 93 % of the students obtaining access to the second year of the study programme after binding study advice implementation. Third, the binding study advice did not impact propaedeutic graduation rates. These data demonstrate that the implementation of the binding study advice in medical faculties has only a small impact on study outcomes. The high performance levels of medical students compared with peers at other faculties are likely to contribute to these findings and suggest a 'ceiling effect' in the potential improvement of study outcomes at medical faculties.

  8. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  9. Stability of the octameric structure affects plasminogen-binding capacity of streptococcal enolase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda J Cork

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS is a human pathogen that has the potential to cause invasive disease by binding and activating human plasmin(ogen. Streptococcal surface enolase (SEN is an octameric α-enolase that is localized at the GAS cell surface. In addition to its glycolytic role inside the cell, SEN functions as a receptor for plasmin(ogen on the bacterial surface, but the understanding of the molecular basis of plasmin(ogen binding is limited. In this study, we determined the crystal and solution structures of GAS SEN and characterized the increased plasminogen binding by two SEN mutants. The plasminogen binding ability of SENK312A and SENK362A is ~2- and ~3.4-fold greater than for the wild-type protein. A combination of thermal stability assays, native mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography approaches shows that increased plasminogen binding ability correlates with decreased stability of the octamer. We propose that decreased stability of the octameric structure facilitates the access of plasmin(ogen to its binding sites, leading to more efficient plasmin(ogen binding and activation.

  10. Vitamin B12 Phosphate Conjugation and Its Effect on Binding to the Human B12 -Binding Proteins Intrinsic Factor and Haptocorrin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ó Proinsias, Keith; Ociepa, Michał; Pluta, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    and its limitations examined. The resulting derivatives, particularly those bearing terminal alkyne and azide groups, were isolated and used in copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition reactions (CuAAC). Their sensitivity towards light revealed their potential as photocleavable molecules. The binding...

  11. Identification of Rift Valley Fever Virus Nucleocapsid Protein-RNA Binding Inhibitors Using a High-Throughput Screening Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbecker, Mary; Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is an emerging infectious pathogen that causes severe disease in humans and livestock and has the potential for global spread. Currently, there is no proven effective treatment for RVFV infection and there is no licensed vaccine. Inhibition of RNA binding to the essential viral nucleocapsid (N) protein represents a potential anti-viral therapeutic strategy because all of the functions performed by N during infection involve RNA binding. To target this interactio...

  12. Tight-binding tunneling amplitude of an optical lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzamasovs, Maksims; Liu, Bo

    2017-11-01

    The particle in a periodic potential is an important topic in an undergraduate quantum mechanics curriculum and a stepping stone on the way to more advanced topics, such as courses on interacting electrons in crystalline solids, and graduate-level research in solid-state and condensed matter physics. The interacting many-body phenomena are usually described in terms of the second quantized lattice Hamiltonians which treat single-particle physics on the level of tight-binding approximation and add interactions on top of it. The aim of this paper is to show how the tight-binding tunneling amplitude can be related to the strength of the periodic potential for the case of a cosine potential used in the burgeoning field of ultracold atoms. We show how to approach the problem of computing the tunneling amplitude of a deep lattice using the JWKB (Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin, also known as semiclassical) approximation. We also point out that care should be taken when applying the method of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) in an optical lattice context. A summary of the exact solution in terms of Mathieu functions is also given.

  13. Tight-binding tunneling amplitude of an optical lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzamasovs, Maksims; Liu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The particle in a periodic potential is an important topic in an undergraduate quantum mechanics curriculum and a stepping stone on the way to more advanced topics, such as courses on interacting electrons in crystalline solids, and graduate-level research in solid-state and condensed matter physics. The interacting many-body phenomena are usually described in terms of the second quantized lattice Hamiltonians which treat single-particle physics on the level of tight-binding approximation and add interactions on top of it. The aim of this paper is to show how the tight-binding tunneling amplitude can be related to the strength of the periodic potential for the case of a cosine potential used in the burgeoning field of ultracold atoms. We show how to approach the problem of computing the tunneling amplitude of a deep lattice using the JWKB (Jeffreys–Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin, also known as semiclassical) approximation. We also point out that care should be taken when applying the method of the linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) in an optical lattice context. A summary of the exact solution in terms of Mathieu functions is also given. (paper)

  14. Groundwater Potential

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    big timmy

    INTEGRATION OF HYDROGEOPHYSICAL AND REMOTE SENSING DATA IN THE. ASSESSMENT OF GROUNDWATER POTENTIAL OF THE BASEMENT COMPLEX. TERRAIN OF EKITI STATE, SOUTHWESTERN NIGERIA. 1. 2. 3. 4. Bayowa O.G., Olorunfemi M.O., Akinluyi F.O., and Ademilua O.L. 1Department of Earth ...

  15. Characterization of a human coagulation factor Xa-binding site on Viperidae snake venom phospholipases A2 by affinity binding studies and molecular bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gowda Veerabasappa T

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The snake venom group IIA secreted phospholipases A2 (SVPLA2, present in the Viperidae snake family exhibit a wide range of toxic and pharmacological effects. They exert their different functions by catalyzing the hydrolysis of phospholipids (PL at the membrane/water interface and by highly specific direct binding to: (i presynaptic membrane-bound or intracellular receptors; (ii natural PLA2-inhibitors from snake serum; and (iii coagulation factors present in human blood. Results Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR protein-protein interaction measurements and an in vitro biological test of inhibition of prothrombinase activity, we identify a number of Viperidae venom SVPLA2s that inhibit blood coagulation through direct binding to human blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa via a non-catalytic, PL-independent mechanism. We classify the SVPLA2s in four groups, depending on the strength of their binding. Molecular electrostatic potentials calculated at the surface of 3D homology-modeling models show a correlation with inhibition of prothrombinase activity. In addition, molecular docking simulations between SVPLA2 and FXa guided by the experimental data identify the potential FXa binding site on the SVPLA2s. This site is composed of the following regions: helices A and B, the Ca2+ loop, the helix C-β-wing loop, and the C-terminal fragment. Some of the SVPLA2 binding site residues belong also to the interfacial binding site (IBS. The interface in FXa involves both, the light and heavy chains. Conclusion We have experimentally identified several strong FXa-binding SVPLA2s that disrupt the function of the coagulation cascade by interacting with FXa by the non-catalytic PL-independent mechanism. By theoretical methods we mapped the interaction sites on both, the SVPLA2s and FXa. Our findings may lead to the design of novel, non-competitive FXa inhibitors.

