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Sample records for binding inhibitor gene

  1. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    Acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa protein isolated from bovine liver by virtue of its ability to bind and induce the synthesis of medium-chain acyl-CoA esters. Surprisingly, it turned out to be identical to a protein named diazepam-binding Inhibitor (DBI) claimed to be an endogenous mod...

  2. Acyl-CoA-binding protein/diazepam-binding inhibitor gene and pseudogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Hummel, R; Ravn, S

    1992-01-01

    have molecularly cloned and characterized the ACBP/DBI gene family in rat. The rat ACBP/DBI gene family comprises one expressed gene and four processed pseudogenes of which one was shown to exist in two allelic forms. The expressed gene is organized into four exons and three introns....... There is a remarkable correspondence between the structural modules of ACBP/DBI as determined by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the exon-intron architecture of the ACBP/DBI gene. Detailed analyses of transcription of the ACBP/DBI gene in brain and liver were performed to map transcription initiation...

  3. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  4. Discovery of inhibitors of aberrant gene transcription from Libraries of DNA binding molecules: inhibition of LEF-1-mediated gene transcription and oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, James S; Shi, Jin; Jin, Wei; Vogt, Peter K; Boger, Dale L

    2009-03-11

    The screening of a >9000 compound library of synthetic DNA binding molecules for selective binding to the consensus sequence of the transcription factor LEF-1 followed by assessment of the candidate compounds in a series of assays that characterized functional activity (disruption of DNA-LEF-1 binding) at the intended target and site (inhibition of intracellular LEF-1-mediated gene transcription) resulting in a desired phenotypic cellular change (inhibit LEF-1-driven cell transformation) provided two lead compounds: lefmycin-1 and lefmycin-2. The sequence of screens defining the approach assures that activity in the final functional assay may be directly related to the inhibition of gene transcription and DNA binding properties of the identified molecules. Central to the implementation of this generalized approach to the discovery of DNA binding small molecule inhibitors of gene transcription was (1) the use of a technically nondemanding fluorescent intercalator displacement (FID) assay for initial assessment of the DNA binding affinity and selectivity of a library of compounds for any sequence of interest, and (2) the technology used to prepare a sufficiently large library of DNA binding compounds.

  5. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wanli; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design.

  6. Crystal Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv AldR (Rv2779c), a Regulator of the ald Gene: DNA BINDING AND IDENTIFICATION OF SMALL MOLECULE INHIBITORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Abhishek; Shree, Sonal; Pandey, Sarvesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2016-06-03

    Here we report the crystal structure of M. tuberculosis AldR (Rv2779c) showing that the N-terminal DNA-binding domains are swapped, forming a dimer, and four dimers are assembled into an octamer through crystal symmetry. The C-terminal domain is involved in oligomeric interactions that stabilize the oligomer, and it contains the effector-binding sites. The latter sites are 30-60% larger compared with homologs like MtbFFRP (Rv3291c) and can consequently accommodate larger molecules. MtbAldR binds to the region upstream to the ald gene that is highly up-regulated in nutrient-starved tuberculosis models and codes for l-alanine dehydrogenase (MtbAld; Rv2780). Further, the MtbAldR-DNA complex is inhibited upon binding of Ala, Tyr, Trp and Asp to the protein. Studies involving a ligand-binding site G131T mutant show that the mutant forms a DNA complex that cannot be inhibited by adding the amino acids. Comparative studies suggest that binding of the amino acids changes the relative spatial disposition of the DNA-binding domains and thereby disrupt the protein-DNA complex. Finally, we identified small molecules, including a tetrahydroquinoline carbonitrile derivative (S010-0261), that inhibit the MtbAldR-DNA complex. The latter molecules represent the very first inhibitors of a feast/famine regulatory protein from any source and set the stage for exploring MtbAldR as a potential anti-tuberculosis target.

  7. HDAC Inhibitors without an Active Site Zn2+-Binding Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickers, Chris J.; Olsen, Christian Adam; Leman, Luke J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and synthetic histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors generally derive their strong binding affinity and high potency from a key functional group that binds to the Zn2+ ion within the enzyme active site. However, this feature is also thought to carry the potential liability of undesirable off......-target interactions with other metalloenzymes. As a step toward mitigating this issue, here, we describe the design, synthesis, and structure−activity characterizations of cyclic α3β-tetrapeptide HDAC inhibitors that lack the presumed indispensable Zn2+-binding group. The lead compounds (e.g., 15 and 26) display good...

  8. The enigmatic drug binding site for sodium channel inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Arpad; Lukacs, Peter

    2010-11-01

    Local anesthetics have been in clinical use since 1884, and different aspects of the local anesthetic binding site have been studied in enormous detail. In spite of all these efforts, some of the most fundamental questions--such as which exact residues constitute the binding site, how many binding sites exist, do local anesthetics share their binding site(s) with other sodium channel inhibitors, and what are the mechanisms of inhibition--are still largely unanswered. We review accumulated data on the "local anesthetic receptor"and discuss controversial points, such as possible mechanisms of inhibition, the possibility of additional binding sites, the orientation of S6 helices, and the internal vs. external position of the anticonvulsant binding site. We describe the four following specific groups of functionally important residues: i) conserved asparagines six residues below the hinge residues; we propose that they are oriented toward the external surface of S6 helices, and have a critical role in the coupling of voltage sensors to gating, ii) residues lining the inner vestibule and constructing the "orthodox" binding site, iii) residues around the outer vestibule, which have been proposed to constitute an alternative external binding site, and iv) residues determining external access for quaternary amine inhibitors, such as QX314. We conclude that sodium channel inhibitors must be heterogenous in terms of binding sites and inhibition mechanisms, and propose that this heterogeneity should be taken into consideration during drug development.

  9. Exploring the inhibitor binding pocket of respiratory complex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fendel, Uta; Tocilescu, Maja A; Kerscher, Stefan; Brandt, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Numerous hydrophobic and amphipathic compounds including several detergents are known to inhibit the ubiquinone reductase reaction of respiratory chain complex I (proton pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Guided by the X-ray structure of the peripheral arm of complex I from Thermus thermophilus we have generated a large collection of site-directed mutants in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica targeting the proposed ubiquinone and inhibitor binding pocket of this huge multiprotein complex at the interface of the 49-kDa and PSST subunits. We could identify a number of residues where mutations changed I(50) values for representatives from all three groups of hydrophobic inhibitors. Many mutations around the domain of the 49-kDa subunit that is homologous to the [NiFe] centre binding region of hydrogenase conferred resistance to DQA (class I/type A) and rotenone (class II/type B) indicating a wider overlap of the binding sites for these two types of inhibitors. In contrast, a region near iron-sulfur cluster N2, where the binding of the n-alkyl-polyoxyethylene-ether detergent C(12)E(8) (type C) was exclusively affected, appeared comparably well separated. Taken together, our data provide structure-based support for the presence of distinct but overlapping binding sites for hydrophobic inhibitors possibly extending into the ubiquinone reduction site of mitochondrial complex I.

  10. The binding mechanism of a peptidic cyclic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Longguang; Svane, Anna S P; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases are classical objects for studies of catalytic and inhibitory mechanisms as well as interesting as therapeutic targets. Since small-molecule serine protease inhibitors generally suffer from specificity problems, peptidic inhibitors, isolated from phage-displayed peptide libraries...... inhibitory mechanism and an unusually high specificity. Using a number of modified variants of upain-1, we characterised the upain-1-urokinase-type plasminogen activator complex using X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined a model of the peptide in solution by NMR spectroscopy, and analysed binding...... kinetics and thermodynamics by surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry. We found that upain-1 changes both main-chain conformation and side-chain orientations as it binds to the protease, in particular its Trp3 residue and the surrounding backbone. The properties of upain-1...

  11. A more robust Boolean model describing inhibitor binding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoqian Steven XIE; Chao TANG

    2008-01-01

    From the first application of the Boolean model to the cell cycle regulation network of budding yeast, new regulative pathways have been discovered, par-ticularly in the G1/S transition circuit. This discovery called for finer modeling to study the essential biology, and the resulting outcomes are first introduced in the ar-ticle. A traditional Boolean network model set up for the new G1/S transition circuit shows that it cannot correctly simulate real biology unless the model parameters are fine tuned. The deficiency is caused by an overly coarse-grained description of the inhibitor binding process, which shall be overcome by a two-vector model proposed whose robustness is surveyed using random perturba-tions. Simulations show that the proposed two-vector model is much more robust in describing inhibitor binding processes within the Boolean framework.

  12. Understanding enzymic binding affinity : thermodynamics of binding of benzamidinium chloride inhibitors to trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talhout, Reinskje

    2003-01-01

    Understanding enzymic binding affinity is of fundamental scientific importance as well as a prerequisite for structure-based drug design. In this study, the interactions of the serine proteinase trypsin with several artificial, benzamidinium-based inhibitors have been studied in aqueous solutions. I

  13. Steered molecular dynamics study of inhibitor binding in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhisen; Santos, Andrew P; Zhou, Qing; Liang, Lijun; Wang, Qi; Wu, Tao; Franzen, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The binding free energy of 4-bromophenol (4-BP), an inhibitor that binds in the internal binding site in dehaloperoxidase-hemoglobin (DHP) was calculated using Molecular Dynamics (MD) methods combined with pulling or umbrella sampling. The effects of systematic changes in the pulling speed, pulling force constant and restraint force constant on the calculated potential of mean force (PMF) are presented in this study. The PMFs calculated using steered molecular dynamics (SMD) were validated by umbrella sampling (US) in the strongly restrained regime. A series of restraint force constants ranging from 1000 down to 5 kJ/(mol nm(2)) were used in SMD simulations. This range was validated using US, however noting that weaker restraints give rise to a broader sampling of configurations. This comparison was further tested by a pulling simulation conducted without any restraints, which was observed to have a value closest to the experimentally measured free energy for binding of 4-BP to DHP based on ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) and resonance Raman spectroscopies. The protein-inhibitor system is well suited for fundamental study of free energy calculations because the DHP protein is relatively small and the inhibitor is quite rigid. Simulation configuration structures are compared to the X-ray crystallography structures of the binding site of 4-BP in the distal pocket above the heme.

  14. Comparative binding energy COMBINE analysis for understanding the binding determinants of type II dehydroquinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peón, Antonio; Coderch, Claire; Gago, Federico; González-Bello, Concepción

    2013-05-01

    Herein we report comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analyses to derive quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models that help rationalize the determinants of binding affinity for inhibitors of type II dehydroquinase (DHQ2), the third enzyme of the shikimic acid pathway. Independent COMBINE models were derived for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DHQ2, which is an essential enzyme in both these pathogenic bacteria that has no counterpart in human cells. These studies quantify the importance of the hydrogen bonding interactions between the ligands and the water molecule involved in the DHQ2 reaction mechanism. They also highlight important differences in the ligand interactions with the interface pocket close to the active site that could provide guides for future inhibitor design.

  15. Inhibitor and substrate binding by angiotensin-converting enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xuemei; Wu, Shanshan; Xu, Dingguo;

    2011-01-01

    . In this work, we propose a model for an ACE Michaelis complex based on two known X-ray structures of inhibitor-enzyme complexes. Specifically, the human testis angiotensin-converting enzyme (tACE) complexed with two clinic drugs were first investigated using a combined quantum mechanical and molecular......Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is an important zinc-dependent hydrolase responsible for converting the inactive angiotensin I to the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II and for inactivating the vasodilator bradykinin. However, the substrate binding mode of ACE has not been completely understood...... mechanical (QM/MM) approach. The structural parameters obtained from the 550 ps molecular dynamics simulations are in excellent agreement with the X-ray structures, validating the QM/MM approach. Based on these structures, a model for the Michaelis complex was proposed and simulated using the same...

  16. Impact of Reducing Complement Inhibitor Binding on the Immunogenicity of Native Neisseria meningitidis Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Daniels-Treffandier

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis recruits host human complement inhibitors to its surface to down-regulate complement activation and enhance survival in blood. We have investigated whether such complement inhibitor binding occurs after vaccination with native outer membrane vesicles (nOMVs, and limits immunogenicity of such vaccines. To this end, nOMVs reactogenic lipopolysaccharide was detoxified by deletion of the lpxl1 gene (nOMVlpxl1. nOMVs unable to bind human complement factor H (hfH were generated by additional deletions of the genes encoding factor H binding protein (fHbp and neisserial surface protein A (NspA (nOMVdis. Antibody responses elicited in mice with nOMVdis were compared to those elicited with nOMVlpxl1 in the presence of hfH. Results demonstrate that the administration of human fH to mice immunized with fHbp containing OMVlpxl1 decreased immunogenicity against fHbp (but not against the OMV as a whole. The majority of the OMV-induced bactericidal immune response (OMVlpxl1 or OMVdis was versus PorA. Despite a considerable reduction of hfH binding to nOMVdis, and the absence of the vaccine antigen fHbp, immunogenicity in mice was not different from nOMVlpxl1, in the absence or presence of hfH (serum bactericidal titers of 1:64 vs 1:128 after one dose in the nOMVdis and nOMVlpxl1-immunized groups respectively. Therefore, partial inhibition of fH binding did not enhance immunity in this model.

  17. Comparative analyses of lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase, and their binding properties with known inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyun Wang

    Full Text Available The triglyceride lipase gene subfamily plays a central role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. There are three members of this subfamily: lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, and endothelial lipase. Although these lipases are implicated in the pathophysiology of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis, their structures have not been fully solved. In the current study, we established homology models of these three lipases, and carried out analysis of their activity sites. In addition, we investigated the kinetic characteristics for the catalytic residues using a molecular dynamics simulation strategy. To elucidate the molecular interactions and determine potential key residues involved in the binding to lipase inhibitors, we analyzed the binding pockets and binding poses of known inhibitors of the three lipases. We identified the spatial consensus catalytic triad "Ser-Asp-His", a characteristic motif in all three lipases. Furthermore, we found that the spatial characteristics of the binding pockets of the lipase molecules play a key role in ligand recognition, binding poses, and affinities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that systematically builds homology models of all the triglyceride lipase gene subfamily members. Our data provide novel insights into the molecular structures of lipases and their structure-function relationship, and thus provides groundwork for functional probe design towards lipase-based therapeutic inhibitors for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis.

  18. Thermodynamics and kinetics of inhibitor binding to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter subtype-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehan, Shahid; Ashok, Yashwanth; Nanekar, Rahul; Jaakola, Veli-Pekka

    2015-12-15

    Many nucleoside transport inhibitors are in clinical use as anti-cancer, vasodilator and cardioprotective drugs. However, little is known about the binding energetics of these inhibitors to nucleoside transporters (NTs) due to their low endogenous expression levels and difficulties in the biophysical characterization of purified protein with ligands. Here, we present kinetics and thermodynamic analyses of inhibitor binding to the human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1), also known as SLC29A1. Using a radioligand binding assay, we obtained equilibrium binding and kinetic rate constants of well-known NT inhibitors--[(3)H]nitrobenzylmercaptopurine ribonucleoside ([(3)H]NBMPR), dilazep, and dipyridamole--and the native permeant, adenosine, to hENT1. We observed that the equilibrium binding affinities for all inhibitors decreased whereas, the kinetic rate constants increased with increasing temperature. Furthermore, we found that binding is enthalpy driven and thus, an exothermic reaction, implying that the transporter does not discriminate between its inhibitors and substrates thermodynamically. This predominantly enthalpy-driven binding by four chemically distinct ligands suggests that the transporter may not tolerate diversity in the type of interactions that lead to high affinity binding. Consistent with this, the measured activation energy of [(3)H]NBMPR association was relatively large (20 kcal mol(-1)) suggesting a conformational change upon inhibitor binding. For all three inhibitors the enthalpy (ΔH°) and entropy (ΔS°) contributions to the reaction energetics were determined by van't Hoff analysis to be roughly similar (25-75% ΔG°). Gains in enthalpy with increasing polar surface area of inhibitors suggest that the binding is favored by electrostatic or polar interactions between the ligands and the transporter.

  19. Profiling of differentially expressed genes in haemophilia A with inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, S H; Lim, J A; Kim, M J; Kim, H C; Lee, H W; Yoo, K Y; You, C W; Lee, K S; Kim, H S

    2012-05-01

    Inhibitor development is the most significant complication in the therapy of haemophilia A (HA) patients. In spite of many studies, not much is known regarding the mechanism underlying inhibitor development. To understand the mechanism, we analysed profiles of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between inhibitor and non-inhibitor HA via a microarray technique. Twenty unrelated Korean HAs were studied: 11 were non-inhibitor and nine were HA with inhibitor (≥5 BU mL(-1)). Microarray analysis was conducted using a Human Ref-8 expression Beadchip system (Illumina) and the data were analysed using Beadstudio software. We identified 545 DEGs in inhibitor HA as compared with the non-inhibitor patients; 384 genes were up-regulated and 161 genes were down-regulated. Among them, 75 genes whose expressions were altered by at least two-fold (>+2 or genes differed significantly in the two groups. For validation of the DEGs, semi-quantitative RT-PCR (semi-qRT-PCR) was conducted with the six selected DEGs. The results corresponded to the microarray data, with the exception of one gene. We also examined the expression of the genes associated with the antigen presentation process via real-time PCR. The average levels of IL10, CTLA4 and TNFα slightly reduced, whereas that of IFNγ increased in the inhibitor HA group. We are currently unable to explain whether this phenomenon is a function of the inhibitor-inducing factor or is an epiphenomenon of antibody production. Nevertheless, our results provide a possible explanation for inhibitor development. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Discovery of MK-8718, an HIV Protease Inhibitor Containing a Novel Morpholine Aspartate Binding Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungard, Christopher J; Williams, Peter D; Ballard, Jeanine E; Bennett, David J; Beaulieu, Christian; Bahnck-Teets, Carolyn; Carroll, Steve S; Chang, Ronald K; Dubost, David C; Fay, John F; Diamond, Tracy L; Greshock, Thomas J; Hao, Li; Holloway, M Katharine; Felock, Peter J; Gesell, Jennifer J; Su, Hua-Poo; Manikowski, Jesse J; McKay, Daniel J; Miller, Mike; Min, Xu; Molinaro, Carmela; Moradei, Oscar M; Nantermet, Philippe G; Nadeau, Christian; Sanchez, Rosa I; Satyanarayana, Tummanapalli; Shipe, William D; Singh, Sanjay K; Truong, Vouy Linh; Vijayasaradhi, Sivalenka; Wiscount, Catherine M; Vacca, Joseph P; Crane, Sheldon N; McCauley, John A

    2016-07-14

    A novel HIV protease inhibitor was designed using a morpholine core as the aspartate binding group. Analysis of the crystal structure of the initial lead bound to HIV protease enabled optimization of enzyme potency and antiviral activity. This afforded a series of potent orally bioavailable inhibitors of which MK-8718 was identified as a compound with a favorable overall profile.

  1. MOLECULAR MODELING AND DRUG DISCOVERY OF POTENTIAL INHIBITORS FOR ANTICANCER TARGET GENE MELK (MATERNAL EMBRYONIC LEUCINE ZIPPER KINASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha. K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK, a member of the AMP serine/threonine kinase family, exhibits multiple features consistent with the potential utility of this gene as an anticancer target. Reports show that MELK functions as a cancer-specific protein kinase, and that down-regulation of MELK results in growth suppression of breast cancer cells. There are many inhibitors which bind to kinases and are in clinical trials too. In our study we have taken a library of different inhibitors and docked those using GLIDE Induced Fit. From docking result we can conclude that Syk inhibitor II, Rho kinase inhibitor IV, p38 MAP Kinase Inhibitor III, HA 1004, Dihydrochloride and IKK -2 inhibitor VI have good binding affinity towards MELK and may have anticancer activity.

  2. Synthesis and evaluation of potential inhibitors of human and Escherichia coli histidine triad nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Ghosh, Brahma; Wagner, Carston R

    2012-01-01

    Based on recent substrate specificity studies, a series of ribonucleotide based esters and carbamates were synthesized and screened as inhibitors of the phosphoramidases and acyl-AMP hydrolases, Escherichia coli Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein (ecHinT) and human Histidine Triad Nucleotide Binding Protein 1 (hHint1). Using our established phosphoramidase assay, K(i) values were determined. All compounds exhibited non-competitive inhibition profiles. The carbamate based inhibitors were shown to successfully suppress the Hint1-associated phenotype in E. coli, suggesting that they are permeable intracellular inhibitors of ecHinT.

  3. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  4. Seeking for Non-Zinc-Binding MMP-2 Inhibitors: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; De Filippis, Barbara; Campestre, Cristina; Laghezza, Antonio; Marrone, Alessandro; Amoroso, Rosa; Tortorella, Paolo; Agamennone, Mariangela

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are an important family of zinc-containing enzymes with a central role in many physiological and pathological processes. Although several MMP inhibitors have been synthesized over the years, none reached the market because of off-target effects, due to the presence of a zinc binding group in the inhibitor structure. To overcome this problem non-zinc-binding inhibitors (NZIs) have been recently designed. In a previous article, a virtual screening campaign identified some hydroxynaphtyridine and hydroxyquinoline as MMP-2 non-zinc-binding inhibitors. In the present work, simplified analogues of previously-identified hits have been synthesized and tested in enzyme inhibition assays. Docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out to rationalize the activity data. PMID:27782083

  5. Seeking for Non-Zinc-Binding MMP-2 Inhibitors: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ammazzalorso

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are an important family of zinc-containing enzymes with a central role in many physiological and pathological processes. Although several MMP inhibitors have been synthesized over the years, none reached the market because of off-target effects, due to the presence of a zinc binding group in the inhibitor structure. To overcome this problem non-zinc-binding inhibitors (NZIs have been recently designed. In a previous article, a virtual screening campaign identified some hydroxynaphtyridine and hydroxyquinoline as MMP-2 non-zinc-binding inhibitors. In the present work, simplified analogues of previously-identified hits have been synthesized and tested in enzyme inhibition assays. Docking and molecular dynamics studies were carried out to rationalize the activity data.

  6. Relationship between brain serotonin transporter binding, plasma concentration and behavioural effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to characterise the relationship between in vivo brain serotonin transporter (SERT) binding, plasma concentration and pharmacological effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in mice. Oral administration of fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, paroxetine and sertraline at pharmacologically relevant doses exerted dose- and time-dependent binding activity of brain SERT as revealed by significant increases in KD for specific [3H]paroxetine binding, and the i...

  7. A competitive nucleotide binding inhibitor: in vitro characterization of Rab7 GTPase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agola, Jacob O; Hong, Lin; Surviladze, Zurab; Ursu, Oleg; Waller, Anna; Strouse, J Jacob; Simpson, Denise S; Schroeder, Chad E; Oprea, Tudor I; Golden, Jennifer E; Aubé, Jeffrey; Buranda, Tione; Sklar, Larry A; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2012-06-15

    Mapping the functionality of GTPases through small molecule inhibitors represents an underexplored area in large part due to the lack of suitable compounds. Here we report on the small chemical molecule 2-(benzoylcarbamothioylamino)-5,5-dimethyl-4,7-dihydrothieno[2,3-c]pyran-3-carboxylic acid (PubChem CID 1067700) as an inhibitor of nucleotide binding by Ras-related GTPases. The mechanism of action of this pan-GTPase inhibitor was characterized in the context of the Rab7 GTPase as there are no known inhibitors of Rab GTPases. Bead-based flow cytometry established that CID 1067700 has significant inhibitory potency on Rab7 nucleotide binding with nanomolar inhibitor (K(i)) values and an inhibitory response of ≥97% for BODIPY-GTP and BODIPY-GDP binding. Other tested GTPases exhibited significantly lower responses. The compound behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Rab7 nucleotide binding based on both equilibrium binding and dissociation assays. Molecular docking analyses are compatible with CID 1067700 fitting into the nucleotide binding pocket of the GTP-conformer of Rab7. On the GDP-conformer, the molecule has greater solvent exposure and significantly less protein interaction relative to GDP, offering a molecular rationale for the experimental results. Structural features pertinent to CID 1067700 inhibitory activity have been identified through initial structure-activity analyses and identified a molecular scaffold that may serve in the generation of more selective probes for Rab7 and other GTPases. Taken together, our study has identified the first competitive GTPase inhibitor and demonstrated the potential utility of the compound for dissecting the enzymology of the Rab7 GTPase, as well as serving as a model for other small molecular weight GTPase inhibitors.

  8. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics of ligands binding into protein: The case of HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Liu, Ming S.; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Kehchih; Huang, Yonggang

    2009-06-01

    Binding dynamics and pathways of ligands or inhibitors to target proteins are challenging both experimental and theoretical biologists. A dynamics understanding of inhibitors interacting with protein is essential for the design of novel potent drugs. In this work we applied a coarse-grained molecular dynamics method for simulating inhibitors entering the binding cavity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (PR). It shows that the coarse-grained dynamics, consistent with the experimental results, can capture the essential molecular dynamics of various inhibitors binding into PR. The primary driving force for the binding processes is the nonbond interaction between inhibitors and PR. The size and topology of inhibitors and the interacting strength between inhibitors and PR have great influence on the binding mode and processes. The interaction strength between the PR and various inhibitors is also analyzed by atomistic molecular mechanics and Poisson-Boltzmann solvation area method.

  9. Small-molecule inhibitor binding to an N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jiwoung; Goo, Eunhye; Yu, Sangheon; Choi, Okhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Kim, Jinwoo; Kim, Hongsup; Igarashi, Jun; Suga, Hiroaki; Moon, Jae Sun; Hwang, Ingyu; Rhee, Sangkee

    2011-07-19

    Quorum sensing (QS) controls certain behaviors of bacteria in response to population density. In gram-negative bacteria, QS is often mediated by N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). Because QS influences the virulence of many pathogenic bacteria, synthetic inhibitors of acyl-HSL synthases might be useful therapeutically for controlling pathogens. However, rational design of a potent QS antagonist has been thwarted by the lack of information concerning the binding interactions between acyl-HSL synthases and their ligands. In the gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia glumae, QS controls virulence, motility, and protein secretion and is mediated by the binding of N-octanoyl-L-HSL (C8-HSL) to its cognate receptor, TofR. C8-HSL is synthesized by the acyl-HSL synthase TofI. In this study, we characterized two previously unknown QS inhibitors identified in a focused library of acyl-HSL analogs. Our functional and X-ray crystal structure analyses show that the first inhibitor, J8-C8, binds to TofI, occupying the binding site for the acyl chain of the TofI cognate substrate, acylated acyl-carrier protein. Moreover, the reaction byproduct, 5'-methylthioadenosine, independently binds to the binding site for a second substrate, S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Closer inspection of the mode of J8-C8 binding to TofI provides a likely molecular basis for the various substrate specificities of acyl-HSL synthases. The second inhibitor, E9C-3oxoC6, competitively inhibits C8-HSL binding to TofR. Our analysis of the binding of an inhibitor and a reaction byproduct to an acyl-HSL synthase may facilitate the design of a new class of QS-inhibiting therapeutic agents.

  10. Computational optimization of AG18051 inhibitor for amyloid-beta binding alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Alexandra T.; Antunes, Agostinho; Fernandes, Pedro A.; Ramos, Maria J.

    Amyloid-beta (Abeta) binding alcohol dehydrogenase (ABAD) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in maintaining the homeostasis. The enzyme can also mediate some diseases, including genetic diseases, Alzheimer's disease, and possibly some prostate cancers. Potent inhibitors of ABAD might facilitate a better clarification of the functions of the enzyme under normal and pathogenic conditions and might also be used for therapeutic intervention in disease conditions mediated by the enzyme. The AG18051 is the only presently available inhibitor of ABAD. It binds in the active-site cavity of the enzyme and reacts with the NAD+ cofactor to form a covalent adduct. In this work, we use computational methods to perform a rational optimization of the AG18051 inhibitor, through the introduction of chemical substitutions directed to improve the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme. The molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area methodology was used to predict the relative free binding energy of the different modified inhibitor-NAD-enzyme complexes. We show that it is possible to increase significantly the affinity of the inhibitor to the enzyme with small modifications, without changing the overall structure and ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) properties of the original inhibitor.

  11. RBI, a one-domain alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor with completely independent binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskos, K; Huber-Wunderlich, M; Glockshuber, R

    1996-11-11

    The bifunctional inhibitor from Ragi (Eleusine coracana Gaertneri) (RBI) is the only member of the alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor family that inhibits both trypsin and alpha-amylase. Here, we show that both enzymes simultaneously and independently bind to RBI. The recently solved three-dimensional NMR structure of RBI has revealed that the inhibitor possesses a hitherto unknown fold for serine proteinase and alpha-amylase inhibitors. Despite its different fold, RBI obeys the standard mechanism observed for most protein inhibitors of serine proteinases and is a strong, competitive inhibitor of bovine trypsin (Ki = 1.2 +/- 0.2 nM). RBI is also a competitive inhibitor of porcine alpha-amylase (Ki = 11 +/- 2 nM) when a disaccharide is used as a substrate of alpha-amylase. However, the inhibition mode becomes complex when larger (> or = 7 saccharide units) alpha-amylase substrates are used. A second saccharide binding site on porcine alpha-amylase may enable larger oligosaccharides to displace RBI from its binding site in an intramolecular reaction.

  12. Estimation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors protein binding degree using chromatographic hydrophobicity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors represent a significant group of drugs primarily used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure. Objective. Selected ACE inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril were studied in order to establish a fast and easy estimation method of their plasma protein binding degree based on their lipophilicity data. Methods. Chromatographic hydrophobicity data (parameter C0 were obtained on cellulose layers under conditions of normal-phase thin-layer chromatography (NPTLC, using different binary solvent systems. The ACE inhibitors lipophilicity descriptors (logP values were calculated using the software package Virtual Computational Chemistry Laboratory. The ACE inhibitors plasma protein binding data were collected from relevant literature. Results. ACE inhibitors protein binding data varied from negligible (lisinopril to 99% (fosinopril. The calculated lipophilicity descriptors, logPKOWWIN values ranged from -0.94 (lisinopril to 6.61 (fosinopril. Good correlations were established between plasma protein binding values and calculated logPKOWWIN values (R2=0.8026 as well as chromatographic hydrophobicity data, C0 parameters (R2=0.7662. Even though good correlation coefficients (R2 were obtained in both relations, unacceptable probability value with p>0.05 was found in relation between protein binding data and calculated logPKOWWIN values. Subsequently, taking into consideration the request for probability value lower than 0.05, a better relationship was observed between protein binding data and chromatographically obtained hydrophobicity parameters C0 values. Conclusion. Cellulose layers are easily available and cost effective sorbent to assess hydrophobicity. Experimentally obtained data on ACE inhibitors hydrophobicity and plasma protein binding estimation are important parameters in evaluating bioavailability of these drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva

  13. Factor VIII gene variants and inhibitor risk in African American hemophilia A patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Devi; Ettinger, Ruth A; Nakaya Fletcher, Shelley; James, Eddie A; Liu, Maochang; Barrett, John C; Withycombe, Janice; Matthews, Dana C; Epstein, Melinda S; Hughes, Richard J; Pratt, Kathleen P

    2015-08-13

    African American hemophilia A (HA) patients experience a higher incidence of neutralizing anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies ("inhibitors") vis-à-vis white patients. Nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene encoding FVIII-H484, FVIII-E1241, and FVIII-V2238 are more prevalent in African Americans. This study tested the hypothesis that immune responses to these sites provoke inhibitors. Blood samples were obtained from 174 African American and 198 white HA subjects and their F8 gene sequences determined. Major histocompatibility complex class II binding and T-cell recognition of polymorphic sequences were evaluated using quantitative binding assays and HLA-DRB1 tetramers. Peptides corresponding to 4 common ns-SNPs showed limited binding to 11 HLA-DRB1 proteins. CD4 T cells from 22 subjects treated with FVIII products having sequences at residues FVIII-484, 1241, and 2238 differing from those of putative proteins encoded by their F8 genes did not show high-avidity tetramer binding, whereas positive-control staining of tetanus-specific CD4 T cells was routinely successful. African Americans with an intron-22 inversion mutation showed a 2-3 times-higher inhibitor incidence than whites with the same mutation (odds ratio = 2.3 [1.1-5.0, P = .04]), but this did not correlate with any of the ns-SNPs. We conclude that immune responses to "sequence-mismatched" FVIII products are unlikely to contribute appreciably to the inhibitor incidence in African Americans.

  14. Assessing the binding of cholinesterase inhibitors by docking and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M Rejwan; Sadoqi, Mostafa; Møller, Simon G; Boutajangout, Allal; Mezei, Mihaly

    2017-09-01

    In this report we assessed by docking and molecular dynamics the binding mechanisms of three FDA-approved Alzheimer drugs, inhibitors of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE): donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine. Dockings by the softwares Autodock-Vina, PatchDock and Plant reproduced the docked conformations of the inhibitor-enzyme complexes within 2Å of RMSD of the X-ray structure. Free-energy scores show strong affinity of the inhibitors for the enzyme binding pocket. Three independent Molecular Dynamics simulation runs indicated general stability of donepezil, galantamine and rivastigmine in their respective enzyme binding pocket (also referred to as gorge) as well as the tendency to form hydrogen bonds with the water molecules. The binding of rivastigmine in the Torpedo California AChE binding pocket is interesting as it eventually undergoes carbamylation and breaks apart according to the X-ray structure of the complex. Similarity search in the ZINC database and targeted docking on the gorge region of the AChE enzyme gave new putative inhibitor molecules with high predicted binding affinity, suitable for potential biophysical and biological assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure and binding efficiency relations of QB site inhibitors of photosynthetic reaction centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husu, Ivan; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Fiser, Béla; Gómez-Bengoa, Enrique; Nagy, László

    2015-04-01

    Many herbicides employed in agriculture and also some antibiotics bind to a specific site of the reaction centre protein (RC) blocking the photosynthetic electron transport. Crystal structures showed that all these compounds bind at the secondary ubiquinone (QB) site albeit to slightly different places. Different herbicide molecules have different binding affinities (evaluated as inhibition constants, KI, and binding enthalpy values, ΔHbind). The action of inhibitors depends on the following parameters: (i) herbicide molecular structure; (ii) interactions between herbicide and quinone binding site; (iii) protein environment. In our investigations KI and ΔHbind were determined for several inhibitors. Bound herbicide structures were optimized and their intramolecular charge distributions were calculated. Experimental and calculated data were compared to those available from databank crystal structures. We can state that the herbicide inhibition efficiency depends on steric and electronic, i.e. geometry of binding with the protein and molecular charge distribution, respectively. Apolar bulky groups on N-7 atom of the inhibitor molecule (like t-buthyl in terbutryn) are preferable for establishing stronger interactions with QB site, while such substituents are not recommended on N-8. The N-4,7,8 nitrogen atoms maintain a larger electron density so that more effective H-bonds are formed between the inhibitor and the surrounding amino acids of the protein.

  16. Pyrazole-based cathepsin S inhibitors with arylalkynes as P1 binding elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ameriks, Michael K.; Axe, Frank U.; Bembenek, Scott D.; Edwards, James P.; Gu, Yin; Karlsson, Lars; Randal, Mike; Sun, Siquan; Thurmond, Robin L.; Zhu, Jian; (J& J-PRD); (Sunesis)

    2010-01-12

    A crystal structure of 1 bound to a Cys25Ser mutant of cathepsin S helped to elucidate the binding mode of a previously disclosed series of pyrazole-based CatS inhibitors and facilitated the design of a new class of arylalkyne analogs. Optimization of the alkyne and tetrahydropyridine portions of the pharmacophore provided potent CatS inhibitors (IC{sub 50} = 40-300 nM), and an X-ray structure of 32 revealed that the arylalkyne moiety binds in the S1 pocket of the enzyme.

  17. Influence of azide incorporation on binding affinity by small papain inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wammes, Angelique E M; Hendriks, Tom G; Amatdjais-Groenen, Helene I V; Wijdeven, Marloes A; van Hest, Jan C M; van Delft, Floris L; Ritschel, Tina; Rutjes, Floris P J T

    2014-10-15

    In order to develop affinity-based biosensor platforms, appropriate ligands with a functional handle for immobilization onto a biosensor surface are required. To this end, a library of papain inhibitors was designed and synthesized, containing different azide linkers for subsequent immobilization by 'click' chemistry, in this particular case by copper-free, strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). Furthermore, a molecular docking study was performed to obtain a better insight as to at which position such azide handles could be tolerated without affecting binding affinity. Although the azide moiety is small, in some cases its introduction strongly influenced the binding affinity. For one class of inhibitors a swapped binding mode was proposed to explain the results. In addition, a specific site for linker introduction was identified, which did not significantly affect the binding affinity.

  18. Resistance Patterns Associated with HCV NS5A Inhibitors Provide Limited Insight into Drug Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moheshwarnath Issur

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs have significantly improved the treatment of infection with the hepatitis C virus. A promising class of novel antiviral agents targets the HCV NS5A protein. The high potency and broad genotypic coverage are favorable properties. NS5A inhibitors are currently assessed in advanced clinical trials in combination with viral polymerase inhibitors and/or viral protease inhibitors. However, the clinical use of NS5A inhibitors is also associated with new challenges. HCV variants with decreased susceptibility to these drugs can emerge and compromise therapy. In this review, we discuss resistance patterns in NS5A with focus prevalence and implications for inhibitor binding.

  19. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of /sup 3/H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown.

  20. Structure-Based Inhibitor Design for an Enzyme That Binds Different Steriods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu,W.; Zhou, M.; Mazumdar, M.; Azzi, A.; Ghanmi, D.; Luu-The, V.; Labrie, F.; Lin, S.

    2007-01-01

    Human type 5 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase plays a crucial role in local androgen formation in prostate tissue. Several chemicals were synthesized and tested for their ability to inhibit this enzyme, and a series of estradiol derivatives bearing a lactone on the D-ring were found to inhibit its activity efficiently. The crystal structure of the type 5 enzyme in complex with NADP and such a novel inhibitor, EM1404, was determined to a resolution of 1.30 {angstrom}. Significantly more hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions were defined between EM1404 and the enzyme than in the substrate ternary complex. The lactone ring of EM1404 accounts for important interactions with the enzyme, whereas the amide group at the opposite end of the inhibitor contributes to the stability of three protein loops involved in the construction of the substrate binding site. EM1404 has a strong competitive inhibition, with a K{sub i} of 6.9 {+-} 1.4 nM, demonstrating 40 times higher affinity than that of the best inhibitor previously reported. This is observed despite the fact that the inhibitor occupies only part of the binding cavity. Attempts to soak the inhibitor into crystals of the binary complex with NADP were unsuccessful, yielding a structure with a polyethylene glycol fragment occupying the substrate binding site. The relative crystal packing is discussed. Combined studies of small molecule inhibitor synthesis, x-ray crystallography, enzyme inhibition, and molecular modeling make it possible to analyze the plasticity of the substrate binding site of the enzyme, which is essential for developing more potent and specific inhibitors for hormone-dependent cancer therapy.

  1. Synthesis of Sulochrin-125I and Its Binding Affinity as α-Glucosidase Inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lestari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of diabetics patients have type 2 diabetes mellitus or non insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Treatment type 2 diabetes mellitus can be done by inhibiting α-glucosidase enzyme which converts carbohydrates into glucose. Sulochrin is one of the potential compounds which can inhibit the function of α-glucosidase enzyme. This study was carried out to obtain data of sulochrin binding with α-glucosidase enzyme as α-glucosidase inhibitor using Radioligand Binding Assay (RBA method. Primary reagent required in RBA method is labeled radioactive ligand (radioligand. In this study, the radioligand was sulochrin-125I and prior to sulochrin-125I synthesis, the sulochrin-I was synthesized. Sulochrin-I and sulochrin-125I were synthesized and their bindings were studied using Radioligand Binding Assay method. Sulochrin-I was synthesized with molecular formula C17H15O7I and molecular weight 457.9940. Sulochrin-125I was synthesized from sulochrin-I by isotope exchange method. From the RBA method, dissociation constant (Kd and maximum binding (Bmax were obtained 26.316 nM and Bmax 9.302 nM respectively. This low Kd indicated that sulochrin was can bind to α-glucosidase

  2. Binding of [alpha, alpha]-Disubstituted Amino Acids to Arginase Suggests New Avenues for Inhibitor Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilies, Monica; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Dowling, Daniel P.; Thorn, Katherine J.; Christianson, David W. (MIT); (Episcopal U); (Rutgers); (Drexel); (Penn)

    2011-10-21

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that hydrolyzes L-arginine to form L-ornithine and urea, and aberrant arginase activity is implicated in various diseases such as erectile dysfunction, asthma, atherosclerosis, and cerebral malaria. Accordingly, arginase inhibitors may be therapeutically useful. Continuing our efforts to expand the chemical space of arginase inhibitor design and inspired by the binding of 2-(difluoromethyl)-L-ornithine to human arginase I, we now report the first study of the binding of {alpha},{alpha}-disubstituted amino acids to arginase. Specifically, we report the design, synthesis, and assay of racemic 2-amino-6-borono-2-methylhexanoic acid and racemic 2-amino-6-borono-2-(difluoromethyl)hexanoic acid. X-ray crystal structures of human arginase I and Plasmodium falciparum arginase complexed with these inhibitors reveal the exclusive binding of the L-stereoisomer; the additional {alpha}-substituent of each inhibitor is readily accommodated and makes new intermolecular interactions in the outer active site of each enzyme. Therefore, this work highlights a new region of the protein surface that can be targeted for additional affinity interactions, as well as the first comparative structural insights on inhibitor discrimination between a human and a parasitic arginase.

  3. Visually Relating Gene Expression and in vivo DNA Binding Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Min-Yu; Mackey, Lester; Ker?,; nen, Soile V. E.; Weber, Gunther H.; Jordan, Michael I.; Knowles, David W.; Biggin, Mark D.; Hamann, Bernd

    2011-09-20

    Gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data provide important information for understanding gene regulatory networks: in vivo DNA binding data indicate genomic regions where transcription factors are bound, and expression data show the output resulting from this binding. Thus, there must be functional relationships between these two types of data. While visualization and data analysis tools exist for each data type alone, there is a lack of tools that can easily explore the relationship between them. We propose an approach that uses the average expression driven by multiple of ciscontrol regions to visually relate gene expression and in vivo DNA binding data. We demonstrate the utility of this tool with examples from the network controlling early Drosophila development. The results obtained support the idea that the level of occupancy of a transcription factor on DNA strongly determines the degree to which the factor regulates a target gene, and in some cases also controls whether the regulation is positive or negative.

  4. Binding of natural and synthetic inhibitors to human heat shock protein 90 and their clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrikaitė, Vilma; Matulis, Daumantas

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the recent progress in the field of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor design. Hsp90 is a heat shock protein with a molecular weight of approximately 90 kDa. Hsp90 is considered a good anticancer target because its inhibition leads to inactivation of its numerous client proteins participating in various signaling and other processes involved in cancer progression. Numerous Hsp90 inhibitors-leads currently tested in clinical trials are presented in this review. Furthermore, this review emphasizes the application of biophysical binding assays in the development of Hsp90 inhibitors. The binding of designed lead compounds to various Hsp90 constructs is measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and thermal shift assay. These assays provide a detailed energetic insight of the binding reaction, including the enthalpy, entropy, heat capacity, and the Gibbs free energy. A detailed description of the binding energetics helps to extend our knowledge of structure-activity relationships in the design of more potent inhibitors. The most active compounds are then tested for their absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination, toxicity, and activity against cancer cell lines.

  5. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  6. Diverse flavonoids stimulate NodD1 binding to nod gene promoters in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Melicent C; Fisher, Robert F; Long, Sharon R

    2006-08-01

    NodD1 is a member of the NodD family of LysR-type transcriptional regulators that mediates the expression of nodulation (nod) genes in the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. Each species of rhizobia establishes a symbiosis with a limited set of leguminous plants. This host specificity results in part from a NodD-dependent upregulation of nod genes in response to a cocktail of flavonoids in the host plant's root exudates. To demonstrate that NodD is a key determinant of host specificity, we expressed nodD genes from different species of rhizobia in a strain of S. meliloti lacking endogenous NodD activity. We observed that nod gene expression was initiated in response to distinct sets of flavonoid inducers depending on the source of NodD. To better understand the effects of flavonoids on NodD, we assayed the DNA binding activity of S. meliloti NodD1 treated with the flavonoid inducer luteolin. In the presence of luteolin, NodD1 exhibited increased binding to nod gene promoters compared to binding in the absence of luteolin. Surprisingly, although they do not stimulate nod gene expression in S. meliloti, the flavonoids naringenin, eriodictyol, and daidzein also stimulated an increase in the DNA binding affinity of NodD1 to nod gene promoters. In vivo competition assays demonstrate that noninducing flavonoids act as competitive inhibitors of luteolin, suggesting that both inducing and noninducing flavonoids are able to directly bind to NodD1 and mediate conformational changes at nod gene promoters but that only luteolin is capable of promoting the downstream changes necessary for nod gene induction.

  7. Binding to large enzyme pockets: small-molecule inhibitors of trypanothione reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persch, Elke; Bryson, Steve; Todoroff, Nickolay K; Eberle, Christian; Thelemann, Jonas; Dirdjaja, Natalie; Kaiser, Marcel; Weber, Maria; Derbani, Hassan; Brun, Reto; Schneider, Gisbert; Pai, Emil F; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise; Diederich, François

    2014-08-01

    The causative agents of the parasitic disease human African trypanosomiasis belong to the family of trypanosomatids. These parasitic protozoa exhibit a unique thiol redox metabolism that is based on the flavoenzyme trypanothione reductase (TR). TR was identified as a potential drug target and features a large active site that allows a multitude of possible ligand orientations, which renders rational structure-based inhibitor design highly challenging. Herein we describe the synthesis, binding properties, and kinetic analysis of a new series of small-molecule inhibitors of TR. The conjunction of biological activities, mutation studies, and virtual ligand docking simulations led to the prediction of a binding mode that was confirmed by crystal structure analysis. The crystal structures revealed that the ligands bind to the hydrophobic wall of the so-called "mepacrine binding site". The binding conformation and potency of the inhibitors varied for TR from Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Amino Acid Derivatives as New Zinc Binding Groups for the Design of Selective Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariateresa Giustiniano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are important medicinal targets for conditions ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to cardiomyopathy, periodontal disease, liver cirrhosis, multiple sclerosis, and cancer invasion and metastasis, where they showed to have a dual role, inhibiting or promoting important processes involved in the pathology. MMPs contain a zinc (II ion in the protein active site. Small-molecule inhibitors of these metalloproteins are designed to bind directly to the active site metal ions. In an effort to devise new approaches to selective inhibitors, in this paper, we describe the synthesis and preliminary biological evaluation of amino acid derivatives as new zinc binding groups (ZBGs. The incorporation of selected metal-binding functions in more complex biphenyl sulfonamide moieties allowed the identification of one compound able to interact selectively with different MMP enzymatic isoforms.

  9. An overview of the binding models of FGFR tyrosine kinases in complex with small molecule inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiyan; Wang, Mixiang; Tian, Xin; Zhang, Xiaojian

    2017-01-27

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) includes four structurally related members, termed as FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, and FGFR4. Given its intimate role in the progression of several solid tumors, excessive FGFR signaling provides an opportunity for anticancer therapy. Along with extensive pharmacological studies validating the therapeutic potential of targeting the FGFRs for cancer treatment, co-crystal structures of FGFRs/inhibitors are continuously coming up to study the mechanism of actions and explore new inhibitors. Herein, we review the reported co-crystals of FGFRs in complex with the corresponding inhibitors, main focusing our attention on the binding models and the pharmacological activities of the inhibitors.

  10. Discovery of a novel allosteric inhibitor-binding site in ERK5: comparison with the canonical kinase hinge ATP-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongming; Tucker, Julie; Wang, Xiaotao; Gavine, Paul R; Phillips, Chris; Augustin, Martin A; Schreiner, Patrick; Steinbacher, Stefan; Preston, Marian; Ogg, Derek

    2016-05-01

    MAP kinases act as an integration point for multiple biochemical signals and are involved in a wide variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, regulation of transcription and development. As a member of the MAP kinase family, ERK5 (MAPK7) is involved in the downstream signalling pathways of various cell-surface receptors, including receptor tyrosine kinases and G protein-coupled receptors. In the current study, five structures of the ERK5 kinase domain co-crystallized with ERK5 inhibitors are reported. Interestingly, three of the compounds bind at a novel allosteric binding site in ERK5, while the other two bind at the typical ATP-binding site. Binding of inhibitors at the allosteric site is accompanied by displacement of the P-loop into the ATP-binding site and is shown to be ATP-competitive in an enzymatic assay of ERK5 kinase activity. Kinase selectivity data show that the most potent allosteric inhibitor exhibits superior kinase selectivity compared with the two inhibitors that bind at the canonical ATP-binding site. An analysis of these structures and comparison with both a previously published ERK5-inhibitor complex structure (PDB entry 4b99) and the structures of three other kinases (CDK2, ITK and MEK) in complex with allosteric inhibitors are presented.

  11. Structural and thermodynamic study on aldose reductase: nitro-substituted inhibitors with strong enthalpic binding contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuber, Holger; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2007-05-04

    To prevent diabetic complications derived from enhanced glucose flux via the polyol pathway the development of aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) has been established as a promising therapeutic concept. In order to identify novel lead compounds, a virtual screening (VS) was performed successfully suggesting carboxylate-type inhibitors of sub-micromolar to micromolar affinity. Here, we combine a structural characterization of the binding modes observed by X-ray crystallography with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements providing insights into the driving forces of inhibitor binding, particularly of the first leads from VS. Characteristic features of this novel inhibitor type include a carboxylate head group connected via an alkyl spacer to a heteroaromatic moiety, which is linked to a further nitro-substituted aromatic portion. The crystal structures of two enzyme-inhibitor complexes have been determined at resolutions of 1.43 A and 1.55 A. Surprisingly, the carboxylic group of the most potent VS lead occupies the catalytic pocket differently compared to the interaction geometry observed in almost all other crystal structures with structurally related ligands and obtained under similar conditions, as an interstitial water molecule is picked up upon ligand binding. The nitro-aromatic moiety of both leads occupies the specificity pocket of the enzyme, however, adopting a different geometry compared to the docking prediction: unexpectedly, the nitro group binds to the bottom of the specificity pocket and provokes remarkable induced-fit adaptations. A peptide group located at the active site orients in such a way that H-bond formation to one nitro group oxygen atom is enabled, whereas a neighbouring tyrosine side-chain performs a slight rotation off from the binding cavity to accommodate the nitro group. Identically constituted ligands, lacking this nitro group, exhibit an affinity drop of one order of magnitude. In addition, thermodynamic data suggest a

  12. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  13. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of substrate-competitive inhibitors of C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korwar, Sudha; Morris, Benjamin L; Parikh, Hardik I; Coover, Robert A; Doughty, Tyler W; Love, Ian M; Hilbert, Brendan J; Royer, William E; Kellogg, Glen E; Grossman, Steven R; Ellis, Keith C

    2016-06-15

    C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) is a transcriptional co-regulator that downregulates the expression of many tumor-suppressor genes. Utilizing a crystal structure of CtBP with its substrate 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) and NAD(+) as a guide, we have designed, synthesized, and tested a series of small molecule inhibitors of CtBP. From our first round of compounds, we identified 2-(hydroxyimino)-3-phenylpropanoic acid as a potent CtBP inhibitor (IC50=0.24μM). A structure-activity relationship study of this compound further identified the 4-chloro- (IC50=0.18μM) and 3-chloro- (IC50=0.17μM) analogues as additional potent CtBP inhibitors. Evaluation of the hydroxyimine analogues in a short-term cell growth/viability assay showed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-analogues are 2-fold and 4-fold more potent, respectively, than the MTOB control. A functional cellular assay using a CtBP-specific transcriptional readout revealed that the 4-chloro- and 3-chloro-hydroxyimine analogues were able to block CtBP transcriptional repression activity. This data suggests that substrate-competitive inhibition of CtBP dehydrogenase activity is a potential mechanism to reactivate tumor-suppressor gene expression as a therapeutic strategy for cancer.

  14. Human 15-LOX-1 active site mutations alter inhibitor binding and decrease potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michelle; van Hoorebeke, Christopher; Horn, Thomas; Deschamps, Joshua; Freedman, J Cody; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Jacobson, Matthew P; Holman, Theodore

    2016-11-01

    Human 15-lipoxygenase-1 (h15-LOX-1 or h12/15-LOX) reacts with polyunsaturated fatty acids and produces bioactive lipid derivatives that are implicated in many important human diseases. One such disease is stroke, which is the fifth leading cause of death and the first leading cause of disability in America. The discovery of h15-LOX-1 inhibitors could potentially lead to novel therapeutics in the treatment of stroke, however, little is known about the inhibitor/active site interaction. This study utilizes site-directed mutagenesis, guided in part by molecular modeling, to gain a better structural understanding of inhibitor interactions within the active site. We have generated eight mutants (R402L, R404L, F414I, F414W, E356Q, Q547L, L407A, I417A) of h15-LOX-1 to determine whether these active site residues interact with two h15-LOX-1 inhibitors, ML351 and an ML094 derivative, compound 18. IC50 values and steady-state inhibition kinetics were determined for the eight mutants, with four of the mutants affecting inhibitor potency relative to wild type h15-LOX-1 (F414I, F414W, E356Q and L407A). The data indicate that ML351 and compound 18, bind in a similar manner in the active site to an aromatic pocket close to F414 but have subtle differences in their specific binding modes. This information establishes the binding mode for ML094 and ML351 and will be leveraged to develop next-generation inhibitors.

  15. Natural and synthetic sialic acid-containing inhibitors of influenza virus receptor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrosovich, Mikhail; Klenk, Hans-Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Influenza viruses attach to susceptible cells via multivalent interactions of their haemagglutinins with sialyloligosaccharide moieties of cellular glycoconjugates. Soluble macromolecules containing sialic acid from animal sera and mucosal fluids can act as decoy receptors and competitively inhibit virus-mediated haemagglutination and infection. Although a role for these natural inhibitors in the innate anti-influenza immunity is still not clear, studies are in progress on the design of synthetic sialic acid-containing inhibitors of receptor binding which could be used as anti-influenza drugs.

  16. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L; Hood, Molly M; Lord, John W; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F; Patt, William C; Smith, Bryan D; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D; Petillo, Peter A; Wise, Scott C; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L

    2010-10-01

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  17. Conformational changes of ovine α-1-proteinase inhibitor: The influence of heparin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Gowda, Lalitha R.

    2008-11-01

    α-1-Proteinase inhibitor (α-1-PI), the archetypal serpin causes rapid, irreversible stoichiometric inhibition of redundant circulating serine proteases and is associated with emphysema, inflammatory response and maintenance of protease-inhibitor equilibrium in vascular and peri-vascular spaces. A homogenous preparation of heparin octasaccharide binds to ovine and human α-1-PI and enhances their protease inhibitory activity phenomenally. Size-exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments reveal that ovine α-1-PI undergoes a decrease in the Stokes' radius upon heparin binding. A strong binding; characterizes this α-1-PI-heparin interaction as revealed by the binding constant ( Kα) 1.98 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 M and 2.1 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 M determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and equilibrium dialysis, respectively. The stoichiometry of heparin binding to ovine α-1-PI was 1.1 ± 0.2:1. The Stern-Volmer constants ( Ksv) for heparin activated ovine and human α-1-PI were found to be 5.13 × 10 -6 M and 5.67 × 10 -6 M, respectively, significantly higher than the native inhibitors. FTIR and CD spectroscopy project the systematic structural reorientations that α-1-PI undergoes upon heparin binding characterized by a decrease in α-helical content and a concomitant increase in β-turn and random coil elements. It is likely that these conformational changes result in the movement of the α-1-PI reactive site loop into an extended structure that is better poised to combat the cognate protease and accelerate the inhibition.

  18. New noncovalent inhibitors of penicillin-binding proteins from penicillin-resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samo Turk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs are well known and validated targets for antibacterial therapy. The most important clinically used inhibitors of PBPs β-lactams inhibit transpeptidase activity of PBPs by forming a covalent penicilloyl-enzyme complex that blocks the normal transpeptidation reaction; this finally results in bacterial death. In some resistant bacteria the resistance is acquired by active-site distortion of PBPs, which lowers their acylation efficiency for β-lactams. To address this problem we focused our attention to discovery of novel noncovalent inhibitors of PBPs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our in-house bank of compounds was screened for inhibition of three PBPs from resistant bacteria: PBP2a from Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, PBP2x from Streptococcus pneumoniae strain 5204, and PBP5fm from Enterococcus faecium strain D63r. Initial hit inhibitor obtained by screening was then used as a starting point for computational similarity searching for structurally related compounds and several new noncovalent inhibitors were discovered. Two compounds had promising inhibitory activities of both PBP2a and PBP2x 5204, and good in-vitro antibacterial activities against a panel of Gram-positive bacterial strains. CONCLUSIONS: We found new noncovalent inhibitors of PBPs which represent important starting points for development of more potent inhibitors of PBPs that can target penicillin-resistant bacteria.

  19. The antiviral drug acyclovir is a slow-binding inhibitor of (D)-amino acid oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katane, Masumi; Matsuda, Satsuki; Saitoh, Yasuaki; Sekine, Masae; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Nakagome, Izumi; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Hirono, Shuichi; Homma, Hiroshi

    2013-08-20

    d-Amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a degradative enzyme that is stereospecific for d-amino acids, including d-serine and d-alanine, which are believed to be coagonists of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. To identify a new class of DAO inhibitor(s) that can be used to elucidate the molecular details of the active site environment of DAO, manifold biologically active compounds of microbial origin and pre-existing drugs were screened for their ability to inhibit DAO activity, and several compounds were identified as candidates. One of these compounds, acyclovir (ACV), a well-known antiviral drug used for the treatment of herpesvirus infections, was characterized and evaluated as a novel DAO inhibitor in vitro. Analysis showed that ACV acts on DAO as a reversible slow-binding inhibitor, and interestingly, the time required to achieve equilibrium between DAO, ACV, and the DAO/ACV complex was highly dependent on temperature. The binding mechanism of ACV to DAO was investigated in detail by several approaches, including kinetic analysis, structural modeling of DAO complexed with ACV, and site-specific mutagenesis of an active site residue postulated to be involved in the binding of ACV. The results confirm that ACV is a novel, active site-directed inhibitor of DAO that can be a valuable tool for investigating the structure-function relationships of DAO, including the molecular details of the active site environment of DAO. In particular, it appears that ACV can serve as an active site probe to study the structural basis of temperature-induced conformational changes of DAO.

  20. Understanding binding affinity : A combined isothermal titration calorimetry/molecular dynamics study of the binding of a series of hydrophobically modified benzamidinium chloride inhibitors to trypsin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talhout, Reinskje; Villa, Alessandra; Mark, AE; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    The binding of a series of p-alkylbenzamidinium chloride inhibitors to the serine proteinase trypsin over a range of temperatures has been studied using isothermal titration (micro)calorimetry and molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The inhibitors have small structural variations at the para

  1. Distinct states of methionyl-tRNA synthetase indicate inhibitor binding by conformational selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Cho Yeow; Kim, Jessica E; Shibata, Sayaka; Ranade, Ranae M; Yu, Mingyan; Liu, Jiyun; Gillespie, J Robert; Buckner, Frederick S; Verlinde, Christophe L M J; Fan, Erkang; Hol, Wim G J

    2012-10-10

    To guide development of new drugs targeting methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MetRS) for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis, crystal structure determinations of Trypanosoma brucei MetRS in complex with its substrate methionine and its intermediate product methionyl-adenylate were followed by those of the enzyme in complex with high-affinity aminoquinolone inhibitors via soaking experiments. Drastic changes in conformation of one of the two enzymes in the asymmetric unit allowed these inhibitors to occupy an enlarged methionine pocket and a new so-called auxiliary pocket. Interestingly, a small low-affinity compound caused the same conformational changes, removed the methionine without occupying the methionine pocket, and occupied the previously not existing auxiliary pocket. Analysis of these structures indicates that the binding of the inhibitors is the result of conformational selection, not induced fit. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure and activity of NO synthase inhibitors specific to the L-arginine binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, S Ya; Konoplyannikov, A G; Skvortsov, V G; Mandrugin, A A; Fedoseev, V M

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of compounds containing a fragment similar to the guanidine group of L-arginine, which is a substrate of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), is the main direction in creating NOS inhibitors. The inhibitory effect of such compounds is caused not only by their competition with the substrate for the L-arginine-binding site and/or oxidizing center of the enzyme (heme) but also by interaction with peptide motifs of the enzyme that influence its dimerization, affinity for cofactors, and interaction with associated proteins. Structures, activities, and relative in vitro and in vivo specificities of various NOS inhibitors (amino acid and non-amino acid) with linear or cyclic structure and containing guanidine, amidine, or isothiuronium group are considered. These properties are mainly analyzed by comparison with effects of the inhibitors on the inducible NOS.

  3. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  4. Molecular docking and NMR binding studies to identify novel inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsri, Pornthip [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M. [Division of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, School of Biological Sciences, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Hannongbua, Supa [Department of Chemistry, NANOTEC Center of Nanotechnology, National Nanotechnology Center, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Sem, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.sem@cuw.edu [Chemical Proteomics Facility at Marquette, Department of Chemistry, Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural and synthetic inhibitors of human phosphomevalonate kinase identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Virtual screening yielded a hit rate of 15%, with inhibitor K{sub d}'s of 10-60 {mu}M. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR studies indicate significant protein conformational changes upon binding. -- Abstract: Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (K{sub d}). Tight binding compounds with K{sub d}'s ranging from 6-60 {mu}M were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC cross peak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development.

  5. Impact of Stereochemistry on Ligand Binding: X-ray Crystallographic Analysis of an Epoxide-Based HIV Protease Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Fabio; Berti, Federico; Campaner, Pietro; Fanfoni, Lidia; Demitri, Nicola; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M; De March, Matteo; Geremia, Silvano

    2014-09-11

    A new pseudopeptide epoxide inhibitor, designed for irreversible binding to HIV protease (HIV-PR), has been synthesized and characterized in solution and in the solid state. However, the crystal structure of the complex obtained by inhibitor-enzyme cocrystallization revealed that a minor isomer, with inverted configuration of the epoxide carbons, has been selected by HIV-PR during crystallization. The structural characterization of the well-ordered pseudopeptide, inserted in the catalytic channel with its epoxide group intact, provides deeper insights into inhibitor binding and HIV-PR stereoselectivity, which aids development of future epoxide-based HIV inhibitors.

  6. C peptides as entry inhibitors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerer, Lisa; Kiem, Hans-Peter; von Laer, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Peptides derived from the C-terminal heptad repeat 2 region of the HIV-1 gp41 envelope glycoprotein, so-called C peptides, are very potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. Antiviral genes encoding either membrane-anchored (ma) or secreted (iSAVE) C peptides have been engineered and allow direct in vivo production of the therapeutic peptides by genetically modified host cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides expressed in the HIV-1 target cells by T-cell or hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy efficiently prevent virus entry into the modified cells. Such gene-protection confers a selective survival advantage and allows accumulation of the genetically modified cells. Membrane-anchored C peptides have been successfully tested in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS and were found to be safe in a phase I clinical trial in AIDS patients transplanted with autologous gene-modified T-cells. Secreted C peptides have the crucial advantage of not only protecting genetically modified cells from HIV-1 infection, but also neighboring cells, thus suppressing virus replication even if only a small fraction of cells is genetically modified. Accordingly, various cell types can be considered as potential in vivo producer cells for iSAVE-based gene therapeutics, which could even be modified by direct in vivo gene delivery in future. In conclusion, C peptide gene therapeutics may provide a strong benefit to AIDS patients and could present an effective alternative to current antiretroviral drug regimens.

  7. Free-energy analysis of enzyme-inhibitor binding: aspartic proteinase-pepstatin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, P; Das, A; Jayaram, B

    2001-01-01

    Expeditious in silico determinations of the free energies of binding of a series of inhibitors to an enzyme are of immense practical value in structure-based drug design efforts. Some recent advances in the field of computational chemistry have rendered a rigorous thermodynamic treatment of biologic molecules feasible, starting from a molecular description of the biomolecule, solvent, and salt. Pursuing the goal of developing and making available a software for assessing binding affinities, we present here a computationally rapid, albeit elaborate, methodology to estimate and analyze the molecular thermodynamics of enzyme-inhibitor binding with crystal structures as the point of departure. The complexes of aspartic proteinases with seven inhibitors have been adopted for this study. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of six distinct steps decomposed into a total of 18 well-defined components. The model we employed involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of electrostatic interactions, solvent screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of salt effects. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated using the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, and solvent accessibility measures. Estimates of translational and rotational entropy losses on complexation as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy are also included. The calculated standard free energies of binding at this stage are within an order of magnitude of the observed inhibition constants and necessitate further improvements in the computational protocols to enable quantitative predictions. Some areas such as inclusion of structural adaptation effects, incorporation of site-dependent amino acid pKa shifts, consideration of the dynamics of the active site for fine-tuning the methodology are easily

  8. A small molecule inhibitor of Pot1 binding to telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altschuler, Sarah E; Croy, Johnny E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2012-10-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of the regulation of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ∼20 000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with sub-micromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red (CR), was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption.

  9. Characterization of the binding of /sup 3/H-norzimeldine, a 5-HT uptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, H. (Department of Biochemical Neuropharmacology, Research and Development Laboratories, Astra Laekemedel, Soedertaelje, Sweden)

    1984-01-01

    The binding of radiolabelled norzimeldine, a potent selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitor, to rat brain homogenates is described. /sup 3/H-Norzimeldine binds to a site with high affinity (Ksub(D) = 10.5 nM) in a saturable manner (Bsub(max) = 15.4 pmol/g wet weight in the cerebral cortex). The number of binding sites in the various regions of the brain parallels the capacity of the 5-HT reuptake mechanism. Drugs that inhibit the reuptake of 5-HT are also potent inhibitors of the /sup 3/H-norzimeldine binding, as are the tricyclic antidepressants, which are non-specific inhibitors of the noradrenaline and the 5-HT reuptake. Lesioning experiments using DSP4 (a NA neurotoxin) and p-chloroamphetamine (a 5-HT neurotoxin) suggest that the binding site is located on the presynaptic 5-HT nerve terminal, although a small component of the binding may be to noradrenergic uptake sites as well.

  10. Key Structures and Interactions for Binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase B Inhibitors from Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punkvang, Auradee; Kamsri, Pharit; Saparpakorn, Patchreenart; Hannongbua, Supa; Wolschann, Peter; Irle, Stephan; Pungpo, Pornpan

    2015-07-01

    Substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors have recently been introduced as antituberculosis agents. These inhibitors show impressive activity against protein kinase B, a Ser/Thr protein kinase that is essential for cell growth of M. tuberculosis. However, up to now, X-ray structures of the protein kinase B enzyme complexes with the substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors are currently unavailable. Consequently, structural details of their binding modes are questionable, prohibiting the structural-based design of more potent protein kinase B inhibitors in the future. Here, molecular dynamics simulations, in conjunction with molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area binding free-energy analysis, were employed to gain insight into the complex structures of the protein kinase B inhibitors and their binding energetics. The complex structures obtained by the molecular dynamics simulations show binding free energies in good agreement with experiment. The detailed analysis of molecular dynamics results shows that Glu93, Val95, and Leu17 are key residues responsible to the binding of the protein kinase B inhibitors. The aminopyrazole group and the pyrimidine core are the crucial moieties of substituted aminopyrimidine inhibitors for interaction with the key residues. Our results provide a structural concept that can be used as a guide for the future design of protein kinase B inhibitors with highly increased antagonistic activity.

  11. Structure-based drug design enables conversion of a DFG-in binding CSF-1R kinase inhibitor to a DFG-out binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Marvin J; Pelc, Matthew; Kamtekar, Satwik; Day, Jacqueline; Poda, Gennadiy I; Hall, Molly K; Michener, Marshall L; Reitz, Beverly A; Mathis, Karl J; Pierce, Betsy S; Parikh, Mihir D; Mischke, Deborah A; Long, Scott A; Parlow, John J; Anderson, David R; Thorarensen, Atli

    2010-03-01

    The work described herein demonstrates the utility of structure-based drug design (SBDD) in shifting the binding mode of an HTS hit from a DFG-in to a DFG-out binding mode resulting in a class of novel potent CSF-1R kinase inhibitors suitable for lead development.

  12. Structure-based drug design enables conversion of a DFG-in binding CSF-1R kinase inhibitor to a DFG-out binding mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, Marvin J.; Pelc, Matthew; Kamtekar, Satwik; Day, Jacqueline; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Hall, Molly K.; Michener, Marshall L.; Reitz, Beverly A.; Mathis, Karl J.; Pierce, Betsy S.; Parikh, Mihir D.; Mischke, Deborah A.; Long, Scott A.; Parlow, John J.; Anderson, David R.; Thorarensen, Atli (Pfizer)

    2010-08-11

    The work described herein demonstrates the utility of structure-based drug design (SBDD) in shifting the binding mode of an HTS hit from a DFG-in to a DFG-out binding mode resulting in a class of novel potent CSF-1R kinase inhibitors suitable for lead development.

  13. Diazepam-binding inhibitor. A brain neuropeptide present in human spinal fluid: studies in depression, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaccia, M L; Costa, E; Ferrero, P; Guidotti, A; Roy, A; Sunderland, T; Pickar, D; Paul, S M; Goodwin, F K

    1986-12-01

    Diazepam-binding inhibitor is a novel peptide purified to homogeneity from rat and human brain. Diazepam-binding inhibitor is present, though not exclusively, in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons where it is believed to inhibit GABAergic neurotransmission mediated by GABA by binding to the benzodiazepine-GABA receptor complex. Since an impairment of central GABAergic tone has been postulated to be associated with a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, we measured human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients suffering from endogenous depression, schizophrenia, and dementia of the Alzheimer's type. Patients with major depression had significantly higher concentrations of human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity in CSF when compared with age- and sex-matched normal volunteers, while no difference in CSF diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity was found in schizophrenics or patients with dementia of the Alzheimer's type when compared with controls. The possibility is discussed that the increased CSF human diazepam-binding inhibitor immunoreactivity observed in depressed patients may represent a functional disinhibition of GABAergic neurotransmission associated with depression.

  14. Thermodynamics parameters for binding of halogenated benzotriazole inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiewska, Maria; Kucińska, Katarzyna; Makowska, Małgorzata; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of human CK2α (hCK2α) with nine halogenated benzotriazoles, TBBt and its analogues representing all possible patterns of halogenation on the benzene ring of benzotriazole, was studied by biophysical methods. Thermal stability of protein-ligand complexes, monitored by calorimetric (DSC) and optical (DSF) methods, showed that the increase in the mid-point temperature for unfolding of protein-ligand complexes (i.e. potency of ligand binding to hCK2α) follow the inhibitory activities determined by biochemical assays. The dissociation constant for the ATP-hCK2α complex was estimated with the aid of microscale thermophoresis (MST) as 4.3±1.8 μM, and MST-derived dissociation constants determined for halogenated benzotriazoles, when converted according to known ATP concentrations, perfectly reconstruct IC50 values determined by the biochemical assays. Ligand-dependent quenching of tyrosine fluorescence, together with molecular modeling and DSC-derived heats of unfolding, support the hypothesis that halogenated benzotriazoles bind in at least two alternative orientations, and those that are efficient hCK2α inhibitors bind in the orientation which TBBt adopts in its complex with maize CK2α. DSC-derived apparent heat for ligand binding (ΔΔHbind) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions between Lys68 and the triazole ring of the ligand, as indicated by a good correlation between ΔΔHbind and ligand pKa. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly (~40 kJ/mol), relative to possible intermolecular halogen/hydrogen bonding (less than 10 kJ/mol), in binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the ATP-binding site of hCK2α. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases.

  15. Diverse modes of binding in structures of Leishmania majorN-myristoyltransferase with selective inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Brannigan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The leishmaniases are a spectrum of global diseases of poverty associated with immune dysfunction and are the cause of high morbidity. Despite the long history of these diseases, no effective vaccine is available and the currently used drugs are variously compromised by moderate efficacy, complex side effects and the emergence of resistance. It is therefore widely accepted that new therapies are needed. N-Myristoyltransferase (NMT has been validated pre-clinically as a target for the treatment of fungal and parasitic infections. In a previously reported high-throughput screening program, a number of hit compounds with activity against NMT from Leishmania donovani have been identified. Here, high-resolution crystal structures of representative compounds from four hit series in ternary complexes with myristoyl-CoA and NMT from the closely related L. major are reported. The structures reveal that the inhibitors associate with the peptide-binding groove at a site adjacent to the bound myristoyl-CoA and the catalytic α-carboxylate of Leu421. Each inhibitor makes extensive apolar contacts as well as a small number of polar contacts with the protein. Remarkably, the compounds exploit different features of the peptide-binding groove and collectively occupy a substantial volume of this pocket, suggesting that there is potential for the design of chimaeric inhibitors with significantly enhanced binding. Despite the high conservation of the active sites of the parasite and human NMTs, the inhibitors act selectively over the host enzyme. The role of conformational flexibility in the side chain of Tyr217 in conferring selectivity is discussed.

  16. Determination of human serum alpha1-acid glycoprotein and albumin binding of various marketed and preclinical kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bencze, Gyula; Kéri, György; Orfi, László

    2009-01-01

    There are about 380 protein kinase inhibitors in drug development as of today and 15 drugs have been marketed already for the treatment of cancer. This time 139 validated kinase targets are in the focus of drug research of pharmaceutical companies and big efforts are made for the development of new, druglike kinase inhibitors. Plasma protein binding is an important factor of the ADME profiling of a drug compound. Human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AAG) are the most relevant drug carriers in blood plasma. Since previous literature data indicated that AAG is the principal plasma binding component of some kinase inhibitors the present work focuses on the comprehensive evaluation of AAG binding of a series of marketed and experimental kinase inhibitors by using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy approach. HSA binding was also evaluated by affinity chromatography. Protein binding interactions of twenty-six kinase inhibitors are characterized. The contribution of AAG and HSA binding data to the pharmacokinetic profiles of the investigated therapeutic agents is discussed. Structural, biological and drug binding properties of AAG as well as the applicability of the CD method in studying drug-protein binding interactions are also briefly reviewed.

  17. Three classes of inhibitors share a common binding domain in mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okun, J G; Lümmen, P; Brandt, U

    1999-01-29

    We have developed two independent methods to measure equilibrium binding of inhibitors to membrane-bound and partially purified NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) to characterize the binding sites for the great variety of hydrophobic compounds acting on this large and complicated enzyme. Taking advantage of a partial quench of fluorescence upon binding of the fenazaquin-type inhibitor 2-decyl-4-quinazolinyl amine to complex I in bovine submitochondrial particles, we determined a Kd of 17 +/- 3 nM and one binding site per complex I. Equilibrium binding studies with [3H]dihydrorotenone and the aminopyrimidine [3H]AE F119209 (4(cis-4-[3H]isopropyl cyclohexylamino)-5-chloro-6-ethyl pyrimidine) using partially purified complex I from Musca domestica exhibited little unspecific binding and allowed reliable determination of dissociation constants. Competition experiments consistently demonstrated that all tested hydrophobic inhibitors of complex I share a common binding domain with partially overlapping sites. Although the rotenone site overlaps with both the piericidin A and the capsaicin site, the latter two sites do not overlap. This is in contrast to the interpretation of enzyme kinetics that have previously been used to define three classes of complex I inhibitors. The existence of only one large inhibitor binding pocket in the hydrophobic part of complex I is discussed in the light of possible mechanisms of proton translocation.

  18. Determining the binding mode and binding affinity constant of tyrosine kinase inhibitor PD153035 to DNA using optical tweezers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chih-Ming [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yuarn-Jang [Section of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wang, Wei-Ting [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Chien-Ting [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Jing-Shin [School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chien-Ming [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30043, Taiwan (China); Ou, Keng-Liang [Institute of Biomedical Materials and Engineering, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); and others

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} PD153035 is a DNA intercalator and intercalation occurs only under very low salt concentration. {yields} The minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. {yields} Binding affinity constant for PD153035 is 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M). {yields} The change of binding free energy of PD153035-DNA interaction is -5.49 kcal mol{sup -1} at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Accurately predicting binding affinity constant (K{sub A}) is highly required to determine the binding energetics of the driving forces in drug-DNA interactions. Recently, PD153035, brominated anilinoquinazoline, has been reported to be not only a highly selective inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor but also a DNA intercalator. Here, we use a dual-trap optical tweezers to determining K{sub A} for PD153035, where K{sub A} is determined from the changes in B-form contour length (L) of PD153035-DNA complex. Here, L is fitted using a modified wormlike chain model. We found that a noticeable increment in L in 1 mM sodium cacodylate was exhibited. Furthermore, our results showed that K{sub A} = 1.18({+-}0.09) x 10{sup 4} (1/M) at 23 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C and the minimum distance between adjacent bound PD153035 {approx} 11 bp. We anticipate that by using this approach we can determine the complete thermodynamic profiles due to the presence of DNA intercalators.

  19. Is There Consistency between the Binding Affinity and Inhibitory Potential of Natural Polyphenols as α-amylase Inhibitors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Shao, Rong; Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-07-26

    The inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols for α-amylases has attracted great interests among researchers. The structure-affinity properties of natural polyphenols binding to α-amylase and the structure-activity relationship of dietary polyphenols inhibiting α-amylase were deeply investigated. There is a lack of consistency between the structure-affinity relationship and the structure-activity relationship of natural polyphenols as α-amylase inhibitors. Is it consistent between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors? It was found that the consistency between the binding affinity and inhibitory potential of natural polyphenols as with α-amylase inhibitors is not equivocal. For example, there is no consistency between the binding affinity and the inhibitory potential of quercetin and its glycosides as α-amylase inhibitors. However, catechins with higher α-amylase inhibitory potential exhibited higher affinity with α-amylase.

  20. Three Classes of Inhibitors Share a Common Binding Domain in Mitochondrial Complex I (NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductase)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jürgen G. Okun; Peter Lümmen; Ulrich Brandt

    1999-01-01

    .... Taking advantage of a partial quench of fluorescence upon binding of the fenazaquin-type inhibitor 2-decyl-4-quinazolinyl amine to complex I in bovine submitochondrial particles, we determined a K d of 17 Â...

  1. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  2. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Tse

    Full Text Available Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations

  3. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Hanson, Alicia M; Shadrick, William R; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L; Hernandez, John J; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J; Heck, Julie A; Arnold, Leggy A; Schoenen, Frank J; Frick, David N

    2012-09-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma's Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for compounds that inhibit NS3-DNA complex formation. Four LOPAC compounds inhibited the FP-based assay: aurintricarboxylic acid (ATA) (IC50=1.4 μM), suramin sodium salt (IC50=3.6 μM), NF 023 hydrate (IC50=6.2 μM) and tyrphostin AG 538 (IC50=3.6 μM). All but AG 538 inhibited helicase-catalyzed strand separation, and all but NF 023 inhibited replication of subgenomic HCV replicons. A counterscreen using Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) revealed that none of the new HCV helicase inhibitors were specific for NS3h. However, when the SSB-based assay was used to analyze derivatives of another non-specific helicase inhibitor, the main component of the dye primuline, it revealed that some primuline derivatives (e.g. PubChem CID50930730) are up to 30-fold more specific for HCV NS3h than similarly potent HCV helicase inhibitors.

  4. Novel Triazole-Quinoline Derivatives as Selective Dual Binding Site Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susimaire P. Mantoani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Currently, the only strategy for palliative treatment of AD is to inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE in order to increase the concentration of acetylcholine in the synaptic cleft. Evidence indicates that AChE also interacts with the β-amyloid (Aβ protein, acting as a chaperone and increasing the number and neurotoxicity of Aβ fibrils. It is known that AChE has two binding sites: the peripheral site, responsible for the interactions with Aβ, and the catalytic site, related with acetylcholine hydrolysis. In this work, we reported the synthesis and biological evaluation of a library of new tacrine-donepezil hybrids, as a potential dual binding site AChE inhibitor, containing a triazole-quinoline system. The synthesis of hybrids was performed in four steps using the click chemistry strategy. These compounds were evaluated as hAChE and hBChE inhibitors, and some derivatives showed IC50 values in the micro-molar range and were remarkably selective towards hAChE. Kinetic assays and molecular modeling studies confirm that these compounds block both catalytic and peripheral AChE sites. These results are quite interesting since the triazole-quinoline system is a new structural scaffold for AChE inhibitors. Furthermore, the synthetic approach is very efficient for the preparation of target compounds, allowing a further fruitful new chemical library optimization.

  5. Binding properties of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates as inhibitors and sensors for glutathione S-transferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martos-Maldonado, Manuel C; Casas-Solvas, Juan M; Téllez-Sanz, Ramiro; Mesa-Valle, Concepción; Quesada-Soriano, Indalecio; García-Maroto, Federico; Vargas-Berenguel, Antonio; García-Fuentes, Luís

    2012-02-01

    The binding properties of two electroactive glutathione-ferrocene conjugates that consist in glutathione attached to one or both of the cyclopentadienyl rings of ferrocene (GSFc and GSFcSG), to Schistosoma japonica glutathione S-transferase (SjGST) were studied by spectroscopy fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Such ferrocene conjugates resulted to be competitive inhibitors of glutathione S-transferase with an increased binding affinity relative to the natural substrate glutathione (GSH). We found that the conjugate having two glutathione units (GSFcSG) exhibits an affinity for SjGST approximately two orders of magnitude higher than GSH. Furthermore, it shows negative cooperativity with the affinity for the second binding site two orders of magnitude lower than that for the first one. We propose that the reason for such negative cooperativity is steric since, i) the obtained thermodynamic parameters do not indicate profound conformational changes upon GSFcSG binding and ii) docking studies have shown that, when bound, part of the first bound ligand invades the second site due to its large size. In addition, voltammetric measurements show a strong decrease of the peak current upon binding of ferrocene-glutathione conjugates to SjGST and provide very similar K values than those obtained by ITC. Moreover, the sensing ability, expressed by the sensitivity parameter shows that GSFcSG is much more sensitive than GSFc, for the detection of SjGST.

  6. Substituent effects on the binding of natural product anthocyanidin inhibitors to influenza neuraminidase with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Kavya; Müller, Patrick; Downard, Kevin M

    2014-05-30

    The binding of three closely related anthocyanins within the 430-cavity of influenza neuraminidase is studied using a combination of mass spectrometry and molecular docking. Despite their similar structures, which differ only in the number and position of the hydroxyl substituents on the phenyl group attached to the chromenylium ring, subtle differences in their binding characteristics are revealed by mass spectrometry and molecular docking that are in accord with their inhibitory properties by neuraminidase inhibition assays. The cyanidin and delphinidin, with the greatest number of hydroxyl groups, bind more strongly and are better inhibitors than pelargonidin that contains a lone hydroxyl group at the 4' position. The study demonstrates, for the first time, the sensitivity of the mass spectrometry based approach for investigating the molecular basis and relative affinity of antiviral inhibitors, with subtly different structures, to their target protein. It has broader application for the screening of other protein interactions more generally with reasonable high-throughput. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Thermodynamic parameters for binding of some halogenated inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winiewska, Maria; Makowska, Małgorzata [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Maj, Piotr [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Wielechowska, Monika; Bretner, Maria [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Warszawa (Poland); Poznański, Jarosław, E-mail: jarek@ibb.waw.pl [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland); Shugar, David [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics PAS, Warszawa (Poland)

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Two new compounds being potential human CK2a inhibitors are studied. • Their IC50 values were determined in vitro. • The heats of binding and kbind were estimated using DSC. • The increased stability of protein–ligand complexes was followed by fluorescence. • Methylated TBBt derivative (MeBr3Br) is almost as active as TBBt. - Abstract: The interaction of human CK2α with a series of tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt) and tetrabromobenzimidazole (TBBz) analogs, in which one of the bromine atoms proximal to the triazole/imidazole ring is replaced by a methyl group, was studied by biochemical (IC{sub 50}) and biophysical methods (thermal stability of protein–ligand complex monitored by DSC and fluorescence). Two newly synthesized tri-bromo derivatives display inhibitory activity comparable to that of the reference compounds, TBBt and TBBz, respectively. DSC analysis of the stability of protein–ligand complexes shows that the heat of ligand binding (H{sub bind}) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions involving the triazole/imidazole ring, as indicated by a strong correlation between H{sub bind} and ligand pK{sub a}. Screening, based on fluorescence-monitored thermal unfolding of protein–ligand complexes, gave comparable results, clearly identifying ligands that most strongly bind to the protein. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly, relative to possible intermolecular halogen bonding, in binding of the ligands to the CK2α ATP-binding site.

  8. Binding site residues control inhibitor selectivity in the human norepinephrine transporter but not in the human dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jacob; Ringsted, Kristoffer B; Bang-Andersen, Benny

    2015-01-01

    . Changing the six diverging residues in the central binding site of NET to the complementary residues in DAT transferred a DAT-like pharmacology to NET, showing that non-conserved binding site residues in NET are critical determinants for inhibitor selectivity. In contrast, changing the equivalent residues...

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of diazepam-binding inhibitor in neurodegenerative disorders with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrarese, C; Appollonio, I; Frigo, M; Meregalli, S; Piolti, R; Tamma, F; Frattola, L

    1990-04-01

    We investigated CSF levels of diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), a recently discovered neuropeptide that allosterically modulates GABAergic transmission, in various neurodegenerative disorders with dementia (28 patients with Parkinson's disease, 10 with Alzheimer's disease, 7 with Huntington's chorea). We applied a battery of neuropsychological tests to determine the degree of dementia and to exclude the presence of mood alterations. CSF DBI levels were elevated in parkinsonian subjects with dementia and in patients with Alzheimer's disease, but decreased in Huntington's chorea patients. We hypothesize that modifications of CSF DBI levels may be related to a functional or structural alteration of the GABAergic system.

  10. Aggrecanase-2 inhibitors based on the acylthiosemicarbazide zinc-binding group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingot, Lucie; Elbakali, Jamal; Dumont, Julie; Bosc, Damien; Cousaert, Nicolas; Urban, Agathe; Deglane, Gaelle; Villoutreix, Bruno; Nagase, Hideaki; Sperandio, Olivier; Leroux, Florence; Deprez, Benoit; Deprez-Poulain, Rebecca

    2013-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is a disabling disease characterized by the articular cartilage breakdown. Aggrecanases are potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of this pathology. At the starting point of this project, an acylthiosemicarbazide was discovered to inhibit aggrecanase-2. The acylthiosemicarbazide Zn binding group is also a convenient linker for library synthesis. A focused library of 920 analogs was thus prepared and screened to establish structure-activity relationships. The modification of the acylthiosemicarbazide was also explored. This strategy combining library design and discrete compounds synthesis yielded inhibitor 35, that is highly selective for aggrecanases over a panel of metalloproteases and inhibits the degradation of native fully glycosylated aggrecan. A docking study generated binding conformations explaining the structure-activity relationships.

  11. Binding of ACE-inhibitors to in vitro and patient-derived amyloid-β fibril models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavaraju, Manikanthan; Phillips, Malachi; Bowman, Deborah; Aceves-Hernandez, Juan M.; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no drugs exist that can prevent or reverse Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disease associated with the presence, in the brain, of plaques that are composed of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides. Recent studies suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, a set of drugs used to treat hypertension, may inhibit amyloid formation in vitro. In the present study, we investigate through computer simulations the binding of ACE inhibitors to patient-derived Aβ fibrils and contrast it with that of ACE inhibitors binding to in vitro generated fibrils. The binding affinities of the ACE inhibitors are compared with that of Congo red, a dye that is used to identify amyloid structures and that is known to be a weak inhibitor of Aβ aggregation. We find that ACE inhibitors have a lower binding affinity to the patient-derived fibrils than to in vitro generated ones. For patient-derived fibrils, their binding affinities are even lower than that of Congo red. Our observations raise doubts on the hypothesis that these drugs inhibit fibril formation in Alzheimer patients by interacting directly with the amyloids.

  12. Characterization of the subunit structure of the maize tonoplast ATPase. Immunological and inhibitor binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandala, S; Taiz, L

    1986-09-25

    Gradient purified preparations of the maize 400-kDa tonoplast ATPase are enriched in two major polypeptides, 72 and 62 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were prepared against these two putative subunits after elution from sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gel slices and against the solubilized native enzyme. Antibodies to both the 72- and 62-kDa polypeptides cross-reacted with similar bands on immunoblots of a tonoplast-enriched fraction from barley, while only the 72-kDa antibodies cross-reacted with tonoplast and tonoplast ATPase preparations from Neurospora. Antibodies to the 72-kDa polypeptide and the native enzyme both strongly inhibited enzyme activity, but the 62-kDa antibody was without effect. The identity and function of the subunits was further probed using radiolabeled covalent inhibitors of the tonoplast ATPase, 7-chloro-4-nitro[14C]benzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole ([14C]NBD-Cl) and N,N'-[14C]dicyclohexylcarbodiimide ([14C]DCCD). [14C]NBD-Cl preferentially labeled the 72-kDa polypeptide, and labeling was prevented by ATP. [14C]DCCD, an inhibitor of the proton channel portion of the mitochondrial ATPase, bound to a 16-kDa polypeptide. Venturicidin blocked binding to the mitochondrial 8-kDa polypeptide but did not affect binding to the tonoplast 16-kDa polypeptide. Taken together, the results implicate the 72-kDa polypeptide as the catalytic subunit of the tonoplast ATPase. The DCCD-binding 16-kDa polypeptide may comprise the proton channel. The presence of nucleotide-binding sites on the 62-kDa polypeptide suggests that it may function as a regulatory subunit.

  13. Study on the drug resistance and the binding mode of HIV-1 integrase with LCA inhibitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU; JianPing; CHANG; Shan; CHEN; WeiZu; WANG; CunXin

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase (IN) is an essential enzyme in the lifecycle of this virus and also an important target for the study of anti-HIV drugs. The binding mode of the wild type IN core domain and its G140S mutant with L-Chicoric acid (LCA) inhibitor were investigated by using multiple conformation molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Based on the binding modes, the drug resistance mechanism was explored for the G140S mutant of IN with LCA. The results indicate that the binding site of the G140S mutant of IN core domain with LCA is different from that of the core domain of the wild type IN, which leads to the partial loss of inhibition potency of LCA. The flexibility of the IN functional loop region and the interactions between Mg2+ ion and the three key residues (i.e., D64, D116, E152) stimulate the biological operation of IN. The drug resistance also lies in several other important effects, such as the repulsion between LCA and E152 in the G140S mutant core domain, the weakening of K159 binding with LCA and Y143 pointing to the pocket of the G140S mutant. All of the above simulation results agree well with experimental data, which provide us with some helpful information for designing the drug of anti-HIV based on the structure of IN.

  14. Jack bean urease: the effect of active-site binding inhibitors on the reactivity of enzyme thiol groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewska, Barbara; Zaborska, Wiesława

    2007-10-01

    In view of the complexity of the role of the active site flap cysteine in the urease catalysis, in this work we studied how the presence of typical active-site binding inhibitors of urease, phenylphosphorodiamidate (PPD), acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), boric acid and fluoride, affects the reactivity of enzyme thiol groups, the active site flap thiol in particular. For that the inhibitor-urease complexes were prepared with excess inhibitors and had their thiol groups titrated with DTNB. The effects observed were analyzed in terms of the structures of the inhibitor-urease complexes reported in the literature. We found that the effectiveness in preventing the active site cysteine from the modification by disulfides, varied among the inhibitors studied, even though they all bind to the active site. The variations were accounted for by different extents of geometrical distortion in the active site that the inhibitors introduced upon binding, leaving the flap either open in AHA-, boric acid- and fluoride-inhibited urease, like in the native enzyme or closed in PPD-inhibited urease. Among the inhibitors, only PPD was found to be able to thoroughly protect the flap cysteines from the further reaction with disulfides, this apparently resulting from the closed conformation of the flap. Accordingly, in practical terms PPD may be regarded as the most suitable inhibitor for active-site protection experiments in inhibition studies of urease.

  15. Computational studies on the binding mechanism between triazolone inhibitors and Chk1 by molecular docking and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Min; Ma, Shuying; Tian, Yueli; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Lv, Wenjuan; Zhai, Honglin

    2015-01-01

    Chk1, a serine/threonine protein kinase that participates in transducing DNA damage signals, is an attractive target due to its involvement in tumor initiation and progression. As a novel Chk1 inhibitor, the triazolone's bioactivity mechanism is not clear. In this study, we carried out an integrated computational study that combines molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, and binding free energy calculations to identify the key factors necessary for the bioactivities. With the aim of discerning the structural features that affect the inhibitory activity of triazolones, MK-8776, a Chk1 inhibitor that reached the clinical stage, was also used as a reference for simulations. A comparative analysis of the triazolone inhibitors at the molecular level offers valuable insight into the structural and energetic properties. A general feature is that all the studied inhibitors bind in the pocket characterized by residues Leu14, Val22, Ala35, Glu84, Tyr85, Cys86, and Leu136 of Chk1. Moreover, introducing hydrophobic groups into triazolone inhibitors is favorable for binding to Chk1, which is corroborated by residue Leu136 with a relatively large difference in the contribution between MK-8776 and five triazolones to the total binding free energies. A hydrogen bond between the polar hydrogen atoms at R1 and Cys86 can facilitate proper placement of the inhibitor in the binding pocket of Chk1 that favors binding. However, the introduction of hydrophilic groups into the R2 position diminishes binding affinity. The information provided by this research is of benefit for further rational design of novel promising inhibitors of Chk1.

  16. A high-throughput, nonisotopic, competitive binding assay for kinases using nonselective inhibitor probes (ED-NSIP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainshtein, Inna; Silveria, Scott; Kaul, Poonam; Rouhani, Riaz; Eglen, Richard M; Wang, John

    2002-12-01

    A novel competitive binding assay for protein kinase inhibitors has been developed for high-throughput screening (HTS). Unlike functional kinase assays, which are based on detection of substrate phosphorylation by the enzyme, this novel method directly measures the binding potency of compounds to the kinase ATP binding site through competition with a conjugated binding probe. The binding interaction is coupled to a signal amplification system based on complementation of beta-galactosidase enzyme fragments, a homogeneous, nonisotopic assay technology platform developed by DiscoveRx Corp. In the present study, staurosporine, a potent, nonselective kinase inhibitor, was chemically conjugated to a small fragment of beta-galactosidase (termed ED-SS). This was used as the binding probe to the kinase ATP binding pocket. The binding potencies of several inhibitors with diverse structures were assessed by displacement of ED-SS from the kinase. The assay format was specifically evaluated with GSK3alpha, an enzyme previously screened in a radioactive kinase assay (i.e., measurement of [(33)P]-gamma-ATP incorporation into the kinase peptide substrate). Under optimized assay conditions, nonconjugated staurosporine inhibited ED-SS binding in a concentration-dependent manner with an apparent potency (IC(50)) of 11 nM, which was similar to the IC(50) value determined in a radioactive assay. Furthermore, 9 kinase inhibitors with diverse structures, previously identified from chemical compound library screening, were screened using the competitive binding assay. The potencies in the binding assay were in very good agreement with those obtained previously in the isotopic functional activity assay. The binding assay was adapted for automated HTS using selected compound libraries in a 384-well microtiter plate format. The HTS assay was observed to be highly robust and reproducible (Z' factors > 0.7) with high interassay precision (R(2) > 0.96). Interference of compounds with the beta

  17. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) binding-mediated gene regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are synthetic oligonucleotides with chemically modified backbones. PNAs can bind to both DNA and RNA targets in a sequence-specific manner to form PNA/DNA and PNA/RNA duplex structures. When bound to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) targets, the PNA molecule replaces one DNA strand in the duplex by strand invasion to form a PNA/DNA/PNA [or (PNA)2/DNA] triplex structure and the displaced DNA strand exists as a singlestranded D-loop. PNA has been used in many studies as research tools for gene regulation and gene targeting. The Dloops generated from the PNA binding have also been demonstrated for its potential in initiating transcription and inducing gene expression. PNA provides a powerful tool to study the mechanism of transcription and an innovative strategy to regulate target gene expression. An understanding of the PNA-mediated gene regulation will have important clinical implications in treatment of many human diseases including genetic, cancerous, and age-related diseases.

  18. Development and binding characteristics of phosphonate inhibitors of SplA protease from Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchacka, Ewa; Zdzalik, Michal; Niemczyk, Justyna-Stec; Pustelny, Katarzyna; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Wladyka, Benedykt; Dubin, Adam; Potempa, Jan; Sienczyk, Marcin; Dubin, Grzegorz; Oleksyszyn, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a variety of human infections, including life-threatening, systemic conditions. Secreted proteome, including a range of proteases, constitutes the major virulence factor of the bacterium. However, the functions of individual enzymes, in particular SplA protease, remain poorly characterized. Here, we report development of specific inhibitors of SplA protease. The design, synthesis, and activity of a series of α-aminoalkylphosphonate diaryl esters and their peptidyl derivatives are described. Potent inhibitors of SplA are reported, which may facilitate future investigation of physiological function of the protease. The binding modes of the high-affinity compounds Cbz-PheP-(OC6H4−4-SO2CH3)2 and Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OC6H5)2 are revealed by high-resolution crystal structures of complexes with the protease. Surprisingly, the binding mode of both compounds deviates from previously characterized canonical interaction of α-aminoalkylphosphonate peptidyl derivatives and family S1 serine proteases. PMID:24375505

  19. Dual Binding Site and Selective Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors Derived from Integrated Pharmacophore Models and Sequential Virtual Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shikhar Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have employed in silico methodology combining double pharmacophore based screening, molecular docking, and ADME/T filtering to identify dual binding site acetylcholinesterase inhibitors that can preferentially inhibit acetylcholinesterase and simultaneously inhibit the butyrylcholinesterase also but in the lesser extent than acetylcholinesterase. 3D-pharmacophore models of AChE and BuChE enzyme inhibitors have been developed from xanthostigmine derivatives through HypoGen and validated using test set, Fischer’s randomization technique. The best acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitors pharmacophore hypotheses Hypo1_A and Hypo1_B, with high correlation coefficient of 0.96 and 0.94, respectively, were used as 3D query for screening the Zinc database. The screened hits were then subjected to the ADME/T and molecular docking study to prioritise the compounds. Finally, 18 compounds were identified as potential leads against AChE enzyme, showing good predicted activities and promising ADME/T properties.

  20. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

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    Kayoko Waki

    Full Text Available Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1 intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR. The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework

  1. Structural and functional insights into the HIV-1 maturation inhibitor binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Kayoko; Durell, Stewart R; Soheilian, Ferri; Nagashima, Kunio; Butler, Scott L; Freed, Eric O

    2012-01-01

    Processing of the Gag precursor protein by the viral protease during particle release triggers virion maturation, an essential step in the virus replication cycle. The first-in-class HIV-1 maturation inhibitor dimethylsuccinyl betulinic acid [PA-457 or bevirimat (BVM)] blocks HIV-1 maturation by inhibiting the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. A structurally distinct molecule, PF-46396, was recently reported to have a similar mode of action to that of BVM. Because of the structural dissimilarity between BVM and PF-46396, we hypothesized that the two compounds might interact differentially with the putative maturation inhibitor-binding pocket in Gag. To test this hypothesis, PF-46396 resistance was selected for in vitro. Resistance mutations were identified in three regions of Gag: around the CA-SP1 cleavage site where BVM resistance maps, at CA amino acid 201, and in the CA major homology region (MHR). The MHR mutants are profoundly PF-46396-dependent in Gag assembly and release and virus replication. The severe defect exhibited by the inhibitor-dependent MHR mutants in the absence of the compound is also corrected by a second-site compensatory change far downstream in SP1, suggesting structural and functional cross-talk between the HIV-1 CA MHR and SP1. When PF-46396 and BVM were both present in infected cells they exhibited mutually antagonistic behavior. Together, these results identify Gag residues that line the maturation inhibitor-binding pocket and suggest that BVM and PF-46396 interact differentially with this putative pocket. These findings provide novel insights into the structure-function relationship between the CA MHR and SP1, two domains of Gag that are critical to both assembly and maturation. The highly conserved nature of the MHR across all orthoretroviridae suggests that these findings will be broadly relevant to retroviral assembly. Finally, the results presented here provide a framework for increased

  2. Localization to Chromosomes of Structural Genes for the Major Protease Inhibitors of Barley Grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hejgaard, Jørn; Bjørn, S.E.; Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel

    1984-01-01

    Wheat-barley chromosome addition lines were compared by isoelectric focusing of protein extracts to identify chromosomes carrying loci for the major immunochemically distinct protease inhibitors of barley grains. Structural genes for the following inhibitors were localized: an inhibitor of both...

  3. High-throughput screening for novel inhibitors of Neisseria gonorrhoeae penicillin-binding protein 2.

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    Alena Fedarovich

    Full Text Available The increasing prevalence of N. gonorrhoeae strains exhibiting decreased susceptibility to third-generation cephalosporins and the recent isolation of two distinct strains with high-level resistance to cefixime or ceftriaxone heralds the possible demise of β-lactam antibiotics as effective treatments for gonorrhea. To identify new compounds that inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, which are proven targets for β-lactam antibiotics, we developed a high-throughput assay that uses fluorescence polarization (FP to distinguish the fluorescent penicillin, Bocillin-FL, in free or PBP-bound form. This assay was used to screen a 50,000 compound library for potential inhibitors of N. gonorrhoeae PBP 2, and 32 compounds were identified that exhibited >50% inhibition of Bocillin-FL binding to PBP 2. These included a cephalosporin that provided validation of the assay. After elimination of compounds that failed to exhibit concentration-dependent inhibition, the antimicrobial activity of the remaining 24 was tested. Of these, 7 showed antimicrobial activity against susceptible and penicillin- or cephalosporin-resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. In molecular docking simulations using the crystal structure of PBP 2, two of these inhibitors docked into the active site of the enzyme and each mediate interactions with the active site serine nucleophile. This study demonstrates the validity of a FP-based assay to find novel inhibitors of PBPs and paves the way for more comprehensive high-throughput screening against highly resistant strains of N. gonorrhoeae. It also provides a set of lead compounds for optimization of anti-gonococcal agents.

  4. Interactions of human P-glycoprotein transport substrates and inhibitors at the drug binding domain: Functional and molecular docking analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Onat; Saeed, Mohamed E M; Valoti, Massimo; Frosini, Maria; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-03-15

    Rhodamine 123 (R123) transport substrate sensitizes P-glycoprotein (P-gp) to inhibition by compound 2c (cis-cis) N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl ester isomer in a concentration-dependent manner in human MDR1-gene transfected mouse T-lymphoma L5178 cells as shown previously. By contrast, epirubicin (EPI) concentration changes left unaltered 2c IC50 values of EPI efflux. To clarify this discrepancy, defined molecular docking (DMD) analyses of 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters, the highly flexible aryl ester analog 4, and several P-gp substrate/non-substrate inhibitors were performed on human P-gp drug- or nucleotide-binding domains (DBD or NBD). DMD measurements yielded lowest binding energy (LBE, kcal/mol) values (mean ± SD) ranging from -11.8 ± 0.54 (valspodar) to -3.98 ± 0.01 (4). Lys234, Ser952 and Tyr953 residues formed H-bonds with most of the compounds. Only 2c docked also at ATP binding site (LBE value of -6.9 ± 0.30 kcal/mol). Inhibition of P-gp-mediated R123 efflux by 12 N,N-bis(cyclohexanolamine)aryl esters and 4 significantly correlated with LBE values. DMD analysis of EPI, (3)H-1EPI, (3)H-2EPI, (14)C-1EPI, (14)C-2EPI, R123 and 2c before and after previous docking of each of them indicated that pre-docking of either 2c or EPI significantly reduced LBE of both EPI and R123, and that of both (3)H-2EPI and (14)C-2EPI, respectively. Since the clusters of DBD amino acid residues interacting with EPI were different, if EPI docked alone or after pre-docking of EPI or 2c, the existence of alternative secondary binding site for EPI on P-gp is credible. In conclusion, 2c may allocate the drug-binding pocket and reduce strong binding of EPI and R123 in agreement with P-gp inhibition experiments, where 2c reduced efflux of EPI and R123.

  5. Conformational Dynamics and Binding Free Energies of Inhibitors of BACE-1: From the Perspective of Protonation Equilibria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Olivia Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACE-1 is the β-secretase responsible for the initial amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease, catalyzing hydrolytic cleavage of substrate in a pH-sensitive manner. The catalytic mechanism of BACE-1 requires water-mediated proton transfer from aspartyl dyad to the substrate, as well as structural flexibility in the flap region. Thus, the coupling of protonation and conformational equilibria is essential to a full in silico characterization of BACE-1. In this work, we perform constant pH replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations on both apo BACE-1 and five BACE-1-inhibitor complexes to examine the effect of pH on dynamics and inhibitor binding properties of BACE-1. In our simulations, we find that solution pH controls the conformational flexibility of apo BACE-1, whereas bound inhibitors largely limit the motions of the holo enzyme at all levels of pH. The microscopic pKa values of titratable residues in BACE-1 including its aspartyl dyad are computed and compared between apo and inhibitor-bound states. Changes in protonation between the apo and holo forms suggest a thermodynamic linkage between binding of inhibitors and protons localized at the dyad. Utilizing our recently developed computational protocol applying the binding polynomial formalism to the constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD framework, we are able to obtain the pH-dependent binding free energy profiles for various BACE-1-inhibitor complexes. Our results highlight the importance of correctly addressing the binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand systems where binding accompanies a net proton transfer. This work comprises the first application of our CpHMD-based free energy computational method to protein-ligand complexes and illustrates the value of CpHMD as an all-purpose tool for obtaining pH-dependent dynamics and binding free energies of biological systems.

  6. Design of multiligand inhibitors for the swine flu H1N1 neuraminidase binding site

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    Narayanan MM

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Manoj M Narayanan,1,2 Chandrasekhar B Nair,2 Shilpa K Sanjeeva,2 PV Subba Rao,2 Phani K Pullela,1,2 Colin J Barrow11Centre for Chemistry and Biotechnology, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia; 2Bigtec Pvt Ltd, Rajajinagar, Bangalore, IndiaAbstract: Viral neuraminidase inhibitors such as oseltamivir and zanamivir prevent early virus multiplication by blocking sialic acid cleavage on host cells. These drugs are effective for the treatment of a variety of influenza subtypes, including swine flu (H1N1. The binding site for these drugs is well established and they were designed based on computational docking studies. We show here that some common natural products have moderate inhibitory activity for H1N1 neuraminidase under docking studies. Significantly, docking studies using AutoDock for biligand and triligand forms of these compounds (camphor, menthol, and methyl salicylate linked via methylene bridges indicate that they may bind in combination with high affinity to the H1N1 neuraminidase active site. These results also indicate that chemically linked biligands and triligands of these natural products could provide a new class of drug leads for the prevention and treatment of influenza. This study also highlights the need for a multiligand docking algorithm to understand better the mode of action of natural products, wherein multiple active ingredients are present.Keywords: neuraminidase, influenza, H1N1, multiligand, binding energy, molecular docking, virus

  7. Exploring NMR ensembles of calcium binding proteins: Perspectives to design inhibitors of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craescu Constantin T

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupting protein-protein interactions by small organic molecules is nowadays a promising strategy employed to block protein targets involved in different pathologies. However, structural changes occurring at the binding interfaces make difficult drug discovery processes using structure-based drug design/virtual screening approaches. Here we focused on two homologous calcium binding proteins, calmodulin and human centrin 2, involved in different cellular functions via protein-protein interactions, and known to undergo important conformational changes upon ligand binding. Results In order to find suitable protein conformations of calmodulin and centrin for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening, we performed in silico structural/energetic analysis and molecular docking of terphenyl (a mimicking alpha-helical molecule known to inhibit protein-protein interactions of calmodulin into X-ray and NMR ensembles of calmodulin and centrin. We employed several scoring methods in order to find the best protein conformations. Our results show that docking on NMR structures of calmodulin and centrin can be very helpful to take into account conformational changes occurring at protein-protein interfaces. Conclusions NMR structures of protein-protein complexes nowadays available could efficiently be exploited for further structure-based drug design/virtual screening processes employed to design small molecule inhibitors of protein-protein interactions.