  16. Electrostatically biased binding of kinesin to microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimum motor domain of kinesin-1 is a single head. Recent evidence suggests that such minimal motor domains generate force by a biased binding mechanism, in which they preferentially select binding sites on the microtubule that lie ahead in the progress direction of the motor. A specific molecular mechanism for biased binding has, however, so far been lacking. Here we use atomistic Brownian dynamics simulations combined with experimental mutagenesis to show that incoming kinesin heads undergo electrostatically guided diffusion-to-capture by microtubules, and that this produces directionally biased binding. Kinesin-1 heads are initially rotated by the electrostatic field so that their tubulin-binding sites face inwards, and then steered towards a plus-endwards binding site. In tethered kinesin dimers, this bias is amplified. A 3-residue sequence (RAK in kinesin helix alpha-6 is predicted to be important for electrostatic guidance. Real-world mutagenesis of this sequence powerfully influences kinesin-driven microtubule sliding, with one mutant producing a 5-fold acceleration over wild type. We conclude that electrostatic interactions play an important role in the kinesin stepping mechanism, by biasing the diffusional association of kinesin with microtubules.

  17. DNA-Aptamers Binding Aminoglycoside Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Nikolaus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are short, single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides that are able to bind specifically and with high affinity to their non-nucleic acid target molecules. This binding reaction enables their application as biorecognition elements in biosensors and assays. As antibiotic residues pose a problem contributing to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and thereby reducing the effectiveness of the drug to fight human infections, we selected aptamers targeted against the aminoglycoside antibiotic kanamycin A with the aim of constructing a robust and functional assay that can be used for water analysis. With this work we show that aptamers that were derived from a Capture-SELEX procedure targeting against kanamycin A also display binding to related aminoglycoside antibiotics. The binding patterns differ among all tested aptamers so that there are highly substance specific aptamers and more group specific aptamers binding to a different variety of aminoglycoside antibiotics. Also the region of the aminoglycoside antibiotics responsible for aptamer binding can be estimated. Affinities of the different aptamers for their target substance, kanamycin A, are measured with different approaches and are in the micromolar range. Finally, the proof of principle of an assay for detection of kanamycin A in a real water sample is given.

  18. Radiation damage to DNA-binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culard, G.; Eon, S.; DeVuyst, G.; Charlier, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding properties of proteins are strongly affected upon irradiation. The tetrameric lactose repressor (a dimer of dimers) losses its ability to bind operator DNA as soon as at least two damages per protomer of each dimer occur. The monomeric MC1 protein losses its ability to bind DNA in two steps : i) at low doses only the specific binding is abolished, whereas the non-specific one is still possible; ii) at high doses all binding vanishes. Moreover, the DNA bending induced by MC1 binding is less pronounced for a protein that underwent the low dose irradiation. When the entire DNA-protein complexes are irradiated, the observed disruption of the complexes is mainly due to the damage of the proteins and not to that of DNA. The doses necessary for complex disruption are higher than those inactivating the free protein. This difference, larger for MC1 than for lactose repressor, is due to the protection of the protein by the bound DNA. The oxidation of the protein side chains that are accessible to the radiation-induced hydroxyl radicals seems to represent the inactivating damage

  19. Identification of pseudomurein cell wall binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenbakkers, Peter J M; Geerts, Wim J; Ayman-Oz, Nilgün A; Keltjens, Jan T

    2006-12-01

    Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus is a methanogenic Gram-positive microorganism with a cell wall consisting of pseudomurein. Currently, no information is available on extracellular pseudomurein biology and so far only two prophage pseudomurein autolysins, PeiW and PeiP, have been reported. In this paper we show that PeiW and PeiP contain two different N-terminal pseudomurein cell wall binding domains. This finding was used to identify a novel domain, PB007923, on the M. thermautotrophicus genome present in 10 predicted open reading frames. Three homologues were identified in the Methanosphaera stadtmanae genome. Binding studies of fusion constructs of three separate PB007923 domains to green fluorescent protein revealed that it also constituted a cell wall binding domain. Both prophage domains and the PB007923 domain bound to the cell walls of Methanothermobacter species and fluorescence microscopy showed a preference for the septal region. Domain specificities were revealed by binding studies with other pseudomurein-containing archaea. Localized binding was observed for M. stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter species, while others stained evenly. The identification of the first pseudomurein cell wall binding domains reveals the dynamics of the pseudomurein cell wall and provides marker proteins to study the extracellular pseudomurein biology of M. thermautotrophicus and of other pseudomurein-containing archaea.

  20. LIBRA: LIgand Binding site Recognition Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Le Viet; Caprari, Silvia; Bizai, Massimiliano; Toti, Daniele; Polticelli, Fabio