  8. Protein arginine deiminase 2 binds calcium in an ordered fashion: implications for inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Daniel J; Fang, Pengfei; Dreyton, Christina J; Zhang, Ying; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Rempel, Don; Bax, Benjamin D; Coonrod, Scott A; Lewis, Huw D; Guo, Min; Gross, Michael L; Thompson, Paul R

    2015-04-17

    Protein arginine deiminases (PADs) are calcium-dependent histone-modifying enzymes whose activity is dysregulated in inflammatory diseases and cancer. PAD2 functions as an Estrogen Receptor (ER) coactivator in breast cancer cells via the citrullination of histone tail arginine residues at ER binding sites. Although an attractive therapeutic target, the mechanisms that regulate PAD2 activity are largely unknown, especially the detailed role of how calcium facilitates enzyme activation. To gain insights into these regulatory processes, we determined the first structures of PAD2 (27 in total), and through calcium-titrations by X-ray crystallography, determined the order of binding and affinity for the six calcium ions that bind and activate this enzyme. These structures also identified several PAD2 regulatory elements, including a calcium switch that controls proper positioning of the catalytic cysteine residue, and a novel active site shielding mechanism. Additional biochemical and mass-spectrometry-based hydrogen/deuterium exchange studies support these structural findings. The identification of multiple intermediate calcium-bound structures along the PAD2 activation pathway provides critical insights that will aid the development of allosteric inhibitors targeting the PADs.

  9. The binding mode of second-generation sulfonamide inhibitors of MurD: clues for rational design of potent MurD inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Simčič

    Full Text Available A series of optimized sulfonamide derivatives was recently reported as novel inhibitors of UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine:D-glutamate ligase (MurD. These are based on naphthalene-N-sulfonyl-D-glutamic acid and have the D-glutamic acid replaced with rigidified mimetics. Here we have defined the binding site of these novel ligands to MurD using (1H/(13C heteronuclear single quantum correlation. The MurD protein was selectively (13C-labeled on the methyl groups of Ile (δ1 only, Leu and Val, and was isolated and purified. Crucial Ile, Leu and Val methyl groups in the vicinity of the ligand binding site were identified by comparison of chemical shift perturbation patterns among the ligands with various structural elements and known binding modes. The conformational and dynamic properties of the bound ligands and their binding interactions were examined using the transferred nuclear Overhauser effect and saturation transfer difference. In addition, the binding mode of these novel inhibitors was thoroughly examined using unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. Our results reveal the complex dynamic behavior of ligand-MurD complexes and its influence on ligand-enzyme contacts. We further present important findings for the rational design of potent Mur ligase inhibitors.

  10. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  11. Discovery of a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Protein-MicroRNA Interaction Using Binding Assay with a Site-Specifically Labeled Lin28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Donghyun; Byun, Wan Gi; Koo, Ja Young; Park, Hankum; Park, Seung Bum

    2016-10-07

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by targeting protein-coding transcripts that are involved in various cellular processes. Thus, miRNA biogenesis has been recognized as a novel therapeutic target. Especially, the let-7 miRNA family is well-known for its tumor suppressor functions and is downregulated in many cancer cells. Lin28 protein binds to let-7 miRNA precursors to inhibit their maturation. Herein, we developed a FRET-based, high-throughput screening system to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the Lin28-let-7 interaction. We employed unnatural amino acid mutagenesis and bioorthogonal chemistry for the site-specific fluorescent labeling of Lin28, which ensures the robustness and reliability of the FRET-based protein-miRNA binding assay. Using this direct binding assay, we identified an inhibitor of the oncogenic Lin28-let-7 interaction. The inhibitor enhanced the production of let-7 miRNAs in Lin28-expressing cancer cells and reduced the level of let-7 target oncogene products.

  12. Variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor genes in type 2 diabetes and related metabolic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lorenzo, Carlo; Greco, Annalisa; Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Hribal, Marta Letizia

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  13. Variants of Insulin-Signaling Inhibitor Genes in Type 2 Diabetes and Related Metabolic Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo de Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance has a central role in the pathogenesis of several metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, obesity, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular diseases. Insulin resistance and related traits are likely to be caused by abnormalities in the genes encoding for proteins involved in the composite network of insulin-signaling; in this review we have focused our attention on genetic variants of insulin-signaling inhibitor molecules. These proteins interfere with different steps in insulin-signaling: ENPP1/PC-1 and the phosphatases PTP1B and PTPRF/LAR inhibit the insulin receptor activation; INPPL1/SHIP-2 hydrolyzes PI3-kinase products, hampering the phosphoinositide-mediated downstream signaling; and TRIB3 binds the serine-threonine kinase Akt, reducing its phosphorylation levels. While several variants have been described over the years for all these genes, solid evidence of an association with type 2 diabetes and related diseases seems to exist only for rs1044498 of the ENPP1 gene and for rs2295490 of the TRIB3 gene. However, overall the data recapitulated in this Review article may supply useful elements to interpret the results of novel, more technically advanced genetic studies; indeed it is becoming increasingly evident that genetic information on metabolic diseases should be interpreted taking into account the complex biological pathways underlying their pathogenesis.

  14. Microarray analysis of E-box binding-related gene expression in young and replicatively senescent human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semov, Alexandre; Marcotte, Richard; Semova, Natalie; Ye, Xiangyun; Wang, Eugenia

    2002-03-01

    An E-box (CACGTG) designer microarray was developed to monitor a group of genes whose expressions share a particular regulatory mode. Sensitivity and specificity of microarray hybridization, as well as variability of microarray data, were evaluated. This designer microarray was used to generate expression profiles of E-box binding-related genes in WI-38 fibroblast cultures at three different growth states: low-passage replicating, low-passage contact-inhibited quiescent, and replicatively senescent. Microarray gene screening reveals that quiescent and senescent cells, in comparison with replicating ones, are characterized by downregulation of Pam, a protein associated with c-Myc, and upregulation of Mad family genes, Max dimerization proteins. Moreover, quiescence and senescence can be distinguished by increased expression of Irlb, c-Myc transcription factor, and Miz-1, c-Myc-interacting Zn finger protein 1, only in the former state. Senescence is characterized by downregulation of Id4, inhibitor of DNA binding 4, and Mitf, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, in comparison with young replicating and quiescent states. Differential expression of genes detected by microarray hybridization was independently confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction technique. Alterations in the expression of E-box-binding transcription factors and c-Myc-binding proteins demonstrate the importance of these genes in establishing the contact-inhibited quiescent or senescent phenotypes.

  15. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptorα Agonists Differentially Regulate Inhibitor of DNA Binding Expression in Rodents and Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen González

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2 is a helix-loop-helix (HLH transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY. WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2. MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V, the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  16. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα agonists differentially regulate inhibitor of DNA binding expression in rodents and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, María Del Carmen; Corton, J Christopher; Acero, Nuria; Muñoz-Mingarro, Dolores; Quirós, Yolanda; Alvarez-Millán, Juan José; Herrera, Emilio; Bocos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor that participates in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones, antidiabetic agents and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma agonists, have been reported to diminish Id2 expression in human cells. We hypothesized that PPARα activators may also alter Id2 expression. Fenofibrate diminished hepatic Id2 expression in both late pregnant and unmated rats. In 24 hour fasted rats, Id2 expression was decreased under conditions known to activate PPARα. In order to determine whether the fibrate effects were mediated by PPARα, wild-type mice and PPARα-null mice were treated with Wy-14,643 (WY). WY reduced Id2 expression in wild-type mice without an effect in PPARα-null mice. In contrast, fenofibrate induced Id2 expression after 24 hours of treatment in human hepatocarcinoma cells (HepG2). MK-886, a PPARα antagonist, did not block fenofibrate-induced activation of Id2 expression, suggesting a PPARα-independent effect was involved. These findings confirm that Id2 is a gene responsive to PPARα agonists. Like other genes (apolipoprotein A-I, apolipoprotein A-V), the opposite directional transcriptional effect in rodents and a human cell line further emphasizes that PPARα agonists have different effects in rodents and humans.

  17. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  18. Investigations on Binding Pattern of Kinase Inhibitors with PPARγ: Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamic Simulations, and Free Energy Calculation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazumder, Mohit; Das, Umashankar; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a potential target for the treatment of several disorders. In view of several FDA approved kinase inhibitors, in the current study, we have investigated the interaction of selected kinase inhibitors with PPARγ using computational modeling, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations (MDS). The docked conformations and MDS studies suggest that the selected KIs interact with PPARγ in the ligand binding domain (LBD) with high positive predictive values. Hence, we have for the first time shown the plausible binding of KIs in the PPARγ ligand binding site. The results obtained from these in silico investigations warrant further evaluation of kinase inhibitors as PPARγ ligands in vitro and in vivo.

  19. A cDNA encoding diazepam-binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA-binding protein in Helicoverpa armigera: molecular characterization and expression analysis associated with pupal diapause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Tian-Yi; Xu, Wei-Hua

    2005-06-01

    The diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) or the acyl-CoA-binding protein (ACBP) is a 9-10 kDa highly conserved multifunctional protein that plays important roles in GABA(A) receptor activity regulation, lipid absorption and steroidogenesis in various organisms. To study the functions of DBI/ACBP in insect development or diapause, we cloned the cDNA from Helicoverpa armigera (Har) utilizing rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). By homology search, Har-DBI/ACBP is conserved with the DBI/ACBPs known from other insects. Northern blot analysis showed that DBI/ACBP gene expressed in nonneural and neural tissues. RT-PCR combined Southern blot analysis revealed that DBI/ACBP mRNA in the brain of nondiapause individual was much higher than that in the brain of diapausing insects. At early and middle stages of 6th instar larvae, the level of DBI/ACBP mRNA was higher in the midgut of diapause type than that in nondiapause type and low at late 6th instar larval stage and early pupal stage in both types. In the prothoracic gland (PG), DBI/ACBP expression appeared at a high level at middle and late stages of 6th larval instar in both nondiapause and diapause types, and declined after pupation. In vitro experiments revealed that DBI/ACBP mRNA in PG could be stimulated by synthetic H. armigera diapause hormone (Har-DH), suggesting that Har-DH may stimulate the PG to produce ecdysteroids by the DBI/ACBP signal pathway. By in vitro assay, we also found that FGIN-1-27, which has similar functions to DBI/ACBP in ecdysteroidogenesis, could induce PG ecdysteroidogenesis effectively, suggesting that DBI/ACBP regulates biosynthesis of ecdysteroids in PG. Thus, DBI/ACBP indeed plays a key role in metabolism and development in H. armigera.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C.

    OpenAIRE

    Zervosen, Astrid; Bouillez, André; Herman, Alexandre; Amoroso, Ana Maria; Joris, Bernard; Sauvage, Eric; Charlier, Paulette; Luxen, André

    2012-01-01

    In response to the widespread use of beta-lactam antibiotics bacteria have evolved drug resistance mechanisms that include the production of resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). Boronic acids are potent beta-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2,6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent...

  1. Dynamics of the substrate binding pocket in the presence of an inhibitor covalently attached to a fungal lipase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, G H; Jensen, M O; Bywater, R P

    2001-08-01

    To gain insight into the mobility of the occupied ligand-binding pocket of the Rhizomucor miehei lipase we have conducted a rigorous molecular dynamics analysis. The covalently attached inhibitor, ethylhexylphosphonate, was employed as a mimic of the putative tetrahedral intermediate in the esterolytic reaction. Our results show that in this lipase, ligand recognition is influenced by the flexibility of the binding pocket, a feature that is common to many other enzymes. Several regions around the active site were found to move significantly to adapt to the inhibitor. These motions are correlated to the flexibility of the inhibitor. In particular, the hexyl chain of the inhibitor shows considerable mobility, and adjacent residues in the binding cleft accommodate to this flexibility. Pronounced fluctuations in the binding pocket induced by the flexibility of the inhibitor are observed in the hinge region F79-S82, the active site loop region W88-V95 and the protein regions P209-F215/H257-Y260. The flexibility in the regions F79-S82 and H257-Y260, where the shorter ethyl chain is located, indicates that additional space in this binding cleft region is available for accommodating a larger moiety. Fluctuations in the region W88-V95 and P209-F215 are due to the relatively short flexible hexyl carbon chain. This part of the binding pocket could be stiffened by the presence of a longer carbon chain. Though the inhibitor is covalently attached through the phosphonate moiety, interaction of the remainder of the molecule and the enzyme are determined by hydrophobic interactions, where the Van der Waals energies are approximately 25% lower than the electrostatic contributions.

  2. High-throughput screening for small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding via a novel fluorescence polarization assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Ferng, Timothy; Rojas, Rafael J; Larsen, Martha J; Sondek, John; Neubig, Richard R

    2009-02-01

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate guanine nucleotide exchange and the subsequent activation of Rho-family proteins in response to extracellular stimuli acting upon cytokine, tyrosine kinase, adhesion, integrin, and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Upon Rho activation, several downstream events occur, such as morphological and cytoskeletal changes, motility, growth, survival, and gene transcription. The leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) is a member of the regulators of G-protein signaling homology domain (RH) family of GEFs originally identified as a result of chromosomal translocation in acute myeloid leukemia. Using a novel fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay using BODIPY-Texas Red-GTPgammaS (BODIPY-TR-GTPgammaS), the authors performed a 10,000-compound high-throughput screen for inhibitors of LARG-stimulated RhoA nucleotide binding. Five compounds identified from the high-throughput screen were confirmed in a nonfluorescent radioactive guanine nucleotide-binding assay measuring LARG-stimulated [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding to RhoA, thus ruling out nonspecific fluorescent effects. All 5 compounds selectively inhibited LARG-stimulated RhoA [( 35)S] GTPgammaS binding but had little to no effect on RhoA or Galpha( o) [(35)S] GTPgammaS binding. Therefore, these 5 compounds should serve as promising starting points for the development of small-molecule inhibitors of LARG-mediated nucleotide exchange as both pharmacological tools and therapeutics. In addition, the fluorescence polarization guanine nucleotide-binding assay described here should serve as a useful approach for both high-throughput screening and general biological applications.

  3. On the binding mode of urease active site inhibitors: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopoldini, M.; Marino, T.; Russo, N.; Toscano, M.

    The way with which boric acid, a rapid reversible competitive inhibitor, binds the urease active site was explored at density functional B3LYP level of theory. The catalytic core of the enzyme was simulated by two models of different size. In both cases, amino acid residues belonging to the inner and to the outer coordination spheres of nickel ions were replaced by smaller molecular species. Contrary to the experimental indication that attributes the inhibitory ability of this acid to the lack of a nucleophilic attack by the enzyme to the boron atom, we instead found that another possibility exists based on the presence of a strong covalent sigma bond between boron and urease that we think can be hardly broken to allow any course of the reaction.

  4. Novel gaseous ethylene binding inhibitor prevents ethylene effects in potted flowering plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serek, M.; Reid, M.S. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Horticulture); Sisler, E.C. (North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry)

    1994-11-01

    A 6-hour fumigation of flowering Begonia xelatior hybrida Fotsch. Najada' and Rosa', B. xtuberhybrida Voss. Non-Stop', Kalanchoe blossfeldiana Poelln. Tropicana', and Rosa hybrida L. Victory Parade' plants with 1-MCP, (formerly designated as SIS-X), a gaseous nonreversible ethylene binding inhibitor, strongly inhibited exogenous ethylene effects such as bud and flower drop, leaf abscission, and accelerated flower senescence. The inhibitory effects of 1-MCP increased linearly with concentration, and at 20 nl-liter[sup [minus]1] this compound gave equal protection to that afforded by spraying the plants with a 0.5 STS mM solution. Chemical names used: 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), silver thiosulfate (STS).

  5. Diazepam Binding Inhibitor Promotes Stem Cell Expansion Controlling Environment-Dependent Neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Ionut; Neitz, Angela; Alfonso, Julieta; Monyer, Hannah

    2017-04-05

    Plasticity of adult neurogenesis supports adaptation to environmental changes. The identification of molecular mediators that signal these changes to neural progenitors in the niche has remained elusive. Here we report that diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) is crucial in supporting an adaptive mechanism in response to changes in the environment. We provide evidence that DBI is expressed in stem cells in all neurogenic niches of the postnatal brain. Focusing on the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ) and employing multiple genetic manipulations in vivo, we demonstrate that DBI regulates the balance between preserving the stem cell pool and neurogenesis. Specifically, DBI dampens GABA activity in stem cells, thereby sustaining the proproliferative effect of physical exercise and enriched environment. Our data lend credence to the notion that the modulatory effect of DBI constitutes a general mechanism that regulates postnatal neurogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reference genes to study herbicide stress response in Lolium sp.: up-regulation of P450 genes in plants resistant to acetolactate-synthase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Duhoux

    Full Text Available Variation in the expression of numerous genes is at the basis of plant response to environmental stresses. Non-target-site-based resistance to herbicides (NTSR, the major threat to grass weed chemical control, is governed by a subset of the genes involved in herbicide stress response. Quantitative PCR assays allowing reliable comparison of gene expression are thus key to identify genes governing NTSR. This work aimed at identifying a set of reference genes with a stable expression to be used as an internal standard for the normalisation of quantitative PCR data in studies investigating NTSR to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS in the major grass weed Lolium sp. Gene expression stability was assessed in plants resistant or sensitive to two ALS inhibitors, subjected or not to herbicide stress. Using three complementary approaches implemented in the programs BestKeeper, NormFinder and geNorm, cap-binding protein, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ubiquitin were identified as the most suitable reference genes. This reference gene set can probably be used to study herbicide response in other weed species. It was used to compare the expression of the genes encoding two herbicide target enzymes (ALS and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase and five cytochromes P450 (CYP with potential herbicide-degrading activity between plants resistant or sensitive to ALS inhibitors. Overall, herbicide application enhanced CYP gene expression. Constitutive up-regulation of all CYP genes observed in resistant plants compared to sensitive plants suggested enhanced secondary metabolism in the resistant plants. Comprehensive transcriptome studies associated to gene expression analyses using the reference gene set validated here are required to unravel NTSR genetic determinants.

  7. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Balas, Qosay A; Hassan, Mohammad A; Al-Shar’i, Nizar A; Mhaidat, Nizar M; Almaaytah, Ammar M; Al-Mahasneh, Fatima M; Isawi, Israa H

    2016-01-01

    Background The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I) and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs. Methods Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I. Results Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM. Conclusion We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may be efficiently employed in future optimization steps. PMID:27574401

  8. Remodeling a DNA-binding protein as a specific in vivo inhibitor of bacterial secretin PulD

    OpenAIRE

    Mouratou, Barbara; Schaeffer, Francis; Guilvout, Ingrid; Tello-Manigne, Diana; Pugsley, Anthony P.; Alzari, Pedro M.; Pecorari, Frédéric

    2007-01-01

    We engineered a class of proteins that binds selected polypeptides with high specificity and affinity. Use of the protein scaffold of Sac7d, belonging to a protein family that binds various ligands, overcomes limitations inherent in the use of antibodies as intracellular inhibitors: it lacks disulfide bridges, is small and stable, and can be produced in large amounts. An in vitro combinatorial/selection approach generated specific, high-affinity (up to 140 pM) binders against bacterial outer ...

  9. Novel glyoxalase-I inhibitors possessing a “zinc-binding feature” as potential anticancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Balas QA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Qosay A Al-Balas,1 Mohammad A Hassan,1 Nizar A Al-Shar’i,1 Nizar M Mhaidat,2 Ammar M Almaaytah,3 Fatima M Al-Mahasneh,1 Israa H Isawi1 1Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 3Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan Background: The glyoxalase system including two thiol-dependent enzymes, glyoxalase I (Glo-I and glyoxalase II, plays an important role in a ubiquitous metabolic pathway involved in cellular detoxification of cytotoxic 2-oxoaldehydes. Tumor cells have high glycolytic activity, leading to increased cellular levels of these toxic metabolites. The increased activity of the detoxification system in cancerous cells makes this pathway a viable target for developing novel anticancer agents. In this study, we examined the potential utility of non-glutathione-based inhibitors of the Glo-I enzyme as novel anticancer drugs.Methods: Computer-aided drug design techniques, such as customized pharmacophoric features, virtual screening, and flexible docking, were used to achieve the project goals. Retrieved hits were extensively filtered and subsequently docked into the active site of the enzyme. The biological activities of retrieved hits were assessed using an in vitro assay against Glo-I.Results: Since Glo-I is a zinc metalloenzyme, a customized Zn-binding pharmacophoric feature was used to search for selective inhibitors via virtual screening of a small-molecule database. Seven hits were selected, purchased, and biologically evaluated. Three of the seven hits inhibited Glo-I activity, the most effective of which exerted 76.4% inhibition at a concentration of 25 µM.Conclusion: We successfully identified a potential Glo-I inhibitor that can serve as a lead compound for further optimization. Moreover, our in silico and experimental results were highly correlated. Hence, the docking protocol adopted in this study may

  10. HIV protease inhibitors act as competitive inhibitors of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUTs with differing affinities for GLUT1 and GLUT4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C Hresko

    Full Text Available The clinical use of several first generation HIV protease inhibitors (PIs is associated with the development of insulin resistance. Indinavir has been shown to act as a potent reversible noncompetitive inhibitor of zero-trans glucose influx via direct interaction with the insulin responsive facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4. Newer drugs within this class have differing effects on insulin sensitivity in treated patients. GLUTs are known to contain two distinct glucose-binding sites that are located on opposite sides of the lipid bilayer. To determine whether interference with the cytoplasmic glucose binding site is responsible for differential effects of PIs on glucose transport, intact intracellular membrane vesicles containing GLUT1 and GLUT4, which have an inverted transporter orientation relative to the plasma membrane, were isolated from 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The binding of biotinylated ATB-BMPA, a membrane impermeable bis-mannose containing photolabel, was determined in the presence of indinavir, ritonavir, atazanavir, tipranavir, and cytochalasin b. Zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose transport was measured in both 3T3-L1 fibroblasts and primary rat adipocytes acutely exposed to these compounds. PI inhibition of glucose transport correlated strongly with the PI inhibition of ATB-BMPA/transporter binding. At therapeutically relevant concentrations, ritonavir was not selective for GLUT4 over GLUT1. Indinavir was found to act as a competitive inhibitor of the cytoplasmic glucose binding site of GLUT4 with a K(I of 8.2 µM. These data establish biotinylated ATB-BMPA as an effective probe to quantify accessibility of the endofacial glucose-binding site in GLUTs and reveal that the ability of PIs to block this site differs among drugs within this class. This provides mechanistic insight into the basis for the clinical variation in drug-related metabolic toxicity.

  11. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  12. Immunological properties of prolactin and studies on a gonadotropin binding inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The physiological role of prolactin in horses has not yet been well defined. With the availability of highly purified ePRL for inducing antibody formation in rabbits and for radiolabeling with Na/sup 125/I, a very sensitive (0.4-0.6 ng/ml) and highly specific homologous RIA for ePRL was developed. A heterologous RIA using /sup 125/I-labeled ovine PRL and anti-ePRL antiserum was also developed and compared to the homologous RIA for ePRL. Of the two systems, it is concluded that this homologous RIA system is more suitable and more reliable for measuring prolactin concentration in horse serum samples. Until now, biochemical information on PRL has not been available for reptilian species. Sea turtle (Chelonia mydas) prolactin was purified from pituitary extracts by selective precipitation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography and gel filtration. Similar to other species of PRL, sea turtle PRL is a 22,000-24,000 daltons protein and contains a high content of glutamic acid, aspartic acid, serine and leucine, the N-terminal amino acid residue. Gonadotropin (FSH) binding inhibitor was partially purified from sheep testes by ammonium sulfate fractionation and ion exchange chromatography. The FSH-BI (molecular weight: 50,000 daltons, estimated by gel filtration) contains a protein moiety necessary for binding inhibitory activity. The inhibition of the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ovine FSH to its receptor by the FSH-BI is not competitive. Both in vivo and in vitro biological studies of FSH-BI preparations in rats indicated various effects on FSH and LH activities at the gonadal level. These findings suggest a physiological role for FSH-BI in the regulation of reproduction.

  13. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  14. Arsenic and cadmium are inhibitors of cyanobacterial dinitrogenase reductase (nifH1) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shilpi; Shrivastava, A K; Singh, V K

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme nitrogenase complex is a key component conferring nitrogen fixation in all known diazotrophs. This study for the first time examines the impact of As, Na, Cd, Cu and butachlor on component II (dinitrogenase reductase, nifH1) of nitrogenase from diazotrophic cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120 using in silico and wet lab approaches. The nifH1 of Anabaena is a glycine-rich stable protein having DNA-binding properties and shows close similarity with free living compared with symbiotic diazotrophs. Phylogenetic tree revealed an adverse effect of the selected stresses on close homologs across the diazotroph community. The protein interaction network demonstrated the presence of nirA, glnA, glnB, alr4255 and alr2485 proteins besides nif proteins, suggesting their involvement in nitrogen fixation along with nifH1. Homology modelling and docking under As, Na, Cd, Cu and butachlor revealed an interaction between stressors and nifH1 protein which was further validated by a transcript of the gene through quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Presence of binding sites for As, Na, Cd and Cu on oxyR promoter attested their adverse affects on nifH1. Maximum down-regulation of nifH1 in Cd and As followed by salt, copper and butachlor revealed that arsenic and cadmium were most potential inhibitors of nitrogenase of diazotrophic community, which might negatively affect crop yield.

  15. Binding characteristics of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor to streptococcal surface collagen-like proteins A and B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seron, Mercedes Valls; Plug, Tom; Marquart, J. Arnoud; Marx, Pauline F.; Herwald, Heiko; de Groot, Philip G.; Meijers, Joost C. M.

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes is the causative agent in a wide range of diseases in humans. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) binds to collagen-like proteins ScIA and ScIB at the surface of S. pyogenes. Activation of TAFI at this surface redirects inflammation from a transient to chronic s

  16. [Application of aspartic acid as a non-specific binding inhibitor in the enrichment of phosphopeptides with titanium dioxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Ming; Bi, Wei; Lu, Zhuang; Song, Lina; Jia, Wei; Zhang, Yangjun; Qian, Xiaohong; Cai, Yun

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of metal oxides widely used for phosphopeptide enrichment in phosphoproteomic research nowadays. However it can bind to some non-phosphorylated peptides containing one or more aspartic acid residues and/or glutamic acid residues. These non-phosphorylated peptides can be eluted along with phosphorylated peptides and cause the reduction of the selectivity. Conventional inhibitors for the non-specific binding of non-phosphorylated peptides can often contaminate the ion source of mass spectrometry and therefore their applications are limited in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). In this study, aspartic acid was reported as a novel non-specific binding inhibitor for phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. Firstly, the tryptic peptide mixtures of 3 and 9 standard proteins were used for the comparison of the enrichment efficiency of titanium dioxide. The effects with the presence of aspartic acid, glutamic acid and no-inhibitor in the enrichment systems were compared separately. The results showed that aspartic acid can greatly improve the selectivity of titanium dioxide for phosphopeptide enrichment. Then, aspartic acid was used for the enrichment of tryptic peptide mixture of C57BL/6J mouse liver lysate and good results were also obtained which demonstrated that aspartic acid was a promising non-specific binding inhibitor for complex biological samples. Besides, no contamination in the ion source occurred during the mass spectrometric analysis.

  17. Functional recruitment of human complement inhibitor C4B-binding protein to outer membrane protein Rck of Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek K Ho

    Full Text Available Resistance to complement mediated killing, or serum resistance, is a common trait of pathogenic bacteria. Rck is a 17 kDa outer membrane protein encoded on the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. When expressed in either E. coli or S. enterica Typhimurium, Rck confers LPS-independent serum resistance as well as the ability to bind to and invade mammalian cells. Having recently shown that Rck binds the inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, factor H (fH, we hypothesized that Rck can also bind the inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways, C4b-binding protein (C4BP. Using flow cytometry and direct binding assays, we demonstrate that E. coli expressing Rck binds C4BP from heat-inactivated serum and by using the purified protein. No binding was detected in the absence of Rck expression. C4BP bound to Rck is functional, as we observed factor I-mediated cleavage of C4b in cofactor assays. In competition assays, binding of radiolabeled C4BP to Rck was reduced by increasing concentrations of unlabeled protein. No effect was observed by increasing heparin or salt concentrations, suggesting mainly non-ionic interactions. Reduced binding of C4BP mutants lacking complement control protein domains (CCPs 7 or 8 was observed compared to wt C4BP, suggesting that these CCPs are involved in Rck binding. While these findings are restricted to Rck expression in E. coli, these data suggest that C4BP binding may be an additional mechanism of Rck-mediated complement resistance.

  18. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel;

    2015-01-01

    IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...... at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...

  19. Discovery of selective inhibitors of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 by targeting the enzyme DNA-binding cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Bradley R; Abdelmalak, Monica; Lopez, Sophia; Tender, Gabrielle; Yan, Chunli; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2016-07-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) processes protein/DNA adducts resulting from abortive DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) activity. TDP2 inhibition could provide synergism with the Top2 poison class of chemotherapeutics. By virtual screening of the NCI diversity small molecule database, we identified selective TDP2 inhibitors and experimentally verified their selective inhibitory activity. Three inhibitors exhibited low-micromolar IC50 values. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a common binding mode for these inhibitors, involving association to the TDP2 DNA-binding cleft. MM-PBSA per-residue energy decomposition identified important interactions of the compounds with specific TDP2 residues. These interactions could provide new avenues for synthetic optimization of these scaffolds.

  20. Acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in cancer cells is mediated by loss of IGF-binding proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guix, Marta; Faber, Anthony C.; Wang, Shizhen Emily; Olivares, Maria Graciela; Song, Youngchul; Qu, Sherman; Rinehart, Cammie; Seidel, Brenda; Yee, Douglas; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    Although some cancers are initially sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), resistance invariably develops. We investigated mechanisms of acquired resistance to the EGFR TKI gefitinib by generating gefitinib-resistant (GR) A431 squamous cancer cells. In GR cells, gefitinib reduced phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB-3, and Erk but not Akt. These cells also showed hyperphosphorylation of the IGFI receptor (IGFIR) and constitutive association of IRS-1 with PI3K. Inhibition of IGFIR signaling disrupted the association of IRS-1 with PI3K and restored the ability of gefitinib to downregulate PI3K/Akt signaling and to inhibit GR cell growth. Gene expression analyses revealed that GR cells exhibited markedly reduced IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) and IGFBP-4 RNA. Addition of recombinant IGFBP-3 restored the ability of gefitinib to downregulate PI3K/Akt signaling and to inhibit cell growth. Finally, gefitinib treatment of mice with A431 xenografts in combination with an IGFIR-specific monoclonal antibody prevented tumor recurrence, whereas each drug given alone was unable to do so. These data suggest that loss of expression of IGFBPs in tumor cells treated with EGFR TKIs derepresses IGFIR signaling, which in turn mediates resistance to EGFR antagonists. Moreover, combined therapeutic inhibition of EGFR and IGFIR may abrogate this acquired mechanism of drug resistance and is thus worthy of prospective clinical investigation. PMID:18568074

  1. Implications of binding mode and active site flexibility for inhibitor potency against the salicylate synthase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Gamma; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; O'Connor, Patrick D; Johnston, Jodie M; Evans, Genevieve L; Baker, Edward N; Payne, Richard J; Lott, J Shaun; Bulloch, Esther M M

    2012-06-19

    MbtI is the salicylate synthase that catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of the iron chelating compound mycobactin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We previously developed a series of aromatic inhibitors against MbtI based on the reaction intermediate for this enzyme, isochorismate. The most potent of these inhibitors had hydrophobic substituents, ranging in size from a methyl to a phenyl group, appended to the terminal alkene of the enolpyruvyl group. These compounds exhibited low micromolar inhibition constants against MbtI and were at least an order of magnitude more potent than the parental compound for the series, which carries a native enolpyruvyl group. In this study, we sought to understand how the substituted enolpyruvyl group confers greater potency, by determining cocrystal structures of MbtI with six inhibitors from the series. A switch in binding mode at the MbtI active site is observed for inhibitors carrying a substituted enolpyruvyl group, relative to the parental compound. Computational studies suggest that the change in binding mode, and higher potency, is due to the effect of the substituents on the conformational landscape of the core inhibitor structure. The crystal structures and fluorescence-based thermal shift assays indicate that substituents larger than a methyl group are accommodated in the MbtI active site through significant but localized flexibility in the peptide backbone. These findings have implications for the design of improved inhibitors of MbtI, as well as other chorismate-utilizing enzymes from this family.

  2. Probing ligand-binding modes and binding mechanisms of benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors with soluble epoxide hydrolase by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Liang; Han, Ju-Guang

    2012-08-30

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has become a new therapeutic target for treating a variety of human diseases. The inhibition of human sEH hydrolase activity was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation techniques. A set of six benzoxazole-based amide inhibitors binding to sEH has been studied through molecular docking, MD simulation, free energy calculations, and energy decomposition analysis. On the basis of molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area (MM-GB/SA) computation and normal-mode analysis (NMA), the obtained results indicate that the rank of calculated binding free energies (ΔΔGTOT) of these inhibitors is in excellent agreement with that of experimental bioactivity data (IC50). The correlation coefficient (r(2)) between the predicted ΔΔGTOT and IC50 is 0.88. van der Waals energies are the largest component of the total energies, and the entropy changes play an indispensable role in determining the ΔΔGTOT. Rational binding modes were discussed and determined by the docking results and binding free energies. The free energy decomposition of each residue reveals that the residue Trp334 dominates the most binding free energies among all residues and that the activities for these molecules to the sEH are not decided by hydrogen bonds or a certain residue but by the common effect of multiple side chains in the active site.

  3. Presence of a low molecular weight endogenous inhibitor on 3H-muscimol binding in synaptic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Yukio; Kuriyama, Kinya

    1980-06-01

    The specific binding of 3H-muscimol to synaptic membrane preparations obtained from the rat brain has been thought to reflect the association of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a potential candidate as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), with its synaptic receptors1,2. Treatment of synaptic membranes with Triton X-100 significantly increases the specific binding of 3H-muscimol2. Several reports also indicate the presence of endogenous substances, such as GABA3, acidic protein4 and phosphatidylethanolamine5, which inhibit Na-independent binding of 3H-GABA in the synaptic membranous fractions from the rat brain. We report here that in the supernatant obtained from Triton-treated synaptic membranes there exists a new type of endogenous inhibitor of 3H-muscimol binding which is apparently different from the inhibitory substances described previously3-5. The new inhibitor has a low molecular weight (MW) and probably originated from neurones rather than glial cells. We have termed this endogenous inhibitor the GABA receptor binding inhibitory factor (GRIF).

  4. In silico modification of Zn2+ binding group of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) by organoselenium compounds as Homo sapiens class II HDAC inhibitor of cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumo Friend Tambunan, Usman; Bakri, Ridla; Aditya Parikesit, Arli; Ariyani, Titin; Dyah Puspitasari, Ratih; Kerami, Djati

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women, and ranks seventh of all cancers worldwide, with 529000 cases in 2008 and more than 85% cases occur in developing countries. One way to treat this cancer is through the inhibition of HDAC enzymes which play a strategic role in the regulation of gene expression. Suberoyl Anilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA) or Vorinostat is a drug which commercially available to treat the cancer, but still has some side effects. This research present in silico SAHA modification in Zinc Binding Group (ZBG) by organoselenium compound to get ligands which less side effect. From molecular docking simulation, and interaction analysis, there are five best ligands, namely CC27, HA27, HB28, IB25, and KA7. These five ligands have better binding affinity than the standards, and also have interaction with Zn2+ cofactor of inhibited HDAC enzymes. This research is expected to produce more potent HDAC inhibitor as novel drug for cervical cancer treatment.

  5. Oxazin-5-Ones as a Novel Class of Penicillin Binding Protein Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis and Structure Activity Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoabedje, Efeturi Abraham; Ibezim, Akachukwu; Okafor, Sunday Nwankwor; Onoabedje, Ufuoma Shalom; Okoro, Uchechukwu Chris

    2016-01-01

    Penicillin binding proteins (PBPs) are normal constituents of bacterial which are absent in mammalian cells. The theoretical binding modes of known oxazin-5-ones toward the protein were used as a guide to synthesis new inhibitors. Structural studies of protein-ligand complexes revealed that conformational discrepancies of the derivatives in the protein’s binding site gave rise to the variation in their inhibition constant which ranged from 68.58 μM to 2.04 mM. Biological assay results further confirmed the antibiotic potencies of the studied compounds. Although the outcome of biological screening does not parallel computational predictions, the results obtained from both methods suggest that the oxazin-5-one derivatives are potential PBP inhibitors, hence interesting antibiotic lead agents. PMID:27749913

  6. Possible role for water dissociation in the slow binding of phosphorus-containing transition-state-analogue inhibitors of thermolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, P A; Marlowe, C K

    1987-12-29

    A number of phosphonamidate and phosphonate tripeptide analogues have been studied as transition-state-analogue inhibitors of the zinc endopeptidase thermolysin. Those with the form Cbz-GlyP(Y)Leu-X [ZGP(Y)LX, X = NH2 or amino acid, Y = NH or O linkage] are potent (Ki = 9-760 nM for X = NH, 9-660 microM for X = O) but otherwise ordinary in their binding behavior, with second-order rate constants for association (kon) greater than 10(5) M-1 s-1. Those with the form Cbz-XP(Y)-Leu-Ala [ZXP(Y)LA,XP = alpha-substituted phosphorus amino acid analogue] are similarly potent (Ki for ZFPLA = 68 pM) but slow binding (kon less than or equal to 1300 M-1 s-1). Several kinetic mechanisms for slow binding behavior are considered, including two-step processes and those that require prior isomerization of inhibitor or enzyme to a rare form. The association rates of ZFPLA and ZFP(O)LA are first order in inhibitor concentration up to 1-2 mM, indicating that any loose complex along the binding pathway must have a dissociation constant above this value. The crystallographic investigation described in the preceding paper [Holden, H. M., Tronrud, D. E., Monzingo, A. F., Weaver, L. H., & Matthews, B. W. (1987) Biochemistry (preceding paper in this issue)] identifies a specific water molecule in the active site that may hinder binding of the alpha-substituted inhibitors. The implication of this observation for a mechanism for slow binding is discussed.

  7. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  8. Insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene and adherence to ACE inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Schelleman (Hedi); O.H. Klungel (Olaf); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert); A.C. de Boer (Anthonius); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAims: We investigated whether the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene modified the adherence to ACE inhibitors as measured by the discontinuation of an ACE inhibitor, or addition of another antihypertensive drug. Methods: This was a cohort study among 239 subjects who

  9. Insertion/deletion polymorphism of the ACE gene and adherence to ACE inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman, H; Klungel, O H; van Duijn, C M; Witteman, J C M; Hofman, A; de Boer, A; Stricker, B H Ch

    AIMS: We investigated whether the insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism of the ACE gene modified the adherence to ACE inhibitors as measured by the discontinuation of an ACE inhibitor, or addition of another antihypertensive drug. METHODS: This was a cohort study among 239 subjects who started ACE

  10. Genes encoding calmodulin-binding proteins in the Arabidopsis genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vaka S.; Ali, Gul S.; Reddy, Anireddy S N.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the recently completed Arabidopsis genome sequence indicates that approximately 31% of the predicted genes could not be assigned to functional categories, as they do not show any sequence similarity with proteins of known function from other organisms. Calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous and multifunctional Ca(2+) sensor, interacts with a wide variety of cellular proteins and modulates their activity/function in regulating diverse cellular processes. However, the primary amino acid sequence of the CaM-binding domain in different CaM-binding proteins (CBPs) is not conserved. One way to identify most of the CBPs in the Arabidopsis genome is by protein-protein interaction-based screening of expression libraries with CaM. Here, using a mixture of radiolabeled CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis, we screened several expression libraries prepared from flower meristem, seedlings, or tissues treated with hormones, an elicitor, or a pathogen. Sequence analysis of 77 positive clones that interact with CaM in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner revealed 20 CBPs, including 14 previously unknown CBPs. In addition, by searching the Arabidopsis genome sequence with the newly identified and known plant or animal CBPs, we identified a total of 27 CBPs. Among these, 16 CBPs are represented by families with 2-20 members in each family. Gene expression analysis revealed that CBPs and CBP paralogs are expressed differentially. Our data suggest that Arabidopsis has a large number of CBPs including several plant-specific ones. Although CaM is highly conserved between plants and animals, only a few CBPs are common to both plants and animals. Analysis of Arabidopsis CBPs revealed the presence of a variety of interesting domains. Our analyses identified several hypothetical proteins in the Arabidopsis genome as CaM targets, suggesting their involvement in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling networks.

  11. New associations: INFG and TGFB1 genes and the inhibitor development in severe haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Alencar, J B; Macedo, L C; de Barros, M F; Rodrigues, C; Shinzato, A H; Pelissari, C B; Machado, J; Sell, A M; Visentainer, J E L

    2015-07-01

    The development of factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitor is the main complication of replacement therapy in patients with haemophilia A (HA). A ratio of 5-7% of individuals HA develops antibodies (inhibitors) against the FVIII infused during the treatment, thereby reducing their pro-coagulant activity. The immunomodulatory cytokine genes have been related to the risk of development of alloantibodies in several studies, mainly in HA with severe form. We investigated the polymorphisms in regulatory regions of cytokine genes (IL1A, IL1B, IL1R, IL1RA, IL4RA, IL12, INFG, TGFB1, TNF, IL2, IL4, IL6, IL10) that could influence the risk of developing inhibitors in patients with severe HA. The genotyping of cytokine genes of 117 patients with HA was performed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) using the protocol recommended by the manufacturer (Invitrogen kit Cytokines(®) , Canoga Park, USA) RESULTS: From the cohort of 117 patients with severe HA, 35 developed inhibitors. There was a higher frequency of +874 T allele in INFG and of +869 TT and TG/TG in TGFB1 genes on patients with inhibitors. This suggests that polymorphisms in INFG and in TGFB1 genes are related to risk of developing inhibitor, and could contribute to a genetic profile of the individual HA for the risk of inhibitors development to FVIII. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Fluoride inhibition of Klebsiella aerogenes urease: mechanistic implications of a pseudo-uncompetitive, slow-binding inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, M J; Hausinger, R P

    2000-05-09

    Klebsiella aerogenes urease uses a dinuclear nickel active site to catalyze the hydrolysis of urea. Here, we describe the steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of urease inhibition by fluoride. Urease is slowly inhibited by fluoride in both the presence and absence of substrate. Steady-state rate studies yield parallel double-reciprocal plots; however, we show that fluoride interaction with urease is not compatible with classical uncompetitive inhibition. Rather, we propose that fluoride binds to an enzyme state (E) that is in equilibrium with resting enzyme (E) and produced during catalysis. Fluoride binding rates are directly proportional to inhibitor concentration. Substrate reduces both the rate of fluoride binding to urease and the rate of fluoride dissociation from the complex, consistent with urea binding to E and E.F in addition to E. Fluoride inhibition is pH-dependent due to a protonation event linked to fluoride dissociation. Fluoride binding is pH-independent, suggesting that fluoride anion, not HF, is the actual inhibitor. We assess the kinetic results in terms of the known protein crystal structure and evaluate possible molecular interpretations for the structure of the E state, the site of fluoride binding, and the factors associated with fluoride release. Finally, we note that the apparent uncompetitive inhibition by fluoride as reported for several other metalloenzymes may need to be reinterpreted in terms of fluoride interaction with the corresponding E states.

  13. An insulin-induced DNA-binding protein for the human growth hormone gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Prager, D; Gebremedhin, S; Melmed, S

    1990-01-01

    The control of gene transcription is usually mediated by transacting transcriptional factors that bind to upstream regulatory elements. As insulin regulates transcription of the growth hormone (GH) gene, we tested nuclear extracts from unstimulated and insulin-stimulated Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells for binding to four human GH (hGH) gene promoter oligonucleotide fragments identified as target-binding sequences by DNAse I footprinting. Using a mobility shift assay, an insulin-induced D...

  14. Response of Fatty Acid Synthesis Genes to the Binding of Human Salivary Amylase by Streptococcus gordonii

    OpenAIRE

    Nikitkova, Anna E.; Haase, Elaine M.; Vickerman, M. Margaret; Gill, Steven R.; Scannapieco, Frank A.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, an important primary colonizer of dental plaque biofilm, specifically binds to salivary amylase via the surface-associated amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). We hypothesized that a function of amylase binding to S. gordonii may be to modulate the expression of chromosomal genes, which could influence bacterial survival and persistence in the oral cavity. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis was performed to detect genes in S. gordonii strain CH1 that were di...

  15. Active site binding modes of inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase from docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addo, James K; Skaff, D Andrew; Miziorko, Henry M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial mevalonate diphosphate decarboxylase (MDD) is an attractive therapeutic target for antibacterial drug development. In this work, we discuss a combined docking and molecular dynamics strategy toward inhibitor binding to bacterial MDD. The docking parameters utilized in this study were first validated with observations for the inhibitors 6-fluoromevalonate diphosphate (FMVAPP) and diphosphoglycolylproline (DPGP) using existing structures for the Staphylococcus epidermidis enzyme. The validated docking protocol was then used to predict structures of the inhibitors bound to Staphylococcus aureus MDD using the unliganded crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus MDD. We also investigated a possible interactions improvement by combining this docking method with molecular dynamics simulations. Thus, the predicted docking structures were analyzed in a molecular dynamics trajectory to generate dynamic models and reinforce the predicted binding modes. FMVAPP is predicted to make more extensive contacts with S. aureus MDD, forming stable hydrogen bonds with Arg144, Arg193, Lys21, Ser107, and Tyr18, as well as making stable hydrophobic interactions with Tyr18, Trp19, and Met196. The differences in predicted binding are supported by experimentally determined Ki values of 0.23 ± 0.02 and 34 ± 8 μM, for FMVAPP and DPGP, respectively. The structural information coupled with the kinetic characterization obtained from this study should be useful in defining the requirements for inhibition as well as in guiding the selection of active compounds for inhibitor optimization.

  16. Dual roles of F123 in protein homodimerization and inhibitor binding to biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Yap, Min Y; Perugini, Matthew A; Wallace, John C; Abell, Andrew D; Wilce, Matthew C J; Polyak, Steven W; Booker, Grant W

    2014-01-01

    Protein biotinylation is catalysed by biotin protein ligase (BPL). The most characterized BPL is from Escherichia coli where it functions as both a biotin ligase and a homodimeric transcriptional repressor. Here we investigated another bifunctional BPL from the clinically important Staphylococcus aureus (SaBPL). Unliganded SaBPL (apo) exists in a dimer-monomer equilibrium at low micromolar concentrations - a stark contrast to E. coli BPL (EcBPL) that is monomeric under the same conditions. EMSA and SAXS analysis demonstrated that dimeric apo SaBPL adopted a conformation that was competent to bind DNA and necessary for it to function as a transcription factor. The SaBPL dimer-monomer dissociation constant was 5.8-fold tighter when binding the inhibitor biotin acetylene, but unchanged with biotin. F123, located in the dimer interface, was critical for homodimerization. Inhibition studies together with surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed a strong correlation between inhibitor potency and slow dissociation kinetics. A 24-fold difference in Ki values for these two enzymes was explained by differences in enzyme:inhibitor dissociation rates. Substitution of F123 in SaBPL and its equivalent in EcBPL altered both inhibitor potency and dissociation. Hence, F123 in SaBPL has novel roles in both protein dimerization and ligand-binding that have not been reported in EcBPL.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of tryptophan hydroxylase-1: binding modes and free energy analysis to phenylalanine derivative inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hao; Huang, Wei; He, Gu; Peng, Cheng; Wu, Fengbo; Ouyang, Liang

    2013-05-10

    Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that modulates many central and peripheral functions. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) is a key enzyme of serotonin synthesis. In the current study, the interaction mechanism of phenylalanine derivative TPH1 inhibitors was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, free energy decomposition analysis and computational alanine scanning. The predicted binding free energies of these complexes are consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms indicates that although the van der Waals and electrostatics interaction contributions are important in distinguishing the binding affinities of these inhibitors, the electrostatic contribution plays a more crucial role in that. Moreover, it is observed that different configurations of the naphthalene substituent could form different binding patterns with protein, yet lead to similar inhibitory potency. The combination of different molecular modeling techniques is an efficient way to interpret the interaction mechanism of inhibitors and our work could provide valuable information for the TPH1 inhibitor design in the future.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Tryptophan Hydroxylase-1: Binding Modes and Free Energy Analysis to Phenylalanine Derivative Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ouyang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that modulates many central and peripheral functions. Tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1 is a key enzyme of serotonin synthesis. In the current study, the interaction mechanism of phenylalanine derivative TPH1 inhibitors was investigated using molecular dynamics (MD simulations, free energy calculations, free energy decomposition analysis and computational alanine scanning. The predicted binding free energies of these complexes are consistent with the experimental data. The analysis of the individual energy terms indicates that although the van der Waals and electrostatics interaction contributions are important in distinguishing the binding affinities of these inhibitors, the electrostatic contribution plays a more crucial role in that. Moreover, it is observed that different configurations of the naphthalene substituent could form different binding patterns with protein, yet lead to similar inhibitory potency. The combination of different molecular modeling techniques is an efficient way to interpret the interaction mechanism of inhibitors and our work could provide valuable information for the TPH1 inhibitor design in the future.

  19. Structure of a small-molecule inhibitor complexed with GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae reveals an allosteric binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mochalkin, Igor; Lightle, Sandra; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Bornemeier, Dirk; Melnick, Michael; VanderRoest, Steven; McDowell, Laura (Pfizer)

    2008-04-02

    N-Acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GlmU) is an essential enzyme in aminosugars metabolism and an attractive target for antibiotic drug discovery. GlmU catalyzes the formation of uridine-diphospho-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc), an important precursor in the peptidoglycan and lipopolisaccharide biosynthesis in both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Here we disclose a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of a synthetic small-molecule inhibitor of GlmU from Haemophilus influenzae (hiGlmU). The compound was identified through a high-throughput screening (HTS) configured to detect inhibitors that target the uridyltransferase active site of hiGlmU. The original HTS hit exhibited a modest micromolar potency (IC{sub 50} - 18 {mu}M in a racemic mixture) against hiGlmU and no activity against Staphylococcus aureus GlmU (saGlmU). The determined crystal structure indicated that the inhibitor occupies an allosteric site adjacent to the GlcNAc-1-P substrate-binding region. Analysis of the mechanistic model of the uridyltransferase reaction suggests that the binding of this allosteric inhibitor prevents structural rearrangements that are required for the enzymatic reaction, thus providing a basis for structure-guided design of a new class of mechanism-based inhibitors of GlmU.

  20. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Sun, Rong; Wu, Yuehong; Song, Mingzhu; Li, Jia; Yang, Qianye; Chen, Xiaoyi; Bao, Jinku; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-24

    The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  1. L1198F Mutation Resensitizes Crizotinib to ALK by Altering the Conformation of Inhibitor and ATP Binding Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC treatment with small molecule inhibitors is greatly challenged by acquired resistance. A recent study reported the newest generation inhibitor resistant mutation L1198F led to the resensitization to crizotinib, which is the first Food and Drug Administration (FDA approved drug for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC. It is of great importance to understand how this extremely rare event occurred for the purpose of overcoming the acquired resistance of such inhibitors. In this study, we exploited molecular dynamics (MD simulation to dissect the molecular mechanisms. Our MD results revealed that L1198F mutation of ALK resulted in the conformational change at the inhibitor site and altered the binding affinity of ALK to crizotinib and lorlatinib. L1198F mutation also affected the autoactivation of ALK as supported by the identification of His1124 and Tyr1278 as critical amino acids involved in ATP binding and phosphorylation. Our findings are valuable for designing more specific and potent inhibitors for the treatment of ALK-positive NSCLC and other types of cancer.

  2. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  3. Identification of a better Homo sapiens Class II HDAC inhibitor through binding energy calculations and descriptor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Wulandari, Evi Kristin

    2010-10-15

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the most common on sexually transmitted viruses in the world. HPVs are responsible for a large spectrum of deseases, both benign and malignant. The certain types of HPV are involved in the development of cervical cancer. In attemps to find additional drugs in the treatment of cervical cancer, inhibitors of the histone deacetylases (HDAC) have received much attention due to their low cytotoxic profiles and the E6/E7 oncogene function of human papilomavirus can be completely by passed by HDAC inhibition. The histone deacetylase inhibitors can induce growth arrest, differentiation and apoptosis of cancer cells. HDAC class I and class II are considered the main targets for cancer. Therefore, the six HDACs class II was modeled and about two inhibitors (SAHA and TSA) were docked using AutoDock4.2, to each of the inhibitor in order to identify the pharmacological properties. Based on the results of docking, SAHA and TSA were able to bind with zinc ion in HDACs models as a drug target. SAHA was satisfied almost all the properties i.e., binding affinity, the Drug-Likeness value and Drug Score with 70% oral bioavailability and the carbonyl group of these compound fits well into the active site of the target where the zinc is present. Hence, SAHA could be developed as potential inhibitors of class II HDACs and valuable cervical cancer drug candidate.

  4. KIT mutations confer a distinct gene expression signature in core binding factor leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Sonja C; Russ, Annika C; Du, Juan; Gaidzik, Verena; Schlenk, Richard F; Pollack, Jonathan R; Döhner, Konstanze; Döhner, Hartmut; Bullinger, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Core binding factor (CBF) leukaemias, characterized by either inv(16)(p13.1q22) or t(8;21)(q22;q22), constitute acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) subgroups with favourable prognosis. However, 40-50% of patients relapse, emphasizing the need for risk-adapted treatment approaches. In this regard, studying secondary genetic aberrations, such as mutations of the KIT gene, is of great interest, particularly as they can be targeted by receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). However, so far little is known about the biology underlying KIT-mutated CBF leukaemias. We analysed gene expression profiles of 83 CBF AML cases with known KIT mutation status in order to gain novel insights in KIT-mutated CBF pathogenesis. KIT-mutated cases were characterized by deregulation of genes belonging to the NFkB signalling complex suggesting impaired control of apoptosis. Notably, a subgroup of KIT wildtype cases was also characterized by the KIT mutation signature due to yet unknown aberrations. Our data suggest that this CBF leukaemia subgroup might profit from TKI therapy, however, the relevance of the KIT mutation-associated signature remains to be validated prior to clinical implementation. Nevertheless, the existence of such a signature supports the notion of relevant biological differences in CBF leukaemia and might serve as diagnostic tool in the future.

  5. Identification of berberine as a direct thrombin inhibitor from traditional Chinese medicine through structural, functional and binding studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Zhang, Yuxin; Yang, Ying; Wu, Xia; Fan, Hantian; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2017-03-01

    Thrombin acts as a key enzyme in the blood coagulation cascade and represents a potential drug target for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study was to identify small-molecule direct thrombin inhibitors from herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). A pharmacophore model and molecular docking were utilized to virtually screen a library of chemicals contained in compositions of traditional Chinese herbs, and these analyses were followed by in vitro bioassay validation and binding studies. Berberine (BBR) was first confirmed as a thrombin inhibitor using an enzymatic assay. The BBR IC50 value for thrombin inhibition was 2.92 μM. Direct binding studies using surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that BBR directly interacted with thrombin with a KD value of 16.39 μM. Competitive binding assay indicated that BBR could bind to the same argartroban/thrombin interaction site. A platelet aggregation assay demonstrated that BBR had the ability to inhibit thrombin-induced platelet aggregation in washed platelets samples. This study proved that BBR is a direct thrombin inhibitor that has activity in inhibiting thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. BBR may be a potential candidate for the development of safe and effective thrombin-inhibiting drugs.

  6. Differential effects of histone deacetylase inhibitors on phorbol ester- and TGF-beta1 induced murine tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David A; Billingham, Olivia; Sampieri, Clara L; Edwards, Dylan R; Clark, Ian M

    2005-04-01

    Expression of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (Timp-1) gene can be induced by either phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1), although the signalling pathways involved are not clearly defined. Canonically, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) such as trichostatin A (TSA) or sodium butyrate (NaB) increase total cellular histone acetylation and activate expression of susceptible genes. Remarkably, PMA and TGF-beta1 stimulation of Timp-1 show a differential response to TSA or NaB. TSA or NaB potentiate PMA-induced Timp-1 expression but repress TGF-beta1-induced Timp-1 expression. The repression of TGF-beta1-induced Timp-1 by TSA was maximal at 5 ng.mL(-1), while for the superinduction of PMA-induced Timp-1 expression, the maximal dose is > 500 ng x mL(-1) TSA. A further HDACi, valproic acid, did not block TGF-beta1-induced Timp-1 expression, demonstrating that different HDACs impact on the induction of Timp-1. For either PMA or TGF-beta1 to induce Timp-1 expression, new protein synthesis is required, and the induction of AP-1 factors closely precedes that of Timp-1. The effects of the HDACi can be reiterated in transient transfection using Timp-1 promoter constructs. Mutation or deletion of the AP-1 motif (-59/-53) in the Timp-1 promoter diminishes PMA-induction of reporter constructs, however, the further addition of TSA still superinduces the reporter. In c-Jun-/- cells, PMA still stimulates Timp-1 expression, but TSA superinduction is lost. Transfection of a series of Timp-1 promoter constructs identified three regions through which TSA superinduces PMA-induced Timp-1 and we have demonstrated specific protein binding to two of these regions which contain either an avian erythroblastosis virus E26 (v-ets) oncogene homologue (Ets) or Sp1 binding motif.

  7. Discovery of pyrrolidine-based β-secretase inhibitors: lead advancement through conformational design for maintenance of ligand binding efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, Shawn J; Steele, Thomas G; Petrocchi, Alessia; Haugabook, Sharie J; McGaughey, Georgia; Katharine Holloway, M; Allison, Timothy; Munshi, Sanjeev; Zuck, Paul; Colussi, Dennis; Tugasheva, Katherine; Wolfe, Abigail; Graham, Samuel L; Vacca, Joseph P

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a novel series of pyrrolidine derived BACE-1 inhibitors. The potency of the weak initial lead structure was enhanced using library-based SAR methods. The series was then further advanced by rational design while maintaining a minimal ligand binding efficiency threshold. Ultimately, the co-crystal structure was obtained revealing that these inhibitors interacted with the enzyme in a unique fashion. In all, the potency of the series was enhanced by 4 orders of magnitude from the HTS lead with concomitant increases in physical properties needed for series advancement. The progression of these developments in a systematic fashion is described.

  8. Non-hinge-binding pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines as potent B-Raf kinase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Dan M.; Torres, Nancy; Dutia, Minu; Powell, Dennis; Ciszewski, Greg; Gopalsamy, Ariamala; Levin, Jeremy I.; Kim, Kyung-Hee; Xu, Weixin; Wilhelm, James; Hu, YongBo; Collins, Karen; Feldberg, Larry; Kim, Steven; Frommer, Eileen; Wojciechowicz, Donald; Mallon, Robert; (Wyeth)

    2010-11-19

    As part of our research effort to discover B-Raf kinase inhibitors, we prepared a series of C-3 substituted N-(3-(pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-yl)phenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamides. X-ray crystallography studies revealed that one of the more potent inhibitors (10n) bound to B-Raf kinase without forming a hinge-binding hydrogen bond. With basic amine residues appended to C-3 aryl residues, cellular activity and solubility were enhanced over previously described compounds of this class.

  9. Comparative gene expression profiling of P. falciparum malaria parasites exposed to three different histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine T Andrews

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors are being intensively pursued as potential new drugs for a range of diseases, including malaria. HDAC inhibitors are also important tools for the study of epigenetic mechanisms, transcriptional control, and other important cellular processes. In this study the effects of three structurally related antimalarial HDAC inhibitors on P. falciparum malaria parasite gene expression were compared. The three hydroxamate-based compounds, trichostatin A (TSA, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat® and a 2-aminosuberic acid derivative (2-ASA-9, all caused profound transcriptional effects, with ~2-21% of genes having >2-fold altered expression following 2 h exposure to the compounds. Only two genes, alpha tubulin II and a hydrolase, were up-regulated by all three compounds after 2 h exposure in all biological replicates examined. The transcriptional changes observed after 2 h exposure to HDAC inhibitors were found to be largely transitory, with only 1-5% of genes being regulated after removing the compounds and culturing for a further 2 h. Despite some structural similarity, the three inhibitors caused quite diverse transcriptional effects, possibly reflecting subtle differences in mode of action or cellular distribution. This dataset represents an important contribution to our understanding of how HDAC inhibitors act on malaria parasites and identifies alpha tubulin II as a potential transcriptional marker of HDAC inhibition in malaria parasites that may be able to be exploited for future development of HDAC inhibitors as new antimalarial agents.

  10. An induced pocket for the binding of potent fusion inhibitor CL-385319 with H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin.

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    Runming Li

    Full Text Available The influenza glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA plays crucial roles in the early stage of virus infection, including receptor binding and membrane fusion. Therefore, HA is a potential target for developing anti-influenza drugs. Recently, we characterized a novel inhibitor of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, CL-385319, which specifically inhibits HA-mediated viral entry. Studies presented here identified the critical binding residues for CL-385319, which clustered in the stem region of the HA trimer by site-directed mutagenesis. Extensive computational simulations, including molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations, molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM_GBSA calculations, charge density and Laplacian calculations, have been carried out to uncover the detailed molecular mechanism that underlies the binding of CL-385319 to H5N1 influenza virus HA. It was found that the recognition and binding of CL-385319 to HA proceeds by a process of "induced fit" whereby the binding pocket is formed during their interaction. Occupation of this pocket by CL-385319 stabilizes the neutral pH structure of hemagglutinin, thus inhibiting the conformational rearrangements required for membrane fusion. This "induced fit" pocket may be a target for structure-based design of more potent influenza fusion inhibitors.

  11. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  12. Ab initio molecular simulations for proposing novel peptide inhibitors blocking the ligand-binding pocket of urokinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Tatsuroh; Sugimoto, Takuya; Kasumi, Tomoyo; Araki, Kohta; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2014-06-01

    Recent biochemical experiments have revealed that a variety of proteases play important roles in cancer invasion and metastasis. Among these proteases, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) is particularly important, since its specific binding to the receptor (uPAR) existing on the surface of a cancer cell is considered to be a trigger for cancer invasion. It is thus expected that the blocking of the binding can inhibit cancer invasion in the cancer patients and improve their prognosis dramatically. To develop a potent inhibitor for the binding, many types of peptides of amino acids were produced and their effect on the cancer invasion was investigated in the previous biochemical experiments. On the other hand, our previous ab initio molecular simulations have clarified that some amino acid residues of uPA play important roles in the specific binding between uPA and uPAR. In the present study, we propose some peptides composed of these important residues and investigate the specific interactions and the binding affinity between uPAR and the peptides at an electronic level, using ab initio molecular simulations. Base on the results simulated, we elucidate which peptide can bind more strongly to uPAR and propose a novel potent peptide which can inhibit the binding between uPAR and uPA efficiently.

  13. Examination of the Addictive and Behavioral Properties of Fatty Acid Binding Protein Inhibitor SBFI26

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    Panayotis eThanos

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:The therapeutic properties of cannabinoids have been well demonstrated but are overshadowed by such adverse effects as cognitive and motor dysfunction, as well as their potential for addiction. Recent research on the natural lipid ligands of cannabinoid receptors, also known as endocannabinoids, have shed light on the mechanisms of intracellular transport of the endocannabinoid anandamide by fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. These findings facilitated the recent development of SBFI26, a pharmacological inhibitor of epidermal- and brain-specific FABP5 and FABP7, which effectively increases anandamide signaling. The goal of this study was to examine this compound for any possible rewarding and addictive properties as well as effects on locomotor activity, working / recognition memory, and propensity for sociability and preference for social novelty given its recently reported anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Male C57BL mice were split into four treatment groups and conditioned with 5.0 mg/kg, 20.0 mg/kg, 40.0 mg/kg SBFI26 or vehicle during a conditioned placed preference (CPP paradigm. Following CPP, mice underwent a battery of behavioral tests (open field, novel object recognition (NOR, and social interaction (SI and novelty (SN paired with acute SBFI26 administration. Results showed that SBFI26 did not produce conditioned placed preference or conditioned place aversion regardless of dose, and did not induce any differences in locomotor and exploratory activity during CPP or SBFI26-paired open field activity. We also observed no differences between treatment groups in NOR, SI, and SN. In conclusion, as SBFI26 was shown previously by our group to have significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties, here we show that it does not pose a risk of dependence or motor and cognitive impairment under the conditions tested.

  14. Heparin-binding Hemagglutinin of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is an Inhibitor of Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qing; Li, Zhi; Zhou, Shan; Zhang, Qian; Zhou, Lei; Fu, Xiaorui; Yang, Liu; Ma, Yueyun; Hao, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Airway epithelial cell is often the initial site of attack by pathogens, and cell death is commonly caused by internalization of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, the mechanism of interaction between epithelial cells and Mtb is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the role of the heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) protein of Mtb in the function of epithelial cells. In particular, the autophagy of A549 cells was determined based on microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 alpha (LC3) activity. Autophagosome formation was detected by Monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining and immune fluorescence staining of LC3. Autophagy could be significantly suppressed by HBHA protein. In addition, the LDH assay results showed that HBHA treatment could induce death on A549 cells. To explore the form of cell death, we detected the activity of caspase-3 and LDH release of A549 cells in the presence or absence of caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Results demonstrated that HBHA treatment could induce apoptosis of A549 cells. To further confirm these results, we constructed the recombinant Mycobacterium smegmatis (MS) expressing HBHA (rMS-HBHA) and explored the influence of rMS-HBHA on the function of A549 cells. rMS-HBHA infection significantly inhibited LC3 expression and the maturation of autophagosomes in A549 cells. Subsequently, we infected A549 cells with MS and detected the viability of intracellular MS by CFU counts. rMS-HBHA showed higher survival and replication capacity in A549 cells than those of the wild-type MS. Finally, infection of A549 cells with rMS-HBHA caused further apoptosis. These findings suggested that rMS-HBHA could inhibit autophagy, promote its survival and replication within A549 cells, and subsequently induce apoptosis on infected cells to facilitate infection.

  15. A matrix-focused structure-activity and binding site flexibility study of quinolinol inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrell, William A; Vieira, Rebecca C; Ensel, Susan M; Montgomery, Vicki; Guernieri, Rebecca; Eccard, Vanessa S; Campbell, Yvette; Roxas-Duncan, Virginia; Cardellina, John H; Webb, Robert P; Smith, Leonard A

    2017-02-01

    Our initial discovery of 8-hydroxyquinoline inhibitors of BoNT/A and separation/testing of enantiomers of one of the more active leads indicated considerable flexibility in the binding site. We designed a limited study to investigate this flexibility and probe structure-activity relationships; utilizing the Betti reaction, a 36 compound matrix of quinolinol BoNT/A LC inhibitors was developed using three 8-hydroxyquinolines, three heteroaromatic amines, and four substituted benzaldehydes. This study has revealed some of the most effective quinolinol-based BoNT/A inhibitors to date, with 7 compounds displaying IC50 values ⩽1μM and 11 effective at ⩽2μM in an ex vivo assay.

  16. Discovery, SAR, and X-ray Binding Mode Study of BCATm Inhibitors from a Novel DNA-Encoded Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongfeng; Zhou, Jingye; Sundersingh, Flora S; Summerfield, Jennifer; Somers, Don; Messer, Jeffrey A; Satz, Alexander L; Ancellin, Nicolas; Arico-Muendel, Christopher C; Sargent Bedard, Katie L; Beljean, Arthur; Belyanskaya, Svetlana L; Bingham, Ryan; Smith, Sarah E; Boursier, Eric; Carter, Paul; Centrella, Paolo A; Clark, Matthew A; Chung, Chun-Wa; Davie, Christopher P; Delorey, Jennifer L; Ding, Yun; Franklin, G Joseph; Grady, LaShadric C; Herry, Kenny; Hobbs, Clare; Kollmann, Christopher S; Morgan, Barry A; Pothier Kaushansky, Laura J; Zhou, Quan

    2015-08-13

    As a potential target for obesity, human BCATm was screened against more than 14 billion DNA encoded compounds of distinct scaffolds followed by off-DNA synthesis and activity confirmation. As a consequence, several series of BCATm inhibitors were discovered. One representative compound (R)-3-((1-(5-bromothiophene-2-carbonyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl)oxy)-N-methyl-2'-(methylsulfonamido)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide (15e) from a novel compound library synthesized via on-DNA Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling showed BCATm inhibitory activity with IC50 = 2.0 μM. A protein crystal structure of 15e revealed that it binds to BCATm within the catalytic site adjacent to the PLP cofactor. The identification of this novel inhibitor series plus the establishment of a BCATm protein structure provided a good starting point for future structure-based discovery of BCATm inhibitors.

  17. In silico investigation of new binding pocket for mitogen activated kinase kinase (MEK): Development of new promising inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yari, Hamed; Ganjalikhany, Mohamad Reza; Sadegh, Hamidreza

    2015-12-01

    It has been previously shown that the inhibition of mitogen activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) contributes to apoptosis and suppression of different cancer cells. Correspondingly, a number of MEK1/2 inhibitors have been designed and evaluated since 2001. However, they did not satisfy essential pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties thus, almost most of them were terminated in pre-clinical or clinical studies. This study aims to design new specific MEK1/2 inhibitors with improved PK/PD profiles to be used as alternative cancer medications. In first part of this study, a comprehensive screening, for the first time, was done on well-known MEK1/2 inhibitors using a number of computational programs such as AutoDock Tools 4.2 (ADT) and AutoDock Vina. Therefore a valuable training dataset as well as a reliable pharmacophore model were provided which were then used to design new inhibitors. According to the results of training dataset, Trametinib was determined as the best inhibitor provided, so far. So, Trametinib was used as the lead structure to design new inhibitors in this study. In second part of this investigation, a set of new allosteric MEK1/2 inhibitors were designed significantly improving the binding energy as well as the ADMET properties, suggesting more specific and stable ligand-receptor complexes. Consequently, the structures 14 and 15 of our inhibitors, as the most potent structures, are great substituents for Trametinib to be used and evaluated in clinical trials as alternative cancer drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro resistance selections for Plasmodium falciparum dihydroorotate dehydrogenase inhibitors give mutants with multiple point mutations in the drug-binding site and altered growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Leila S; Gamo, Francisco Javier; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria José; Singh, Onkar M P; Rowland, Paul; Wiegand, Roger C; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-06-27

    Malaria is a preventable and treatable disease; yet half of the world's population lives at risk of infection, and an estimated 660,000 people die of malaria-related causes every year. Rising drug resistance threatens to make malaria untreatable, necessitating both the discovery of new antimalarial agents and the development of strategies to identify and suppress the emergence and spread of drug resistance. We focused on in-development dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitors. Characterizing resistance pathways for antimalarial agents not yet in clinical use will increase our understanding of the potential for resistance. We identified resistance mechanisms of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) DHODH inhibitors via in vitro resistance selections. We found 11 point mutations in the PfDHODH target. Target gene amplification and unknown mechanisms also contributed to resistance, albeit to a lesser extent. These mutant parasites were often hypersensitive to other PfDHODH inhibitors, which immediately suggested a novel combination therapy approach to preventing resistance. Indeed, a combination of wild-type and mutant-type selective inhibitors led to resistance far less often than either drug alone. The effects of point mutations in PfDHODH were corroborated with purified recombinant wild-type and mutant-type PfDHODH proteins, which showed the same trends in drug response as the cognate cell lines. Comparative growth assays demonstrated that two mutant parasites grew less robustly than their wild-type parent, and the purified protein of those mutants showed a decrease in catalytic efficiency, thereby suggesting a reason for the diminished growth rate. Co-crystallography of PfDHODH with three inhibitors suggested that hydrophobic interactions are important for drug binding and selectivity.

  19. Comparisons of Prostate Cancer Inhibitors Abiraterone and TOK-001 Binding with CYP17A1 through Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2015-01-01

    However, biology-driven inhibitor development of prostate cancer is poorly elucidated. The aims of this study are to address structural differences at atomic-level between CYP17A1 and inhibitors i.e., abiraterone and TOK-001, and further investigate the effect of point mutation of CYP17A1 on the active site stability and the local interactions that are hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding throughout molecular dynamics (MD simulation. After performing multiple comparisons among four different complexes across CYP17A1 and inhibitors, interestingly TOK-001 oriented toward the active pocket and formed larger volume with I-helix of CYP17A1 than abiraterone, whereas abiraterone showed tighter binding and more active site stability. Considering on the effect of hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding between abiraterone and CYP17A1, the key residues of Phe114, Ile371, Val482, and Asn202 were identified. This contributes into tight binding interactions; however abiraterone is effectively weakened along with the global conformation mobility increased in A105L mutation. Surprisingly, overall conformation of the CYP17A1 remained stable when bound to TOK-001. This basic knowledge can guide future experiments on design of efficient inhibitors for CYP17A1, which provides theoretical basis of androgen-dependent disease therapy.

  20. Molecular modeling study on the allosteric inhibition mechanism of HIV-1 integrase by LEDGF/p75 binding site inhibitors.

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    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HIV-1 integrase (IN is essential for the integration of viral DNA into the host genome and an attractive therapeutic target for developing antiretroviral inhibitors. LEDGINs are a class of allosteric inhibitors targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site of HIV-1 IN. Yet, the detailed binding mode and allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs to HIV-1 IN is only partially understood, which hinders the structure-based design of more potent anti-HIV agents. A molecular modeling study combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy calculation were performed to investigate the interaction details of HIV-1 IN catalytic core domain (CCD with two recently discovered LEDGINs BI-1001 and CX14442, as well as the LEDGF/p75 protein. Simulation results demonstrated the hydrophobic domain of BI-1001 and CX14442 engages one subunit of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer through hydrophobic interactions, and the hydrophilic group forms hydrogen bonds with HIV-1 IN CCD residues from other subunit. CX14442 has a larger tert-butyl group than the methyl of BI-1001, and forms better interactions with the highly hydrophobic binding pocket of HIV-1 IN CCD dimer interface, which can explain the stronger affinity of CX14442 than BI-1001. Analysis of the binding mode of LEDGF/p75 with HIV-1 IN CCD reveals that the LEDGF/p75 integrase binding domain residues Ile365, Asp366, Phe406 and Val408 have significant contributions to the binding of the LEDGF/p75 to HIV1-IN. Remarkably, we found that binding of BI-1001 and CX14442 to HIV-1 IN CCD induced the structural rearrangements of the 140 s loop and oration displacements of the side chains of the three conserved catalytic residues Asp64, Asp116, and Glu152 located at the active site. These results we obtained will be valuable not only for understanding the allosteric inhibition mechanism of LEDGINs but also for the rational design of allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN targeting LEDGF/p75 binding site.

  1. Irreversible inhibitors of the 3C protease of Coxsackie virus through templated assembly of protein-binding fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Daniel; Kaczmarska, Zuzanna; Arkona, Christoph; Schulz, Robert; Tauber, Carolin; Wolber, Gerhard; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Coll, Miquel; Rademann, Jörg

    2016-09-01

    Small-molecule fragments binding to biomacromolecules can be starting points for the development of drugs, but are often difficult to detect due to low affinities. Here we present a strategy that identifies protein-binding fragments through their potential to induce the target-guided formation of covalently bound, irreversible enzyme inhibitors. A protein-binding nucleophile reacts reversibly with a bis-electrophilic warhead, thereby positioning the second electrophile in close proximity of the active site of a viral protease, resulting in the covalent de-activation of the enzyme. The concept is implemented for Coxsackie virus B3 3C protease, a pharmacological target against enteroviral infections. Using an aldehyde-epoxide as bis-electrophile, active fragment combinations are validated through measuring the protein inactivation rate and by detecting covalent protein modification in mass spectrometry. The structure of one enzyme-inhibitor complex is determined by X-ray crystallography. The presented warhead activation assay provides potent non-peptidic, broad-spectrum inhibitors of enteroviral proteases.

  2. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  3. Variations in the binding pocket of an inhibitor of the bacterial division protein FtsZ across genotypes and species.

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    Amanda Miguel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent increase in antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria calls for new approaches to drug-target selection and drug development. Targeting the mechanisms of action of proteins involved in bacterial cell division bypasses problems associated with increasingly ineffective variants of older antibiotics; to this end, the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ is a promising target. Recent work on its allosteric inhibitor, PC190723, revealed in vitro activity on Staphylococcus aureus FtsZ and in vivo antimicrobial activities. However, the mechanism of drug action and its effect on FtsZ in other bacterial species are unclear. Here, we examine the structural environment of the PC190723 binding pocket using PocketFEATURE, a statistical method that scores the similarity between pairs of small-molecule binding sites based on 3D structure information about the local microenvironment, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations. We observed that species and nucleotide-binding state have significant impacts on the structural properties of the binding site, with substantially disparate microenvironments for bacterial species not from the Staphylococcus genus. Based on PocketFEATURE analysis of MD simulations of S. aureus FtsZ bound to GTP or with mutations that are known to confer PC190723 resistance, we predict that PC190723 strongly prefers to bind Staphylococcus FtsZ in the nucleotide-bound state. Furthermore, MD simulations of an FtsZ dimer indicated that polymerization may enhance PC190723 binding. Taken together, our results demonstrate that a drug-binding pocket can vary significantly across species, genetic perturbations, and in different polymerization states, yielding important information for the further development of FtsZ inhibitors.

  4. Impact of recombination on polymorphism of genes encoding Kunitz-type protease inhibitors in the genus Solanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speranskaya, Anna S; Krinitsina, Anastasia A; Kudryavtseva, Anna V; Poltronieri, Palmiro; Santino, Angelo; Oparina, Nina Y; Dmitriev, Alexey A; Belenikin, Maxim S; Guseva, Marina A; Shevelev, Alexei B

    2012-08-01

    The group of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors (KPI) from potato is encoded by a polymorphic family of multiple allelic and non-allelic genes. The previous explanations of the KPI variability were based on the hypothesis of random mutagenesis as a key factor of KPI polymorphism. KPI-A genes from the genomes of Solanum tuberosum cv. Istrinskii and the wild species Solanum palustre were amplified by PCR with subsequent cloning in plasmids. True KPI sequences were derived from comparison of the cloned copies. "Hot spots" of recombination in KPI genes were independently identified by DnaSP 4.0 and TOPALi v2.5 software. The KPI-A sequence from potato cv. Istrinskii was found to be 100% identical to the gene from Solanum nigrum. This fact illustrates a high degree of similarity of KPI genes in the genus Solanum. Pairwise comparison of KPI A and B genes unambiguously showed a non-uniform extent of polymorphism at different nt positions. Moreover, the occurrence of substitutions was not random along the strand. Taken together, these facts contradict the traditional hypothesis of random mutagenesis as a principal source of KPI gene polymorphism. The experimentally found mosaic structure of KPI genes in both plants studied is consistent with the hypothesis suggesting recombination of ancestral genes. The same mechanism was proposed earlier for other resistance-conferring genes in the nightshade family (Solanaceae). Based on the data obtained, we searched for potential motifs of site-specific binding with plant DNA recombinases. During this work, we analyzed the sequencing data reported by the Potato Genome Sequencing Consortium (PGSC), 2011 and found considerable inconsistence of their data concerning the number, location, and orientation of KPI genes of groups A and B. The key role of recombination rather than random point mutagenesis in KPI polymorphism was demonstrated for the first time. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Inhibitors of Fatty Acid Synthesis Induce PPAR α -Regulated Fatty Acid β -Oxidative Genes: Synergistic Roles of L-FABP and Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Petrescu, Anca D; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    While TOFA (acetyl CoA carboxylase inhibitor) and C75 (fatty acid synthase inhibitor) prevent lipid accumulation by inhibiting fatty acid synthesis, the mechanism of action is not simply accounted for by inhibition of the enzymes alone. Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), a mediator of long chain fatty acid signaling to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- α (PPAR α ) in the nucleus, was found to bind TOFA and its activated CoA thioester, TOFyl-CoA, with high affinity while binding C75 and C75-CoA with lower affinity. Binding of TOFA and C75-CoA significantly altered L-FABP secondary structure. High (20 mM) but not physiological (6 mM) glucose conferred on both TOFA and C75 the ability to induce PPAR α transcription of the fatty acid β -oxidative enzymes CPT1A, CPT2, and ACOX1 in cultured primary hepatocytes from wild-type (WT) mice. However, L-FABP gene ablation abolished the effects of TOFA and C75 in the context of high glucose. These effects were not associated with an increased cellular level of unesterified fatty acids but rather by increased intracellular glucose. These findings suggested that L-FABP may function as an intracellular fatty acid synthesis inhibitor binding protein facilitating TOFA and C75-mediated induction of PPAR α in the context of high glucose at levels similar to those in uncontrolled diabetes.

  6. Protein C inhibitor (PCI) binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Daniela; Assinger, Alice; Einfinger, Katrin; Sokolikova, Barbora; Geiger, Margarethe

    2014-01-01

    Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS) is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells). PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  7. Protein C inhibitor (PCI binds to phosphatidylserine exposing cells with implications in the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and activated platelets.

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    Daniela Rieger

    Full Text Available Protein C Inhibitor (PCI is a secreted serine protease inhibitor, belonging to the family of serpins. In addition to activated protein C PCI inactivates several other proteases of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems, suggesting a regulatory role in hemostasis. Glycosaminoglycans and certain negatively charged phospholipids, like phosphatidylserine, bind to PCI and modulate its activity. Phosphatidylerine (PS is exposed on the surface of apoptotic cells and known as a phagocytosis marker. We hypothesized that PCI might bind to PS exposed on apoptotic cells and thereby influence their removal by phagocytosis. Using Jurkat T-lymphocytes and U937 myeloid cells, we show here that PCI binds to apoptotic cells to a similar extent at the same sites as Annexin V, but in a different manner as compared to live cells (defined spots on ∼10-30% of cells. PCI dose dependently decreased phagocytosis of apoptotic Jurkat cells by U937 macrophages. Moreover, the phagocytosis of PS exposing, activated platelets by human blood derived monocytes declined in the presence of PCI. In U937 cells the expression of PCI as well as the surface binding of PCI increased with time of phorbol ester treatment/macrophage differentiation. The results of this study suggest a role of PCI not only for the function and/or maturation of macrophages, but also as a negative regulator of apoptotic cell and activated platelets removal.

  8. Discovery of New E-Selectin Inhibitors by Virtual Screening, Fluorescence Binding Assays, and STD NMR Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Pabla A; Jiménez, Verónica A; Gavin, José A; Daranas, Antonio H; Alderete, Joel B

    2016-05-06

    E-selectin is an endothelial protein that participates in the adhesion of metastatic cancer cells, and is therefore a relevant target for antitumor therapeutic intervention. In this work, virtual screening was used to identify new E-selectin inhibitors from a subset of drug-like molecules retrieved from the ZINC database, including the physiological ligand sLe(x) as reference structure (PDB ID: 1G1T). Four hits were chosen and subjected to molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence binding assays, which led to the determination of experimental dissociation constants between 333 and 1012 μm. The candidate with the highest affinity was studied by saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR experiments and complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix analysis of saturation transfer (CORCEMA-ST), aimed at identifying the preferable binding mode with E-selectin. Our results revealed that this new inhibitor binds more strongly than sLe(x) in the E-selectin binding site, in good agreement with simulation predictions. These properties will prove valuable for the future design of drugs that target E-selectin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaneta Odrowaz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  10. Application of robotics to steady state enzyme kinetics: analysis of tight-binding inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aiying; Huang, Yanting; Taunk, Prakash; Magnin, David R; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Robertson, James G

    2003-10-15

    Using available commercial robotics and instrumentation, we developed a fully automated and rigorous steady state enzyme kinetic assay for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV; E.C. 3.4.14.5). The automated assay was validated with isoleucyl thiazolidide, a potent inhibitor of DPP IV with K(is)=110nM. Signal window analysis indicated that the assay had a 98% probability of detecting an inhibitor yielding 15% inhibition, with a predicted false positive rate of 0.13%. A mechanistic inhibition version of the automated assay was validated with isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide, a very potent inhibitor of DPP IV. Isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide was a competitive inhibitor of purified porcine DPP IV with K(is)=1 nM. Similar K(is) values were obtained for purified rat DPP IV and for DPP IV activity in human plasma from normal and diabetic donors. The pH dependence of K(is) for isoleucyl 4-cyanothiazolidide yielded a bell-shaped profile, with pK(a)=5.0 and pK(b)=7.6. To date, over 100,000 data points have been generated in profiling targeted compound libraries and in the analysis of tight-binding inhibitors of DPP IV. The data also show that robotic analysis is capable of producing full mechanistic inhibition analysis in a timely fashion to support drug discovery.

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of boronic acids as inhibitors of Penicillin Binding Proteins of classes A, B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervosen, Astrid; Bouillez, André; Herman, Alexandre; Amoroso, Ana; Joris, Bernard; Sauvage, Eric; Charlier, Paulette; Luxen, André

    2012-06-15

    In response to the widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics bacteria have evolved drug resistance mechanisms that include the production of resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs). Boronic acids are potent β-lactamase inhibitors and have been shown to display some specificity for soluble transpeptidases and PBPs, but their potential as inhibitors of the latter enzymes is yet to be widely explored. Recently, a (2,6-dimethoxybenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as being a potent inhibitor of Actinomadura sp. R39 transpeptidase (IC(50): 1.3 μM). In this work, we synthesized and studied the potential of a number of acylaminomethylboronic acids as inhibitors of PBPs from different classes. Several derivatives inhibited PBPs of classes A, B and C from penicillin sensitive strains. The (2-nitrobenzamido)methylboronic acid was identified as a good inhibitor of a class A PBP (PBP1b from Streptococcus pneumoniae, IC(50) = 26 μM), a class B PBP (PBP2xR6 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, IC(50) = 138 μM) and a class C PBP (R39 from Actinomadura sp., IC(50) = 0.6 μM). This work opens new avenues towards the development of molecules that inhibit PBPs, and eventually display bactericidal effects, on distinct bacterial species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase attenuates inhibitor development in gene-therapy-treated hemophilia A mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Liu, H; Mah, C; Fletcher, B S

    2009-06-01

    A serious impediment to gene and protein replacement therapy in hemophilia A is the development of inhibitors. Mechanisms responsible for inhibitor development include T-cell-dependent adaptive immune responses and the CD28-B7 signaling pathway that eventually leads to the formation of antibodies directed against factor VIII (FVIII). Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is a potent immunosuppressive enzyme that can inhibit T-cell responses and induce T-cell apoptosis by regulation of tryptophan metabolism. Kynurenine, one of the metabolites of tryptophan, has been implicated as an immune modulator. Here we hypothesize that co-delivery of the genes for FVIII and IDO can attenuate inhibitor formation. Using transposon-based gene delivery, we observed long-term therapeutic FVIII expression and significantly reduced inhibitor titers when the genes were co-delivered. Co-expression of FVIII and IDO in the liver was associated with increased plasma kynurenine levels, an inhibition of T-cell infiltration and increased apoptosis of T cells within the liver. These experiments suggest that modulation of tryptophan catabolism through IDO expression provides a novel strategy to reduce inhibitor development in hemophilia gene/protein therapy.

  13. The Mode of Inhibitor Binding to Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase: Binding Studies and Structure Determination of Unbound and Bound Peptidyl-tRNA Hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sanket; Singh, Nagendra; Yamini, Shavait; Singh, Avinash; Sinha, Mau; Arora, Ashish; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2013-01-01

    The incidences of infections caused by an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii are very common in hospital environments. It usually causes soft tissue infections including urinary tract infections and pneumonia. It is difficult to treat due to acquired resistance to available antibiotics is well known. In order to design specific inhibitors against one of the important enzymes, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii, we have determined its three-dimensional structure. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (AbPth) is involved in recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs which are produced in the cell as a result of premature termination of translation process. We have also determined the structures of two complexes of AbPth with cytidine and uridine. AbPth was cloned, expressed and crystallized in unbound and in two bound states with cytidine and uridine. The binding studies carried out using fluorescence spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance techniques revealed that both cytidine and uridine bound to AbPth at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes revealed that both ligands were located in the active site cleft of AbPth. The introduction of ligands to AbPth caused a significant widening of the entrance gate to the active site region and in the process of binding, it expelled several water molecules from the active site. As a result of interactions with protein atoms, the ligands caused conformational changes in several residues to attain the induced tight fittings. Such a binding capability of this protein makes it a versatile molecule for hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs having variable peptide sequences. These are the first studies that revealed the mode of inhibitor binding in Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases which will facilitate the structure based ligand design. PMID:23844024

  14. The mode of inhibitor binding to peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase: binding studies and structure determination of unbound and bound peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanket Kaushik

    Full Text Available The incidences of infections caused by an aerobic Gram-negative bacterium, Acinetobacter baumannii are very common in hospital environments. It usually causes soft tissue infections including urinary tract infections and pneumonia. It is difficult to treat due to acquired resistance to available antibiotics is well known. In order to design specific inhibitors against one of the important enzymes, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase from Acinetobacter baumannii, we have determined its three-dimensional structure. Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase (AbPth is involved in recycling of peptidyl-tRNAs which are produced in the cell as a result of premature termination of translation process. We have also determined the structures of two complexes of AbPth with cytidine and uridine. AbPth was cloned, expressed and crystallized in unbound and in two bound states with cytidine and uridine. The binding studies carried out using fluorescence spectroscopic and surface plasmon resonance techniques revealed that both cytidine and uridine bound to AbPth at nanomolar concentrations. The structure determinations of the complexes revealed that both ligands were located in the active site cleft of AbPth. The introduction of ligands to AbPth caused a significant widening of the entrance gate to the active site region and in the process of binding, it expelled several water molecules from the active site. As a result of interactions with protein atoms, the ligands caused conformational changes in several residues to attain the induced tight fittings. Such a binding capability of this protein makes it a versatile molecule for hydrolysis of peptidyl-tRNAs having variable peptide sequences. These are the first studies that revealed the mode of inhibitor binding in Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolases which will facilitate the structure based ligand design.

  15. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    at different levels. Gene Ontology analyses showed that FUS and EWS target genes preferentially encode proteins involved in regulatory processes at the RNA level. Conclusions The presented results yield new insights into gene interactions of EWS and FUS and have identified a set of FUS and EWS target genes...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  16. From Acute to Chronic Pancreatitis: The Role of Mutations in the Pancreatic Secretory Trypsin Inhibitor Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Hirota M; Kuwata K; Ohmuraya M; Ogawa M

    2003-01-01

    Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) is a potent natural inhibitor of trypsin. We proposed the hypothesis that, if the function of the PSTI is impaired by its genetic mutation, trypsin may easily promote autodigestion causing pancreatitis and we performed a mutational analysis of the PSTI gene in patients with pancreatitis. Two exonic mutations (N34S and R67C) were thought to be associated with a predisposition to pancreatitis. The N34S mutation was co-segregated with two intronic mu...

  17. Novel alleles among soybean Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor gene families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG YuePing; CHEN XiongTing; QIU LiJuan

    2008-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors have been found in various animals, plants and microorganisms. There were two types of trypsin inhibitors in soybean including Bowman-Birk protease inhibitors (BBI) and Kunitz in-hibitors (KTI). The different BBI genes from wild soybean (G.soja) and cultivated soybean (G max) formed a multigene family. We constructed a cDNA library of cultivar 'SuiNong 14' seed at the R7 growth stage using the SMART Kit. Seventeen contigs or singletons were highly homologous to soy-bean protease inhibitors. Contigs of 5, 35, 8 and 9 were highly homologous to BBI family members BBI-A1, BBI-A2, BBI-C and BBI-D, respectively. Sequence analyses showed there were novel allelic varia-tions among the 4 BBI members in SuiNong 14. Based on the comparison of soybean seed cDNA li-braries from different developmental stages, it was apparent that the expression of trypsin inhibitors increased during seed development in soybean. Phylogenetic analysis of BBI gene sequences among dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants demonstrated that these genes shared a common pro-genitor.

  18. Identification of a DNA binding protein that recognizes the nonamer recombinational signal sequence of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halligan, B D; Desiderio, S V

    1987-10-01

    Extracts of nuclei from B- and T-lymphoid cells contain a protein that binds specifically to the conserved nonamer DNA sequence within the recombinational signals of immunoglobulin genes. Complexes with DNA fragments from four kappa light-chain joining (J) segments have the same electrophoretic mobility. Nonamer-containing DNA fragments from heavy-chain and light-chain genes compete for binding. Within the 5'-flanking DNA of the J kappa 4 gene segment, the binding site has been localized to a 27-base-pair interval spanning the nonamer region. The binding activity is recovered as a single peak after ion-exchange chromatography. The site of binding of the protein and its presence in nuclei of lymphoid cells suggest that it may function in the assembly of immunoglobulin genes.

  19. Factor 8 (F8) gene mutation profile of Turkish hemophilia A patients with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidanci, Inanç D; Kavakli, Kaan; Uçar, Canan; Timur, Cetin; Meral, Adalet; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Sayilan, Hülya; Kazanci, Elif; Cağlayan, S Hande

    2008-07-01

    Factor VIII (FVIII) replacement therapy is ineffective in hemophilia A patients who develop alloantibodies (inhibitors) against FVIII. The type of factor 8 (F8) gene mutation, genes in the major histocompatibility complex loci, and also polymorphisms in IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha are the major predisposing factors for inhibitor formation. The present study was initiated to reveal the F8 gene mutation profile of 30 severely affected high-responder patients with inhibitor levels of more than 5 Bethesda U (BU)/ml and four low-responder patients with inhibitors less than 5 BU/ml. Southern blot and PCR analysis were performed to detect intron 22 and intron 1 inversions, respectively. Point mutations were screened by DNA sequence analysis of all coding regions, intron/exon boundaries, promoter and 3' UTR regions of the F8 gene. The prevalent mutation was the intron 22 inversion among the high-responder patients followed by large deletions, small deletions, and nonsense mutations. Only one missense and one splicing error mutation was seen. Among the low-responder patients, three single nucleotide deletions and one intron 22 inversion were found. All mutation types detected were in agreement with the severe hemophilia A phenotype, most likely leading to a deficiency of and predisposition to the development of alloantibodies against FVIII. It is seen that Turkish hemophilia A patients with major molecular defects have a higher possibility of developing inhibitors.

  20. Benzimidazole inhibitors of the protein kinase CHK2: Clarification of the binding mode by flexible side chain docking and protein–ligand crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijssen, Cornelis; Silva-Santisteban, M. Cris; Westwood, Isaac M.; Siddique, Samerene; Choi, Vanessa; Sheldrake, Peter; van Montfort, Rob L.M.; Blagg, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Two closely related binding modes have previously been proposed for the ATP-competitive benzimidazole class of checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) inhibitors; however, neither binding mode is entirely consistent with the reported SAR. Unconstrained rigid docking of benzimidazole ligands into representative CHK2 protein crystal structures reveals an alternative binding mode involving a water-mediated interaction with the hinge region; docking which incorporates protein side chain flexibility for selected residues in the ATP binding site resulted in a refinement of the water-mediated hinge binding mode that is consistent with observed SAR. The flexible docking results are in good agreement with the crystal structures of four exemplar benzimidazole ligands bound to CHK2 which unambiguously confirmed the binding mode of these inhibitors, including the water-mediated interaction with the hinge region, and which is significantly different from binding modes previously postulated in the literature. PMID:23058106

  1. Kinetic and structural insights into the binding of histone deacetylase 1 and 2 (HDAC1, 2) inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Florence F; Weïwer, Michel; Steinbacher, Stefan; Schomburg, Adrian; Reinemer, Peter; Gale, Jennifer P; Campbell, Arthur J; Fisher, Stewart L; Zhao, Wen-Ning; Reis, Surya A; Hennig, Krista M; Thomas, Méryl; Müller, Peter; Jefson, Martin R; Fass, Daniel M; Haggarty, Stephen J; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Holson, Edward B

    2016-09-15

    The structure-activity and structure-kinetic relationships of a series of novel and selective ortho-aminoanilide inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1 and 2 are described. Different kinetic and thermodynamic selectivity profiles were obtained by varying the moiety occupying an 11Å channel leading to the Zn(2+) catalytic pocket of HDACs 1 and 2, two paralogs with a high degree of structural similarity. The design of these novel inhibitors was informed by two ligand-bound crystal structures of truncated hHDAC2. BRD4884 and BRD7232 possess kinetic selectivity for HDAC1 versus HDAC2. We demonstrate that the binding kinetics of HDAC inhibitors can be tuned for individual isoforms in order to modulate target residence time while retaining functional activity and increased histone H4K12 and H3K9 acetylation in primary mouse neuronal cell culture assays. These chromatin modifiers, with tuned binding kinetic profiles, can be used to define the relation between target engagement requirements and the pharmacodynamic response of HDACs in different disease applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ADMET, Docking studies & binding energy calculations of some Novel ACE - inhibitors for the treatment of Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gade Deepak Reddy

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic Nephropathy (DN is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus, representing the leading of cause of chronic renal disease and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both type 1 and type 2 diabetic patients. The Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS has been implicated in the pathophysiology of DN, and suggests a therapeutic target for blocking this system. Therefore, inhibition of RAAS plays a crucial role in the treatment of DN and therapeutic intervention mostly involves administration of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors and angiotensin AT1 receptor blockers. In this current study, we have used computational methods to design 37 novel ACE-inhibitors and evaluated them for the interaction with the enzyme ACE through insilico analysis. The obtained results were compared with the standard drug enalapril to find out the potential inhibitors. Here we report that ligand 4 exhibited strongest inhibitory activity among all. All the analogs are also screened for their ADME & Toxicity profiles using insilico tools and ligand 9 is having better binding affinity next to ligand 4, and also having better ADMET profile when compared to that of ligand 4. Post docking calculations were also performed for the docked complexes in order to identify the individual ligand binding energies by employing Multi-Ligand Bimolecular Association with Energetics (Embrace

  3. De novo design of protein kinase inhibitors by in silico identification of hinge region-binding fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urich, Robert; Wishart, Grant; Kiczun, Michael; Richters, André; Tidten-Luksch, Naomi; Rauh, Daniel; Sherborne, Brad; Wyatt, Paul G; Brenk, Ruth

    2013-05-17

    Protein kinases constitute an attractive family of enzyme targets with high relevance to cell and disease biology. Small molecule inhibitors are powerful tools to dissect and elucidate the function of kinases in chemical biology research and to serve as potential starting points for drug discovery. However, the discovery and development of novel inhibitors remains challenging. Here, we describe a structure-based de novo design approach that generates novel, hinge-binding fragments that are synthetically feasible and can be elaborated to small molecule libraries. Starting from commercially available compounds, core fragments were extracted, filtered for pharmacophoric properties compatible with hinge-region binding, and docked into a panel of protein kinases. Fragments with a high consensus score were subsequently short-listed for synthesis. Application of this strategy led to a number of core fragments with no previously reported activity against kinases. Small libraries around the core fragments were synthesized, and representative compounds were tested against a large panel of protein kinases and subjected to co-crystallization experiments. Each of the tested compounds was active against at least one kinase, but not all kinases in the panel were inhibited. A number of compounds showed high ligand efficiencies for therapeutically relevant kinases; among them were MAPKAP-K3, SRPK1, SGK1, TAK1, and GCK for which only few inhibitors are reported in the literature.

  4. ANDROGEN REGULATION OF PROSTATIC STEROID BINDING PROTEIN GENE TRANSCRIPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGYong-Lian; ZHOUZong-Xun; ZHANGYou-Duan; PARKERMalcolmG

    1989-01-01

    Prostatic steroid binding protein (PSBP) is a major protein secreted in the rat ventral prostate (V.P.) and also one of the components in seminal fluid, The potential importance of this protein in male fertility emerged from its ability of binding cholesterol which might modulate the proportion of phospholipids and cholesterol in sperm making it suitable

  5. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors.

  6. Binding Energy Calculation of Patchouli Alcohol Isomer Cyclooxygenase Complexes Suggested as COX-1/COX-2 Selective Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sentot Joko Raharjo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the structural features that dictate the selectivity of the two isoforms of the prostaglandin H2 synthase (PGHS/COX, the three-dimensional (3D structure of COX-1/COX-2 was assessed by means of binding energy calculation of virtual molecular dynamic with using ligand alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomers. Molecular interaction studies with COX-1 and COX-2 were done using the molecular docking tools by Hex 8.0. Interactions were further visualized by using Discovery Studio Client 3.5 software tool. The binding energy of molecular interaction was calculated by AMBER12 and Virtual Molecular Dynamic 1.9.1 software. The analysis of the alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomer compounds showed that all alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomers were suggested as inhibitor of COX-1 and COX-2. Collectively, the scoring binding energy calculation (with PBSA Model Solvent of alpha-Patchouli alcohol isomer compounds (CID442384, CID6432585, CID3080622, CID10955174, and CID56928117 was suggested as candidate for a selective COX-1 inhibitor and CID521903 as nonselective COX-1/COX-2.

  7. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Adachi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014 [1]. As a result, we identified 539 proteins, including 178 novel ATP-binding protein candidates. We also established an ATPome selectivity profiling method for kinase inhibitors using our cataloged ATPome list. Normally only kinome selectivity is profiled in selectivity profiling of kinase inhibitors. In this data, we expand the profiled targets from the kinome to the ATPome through performance of ATPome selectivity profiling and obtained target profiles of staurosporine and (S-crizotinib. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Adachi et al., 2014 [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001200.

  8. 6-alkylsalicylates are selective Tip60 inhibitors and target the acetyl-CoA binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghizzoni, Massimo; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Tielong; Haisma, Hidde J.; Dekker, Frank J.; Zheng, Y. George

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases are important enzymes that regulate various cellular functions, such as epigenetic control of DNA transcription. Development of HAT inhibitors with high selectivity and potency will provide powerful mechanistic tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of HATs

  9. Identification of Genes Encoding the Folate- and Thiamine-Binding Membrane Proteins in Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Naponelli, Valeria; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding high-affinity folate- and thiamine-binding proteins (FolT, ThiT) were identified in the Lactobacillus casei genome, expressed in Lactococcus lactis, and functionally characterized. Similar genes occur in many Firmicutes, sometimes next to folate or thiamine salvage genes. Most thiT ge

  10. Identification of Genes Encoding the Folate- and Thiamine-Binding Membrane Proteins in Firmicutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Erkens, Guus B.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Naponelli, Valeria; Hanson, Andrew D.

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding high-affinity folate- and thiamine-binding proteins (FolT, ThiT) were identified in the Lactobacillus casei genome, expressed in Lactococcus lactis, and functionally characterized. Similar genes occur in many Firmicutes, sometimes next to folate or thiamine salvage genes. Most thiT ge

  11. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Albert T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1 is cleaved to p24 (CA and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR. Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors.

  12. The prototype HIV-1 maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, binds to the CA-SP1 cleavage site in immature Gag particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Bevirimat, the prototype Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) maturation inhibitor, is highly potent in cell culture and efficacious in HIV-1 infected patients. In contrast to inhibitors that target the active site of the viral protease, bevirimat specifically inhibits a single cleavage event, the final processing step for the Gag precursor where p25 (CA-SP1) is cleaved to p24 (CA) and SP1. Results In this study, photoaffinity analogs of bevirimat and mass spectrometry were employed to map the binding site of bevirimat to Gag within immature virus-like particles. Bevirimat analogs were found to crosslink to sequences overlapping, or proximal to, the CA-SP1 cleavage site, consistent with previous biochemical data on the effect of bevirimat on Gag processing and with genetic data from resistance mutations, in a region predicted by NMR and mutational studies to have α-helical character. Unexpectedly, a second region of interaction was found within the Major Homology Region (MHR). Extensive prior genetic evidence suggests that the MHR is critical for virus assembly. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of a direct interaction between the maturation inhibitor, bevirimat, and its target, Gag. Information gained from this study sheds light on the mechanisms by which the virus develops resistance to this class of drug and may aid in the design of next-generation maturation inhibitors. PMID:22151792

  13. Alpha-amylase inhibitor, CS-1036 binds to serum amylase in a concentration-dependent and saturable manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Tomohiro; Kaneno-Urasaki, Yoko; Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Takako; Matsushima, Nobuko; Okabe, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    (2R,3R,4R)-4-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidin-3-yl 4-O-(6-deoxy-β-D-glucopyranosyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (CS-1036), which is an α-amylase inhibitor, exhibited biphasic and sustained elimination with a long t1/2 (18.4-30.0 hours) in rats and monkeys, but exhibited a short t1/2 (3.7-7.9 hours) in humans. To clarify the species differences in the t1/2, the plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was evaluated by ultrafiltration. A concentration-dependent and saturable plasma protein binding of CS-1036 was observed in rats and monkeys with the dissociation rate constant (KD) of 8.95 and 27.2 nM, and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 52.8 and 22.1 nM, respectively. By the assessments of the recombinant amylase and immunoprecipitation, the major binding protein of CS-1036 in rats was identified as salivary amylase (KD 5.64 nM). CS-1036 also showed concentration-dependent and saturable binding to human salivary and pancreatic amylase, with similar binding affinity in rats. However, the protein binding of CS-1036 was constant in human plasma (≤10.2%) due to the lower serum amylase level compared with rats and monkeys. From the calculation of the unbound fraction (fu) in plasma based on in vitro KD and Bmax, the dose-dependent increase in fu after oral administration is speculated to lead to a dose-dependent increase in total body clearance and a high area under the curve/dose at lower doses, such as 0.3 mg/kg in rats.