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, structural genomics and ab initio molecular modeling activities are leading to the availability of a large number of structural models of proteins whose biochemical function is not known. The aim of this study was the development of a novel software tool that, given a protein's structural model, predicts the presence and identity of active sites and/or ligand binding sites. The algorithm implemented by ligand binding site recognition application (LIBRA) is based on a graph theory approach to find the largest subset of similar residues between an input protein and a collection of known functional sites. The algorithm makes use of two predefined databases for active sites and ligand binding sites, respectively, derived from the Catalytic Site Atlas and the Protein Data Bank. Tests indicate that LIBRA is able to identify the correct binding/active site in 90% of the cases analyzed, 90% of which feature the identified site as ranking first. As far as ligand binding site recognition is concerned, LIBRA outperforms other structure-based ligand binding sites detection tools with which it has been compared. The application, developed in Java SE 7 with a Swing GUI embedding a JMol applet, can be run on any OS equipped with a suitable Java Virtual Machine (JVM), and is available at the following URL: http://www.computationalbiology.it/software/LIBRAv1.zip. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Mannose-Binding Lectin Binds to Amyloid Protein and Modulates Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykol Larvie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mannose-binding lectin (MBL, a soluble factor of the innate immune system, is a pattern recognition molecule with a number of known ligands, including viruses, bacteria, and molecules from abnormal self tissues. In addition to its role in immunity, MBL also functions in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. We present evidence here that MBL binds to amyloid β peptides. MBL binding to other known carbohydrate ligands is calcium-dependent and has been attributed to the carbohydrate-recognition domain, a common feature of other C-type lectins. In contrast, we find that the features of MBL binding to Aβ are more similar to the reported binding characteristics of the cysteine-rich domain of the unrelated mannose receptor and therefore may involve the MBL cysteine-rich domain. Differences in MBL ligand binding may contribute to modulation of inflammatory response and may correlate with the function of MBL in processes such as coagulation and tissue homeostasis.

  2. Immobilized purified folate-binding protein: binding characteristics and use for quantifying folate in erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, S.I.; Holm, J.; Nexo, E.

    1987-01-01

    Purified folate-binding protein from cow's milk was immobilized on monodisperse polymer particles (Dynospheres) activated by rho-toluenesulfonyl chloride. Leakage from the spheres was less than 0.1%, and the binding properties were similar to those of the soluble protein with regard to dissociation, pH optimum for binding pteroylglutamic acid, and specificity for binding various folate derivatives. We used the immobilized folate-binding protein as binding protein in an isotope-dilution assay for quantifying folate in erythrocytes. The detection limit was 50 nmol/L and the CV over a six-month period was 2.3% (means = 1.25 mumol/L, n = 15). The reference interval, for folate measured in erythrocytes of 43 blood donors, was 0.4-1.5 mumol/L

  3. To Bind or not to Bind: It’s in the Contract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvarnø, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the formalization of collaboration through partnering contracts in the construction industry in the USA, Great Britain and Denmark. The article compares the different types of collaborative partnering contracts in the three countries, and provides a conclusion on whether...... the collaborative partnering contract should be binding or non-binding, based on the three empirical contracts analyzed in this article. The partnering contracts in Great Britain and Denmark are legally binding, while in the USA the partnering agreements are non-binding charters or letters of intent. This article...... discusses, in a theoretical perspective, the legal reasoning behind the different partnering approaches, both from a historical and contract law perspective, and furthermore applies a game theoretical approach in evaluating binding versus non-binding partnering contracts. The analysis focuses on private...

  4. DEK binding to class II MHC Y-box sequences is gene- and allele-specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Barbara S; Cha, Hyuk C; Cleary, Joanne; Haiying, Tan; Wang, Hongling; Sitwala, Kajal; Markovitz, David M

    2003-01-01

    Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we examined sequence-specific binding of DEK, a potential autoantigen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, to conserved Y-box regulatory sequences in class II MHC gene promoters. Nuclear extracts from several cell lines of different phenotypes contained sequence-specific binding activity recognizing DRA, DQA1*0101, and DQA1*0501 Y-box sequences. Participation of both DEK and NF-Y in the DQA1 Y-box binding complex was confirmed by 'supershifting' with anti-DEK and anti-NF-Y antibodies. Recombinant DEK also bound specifically to the DQA1*0101 Y box and to the polymorphic DQA1*0501 Y box, but not to the consensus DRA Y box. Measurement of the apparent dissociation constants demonstrated a two- to fivefold difference in DEK binding to the DQA1 Y-box sequence in comparison with other class II MHC Y-box sequences. Residues that are crucial for DEK binding to the DQA1*0101 Y box were identified by DNase I footprinting. The specific characteristics of DEK binding to these related sequences suggests a potential role for DEK in differential regulation of class II MHC expression, and thus in the pathogenesis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:12823858

  5. Effect of dipole polarizability on positron binding by strongly polar molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribakin, G F; Swann, A R

    2015-01-01

    A model for positron binding to polar molecules is considered by combining the dipole potential outside the molecule with a strongly repulsive core of a given radius. Using existing experimental data on binding energies leads to unphysically small core radii for all of the molecules studied. This suggests that electron–positron correlations neglected in the simple model play a large role in determining the binding energy. We account for these by including the polarization potential via perturbation theory and non-perturbatively. The perturbative model makes reliable predictions of binding energies for a range of polar organic molecules and hydrogen cyanide. The model also agrees with the linear dependence of the binding energies on the polarizability inferred from the experimental data (Danielson et al 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 235203). The effective core radii, however, remain unphysically small for most molecules. Treating molecular polarization non-perturbatively leads to physically meaningful core radii for all of the molecules studied and enables even more accurate predictions of binding energies to be made for nearly all of the molecules considered. (paper)

  6. Neurochemical binding profiles of novel indole and benzofuran MDMA analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimshoni, Jakob A; Winkler, Ilan; Golan, Ezekiel; Nutt, David

    2017-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in numerous clinical trials. In the present study, we have characterized the neurochemical binding profiles of three MDMA-benzofuran analogues (1-(benzofuran-5-yl)-propan-2-amine, 5-APB; 1-(benzofuran-6-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine, 6-MAPB; 1-(benzofuran-5-yl)-N-methylpropan-2-amine, 5-MAPB) and one MDMA-indole analogue (1-(1H-indol-5-yl)-2-methylamino-propan-1-ol, 5-IT). These compounds were screened as potential second-generation anti-PTSD drugs, against a battery of human and non-human receptors, transporters, and enzymes, and their potencies as 5-HT 2 receptor agonist and monoamine uptake inhibitors determined. All MDMA analogues displayed high binding affinities for 5-HT 2a,b,c and NE α2 receptors, as well as significant 5-HT, DA, and NE uptake inhibition. 5-APB revealed significant agonist activity at the 5-HT 2a,b,c receptors, while 6-MAPB, 5-MAPB, and 5-IT exhibited significant agonist activity at the 5-HT 2c receptor. There was a lack of correlation between the results of functional uptake and the monoamine transporter binding assay. MDMA analogues emerged as potent and selective monoamine oxidase A inhibitors. Based on 6-MAPB favorable pharmacological profile, it was further subjected to IC 50 determination for monoamine transporters. Overall, all MDMA analogues displayed higher monoamine receptor/transporter binding affinities and agonist activity at the 5-HT 2a,c receptors as compared to MDMA.