  14. Acylguanidine inhibitors of beta-secretase: optimization of the pyrrole ring substituents extending into the S1' substrate binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lee D; Cole, Derek C; Stock, Joseph R; Sukhdeo, Mohani N; Ellingboe, John W; Cowling, Rebecca; Jin, Guixian; Manas, Eric S; Fan, Kristi Y; Malamas, Michael S; Harrison, Boyd L; Jacobsen, Steve; Chopra, Rajiv; Lohse, Peter A; Moore, William J; O'Donnell, Mary-Margaret; Hu, Yun; Robichaud, Albert J; Turner, M James; Wagner, Erik; Bard, Jonathan

    2008-01-15

    The proteolytic enzyme beta-secretase (BACE-1) produces amyloid beta (Abeta) peptide, the primary constituent of neurofibrillary plaques, implicated in Alzheimer's disease, by cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. A small molecule inhibitor of BACE-1, (diaminomethylene)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrole-1-acetamide (1, BACE-1 IC(50)=3.7 microM), was recently described, representing a new small molecule lead. Initial SAR investigation demonstrated the potential of accessing the nearby S(3) and S(1)(') substrate binding pockets of the BACE-1 enzyme by building substituents off one of the phenyl substituents and guanidinyl functional group. We report here the optimization of guanidinyl functional group substituents on 1, leading to potent submicromolar BACE-1 inhibitors.

  15. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of CD4-gp120 binding based on virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Judith M; Elban, Mark A; Courter, Joel R; Sugawara, Akihiro; Soeta, Takahiro; Madani, Navid; Princiotto, Amy M; Kwon, Young Do; Kwong, Peter D; Schön, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Sodroski, Joseph; Smith, Amos B

    2011-01-01

    The low-molecular-weight compound JRC-II-191 inhibits infection of HIV-1 by blocking the binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and is therefore an important lead in the development of a potent viral entry inhibitor. Reported here is the use of two orthogonal screening methods, gold docking and ROCS shape-based similarity searching, to identify amine-building blocks that, when conjugated to the core scaffold, yield novel analogs that maintain similar affinity for gp120. Use of this computational approach to expand SAR produced analogs of equal inhibitory activity but with diverse capacity to enhance viral infection. The novel analogs provide additional lead scaffolds for the development of HIV-1 entry inhibitors that employ protein-ligand interactions in the vestibule of gp120 Phe 43 cavity.

  16. Synthesis of a selective inhibitor of a fucose binding bacterial lectin from Burkholderia ambifaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Barbara; Imberty, Anne; Gillon, Emilie; Bosco, Rosa; Sutkeviciute, Ieva; Fieschi, Franck; Nativi, Cristina

    2013-06-28

    Burkholderia ambifaria is a bacterium member of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC), a closely related group of Gram-negative bacteria responsible for "cepacia syndrome" in immunocompromised patients. B. ambifaria produces BambL, a fucose-binding lectin that displays fine specificity to human fucosylated epitopes. Here, we report the first example of a synthetic ligand able to selectively bind, in the micromolar range, the pathogen-lectin BambL. The synthetic routes for the preparation of the α conformationally constrained fucoside are described, focusing on a totally diastereoselective inverse electron demand [4 + 2] Diels-Alder reaction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) demonstrated that this compound binds to the pathogen-associated lectin BambL with an affinity comparable to that of natural fucose-containing oligosaccharides. No binding was observed by LecB, a fucose-binding lectin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the differences in affinity between the two lectins could be rationalized by modeling. Furthermore, SPR analyses showed that this fucomimetic does not bind to the human fucose-binding lectin DC-SIGN, thus supporting the selective binding profile towards B. ambifaria lectin.

  17. Novel alleles among soybean Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor gene families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Trypsin inhibitors have been found in various animals, plants and microorganisms.There were two types of trypsin inhibitors in soybean including Bowman-Birk protease inhibitors(BBI) and Kunitz in-hibitors(KTI).The different BBI genes from wild soybean(G.soja) and cultivated soybean(G.max) formed a multigene family.We constructed a cDNA library of cultivar ’SuiNong 14’ seed at the R7 growth stage using the SMART Kit.Seventeen contigs or singletons were highly homologous to soy-bean protease inhibitors.Contigs of 5, 35, 8 and 9 were highly homologous to BBI family members BBI-A1, BBI-A2, BBI-C and BBI-D, respectively.Sequence analyses showed there were novel allelic varia-tions among the 4 BBI members in SuiNong 14.Based on the comparison of soybean seed cDNA li-braries from different developmental stages, it was apparent that the expression of trypsin inhibitors increased during seed development in soybean.Phylogenetic analysis of BBI gene sequences among dicotyledonous and monocotyledonous plants demonstrated that these genes shared a common pro-genitor.

  18. Active site - a site of binding of affinity inhibitors in baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyato, I.E.; Sklyankina, V.A.; Avaeva, S.M.

    1986-03-20

    The interaction of the enzyme-substrate complex with methyl phosphate, O-phosphoethanolamine, O-phosphopropanolamine, N-acetylphosphoserine, and phosphoglyolic acid, as well as pyrophosphatase, modified by monoesters of phosphoric acid, with pyrophosphate and tripolyphosphate, was investigated. It was shown that the enzyme containing the substrate in the active site does not react with monophosphates, but modified pyrophosphatase entirely retains the ability to bind polyanions to the regulatory site. It is concluded that the inactivation of baker's yeast inorganic pyrophosphatase by monoesters of phosphoric acid, which are affinity inhibitors of it, is the result of modification of the active site of the enzyme.

  19. Transformation of Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA) Gene into Jatropha curcas L.

    OpenAIRE

    Asri Pirade Paserang; Aris Tjahjoleksono; Utut Widyastuti; Suharsono Suharsono

    2015-01-01

    Jatropha is one of the many biodiesel plants developed in tropical countries. Efforts to increase its productivity can be done using various methods of breeding. One of the breeding methods is the introduction of genes into the Jatropha plant. The aim of this study is to assess the success of genetic transformation using the Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA) gene in Jatropha curcas. The research procedures included inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, callus induction, s...

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of chickpea with -amylase inhibitor gene for insect resistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ignacimuthu; S Prakash

    2006-09-01

    Chickpea is the world’s third most important pulse crop and India produces 75% of the world’s supply. Chickpea seeds are attacked by Callosobruchus maculatus and C. chinensis which cause extensive damage. The -amylase inhibitor gene isolated from Phaseolus vulgaris seeds was introduced into chickpea cultivar K850 through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. A total of 288 kanamycin resistant plants were regenerated. Only 0.3% of these were true transformants. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and Southern hybridization confirmed the presence of 4.9 kb -amylase inhibitor gene in the transformed plants. Western blot confirmed the presence of -amylase inhibitor protein. The results of bioassay study revealed a significant reduction in the survival rate of bruchid weevil C. maculatus reared on transgenic chickpea seeds. All the transgenic plants exhibited a segregation ratio of 3:1.

  1. Relationship between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1 gene polymorphisms and osteoporosis in Turkish women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merih Ozgen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The development of osteoporosis is associated with several risk factors, such as genetic structures that affect bone turnover and bone mass. The impact of genetic structures on osteoporosis is not known. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 regulates the bone matrix and bone balance. This study assessed the correlation between plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphisms and osteoporosis in a population of Turkish women. METHODS: A total of 195 postmenopausal female patients who were diagnosed with osteoporosis (Group I based on bone mineral density measurements via dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and 90 females with no osteoporosis (Group II were included in this study. Correlations between PAI-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphisms and osteoporosis were investigated through the identification of PAI-1 gene 4G/5G polymorphism genotypes using the polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: No significant differences in the genotype and allele frequency of 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 polymorphisms were observed between the two groups, and both groups exhibited the most frequently observed 4G5G genotype. CONCLUSION: No correlation between the development of osteoporosis in the female Turkish population and 4G/5G plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 gene polymorphisms was observed.

  2. Molecular docking guided structure based design of symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea/thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, Sree Kanth; Vangala, Radhika; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2013-08-01

    Induced fit molecular docking studies were performed on BMS-806 derivatives reported as small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding. Comprehensive study of protein-ligand interactions guided in identification and design of novel symmetrical N,N'-disubstituted urea and thiourea as HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding inhibitors. These molecules were synthesized in aqueous medium using microwave irradiation. Synthesized molecules were screened for their inhibitory ability by HIV-1 gp120-CD4 capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Designed compounds were found to inhibit HIV-1 gp120-CD4 binding in micromolar (0.013-0.247 μM) concentrations.

  3. Sourcing the affinity of flavonoids for the glycogen phosphorylase inhibitor site via crystallography, kinetics and QM/MM-PBSA binding studies: comparison of chrysin and flavopiridol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsanou, Katerina E; Hayes, Joseph M; Keramioti, Maria; Mamais, Michalis; Oikonomakos, Nikos G; Kato, Atsushi; Leonidas, Demetres D; Zographos, Spyros E

    2013-11-01

    Flavonoids have been discovered as novel inhibitors of glycogen phosphorylase (GP), a target to control hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the mechanism of inhibition, we have determined the crystal structure of the GPb-chrysin complex at 1.9 Å resolution. Chrysin is accommodated at the inhibitor site intercalating between the aromatic side chains of Phe285 and Tyr613 through π-stacking interactions. Chrysin binds to GPb approximately 15 times weaker (Ki=19.01 μM) than flavopiridol (Ki=1.24 μM), exclusively at the inhibitor site, and both inhibitors display similar behavior with respect to AMP. To identify the source of flavopiridols' stronger affinity, molecular docking with Glide and postdocking binding free energy calculations using QM/MM-PBSA have been performed and compared. Whereas docking failed to correctly rank inhibitor binding conformations, the QM/MM-PBSA method employing M06-2X/6-31+G to model the π-stacking interactions correctly reproduced the experimental results. Flavopiridols' greater binding affinity is sourced to favorable interactions of the cationic 4-hydroxypiperidin-1-yl substituent with GPb, with desolvation effects limited by the substituent conformation adopted in the crystallographic complex. Further successful predictions using QM/MM-PBSA for the flavonoid quercetagetin (which binds at the allosteric site) leads us to propose the methodology as a useful and inexpensive tool to predict flavonoid binding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Anti-tumor agent calixarene 0118 targets human galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of carbohydrate binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P.M.; Miller, Michelle C.; Nesmelova, Irina; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Kumar, Nigam; Serova, Maria; Chen, Xuimei; Raymond, Eric; Hoye, Thomas R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Calix[4]arene compound 0118 is an angiostatic agent that inhibits tumor growth in mice. Although 0118 is a topomimetic of galectin-1-targeting angiostatic amphipathic peptide anginex, we had yet to prove that 0118 targets galectin-1. Galectin-1 is involved in pathological disorders like tumor endothelial cell adhesion and migration and therefore presents a relevant target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. Here, 15N-1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 0118 indeed targets galectin-1 at a site away from the lectin’s carbohydrate binding site, and thereby attenuates lactose binding to the lectin. Flow cytometry and agglutination assays show that 0118 attenuates binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycans, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 0118 is found to be correlated with the cellular expression of the lectin. In general, our data indicate that 0118 targets galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of glycan/carbohydrate binding. This work contributes to the clinical development of anti-tumor calixarene compound 0118. PMID:22575017

  5. Real time enzyme inhibition assays provide insights into differences in binding of neuraminidase inhibitors to wild type and mutant influenza viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Barrett

    Full Text Available The influenza neuraminidase (NA inhibitors zanamivir, oseltamivir and peramivir were all designed based on the knowledge that the transition state analogue of the cleaved sialic acid, 2-deoxy,2,3-dehydro N-acetyl neuraminic acid (DANA was a weak inhibitor of NA. While DANA bound rapidly to the NA, modifications leading to the improved potency of these new inhibitors also conferred a time dependent or slow binding phenotype. Many mutations in the NA leading to decreased susceptibility result in loss of slow binding, hence this is a phenotypic marker of many but not all resistant NAs. We present here a simplified approach to determine whether an inhibitor is fast or slow binding by extending the endpoint fluorescent enzyme inhibition assay to a real time assay and monitoring the changes in IC(50s with time. We carried out two reactions, one with a 30 min preincubation with inhibitor and the second without. The enzymatic reaction was started via addition of substrate and IC(50s were calculated after each 10 min interval up to 60 min. Results showed that without preincubation IC(50s for the wild type viruses started high and although they decreased continuously over the 60 min reaction time the final IC(50s remained higher than for pre-incubated samples. These results indicate a slow equilibrium of association and dissociation and are consistent with slow binding of the inhibitors. In contrast, for viruses with decreased susceptibility, preincubation had minimal effect on the IC(50s, consistent with fast binding. Therefore this modified assay provides additional phenotypic information about the rate of inhibitor binding in addition to the IC(50, and critically demonstrates the differential effect of incubation times on the IC(50 and K(i values of wild type and mutant viruses for each of the inhibitors.

  6. Cooperative binding mode of the inhibitors of R6K replication, pi dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Lisa M; Filutowicz, Marcin

    2008-03-28

    The replication initiator protein, pi, plays an essential role in the initiation of plasmid R6K replication. Both monomers and dimers of pi bind to iterons in the gamma origin of plasmid R6K, yet monomers facilitate open complex formation, while dimers, the predominant form in the cell, do not. Consequently, pi monomers activate replication, while pi dimers inhibit replication. Recently, it was shown that the monomeric form of pi binds multiple tandem iterons in a strongly cooperative fashion, which might explain how monomers outcompete dimers for replication initiation when plasmid copy number and pi supply are low. Here, we examine cooperative binding of pi dimers and explore the role that these interactions may have in the inactivation of gamma origin. To examine pi dimer/iteron interactions in the absence of competing pi monomer/iteron interactions using wild-type pi, constructs were made with key base changes to each iteron that eliminate pi monomer binding yet have no impact on pi dimer binding. Our results indicate that, in the absence of pi monomers, pi dimers bind with greater cooperativity to alternate iterons than to adjacent iterons, thus preferentially leaving intervening iterons unbound and the origin unsaturated. We discuss new insights into plasmid replication control by pi dimers.

  7. Inhibitors of angiotensin-converting enzyme modulate mitosis and gene expression in pancreatic cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.K.; Baskaran, K.; Molteni, A. [Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril inhibits mitosis in several cell types that contain ACE and renin activity. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of the ACE inhibitors captopril and CGS 13945 (10{sup {minus}8} to 10{sup {minus}2}M) on proliferation and gene expression in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells in culture. These cells lack renin and ACE activity. Both ACE inhibitors produced a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation within 24 hr. Captopril at a concentration of 0.36 mM and CGS 13945 at 150 {mu}M decreased cellular growth rate to approximately half that of the control. Neither drug influenced the viability or the cell cycle distribution of the tumor cells. Slot blot analysis of mRNA for four genes, proliferation associated cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), K-ras, protein kinase C-{Beta} (PKC-{Beta}) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) was performed. Both ACE inhibitors increased K-ras expression by a factor of 2, and had no effect on CA II mRNA levels. Captopril also lowered PCNA by 40% and CGS 13945 lowered PKC-{Beta} gene expression to 30% of the control level. The data demonstrate that ACE inhibitors exhibit antimitotic activity and differential gene modulation in hamster pancreatic duct carcinoma cells. The absence of renin and ACE activity in these cells suggests that the antimitotic action of captopril and CGS 13945 is independent of renin-angiotensin regulation. The growth inhibition may occur through downregulation of growth-related gene expression. 27 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Pituitary tumor transforming gene binding factor: a new gene in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Rachel J; Read, Martin L; Smith, Vicki E; Sharma, Neil; Reynolds, Gary M; Buckley, Laura; Doig, Craig; Campbell, Moray J; Lewy, Greg; Eggo, Margaret C; Loubiere, Laurence S; Franklyn, Jayne A; Boelaert, Kristien; McCabe, Christopher J

    2010-05-01

    Pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) binding factor (PBF; PTTG1IP) is a relatively uncharacterized oncoprotein whose function remains obscure. Because of the presence of putative estrogen response elements (ERE) in its promoter, we assessed PBF regulation by estrogen. PBF mRNA and protein expression were induced by both diethylstilbestrol and 17beta-estradiol in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-positive MCF-7 cells. Detailed analysis of the PBF promoter showed that the region -399 to -291 relative to the translational start site contains variable repeats of an 18-bp sequence housing a putative ERE half-site (gcccctcGGTCAcgcctc). Sequencing the PBF promoter from 122 normal subjects revealed that subjects may be homozygous or heterozygous for between 1 and 6 repeats of the ERE. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and oligonucleotide pull-down assays revealed ERalpha binding to the PBF promoter. PBF expression was low or absent in normal breast tissue but was highly expressed in breast cancers. Subjects with greater numbers of ERE repeats showed higher PBF mRNA expression, and PBF protein expression positively correlated with ERalpha status. Cell invasion assays revealed that PBF induces invasion through Matrigel, an action that could be abrogated both by siRNA treatment and specific mutation. Furthermore, PBF is a secreted protein, and loss of secretion prevents PBF inducing cell invasion. Given that PBF is a potent transforming gene, we propose that estrogen treatment in postmenopausal women may upregulate PBF expression, leading to PBF secretion and increased cell invasion. Furthermore, the number of ERE half-sites in the PBF promoter may significantly alter the response to estrogen treatment in individual subjects.

  9. Binding of carbohydrates and protein inhibitors to the surface of alpha-amylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozonnet, Sophie; Bønsager, Birgit Christine; Kramhoft, B.

    2005-01-01

    This review on barley alpha-amylases 1 (AMY1) and 2 (AMY2) addresses rational mutations at distal subsites to the catalytic site, polysaccharide hydrolysis, and interactions with proteinaceous inhibitors. Subsite mapping of barley alpha-amylases revealed 6 glycone and 4 aglycone substrate subsite...

  10. Influence of azide incorporation on binding affinity by small papain inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wammes, A.E.; Hendriks, T.G.; Amatdjais-Groenen, H.I.; Wijdeven, M.A.; Hest, J.C.M. van; Delft, F.L. van; Ritschel, T.; Rutjes, F.P.J.T.

    2014-01-01

    In order to develop affinity-based biosensor platforms, appropriate ligands with a functional handle for immobilization onto a biosensor surface are required. To this end, a library of papain inhibitors was designed and synthesized, containing different azide linkers for subsequent immobilization by

  11. Binding of carbohydrates and protein inhibitors to the surface of alpha-amylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozonnet, Sophie; Bønsager, Birgit Christine; Kramhoft, B.

    2005-01-01

    This review on barley alpha-amylases 1 (AMY1) and 2 (AMY2) addresses rational mutations at distal subsites to the catalytic site, polysaccharide hydrolysis, and interactions with proteinaceous inhibitors. Subsite mapping of barley alpha-amylases revealed 6 glycone and 4 aglycone substrate subsite...

  12. Dissection of Conformationally Restricted Inhibitors Binding to a β-Glucosidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloster, Tracey M.; Madsen, Robert; Davies, Gideon J.

    2006-01-01

    Glycosidase inhibition, important in the quest for highly potent and specific drugs, can be achieved by mimicking the oxocarbenium ion-like transition-state species that form during the catalytic mechanism. Castanospermine and calystegine B2 are potent inhibitors that are conformationally restric...

  13. Acute stress enhances heterodimerization and binding of corticosteroid receptors at glucocorticoid target genes in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Karen R; Reul, Johannes M H M

    2016-10-04

    A stressful event results in secretion of glucocorticoid hormones, which bind to mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in the hippocampus to regulate cognitive and affective responses to the challenge. MRs are already highly occupied by low glucocorticoid levels under baseline conditions, whereas GRs only become substantially occupied by stress- or circadian-driven glucocorticoid levels. Currently, however, the binding of MRs and GRs to glucocorticoid-responsive elements (GREs) within hippocampal glucocorticoid target genes under such physiological conditions in vivo is unknown. We found that forced swim (FS) stress evoked increased hippocampal RNA expression levels of the glucocorticoid-responsive genes FK506-binding protein 5 (Fkbp5), Period 1 (Per1), and serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1). Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis showed that this stressor caused substantial gene-dependent increases in GR binding and surprisingly, also MR binding to GREs within these genes. Different acute challenges, including novelty, restraint, and FS stress, produced distinct glucocorticoid responses but resulted in largely similar MR and GR binding to GREs. Sequential and tandem ChIP analyses showed that, after FS stress, MRs and GRs bind concomitantly to the same GRE sites within Fkbp5 and Per1 but not Sgk1 Thus, after stress, MRs and GRs seem to bind to GREs as homo- and/or heterodimers in a gene-dependent manner. MR binding to GREs at baseline seems to be restricted, whereas after stress, GR binding may facilitate cobinding of MR. This study reveals that the interaction of MRs and GRs with GREs within the genome constitutes an additional level of complexity in hippocampal glucocorticoid action beyond expectancies based on ligand-receptor interactions.

  14. Evolution of the duplicated intracellular lipid-binding protein genes of teleost fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Ananda B; Parmar, Manoj B; Wright, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    Increasing organismal complexity during the evolution of life has been attributed to the duplication of genes and entire genomes. More recently, theoretical models have been proposed that postulate the fate of duplicated genes, among them the duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model. In the DDC model, the common fate of a duplicated gene is lost from the genome owing to nonfunctionalization. Duplicated genes are retained in the genome either by subfunctionalization, where the functions of the ancestral gene are sub-divided between the sister duplicate genes, or by neofunctionalization, where one of the duplicate genes acquires a new function. Both processes occur either by loss or gain of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. Here, we review the genomic organization, evolution, and transcriptional regulation of the multigene family of intracellular lipid-binding protein (iLBP) genes from teleost fishes. Teleost fishes possess many copies of iLBP genes owing to a whole genome duplication (WGD) early in the teleost fish radiation. Moreover, the retention of duplicated iLBP genes is substantially higher than the retention of all other genes duplicated in the teleost genome. The fatty acid-binding protein genes, a subfamily of the iLBP multigene family in zebrafish, are differentially regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) isoforms, which may account for the retention of iLBP genes in the zebrafish genome by the process of subfunctionalization of cis-acting regulatory elements in iLBP gene promoters.

  15. Evolutionary Limitation and Opportunities for Developing tRNA Synthetase Inhibitors with 5-Binding-Mode Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Fang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs are enzymes that catalyze the transfer of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs as building blocks for translation. Each of the aaRS families plays a pivotal role in protein biosynthesis and is indispensable for cell growth and survival. In addition, aaRSs in higher species have evolved important non-translational functions. These translational and non-translational functions of aaRS are attractive for developing antibacterial, antifungal, and antiparasitic agents and for treating other human diseases. The interplay between amino acids, tRNA, ATP, EF-Tu and non-canonical binding partners, had shaped each family with distinct pattern of key sites for regulation, with characters varying among species across the path of evolution. These sporadic variations in the aaRSs offer great opportunity to target these essential enzymes for therapy. Up to this day, growing numbers of aaRS inhibitors have been discovered and developed. Here, we summarize the latest developments and structural studies of aaRS inhibitors, and classify them with distinct binding modes into five categories.

  16. Novel hinge-binding motifs for Janus kinase 3 inhibitors: a comprehensive structure-activity relationship study on tofacitinib bioisosteres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehringer, Matthias; Forster, Michael; Pfaffenrot, Ellen; Bauer, Silke M; Laufer, Stefan A

    2014-11-01

    The Janus kinases (JAKs) are a family of cytosolic tyrosine kinases crucially involved in cytokine signaling. JAKs have been demonstrated to be valid targets in the treatment of inflammatory and myeloproliferative disorders, and two inhibitors, tofacitinib and ruxolitinib, recently received their marketing authorization. Despite this success, selectivity within the JAK family remains a major issue. Both approved compounds share a common 7H-pyrrolo[2,3-d]pyrimidine hinge binding motif, and little is known about modifications tolerated at this heterocyclic core. In the current study, a library of tofacitinib bioisosteres was prepared and tested against JAK3. The compounds possessed the tofacitinib piperidinyl side chain, whereas the hinge binding motif was replaced by a variety of heterocycles mimicking its pharmacophore. In view of the promising expectations obtained from molecular modeling, most of the compounds proved to be poorly active. However, strategies for restoring activity within this series of novel chemotypes were discovered and crucial structure-activity relationships were deduced. The compounds presented may serve as starting point for developing novel JAK inhibitors and as a valuable training set for in silico models.

  17. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  18. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  19. Multiple ETS family proteins regulate PF4 gene expression by binding to the same ETS binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Okada

    Full Text Available In previous studies on the mechanism underlying megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, several ETS motifs were found in each megakaryocyte-specific gene promoter. Although these studies suggested that several ETS family proteins regulate megakaryocyte-specific gene expression, only a few ETS family proteins have been identified. Platelet factor 4 (PF4 is a megakaryocyte-specific gene and its promoter includes multiple ETS motifs. We had previously shown that ETS-1 binds to an ETS motif in the PF4 promoter. However, the functions of the other ETS motifs are still unclear. The goal of this study was to investigate a novel functional ETS motif in the PF4 promoter and identify proteins binding to the motif. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay, FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP bound to the -51 ETS site. Expression of FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP activated the PF4 promoter in HepG2 cells. Mutation of a -51 ETS site attenuated FLI-1-, ELF-1-, and GABP-mediated transactivation of the promoter. siRNA analysis demonstrated that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression in HEL cells. Among these three proteins, only FLI-1 synergistically activated the promoter with GATA-1. In addition, only FLI-1 expression was increased during megakaryocytic differentiation. Finally, the importance of the -51 ETS site for the activation of the PF4 promoter during physiological megakaryocytic differentiation was confirmed by a novel reporter gene assay using in vitro ES cell differentiation system. Together, these data suggest that FLI-1, ELF-1, and GABP regulate PF4 gene expression through the -51 ETS site in megakaryocytes and implicate the differentiation stage-specific regulation of PF4 gene expression by multiple ETS factors.

  20. HIV-1 IN strand transfer chelating inhibitors: a focus on metal binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Alessia; Carcelli, Mauro; Compari, Carlotta; Fisicaro, Emilia; Pala, Nicolino; Rispoli, Gabriele; Rogolino, Dominga; Sanchez, Tino W; Sechi, Mario; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-04-01

    Most active and selective strand transfer HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors contain chelating functional groups that are crucial feature for the inhibition of the catalytic activities of the enzyme. In particular, diketo acids and their derivatives can coordinate one or two metal ions within the catalytic core of the enzyme. The present work is intended as a contribution to elucidate the mechanism of action of the HIV-IN inhibitors by studying the coordinative features of H₂L¹ (L-708,906), an important member of the diketo acids family of inhibitors, and H₂L₂, a model for S-1360, another potent IN inhibitor. Magnesium(II) and manganese(II) complexes of H₂L¹ and H₂L² were isolated and fully characterized in solution and in the solid state. The crystal structures of the manganese complex [Mn(HL₂)₂(CH₃OH)₂]·2CH₃OH were solved by X-ray diffraction analysis. Moreover, the speciation models for H₂L₂ with magnesium(II) and manganese(II) ions were performed and the formation constants of the complexes were measured. M(HL₂)₂ (M = Mg²+, Mn²+) was the most abundant species in solution at physiological pH. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their anti-IN activity, showing good results both for the ligand and the corresponding complexes. From analysis of the speciation models and of the biological data we can conclude that coordination of both metal cofactors could not be strictly necessary and that inhibitors can act as complexes and not only as free ligands.

  1. Chemical Editing of Macrocyclic Natural Products and Kinetic Profiling Reveal Slow, Tight-Binding Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors with Picomolar Affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitir, Betül; Maolanon, Alex R; Ohm, Ragnhild G; Colaço, Ana R; Fristrup, Peter; Madsen, Andreas S; Olsen, Christian A

    2017-09-26

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are validated targets for treatment of certain cancer types and play numerous regulatory roles in biology, ranging from epigenetics to metabolism. Small molecules are highly important as tool compounds for probing these mechanisms as well as for the development of new medicines. Therefore, detailed mechanistic information and precise characterization of the chemical probes used to investigate the effects of HDAC enzymes are vital. We interrogated Nature's arsenal of macrocyclic nonribosomal peptide HDAC inhibitors by chemical synthesis and evaluation of more than 30 natural products and analogues. This furnished surprising trends in binding affinities for the various macrocycles, which were then exploited for the design of highly potent class I and IIb HDAC inhibitors. Furthermore, thorough kinetic investigation revealed unexpected inhibitory mechanisms of important tool compounds as well as the approved drug Istodax (romidepsin). This work provides novel inhibitors with varying potencies, selectivity profiles, and mechanisms of inhibition and, importantly, affords insight into known tool compounds that will improve the interpretation of their effects in biology and medicine.

  2. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor antidepressants potentiate methylphenidate (Ritalin)-induced gene regulation in the adolescent striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Vincent; Beverley, Joel; Marinelli, Michela; Steiner, Heinz

    2010-08-01

    The psychostimulant methylphenidate (Ritalin) is used in conjunction with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of medical conditions such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with anxiety/depression comorbidity and major depression. Co-exposure also occurs in patients on SSRIs who use psychostimulant 'cognitive enhancers'. Methylphenidate is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor that produces altered gene expression in the forebrain; these effects partly mimic gene regulation by cocaine (dopamine/norepinephrine/serotonin reuptake inhibitor). We investigated whether the addition of SSRIs (fluoxetine or citalopram; 5 mg/kg) modified gene regulation by methylphenidate (2-5 mg/kg) in the striatum and cortex of adolescent rats. Our results show that SSRIs potentiate methylphenidate-induced expression of the transcription factor genes zif268 and c-fos in the striatum, rendering these molecular changes more cocaine-like. Present throughout most of the striatum, this potentiation was most robust in its sensorimotor parts. The methylphenidate + SSRI combination also enhanced behavioral stereotypies, consistent with dysfunction in sensorimotor striatal circuits. In so far as such gene regulation is implicated in psychostimulant addiction, our findings suggest that SSRIs may enhance the addiction potential of methylphenidate.

  3. Isolation and characterization of the plasma hyaluronan-binding protein (PHBP) gene (HABP2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumiya, J; Asakawa, S; Tobe, T; Hashimoto, K; Saguchi, K; Choi-Miura, N H; Shimizu, Y; Minoshima, S; Shimizu, N; Tomita, M

    1997-11-01

    PHBP is a novel human plasma hyaluronan-binding protein that shows significant homology in amino acid sequence to hepatocyte growth factor activator. Two overlapping clones that encode the human plasma hyaluronan-binding protein (PHBP) gene (HABP2) were isolated and characterized. The PHBP gene spans 35 kb and is composed of 13 exons from 37 to 1,394 bp in size with consensus splice sites. The gene's regulatory sequences contain putative promoter elements, but no typical TATA box. Some exons of this gene showed significant similarities to those of coagulation factor XII, tissue-type plasminogen activator, and urokinase genes in nucleotide length and in intron phasing. We also report the chromosome mapping of this gene by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a genomic DNA fragment as a probe. The PHBP gene (HABP2) was located on chromosome 10q25-q26.

  4. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann C Smigocki

    Full Text Available Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  5. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smigocki, Ann C; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  6. TATA-binding protein and the retinoblastoma gene product bind to overlapping epitopes on c-Myc and adenovirus E1A protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Timmers, H.T.M.; Rustgi, A.K.; Billaud, Marc; Veer, L.J. Van 't; Bernards, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a protein binding assay, we show that the amino-teminal 204 amino acids of the c-Myc protein interact di y with a key component of the basal p tdon factor TFID, the TATA box-binding protein (TBP). Essentialy the same region of the c-Myc protein alo binds the product of the retinoblatoma gene,

  7. CD6 and Syntaxin Binding Protein 6 Variants and Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Inhibitors in Danish Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krintel, Sophine B.; Essioux, Laurent; Wool, Assaf; Johansen, Julia S.; Schreiber, Ehud; Zekharya, Tomer; Akiva, Pinchas; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hetland, Merete L.

    2012-01-01

    Background TNFα inhibitor therapy has greatly improved the treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, however at least 30% do not respond. We aimed to investigate insertions and deletions (INDELS) associated with response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methodology and Principal Findings In the DANBIO Registry we identified 237 TNFα inhibitor naïve patients with RA (81% women; median age 56 years; disease duration 6 years) who initiated treatment with infliximab (n = 160), adalimumab (n = 56) or etanercept (n = 21) between 1999 and 2008 according to national treatment guidelines. Clinical response was assessed at week 26 using EULAR response criteria. Based on literature, we selected 213 INDELS potentially related to RA and treatment response using the GeneVa® (Compugen) in silico database of 350,000 genetic variations in the human genome. Genomic segments were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and genotyped by Sanger sequencing or fragment analysis. We tested the association between genotypes and EULAR good response versus no response, and EULAR good response versus moderate/no response using Fisher’s exact test. At baseline the median DAS28 was 5.1. At week 26, 68 (29%) patients were EULAR good responders, while 81 (34%) and 88 (37%) patients were moderate and non-responders, respectively. A 19 base pair insertion within the CD6 gene was associated with EULAR good response vs. no response (OR = 4.43, 95% CI: 1.99–10.09, p = 7.211×10−5) and with EULAR good response vs. moderate/no response (OR = 4.54, 95% CI: 2.29–8.99, p = 3.336×10−6). A microsatellite within the syntaxin binding protein 6 (STXBP6) was associated with EULAR good response vs. no response (OR = 4.01, 95% CI: 1.92–8.49, p = 5.067×10−5). Conclusion Genetic variations within CD6 and STXBP6 may influence response to TNFα inhibitors in patients with RA. PMID:22685579

  8. EFFECTS OF p53 GENE THERAPY COMBINED WITH CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 INHIBITOR ON CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 GENE EXPRESSION AND GROWTH INHIBITION OF HUMAN LUNG CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhao-Xia; LU Bin-Bin; WANG Teng; YIN Yong-Mei; DE Wei; SHU Yong-Qian

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene therapy by adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 gene transfer has been shown to inhibit lung cancer growth in vitro, in animal models, and in human clinical trials. The antitumor effect of selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors has been demonstrated in preclinical studies. However, no information is available on the effects of p53 gene therapy combined with selective COX-2 inhibitor on COX-2 gene expression and growth inhibition of human lung cancer cells. Methods We evaluated the effects of recombinant adenovirus-p53 (Ad-p53) gene therapy combined with selective COX-2 inhibitor on the proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line, and the effects of tumor suppressor exogenous wild type p53 on COX-2 gene expression. Results Ad-p53 gene therapy combined with selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib shows significant synergistic inhibition effects on the growth of human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell line. Exogenous p53 gene can suppress COX-2 gene expression. Conclusions Significant synergistic inhibition effects of A549 cell line by the combined Ad-p53 and selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib may be achieved by enhancement of growth inhibition, apoptosis induction and suppression of COX-2 gene expression. This study provides first evidence that the administration of p53 gene therapy in combination with COX-2 inhibitors might be a new clinical strategy for the treatment or prevention of NSCLC.

  9. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H

    2017-01-09

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively.

  10. Combining transcription factor binding affinities with open-chromatin data for accurate gene expression prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Florian; Gasparoni, Nina; Gasparoni, Gilles; Gianmoena, Kathrin; Cadenas, Cristina; Polansky, Julia K.; Ebert, Peter; Nordström, Karl; Barann, Matthias; Sinha, Anupam; Fröhler, Sebastian; Xiong, Jieyi; Dehghani Amirabad, Azim; Behjati Ardakani, Fatemeh; Hutter, Barbara; Zipprich, Gideon; Felder, Bärbel; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Chen, Wei; Hengstler, Jan G.; Hamann, Alf; Lengauer, Thomas; Rosenstiel, Philip; Walter, Jörn; Schulz, Marcel H.

    2017-01-01

    The binding and contribution of transcription factors (TF) to cell specific gene expression is often deduced from open-chromatin measurements to avoid costly TF ChIP-seq assays. Thus, it is important to develop computational methods for accurate TF binding prediction in open-chromatin regions (OCRs). Here, we report a novel segmentation-based method, TEPIC, to predict TF binding by combining sets of OCRs with position weight matrices. TEPIC can be applied to various open-chromatin data, e.g. DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq. Additionally, Histone-Marks (HMs) can be used to identify candidate TF binding sites. TEPIC computes TF affinities and uses open-chromatin/HM signal intensity as quantitative measures of TF binding strength. Using machine learning, we find low affinity binding sites to improve our ability to explain gene expression variability compared to the standard presence/absence classification of binding sites. Further, we show that both footprints and peaks capture essential TF binding events and lead to a good prediction performance. In our application, gene-based scores computed by TEPIC with one open-chromatin assay nearly reach the quality of several TF ChIP-seq data sets. Finally, these scores correctly predict known transcriptional regulators as illustrated by the application to novel DNaseI-seq and NOMe-seq data for primary human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-cells, respectively. PMID:27899623

  11. Computational Characterization and Prediction of Estrogen Receptor Coactivator Binding Site Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, B J; Kulp, K S; Cosman, M; Lightstone, F C

    2005-08-26

    Many carcinogens have been shown to cause tissue specific tumors in animal models. The mechanism for this specificity has not been fully elucidated and is usually attributed to differences in organ metabolism. For heterocyclic amines, potent carcinogens that are formed in well-done meat, the ability to either bind to the estrogen receptor and activate or inhibit an estrogenic response will have a major impact on carcinogenicity. Here we describe our work with the human estrogen receptor alpha (hERa) and the mutagenic/carcinogenic heterocyclic amines PhIP, MeIQx, IFP, and the hydroxylated metabolite of PhIP, N2-hydroxy-PhIP. We found that PhIP, in contrast to the other heterocyclic amines, increased cell-proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells and activated the hERa receptor. We show mechanistic data supporting this activation both computationally by homology modeling and docking, and by NMR confirmation that PhIP binds with the ligand binding domain (LBD). This binding competes with estradiol (E2) in the native E2 binding cavity of the receptor. We also find that other heterocyclic amines and N2-hydroxy-PhIP inhibit ER activation presumably by binding into another cavity on the LBD. Moreover, molecular dynamics simulations of inhibitory heterocyclic amines reveal a disruption of the surface of the receptor protein involved with protein-protein signaling. We therefore propose that the mechanism for the tissue specific carcinogenicity seen in the rat breast tumors and the presumptive human breast cancer associated with the consumption of well-done meat maybe mediated by this receptor activation.

  12. Dissecting the Binding between Glutamine Synthetase and Its Two Natively Unfolded Protein Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Neira, José L; Saelices, Lorena; Robles-Rengel, Rocío; Florencio, Francisco J; Muro-Pastor, M Isabel; Santoro, Jorge

    2016-06-21

    Ammonium is incorporated into carbon skeletons by the sequential action of glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cyanobacteria. The activity of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 GS type I is controlled by protein-protein interactions with two intrinsically disordered inactivating factors (IFs): the 65-residue (IF7) and the 149-residue one (IF17). In this work, we studied both IF7 and IF17 by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and we described their binding to GS by using NMR and biolayer interferometry. We assigned the backbone nuclei of all residues of IF7. Analyses of chemical shifts and the (15)N-{(1)H} NOEs at two field strengths suggest that IF7 region Thr3-Arg13 and a few residues around Ser27 and Phe41 populated helical conformations (although the percentage is smaller around Phe41). The two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N HSQC and CON experiments suggest that IF17 populated several conformations. We followed the binding between GS and IF7 by NMR at physiological pH, and the residues interacting first with IF7 were Gln6 and Ser27, belonging to those regions that appeared to be ordered in the isolated protein. We also determined the kon values and koff values for the binding of both IF7 and IF17 to GS, where the GS protein was bound to a biosensor. The measurements of the kinetic constants for the binding of IF7 to GS suggest that: (i) binding does not follow a kinetic two-state model ([Formula: see text]), (ii) there is a strong electrostatic component in the determined kon, and (iii) the binding is not diffusion-limited.

  13. Genes encoding FAD-binding proteins in Volvariella volvacea exhibit differential expression in homokaryons and heterokaryons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Yan, Junjie; Xie, Baogui; Li, Yu; Chen, Bingzhi; Liu, Shuyan; Li, Dan; Yang, Zhiyun; Zeng, Xiancheng; Deng, Youjin; Jiang, Yuji

    2013-10-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-binding proteins play a vital role in energy transfer and utilization during fungal growth and mycelia aggregation. We sequenced the genome of Volvariella volvacea, an economically important edible fungus, and discovered 41 genes encoding FAD-binding proteins. Gene expression profiles revealed that the expression levels of four distinctly differentially expressed genes in heterokaryotic strain H1521 were higher than in homokaryotic strains PYd15 and PYd21 combined. These observations were validated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggest that the differential expression of FAD-binding proteins may be important in revealing the distinction between homokaryons and heterokaryons on the basis of FAD-binding protein functionality.

  14. Are PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR Genes Involved in Mediating Resistance to Rhynchosporium commune in Barley?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzin, Stephan; Hanemann, Anja; Sharma, Shailendra; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schweizer, Günther; Röder, Marion S

    2016-01-01

    A family of putative PECTIN ESTERASE INHIBITOR (PEI) genes, which were detected in the genomic region co-segregating with the resistance gene Rrs2 against scald caused by Rhynchosporium commune in barley, were characterized and tested for their possible involvement in mediating resistance to the pathogen by complementation and overexpression analysis. The sequences of the respective genes were derived from two BAC contigs originating from the susceptible cultivar 'Morex'. For the genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3, HvPEI4 and HvPEI6, specific haplotypes for 18 resistant and 23 susceptible cultivars were detected after PCR-amplification and haplotype-specific CAPS-markers were developed. None of the tested candidate genes HvPEI2, HvPEI3 and HvPEI4 alone conferred a high resistance level in transgenic over-expression plants, though an improvement of the resistance level was observed especially with OE-lines for gene HvPEI4. These results do not confirm but also do not exclude an involvement of the PEI gene family in the response to the pathogen. A candidate for the resistance gene Rrs2 could not be identified yet. It is possible that Rrs2 is a PEI gene or another type of gene which has not been detected in the susceptible cultivar 'Morex' or the full resistance reaction requires the presence of several PEI genes.

  15. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...

  16. Chromosome-biased binding and gene regulation by the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko M Tabuchi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available DRM is a conserved transcription factor complex that includes E2F/DP and pRB family proteins and plays important roles in development and cancer. Here we describe new aspects of DRM binding and function revealed through genome-wide analyses of the Caenorhabditis elegans DRM subunit LIN-54. We show that LIN-54 DNA-binding activity recruits DRM to promoters enriched for adjacent putative E2F/DP and LIN-54 binding sites, suggesting that these two DNA-binding moieties together direct DRM to its target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression profiling reveals conserved roles for DRM in regulating genes involved in cell division, development, and reproduction. We find that LIN-54 promotes expression of reproduction genes in the germline, but prevents ectopic activation of germline-specific genes in embryonic soma. Strikingly, C. elegans DRM does not act uniformly throughout the genome: the DRM recruitment motif, DRM binding, and DRM-regulated embryonic genes are all under-represented on the X chromosome. However, germline genes down-regulated in lin-54 mutants are over-represented on the X chromosome. We discuss models for how loss of autosome-bound DRM may enhance germline X chromosome silencing. We propose that autosome-enriched binding of DRM arose in C. elegans as a consequence of germline X chromosome silencing and the evolutionary redistribution of germline-expressed and essential target genes to autosomes. Sex chromosome gene regulation may thus have profound evolutionary effects on genome organization and transcriptional regulatory networks.

  17. X-ray crystal structures of Enterococcus faecalis thymidylate synthase with folate binding site inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Alessia; Luciani, Rosaria; Carocci, Alessia; Cortesi, Debora; Pozzi, Cecilia; Borsari, Chiara; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangani, Stefano

    2016-11-10

    Infections caused by Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) represent nowadays a relevant health problem. We selected Thymidylate synthase (TS) from this organism as a potential specific target for antibacterial therapy. We have previously demonstrated that species-specific inhibition of the protein can be achieved despite the relatively high structural similarity among bacterial TSs and human TS. We had previously obtained the EfTS crystal structure of the protein in complex with the metabolite 5-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-FTHF) suggesting the protein role as metabolite reservoir; however, protein-inhibitors complexes were still missing. In the present work we identified some inhibitors bearing the phthalimidic core from our in-house library and we performed crystallographic screening towards EfTS. We obtained two X-ray crystallographic structures: the first with a weak phthalimidic inhibitor bound in one subunit and 5-hydroxymethylene-6-hydrofolic acid (5-HMHF) in the other subunit; a second X-ray structure complex with methotrexate. The structural information achieved confirm the role of EfTS as an enzyme involved in the folate pool system and provide a structural basis for structure-based drug design.

  18. Molecular dynamics of Mycobacterium tuberculosis KasA: implications for inhibitor and substrate binding and consequences for drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Benjamin; Kisker, Caroline; Sotriffer, Christoph A.

    2011-11-01

    Inhibition of the production of fatty acids as essential components of the mycobacterial cell wall has been an established way of fighting tuberculosis for decades. However, increasing resistances and an outdated medical treatment call for the validation of new targets involved in this crucial pathway. In this regard, the β-ketoacyl ACP synthase KasA is a promising enzyme. In this study, three molecular dynamics simulations based on the wildtype crystal structures of inhibitor bound and unbound KasA were performed in order to investigate the flexibility and conformational space of this target. We present an exhaustive analysis of the binding-site flexibility and representative pocket conformations that may serve as new starting points for structure-based drug design. We also revealed a mechanism which may account for the comparatively low binding affinity of thiolactomycin. Furthermore, we examined the behavior of water molecules within the binding pocket and provide recommendations how to handle them in the drug design process. Finally, we analyzed the dynamics of a channel that accommodates the long-chain fatty acid substrates and, thereby, propose a mechanism of substrate access to this channel and how products are most likely released.

  19. Structure based design towards the identification of novel binding sites and inhibitors for the chikungunya virus envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashad, Adel A; Keller, Paul A

    2013-07-01

    Chikungunya virus is an emerging arbovirus that is widespread in tropical regions and is spreading quickly to temperate climates with recent epidemics in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas. It is having an increasingly major impact on humans with potentially life-threatening and debilitating arthritis. Thus far, neither vaccines nor medications are available to treat or control the virus and therefore, the development of medicinal chemistry is a vital and immediate issue that needs to be addressed. The viral envelope proteins play a major role during infection through mediation of binding and fusion with the infected cell surfaces. The possible binding target sites of the chikungunya virus envelope proteins have not previously been investigated; we describe here for the first time the identification of novel sites for potential binding on the chikungunya glycoprotein complexes and the identification of possible antagonists for these sites through virtual screening using two successive docking scores; FRED docking for fast precise screening, with the top hits then subjected to a ranking scoring using the AUTODOCK algorithm. Both the immature and the mature forms of the chikungunya envelope proteins were included in the study to increase the probability of finding positive and reliable hits. Some small molecules have been identified as good in silico chikungunya virus envelope proteins inhibitors and these could be good templates for drug design targeting this virus.

  20. Novel bis-(-)-nor-meptazinol derivatives act as dual binding site AChE inhibitors with metal-complexing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Juan; Qiu, Zhuibai; Xia, Zheng; Li, Wei; Yu, Lining; Chen, Hailin; Chen, Jianxing; Chen, Yan; Hu, Zhuqin; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Biyun; Cui, Yongyao; Xie, Qiong; Chen, Hongzhuan

    2012-10-01

    The strategy of dual binding site acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition along with metal chelation may represent a promising direction for multi-targeted interventions in the pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, two derivatives (ZLA and ZLB) of a potent dual binding site AChE inhibitor bis-(-)-nor-meptazinol (bis-MEP) were designed and synthesized by introducing metal chelating pharmacophores into the middle chain of bis-MEP. They could inhibit human AChE activity with IC(50) values of 9.63μM (for ZLA) and 8.64μM (for ZLB), and prevent AChE-induced amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregation with IC(50) values of 49.1μM (for ZLA) and 55.3μM (for ZLB). In parallel, molecular docking analysis showed that they are capable of interacting with both the catalytic and peripheral anionic sites of AChE. Furthermore, they exhibited abilities to complex metal ions such as Cu(II) and Zn(II), and inhibit Aβ aggregation triggered by these metals. Collectively, these results suggest that ZLA and ZLB may act as dual binding site AChEIs with metal-chelating potency, and may be potential leads of value for further study on disease-modifying treatment of AD.

  1. Modulating the function of ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) with inhibitor cabozantinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guan-Nan; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Barbuti, Anna Maria; Zhu, Xi-Jun; Yu, Xin-Yue; Wen, Ai-Wen; Wurpel, John N D; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-01-25

    Cabozantinib (XL184) is a small molecule tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, which targets c-Met and VEGFR2. Cabozantinib has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat advanced medullary thyroid cancer and renal cell carcinoma. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of cabozantinib to modulate the function of the ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 2 (ABCG2) by sensitizing cells that are resistant to ABCG2 substrate antineoplastic drugs. We used a drug-selected resistant cell line H460/MX20 and three ABCG2 stable transfected cell lines ABCG2-482-R2, ABCG2-482-G2, and ABCG2-482-T7, which overexpress ABCG2. Cabozantinib, at non-toxic concentrations (3 or 5μM), sensitized the ABCG2-overexpressing cells to mitoxantrone, SN-38, and topotecan. Our results indicate that cabozantinib reverses ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance by antagonizing the drug efflux function of the ABCG2 transporter instead of downregulating its expression. The molecular docking analysis indicates that cabozantinib binds to the drug-binding site of the ABCG2 transporter. Overall, our findings demonstrate that cabozantinib inhibits the ABCG2 transporter function and consequently enhances the effect of the antineoplastic agents that are substrates of ABCG2. Cabozantinib may be a useful agent in anticancer treatment regimens for patients who are resistant to ABCG2 substrate drugs.

  2. Contribution of explicit solvent effects to the binding affinity of small-molecule inhibitors in blood coagulation factor serine proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert; Salam, Noeris K; Shelley, John; Farid, Ramy; Friesner, Richard A; Sherman, Woody

    2011-06-06

    The prevention of blood coagulation is important in treating thromboembolic disorders, and several serine proteases involved in the coagulation cascade have been classified as pharmaceutically relevant. Whereas structure-based drug design has contributed to the development of some serine protease inhibitors, traditional computational methods have not been able to fully describe structure-activity relationships (SAR). Here, we study the SAR for a number of serine proteases by using a method that calculates the thermodynamic properties (enthalpy and entropy) of the water that solvates the active site. We show that the displacement of water from specific subpockets (such as S1-4 and the ester binding pocket) of the active site by the ligand can govern potency, especially for cases in which small chemical changes (i.e., a methyl group or halogen) result in a substantial increase in potency. Furthermore, we describe how relative binding free energies can be estimated by combining the water displacement energy with complementary terms from an implicit solvent molecular mechanics description binding.

  3. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Pettersson, Fredrik; Larsson, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF) protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  4. POF and HP1 bind expressed exons, suggesting a balancing mechanism for gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Mia Johansson

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Two specific chromosome-targeting and gene regulatory systems are present in Drosophila melanogaster. The male X chromosome is targeted by the male-specific lethal complex believed to mediate the 2-fold up-regulation of the X-linked genes, and the highly heterochromatic fourth chromosome is specifically targeted by the Painting of Fourth (POF protein, which, together with heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1, modulates the expression level of genes on the fourth chromosome. Here we use chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiling microarray analysis to map POF and HP1 on the fourth chromosome in S2 cells and salivary glands at high resolution. The enrichment profiles were complemented by transcript profiles to examine the link between binding and transcripts. The results show that POF specifically binds to genes, with a strong preference for exons, and the HP1 binding profile is a mirror image of POF, although HP1 displays an additional "peak" in the promoter regions of bound genes. HP1 binding within genes is much higher than the basal HP1 enrichment on Chromosome 4. Our results suggest a balancing mechanism for the regulation of the fourth chromosome where POF and HP1 competitively bind at increasing levels with increased transcriptional activity. In addition, our results contradict transposable elements as a major nucleation site for HP1 on the fourth chromosome.

  5. Metabolism of ATP-binding cassette drug transporter inhibitors: complicating factor for multidrug resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnubben, N.H.; Wortelboer, H.M.; Zanden, J.J. van; Rietjens, I.M.; Bladeren, P.J. van

    2005-01-01

    Membrane transport proteins belonging to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family of transport proteins play a central role in the defence of organisms against toxic compounds, including anticancer drugs. However, for compounds that are designed to display a toxic effect, this defence system diminishes

  6. Human mannose-binding lectin inhibitor prevents Shiga toxin-induced renal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozaki, Masayuki; Kang, Yulin; Tan, Ying Siow

    2016-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC HUS) is a worldwide endemic problem, and its pathophysiology is not fully elucidated. Here we tested whether the mannose-binding lectin (MBL2), an initiating factor of lectin complement pathway activation, plays a cr...

  7. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  8. Structural studies of nucleoside analog and feedback inhibitor binding to Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Niels Egil; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Eklund, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila Melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (dNK) has a high turnover rate and a wide substrate range that makes it a very good candidate for gene therapy. This concept is based on introducing a suicide gene into malignant cells in order to activate a pro...

  9. A model of peptide triazole entry inhibitor binding to HIV-1 gp120 and the mechanism of bridging sheet disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emileh, Ali; Tuzer, Ferit; Yeh, Herman; Umashankara, Muddegowda; Moreira, Diogo R M; Lalonde, Judith M; Bewley, Carole A; Abrams, Cameron F; Chaiken, Irwin M

    2013-04-02

    Peptide triazole (PT) entry inhibitors prevent HIV-1 infection by blocking the binding of viral gp120 to both the HIV-1 receptor and the coreceptor on target cells. Here, we used all-atom explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) to propose a model for the encounter complex of the peptide triazoles with gp120. Saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance (STD NMR) and single-site mutagenesis experiments were performed to test the simulation results. We found that docking of the peptide to a conserved patch of residues lining the "F43 pocket" of gp120 in a bridging sheet naïve gp120 conformation of the glycoprotein led to a stable complex. This pose prevents formation of the bridging sheet minidomain, which is required for receptor-coreceptor binding, providing a mechanistic basis for dual-site antagonism of this class of inhibitors. Burial of the peptide triazole at the gp120 inner domain-outer domain interface significantly contributed to complex stability and rationalizes the significant contribution of hydrophobic triazole groups to peptide potency. Both the simulation model and STD NMR experiments suggest that the I-X-W [where X is (2S,4S)-4-(4-phenyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)pyrrolidine] tripartite hydrophobic motif in the peptide is the major contributor of contacts at the gp120-PT interface. Because the model predicts that the peptide Trp side chain hydrogen bonding with gp120 S375 contributes to the stability of the PT-gp120 complex, we tested this prediction through analysis of peptide binding to gp120 mutant S375A. The results showed that a peptide triazole KR21 inhibits S375A with 20-fold less potency than WT, consistent with predictions of the model. Overall, the PT-gp120 model provides a starting point for both the rational design of higher-affinity peptide triazoles and the development of structure-minimized entry inhibitors that can trap gp120 into an inactive conformation and prevent infection.

  10. Response of fatty acid synthesis genes to the binding of human salivary amylase by Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitkova, Anna E; Haase, Elaine M; Vickerman, M Margaret; Gill, Steven R; Scannapieco, Frank A

    2012-03-01

    Streptococcus gordonii, an important primary colonizer of dental plaque biofilm, specifically binds to salivary amylase via the surface-associated amylase-binding protein A (AbpA). We hypothesized that a function of amylase binding to S. gordonii may be to modulate the expression of chromosomal genes, which could influence bacterial survival and persistence in the oral cavity. Gene expression profiling by microarray analysis was performed to detect genes in S. gordonii strain CH1 that were differentially expressed in response to the binding of purified human salivary amylase versus exposure to purified heat-denatured amylase. Selected genes found to be differentially expressed were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR). Five genes from the fatty acid synthesis (FAS) cluster were highly (10- to 35-fold) upregulated in S. gordonii CH1 cells treated with native amylase relative to those treated with denatured amylase. An abpA-deficient strain of S. gordonii exposed to amylase failed to show a response in FAS gene expression similar to that observed in the parental strain. Predicted phenotypic effects of amylase binding to S. gordonii strain CH1 (associated with increased expression of FAS genes, leading to changes in fatty acid synthesis) were noted; these included increased bacterial growth, survival at low pH, and resistance to triclosan. These changes were not observed in the amylase-exposed abpA-deficient strain, suggesting a role for AbpA in the amylase-induced phenotype. These results provide evidence that the binding of salivary amylase elicits a differential gene response in S. gordonii, resulting in a phenotypic adjustment that is potentially advantageous for bacterial survival in the oral environment.

  11. Cloning of Proteinase Inhibitor Gene StPI in Diploid Potato and Its Expression Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A full-length cDNA of proteinase inhibitor gene with completed open reading frame of 116 amino acids was cloned from Ralstonia solanacearum (Rs) resistant potato leaves using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method and designated as StPI. BLAST search against NCBI showed that the StPI gene shared 89% identity with potato proteinase inhibitor Ⅰ precursor in nucleotide and 74% in amino acid. Analysis of semi-quantitative RT-PCR indicated that this gene was induced by Rs as well as up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA). The StPI gene expression reached the highest level during 6-12 h post Rs-inoculation or JA-treatment, and then leveled off. Moreover, this gene was strongly induced by JA and its mRNA accumulation increased more quickly than that of Rs-inoculation. The StPI gene may play a role in potato resistance against Rs. The induction of StPI by Rs invasion may have a similar signal transduction pathway with JA treatment.

  12. Tobacco plants transformed with the bean. alpha. ai gene express an inhibitor of insect. alpha. -amylase in their seeds. [Nicotiana tabacum; Tenebrio molitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altabella, T.; Chrispeels, M.J. (Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seeds contain a putative plant defense protein that inhibits insect and mammalian but not plant {alpha}-amylases. We recently presented strong circumstantial evidence that this {alpha}-amylase inhibitor ({alpha}Al) is encoded by an already-identified lectin gene whose product is referred to as lectin-like-protein (LLP). We have now made a chimeric gene consisting of the coding sequence of the lectin gene that encodes LLP and the 5{prime} and 3{prime} flanking sequences of the lectin gene that encodes phytohemagglutinin-L. When this chimeric gene was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), we observed in the seeds a series of polypeptides (M{sub r} 10,000-18,000) that cross-react with antibodies to the bean {alpha}-amylase inhibitor. Most of these polypeptides bind to a pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase affinity column. An extract of the seeds of the transformed tobacco plants inhibits pig pancreas {alpha}-amylase activity as well as the {alpha}-amylase present in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor. We suggest that introduction of this lectin gene (to be called {alpha}ai) into other leguminous plants may be a strategy to protect the seeds from the seed-eating larvae of Coleoptera.

  13. Metalloprotein-inhibitor binding: human carbonic anhydrase II as a model for probing metal-ligand interactions in a metalloprotein active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, David P; Hann, Zachary S; Cohen, Seth M

    2013-11-01

    An ever-increasing number of metalloproteins are being discovered that play essential roles in physiological processes. Inhibitors of these proteins have significant potential for the treatment of human disease, but clinical success of these compounds has been limited. Herein, zinc(II)-dependent metalloprotein inhibitors in clinical use are reviewed, and the potential for using novel metal-binding groups (MBGs) in the design of these inhibitors is discussed. By using human carbonic anhydrase II as a model system, the nuances of MBG-metal interactions in the context of a protein environment can be probed. Understanding how metal coordination influences inhibitor binding may help in the design of new therapeutics targeting metalloproteins.

  14. Wheat and barley allergens associated with baker's asthma. Glycosylated subunits of the alpha-amylase-inhibitor family have enhanced IgE-binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Monge, R; Gomez, L; Barber, D; Lopez-Otin, C; Armentia, A; Salcedo, G

    1992-01-15

    A 16 kDa protein, designated CM16*, which strongly binds IgE from baker's-asthma patients has been identified as a glycosylated form of the previously reported WTAI-CM16, which is a subunit of the wheat tetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor. A glycosylated form (CMb*) of BTAI-CMb, the equivalent inhibitor subunit from barley, has been also found to have significantly enhanced IgE-binding capacity. In all, 14 purified members of the alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitor family showed very different IgE-binding capacities when tested by a dot-blot assay. The glycosylated components CM16*, CMb* and the previously described non-glycosylated 14.5 kDa allergen from barley (renamed BMAI-1) were found to be the strongest allergens.

  15. Inhibitor of endocytosis impairs gene electrotransfer to mouse muscle in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markelc, Bostjan; Skvarca, Eva; Dolinsek, Tanja; Kloboves, Veronika Prevodnik; Coer, Andrej; Sersa, Gregor; Cemazar, Maja

    2015-06-01

    Application of electric pulses (electroporation/electropermeabilization) is an effective method for gene transfer (i.e. gene electrotransfer (GET)) in vitro and in vivo. Currently, the mechanisms by which the DNA enters the cell are not yet fully understood. Experimental evidence is building up that endocytosis is the main mechanism by which the DNA, which is later expressed, enters the cell. Therefore the aim of our study was to elucidate whether inhibitors of endocytosis, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), Concanavalin A (ConA) and Dynasore, can impair the transfection efficacy of GET in vitro in B16F1 murine melanoma and in vivo in m. tibialis cranialis in mice. We show that MβCD--general inhibitor of endocytosis--can almost prevent GET of EGFP-N1 plasmid in vitro, that ConA--inhibitor of clathrin mediated endocytosis--also abrogates GET but to a lesser extent, and when using Dynasore--reversible inhibitor of dynamin--there is no effect on GET efficacy, if endocytosis is blocked for only 5 min after GET. Moreover, MβCD also reduced GET efficacy in vivo in m. tibialis cranialis and this effect was long lasting. The results of this study show that endocytosis is probably the main mechanism of entrance of DNA after GET in vitro and also in vivo.

  16. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to defined regions of the growth hormone and placental lactogen genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, J W; Voz, M L; Eliard, P H; Mathy-Harter, M; De Nayer, P; Economidis, I V; Belayew, A; Martial, J A; Rousseau, G G

    1986-12-01

    The intracellular receptor for thyroid hormone is a protein found in chromatin. Since thyroid hormone stimulates transcription of the growth hormone gene through an unknown mechanism, the hypothesis that the thyroid hormone-receptor complex interacts with defined regions of this gene has been investigated in a cell-free system. Nuclear extracts from human lymphoblastoid IM-9 cells containing thyroid hormone receptors were incubated with L-3,5,3'-tri[125I]iodothyronine and calf thymus DNA-cellulose. Restriction fragments of the human growth hormone gene were added to determine their ability to inhibit labeled receptor binding to DNA-cellulose. These fragments encompassed nucleotide sequences from about three kilobase pairs upstream to about four kilobase pairs downstream from the transcription initiation site. The thyroid hormone-receptor complex bound preferentially to the 5'-flanking sequences of the growth hormone gene in a region between nucleotide coordinates -290 and -129. The receptor also bound to an analogous promoter region in the human placental lactogen gene, which has 92% nucleotide sequence homology with the growth hormone gene. These binding regions appear to be distinct from those that are recognized by the receptor for glucocorticoids, which stimulate growth hormone gene expression synergistically with thyroid hormone. The presence of thyroid hormone was required for binding of its receptor to the growth hormone gene promoter, suggesting that thyroid hormone renders the receptor capable of recognizing specific gene regions.

  17. Identification and analysis of hepatitis C virus NS3 helicase inhibitors using nucleic acid binding assays

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Alicia M Hanson; Shadrick, William R.; Ndjomou, Jean; Sweeney, Noreena L.; Hernandez, John J.; Bartczak, Diana; Li, Kelin; Frankowski, Kevin J.; Heck, Julie A.; Arnold, Leggy A.; Schoenen, Frank J.; Frick, David N.

    2012-01-01

    Typical assays used to discover and analyze small molecules that inhibit the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS3 helicase yield few hits and are often confounded by compound interference. Oligonucleotide binding assays are examined here as an alternative. After comparing fluorescence polarization (FP), homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF®; Cisbio) and AlphaScreen® (Perkin Elmer) assays, an FP-based assay was chosen to screen Sigma’s Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) for c...

  18. IC 50-to-K i: a web-based tool for converting IC 50 to K i values for inhibitors of enzyme activity and ligand binding

    OpenAIRE

    Cer, R. Z.; Mudunuri, U.; Stephens, R.; Lebeda, F. J.

    2009-01-01

    A new web-server tool estimates K i values from experimentally determined IC 50 values for inhibitors of enzymes and of binding reactions between macromolecules (e.g. proteins, polynucleic acids) and ligands. This converter was developed to enable end users to help gauge the quality of the underlying assumptions used in these calculations which depend on the type of mechanism of inhibitor action and the concentrations of the interacting molecular species. Additional calculations are performed...

  19. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  20. Newly Found C1 Inhibitor Gene Mutation in Hereditary Angioedema Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Tang; Hong-yu Zhang

    2009-01-01

    @@ Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant condition that affects one in about 50 000 persons,characterized by recurrent episodes of subcutaneous or submucosal swelling involving the hands, feet, limbs, face,intestinal tract, even larynx and trachea. HAE is caused by gene mutation of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1INH) on the position of chromosome 11q12-q13.1, which results in quantitative or qualitative deficiency of C1INH. C1INH, a member of the serpin family of the serine protease inhibitors, plays a key role in the classical pathway of the complement cascade and mainly controls enzymatic activity of the first component. In this study, we evaluated the expression of C1INH gene in HAE patients in order to find novel mutation in C1INH.

  1. Identification of Y-box binding protein 1 as a core regulator of MEK/ERK pathway-dependent gene signatures in colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Jürchott

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional signatures are an indispensible source of correlative information on disease-related molecular alterations on a genome-wide level. Numerous candidate genes involved in disease and in factors of predictive, as well as of prognostic, value have been deduced from such molecular portraits, e.g. in cancer. However, mechanistic insights into the regulatory principles governing global transcriptional changes are lagging behind extensive compilations of deregulated genes. To identify regulators of transcriptome alterations, we used an integrated approach combining transcriptional profiling of colorectal cancer cell lines treated with inhibitors targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK/RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, computational prediction of regulatory elements in promoters of co-regulated genes, chromatin-based and functional cellular assays. We identified commonly co-regulated, proliferation-associated target genes that respond to the MAPK pathway. We recognized E2F and NFY transcription factor binding sites as prevalent motifs in those pathway-responsive genes and confirmed the predicted regulatory role of Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1 by reporter gene, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. We also validated the MAPK-dependent gene signature in colorectal cancers and provided evidence for the association of YBX1 with poor prognosis in colorectal cancer patients. This suggests that MEK/ERK-dependent, YBX1-regulated target genes are involved in executing malignant properties.

  2. Repositioning of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors as Antagonists of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters in Anticancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jun Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of multidrug resistance (MDR has attenuated the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the possibility of successful cancer chemotherapy. ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters play an essential role in mediating MDR in cancer cells by increasing efflux of drugs from cancer cells, hence reducing the intracellular accumulation of chemotherapeutic drugs. Interestingly, small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as AST1306, lapatinib, linsitinib, masitinib, motesanib, nilotinib, telatinib and WHI-P154, have been found to have the capability to overcome anticancer drug resistance by inhibiting ABC transporters in recent years. This review will focus on some of the latest and clinical developments with ABC transporters, TKIs and anticancer drug resistance.

  3. Assessing the Performance of Metadynamics and Path Variables in Predicting the Binding Free Energies of p38 Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, G; Gauthier, L; Bianciotto, M; Gervasio, F L

    2012-04-10

    The accurate yet efficient evaluation of the free energy profiles of ligand-target association is a long sought goal in rational drug design. Methods that calculate the free energy along realistic association pathways, such as metadynamics, have been shown to provide reliable profiles, while accounting properly for solvation and target flexibility. However, these approaches usually require prohibitive computational resources and expert human intervention. Here, we show how multiple walkers metadynamics, when performed with optimal path collective variables (PCV), provides in a predetermined amount of computer time an accurate set of free energy profiles for a series of p38 inhibitors. The chosen test set, spanning a wide range of activity, is a challenging benchmark, both for computational methods and for human intuition, as the correct order for the binding affinity cannot be easily guessed. An excellent ranking of the ligands was obtained with minimal human assistance, an important step toward a fully automated pharmaceutical work-flow.

  4. Using Homology Modeling, Molecular Dynamics and Molecular Docking Techniques to Identify Inhibitor Binding Regions of Somatostatin Receptor 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Hai-nan; WANG Yue-xi; ZHENG Ming-zhu; HAN Wei-wei; ZHENG Xin

    2013-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptor(GPCR),one of the members in the superfamily,which consists of thousands of integral membrane proteins,exerts a wide variety of physiological functions and responses to a large portion of the drug targets.The 3D structure of somatostatin receptor 1(SSTR1) was modeled and refined by means of homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation.This model was assessed by Verify-3D and Vadar,which confirmed the reliability of the refined model.The interaction between the inhibitor cysteamine,somatostatin(SST) and SSTRI was investigated by a molecular docking program,Affinity.The binding module not only showed the crucial residues involved in the interaction,but also provided important information about the interaction between SSTR1 on the one hand and ligands on the other,which might be the significant evidence for the structure-based design.

  5. In silico binding analysis and SAR elucidations of newly designed benzopyrazine analogs as potent inhibitors of thymidine phosphorylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Muhammad; Ismail, Nor Hadiani; Imran, Syahrul; Rahim, Fazal; Wadood, Abdul; Al Muqarrabun, Laode Muhammad Ramadhan; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Ghufran, Mehreen; Ali, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is up regulated in wide variety of solid tumors and therefore presents a remarkable target for drug discovery in cancer. A novel class of extremely potent TPase inhibitors based on benzopyrazine (1-28) has been developed and evaluated against thymidine phosphorylase enzyme. Out of these twenty-eight analogs eleven (11) compounds 1, 4, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 24 and 28 showed potent thymidine phosphorylase inhibitory potentials with IC50 values ranged between 3.20±0.30 and 37.60±1.15μM when compared with the standard 7-Deazaxanthine (IC50=38.68±4.42μM). Structure-activity relationship was established and molecular docking studies were performed to determine the binding interactions of these newly synthesized compounds. Current studies have revealed that these compounds established stronger hydrogen bonding networks with active site residues as compare to the standard compound 7DX.

  6. Characterization of binding and inhibitory properties of TAK-063, a novel phosphodiesterase 10A inhibitor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akina Harada

    Full Text Available Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A inhibition is a novel and promising approach for the treatment of central nervous system disorders such as schizophrenia and Huntington's disease. A novel PDE10A inhibitor, TAK-063 [1-[2-fluoro-4-(1H-pyrazol-1-ylphenyl]-5-methoxy-3-(1-phenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl-pyridazin-4(1H-one] has shown high inhibitory activity and selectivity for human recombinant PDE10A2 in vitro; the half-maximal inhibitory concentration was 0.30 nM, and selectivity over other phosphodiesterases (PDEs was more than 15000-fold. TAK-063 at 10 µM did not show more than 50% inhibition or stimulation of 91 enzymes or receptors except for PDEs. In vitro autoradiography (ARG studies using rat brain sections revealed that [3H]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in the caudate putamen (CPu, nucleus accumbens (NAc, globus pallidus, substantia nigra, and striatonigral projection, where PDE10A is highly expressed. This [3H]TAK-063 accumulation was almost entirely blocked by an excess amount of MP-10, a PDE10A selective inhibitor, and the accumulation was not observed in brain slices of Pde10a-knockout mice. In rat brain sections, [3H]TAK-063 bound to a single high-affinity site with mean ± SEM dissociation constants of 7.2 ± 1.2 and 2.6 ± 0.5 nM for the CPu and NAc shell, respectively. Orally administered [14C]TAK-063 selectively accumulated in PDE10A expressing brain regions in an in vivo ARG study in rats. Striatal PDE10A occupancy by TAK-063 in vivo was measured using T-773 as a tracer and a dose of 0.88 mg/kg (p.o. was calculated to produce 50% occupancy in rats. Translational studies with TAK-063 and other PDE10A inhibitors such as those presented here will help us better understand the pharmacological profile of this class of potential central nervous system drugs.

  7. Structure-Based Design of a Novel SMYD3 Inhibitor that Bridges the SAM-and MEKK2-Binding Pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Aller, Glenn S; Graves, Alan P; Elkins, Patricia A; Bonnette, William G; McDevitt, Patrick J; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S; Dean, Tony W; Su, Dai-Shi; Carpenter, Christopher L; Mohammad, Helai P; Kruger, Ryan G

    2016-05-03

    SMYD3 is a lysine methyltransferase overexpressed in colorectal, breast, prostate, and hepatocellular tumors, and has been implicated as an oncogene in human malignancies. Methylation of MEKK2 by SMYD3 is important for regulation of the MEK/ERK pathway, suggesting the possibility of selectively targeting SMYD3 in RAS-driven cancers. Structural and kinetic characterization of SMYD3 was undertaken leading to a co-crystal structure of SMYD3 with a MEKK2-peptide substrate bound, and the observation that SMYD3 follows a partially processive mechanism. These insights allowed for the design of GSK2807, a potent and selective, SAM-competitive inhibitor of SMYD3 (Ki = 14 nM). A high-resolution crystal structure reveals that GSK2807 bridges the gap between the SAM-binding pocket and the substrate lysine tunnel of SMYD3. Taken together, our data demonstrate that small-molecule inhibitors of SMYD3 can be designed to prevent methylation of MEKK2 and these could have potential use as anticancer therapeutics.

  8. Germline V-genes sculpt the binding site of a family of antibodies neutralizing human cytomegalovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, Christy A.; Bryson, Steve; McLean, Gary R.; Creagh, A. Louise; Pai, Emil F.; Schrader, John W. (Toronto); (UBC)

    2008-10-17

    Immunoglobulin genes are generated somatically through specialized mechanisms resulting in a vast repertoire of antigen-binding sites. Despite the stochastic nature of these processes, the V-genes that encode most of the antigen-combining site are under positive evolutionary selection, raising the possibility that V-genes have been selected to encode key structural features of binding sites of protective antibodies against certain pathogens. Human, neutralizing antibodies to human cytomegalovirus that bind the AD-2S1 epitope on its gB envelope protein repeatedly use a pair of well-conserved, germline V-genes IGHV3-30 and IGKV3-11. Here, we present crystallographic, kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of the binding site of such an antibody and that of its primary immunoglobulin ancestor. These show that these germline V-genes encode key side chain contacts with the viral antigen and thereby dictate key structural features of the hypermutated, high-affinity neutralizing antibody. V-genes may thus encode an innate, protective immunological memory that targets vulnerable, invariant sites on multiple pathogens.

  9. Rye inhibitors of animal alpha-amylases show different specificities, aggregative properties and IgE-binding capacities than their homologues from wheat and barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Casado, G; Sánchez-Monge, R; López-Otín, C; Salcedo, G

    1994-09-01

    Three new members of the alpha-amylase/trypsin-inhibitor family of cereal endosperm have been isolated from rye. N-terminal amino acid sequence comparison revealed that two of the purified proteins were the rye homologues of the barley monomeric inhibitor (BMAI-1) previously described, while the other rye protein corresponded to one of the subunits of the barley and wheat heterotetrameric inhibitors. However, the inhibitory specificities (active against human salivary alpha-amylase), aggregative behaviours (mainly as dimeric forms) and IgE-binding capacities (not recognized by sera from allergic patients) of the rye inhibitors were clearly different from those of their wheat and barley counterparts. These results indicate that homologous inhibitors may have distinctive properties in different cereal species.

  10. N-acylhydrazone inhibitors of influenza virus PA endonuclease with versatile metal binding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Gatti, Anna; de Luca, Laura; Sechi, Mario; Kumar, Gyanendra; White, Stephen W.; Stevaert, Annelies; Naesens, Lieve

    2016-08-01

    Influenza virus PA endonuclease has recently emerged as an attractive target for the development of novel antiviral therapeutics. This is an enzyme with divalent metal ion(s) (Mg2+ or Mn2+) in its catalytic site: chelation of these metal cofactors is an attractive strategy to inhibit enzymatic activity. Here we report the activity of a series of N-acylhydrazones in an enzymatic assay with PA-Nter endonuclease, as well as in cell-based influenza vRNP reconstitution and virus yield assays. Several N-acylhydrazones were found to have promising anti-influenza activity in the low micromolar concentration range and good selectivity. Computational docking studies are carried on to investigate the key features that determine inhibition of the endonuclease enzyme by N-acylhydrazones. Moreover, we here describe the crystal structure of PA-Nter in complex with one of the most active inhibitors, revealing its interactions within the protein’s active site.

  11. Miz-1 activates gene expression via a novel consensus DNA binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Barrilleaux

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Miz-1 can either activate or repress gene expression in concert with binding partners including the Myc oncoprotein. The genomic binding of Miz-1 includes both core promoters and more distal sites, but the preferred DNA binding motif of Miz-1 has been unclear. We used a high-throughput in vitro technique, Bind-n-Seq, to identify two Miz-1 consensus DNA binding motif sequences--ATCGGTAATC and ATCGAT (Mizm1 and Mizm2--bound by full-length Miz-1 and its zinc finger domain, respectively. We validated these sequences directly as high affinity Miz-1 binding motifs. Competition assays using mutant probes indicated that the binding affinity of Miz-1 for Mizm1 and Mizm2 is highly sequence-specific. Miz-1 strongly activates gene expression through the motifs in a Myc-independent manner. MEME-ChIP analysis of Miz-1 ChIP-seq data in two different cell types reveals a long motif with a central core sequence highly similar to the Mizm1 motif identified by Bind-n-Seq, validating the in vivo relevance of the findings. Miz-1 ChIP-seq peaks containing the long motif are predominantly located outside of proximal promoter regions, in contrast to peaks without the motif, which are highly concentrated within 1.5 kb of the nearest transcription start site. Overall, our results indicate that Miz-1 may be directed in vivo to the novel motif sequences we have identified, where it can recruit its specific binding partners to control gene expression and ultimately regulate cell fate.

  12. Binding Sites of miR-1273 Family on the mRNA of Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Ivashchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined binding sites of 2,578 miRNAs in the mRNAs of 12,175 human genes using the MirTarget program. It found that the miRNAs of miR-1273 family have between 33 and 1,074 mRNA target genes, with a free hybridization energy of 90% or more of its maximum value. The miR-1273 family consists of miR-1273a, miR-1273c, miR-1273d, miR-1273e, miR-1273f, miR-1273g-3p, miR-1273g-5p, miR-1273h-3p, and miR-1273h-5p. Unique miRNAs (miR-1273e, miR-1273f, and miR-1273g-3p have more than 400 target genes. We established 99 mRNA nucleotide sequences that contain arranged binding sites for the miR-1273 family. High conservation of each miRNA binding site in the mRNA of the target genes was found. The arranged binding sites of the miR-1273 family are located in the 5′UTR, CDS, or 3′UTR of many mRNAs. Five repeating sites containing some of the miR-1273 family’s binding sites were found in the 3′UTR of several target genes. The oligonucleotide sequences of miR-1273 binding sites located in CDSs code for homologous amino acid sequences in the proteins of target genes. The biological role of unique miRNAs was also discussed.

  13. Rational Design of Highly Potent and Slow-Binding Cytochrome bc1 Inhibitor as Fungicide by Computational Substitution Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ge-Fei; Yang, Sheng-Gang; Huang, Wei; Wang, Le; Shen, Yan-Qing; Tu, Wen-Long; Li, Hui; Huang, Li-Shar; Wu, Jia-Wei; Berry, Edward A.; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Hit to lead (H2L) optimization is a key step for drug and agrochemical discovery. A critical challenge for H2L optimization is the low efficiency due to the lack of predictive method with high accuracy. We described a new computational method called Computational Substitution Optimization (CSO) that has allowed us to rapidly identify compounds with cytochrome bc1 complex inhibitory activity in the nanomolar and subnanomolar range. The comprehensively optimized candidate has proved to be a slow binding inhibitor of bc1 complex, ~73-fold more potent (Ki = 4.1 nM) than the best commercial fungicide azoxystrobin (AZ; Ki = 297.6 nM) and shows excellent in vivo fungicidal activity against downy mildew and powdery mildew disease. The excellent correlation between experimental and calculated binding free-energy shifts together with further crystallographic analysis confirmed the prediction accuracy of CSO method. To the best of our knowledge, CSO is a new computational approach to substitution-scanning mutagenesis of ligand and could be used as a general strategy of H2L optimisation in drug and agrochemical design.

  14. VP40 of the Ebola Virus as a Target for EboV Therapy: Comprehensive Conformational and Inhibitor Binding Landscape from Accelerated Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmith, Marissa; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2017-03-01

    The first account of the dynamic features of the loop region of VP40 of the Ebola virus was studied using accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and reported herein. Among the proteins of the Ebola virus, the matrix protein (VP40) plays a significant role in the virus lifecycle thereby making it a promising therapeutic target. Of interest is the newly elucidated N-terminal domain loop region of VP40 comprising residues K127, T129, and N130 which when mutated to alanine have demonstrated an unrecognized role for N-terminal domain-plasma membrane interaction for efficient VP40-plasma membrane localization, oligomerization, matrix assembly, and egress. The molecular understanding of the conformational features of VP40 in complex with a known inhibitor still remains elusive. Using accelerated molecular dynamics approaches, we conducted a comparative study on VP40 apo and bound systems to understand the conformational features of VP40 at the molecular level and to determine the effect of inhibitor binding with the aid of a number of post-dynamic analytical tools. Significant features were seen in the presence of an inhibitor as per molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area binding free energy calculations. Results revealed that inhibitor binding to VP40 reduces the flexibility and mobility of the protein as supported by root mean square fluctuation and root mean square deviation calculations. The study revealed a characteristic "twisting" motion and coiling of the loop region of VP40 accompanied by conformational changes in the dimer interface upon inhibitor binding. We believe that results presented in this study will ultimately provide useful insight into the binding landscape of VP40 which could assist researchers in the discovery of potent Ebola virus inhibitors for anti-Ebola therapies.

  15. Polymorphic miRNA-mediated gene contribution to inhibitor development in haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafunno, V; Santacroce, R; Chetta, M; Peyvandi, F; Sessa, F; Chinni, E; Longo, V; Margaglione, M

    2012-11-01

    Development of inhibitory antibodies is perhaps the most serious complication of FVIII replacement therapy, precluding efficient clinical management of patients with haemophilia A (HA). The development and function of immune system are also regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). Mutations and changes in the level of expression of some miRNA genes have been associated with the onset and progression of immunological disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate new genetic polymorphisms in loci for miRNA and their targets to evaluate whether these SNPs may confer susceptibility to inhibitor development in patients with HA. Italian HA patients with and without inhibitors and healthy controls were recruited in this study. For SNP analysis, standard DNA sequencing method was used. We have studied four SNPs, i.e. rs36101366, rs34683807, rs1803603 and rs3024496 located in the 3'UTR of F8 and IL-10 genes. These SNPs have been checked for their frequencies in patients with and without inhibitors, but no statistically significant differences were found. Then, we have searched for other genetic variants in loci for haematopoietic-specific miRNAs, i.e. hsa-mir-150, hsa-mir-155, hsa-mir-146a, hsa-mir-142, hsa-mir-181a and in a specific miRNA, hsa-mir-1184, i.e. predicted to be located in the intron 22 of F8 gene. For all miRNAs selected, we did not identify any sequence variation in our study population. This is the first study to demonstrate that there was no association between selected SNPs in miRNAs and their targets and the susceptibility to inhibitor development in people affected by HA. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Kristina A; Haq, Omar; Felts, Anthony K; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-10-22

    Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms. The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT. Two of these clusters are populated by structures in which the primer grip exhibits novel conformations that differ from the predominant cluster by over 4 A and are induced by the unique inhibitors capravirine and rilpivirine/TMC278. This work identifies a new conformation of the NNIBP that may be used to design NNRTIs. It can also be used to guide more complete exploration of the NNIBP free energy landscape using advanced sampling techniques.

  17. Thermodynamics of binding of a sulfonamide inhibitor to metal-mutated carbonic anhydrase as studied by affinity capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yosuke; Hoshino, Hitoshi; Iki, Nobuhiko

    2015-09-01

    By affinity capillary electrophoresis (ACE), the thermodynamic binding constants of a sulfonamide (SA) inhibitor to bovine carbonic anhydrase II (CA) and metal mutated variants (M-CAs) were evaluated. 1-(4-Aminosulfonylphenylazo)-2-naphthol-6,8-disulfonate was used as the SA in the electrophoretic buffer for ACE. The Scatchard analysis of the dependence of the electrophoretic mobility of native CA on the SA concentration provided the binding constant to be Kb=(2.29±0.05)×10(6) M(-1) (at pH8.4, 25°C). On the other hand, apoCA showed far smaller value [Kb=(3.76±0.14)×10(2) M(-1)], suggesting that the coordination of SA to the Zn(II) center controlled the binding thermodynamics. The ACE of M-CAs showed the same behaviors as native CA but with different Kb values. For example, Co-CA adopting the same tetrahedral coordination geometry as native CA exhibited the largest Kb value [(2.55±0.05)×10(6) M(-1)] among the M-CAs. In contrast, Mn- and Ni-CA, which adopted the octahedral coordination geometry, had Kb values that were about two orders of magnitude lower. Because the hydrophobic cavity of CA around the active center pre-organized the orientation of SA, thereby fixing the ligating NH(-) moiety to the apex of the tetrahedron supported by three basal His3 of CA, metals such as Zn and Co at the center of M-CA gave the most stable CA-SA complex. However, pre-organization was not favored for octahedral geometry. Thus, pre-organization of SA was the key to facilitating the tetrahedral coordination geometry of the Zn(II) active center of CA.

  18. Crystal structures and inhibitor binding properties of plant class V chitinases: the cycad enzyme exhibits unique structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Naoyuki; Kanda, Yuka; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Osawa, Takuo; Numata, Tomoyuki; Sakuda, Shohei; Taira, Toki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2015-04-01

    A class V (glycoside hydrolase family 18) chitinase from the cycad Cycas revoluta (CrChiA) is a plant chitinase that has been reported to possess efficient transglycosylation (TG) activity. We solved the crystal structure of CrChiA, and compared it with those of class V chitinases from Nicotiana tabacum (NtChiV) and Arabidopsis thaliana (AtChiC), which do not efficiently catalyze the TG reaction. All three chitinases had a similar (α/β)8 barrel fold with an (α + β) insertion domain. In the acceptor binding site (+1, +2 and +3) of CrChiA, the Trp168 side chain was found to stack face-to-face with the +3 sugar. However, this interaction was not found in the identical regions of NtChiV and AtChiC. In the DxDxE motif, which is essential for catalysis, the carboxyl group of the middle Asp (Asp117) was always oriented toward the catalytic acid Glu119 in CrChiA, whereas the corresponding Asp in NtChiV and AtChiC was oriented toward the first Asp. These structural features of CrChiA appear to be responsible for the efficient TG activity. When binding of the inhibitor allosamidin was evaluated using isothermal titration calorimetry, the changes in binding free energy of the three chitinases were found to be similar to each other, i.e. between -9.5 and -9.8 kcal mol(-1) . However, solvation and conformational entropy changes in CrChiA were markedly different from those in NtChiV and AtChiC, but similar to those of chitinase A from Serratia marcescens (SmChiA), which also exhibits significant TG activity. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism underlying the TG reaction and the molecular evolution from bacterial chitinases to plant class V chitinases.

  19. The artificial zinc finger coding gene 'Jazz' binds the utrophin promoter and activates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi, N; Libri, V; Fanciulli, M; Tinsley, J M; Davies, K E; Passananti, C

    2000-06-01

    Up-regulation of utrophin gene expression is recognized as a plausible therapeutic approach in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We have designed and engineered new zinc finger-based transcription factors capable of binding and activating transcription from the promoter of the dystrophin-related gene, utrophin. Using the recognition 'code' that proposes specific rules between zinc finger primary structure and potential DNA binding sites, we engineered a new gene named 'Jazz' that encodes for a three-zinc finger peptide. Jazz belongs to the Cys2-His2 zinc finger type and was engineered to target the nine base pair DNA sequence: 5'-GCT-GCT-GCG-3', present in the promoter region of both the human and mouse utrophin gene. The entire zinc finger alpha-helix region, containing the amino acid positions that are crucial for DNA binding, was specifically chosen on the basis of the contacts more frequently represented in the available list of the 'code'. Here we demonstrate that Jazz protein binds specifically to the double-stranded DNA target, with a dissociation constant of about 32 nM. Band shift and super-shift experiments confirmed the high affinity and specificity of Jazz protein for its DNA target. Moreover, we show that chimeric proteins, named Gal4-Jazz and Sp1-Jazz, are able to drive the transcription of a test gene from the human utrophin promoter.

  20. APUM5, encoding a Pumilio RNA binding protein, negatively regulates abiotic stress responsive gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background A mutant screening was carried out previously to look for new genes related to the Cucumber mosaic virus infection response in Arabidopsis. A Pumilio RNA binding protein-coding gene, Arabidopsis Pumilio RNA binding protein 5 (APUM5), was obtained from this screening. Results APUM5 transcriptional profiling was carried out using a bioinformatics tool. We found that APUM5 was associated with both biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, bacterial and fungal pathogen infection susceptibility was not changed in APUM5 transgenic plants compared to that in wild type plants although APUM5 expression was induced upon pathogen infection. In contrast, APUM5 was involved in the abiotic stress response. 35S-APUM5 transgenic plants showed hypersensitive phenotypes under salt and drought stresses during germination, primary root elongation at the seedling stage, and at the vegetative stage in soil. We also showed that some abiotic stress-responsive genes were negatively regulated in 35S-APUM5 transgenic plants. The APUM5-Pumilio homology domain (PHD) protein bound to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the abiotic stress-responsive genes which contained putative Pumilio RNA binding motifs at the 3′ UTR. Conclusions These results suggest that APUM5 may be a new post-transcriptional regulator of the abiotic stress response by direct binding of target genes 3′ UTRs. PMID:24666827

  1. Aggressive periodontitis and chronic arthritis: blood mononuclear cell gene expression and plasma protein levels of cytokines and cytokine inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars K; Havemose-Poulsen, Anne; Bendtzen, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytokines and cytokine inhibitors have been associated with many immunoinflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression mirrors the corresponding plasma levels of clinically important pro- and anti-inflammatory c......BACKGROUND: Cytokines and cytokine inhibitors have been associated with many immunoinflammatory diseases. In the present study, we examined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression mirrors the corresponding plasma levels of clinically important pro- and anti...

  2. Transformation of Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA Gene into Jatropha curcas L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asri Pirade Paserang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jatropha is one of the many biodiesel plants developed in tropical countries. Efforts to increase its productivity can be done using various methods of breeding. One of the breeding methods is the introduction of genes into the Jatropha plant. The aim of this study is to assess the success of genetic transformation using the Inhibitor of Meristem Activity (IMA gene in Jatropha curcas. The research procedures included inoculation of explants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens, callus induction, screening test of selection media, regeneration, and gene expression analysis using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR. IMA is one of the genes that controls flowering genes and ovule development. It was first isolated from tomato plants and has been successfully overexpressed in these plants using the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV 35S promoter. In this experiment, plant transformation was performed on J. curcas as the target. Explant callus formation in both the control and treated samples was good, but shoot formation decreased dramatically in the treated explants. PCR analysis indicated that IMA genes can be inserted into J. curcas with the size of the IMA gene is 500 bp.

  3. Mechanistic Insights into the Binding of Class IIa HDAC Inhibitors toward Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-2: A 3D-QSAR and Pharmacophore Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Siddharth; Goyal, Sukriti; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2017-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2) type-2 is a rare neurological disorder among the nine polyglutamine disorders, mainly caused by polyQ (CAG) trinucleotide repeats expansion within gene coding ataxin-2 protein. The expanded trinucleotide repeats within the ataxin-2 protein sequesters transcriptional cofactors i.e., CREB-binding protein (CBP), Ataxin-2 binding protein 1 (A2BP1) leading to a state of hypo-acetylation and transcriptional repression. Histone de-acetylases inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported to restore transcriptional balance through inhibition of class IIa HDAC's, that leads to an increased acetylation and transcription as demonstrated through in-vivo studies on mouse models of Huntington's. In this study, 61 di-aryl cyclo-propanehydroxamic acid derivatives were used for developing three dimensional (3D) QSAR and pharmacophore models. These models were then employed for screening and selection of anti-ataxia compounds. The chosen QSAR model was observed to be statistically robust with correlation coefficient (r2) value of 0.6774, cross-validated correlation coefficient (q2) of 0.6157 and co-relation coefficient for external test set (pred_r2) of 0.7570. A high F-test value of 77.7093 signified the robustness of the model. Two potential drug leads ZINC 00608101 (SEI) and ZINC 00329110 (ACI) were selected after a coalesce procedure of pharmacophore based screening using the pharmacophore model ADDRR.20 and structural analysis using molecular docking and dynamics simulations. The pharmacophore and the 3D-QSAR model generated were further validated for their screening and prediction ability using the enrichment factor (EF), goodness of hit (GH), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The compounds SEI and ACI exhibited a docking score of −10.097 and −9.182 kcal/mol, respectively. An evaluation of binding conformation of ligand-bound protein complexes was performed with MD simulations for a time period of 30 ns along with free

  4. Mechanistic Insights into the Binding of Class IIa HDAC Inhibitors toward Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type-2: A 3D-QSAR and Pharmacophore Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Siddharth; Goyal, Sukriti; Somvanshi, Pallavi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA-2) type-2 is a rare neurological disorder among the nine polyglutamine disorders, mainly caused by polyQ (CAG) trinucleotide repeats expansion within gene coding ataxin-2 protein. The expanded trinucleotide repeats within the ataxin-2 protein sequesters transcriptional cofactors i.e., CREB-binding protein (CBP), Ataxin-2 binding protein 1 (A2BP1) leading to a state of hypo-acetylation and transcriptional repression. Histone de-acetylases inhibitors (HDACi) have been reported to restore transcriptional balance through inhibition of class IIa HDAC's, that leads to an increased acetylation and transcription as demonstrated through in-vivo studies on mouse models of Huntington's. In this study, 61 di-aryl cyclo-propanehydroxamic acid derivatives were used for developing three dimensional (3D) QSAR and pharmacophore models. These models were then employed for screening and selection of anti-ataxia compounds. The chosen QSAR model was observed to be statistically robust with correlation coefficient (r(2)) value of 0.6774, cross-validated correlation coefficient (q(2)) of 0.6157 and co-relation coefficient for external test set (pred_r(2)) of 0.7570. A high F-test value of 77.7093 signified the robustness of the model. Two potential drug leads ZINC 00608101 (SEI) and ZINC 00329110 (ACI) were selected after a coalesce procedure of pharmacophore based screening using the pharmacophore model ADDRR.20 and structural analysis using molecular docking and dynamics simulations. The pharmacophore and the 3D-QSAR model generated were further validated for their screening and prediction ability using the enrichment factor (EF), goodness of hit (GH), and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis. The compounds SEI and ACI exhibited a docking score of -10.097 and -9.182 kcal/mol, respectively. An evaluation of binding conformation of ligand-bound protein complexes was performed with MD simulations for a time period of 30 ns along with free

  5. PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTORα (PPARα) AGONISTS DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATE INHIBITOR OF DNA BINDING (ID2) EXPRESSION IN RODENTS AND HUMAN CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Inhibitor of DNA binding (Id2) is a member of the helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factor family whose members play important roles in cell differentiation and proliferation. Id2 has been linked to the development of cardiovascular diseases since thiazolidinediones,...

  6. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechang Li

    Full Text Available To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  7. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  8. Association of mannan-binding lectin gene polymorphisms with progression of severe lupus nephritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常欣蓓

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs)of the mannan-binding lectin(MBL)gene with serum levels,development,progression and prognosis of severe lupus nephritis(LN).Methods A total of 107 severe lupus nephritis patients were enrolled in the study from January 2003 to October2013.Integrated capillary electrophoresis was used to detect MBL gene polymorphism in peripheral blood

  9. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    OpenAIRE

    Nordlund Henri R; Grapputo Alessandro; Hytönen Vesa P; Niskanen Einari A; Kulomaa Markku S; Laitinen Olli H

    2005-01-01

    Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Res...

  10. Energetics of dendrimer binding to HIV-1 gp120-CD4 complex and mechanismic aspects of its role as an entry-inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saurabh, Suman; Sahoo, Anil Kumar; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and computational studies have established that de-protonated dendrimers (SPL7013 and PAMAM) act as entry-inhibitors of HIV. SPL7013 based Vivagel is currently under clinical development. The dendrimer binds to gp120 in the gp120-CD4 complex, destabilizes it by breaking key contacts between gp120 and CD4 and prevents viral entry into target cells. In this work, we provide molecular details and energetics of the formation of the SPL7013-gp120-CD4 ternary complex and decipher modes of action of the dendrimer in preventing viral entry. It is also known from experiments that the dendrimer binds weakly to gp120 that is not bound to CD4. It binds even more weakly to the CD4-binding region of gp120 and thus cannot directly block gp120-CD4 complexation. In this work, we examine the feasibility of dendrimer binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4 and directly blocking gp120-CD4 complex formation. We find that the process of the dendrimer binding to CD4 can compete with gp120-CD4 binding due to comparable free energy change for the two processes, thus creating a possibility for the dendrimer to directly block gp120-CD4 complexation by binding to the gp120-binding region of CD4.

  11. Binding of upstream stimulatory factor 1 to the E-box regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 expression in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhongcai; Jhun, Bongsook; Jung, Sandy Y; Oh, Chad K

    2008-04-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 is a key regulator of the fibrinolytic system. PAI-1 levels are markedly elevated in the asthmatic airways. The 4G/5G polymorphism of the PAI-1 gene is associated with allergic asthma. To characterize the mechanisms of the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 expression in mast cells (MCs), a major source of PAI-1 and key effector cells in asthma. Transcription of PAI-1 was assessed by transiently transfecting human MC line (HMC-1) cells with the luciferase-tagged PAI-1 promoters containing the 4G or 5G allele (4G-PAI-1 or 5G-PAI-1 promoter). Upstream stimulatory factor (USF)-1 and the E-box interactions were studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and supershift assays. Expression of USF-1 was determined by Western blot analysis. The 4G-PAI-1 promoter has higher promoter activity than the 5G-PAI-1 promoter in stimulated HMC-1 cells, and the E-box adjacent to the 4G/5G site (E-4G/5G) regulates the genotype-specific PAI-1 transcription. USF-1 binds to the E-4G with greater affinity than to the E-5G. USF-1 level is increased in HMC-1 cells after stimulation, and elevated USF-1 enhances PAI-1 transcription. Overexpression of wild-type USF-1 or dominant-negative USF remedies the 4G/5G-dependent PAI-1 transcription. Binding of USF-1 to the E-4G/5G regulates the 4G/5G polymorphism-dependent PAI-1 expression in MCs.

  12. Hemolytic and antimalarial effects of tight-binding glyoxalase 1 inhibitors on the host-parasite unit of erythrocytes infected with Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cletus A. Wezena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glyoxalases prevent the formation of advanced glycation end products by converting glycolysis-derived methylglyoxal to d-lactate with the help of glutathione. Vander Jagt and colleagues previously showed that erythrocytes release about thirty times more d-lactate after infection with the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Functional glyoxalases in the host-parasite unit might therefore be crucial for parasite survival. Here, we determined the antimalarial and hemolytic activity of two tight-binding glyoxalase inhibitors using infected and uninfected erythrocytes. In addition, we synthesized and analyzed a set of diester derivates of both tight-binding inhibitors resulting in up to threefold lower IC50 values and an altered methemoglobin formation and hemolytic activity depending on the type of ester. Inhibitor treatments of uninfected erythrocytes revealed an extremely slow inactivation of the host cell glyoxalase, irrespective of inhibitor modifications, and a potential dispensability of the host cell enzyme for parasite survival. Our study highlights the benefits and drawbacks of different esterifications of glutathione-derived inhibitors and demonstrates the suitability of glyoxalase inhibitors as a tool for deciphering the relevance and mode of action of different glyoxalase systems in a host-parasite unit.

  13. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D G; Carayannopoulos, L; Capra, J D; Tucker, P W; Hanke, J H

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. We have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  14. The ubiquitous octamer-binding protein(s) is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.G.; Carayannopoulos, L.; Capra, J.D.; Tucker, P.W. (Dept. of Microbiology, Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX (US)); Hanke, J.H. (Central Research, Dept. of Molecular Genetics, Pfizer, Inc., Groton, CT (US))

    1990-03-01

    All immunoglobulin genes contain a conserved octanucleotide promoter element, ATGCAAAT, which has been shown to be required for their normal B-cell-specific transcription. Proteins that bind this octamer have been purified, and cDNAs encoding octamer-binding proteins have been cloned. Some of these proteins (referred to as OTF-2) are lymphoid specific, whereas at least one other, and possibly more (referred to as OTF-1), is found ubiquitously in all cell types. The exact role of these different proteins in directing the tissue-specific expression of immunoglobulin genes is unclear. The authors have identified two human pre-B-cell lines that contain extremely low levels of OTF-2 yet still express high levels of steady-state immunoglobulin heavy-chain mRNA in vivo and efficiently transcribe an immunoglobulin gene in vitro. Addition of a highly enriched preparation of OTF-1 made from one of these pre-B cells or from HeLa cells specifically stimulated in vitro transcription of an immunoglobulin gene. Furthermore, OFT-1 appeared to have approximately the same transactivation ability as OTF-2 when normalized for binding activity. These results suggest that OTF-1, without OTF-2, is sufficient for transcription of immunoglobulin genes and that OTF-2 alone is not responsible for the B-cell-specific regulation of immunoglobulin gene expression.

  15. Using docking and alchemical free energy approach to determine the binding mechanism of eEF2K inhibitors and prioritizing the compound synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiantao; Edupuganti, Ramakrishna; Tavares, Clint D J; Dalby, Kevin N; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    A-484954 is a known eEF2K inhibitor with submicromolar IC50 potency. However, the binding mechanism and the crystal structure of the kinase remains unknown. Here, we employ a homology eEF2K model, docking and alchemical free energy simulations to probe the binding mechanism of eEF2K, and in turn, guide the optimization of potential lead compounds. The inhibitor was docked into the ATP-binding site of a homology model first. Three different binding poses, hypothesis 1, 2, and 3, were obtained and subsequently applied to molecular dynamics (MD) based alchemical free energy simulations. The calculated relative binding free energy of the analogs of A-484954 using the binding pose of hypothesis 1 show a good correlation with the experimental IC50 values, yielding an r (2) coefficient of 0.96 after removing an outlier (compound 5). Calculations using another two poses show little correlation with experimental data, (r (2) of less than 0.5 with or without removing any outliers). Based on hypothesis 1, the calculated relative free energy suggests that bigger cyclic groups, at R1 e.g., cyclobutyl and cyclopentyl promote more favorable binding than smaller groups, such as cyclopropyl and hydrogen. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the ability of the alchemical free energy approach in combination with docking and homology modeling to prioritize compound synthesis. This can be an effective means of facilitating structure-based drug design when crystal structures are not available.

  16. Lack of ligand-selective binding of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor to putative DNA binding sites regulating expression of Bax and paraoxonase 1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroot, Danica E; Hayashi, Ai; Denison, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the biological and toxicological effects of structurally diverse chemicals through its ability to bind specific DNA recognition sites (dioxin responsive elements (DREs)), and activate transcription of adjacent genes. While the DRE has a highly conserved consensus sequence, it has been suggested that the nucleotide specificity of AhR DNA binding may be ligand-dependent. The upstream regulatory regions of the murine Bax and human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) genes reportedly contain unique DRE-like sequences that respond to AhRs activated by some ligands but not others. Given the significant implications of this observation to understanding the diversity in AhR responses and that of other ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, a combination of DNA binding, nuclear translocation and gene expression analysis was used to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these ligand-selective responses. Although known AhR agonists stimulated AhR nuclear translocation, DRE binding and gene expression, the ligand-selective DRE-like DNA elements identified in the Bax and PON1 upstream regulatory regions failed to bind ligand-activated AhR or confer AhR-responsiveness upon a reporter gene. These results argue against the reported ligand-selectivity of AhR DNA binding and suggest DNA binding by ligand activated AhR involves DRE-containing DNA.

  17. Interplay between estrogen response element sequence and ligands controls in vivo binding of estrogen receptor to regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Adam J; Krieg, Sacha A; Ahn, Bonnie S; Shapiro, David J

    2004-02-06

    To examine the role of the estrogen response element (ERE) sequence in binding of liganded estrogen receptor (ER) to promoters, we analyzed in vivo interaction of liganded ER with the imperfect ERE in the pS2 gene and the composite estrogen-responsive unit (ERU) in the proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9) gene. In transient transfections of ER-positive HepG2-ER7 cells, PI-9 was strongly induced by estrogen, moxestrol (MOX), and 4-hydroxytamoxifen (OHT). PI-9 was not induced by raloxifene or ICI 182,780. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that moxestrol strongly induced cellular PI-9 and pS2 mRNAs, whereas OHT moderately induced PI-9 mRNA and weakly induced pS2 mRNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated strong and similar association of 17beta-estradiol-hERalpha and MOX-hERalpha with the PI-9 ERU and with the pS2 ERE. Binding of MOX-hERalpha to the PI-9 ERU and the pS2 ERE was rapid and continuous. Although MOX-hERalpha bound strongly to the PI-9 ERU and less well to the pS2 ERE in chromatin immunoprecipitation, gel shift assays showed that estrogen-hERalpha binds with higher affinity to the deproteinized pS2 ERE than to the PI-9 ERU. Across a broad range of OHT concentrations, OHT-hERalpha associated strongly with the pS2 ERE and weakly with the PI-9 ERU. ICI-hERalpha bound poorly to the PI-9 ERU and effectively to the pS2 ERE. Raloxifene-hERalpha and MOX-hERalpha exhibited similar binding to the PI-9 ERU and the pS2 ERE. These studies demonstrate that ER ligand and ERE sequence work together to regulate in vivo binding of ER to estrogen-responsive promoters.

  18. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies.

  19. Molecular phylogenetic and sequence variation analysis of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wheat and its wild relative species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati Pandey

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitors serve protection against insects that are highly dependent on starch for their energy. In order to study the molecular evolution and sequence variation, we have sequenced dimeric α-amylase inhibitors gene from different genomes in Triticeae including Indian bread and durum wheat genotypes. Using BLAST, obtained sequences show very high homology with other inhibitors available at GenBank database and had common conserved 10 cysteine residues. Investigated frequency of significant SNPs in the α-amylase inhibitor gene was 1 out of 60 bases. The phylogenetic analysis based on deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the genes encoding dimeric α-amylase inhibitors formed three groups and genes isolated from Indian bread wheat clustered with 0.19 inhibitors. In addition, we predicted that dimeric α-amylase inhibitors co-localized into chloroplast and mitochondria expect for the sequences isolated from Aegilops tauschii. Fingerprinting analysis done with ScanProsite confirmed biologically meaningful signatures. Multiple sequence alignment of dimeric α-amylase proteins from different plant species revealed a conserved secondary structure region, indicating homology at the sequence and structural levels. Analysis of the protein sequences obtained from wheat and its wild related species are very similar, indicates a highest conservation of these proteins.