  7. Phosphorylation of the chromatin binding domain of KSHV LANA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Woodard

    Full Text Available The Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA is expressed in all KSHV associated malignancies and is essential for maintenance of KSHV genomes in infected cells. To identify kinases that are potentially capable of modifying LANA, in vitro phosphorylation assays were performed using an Epstein Barr virus plus LANA protein microarray and 268 human kinases purified in active form from yeast. Interestingly, of the Epstein-Barr virus proteins on the array, the EBNA1 protein had the most similar kinase profile to LANA. We focused on nuclear kinases and on the N-terminus of LANA (amino acids 1-329 that contains the LANA chromatin binding domain. Sixty-three nuclear kinases phosphorylated the LANA N-terminus. Twenty-four nuclear kinases phosphorylated a peptide covering the LANA chromatin binding domain (amino acids 3-21. Alanine mutations of serine 10 and threonine 14 abolish or severely diminish chromatin and histone binding by LANA. However, conversion of these residues to the phosphomimetic glutamic acid restored histone binding suggesting that phosphorylation of serine 10 and threonine 14 may modulate LANA function. Serine 10 and threonine 14 were validated as substrates of casein kinase 1, PIM1, GSK-3 and RSK3 kinases. Short-term treatment of transfected cells with inhibitors of these kinases found that only RSK inhibition reduced LANA interaction with endogenous histone H2B. Extended treatment of PEL cell cultures with RSK inhibitor caused a decrease in LANA protein levels associated with p21 induction and a loss of PEL cell viability. The data indicate that RSK phosphorylation affects both LANA accumulation and function.

  8. Semi-empirical quantum evaluation of peptide - MHC class II binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ronald; Suárez, Carlos F.; Bohórquez, Hugo J.; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Patarroyo, Manuel E.

    2017-01-01

    Peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a key process for triggering a specific immune response. Studying peptide-MHC (pMHC) binding from a structural-based approach has potential for reducing the costs of investigation into vaccine development. This study involved using two semi-empirical quantum chemistry methods (PM7 and FMO-DFTB) for computing the binding energies of peptides bonded to HLA-DR1 and HLA-DR2. We found that key stabilising water molecules involved in the peptide binding mechanism were required for finding high correlation with IC50 experimental values. Our proposal is computationally non-intensive, and is a reliable alternative for studying pMHC binding interactions.

  9. An Overview of Tubulin Inhibitors That Interact with the Colchicine Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Chen, Jianjun; Xiao, Min; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin dynamics is a promising target for new chemotherapeutic agents. The colchicine binding site is one of the most important pockets for potential tubulin polymerization destabilizers. Colchicine binding site inhibitors (CBSI) exert their biological effects by inhibiting tubulin assembly and suppressing microtubule formation. A large number of molecules interacting with the colchicine binding site have been designed and synthesized with significant structural diversity. CBSIs have been modified as to chemical structure as well as pharmacokinetic properties, and tested in order to find a highly potent, low toxicity agent for treatment of cancers. CBSIs are believed to act by a common mechanism via binding to the colchicine site on tubulin. The present review is a synopsis of compounds that have been reported in the past decade that have provided an increase in our understanding of the actions of CBSIs. PMID:22814904

  10. Experimental and theoretical study on the binding of 2-mercaptothiazoline to bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Yue, E-mail: tengyue@jiangnan.edu.cn; Wang, Xiang; Zou, Luyi; Huang, Ming; Du, Xianzheng

    2015-05-15

    2-Mercaptothiazoline (MTZ) is widely utilized as a brightening and stabilization agent, corrosion inhibitor and antifungal reagent. The residue of MTZ in the environment is potentially hazardous to human health. In this study, the binding mode of MTZ with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using spectroscopic and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. MTZ could spontaneously bind with BSA through hydrogen bond and van der Waals interactions with one binding site. The site marker displacement experiments and the molecular docking revealed that MTZ bound into site II (subdomain IIIA) of BSA, which further resulted in some backbone structures and microenvironmental changes of BSA. This work is helpful for understanding the transportation, distribution and toxicity effects of MTZ in blood. - Highlights: • The mechanism was explored by multiple spectroscopic and molecular docking methods. • MTZ can spontaneously bind with BSA at subdomain IIIA (site II). • MTZ can lead to some conformational changes of BSA.

  11. Carbene footprinting accurately maps binding sites in protein-ligand and protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Lucio; Barrow, Andrew S.; Scott, Daniel; Layfield, Robert; Wright, Timothy G.; Moses, John E.; Oldham, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    Specific interactions between proteins and their binding partners are fundamental to life processes. The ability to detect protein complexes, and map their sites of binding, is crucial to understanding basic biology at the molecular level. Methods that employ sensitive analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry have the potential to provide valuable insights with very little material and on short time scales. Here we present a differential protein footprinting technique employing an efficient photo-activated probe for use with mass spectrometry. Using this methodology the location of a carbohydrate substrate was accurately mapped to the binding cleft of lysozyme, and in a more complex example, the interactions between a 100 kDa, multi-domain deubiquitinating enzyme, USP5 and a diubiquitin substrate were located to different functional domains. The much improved properties of this probe make carbene footprinting a viable method for rapid and accurate identification of protein binding sites utilizing benign, near-UV photoactivation.

  12. Estimation of kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-binding parameters using computational strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deganutti, Giuseppe; Moro, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Kinetic and thermodynamic ligand-protein binding parameters are gaining growing importance as key information to consider in drug discovery. The determination of the molecular structures, using particularly x-ray and NMR techniques, is crucial for understanding how a ligand recognizes its target in the final binding complex. However, for a better understanding of the recognition processes, experimental studies of ligand-protein interactions are needed. Even though several techniques can be used to investigate both thermodynamic and kinetic profiles for a ligand-protein complex, these procedures are very often laborious, time consuming and expensive. In the last 10 years, computational approaches have enormous potential in providing insights into each of the above effects and in parsing their contributions to the changes in both kinetic and thermodynamic binding parameters. The main purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the art of computational strategies for estimating the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of a ligand-protein binding.

  13. Novel ZnO-binding peptides obtained by the screening of a phage display peptide library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golec, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular Biology (affiliated with the University of Gdansk) (Poland); Karczewska-Golec, Joanna [University of Gdansk and Medical University of Gdansk, Laboratory of Molecular Bacteriology, Intercollegiate Faculty of Biotechnology (Poland); Los, Marcin; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz, E-mail: wegrzyn@biotech.univ.gda.pl [University of Gdansk, Department of Molecular Biology (Poland)

    2012-11-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) is a semiconductor compound with a potential for wide use in various applications, including biomaterials and biosensors, particularly as nanoparticles (the size range of ZnO nanoparticles is from 2 to 100 nm, with an average of about 35 nm). Here, we report isolation of novel ZnO-binding peptides, by screening of a phage display library. Interestingly, amino acid sequences of the ZnO-binding peptides reported in this paper and those described previously are significantly different. This suggests that there is a high variability in sequences of peptides which can bind particular inorganic molecules, indicating that different approaches may lead to discovery of different peptides of generally the same activity (e.g., binding of ZnO) but having various detailed properties, perhaps crucial under specific conditions of different applications.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Botulinum Neurotoxin Type G Binding Domain: Insight into Cell Surface Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenmark, Pål; Dong, Min; Dupuy, Jérôme; Chapman, Edwin R.; Stevens, Raymond C. (Scripps); (UW)

    2011-11-02

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) typically bind the neuronal cell surface via dual interactions with both protein receptors and gangliosides. We present here the 1.9-{angstrom} X-ray structure of the BoNT serotype G (BoNT/G) receptor binding domain (residues 868-1297) and a detailed view of protein receptor and ganglioside binding regions. The ganglioside binding motif (SxWY) has a conserved structure compared to the corresponding regions in BoNT serotype A and BoNT serotype B (BoNT/B), but several features of interactions with the hydrophilic face of the ganglioside are absent at the opposite side of the motif in the BoNT/G ganglioside binding cleft. This may significantly reduce the affinity between BoNT/G and gangliosides. BoNT/G and BoNT/B share the protein receptor synaptotagmin (Syt) I/II. The Syt binding site has a conserved hydrophobic plateau located centrally in the proposed protein receptor binding interface (Tyr1189, Phe1202, Ala1204, Pro1205, and Phe1212). Interestingly, only 5 of 14 residues that are important for binding between Syt-II and BoNT/B are conserved in BoNT/G, suggesting that the means by which BoNT/G and BoNT/B bind Syt diverges more than previously appreciated. Indeed, substitution of Syt-II Phe47 and Phe55 with alanine residues had little effect on the binding of BoNT/G, but strongly reduced the binding of BoNT/B. Furthermore, an extended solvent-exposed hydrophobic loop, located between the Syt binding site and the ganglioside binding cleft, may serve as a third membrane association and binding element to contribute to high-affinity binding to the neuronal membrane. While BoNT/G and BoNT/B are homologous to each other and both utilize Syt-I/Syt-II as their protein receptor, the precise means by which these two toxin serotypes bind to Syt appears surprisingly divergent.

  15. Are many Z-DNA binding proteins actually phospholipid-binding proteins?

    OpenAIRE

    Krishna, P; Kennedy, B P; Waisman, D M; van de Sande, J H; McGhee, J D

    1990-01-01

    We used a Z-DNA affinity column to isolate a collection of Z-DNA binding proteins from a high salt extract of Escherichia coli. We identified one of the major Z-DNA binding proteins of this fraction, not as a protein involved in gene regulation or genetic recombination, but rather as an outer membrane porin protein. We then showed that several other known phospholipid-binding proteins (bovine lung annexins and human serum lipoproteins) also bind much more tightly to Z-DNA than to B-DNA. In al...

  16. Pressure-dependent shallow donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN square QWWs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, Haddou El; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Using a variational approach, we perform a theoretical study of hydrostatic pressure effect on the ground-state of axial hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN square quantum well wire (SQWWs) as a function of the side length within the effective-mass scheme and finite potential barrier. The pressure dependence of wire length, effective mass, dielectric constant and potential barrier are taken into account. Numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the wire length and the external applied pressure and (ii) its maximum moves to the narrow wire in particular for height pressure.

  17. Potential theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helms, Lester L

    2014-01-01

    Potential Theory presents a clear path from calculus to classical potential theory and beyond, with the aim of moving the reader into the area of mathematical research as quickly as possible. The subject matter is developed from first principles using only calculus. Commencing with the inverse square law for gravitational and electromagnetic forces and the divergence theorem, the author develops methods for constructing solutions of Laplace's equation on a region with prescribed values on the boundary of the region. The latter half of the book addresses more advanced material aimed at those with the background of a senior undergraduate or beginning graduate course in real analysis. Starting with solutions of the Dirichlet problem subject to mixed boundary conditions on the simplest of regions, methods of morphing such solutions onto solutions of Poisson's equation on more general regions are developed using diffeomorphisms and the Perron-Wiener-Brelot method, culminating in application to Brownian motion. In ...