  20. Down-regulation of Flt-1 gene expression by the proteasome inhibitor MG262.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, J; Mezquita, B; Pau, M; Mezquita, C

    2003-08-15

    The mechanisms involved in the anti-angiogenic actions of the proteasome inhibitors are poorly understood. Here, we report that the gene expression of the VEGF receptor Flt-1 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1) was down-regulated by the reversible proteasome inhibitor MG262 in explant cultures of the developing chicken pecten oculi, a vascular organ consisting of endothelial cells, pericytes, and macrophages. In addition, the inhibitor prevented the induction of Flt-1 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in macrophages and down-regulated the expression of Flt-1 after LPS induction. Flt-1 gene expression was also down regulated by MG262 in cultures of human microvascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, a transcript of Flt-1, coding for a soluble form of the receptor (sFlt-1) with anti-angiogenic properties, was not down-regulated in the same extent. Only a small decrease in the expression of VEGF and Ang-2 was detected in the pecten oculi upon inhibition of the proteasome, while no major changes were observed in the expression of other angiogenic molecules, such as KDR or Ang-1. Since recent experiments have demonstrated the importance of anti-Flt-1 therapy in the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis, retinal angiogenesis, arthritis, and atherosclerosis (Luttun et al. [2002]: Nat Med 8:831-840), our observation on down-regulation of Flt-1 in microvascular endothelial cells and macrophages by MG262 supports the postulated role of the proteasome inhibitors as potential candidates for therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis and inflammation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  2. The chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha gene. Cloning, characterisation and tissue distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Gringhuis, SI; Ab, G

    1997-01-01

    We present the cloning and sequencing of the gene encoding the chicken CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha (cC/EBP alpha). The coding region and 1.5 kb of 5' flanking DNA form a CpG island. Comparison of the chicken C/EBP alpha sequence to the homologous proteins of other species reveals several ev

  3. Cardanol-derived AChE inhibitors: Towards the development of dual binding derivatives for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Laís Flávia Nunes; de Andrade Ramos, Giselle; de Oliveira, Andressa Souza; da Silva, Fernanda Motta R; de Castro Couto, Gina; da Silva Boni, Marina; Guimarães, Marcos Jorge R; Souza, Isis Nem O; Bartolini, Manuela; Andrisano, Vincenza; do Nascimento Nogueira, Patrícia Coelho; Silveira, Edilberto Rocha; Brand, Guilherme D; Soukup, Ondřej; Korábečný, Jan; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Castro, Newton G; Bolognesi, Maria Laura; Romeiro, Luiz Antonio Soares

    2016-01-27

    Cardanol is a phenolic lipid component of cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), obtained as the byproduct of cashew nut food processing. Being a waste product, it has attracted much attention as a precursor for the production of high-value chemicals, including drugs. On the basis of these findings and in connection with our previous studies on cardanol derivatives as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors, we designed a novel series of analogues by including a protonable amino moiety belonging to different systems. Properly addressed docking studies suggested that the proposed structural modifications would allow the new molecules to interact with both the catalytic active site (CAS) and the peripheral anionic site (PAS) of AChE, thus being able to act as dual binding inhibitors. To disclose whether the new molecules showed the desired profile, they were first tested for their cholinesterase inhibitory activity towards EeAChE and eqBuChE. Compound 26, bearing an N-ethyl-N-(2-methoxybenzyl)amine moiety, showed the highest inhibitory activity against EeAChE, with a promising IC50 of 6.6 μM, and a similar inhibition profile of the human isoform (IC50 = 5.7 μM). As another positive feature, most of the derivatives did not show appreciable toxicity against HT-29 cells, up to a concentration of 100 μM, which indicates drug-conform behavior. Also, compound 26 is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), as predicted by a PAMPA-BBB assay. Collectively, the data suggest that the approach to obtain potential anti-Alzheimer drugs from CNSL is worth of further pursuit and development.

  4. Statins Increase Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type 1 Gene Transcription through a Pregnane X Receptor Regulated Element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick M Stanley

    Full Text Available Plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 is a multifunctional protein that has important roles in inflammation and wound healing. Its aberrant regulation may contribute to many disease processes such as heart disease. The PAI-1 promoter is responsive to multiple inputs including cytokines, growth factors, steroids and oxidative stress. The statin drugs, atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin, increased basal and stimulated expression of the PAI-1 promoter 3-fold. A statin-responsive, nuclear hormone response element was previously identified in the PAI-1 promoter, but it was incompletely characterized. We characterized this direct repeat (DR of AGGTCA with a 3-nucleotide spacer at -269/-255 using deletion and directed mutagenesis. Deletion or mutation of this element increased basal transcription from the promoter suggesting that it repressed PAI-1 transcription in the unliganded state. The half-site spacing and the ligand specificity suggested that this might be a pregnane X receptor (PXR responsive element. Computational molecular docking showed that atorvastatin, mevastatin and rosuvastatin were structurally compatible with the PXR ligand-binding pocket in its agonist conformation. Experiments with Gal4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins showed that Gal4-PXR was activated by statins while other DR + 3 binding nuclear receptor fusions were not. Overexpression of PXR further enhanced PAI-1 transcription in response to statins. Finally, ChIP experiments using Halo-tagged PXR and RXR demonstrated that both components of the PXR-RXR heterodimer bound to this region of the PAI-1 promoter.

  5. 1,1-Difluoroethyl-substituted triazolothienopyrimidines as inhibitors of a human urea transport protein (UT-B): new analogs and binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Esteva-Font, C; Yao, C; Phuan, P W; Verkman, A S; Anderson, M O

    2013-06-01

    The kidney urea transport protein UT-B is an attractive target for the development of small-molecule inhibitors with a novel diuretic ('urearetic') action. Previously, two compounds in the triazolothienopyrimidine scaffold (1a and 1c) were reported as UT-B inhibitors. Compound 1c incorporates a 1,1-difluoroethyl group, which affords improved microsomal stability when compared to the corresponding ethyl-substituted compound 1a. Here, a small focused library (4a-4f) was developed around lead inhibitor 1c to investigate the requirement of an amidine-linked thiophene in the inhibitor scaffold. Two compounds (4a and 4b) with nanomolar inhibitory potency (IC50≈40 nM) were synthesized. Computational docking of lead structure 1c and 4a-4f into a homology model of the UT-B cytoplasmic surface suggested binding with the core heterocycle buried deep into the hydrophobic pore region of the protein.

  6. Positive selection at reproductive ADAM genes with potential intercellular binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassey, Barb; Civetta, Alberto

    2004-05-01

    Many genes with a role in reproduction, including those implicated in fertilization and spermatogenesis, have been shown to evolve at a faster rate relative to genes associated with other functions and tissues. These survey studies usually group a wide variety of genes with different characteristics and evolutionary histories as reproductive genes based on their site of expression or function. We have examined the molecular evolution of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) gene family, a structurally and functionally diverse group of genes expressed in reproductive and somatic tissue to test whether a variety of protein characteristics such as phylogenetic clusters, tissue of expression, and proteolytic and adhesive function can group fast evolving ADAM genes. We found that all genes were evolving under purifying selection (d(N)/d(S) < 1), although reproductive ADAMs, including those implicated in fertilization and spermatogenesis, evolved at the fastest rate. Genes with a role in binding to cell receptors in endogenous tissue appear to be evolving under purifying selection, regardless of the tissue of expression. In contrast, positive selection of codon sites in the disintegrin/cysteine-rich adhesion domains was detected exclusively in ADAMs 2 and 32, two genes expressed in the testis with a potential role in sperm-egg adhesion. Positive selection was detected in the transmembrane/cytosolic tail region of ADAM genes expressed in a variety of tissues.

  7. Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Y-box Binding Protein Gene in Min Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dong-jie; Liu Di; Wang Liang; He Xin-miao; Wang Wen-tao

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the gene sequence of Min pig Y-box binding protein (YB-1) gene, the complete coding sequence of Min pig YB-1 gene was cloned by RT-PCR, the sequence features were analyzed by some software and online website. The results showed that the complete CDS of Min pig Y-box was found to be 975 bp long, encoding 324 amino acids. It contained a conserved cold shock domain and several phosphorylation sites, but had no transmembrane domains, and was consistent with a protein found in the cytoplasm. Min pig YB-1 nucleotides shared high similarity (61.37%-97.66%) with other mammals.

  8. Glutamine synthetase stabilizes the binding of GlnR to nitrogen fixation gene operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Gabriela de C; Hauf, Ksenia; Sant'Anna, Fernando H; Forchhammer, Karl; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2017-03-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a high energy demanding process carried out by diazotrophic microorganisms that supply combined nitrogen to the biosphere. The genes related to BNF are strictly regulated, but these mechanisms are poorly understood in gram-positive bacteria. The transcription factor GlnR was proposed to regulate nitrogen fixation-related genes based on Paenibacillus comparative genomics. In order to validate this proposal, we investigated BNF regulatory sequences in Paenibacillus riograndensis SBR5(T) genome. We identified GlnR-binding sites flanking σ(A) -binding sites upstream from BNF-related genes. GlnR binding to these sites was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. GlnR-DNA affinity is greatly enhanced when GlnR is in complex with feedback-inhibited (glutamine-occupied) glutamine synthetase (GS). GlnR-GS complex formation is also modulated by ATP and AMP. Thereby, gene repression exerted by the GlnR-GS complex is coupled with nitrogen (glutamine levels) and energetic status (ATP and AMP). Finally, we propose a DNA-looping model based on multiple operator sites that represents a strong and strict regulation for these genes. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. DNA-Binding Kinetics Determines the Mechanism of Noise-Induced Switching in Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Margaret J; Chu, Brian K; Roy, Mahua; Read, Elizabeth L

    2015-10-20

    Gene regulatory networks are multistable dynamical systems in which attractor states represent cell phenotypes. Spontaneous, noise-induced transitions between these states are thought to underlie critical cellular processes, including cell developmental fate decisions, phenotypic plasticity in fluctuating environments, and carcinogenesis. As such, there is increasing interest in the development of theoretical and computational approaches that can shed light on the dynamics of these stochastic state transitions in multistable gene networks. We applied a numerical rare-event sampling algorithm to study transition paths of spontaneous noise-induced switching for a ubiquitous gene regulatory network motif, the bistable toggle switch, in which two mutually repressive genes compete for dominant expression. We find that the method can efficiently uncover detailed switching mechanisms that involve fluctuations both in occupancies of DNA regulatory sites and copy numbers of protein products. In addition, we show that the rate parameters governing binding and unbinding of regulatory proteins to DNA strongly influence the switching mechanism. In a regime of slow DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, spontaneous switching occurs relatively frequently and is driven primarily by fluctuations in DNA-site occupancies. In contrast, in a regime of fast DNA-binding/unbinding kinetics, switching occurs rarely and is driven by fluctuations in levels of expressed protein. Our results demonstrate how spontaneous cell phenotype transitions involve collective behavior of both regulatory proteins and DNA. Computational approaches capable of simulating dynamics over many system variables are thus well suited to exploring dynamic mechanisms in gene networks.

  10. Biological characterization of liver fatty acid binding gene from miniature pig liver cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y H; Wang, K F; Zhang, S; Fan, Y N; Guan, W J; Ma, Y H

    2015-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding proteins (L-FABP) are a family of small, highly conserved, cytoplasmic proteins that bind to long-chain fatty acids and other hydrophobic ligands. In this study, a full-length enriched cDNA library was successfully constructed from Wuzhishan miniature pig, and then the L-FABP gene was cloned from this cDNA library and an expression vector (pEGFP-N3-L-FABP) was constructed in vitro. This vector was transfected into hepatocytes to test its function. The results of western blotting analysis demonstrated that the L-FABP gene from our full-length enriched cDNA library regulated downstream genes, including the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor family in hepatocytes. This study provides a theoretical basis and experimental evidence for the application of L-FABP for the treatment of liver injury.

  11. ISWI and CHD chromatin remodelers bind promoters but act in gene bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel E Zentner

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent nucleosome remodelers influence genetic processes by altering nucleosome occupancy, positioning, and composition. In vitro, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ISWI and CHD remodelers require ∼30-85 bp of extranucleosomal DNA to reposition nucleosomes, but linker DNA in S. cerevisiae averages <20 bp. To address this discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo observations, we have mapped the genomic distributions of the yeast Isw1, Isw2, and Chd1 remodelers at base-pair resolution on native chromatin. Although these remodelers act in gene bodies, we find that they are also highly enriched at nucleosome-depleted regions (NDRs, where they bind to extended regions of DNA adjacent to particular transcription factors. Surprisingly, catalytically inactive remodelers show similar binding patterns. We find that remodeler occupancy at NDRs and gene bodies is associated with nucleosome turnover and transcriptional elongation rate, suggesting that remodelers act on regions of transient nucleosome unwrapping or depletion within gene bodies subsequent to transcriptional elongation.

  12. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-06

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  13. Small-Molecule Fusion Inhibitors Bind the pH-Sensing Stable Signal Peptide-GP2 Subunit Interface of the Lassa Virus Envelope Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Sundaresh; Whitby, Landon R.; Casquilho-Gray, Hedi E.; York, Joanne; Boger, Dale L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Arenavirus species are responsible for severe life-threatening hemorrhagic fevers in western Africa and South America. Without effective antiviral therapies or vaccines, these viruses pose serious public health and biodefense concerns. Chemically distinct small-molecule inhibitors of arenavirus entry have recently been identified and shown to act on the arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) to prevent membrane fusion. In the tripartite GPC complex, pH-dependent membrane fusion is triggered through a poorly understood interaction between the stable signal peptide (SSP) and the transmembrane fusion subunit GP2, and our genetic studies have suggested that these small-molecule inhibitors act at this interface to antagonize fusion activation. Here, we have designed and synthesized photoaffinity derivatives of the 4-acyl-1,6-dialkylpiperazin-2-one class of fusion inhibitors and demonstrate specific labeling of both the SSP and GP2 subunits in a native-like Lassa virus (LASV) GPC trimer expressed in insect cells. Photoaddition is competed by the parental inhibitor and other chemically distinct compounds active against LASV, but not those specific to New World arenaviruses. These studies provide direct physical evidence that these inhibitors bind at the SSP-GP2 interface. We also find that GPC containing the uncleaved GP1-GP2 precursor is not susceptible to photo-cross-linking, suggesting that proteolytic maturation is accompanied by conformational changes at this site. Detailed mapping of residues modified by the photoaffinity adducts may provide insight to guide the further development of these promising lead compounds as potential therapeutic agents to treat Lassa hemorrhagic fever. IMPORTANCE Hemorrhagic fever arenaviruses cause lethal infections in humans and, in the absence of licensed vaccines or specific antiviral therapies, are recognized to pose significant threats to public health and biodefense. Lead small-molecule inhibitors that target the

  14. Identification of inhibitors that target dual-specificity phosphatase 5 provide new insights into the binding requirements for the two phosphate pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Terrence S; Span, Elise A; Kalous, Kelsey S; Bongard, Robert; Gastonguay, Adam; Lepley, Michael A; Kutty, Raman G; Nayak, Jaladhi; Bohl, Chris; Lange, Rachel G; Sarker, Majher I; Talipov, Marat R; Rathore, Rajendra; Ramchandran, Ramani; Sem, Daniel S

    2015-08-19

    Dual-specificity phosphatase-5 (DUSP5) plays a central role in vascular development and disease. We present a p-nitrophenol phosphate (pNPP) based enzymatic assay to screen for inhibitors of the phosphatase domain of DUSP5. pNPP is a mimic of the phosphorylated tyrosine on the ERK2 substrate (pERK2) and binds the DUSP5 phosphatase domain with a Km of 7.6 ± 0.4 mM. Docking followed by inhibitor verification using the pNPP assay identified a series of polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that occupy the DUSP5 active site in the region that is likely occupied by the dual-phosphorylated ERK2 substrate tripeptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr). Secondary assays were performed with full length DUSP5 with ERK2 as substrate. The most potent inhibitor has a naphthalene trisulfonate (NTS) core. A search for similar compounds in a drug database identified suramin, a dimerized form of NTS. While suramin appears to be a potent and competitive inhibitor (25 ± 5 μM), binding to the DUSP5 phosphatase domain more tightly than the monomeric ligands of which it is comprised, it also aggregates. Further ligand-based screening, based on a pharmacophore derived from the 7 Å separation of sulfonates on inhibitors and on sulfates present in the DUSP5 crystal structure, identified a disulfonated and phenolic naphthalene inhibitor (CSD (3) _2320) with IC₅₀ of 33 μM that is similar to NTS and does not aggregate. The new DUSP5 inhibitors we identify in this study typically have sulfonates 7 Å apart, likely positioning them where the two phosphates of the substrate peptide (pThr-Glu-pTyr) bind, with one inhibitor also positioning a phenolic hydroxyl where the water nucleophile may reside. Polysulfonated aromatic compounds do not commonly appear in drugs and have a tendency to aggregate. One FDA-approved polysulfonated drug, suramin, inhibits DUSP5 and also aggregates. Docking and modeling studies presented herein identify polysulfonated aromatic inhibitors that do not aggregate, and provide

  15. Binding mode analyses and pharmacophore model development for stilbene derivatives as a novel and competitive class of α-glucosidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuno; Kim, Songmi; Kim, Jun Young; Arooj, Mahreen; Kim, Siu; Hwang, Swan; Kim, Byeong-Woo; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Keun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Stilbene urea derivatives as a novel and competitive class of non-glycosidic α-glucosidase inhibitors are effective for the treatment of type II diabetes and obesity. The main purposes of our molecular modeling study are to explore the most suitable binding poses of stilbene derivatives with analyzing the binding affinity differences and finally to develop a pharmacophore model which would represents critical features responsible for α-glucosidase inhibitory activity. Three-dimensional structure of S. cerevisiae α-glucosidase was built by homology modeling method and the structure was used for the molecular docking study to find out the initial binding mode of compound 12, which is the most highly active one. The initial structure was subjected to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for protein structure adjustment at compound 12-bound state. Based on the adjusted conformation, the more reasonable binding modes of the stilbene urea derivatives were obtained from molecular docking and MD simulations. The binding mode of the derivatives was validated by correlation analysis between experimental Ki value and interaction energy. Our results revealed that the binding modes of the potent inhibitors were engaged with important hydrogen bond, hydrophobic, and π-interactions. With the validated compound 12-bound structure obtained from combining approach of docking and MD simulation, a proper four featured pharmacophore model was generated. It was also validated by comparison of fit values with the Ki values. Thus, these results will be helpful for understanding the relationship between binding mode and bioactivity and for designing better inhibitors from stilbene derivatives.

  16. Computational analysis of BACE1-ligand complex crystal structures and linear discriminant analysis for identification of BACE1 inhibitors with anti P-glycoprotein binding property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoharan, Prabu; Chennoju, Kiranmai; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2017-01-12

    More than 100 years of research on Alzheimer's disease didn't yield a potential cure for this dreadful disease. Poor Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) permeability and P-glycoprotein binding of BACE1 inhibitors are the major causes for the failure of these molecules during clinical trials. The design of BACE1 inhibitors with a balance of sufficient affinity to the binding site and little or no interaction with P-glycoproteins is indispensable. Identification and understanding of protein-ligand interactions are essential for ligand optimization process. Structure-based drug design (SBDD) efforts led to a steady accumulation of BACE1-ligand crystal complexes in the PDB. This study focuses on analyses of 153 BACE1-ligand complexes for the direct contacts (hydrogen bonds and weak interactions) observed between protein and ligand and indirect contacts (water-mediated hydrogen bonds), observed in BACE1-ligand complex crystal structures. Intraligand hydrogen bonds were analyzed, with focus on ligand P-glycoprotein efflux. The interactions are dissected specific to subsites in the active site and discussed. The observed protein-ligand and intraligand interactions were used to develop the linear discriminant model for the identification of BACE1 inhibitors with less or no P-glycoprotein binding property. Excellent statistical results and model's ability to correctly predict a new data-set with an accuracy of 92% is achieved. The results are retrospectively analyzed to give input for the design of potential BACE1 inhibitors.

  17. Febrifugine analogues as Leishmania donovani trypanothione reductase inhibitors: binding energy analysis assisted by molecular docking, ADMET and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajan Kumar; Kumbhar, Bajarang Vasant; Srivastava, Shubham; Malik, Ruchi; Sundar, Shyam; Kunwar, Ambarish; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis affects people from 70 countries worldwide, mostly from Indian, African and south American continent. The increasing resistance to antimonial, miltefosine and frequent toxicity of amphotericin B drives an urgent need to develop an antileishmanial drug with excellent efficacy and safety profile. In this study we have docked series of febrifugine analogues (n = 8813) against trypanothione reductase in three sequential docking modes. Extra precision docking resulted into 108 ligands showing better docking score as compared to two reference ligand. Furthermore, 108 febrifugine analogues and reference inhibitor clomipramine were subjected to ADMET, QikProp and molecular mechanics, the generalized born model and solvent accessibility study to ensure the toxicity caused by compounds and binding-free energy, respectively. Two best ligands (FFG7 and FFG2) qualifying above screening parameters were further subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. Conducting these studies, here we confirmed that 6-chloro-3-[3-(3-hydroxy-2-piperidyl)-2-oxo-propyl]-7-(4-pyridyl) quinazolin-4-one can be potential drug candidate to fight against Leishmania donovani parasites.

  18. Contribution of Inhibitor of DNA Binding/Differentiation-3 and Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals to Pathophysiological Aspects of Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Avecilla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overwhelming increase in the global incidence of obesity and its associated complications such as insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, pulmonary disease, and degenerative disorders including dementia constitutes a serious public health problem. The Inhibitor of DNA Binding/Differentiation-3 (ID3, a member of the ID family of transcriptional regulators, has been shown to play a role in adipogenesis and therefore ID3 may influence obesity and metabolic health in response to environmental factors. This review will highlight the current understanding of how ID3 may contribute to complex chronic diseases via metabolic perturbations. Based on the increasing number of reports that suggest chronic exposure to and accumulation of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs within the human body are associated with metabolic disorders, we will also consider the impact of these chemicals on ID3. Improved understanding of the ID3 pathways by which exposure to EDCs can potentiate complex chronic diseases in populations with metabolic disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, and glucose intolerance will likely provide useful knowledge in the prevention and control of complex chronic diseases associated with exposure to environmental pollutants.

  19. Hypomethylation of DNA-binding inhibitor 4 serves as a potential biomarker in distinguishing acquired tamoxifen-refractory breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yonghui; Zhang, Bin; Fang, Jing; Cao, Xuchen

    2015-01-01

    To explore the methylation status of DNA-binding inhibitor 4 (ID4) in tamoxifen-refractory (TR) breast cancer. From January 2012 to December 2014, breast cancer patients managed by radical mastectomy previously and receiving tamoxifen treatment for at least 12 months were enrolled. According to the response to tamoxifen, patients were divided into TR group and tamoxifen-sensitive (TS) group. Genomic DNA was isolated from fasting venous blood, and methylight technique was applied to determine the methylation status of ID4. 43 patients with TS breast cancer and 31 patients with TR breast cancer were enrolled. No significant difference between groups was observed in term of patients' characteristics, such as age (P=0.693), progesterone receptor (P=0.970), menopausal status (P=0.784) and histological type (P=0.537), while the stage of cancer in TR group was significantly higher than TS group (Pset at 6.8% in survival analysis, log-rank test indicated the risk of disease progression was comparable between patients with ID4 hypermethylation or hypomethylation (P=0.287). ID4 hypomethylation is present in TR breast cancer, and it may serve as a potential biomarker in distinguishing TR breast cancer. However, the results need further validation in larger studies.

  20. Structures of genes encoding phospholipase A2 inhibitors from the serum of Trimeresurus flavoviridis snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Chijiwa, T; Nakashima, K; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, S; Kihara, H; Ohno, M

    1997-05-20

    Inhibitors (PLIs) against snake venom gland phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) have been found in their sera. A cDNA encoding a PLI from Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Tf, habu snake, Crotalinae) serum, cPLI-A, was isolated from the Tf liver cDNA library and sequenced. Northern blot analysis with cPLI-A showed that PLIs are expressed only in liver. Genes for PLIs, gPLI-A and gPLI-B, were isolated from the Tf genomic DNA library and their nucleotide (nt) sequences were determined. The genes consisted of four exons and three introns, and exon 4 encoded the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD)-like motif. Comparison of the nt sequences between gPLI-A and gPLI-B showed that these genes are highly homologous, including introns, except that exon 3 is rich in nonsynonymous nt substitutions which are almost four times as frequent as synonymous nt substitutions. This evolutionary feature of PLI genes is different from that of venom gland PLA2 isozyme genes in which nonsynonymous nt substitutions are spread over the entire mature protein-coding region.

  1. Heparin-binding secretory transforming gene (hst) facilitates rat lactotrope cell tumorigenesis and induces prolactin gene transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Shimon, I; Hüttner, A; Said, J; Spirina, O M; Melmed, S

    1996-01-01

    We have shown previously that human prolactinomas express transforming sequences of the heparin-binding secretory transforming gene (hst) which encodes fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4). To elucidate the role of hst in pituitary tumorigenesis we treated primary rat pituitary and pituitary tumor cell cultures with recombinant FGF-4 and also stably transfected pituitary cell lines with full-length human hst cDNA. Transfectants were screened for hst mRNA expression and FGF-4 production. FGF-4 (...

  2. Isolation of tomato proteinase inhibitorgene and the function of its intron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The genomic DNA sequence of tomato proteinase inhibitorgene (named tin2i, whose accession number in GenBank is AF007240) was isolated by PCR techniques. The intron sequence (TPI), with a length of 109 bp, owns typical structures of GT/AG dinucleotides at both ends and high content of AT base pairs which accounts for 80.7% of the total nucleotides. As shown by recombination experiment, the TPI sequence could efficiently promote the expression of the reporter gene gusA and this effect was independent of the position and orientation of the intron, thus showing its role as an enhancer. Such experiments as gel retardation assays, GUS histochemical staining and GUS fluorometric assays further demonstrated that TPI sequence maybe has promoter-like activity.

  3. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Hu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A and inhibitor (GRL-0519 complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors.

  4. Suppression of extracellular invertase inhibitor gene expression improves seed weight in soybean (Glycine max).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaofei; Su, Tao; Han, Mei; Wei, Lai; Wang, Weiwei; Yu, Zhiyuan; Xue, Yongguo; Wei, Hongbin; Du, Yejie; Greiner, Steffen; Rausch, Thomas; Liu, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Cell wall invertase (CWI) and vacuolar invertase (VI) play multiple functions in plant growth. As well as depending on transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, there is growing evidence that CWI and VI are also subject to post-translational control by small inhibitory proteins. Despite the significance of this, genes encoding inhibitors, their molecular and biochemical properties, and their potential roles in regulating seed production have not been well documented in soybean (Glycine max). In this study, two invertase inhibitor isoforms, GmCIF1 and GmC/VIF2, were characterized to possess inhibitory activities in vitro via heterologous expression. Transcript analyses showed that they were predominantly expressed in developing seeds and in response to ABA. In accordance with this, surveys of primary targets showed subcellular localizations to the apoplast in tobacco epidermis after expressing YFP-fusion constructs. Investigations using RNAi transgenic plants demonstrated marked elevations of CWI activities and improvements in seed weight in conjunction with higher accumulations of hexoses, starch, and protein in mature seeds. Further co-expression analyses of GmCIF1 with several putative CWI genes corroborated the notion that GmCIF1 modulation of CWI that affects seed weight is mainly contingent on post-translational mechanisms. Overall, the results suggest that post-translational elevation of CWI by silencing of GmCIF1 expression orchestrates the process of seed maturation through fine-tuning sucrose metabolism and sink strength.

  5. A competitive inhibitor that reduces recruitment of androgen receptor to androgen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Shapiro, David J

    2012-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in the growth and progression of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancers. To identify novel inhibitors of AR transactivation that block growth of prostate cancer cells, a luciferase-based high-throughput screen of ~160,000 small molecules was performed in cells stably expressing AR and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-luciferase reporter. CPIC (1-(3-(2-chlorophenoxy) propyl)-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile) was identified as a small molecule that blocks AR transactivation to a greater extent than other steroid receptors. CPIC inhibited AR-mediated proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, with minimal toxicity in AR-negative cell lines. CPIC treatment also reduced the anchorage-independent growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. CPIC functioned as a pure antagonist by inhibiting the expression of AR-regulated genes in LAPC-4 cells that express wild-type AR and exhibited weak agonist activity in LNCaP cells that express the mutant AR-T877A. CPIC treatment did not reduce AR levels or alter its nuclear localization. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the site of action of CPIC. CPIC inhibited recruitment of androgen-bound AR to the PSA promoter and enhancer sites to a greater extent than bicalutamide. CPIC is a new therapeutic inhibitor that targets AR-mediated gene activation with potential to arrest the growth of prostate cancer.

  6. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlund Henri R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs, whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Results Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. Conclusion We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  7. Chicken genome analysis reveals novel genes encoding biotin-binding proteins related to avidin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Einari A; Hytönen, Vesa P; Grapputo, Alessandro; Nordlund, Henri R; Kulomaa, Markku S; Laitinen, Olli H

    2005-03-18

    A chicken egg contains several biotin-binding proteins (BBPs), whose complete DNA and amino acid sequences are not known. In order to identify and characterise these genes and proteins we studied chicken cDNAs and genes available in the NCBI database and chicken genome database using the reported N-terminal amino acid sequences of chicken egg-yolk BBPs as search strings. Two separate hits showing significant homology for these N-terminal sequences were discovered. For one of these hits, the chromosomal location in the immediate proximity of the avidin gene family was found. Both of these hits encode proteins having high sequence similarity with avidin suggesting that chicken BBPs are paralogous to avidin family. In particular, almost all residues corresponding to biotin binding in avidin are conserved in these putative BBP proteins. One of the found DNA sequences, however, seems to encode a carboxy-terminal extension not present in avidin. We describe here the predicted properties of the putative BBP genes and proteins. Our present observations link BBP genes together with avidin gene family and shed more light on the genetic arrangement and variability of this family. In addition, comparative modelling revealed the potential structural elements important for the functional and structural properties of the putative BBP proteins.

  8. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  9. Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry Reveals Specific Changes in the Local Flexibility of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1 upon Binding to the Somatomedin B Domain of Vitronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten Beck; Hirschberg, Daniel; Jansson, Anna

    2012-01-01

    and increases the thermal stability of the protein dramatically. We have used hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to assess the inherent structural flexibility of PAI-1 and to monitor the changes induced by SMB binding. Our data show that the PAI-1 core consisting of β-sheet B is rather protected......The native fold of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) represents an active metastable conformation that spontaneously converts to an inactive latent form. Binding of the somatomedin B domain (SMB) of the endogenous cofactor vitronectin to PAI-1 delays the transition to the latent state...... against exchange with the solvent, while the remainder of the molecule is more dynamic. SMB binding causes a pronounced and widespread stabilization of PAI-1 that is not confined to the binding interface with SMB. We further explored the local structural flexibility in a mutationally stabilized PAI-1...

  10. Transcriptional effect of a calmodulin inhibitor, W-7, on the ligninolytic enzyme genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takaiku; Kitaura, Hironori; Minami, Masahiko; Honda, Yoichi; Watanabe, Takashi; Ueda, Akio; Suzuki, Kazumi; Irie, Toshikazu

    2010-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a calmodulin (CaM) inhibitor, W-7, on the expression of lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes in Phanerochaete chrysosporium to consider the role of cam gene, which was upregulated in parallel with the total activities of LiP and MnP in our previous transcriptomic analysis. The addition of 100 μM W-7 to the fungal cultures repressed the total activities of LiP and MnP, whereas the addition of 100 μM W-5, which is a control drug of W-7, retained approximately half of them, indicating that the effect of W-7 was attributable to CaM inhibition. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that most of lip and mnp isozyme genes predicted from whole-genome data were significantly inhibited by W-7 at the transcription level (P ≤ 0.05). These results suggest that CaM has an important role for the expression of isozyme genes of LiP and MnP at the transcription level.

  11. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  12. Molecular cloning of rhamnose-binding lectin gene and its promoter region from snakehead Channa argus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, W Z; Shang, N; Guo, Q L

    2010-09-01

    Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that mediate pathogen recognition and cell-cell interactions. A rhamnose-binding lectin (RBL) gene and its promoter region have been cloned and characterized from snakehead Channa argus. From the transcription initiation site, snakehead rhamnose-binding lectin (SHL) gene extends 2,382 bp to the end of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), and contains nine exons and eight introns. The open reading frame (ORF) of the SHL transcript has 675 bp which encodes 224 amino acids. The molecular structure of SHL is composed of two tandem repeat carbohydrate recognition domains (CRD) with 35% internal identity. Analysis of the gene organization of SHL indicates that the ancestral gene of RBL may diverge and evolve by exon shuffling and gene duplication, producing new forms to play their own roles in various organisms. The characteristics of SHL gene 5' flanking region are the presence of consensus nuclear factor of interleukin 6 (NF-IL6) and IFN-gamma activation (GAS) sites. The results provide indirect evidence that up-regulation of SHL expression may be induced in response to inflammatory stimuli, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma). The transcript of SHL mRNA was expressed in the head kidney, posterior kidney, spleen, liver, intestine, heart, muscle, and ovary. No tissue-specific expressive pattern is different from reported STLs, WCLs, and PFLs, suggesting that different types of RBLs exist in species-specific fish that have evolved and adapted to their surroundings.

  13. Low levels of Bax inhibitor-1 gene expression increase tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma SY5Y cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Wu; Peirong Wang; Shiyao Wang

    2012-01-01

    A human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line with a low level of Bax inhibitor-1 expression was established by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. In control SH-SY5Y cells, tunicamycin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis; however, after Bax inhibitor-1 gene knockdown, cell survival rates were significantly decreased and the degree of apoptosis was significantly increased following tunicamycin treatment. In addition, chromatin condensation and apparent apoptotic phenomena, such as marginalization and cytoplasmic vesicles, were observed. Our findings indicate that Bax inhibitor-1 can delay apoptosis induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  14. Expression of a Buckwheat Trypsin Inhibitor Gene in Escherichia coli and its Effect on Multiple Myeloma IM-9 Cell Proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The gene of buckwheat trypsin inhibitor (BTI) has been cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The yield of this recombinant inhibitor was over 12 mg/L by using one-step purification on a Ni2+-NTA Sepharose column. Its molecular weight was 9322.1 Da, determined by mass spectrum analysis. The MTT and cytometry analyses showed that recombinant BTI could specifically inhibit the proliferation of IM-9 human B lymphoblastoid cells (from patient with multiple myeloma) in a dose-dependent manner. The test of recombinant BTI-induced apoptosis in IM-9 cells implied that the inhibitor might have potential application in the treatment of cancer.

  15. The Microarray Gene Profiling Analysis of Glioblastoma Cancer Cells Reveals Genes Affected by FAK Inhibitor Y15 and Combination of Y15 and Temozolomide

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma cells. Recently, we demonstrated that FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15 significantly decreased tumor growth of DBTRG and U87 cells, especially in combination with temozolomide. In the present report, we performed gene expression analysis in these cells to reveal genes affected by Y15, temozolomide and combination of Y15 and temozolomide. We tested the effect of Y15 on gene expression by Illumina Human HT12v4 microarr...

  16. Ethylene-regulated expression of a tomato fruit ripening gene encoding a proteinase inhibitor I with a glutamic residue at the reactive site.

    OpenAIRE

    Margossian, L J; Federman, A D; Giovannoni, J.J.; Fischer, R L

    1988-01-01

    We report the isolation from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) of an ethylene-responsive member of the proteinase inhibitor gene family. DNA sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA clone indicates that the ethylene-responsive gene is distantly related to the tomato proteinase inhibitor I gene, having 53% sequence identity. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals 47% and 45% sequence identity with the tomato and potato proteinase inhibitor I polypeptides, respectively. Additionally, the ethyl...

  17. Lin28A Binds Active Promoters and Recruits Tet1 to Regulate Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yaxue; Yao, Bing; Shin, Jaehoon; Lin, Li; Kim, Namshik; Song, Qifeng; Liu, Shuang; Su, Yijing; Guo, Junjie U; Huang, Luoxiu; Wan, Jun; Wu, Hao; Qian, Jiang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Zhu, Heng; Ming, Guo-li; Jin, Peng; Song, Hongjun

    2016-01-07

    Lin28, a well-known RNA-binding protein, regulates diverse cellular properties. All physiological functions of Lin28A characterized so far have been attributed to its repression of let-7 miRNA biogenesis or modulation of mRNA translational efficiency. Here we show that Lin28A directly binds to a consensus DNA sequence in vitro and in mouse embryonic stem cells in vivo. ChIP-seq and RNA-seq reveal enrichment of Lin28A binding around transcription start sites and a positive correlation between its genomic occupancy and expression of many associated genes. Mechanistically, Lin28A recruits 5-methylcytosine-dioxygenase Tet1 to genomic binding sites to orchestrate 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine dynamics. Either Lin28A or Tet1 knockdown leads to dysregulated DNA methylation and expression of common target genes. These results reveal a surprising role for Lin28A in transcriptional regulation via epigenetic DNA modifications and have implications for understanding mechanisms underlying versatile functions of Lin28A in mammalian systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genome Wide Analysis of Nucleotide-Binding Site Disease Resistance Genes in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenglong Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding site (NBS disease resistance genes play an important role in defending plants from a variety of pathogens and insect pests. Many R-genes have been identified in various plant species. However, little is known about the NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium distachyon. In this study, using computational analysis of the B. distachyon genome, we identified 126 regular NBS-encoding genes and characterized them on the bases of structural diversity, conserved protein motifs, chromosomal locations, gene duplications, promoter region, and phylogenetic relationships. EST hits and full-length cDNA sequences (from Brachypodium database of 126 R-like candidates supported their existence. Based on the occurrence of conserved protein motifs such as coiled-coil (CC, NBS, leucine-rich repeat (LRR, these regular NBS-LRR genes were classified into four subgroups: CC-NBS-LRR, NBS-LRR, CC-NBS, and X-NBS. Further expression analysis of the regular NBS-encoding genes in Brachypodium database revealed that these genes are expressed in a wide range of libraries, including those constructed from various developmental stages, tissue types, and drought challenged or nonchallenged tissue.

  19. The inhibitor of growth (ING) gene family: potential role in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Mehmet; Gunduz, Esra; Rivera, Rosario S; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2008-06-01

    The discovery of ING1 gene paved the way to the identification of other ING members (ING2-5) and their isoforms associated with cell cycle, apoptosis and senescence. The ING family has been an emerging putative tumor suppressor gene (TSG) in which the major mechanism is through interaction with the determinants of chromatin function and gene-specific transcription factors. The regulatory mechanism highly involves the conserved plant homeodomain (PHD), which binds to histones in a methylation-sensitive manner, suggesting that ING proteins may contribute to the maintenance of the epigenetic code. Furthermore, ING family members contain nuclear localization signals and N-terminal sequences important in the interaction with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetyltransferase (HDAC) that regulate gene promoter activity within chromatin. Although ING proteins have the same PHD motif, the variation in the N-terminal dictates the differences in tumor the suppressive ability of ING in various tumors. Inactivation of the normal function is achieved through allelic loss of genomic regions containing the ING gene, alteration in the ING promoter region, variation of mRNA splicing efficacy or reduced mRNA stability. It is most probably the apparent combination of these aberrant mechanisms that resulted in reduced availability of functional ING protein. In cancer cells, ING transcript levels are often suppressed but the genes are rarely mutated. The mechanism of suppression of ING expression may have to do with the abnormally high methylation levels of the ING gene promoter, which have been correlated with low transcript levels. Emerging evidence on the function of ING and related regulatory mechanisms strongly points to ING as a candidate TSG and therefore a potential target in the molecular therapy of some types of tumor.

  20. Interactions outside the proteinase-binding loop contribute significantly to the inhibition of activated coagulation factor XII by its canonical inhibitor from corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneeva, Vera A; Trubetskov, Mikhail M; Korshunova, Alena V; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Sergienko, Olga V; Lunin, Vladimir G; Panteleev, Mikhail A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I

    2014-05-16

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) is selectively inhibited by corn Hageman factor inhibitor (CHFI) among other plasma proteases. CHFI is considered a canonical serine protease inhibitor that interacts with FXIIa through its protease-binding loop. Here we examined whether the protease-binding loop alone is sufficient for the selective inhibition of serine proteases or whether other regions of a canonical inhibitor are involved. Six CHFI mutants lacking different N- and C-terminal portions were generated. CHFI-234, which lacks the first and fifth disulfide bonds and 11 and 19 amino acid residues at the N and C termini, respectively, exhibited no significant changes in FXIIa inhibition (Ki = 3.2 ± 0.4 nm). CHFI-123, which lacks 34 amino acid residues at the C terminus and the fourth and fifth disulfide bridges, inhibited FXIIa with a Ki of 116 ± 16 nm. To exclude interactions outside the FXIIa active site, a synthetic cyclic peptide was tested. The peptide contained residues 20-45 (Protein Data Bank code 1BEA), and a C29D substitution was included to avoid unwanted disulfide bond formation between unpaired cysteines. Surprisingly, the isolated protease-binding loop failed to inhibit FXIIa but retained partial inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 11.7 ± 1.2 μm) and activated factor XI (Ki = 94 ± 11 μm). Full-length CHFI inhibited trypsin with a Ki of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm and activated factor XI with a Ki of 5.4 ± 0.2 μm. Our results suggest that the protease-binding loop is not sufficient for the interaction between FXIIa and CHFI; other regions of the inhibitor also contribute to specific inhibition.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a new mannose-binding lectin gene from Taxus media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guoyin Kai; Lingxia Zhao; Jingui Zheng; Lei Zhang; Zhiqi Miao; Xiaofen Sun; Kexuan Tanga

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we report the cloning and characterization of the first mannose-binding lectin gene from a gymnosperm plant species, Taxus media. The full-length cDNA of T. media agglutinin (TMA) consisted of 676 bp and contained a 432 bp open reading frame (ORF) encoding a 144 amino acid protein. Comparative analysis showed that TMA had high homology with many previously reported plant mannose-binding lectins and that tma encoded a precursor lectin with a 26-aa signal peptide. Molecular modelling revealed that TMA was a new mannose-binding lectin with three typical mannose-binding boxes like lectins from species of angiosperms. Tissue expression pattern analyses revealed that tma is expressed in a tissue-specific manner in leaves and stems, but not in fruits and roots. Phylogenetic tree analyses showed that TMA belonged to the structurally and evolutionarily closely related monocot mannose-binding lectin superfamily. This study provides useful information to understand the molecular evolution of plant lectins.

  2. A Polymorphism in the IL-5 Gene is Associated with Inhibitor Development in Severe Hemophilia A Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İnanç Değer Fidancı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A severe complication in the replacement therapy of hemophilia A (HA patients is the development of alloantibodies (inhibitors against factor VIII, which neutralizes the substituted factor. The primary genetic risk factors influencing the development of inhibitors are F8 gene mutations. Interleukins and cytokines that are involved in the regulation of B-lymphocyte development are other possible targets as genetic risk factors. This study assesses the possible involvement of 9 selected single nucleotide gene polymorphisms (SNPs with interleukins (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ in inhibitor development in severely affected HA patients carrying a null mutation in the F8 gene. METHODS: A total of 173 HA patients were screened for intron 22 inversion and null mutations (nonsense and deletions. Genotyping of a total of 9 SNPs in genes IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, TGF-β1, and IFN-γ in 103 patients and 100 healthy individuals was carried out. RESULTS: An association analysis between 42 inhibitor (+ and 61 inhibitor (- patients showed a significant association with the T allele of rs2069812 in the IL-5 gene promoter and patients with inhibitors (p=0.0251. The TT genotype was also significantly associated with this group with a p-value of 0.0082, odds ratio of about 7, and confidence interval of over 90%, suggesting that it is the recessive susceptibility allele and that the C allele is the dominant protective allele. CONCLUSION: The lack of other variants in the IL-5 gene of patients and controls suggests that rs2069812 may be a regulatory SNP and may have a role in B-lymphocyte development, constituting a genetic risk factor in antibody development.

  3. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  4. Diversity of the luciferin binding protein gene in bioluminescent dinoflagellates--insights from a new gene in Noctiluca scintillans and sequences from gonyaulacoid genera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiadi, Martha; Iglesias-Rodriguez, Maria Debora

    2014-01-01

    Dinoflagellate bioluminescence systems operate with or without a luciferin binding protein, representing two distinct modes of light production. However, the distribution, diversity, and evolution of the luciferin binding protein gene within bioluminescent dinoflagellates are not well known. We used PCR to detect and partially sequence this gene from the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans and a group of ecologically important gonyaulacoid species. We report an additional luciferin binding protein gene in N. scintillans which is not attached to luciferase, further to its typical combined bioluminescence gene. This supports the hypothesis that a profound re-organization of the bioluminescence system has taken place in this organism. We also show that the luciferin binding protein gene is present in the genera Ceratocorys, Gonyaulax, and Protoceratium, and is prevalent in bioluminescent species of Alexandrium. Therefore, this gene is an integral component of the standard molecular bioluminescence machinery in dinoflagellates. Nucleotide sequences showed high within-strain variation among gene copies, revealing a highly diverse gene family comprising multiple gene types in some organisms. Phylogenetic analyses showed that, in some species, the evolution of the luciferin binding protein gene was different from the organism's general phylogenies, highlighting the complex evolutionary history of dinoflagellate bioluminescence systems.

  5. Molecular evolution of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wild emmer wheat and its ecological association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baum Bernard R

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background α-Amylase inhibitors are attractive candidates for the control of seed weevils, as these insects are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. In this study, we aimed to reveal the structure and diversity of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes in wild emmer wheat from Israel and to elucidate the relationship between the emmer wheat genes and ecological factors using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers. Another objective of this study was to find out whether there were any correlations between SNPs in functional protein-coding genes and the environment. Results The influence of ecological factors on the genetic structure of dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes was evaluated by specific SNP markers. A total of 244 dimeric α-amylase inhibitor genes were obtained from 13 accessions in 10 populations. Seventy-five polymorphic positions and 74 haplotypes were defined by sequence analysis. Sixteen out of the 75 SNP markers were designed to detect SNP variations in wild emmer wheat accessions from different populations in Israel. The proportion of polymorphic loci P (5%, the expected heterozygosity He, and Shannon's information index in the 16 populations were 0.887, 0.404, and 0.589, respectively. The populations of wild emmer wheat showed great diversity in gene loci both between and within populations. Based on the SNP marker data, the genetic distance of pair-wise comparisons of the 16 populations displayed a sharp genetic differentiation over long geographic distances. The values of P, He, and Shannon's information index were negatively correlated with three climatic moisture factors, whereas the same values were positively correlated by Spearman rank correlation coefficients' analysis with some of the other ecological factors. Conclusion The populations of wild emmer wheat showed a wide range of diversity in dimeric α-amylase inhibitors, both between and within populations. We suggested that SNP markers are useful

  6. A colostrum trypsin inhibitor gene expressed in the Cape fur seal mammary gland during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharo, Elizabeth A; Cane, Kylie N; McCoey, Julia; Buckle, Ashley M; Oosthuizen, W H; Guinet, Christophe; Arnould, John P Y

    2016-03-01

    The colostrum trypsin inhibitor (CTI) gene and transcript were cloned from the Cape fur seal mammary gland and CTI identified by in silico analysis of the Pacific walrus and polar bear genomes (Order Carnivora), and in marine and terrestrial mammals of the Orders Cetartiodactyla (yak, whales, camel) and Perissodactyla (white rhinoceros). Unexpectedly, Weddell seal CTI was predicted to be a pseudogene. Cape fur seal CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of a pregnant multiparous seal, but not in a seal in its first pregnancy. While bovine CTI is expressed for 24-48 h postpartum (pp) and secreted in colostrum only, Cape fur seal CTI was detected for at least 2-3 months pp while the mother was suckling its young on-shore. Furthermore, CTI was expressed in the mammary gland of only one of the lactating seals that was foraging at-sea. The expression of β-casein (CSN2) and β-lactoglobulin II (LGB2), but not CTI in the second lactating seal foraging at-sea suggested that CTI may be intermittently expressed during lactation. Cape fur seal and walrus CTI encode putative small, secreted, N-glycosylated proteins with a single Kunitz/bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) domain indicative of serine protease inhibition. Mature Cape fur seal CTI shares 92% sequence identity with Pacific walrus CTI, but only 35% identity with BPTI. Structural homology modelling of Cape fur seal CTI and Pacific walrus trypsin based on the model of the second Kunitz domain of human tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and porcine trypsin (Protein Data Bank: 1TFX) confirmed that CTI inhibits trypsin in a canonical fashion. Therefore, pinniped CTI may be critical for preventing the proteolytic degradation of immunoglobulins that are passively transferred from mother to young via colostrum and milk.

  7. Assessment of Rhizospheric Microorganisms of Transgenic Populus tomentosa with Cowpea Trypsin Inhibitor (CpTI) Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    To have a preliminary insight into biosafety of genetically transformed hybrid triploid poplars (Populus tomentosa × P. bolleana) × P. tomentosa with the cowpea trypsin inhibitor (CpTI) gene, two layers of rhizospheric soil (from 0 to 20 cm deep and from 20 to 40 cm deep, respectively) were collected for microorganism culture, counting assay and PCR analysis to assess the potential impact of transgenic poplars on non-target microorganism population and transgene dispersal. When the same soil layer of suspension stock solution was diluted at both 1:1 000 and 1:10 000 rates, there were no significant differences in bacterium colony numbers between the inoculation plates of both transgenic and non-transgenic poplars. The uniform results were revealed for both soil layer suspension solutions of identical poplars at both dilution rates except for non-transgenic poplars at 1:10 000 dilution rates from the same type of soil. No significant variation in morphology of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria was observed under the microscope. The potential transgene dispersal from root exudates or fallen leaves to non-target microbes was repudiated by PCR analysis, in which no CpTI gene specific DNA band was amplified for 15 sites of transgenic rhizospheric soil samples. It can be concluded that transgenic poplar with the CpTI gene has no severe impact on rhizospheric microorganisms and is tentatively safe to surrounding soil micro-ecosystem.

  8. Structural analysis of ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034) binding to protein kinase A catalytic subunit and rational design of bisubstrate analogue inhibitors of basophilic protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavogina, Darja; Lust, Marje; Viil, Indrek; König, Norbert; Raidaru, Gerda; Rogozina, Jevgenia; Enkvist, Erki; Uri, Asko; Bossemeyer, Dirk

    2009-01-22

    The crystal structure of a complex of the catalytic subunit (type alpha) of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA C alpha) with ARC-type inhibitor (ARC-1034), the presumed lead scaffold of previously reported adenosine-oligo-arginine conjugate-based (ARC-type) inhibitors, was solved. Structural elements important for interaction with the kinase were established with specifically modified derivatives of the lead compound. On the basis of this knowledge, a new generation of inhibitors, conjugates of adenosine-4'-dehydroxymethyl-4'-carboxylic acid moiety and oligo(D-arginine), was developed with inhibitory constants well into the subnanomolar range. The structural determinants of selectivity of the new compounds were established in assays with ROCK-II and PKBgamma.

  9. Arabidopsis SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex binds both promoters and terminators to regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archacki, Rafal; Yatusevich, Ruslan; Buszewicz, Daniel; Krzyczmonik, Katarzyna; Patryn, Jacek; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Biecek, Przemyslaw; Wilczynski, Bartek; Koblowska, Marta; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej; Swiezewski, Szymon

    2017-04-07

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes are important regulators of gene expression in Eukaryotes. In plants, SWI/SNF-type complexes have been shown critical for transcriptional control of key developmental processes, growth and stress responses. To gain insight into mechanisms underlying these roles, we performed whole genome mapping of the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit BRM in Arabidopsis thaliana, combined with transcript profiling experiments. Our data show that BRM occupies thousands of sites in Arabidopsis genome, most of which located within or close to genes. Among identified direct BRM transcriptional targets almost equal numbers were up- and downregulated upon BRM depletion, suggesting that BRM can act as both activator and repressor of gene expression. Interestingly, in addition to genes showing canonical pattern of BRM enrichment near transcription start site, many other genes showed a transcription termination site-centred BRM occupancy profile. We found that BRM-bound 3΄ gene regions have promoter-like features, including presence of TATA boxes and high H3K4me3 levels, and possess high antisense transcriptional activity which is subjected to both activation and repression by SWI/SNF complex. Our data suggest that binding to gene terminators and controlling transcription of non-coding RNAs is another way through which SWI/SNF complex regulates expression of its targets. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid.

  11. Molecular Identification and Sequencing of Mannose Binding Protein (MBP Gene of Acanthamoeba palestinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaeian

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acanthamoeba keratitis develops by pathogenic Acanthamoeba such as A. pal­es­tinen­sis. Indeed this species is one of the known causative agents of amoebic keratitis in Iran. Mannose Binding Protein (MBP is the main pathogenicity factors for developing this sight threatening disease. We aimed to characterize MBP gene in pathogenic Acanthamoeba isolates such as A. palestinensis."nMethods: This experimental research was performed in the School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran during 2007-2008.  A. palestinensis was grown on 2% non-nutrient agar overlaid with Escherichia coli. DNA extraction was performed using phenol-chloroform method. PCR reaction and amplification were done using specific primer pairs of MBP. The amplified fragment were purified and sequenced. Finally, the obtained fragment was deposited in the gene data bank."nResults: A 900 bp PCR-product was recovered after PCR reaction. Sequence analysis of the purified PCR product revealed a gene with 943 nucleotides. Homology analysis of the ob­tained sequence showed 81% similarity with the available MBP gene in the gene data bank. The fragment was deposited in the gene data bank under accession number EU678895"nConclusion: MBP is known as the most important factor in Acanthamoeba pathogenesis cas­cade. Therefore, characterization of this gene can aid in developing better therapeutic agents and even immunization of high-risk people.