  18. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  19. Identification and characterization of the DNA-binding domain of the multifunctional PutA flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dan; Zhou, Yuzhen; Kallhoff, Verena; Baban, Berevan; Tanner, John J; Becker, Donald F

    2004-07-23

    The PutA flavoprotein from Escherichia coli is a transcriptional repressor and a bifunctional enzyme that regulates and catalyzes proline oxidation. PutA represses transcription of genes putA and putP by binding to the control DNA region of the put regulon. The objective of this study is to define and characterize the DNA binding domain of PutA. The DNA binding activity of PutA, a 1320 amino acid polypeptide, has been localized to N-terminal residues 1-261. After exploring a potential DNA-binding region and an N-terminal deletion mutant of PutA, residues 1-90 (PutA90) were determined to contain DNA binding activity and stabilize the dimeric structure of PutA. Cell-based transcriptional assays demonstrate that PutA90 functions as a transcriptional repressor in vivo. The dissociation constant of PutA90 with the put control DNA was estimated to be 110 nm, which is slightly higher than that of the PutA-DNA complex (K(d) approximately 45 nm). Primary and secondary structure analysis of PutA90 suggested the presence of a ribbon-helix-helix DNA binding motif in residues 1-47. To test this prediction, we purified and characterized PutA47. PutA47 is shown to purify as an apparent dimer, to exhibit in vivo transcriptional activity, and to bind specifically to the put control DNA. In gel-mobility shift assays, PutA47 was observed to bind cooperatively to the put control DNA with an overall dissociation constant of 15 nm for the PutA47-DNA complex. Thus, N-terminal residues 1-47 are critical for DNA-binding and the dimeric structure of PutA. These results are consistent with the ribbon-helix-helix family of transcription factors.

  20. Src binds cortactin through an SH2 domain cystine-mediated linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jason V.; Ammer, Amanda G.; Jett, John E.; Bolcato, Chris A.; Breaux, Jason C.; Martin, Karen H.; Culp, Mark V.; Gannett, Peter M.; Weed, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tyrosine-kinase-based signal transduction mediated by modular protein domains is critical for cellular function. The Src homology (SH)2 domain is an important conductor of intracellular signaling that binds to phosphorylated tyrosines on acceptor proteins, producing molecular complexes responsible for signal relay. Cortactin is a cytoskeletal protein and tyrosine kinase substrate that regulates actin-based motility through interactions with SH2-domain-containing proteins. The Src kinase SH2 domain mediates cortactin binding and tyrosine phosphorylation, but how Src interacts with cortactin is unknown. Here we demonstrate that Src binds cortactin through cystine bonding between Src C185 in the SH2 domain within the phosphotyrosine binding pocket and cortactin C112/246 in the cortactin repeats domain, independent of tyrosine phosphorylation. Interaction studies show that the presence of reducing agents ablates Src-cortactin binding, eliminates cortactin phosphorylation by Src, and prevents Src SH2 domain binding to cortactin. Tandem MS/MS sequencing demonstrates cystine bond formation between Src C185 and cortactin C112/246. Mutational studies indicate that an intact cystine binding interface is required for Src-mediated cortactin phosphorylation, cell migration, and pre-invadopodia formation. Our results identify a novel phosphotyrosine-independent binding mode between the Src SH2 domain and cortactin. Besides Src, one quarter of all SH2 domains contain cysteines at or near the analogous Src C185 position. This provides a potential alternative mechanism to tyrosine phosphorylation for cysteine-containing SH2 domains to bind cognate ligands that may be widespread in propagating signals regulating diverse cellular functions. PMID:23097045

  1. Probing and mapping the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duman, Memed

    2014-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is an effective technique for preparing recognition sites which act as synthetic receptors on polymeric surfaces. Herein, we synthesized MIP surfaces with specific binding sites for streptavidin and characterized them at nanoscale by using two different atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. While the single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) reveals the unbinding kinetics between streptavidin molecule and binding sites, simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) was employed, for the first time, to directly map the binding sites on streptavidin imprinted polymers. Streptavidin modified AFM cantilever showed specific unbinding events with an unbinding force around 300 pN and the binding probability was calculated as 35.2% at a given loading rate. In order to prove the specificity of the interaction, free streptavidin molecules were added to AFM liquid cell and the binding probability was significantly decreased to 7.6%. Moreover, the recognition maps show that the smallest recognition site with a diameter of around ∼ 21 nm which corresponds to a single streptavidin molecule binding site. We believe that the potential of combining SMFS and TREC opens new possibilities for the characterization of MIP surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Graphical abstract: Simultaneous Topography and RECognition (TREC) imaging is a novel characterization technique to reveal binding sites on molecularly imprinted polymer surfaces with single molecule resolution under physiological conditions. - Highlights: • Highly specific streptavidin printed polymer surfaces were synthesized. • Unbinding kinetic rate of single streptavidin molecule was studied by SMFS. • The distribution of binding pockets was revealed for the first time by TREC imaging. • TREC showed that the binding pockets formed nano-domains on MIP surface. • SMFS and TREC are powerful AFM techniques for characterization of MIP surfaces

  2. Differential roles for Fos and Jun in DNA-binding: redox-dependent and independent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, L; Forrest, D; Curran, T

    1993-01-01

    The Fos and Jun family of transcription factors contain an invariant sequence motif lysine-cysteine-arginine (KCR) in the highly conserved DNA-binding region. Reduction of the cysteine residue is necessary to facilitate DNA-binding. Here, we examined the potential dual roles of the flanking lysine and arginine residues in influencing the redox reactivity of the cysteine and the DNA-binding activity of Fos and Jun. Two sets of Fos and Jun mutants were generated: the KCR and KSR series representing proteins capable of redox-dependent and redox-independent DNA-binding activity, respectively. Mutation of the lysine in Fos-Jun heterodimers had no obvious effect on the redox reactivity of the cysteine, suggesting that lysine is not essential in this respect. However, mutation of the arginine but not lysine, in both the KCR and the KSR series abolished DNA-binding activity. Thus, the arginine but not the lysine residue in the KCR motif is critical for both redox-dependent and redox-independent functions in DNA-binding. Surprisingly, the triple substitution, ISI, exhibited high levels of DNA-binding activity. This demonstrates that the effects of amino acid substitutions can be highly dependent on context and that non-basic amino acids can function efficiently in DNA-binding. Analysis of combinations of wild-type and mutant Fos and Jun proteins indicated that Fos was dominant in dictating the DNA-binding ability of Fos-Jun heterodimers. This suggests that the lysine and arginine residues in the KCR region of Fos are not equivalent to those in Jun and that they interact with DNA differently. Images PMID:8290340

  3. Metal binding spectrum and model structure of the Bacillus anthracis virulence determinant MntA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigonsky, Elena; Fish, Inbar; Livnat-Levanon, Nurit; Ovcharenko, Elena; Ben-Tal, Nir; Lewinson, Oded

    2015-10-01

    The potentially lethal human pathogen Bacillus anthracis expresses a putative metal import system, MntBCA, which belongs to the large family of ABC transporters. MntBCA is essential for virulence of Bacillus anthracis: deletion of MntA, the system's substrate binding protein, yields a completely non-virulent strain. Here we determined the metal binding spectrum of MntA. In contrast to what can be inferred from growth complementation studies we find no evidence that MntA binds Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). Rather, MntA binds a variety of other metal ions, including Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) with affinities ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-8) M. Binding of Zn(2+) and Co(2+) have a pronounced thermo-stabilizing effect on MntA, with Mn(2+) having a milder effect. The thermodynamic stability of MntA, competition experiments, and metal binding and release experiments all suggest that Mn(2+) is the metal that is likely transported by MntBCA and is therefore the limiting factor for virulence of Bacillus anthracis. A homology-model of MntA shows a single, highly conserved metal binding site, with four residues that participate in metal coordination: two histidines, a glutamate, and an aspartate. The metals bind to this site in a mutually exclusive manner, yet surprisingly, mutational analysis shows that for proper coordination each metal requires a different subset of these four residues. ConSurf evolutionary analysis and structural comparison of MntA and its homologues suggest that substrate binding proteins (SBPs) of metal ions use a pair of highly conserved prolines to interact with their cognate ABC transporters. This proline pair is found exclusively in ABC import systems of metal ions.

  4. Computational Calorimetry: High-Precision Calculation of Host–Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present a strategy for carrying out high-precision calculations of binding free energy and binding enthalpy values from molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. The approach is used to calculate the thermodynamic profiles for binding of nine small molecule guests to either the cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) or β-cyclodextrin (βCD) host. For these systems, calculations using commodity hardware can yield binding free energy and binding enthalpy values with a precision of ∼0.5 kcal/mol (95% CI) in a matter of days. Crucially, the self-consistency of the approach is established by calculating the binding enthalpy directly, via end point potential energy calculations, and indirectly, via the temperature dependence of the binding free energy, i.e., by the van’t Hoff equation. Excellent agreement between the direct and van’t Hoff methods is demonstrated for both host–guest systems and an ion-pair model system for which particularly well-converged results are attainable. Additionally, we find that hydrogen mass repartitioning allows marked acceleration of the calculations with no discernible cost in precision or accuracy. Finally, we provide guidance for accurately assessing numerical uncertainty of the results in settings where complex correlations in the time series can pose challenges to statistical analysis. The routine nature and high precision of these binding calculations opens the possibility of including measured binding thermodynamics as target data in force field optimization so that simulations may be used to reliably interpret experimental data and guide molecular design. PMID:26523125

  5. CaMELS: In silico prediction of calmodulin binding proteins and their binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Wajid Arshad; Asif, Amina; Andleeb, Saiqa; Minhas, Fayyaz Ul Amir Afsar

    2017-09-01

    Due to Ca 2+ -dependent binding and the sequence diversity of Calmodulin (CaM) binding proteins, identifying CaM interactions and binding sites in the wet-lab is tedious and costly. Therefore, computational methods for this purpose are crucial to the design of such wet-lab experiments. We present an algorithm suite called CaMELS (CalModulin intEraction Learning System) for predicting proteins that interact with CaM as well as their binding sites using sequence information alone. CaMELS offers state of the art accuracy for both CaM interaction and binding site prediction and can aid biologists in studying CaM binding proteins. For CaM interaction prediction, CaMELS uses protein sequence features coupled with a large-margin classifier. CaMELS models the binding site prediction problem using multiple instance machine learning with a custom optimization algorithm which allows more effective learning over imprecisely annotated CaM-binding sites during training. CaMELS has been extensively benchmarked using a variety of data sets, mutagenic studies, proteome-wide Gene Ontology enrichment analyses and protein structures. Our experiments indicate that CaMELS outperforms simple motif-based search and other existing methods for interaction and binding site prediction. We have also found that the whole sequence of a protein, rather than just its binding site, is important for predicting its interaction with CaM. Using the machine learning model in CaMELS, we have identified important features of protein sequences for CaM interaction prediction as well as characteristic amino acid sub-sequences and their relative position for identifying CaM binding sites. Python code for training and evaluating CaMELS together with a webserver implementation is available at the URL: http://faculty.pieas.edu.pk/fayyaz/software.html#camels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. ATP Binding and Hydrolysis Properties of ABCB10 and Their Regulation by Glutathione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Liesa, Marc; Carpenter, Elizabeth P.; Shirihai, Orian S.

    2015-01-01

    ABCB10 (ATP binding cassette sub-family B10) is a mitochondrial inner-membrane ABC transporter. ABCB10 has been shown to protect the heart from the impact of ROS during ischemia-reperfusion and to allow for proper hemoglobin synthesis during erythroid development. ABC transporters are proteins that increase ATP binding and hydrolysis activity in the presence of the transported substrate. However, molecular entities transported by ABCB10 and its regulatory mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we characterized ATP binding and hydrolysis properties of ABCB10 by using the 8-azido-ATP photolabeling technique. This technique can identify potential ABCB10 regulators, transported substrates and amino-acidic residues required for ATP binding and hydrolysis. We confirmed that Gly497 and Lys498 in the Walker A motif, Glu624 in the Walker B motif and Gly602 in the C-Loop motif of ABCB10 are required for proper ATP binding and hydrolysis activity, as their mutation changed ABCB10 8-Azido-ATP photo-labeling. In addition, we show that the potential ABCB10 transported entity and heme precursor delta-aminolevulinic acid (dALA) does not alter 8-azido-ATP photo-labeling. In contrast, oxidized glutathione (GSSG) stimulates ATP hydrolysis without affecting ATP binding, whereas reduced glutathione (GSH) inhibits ATP binding and hydrolysis. Indeed, we detectABCB10 glutathionylation in Cys547 and show that it is one of the exposed cysteine residues within ABCB10 structure. In all, we characterize essential residues for ABCB10 ATPase activity and we provide evidence that supports the exclusion of dALA as a potential substrate directly transported by ABCB10. Last, we show the first molecular mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative status, through GSH/GSSG, can regulate ABCB10. PMID:26053025

  7. Computational search for aflatoxin binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2017-10-01

    Aflatoxin is one of the mycotoxins that contaminate various food products. Among various aflatoxin types (B1, B2, G1, G2 and M1), aflatoxin B1 is the most important and the most toxic one. In this study, through computational screening, we found that several proteins may bind specifically with different type of aflatoxins. Combination of theoretical methods including target fishing, molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, MM/PBSA calculation were utilized to search for new aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. A recently developed method for calculating entropic contribution to binding free energy called interaction entropy (IE) was employed to compute the binding free energy between the protein and aflatoxin B1. Through comprehensive comparison, three proteins, namely, trihydroxynaphthalene reductase, GSK-3b, and Pim-1 were eventually selected as potent aflatoxin B1 binding proteins. GSK-3b and Pim-1 are drug targets of cancers or neurological diseases. GSK-3b is the strongest binder for aflatoxin B1.

  8. Engineering Escherichia coli to bind to cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zijian; Meng, Liuyi; Ni, Congjian; Yao, Lanqiu; Zhang, Fengyu; Jin, Yuji; Mu, Xuelang; Zhu, Shiyu; Lu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Shiyu; Yu, Congyu; Wang, Chenggong; Zheng, Pu; Wu, Jie; Kang, Li; Zhang, Haoqian M; Ouyang, Qi

    2017-03-01

    We engineered Escherichia coli cells to bind to cyanobacteria by heterologously producing and displaying lectins of the target cyanobacteria on their surface. To prove the efficacy of our approach, we tested this design on Microcystis aeruginosa with microvirin (Mvn), the lectin endogenously produced by this cyanobacterium. The coding sequence of Mvn was C-terminally fused to the ice nucleation protein NC (INPNC) gene and expressed in E. coli. Results showed that E. coli cells expressing the INPNC::Mvn fusion protein were able to bind to M. aeruginosa and the average number of E. coli cells bound to each cyanobacterial cell was enhanced 8-fold. Finally, a computational model was developed to simulate the binding reaction and help reconstruct the binding parameters. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on the binding of two organisms in liquid culture mediated by the surface display of lectins and it may serve as a novel approach to mediate microbial adhesion. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment of the binding properties of granuloszint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubiger, P.A.; Hasler, P.H.; Novak-Hofer, I.; Blaeuenstein, P.

    1989-09-01

    /sup 123/I-granuloszint (a murine monoclonal antibody - called AK-47 - against NCA-95 glycoprotein of granulocytes) has been proved to be a very convenient and successful radiopharmaceutical for visualizing infectious diseases. For a broad introduction in routine nuclear medicine it was necessary to optimize the labelling method and to determine in vitro exactly those biological and binding parameters which are relevant for an effective application in vivo. Binding to granulocytes has been shown to be specific and saturable (nonspecific binding about 10%) and is not via the Fc part of the antibody. The investigation of the binding properties of /sup 125/I-labelled AK-47 gave the following results: Affinity constant 5x10/sup 8/, 20,000-100,000 epitopes per granulocyte and an immunoreactivity of more than 90%. Labelling with /sup 123/I reduced the immunoreactivity to 40%. The Lindmo method and immunoblotting are used as quality control to check the likely in vivo behaviour of the labelled antibody. There is a good correspondence between the results from the two methods. With our special labelling method and the different in vitro checks we have found a reliable way to control the production and to assure an optimal binding behaviour of /sup 123/I-granuloszint. (orig.).

  10. Human serum albumin binding of certain antimalarials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Olivera S.; Cvijetić, Ilija N.; Zlatović, Mario V.; Opsenica, Igor M.; Konstantinović, Jelena M.; Terzić Jovanović, Nataša V.; Šolaja, Bogdan A.; Verbić, Tatjana Ž.

    2018-03-01

    Interactions between eight in-house synthesized aminoquinolines, along with well-known chloroquine, and human serum albumin (HSA) have been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The synthesized aminoquinolines, despite being structurally diverse, were found to be very potent antimalarials. Fluorescence measurements indicate that three compounds having additional thiophene or benzothiophene substructure bind more strongly to HSA than other studied compounds. Competitive binding experiments indicate that these three compounds bind significantly stronger to warfarin compared to diazepam binding site. Fluorescence quenching at three temperatures (20, 25, and 37 °C) was analyzed using classical Stern-Volmer equation, and a static quenching mechanism was proposed. The enthalpy and entropy changes upon sulphur-containing compound-HSA interactions were calculated using Van't Hoff equation. Positive values of enthalpy and entropy changes indicate that non-specific, hydrophobic interactions are the main contributors to HSA-compound interaction. Molecular docking and calculated lipophilicity descriptors indicate the same, pointing out that the increased lipophilicity of sulphur-containing compounds might be a reason for their better binding to HSA. Obtained results might contribute to design of novel derivatives with improved pharmacokinetic properties and drug efficacy.

  11. Binding