  12. From Acute to Chronic Pancreatitis: The Role of Mutations in the Pancreatic Secretory Trypsin Inhibitor Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirota M

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI is a potent natural inhibitor of trypsin. We proposed the hypothesis that, if the function of the PSTI is impaired by its genetic mutation, trypsin may easily promote autodigestion causing pancreatitis and we performed a mutational analysis of the PSTI gene in patients with pancreatitis. Two exonic mutations (N34S and R67C were thought to be associated with a predisposition to pancreatitis. The N34S mutation was co-segregated with two intronic mutations, IVS1-37T>C and IVS3-69insTTTT. Although we analyzed the function of the recombinant N34S protein, we could not demonstrate the loss of function of this protein. Intronic mutations, rather than N34S itself (IVS1-37T>C + N34S + IVS3-69insTTTT complex, may be associated with the decreased function of the PSTI. Alternatively, increased digestion of N34S in vivo may be applicable. As for R67C, the conformational alteration of the protein by forming intra-molecular or inter-molecular disulfide bonds with 67Cys was strongly suggested. These results, along with the brand-new findings in PSTI knockout mice, suggest that the genetic mutation of the PSTI is one of the important mechanisms for predisposition to pancreatitis by lowering the trypsin inhibitory function.

  13. Adeno-associated virus mediated endostatin gene therapy in combination with topoisomerase inhibitor effectively controls liver tumor in mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Yi Hong; Myun Hee Lee; Kyung Sup Kim; Hyun Cheol Jung; Jae Kyung Roh; Woo Jin Hyung; Sung Hoon Noh; Seung Ho Choi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: rAAV mediated endostatin gene therapy has been examined as a new method for treating cancer. However,a sustained and high protein delivery is required to achieve the desired therapeutic effects. We evaluated the impact of topoisomerase inhibitors in rAAV delivered endostatin gene therapy in a liver tumor model.METHODS: rAAV containing endostatin expression cassettes were transduced into hepatoma cell lines. To test whether the topoisomerase inhibitor pretreatment increased the expression of endostatin, Western blotting and ELISA were performed. The biologic activity of endostatin was confirmed by endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation assays.The anti-tumor effects of the rAAV-endostatin vector combined with a topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide, were evaluated in a mouse liver tumor model.RESULTS: Topoisomerase inhibitors, including camptothecin and etoposide, were found to increase the endostatin expression level in vitro. The over-expressed endostatin,as a result of pretreatment with a topoisomerase inhibitor,was also biologically active. In animal experiments, the combined therapy of topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide with the rAAV-endostatin vector had the best tumorsuppressive effect and tumor foci were barely observed in livers of the treated mice. Pretreatment with an etoposide increased the level of endostatin in the liver and serum of rAAV-endostatin treated mice. Finally, the mice treated with rAAV-endostatin in combination with etoposide showed the longest survival among the experimental models.CONCLUSION: rAAV delivered endostatin gene therapy in combination with a topoisomerase inhibitor pretreatment is an effective modality for anticancer gene therapy.

  14. Transgenic tobacco plants harboring tomato proteinase inhibitor II gene and their insect resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The plant expression vectors pBCT2 and pBT2 were constructed with the cDNA sequence (tin2) and genomic DNA sequence (tin2i) of tomato proteinase inhibitor II gene respectively. Then the two expression vectors were transferred into tobacco via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404, and transgenic tobacco plants were generated. Molecular analysis and trypsin activity assay showed that both cDNA and genomic DNA were expressed properly in the transgenic plants. Insecticidal activities in these transgenic plants indicated that transgenic tobacco plants carrying tin2i sequence were more resistant to 2-instar larvae of Heliothis armigera Hubner than those carrying tin2 sequence. Therefore the intron of tin2i sequence might be a contributor to insecticidal activity of the transgenic tobacco.

  15. Bicarbonate increases binding affinity of Vibrio cholerae ToxT to virulence gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joshua J; Withey, Jeffrey H

    2014-11-01

    The major Vibrio cholerae virulence gene transcription activator, ToxT, is responsible for the production of the diarrhea-inducing cholera toxin (CT) and the major colonization factor, toxin coregulated pilus (TCP). In addition to the two primary virulence factors mentioned, ToxT is responsible for the activation of accessory virulence genes, such as aldA, tagA, acfA, acfD, tcpI, and tarAB. ToxT activity is negatively modulated by bile and unsaturated fatty acids found in the upper small intestine. Conversely, previous work identified another intestinal signal, bicarbonate, which enhances the ability of ToxT to activate production of CT and TCP. The work presented here further elucidates the mechanism for the enhancement of ToxT activity by bicarbonate. Bicarbonate was found to increase the activation of ToxT-dependent accessory virulence promoters in addition to those that produce CT and TCP. Bicarbonate is taken up into the V. cholerae cell, where it positively affects ToxT activity by increasing DNA binding affinity for the virulence gene promoters that ToxT activates regardless of toxbox configuration. The increase in ToxT binding affinity in the presence of bicarbonate explains the elevated level of virulence gene transcription.

  16. Grainyhead and Zelda compete for binding to the promoters of the earliest-expressed Drosophila genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Melissa M; Botchan, Michael R; Cline, Thomas W

    2010-09-15

    Maternally contributed mRNAs and proteins control the initial stages of development following fertilization. During this time, most of the zygotic genome remains transcriptionally silent. The initiation of widespread zygotic transcription is coordinated with the degradation of maternally provided mRNAs at the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). While most of the genome is silenced prior to the MZT, a small subset of zygotic genes essential for the future development of the organism is transcribed. Previous work in our laboratory and others identified the TAGteam element, a set of related heptameric DNA-sequences in the promoters of many early-expressed Drosophila genes required to drive their unusually early transcription. To understand how this unique subset of genes is regulated, we identified a TAGteam-binding factor Grainyhead (Grh). We demonstrated that Grh and the previously characterized transcriptional activator Zelda (Zld) bind to different TAGteam sequences with varying affinities, and that Grh competes with Zld for TAGteam occupancy. Moreover, overexpression of Grh in the early embryo causes defects in cell division, phenocopying Zld depletion. Our findings indicate that during early embryonic development the precise timing of gene expression is regulated by both the sequence of the TAGteam elements in the promoter and the relative levels of the transcription factors Grh and Zld.

  17. Acquisition of complement inhibitor serine protease factor I and its cofactors C4b-binding protein and factor H by Prevotella intermedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Malm

    Full Text Available Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Prevotella intermedia gives rise to periodontitis and a growing number of studies implies an association of P. intermedia with rheumatoid arthritis. The serine protease Factor I (FI is the central inhibitor of complement degrading complement components C3b and C4b in the presence of cofactors such as C4b-binding protein (C4BP and Factor H (FH. Yet, the significance of complement inhibitor acquisition in P. intermedia infection and FI binding by Gram-negative pathogens has not been addressed. Here we show that P. intermedia isolates bound purified FI as well as FI directly from heat-inactivated human serum. FI bound to bacteria retained its serine protease activity as shown in degradation experiments with (125I-labeled C4b. Since FI requires cofactors for its activity we also investigated the binding of purified cofactors C4BP and FH and found acquisition of both proteins, which retained their activity in FI mediated degradation of C3b and C4b. We propose that FI binding by P. intermedia represents a new mechanism contributing to complement evasion by a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen associated with chronic diseases.

  18. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da Silveira Carlos H

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR. We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. Results We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI, ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. Conclusions The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine residues (with some exceptions. Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the

  19. Analysis of binding properties and specificity through identification of the interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases in silico docked to different inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Cristina; Togawa, Roberto C; Neshich, Izabella A P; Mazoni, Ivan; Mancini, Adauto L; Minardi, Raquel C de Melo; da Silveira, Carlos H; Jardine, José G; Santoro, Marcelo M; Neshich, Goran

    2010-10-20

    Enzymes belonging to the same super family of proteins in general operate on variety of substrates and are inhibited by wide selection of inhibitors. In this work our main objective was to expand the scope of studies that consider only the catalytic and binding pocket amino acids while analyzing enzyme specificity and instead, include a wider category which we have named the Interface Forming Residues (IFR). We were motivated to identify those amino acids with decreased accessibility to solvent after docking of different types of inhibitors to sub classes of serine proteases and then create a table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface as well as their respective occupancies. Our goal is to establish a platform for analysis of the relationship between IFR characteristics and binding properties/specificity for bi-molecular complexes. We propose a novel method for describing binding properties and delineating serine proteases specificity by compiling an exhaustive table of interface forming residues (IFR) for serine proteases and their inhibitors. Currently, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) does not contain all the data that our analysis would require. Therefore, an in silico approach was designed for building corresponding complexes. The IFRs are obtained by "rigid body docking" among 70 structurally aligned, sequence wise non-redundant, serine protease structures with 3 inhibitors: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), ecotine and ovomucoid third domain inhibitor. The table (matrix) of all amino acid positions at the interface and their respective occupancy is created. We also developed a new computational protocol for predicting IFRs for those complexes which were not deciphered experimentally so far, achieving accuracy of at least 0.97. The serine proteases interfaces prefer polar (including glycine) residues (with some exceptions). Charged residues were found to be uniquely prevalent at the interfaces between the "miscellaneous-virus" subfamily

  20. 2-(4-Carbonylphenyl)benzoxazole inhibitors of CETP: attenuation of hERG binding and improved HDLc-raising efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweis, Ramzi F; Hunt, Julianne A; Sinclair, Peter J; Chen, Ying; Eveland, Suzanne S; Guo, Qiu; Hyland, Sheryl A; Milot, Denise P; Cumiskey, Anne-Marie; Latham, Melanie; Rosa, Raymond; Peterson, Larry; Sparrow, Carl P; Anderson, Matt S

    2011-05-01

    The development of 2-phenylbenzoxazoles as inhibitors of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) is described. Efforts focused on finding suitable replacements for the central piperidine with the aim of reducing hERG binding: a main liability of our benchmark benzoxazole (1a). Replacement of the piperidine with a cyclohexyl group successfully attenuated hERG binding, but was accompanied by reduced in vivo efficacy. The approach of substituting a piperidine moiety with an oxazolidinone also attenuated hERG binding. Further refinement of this latter scaffold via SAR at the pyridine terminus and methyl branching on the oxazolidinone led to compounds 7e and 7f, which raised HDLc by 33 and 27mg/dl, respectively, in our transgenic mouse PD model and without the hERG liability of previous series.

  1. Structures of genes encoding TATA box-binding proteins from Trimeresurus gramineus and T. flavoviridis snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, K; Nobuhisa, I; Deshimaru, M; Ogawa, T; Shimohigashi, Y; Fukumaki, Y; Hattori, M; Sakaki, Y; Hattori, S; Ohno, M

    1995-01-23

    A cDNA encoding the Trimeresurus gramineus (Tg; green habu snake) TATA-box-binding protein (TgTBP) was cloned and sequenced. The cDNA encodes a 33-kDa protein with an extensive sequence similarity to those derived from other organisms, except for the N-terminal domain. Genes encoding TgTBP and Trimeresurus flavoviridis (Tf; habu snake) TBP (TfTBP) were isolated using a TgTBP cDNA and their nt sequences were determined. They are the first TBP genes entirely sequenced in higher animals. Both genes span over 15 kb and are constructed from eight exons and seven introns. Comparison of the loci of introns on the aligned amino-acid sequences of TBP from six organisms (Tg, Tf, mouse, Arabidopsis thaliana, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Acanthamoeba castellanii) indicated that there are three highly conserved loci in the C-terminal domain.

  2. Role of a liver fatty acid-binding protein gene in lipid metabolism in chicken hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G L; Na, W; Wang, Y X; Zhang, H F; Li, H; Wang, Q G

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the role of the chicken liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene in lipid metabolism in hepatocytes, and the regulatory relationships between L-FABP and genes related to lipid metabolism. The short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference vector with L-FABP and an eukaryotic expression vector were used. Chicken hepatocytes were subjected to shRNA-mediated knockdown or L-FABP cDNA overexpression. Expression levels of lipid metabolism-related genes and biochemical parameters were detected 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h after transfection with the interference or overexpression plasmids for L-FABP, PPARα and L-BABP expression levels, and the total amount of cholesterol, were significantly affected by L-FABP expression. L-FABP may affect lipid metabolism by regulating PPARα and L-BABP in chicken hepatocytes.

  3. Identification of transcription factor AML-1 binding site upstream of human cytomegalovirus UL111A gene.

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    Xiaoqun Zheng

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV interleukin-10 (hcmvIL-10, encoded by HCMV UL111A gene, is a homolog of human IL-10. It exerts immunomodulatory effects that allow HCMV to evade host defense mechanisms. However, the exact mechanism underlying the regulation of hcmvIL-10 expression is not well understood. The transcription factor acute myeloid leukemia 1 (AML-1 plays an important role in the regulation of various genes involved in the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. A putative AML-1 binding site is present within the upstream regulatory region (URR of UL111A gene. To provide evidence that AML-1 is involved in regulating UL111A gene expression, we examined the interaction of AML-1 with the URR of UL111A in HCMV-infected human monocytic THP-1 cells using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. HcmvIL-10 transcription was detected in differentiated THP-1 cells, but not in undifferentiated ones. Furthermore, the URR of UL111A showed a higher intensity of AML-1 binding, a higher level of histone H3 acetyl-K9, but a lower level of histone H3 dimethyl-K9 in differentiated THP-1 cells than undifferentiated cells. Down-regulation of AML1 by RNA interference decreased the expression of the UL111A gene. Our results suggest that AML-1 may contribute to the epigenetic regulation of UL111A gene via histone modification in HCMV-infected differentiated THP-1 cells. This finding could be useful for the development of new anti-viral therapies.

  4. Tuning riboswitch-mediated gene regulation by rational control of aptamer ligand binding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Ambadas B; Endoh, Tamaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2015-01-12

    Riboswitch-mediated control of gene expression depends on ligand binding properties (kinetics and affinity) of its aptamer domain. A detailed analysis of interior regions of the aptamer, which affect the ligand binding properties, is important for both understanding natural riboswitch functions and for enabling rational design of tuneable artificial riboswitches. Kinetic analyses of binding reaction between flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and several natural and mutant aptamer domains of FMN-specific riboswitches were performed. The strong dependence of the dissociation rate (52.6-fold) and affinity (100-fold) on the identities of base pairs in the aptamer stem suggested that the stem region, which is conserved in length but variable in base-pair composition and context, is the tuning region of the FMN-specific aptamer. Synthetic riboswitches were constructed based on the same aptamer domain by rationally modifying the tuning regions. The observed 9.31-fold difference in the half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) corresponded to a 11.6-fold difference in the dissociation constant (K(D)) of the aptamer domains and suggested that the gene expression can be controlled by rationally adjusting the tuning regions.

  5. Human Jk recombination signal binding protein gene (IGKJRB): Comparison with its mouse homologue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amakawa, Ryuichi; Jing, Wu; Matsunami, Norisada; Hamaguchi, Yasushi; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Kawaichi, Masashi; Honjo, Tasuku (Kyoto Univ., Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan)); Ozawa, Kazuo (Tsukuba Life Science Center, Tsukuba, Ibraraki (Japan))

    1993-08-01

    The mouse Igkjrb protein specifically binds to the immunoglobulin Jk recombination signal sequence. The IGKJRB gene is highly conserved among many species such as human, Xenopus, and Drosophila. Using cDNA fragments of the mouse Igkjrb gene, the authors isolated its human counterpart, IGKJRB. The human genome contains one functional IGKJRB gene and two types of processed pseudogenes. In situ chromosome hybridization analysis demonstrated that the functional gene is localized at chromosome 3q25, and the pseudogenes (IGKJRBP1 and IGKJRBP2, respectively) are located at chromosomes 9p13 and 9q13. The functional gene is composed of 13 exons spanning at least 67 kb. Three types of cDNA with different 5[prime] sequences were isolated by rapid amplification of cDNA ends, suggesting the presence of three proteins. The aPCR-1 protein, which possessed the exon 1 sequence, was the counterpart of the mouse RBP-2 type protein. The aPCR-2 and 3 proteins may be specific to human cells because the mouse counterparts were not detected. The amino acid sequences of the human and mouse IGKJRB genes were 98% homologous in exons 2-11, whereas the homology of the human and mouse exon 1 sequences was 75%. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Comparison of the cancer gene targeting and biochemical selectivities of all targeted kinase inhibitors approved for clinical use.

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    Joost C M Uitdehaag

    Full Text Available The anti-proliferative activities of all twenty-five targeted kinase inhibitor drugs that are in clinical use were measured in two large assay panels: (1 a panel of proliferation assays of forty-four human cancer cell lines from diverse tumour tissue origins; and (2 a panel of more than 300 kinase enzyme activity assays. This study provides a head-on comparison of all kinase inhibitor drugs in use (status Nov. 2013, and for six of these drugs, the first kinome profiling data in the public domain. Correlation of drug activities with cancer gene mutations revealed novel drug sensitivity markers, suggesting that cancers dependent on mutant CTNNB1 will respond to trametinib and other MEK inhibitors, and cancers dependent on SMAD4 to small molecule EGFR inhibitor drugs. Comparison of cellular targeting efficacies reveals the most targeted inhibitors for EGFR, ABL1 and BRAF(V600E-driven cell growth, and demonstrates that the best targeted agents combine high biochemical potency with good selectivity. For ABL1 inhibitors, we computationally deduce optimized kinase profiles for use in a next generation of drugs. Our study shows the power of combining biochemical and cellular profiling data in the evaluation of kinase inhibitor drug action.

  7. Is there a close relationship between synonymous codon bias and codon-anticodon binding strength in human genes?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synonymous codon bias has been examined in 78 human genes (19967 codons) and measured by relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU). Relative frequencies of all kinds of dinucleotides in 2,3 or 3,4 codon positions have been calculated, and codon-anticodon binding strength has been estimated by the stacking energies of codon-anticodon bases in Watson-Crick pairs. The data show common features in synonymous codon bias for all codon families in human genes: all C-ending codons, which possess the strongest co-don-anticodon binding energies, are the most favored codons in almost all codon families, and those codons with medium codon-anticodon binding energies are avoided. Data analysis suggests that besides isochore and genome signature , codon-anticodon binding strength may be closely related to syn-onymous codon choice in human genes. The join-effect of these factors on human genes results in the common features in codon bias.

  8. Client Proteins and Small Molecule Inhibitors Display Distinct Binding Preferences for Constitutive and Stress-Induced HSP90 Isoforms and Their Conformationally Restricted Mutants.

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    Thomas L Prince

    Full Text Available The two cytosolic/nuclear isoforms of the molecular chaperone HSP90, stress-inducible HSP90α and constitutively expressed HSP90β, fold, assemble and maintain the three-dimensional structure of numerous client proteins. Because many HSP90 clients are important in cancer, several HSP90 inhibitors have been evaluated in the clinic. However, little is known concerning possible unique isoform or conformational preferences of either individual HSP90 clients or inhibitors. In this report, we compare the relative interaction strength of both HSP90α and HSP90β with the transcription factors HSF1 and HIF1α, the kinases ERBB2 and MET, the E3-ubiquitin ligases KEAP1 and RHOBTB2, and the HSP90 inhibitors geldanamycin and ganetespib. We observed unexpected differences in relative client and drug preferences for the two HSP90 isoforms, with HSP90α binding each client protein with greater apparent affinity compared to HSP90β, while HSP90β bound each inhibitor with greater relative interaction strength compared to HSP90α. Stable HSP90 interaction was associated with reduced client activity. Using a defined set of HSP90 conformational mutants, we found that some clients interact strongly with a single, ATP-stabilized HSP90 conformation, only transiently populated during the dynamic HSP90 chaperone cycle, while other clients interact equally with multiple HSP90 conformations. These data suggest different functional requirements among HSP90 clientele that, for some clients, are likely to be ATP-independent. Lastly, the two inhibitors examined, although sharing the same binding site, were differentially able to access distinct HSP90 conformational states.

  9. Computational study on the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism in hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protein.

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    Weiwei Xue

    Full Text Available HCV NS3/4A protein is an attractive therapeutic target responsible for harboring serine protease and RNA helicase activities during the viral replication. Small molecules binding at the interface between the protease and helicase domains can stabilize the closed conformation of the protein and thus block the catalytic function of HCV NS3/4A protein via an allosteric regulation mechanism. But the detailed mechanism remains elusive. Here, we aimed to provide some insight into the inhibitor binding mode and allosteric regulation mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein by using computational methods. Four simulation systems were investigated. They include: apo state of HCV NS3/4A protein, HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with an allosteric inhibitor and the truncated form of the above two systems. The molecular dynamics simulation results indicate HCV NS3/4A protein in complex with the allosteric inhibitor 4VA adopts a closed conformation (inactive state, while the truncated apo protein adopts an open conformation (active state. Further residue interaction network analysis suggests the communication of the domain-domain interface play an important role in the transition from closed to open conformation of HCV NS3/4A protein. However, the inhibitor stabilizes the closed conformation through interaction with several key residues from both the protease and helicase domains, including His57, Asp79, Asp81, Asp168, Met485, Cys525 and Asp527, which blocks the information communication between the functional domains interface. Finally, a dynamic model about the allosteric regulation and conformational changes of HCV NS3/4A protein was proposed and could provide fundamental insights into the allosteric mechanism of HCV NS3/4A protein function regulation and design of new potent inhibitors.

  10. Homo-timeric structural model of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 and characterization of its substrate/inhibitor binding interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Li; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Frazier, Ronald B.; Davies, Michael S.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Weinberg, Robin A.; Gierse, James K.; Caspers, Nicole; Carter, Jeffrey S.; McDonald, Joseph J.; Moore, William M.; Vazquez, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Inducible, microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1), the terminal enzyme in the prostaglandin (PG) biosynthetic pathway, constitutes a promising therapeutic target for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. To elucidate structure-function relationships and to enable structure-based design, an mPGES-1 homology model was developed using the three-dimensional structure of the closest homologue of the MAPEG family (Membrane Associated Proteins in Eicosanoid and Glutathione metabolism), mGST-1. The ensuing model of mPGES-1 is a homo-trimer, with each monomer consisting of four membrane-spanning segments. Extensive structure refinement revealed an inter-monomer salt bridge (K26-E77) as well as inter-helical interactions within each monomer, including polar hydrogen bonds (e.g. T78-R110-T129) and hydrophobic π-stacking (F82-F103-F106), all contributing to the overall stability of the homo-trimer of mPGES-1. Catalytic co-factor glutathione (GSH) was docked into the mPGES-1 model by flexible optimization of both the ligand and the protein conformations, starting from the initial location ascertained from the mGST-1 structure. Possible binding site for the substrate, prostaglandin H2 (PGH2), was identified by systematically probing the refined molecular structure of mPGES-1. A binding model was generated by induced fit docking of PGH2 in the presence of GSH. The homology model prescribes three potential inhibitor binding sites per mPGES-1 trimer. This was further confirmed experimentally by equilibrium dialysis study which generated a binding stoichiometric ratio of approximately three inhibitor molecules to three mPGES-1 monomers. The structural model that we have derived could serve as a useful tool for structure-guided design of inhibitors for this emergently important therapeutic target.

  11. Selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors potentiate gene blunting induced by repeated methylphenidate treatment: Zif268 versus Homer1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Vincent; Vandrevala, Malcolm; Beverley, Joel; Steiner, Heinz

    2014-11-01

    There is a growing use of psychostimulants, such as methylphenidate (Ritalin; dopamine re-uptake inhibitor), for medical treatments and as cognitive enhancers in the healthy. Methylphenidate is known to produce some addiction-related gene regulation. Recent findings in animal models show that selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including fluoxetine, can potentiate acute induction of gene expression by methylphenidate, thus indicating an acute facilitatory role for serotonin in dopamine-induced gene regulation. We investigated whether repeated exposure to fluoxetine, in conjunction with methylphenidate, in adolescent rats facilitated a gene regulation effect well established for repeated exposure to illicit psychostimulants such as cocaine-blunting (repression) of gene inducibility. We measured, by in situ hybridization histochemistry, the effects of a 5-day repeated treatment with methylphenidate (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) or a combination on the inducibility (by cocaine) of neuroplasticity-related genes (Zif268, Homer1a) in the striatum. Repeated methylphenidate treatment alone produced minimal gene blunting, while fluoxetine alone had no effect. In contrast, fluoxetine added to methylphenidate robustly potentiated methylphenidate-induced blunting for both genes. This potentiation was widespread throughout the striatum, but was most robust in the lateral, sensorimotor striatum, thus mimicking cocaine effects. For illicit psychostimulants, blunting of gene expression is considered part of the molecular basis of addiction. Our results thus suggest that SSRIs, such as fluoxetine, may increase the addiction liability of methylphenidate.

  12. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

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    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  13. Expression of LIM-domain binding protein (ldb) genes during zebrafish embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, R; Kobayashi, M; Tomita, T; Dawid, I B

    1998-02-01

    LIM homeodomain proteins are developmental regulators whose functions depend on synergism with LIM domain binding proteins (Ldb proteins). We have isolated four members of the ldb gene family from the zebrafish, Danio rerio. Ldb1, Ldb2 and Ldb3 share 95%, 73% and 62% amino acid identity with mouse Ldb1, respectively. In overlay assays, Ldb proteins bind LIM homeodomain proteins and LMO1, but not zyxin or MLP. Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that zebrafish ldb1 is expressed ubiquitously from gastrulation onward. Ldb2 is ubiquitous at gastrulation, and later is found in many but not all tissues, especially the anterior central nervous system (CNS) and vasculature. Ldb3 mRNA was expressed primarily in the anterior CNS.

  14. Cloning of the quail PIWI gene and characterization of PIWI binding to small RNAs.

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    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available The PIWI protein regulates gene expression at the epigenetic and post-transcriptional level with a variety of endogenous small non-coding RNAs. In poultry, the biological function of the PIWI protein and PIWI binding to small RNAs had not been determined. The present study cloned and analyzed the sequences of the PIWIL1 protein. We also characterized PIWIL1 binding to small RNAs from adult quail testis, where the PIWIL1 protein is specifically expressed. Small RNAs showed a strong peak at 24-27 nt in the testicular RNA library, mapped primarily to repeat sequences and were similar to rasiRNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs were abundant in the ovarian RNA library at a peak of 22 nt.

  15. Evolution of the B3 DNA binding superfamily: new insights into REM family gene diversification.

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    Elisson A C Romanel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B3 DNA binding domain includes five families: auxin response factor (ARF, abscisic acid-insensitive3 (ABI3, high level expression of sugar inducible (HSI, related to ABI3/VP1 (RAV and reproductive meristem (REM. The release of the complete genomes of the angiosperm eudicots Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa, the monocot Orysa sativa, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens,the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri and the red algae Cyanidioschyzon melorae provided an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of this superfamily. METHODOLOGY: In order to better understand the origin and the diversification of B3 domains in plants, we combined comparative phylogenetic analysis with exon/intron structure and duplication events. In addition, we investigated the conservation and divergence of the B3 domain during the origin and evolution of each family. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that showed that the B3 containing genes have undergone extensive duplication events, and that the REM family B3 domain has a highly diverged DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the founding member of the B3 gene family is likely to be similar to the ABI3/HSI genes found in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Among the B3 families, ABI3, HSI, RAV and ARF are most structurally conserved, whereas the REM family has experienced a rapid divergence. These results are discussed in light of their functional and evolutionary roles in plant development.

  16. Telomere binding protein TRB1 is associated with promoters of translation machinery genes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrumpfová, Petra Procházková; Vychodilová, Ivona; Hapala, Jan; Schořová, Šárka; Dvořáček, Vojtěch; Fajkus, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Recently we characterised TRB1, a protein from a single-myb-histone family, as a structural and functional component of telomeres in Arabidopsis thaliana. TRB proteins, besides their ability to bind specifically to telomeric DNA using their N-terminally positioned myb-like domain of the same type as in human shelterin proteins TRF1 or TRF2, also possess a histone-like domain which is involved in protein-protein interactions e.g., with POT1b. Here we set out to investigate the genome-wide localization pattern of TRB1 to reveal its preferential sites of binding to chromatin in vivo and its potential functional roles in the genome-wide context. Our results demonstrate that TRB1 is preferentially associated with promoter regions of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, in addition to its roles at telomeres. This preference coincides with the frequent occurrence of telobox motifs in the upstream regions of genes in this category, but it is not restricted to the presence of a telobox. We conclude that TRB1 shows a specific genome-wide distribution pattern which suggests its role in regulation of genes involved in biogenesis of the translational machinery, in addition to its preferential telomeric localization.

  17. Cloning, characterization, expression analysis and inhibition studies of a novel gene encoding Bowman-Birk type protease inhibitor from rice bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the first study describing the isolation, cloning and characterization of a full length gene encoding Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor (RbTI) from rice bean (Vigna umbellata). A full-length protease inhibitor gene with complete open reading frame of 327bp encoding 109 amino acids w...

  18. Cellular retinol binding protein 1 could be a tumor suppressor gene in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Rodriguez, Mónica; Arreola, Hugo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Peralta, Raúl; Serna, Humberto; Villegas, Vanessa; Romero, Pablo; Alvarado-Hernández, Beatriz; Paniagua, Lucero; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Meraz, Marco A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Cervical Cancer (CC) is one of the most important health problems in women. It frequently presents genetic changes at chromosome region 3q21. This region contains the Cellular Retinol Binding Protein 1 gene (CRBP1) which has been implicated as an important element in the development of other types of cancer. The main goal of the present work was to determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 and its relationship to CC. Methods: To determine the molecular alterations of CRBP1 gene in CC; twenty-six CC and twenty-six healthy cervix samples were evaluated for: 1) Copy number gain by real-time PCR analysis, 2) expression levels by an immunohistochemistry assay on tissue microarray, and 3) the methylation status of the CRBP1 promoter region. Results: The increase in CRBP1 copy number was observed in 10 out of the 26 CC samples analyzed, while healthy cervices samples showed no changes in the copy number. In addition, there was a lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene in an important number of the CC samples (17/26), and the CRBP1 gene promoter was methylated in 15/26 of the CC samples. Interestingly, there was a significant association between the lack of expression of the CRBP1 gene and its methylation status. Conclusions: The data indicates that, both activating and inactivating changes in the CRBP1 gene could be significant events in the development and progression of CC, and the lack of expression of the CRBP1 protein could be related with to the development of CC. We believe that there is enough evidence to consider to CRBP1 gene as a tumor suppressor gene for CC. PMID:24040446

  19. Analysis of Genes Encoding Penicillin-Binding Proteins in Clinical Isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayô, Rodrigo; Rodríguez, María-Cruz; Espinal, Paula; Fernández-Cuenca, Felipe; Ocampo-Sosa, Alain A.; Pascual, Álvaro; Ayala, Juan A.; Vila, Jordi; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2011-01-01

    There is limited information on the role of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in the resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii to β-lactams. This study presents an analysis of the allelic variations of PBP genes in A. baumannii isolates. Twenty-six A. baumannii clinical isolates (susceptible or resistant to carbapenems) from three teaching hospitals in Spain were included. The antimicrobial susceptibility profile, clonal pattern, and genomic species identification were also evaluated. Based on the six complete genomes of A. baumannii, the PBP genes were identified, and primers were designed for each gene. The nucleotide sequences of the genes identified that encode PBPs and the corresponding amino acid sequences were compared with those of ATCC 17978. Seven PBP genes and one monofunctional transglycosylase (MGT) gene were identified in the six genomes, encoding (i) four high-molecular-mass proteins (two of class A, PBP1a [ponA] and PBP1b [mrcB], and two of class B, PBP2 [pbpA or mrdA] and PBP3 [ftsI]), (ii) three low-molecular-mass proteins (two of type 5, PBP5/6 [dacC] and PBP6b [dacD], and one of type 7 (PBP7/8 [pbpG]), and (iii) a monofunctional enzyme (MtgA [mtgA]). Hot spot mutation regions were observed, although most of the allelic changes found translated into silent mutations. The amino acid consensus sequences corresponding to the PBP genes in the genomes and the clinical isolates were highly conserved. The changes found in amino acid sequences were associated with concrete clonal patterns but were not directly related to susceptibility or resistance to β-lactams. An insertion sequence disrupting the gene encoding PBP6b was identified in an endemic carbapenem-resistant clone in one of the participant hospitals. PMID:21947403

  20. Identification of co-regulated genes through Bayesian clustering of predicted regulatory binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhaohui S; McCue, Lee Ann; Thompson, William; Mayerhofer, Linda; Lawrence, Charles E; Liu, Jun S

    2003-04-01

    The identification of co-regulated genes and their transcription-factor binding sites (TFBS) are key steps toward understanding transcription regulation. In addition to effective laboratory assays, various computational approaches for the detection of TFBS in promoter regions of coexpressed genes have been developed. The availability of complete genome sequences combined with the likelihood that transcription factors and their cognate sites are often conserved during evolution has led to the development of phylogenetic footprinting. The modus operandi of this technique is to search for conserved motifs upstream of orthologous genes from closely related species. The method can identify hundreds of TFBS without prior knowledge of co-regulation or coexpression. Because many of these predicted sites are likely to be bound by the same transcription factor, motifs with similar patterns can be put into clusters so as to infer the sets of co-regulated genes, that is, the regulons. This strategy utilizes only genome sequence information and is complementary to and confirmative of gene expression data generated by microarray experiments. However, the limited data available to characterize individual binding patterns, the variation in motif alignment, motif width, and base conservation, and the lack of knowledge of the number and sizes of regulons make this inference problem difficult. We have developed a Gibbs sampling-based Bayesian motif clustering (BMC) algorithm to address these challenges. Tests on simulated data sets show that BMC produces many fewer errors than hierarchical and K-means clustering methods. The application of BMC to hundreds of predicted gamma-proteobacterial motifs correctly identified many experimentally reported regulons, inferred the existence of previously unreported members of these regulons, and suggested novel regulons.

  1. Functional evolution in the plant SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christine Preston

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The SQUAMOSA-PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN-LIKE (SPL family of transcription factors is functionally diverse, controlling a number of fundamental aspects of plant growth and development, including vegetative phase change, flowering time, branching, and leaf initiation rate. In natural plant populations, variation in flowering time and shoot architecture have major consequences for fitness. Likewise, in crop species, variation in branching and developmental rate impact biomass and yield. Thus, studies aimed at dissecting how the various functions are partitioned among different SPL genes in diverse plant lineages are key to providing insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation and have already garnered attention by crop breeders. Here we use phylogenetic reconstruction to reveal nine major SPL gene lineages, each of which is described in terms of function and diversification. To assess evidence for ancestral and derived functions within each SPL gene lineage, we use ancestral character state reconstructions. Our analyses suggest an emerging pattern of sub-functionalization, neo-functionalization, and possible convergent evolution following both ancient and recent gene duplication. Based on these analyses we suggest future avenues of research that may prove fruitful for elucidating the importance of SPL gene evolution in plant growth and development.

  2. Design of a zinc finger protein binding a sequence upstream of the A20 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Xiaoping

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artificial transcription factors (ATFs are composed of DNA-binding and functional domains. These domains can be fused together to create proteins that can bind a chosen DNA sequence. To construct a valid ATF, it is necessary to design suitable DNA-binding and functional domains. The Cys2-His2 zinc finger motif is the ideal structural scaffold on which to construct a sequence-specific protein. A20 is a cytoplasmic zinc finger protein that inhibits nuclear factor kappa-B activity and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-mediated programmed cell death. A20 has been shown to prevent TNF-induced cytotoxicity in a variety of cell types including fibroblasts, B lymphocytes, WEHI 164 cells, NIH 3T3 cells and endothelial cells. Results In order to design a zinc finger protein (ZFP structural domain that binds specific target sequences in the A20 gene promoter region, the structure and sequence composition of this promoter were analyzed by bioinformatics methods. The target sequences in the A20 promoter were submitted to the on-line ZF Tools server of the Barbas Laboratory, Scripps Research Institute (TSRI, to obtain a specific 18 bp target sequence and also the amino acid sequence of a ZFP that would bind to it. Sequence characterization and structural modeling of the predicted ZFP were performed by bioinformatics methods. The optimized DNA sequence of this artificial ZFP was recombined into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES2-EGFP to construct pIRES2-EGFP/ZFP-flag recombinants, and the expression and biological activity of the ZFP were analyzed by RT-PCR, western blotting and EMSA, respectively. The ZFP was designed successfully and exhibited biological activity. Conclusion It is feasible to design specific zinc finger proteins by bioinformatics methods.

  3. A major barley allergen associated with baker's asthma disease is a glycosylated monomeric inhibitor of insect alpha-amylase: cDNA cloning and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, M; Sanchez-Monge, R; Gomez, L; Salcedo, G; Carbonero, P

    1992-11-01

    A 14.5 kDa barley endosperm protein that is a major allergen in baker's asthma disease, as previously shown by both in vitro (IgE binding) and in vivo tests, has been identified as a glycosylated monomeric member of the multigene family of inhibitors of alpha-amylase/trypsin from cereals. A cDNA encoding this allergen (renamed BMAI-1) has been isolated and characterized. The deduced sequence for the mature protein, which is 132 residues long, is identical in its N-terminal end to the 20 amino acid partial sequence previously determined from the purified allergen, and fully confirms that it is a member of the multigene family of cereal inhibitors. Southern-blot analysis of wheat/barley addition lines using the insert in the BMAI-1 cDNA clone as a probe, has led to the location of the allergen gene (Iam1) in barley chromosome 2, while another related member of this protein family, the barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1 gene (Iad1) has been located in chromosome 6. Iam1 is the first member of this inhibitor family in cereals to be assigned to chromosome group 2, thus extending the dispersion of genes in the family to five out of the seven homology groups of chromosomes in wheat and barley (chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7).

  4. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy.

  5. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors Bind to PPARα to Upregulate Neurotrophin Expression in the Brain and Improve Memory in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avik; Jana, Malabendu; Kundu, Madhuchhanda; Corbett, Grant T; Rangaswamy, Suresh B; Mishra, Rama K; Luan, Chi-Hao; Gonzalez, Frank J; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-08-01

    Neurotrophins are important for neuronal health and function. Here, statins, inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase and cholesterol lowering drugs, were found to stimulate expression of neurotrophins in brain cells independent of the mevalonate pathway. Time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analyses, computer-derived simulation, site-directed mutagenesis, thermal shift assay, and de novo binding followed by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) demonstrates that statins serve as ligands of PPARα and that Leu331 and Tyr 334 residues of PPARα are important for statin binding. Upon binding, statins upregulate neurotrophins via PPARα-mediated transcriptional activation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB). Accordingly, simvastatin increases CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of Ppara null mice receiving full-length lentiviral PPARα, but not L331M/Y334D statin-binding domain-mutated lentiviral PPARα. This study identifies statins as ligands of PPARα, describes neurotrophic function of statins via the PPARα-CREB pathway, and analyzes the importance of PPARα in the therapeutic success of simvastatin in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. The versatile binding mode of transition-state analogue inhibitors of tyrosinase towards dicopper(II) model complexes: experimental and theoretical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orio, Maylis; Bochot, Constance; Dubois, Carole; Gellon, Gisèle; Hardré, Renaud; Jamet, Hélène; Luneau, Dominique; Philouze, Christian; Réglier, Marius; Serratrice, Guy; Belle, Catherine

    2011-11-25

    We describe 2-mercaptopyridine-N-oxide (HSPNO) as a new and efficient competitive inhibitor of mushroom tyrosinase (K(IC) =3.7 μM). Binding studies of HSPNO and 2-hydroxypyridine-N-oxide (HOPNO) on dinuclear copper(II) complexes [Cu(2)(BPMP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2) (1; HBPMP=2,6-bis[bis(2-pyridylmethyl)aminomethyl]-4-methylphenol) and [Cu(2)(BPEP)(μ-OH)](ClO(4))(2)) (2; HBPEP=2,6-bis{bis[2-(2-pyridyl)ethyl]aminomethyl}-4-methylphenol), known to be functional models for the tyrosinase diphenolase activity, have been performed. A combination of structural data, spectroscopic studies, and DFT calculations evidenced the adaptable binding mode (bridging versus chelating) of HOPNO in relation to the geometry and chelate size of the dicopper center. For comparison, binding studies of HSPNO and kojic acid (5-hydroxy-2-(hydroxymethyl)-4-pyrone) on dinuclear complexes were performed. A theoretical approach has been developed and validated on HOPNO adducts to compare the binding mode on the model complexes. It has been applied for HSPNO and kojic acid. Although results for HSPNO were in line with those obtained with HOPNO, thus reflecting their chemical similarity, we showed that the bridging mode was the most preferential binding mode for kojic acid on both complexes.

  7. Ixodes scapularis tick serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin gene family; annotation and transcriptional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalaire Katelyn C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serine proteinase inhibitors (Serpins are a large superfamily of structurally related, but functionally diverse proteins that control essential proteolytic pathways in most branches of life. Given their importance in the biology of many organisms, the concept that ticks might utilize serpins to evade host defenses and immunizing against or disrupting their functions as targets for tick control is an appealing option. Results A sequence homology search strategy has allowed us to identify at least 45 tick serpin genes in the Ixodes scapularis genome that are structurally segregated into 32 intronless and 13 intron-containing genes. Nine of the intron-containing serpins occur in a cluster of 11 genes that span 170 kb of DNA sequence. Based on consensus amino acid residues in the reactive center loop (RCL and signal peptide scanning, 93% are putatively inhibitory while 82% are putatively extracellular. Among the 11 different amino acid residues that are predicted at the P1 sites, 16 sequences possess basic amino acid (R/K residues. Temporal and spatial expression analyses revealed that 40 of the 45 serpins are differentially expressed in salivary glands (SG and/or midguts (MG of unfed and partially fed ticks. Ten of the 38 serpin genes were expressed from six to 24 hrs of feeding while six and fives genes each are predominantly or exclusively expressed in either MG and SG respectively. Conclusion Given the diversity among tick species, sizes of tick serpin families are likely to be variable. However this study provides insight on the potential sizes of serpin protein families in ticks. Ticks must overcome inflammation, complement activation and blood coagulation to complete feeding. Since these pathways are regulated by serpins that have basic residues at their P1 sites, we speculate that I. scapularis may utilize some of the serpins reported in this study to manipulate host defense. We have discussed our data in the context of

  8. A high-affinity inhibitor of yeast carboxypeptidase Y is encoded by TFS1 and shows homology to a family of lipid binding proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, A W; Svendsen, I; Sørensen, S O;

    1998-01-01

    degree of specificity, showing a 200-fold higher Ki toward a carboxypeptidase from Candida albicans which is highly homologous to carboxypeptidase Y. The TFS1 gene product shows extensive similarity to a class of proteins termed "21-23-kDa lipid binding proteins", members of which are found in several...

  9. IC50-to-Ki: a web-based tool for converting IC50 to Ki values for inhibitors of enzyme activity and ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cer, R Z; Mudunuri, U; Stephens, R; Lebeda, F J

    2009-07-01

    A new web-server tool estimates K(i) values from experimentally determined IC(50) values for inhibitors of enzymes and of binding reactions between macromolecules (e.g. proteins, polynucleic acids) and ligands. This converter was developed to enable end users to help gauge the quality of the underlying assumptions used in these calculations which depend on the type of mechanism of inhibitor action and the concentrations of the interacting molecular species. Additional calculations are performed for nonclassical, tightly bound inhibitors of enzyme-substrate or of macromolecule-ligand systems in which free, rather than total concentrations of the reacting species are required. Required user-defined input values include the total enzyme (or another target molecule) and substrate (or ligand) concentrations, the K(m) of the enzyme-substrate (or the K(d) of the target-ligand) reaction, and the IC(50) value. Assumptions and caveats for these calculations are discussed along with examples taken from the literature. The host database for this converter contains kinetic constants and other data for inhibitors of the proteolytic clostridial neurotoxins (http://botdb.abcc.ncifcrf.gov/toxin/kiConverter.jsp).

  10. The human renin-binding protein gene (RENBP) maps in Xq28

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouweland, A.M.W. van der; Verdijk, M.; Oost, B.A. van (Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)); Kiochis, P.; Poustka, A. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszemtrum, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1994-05-01

    The authors report here the successful application of the method by which cDNA libraries are screened with positionally identified genomic clones. Human cosmid clones were selected from a cosmid library derived from the Q1Z cell line. This Q1Z cell line is a hamster-human somatic cell hybrid that contains the Xq28 region as its sole human component. To search for kidney-expressed genes, they screened a kidney cDNA library purchased from Clontech with cosmid-derived probes. Based on the physical mapping of the vasopressin V2 receptor gene close to the L1CAM gene, they analyzed cosmids derived from this region. One of the cosmids was 12B2, located 50 kb from the L1CAM gene. A 20-kb EcoRI subclone from the 12B2 cosmid was used as probe. This fragment did not hybridize to the probe 2-55 in contrast to the whole cosmid 12B2. Screening of 200,000 cDNA clones resulted in the identification of two positive clones. After sequence determination, it appeared that one of the positive cDNA clones contained Escherichia coli DNA as insert (data not shown). The other cDNA (pMV24) contained an open reading frame corresponding to the 243 amino-terminal amino acids of the human renin binding protein. The RENBP gene maps to interval 3 between the loci for DX52 and G-6-PD. This is the same interval as that for the color blindness gene, DXS707, and the AVPR2, L1CAM, and QM genes. This result confirms that the isolated RENBP cDNA originates from the same location as that from which the parental cosmid clone was derived. 28 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Predicting Polymerase Ⅱ Core Promoters by Cooperating Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Eukaryotic Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Tu MA; Min-Ping QIAN; Hai-Xu TANG

    2004-01-01

    Several discriminate functions for predicting core promoters that based on the potential cooperation between transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are discussed. It is demonstrated that the promoter predicting accuracy is improved when the cooperation among TFBSs is taken into consideration.The core promoter region of a newly discovered gene CKLFSF1 is predicted to locate more than 1.5 kb far away from the 5′ end of the transcript and in the last intron of its upstream gene, which is experimentally confirmed later. The core promoters of 3402 human RefSeq sequences, obtained by extending the mRNAs in human genome sequences, are predicted by our algorithm, and there are about 60% of the predicted core promoters locating within the ± 500 bp region relative to the annotated transcription start site.

  12. The spinal precerebellar nuclei: calcium binding proteins and gene expression profile in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Sengul, Gulgun; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2012-06-19

    We have localized the spinocerebellar neuron groups in C57BL/6J mice by injecting the retrograde neuronal tracer Fluoro-Gold into the cerebellum and examined the distribution of SMI 32 and the calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), calbindin-D-28K (Cb), calretinin (Cr), and parvalbumin (Pv) in the spinal precerebellar nuclei. The spinal precerebellar neuron clusters identified were the dorsal nucleus, central cervical nucleus, lumbar border precerebellar nucleus, lumbar precerebellar nucleus, and sacral precerebellar nucleus. Some dispersed neurons in the deep dorsal horn and spinal laminae 6-8 also projected to the cerebellum. Cb, Cr, Pv, and SMI 32 were present in all major spinal precerebellar nuclei and Pv was the most commonly observed CBP. A number of genes expressed in hindbrain precerebellar nuclei are also expressed in spinal precerebellar groups, but there were some differences in gene expression profile between the different spinal precerebellar nuclei, pointing to functional diversity amongst them.

  13. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel mannose-binding lectin gene from Amorphophallus konjac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Jiong; Liao, Zhihua; Chai, Yourong; Pang, Yongzhen; Yao, Jianhong; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2003-09-01

    A new lectin gene was cloned from Amorphophallus konjac. The full-length cDNA of Amorphophallus konjac agglutinin (aka) was 736 bp and contained a 474 bp open reading frame encoding a 158 amino acid protein. Homology analysis revealed that the lectin from this Araceae species belonged to the superfamily of monocot mannose-binding proteins. Molecular modeling of AKA indicated that the three-dimensional structure of AKA strongly resembles that of the snowdrop lectin. Southern blot analysis of the genomic DNA revealed that aka belonged to a low-copy gene family. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that aka expression was tissue-specific with the strongest expression being found in root.

  14. Binding of complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein to a highly virulent Streptococcus pyogenes M1 strain is mediated by protein H and enhances adhesion to and invasion of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Weckel, Antonin; Agarwal, Vaibhav; Frick, Inga-Maria; Björck, Lars; Blom, Anna M

    2013-11-08

    Streptococcus pyogenes AP1, a strain of the highly virulent M1 serotype, uses exclusively protein H to bind the complement inhibitor C4b-binding protein (C4BP). We found a strong correlation between the ability of AP1 and its isogenic mutants lacking protein H to inhibit opsonization with complement C3b and binding of C4BP. C4BP bound to immobilized protein H or AP1 bacteria retained its cofactor activity for degradation of (125)I-C4b. Furthermore, C4b deposited from serum onto AP1 bacterial surfaces was processed into C4c/C4d fragments, which did not occur on strains unable to bind C4BP. Recombinant C4BP mutants, which (i) lack certain CCP domains or (ii) have mutations in single aa as well as (iii) mutants with additional aa between different CCP domains were used to determine that the binding is mainly mediated by a patch of positively charged amino acid residues at the interface of domains CCP1 and CCP2. Using recombinant protein H fragments, we narrowed down the binding site to the N-terminal domain A. With a peptide microarray, we identified one single 18-amino acid-long peptide comprising residues 92-109, which specifically bound C4BP. Biacore was used to determine KD = 6 × 10(-7) M between protein H and a single subunit of C4BP. C4BP binding also correlated with elevated levels of adhesion and invasion to endothelial cells. Taken together, we identified the molecular basis of C4BP-protein H interaction and found that it is not only important for decreased opsonization but also for invasion of endothelial cells by S. pyogenes.

  15. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants.

  16. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  17. Matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10) interaction with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases TIMP-1 and TIMP-2: binding studies and crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Jyotica; Robinson, Jessica; Soares, Alexei S; Fields, Alan P; Radisky, Derek C; Radisky, Evette S

    2012-05-04

    Matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP-10, stromelysin-2) is a secreted metalloproteinase with functions in skeletal development, wound healing, and vascular remodeling; its overexpression is also implicated in lung tumorigenesis and tumor progression. To understand the regulation of MMP-10 by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), we have assessed equilibrium inhibition constants (K(i)) of putative physiological inhibitors TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 for the active catalytic domain of human MMP-10 (MMP-10cd) using multiple kinetic approaches. We find that TIMP-1 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 1.1 × 10(-9) M; this interaction is 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of the similar MMP-3 (stromelysin-1) catalytic domain (MMP-3cd) by TIMP-1. TIMP-2 inhibits the MMP-10cd with a K(i) of 5.8 × 10(-9) M, which is again 10-fold weaker than the inhibition of MMP-3cd by this inhibitor (K(i) = 5.5 × 10(-10) M). We solved the x-ray crystal structure of TIMP-1 bound to the MMP-10cd at 1.9 Å resolution; the structure was solved by molecular replacement and refined with an R-factor of 0.215 (R(free) = 0.266). Comparing our structure of MMP-10cd·TIMP-1 with the previously solved structure of MMP-3cd·TIMP-1 (Protein Data Bank entry 1UEA), we see substantial differences at the binding interface that provide insight into the differential binding of stromelysin family members to TIMP-1. This structural information may ultimately assist in the design of more selective TIMP-based inhibitors tailored for specificity toward individual members of the stromelysin family, with potential therapeutic applications.

  18. Polymorphisms in Genes Coding for Cytokines, Mannose-Binding Lectin, Collagen Metabolism and Thrombophilia in Women with Cervical Insufficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundtoft, Iben; Uldbjerg, Niels; Steffensen, Rudi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between cervical insufficiency and single nucleotide polymorphisms in seven genes coding for pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine-related factors, mannose-binding lectin 2 (MBL2), collagen1α1 (COL1A1), factor II and factor V Leiden genes. METHODS: In a case-cont...

  19. Inhibition of corticosteroid-binding globulin gene expression by glucocorticoids involves C/EBPβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolette Verhoog

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, a negative acute phase protein produced primarily in the liver, is responsible for the transport of glucocorticoids (GCs. It also modulates the bioavailability of GCs, as only free or unbound steroids are biologically active. Fluctuations in CBG levels therefore can directly affect GC bioavailability. This study investigates the molecular mechanism whereby GCs inhibit the expression of CBG. GCs regulate gene expression via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR, which either directly binds to DNA or acts indirectly via tethering to other DNA-bound transcription factors. Although no GC-response elements (GRE are present in the Cbg promoter, putative binding sites for C/EBPβ, able to tether to the GR, as well as HNF3α involved in GR signaling, are present. C/EBPβ, but not HNF3α, was identified as an important mediator of DEX-mediated inhibition of Cbg promoter activity by using specific deletion and mutant promoter reporter constructs of Cbg. Furthermore, knockdown of C/EBPβ protein expression reduced DEX-induced repression of CBG mRNA, confirming C/EBPβ's involvement in GC-mediated CBG repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP after DEX treatment indicated increased co-recruitment of C/EBPβ and GR to the Cbg promoter, while C/EBPβ knockdown prevented GR recruitment. Together, the results suggest that DEX repression of CBG involves tethering of the GR to C/EBPβ.

  20. AtMBD6, a methyl CpG binding domain protein, maintains gene silencing in Arabidopsis by interacting with RNA binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parida, Adwaita Prasad; Sharma, Amrapali; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2017-03-01

    DNA methylation, mediated by double-stranded RNA, is a conserved epigenetic phenomenon that protects a genome from transposons, silences unwanted genes and has a paramount function in plant or animal development. Methyl CpG binding domain proteins are members of a class of proteins that bind to methylated DNA. The Arabidopsis thaliana genome encodes 13 methyl CpG binding domain (MBD) proteins, but the molecular/biological functions of most of these proteins are still not clear. In the present study, we identified four proteins that interact with AtMBD6. Interestingly, three of them contain RNA binding domains and are co-localized with AtMBD6 in the nucleus. The interacting partners includes AtRPS2C (a 40S ribosomal protein), AtNTF2 (nuclear transport factor 2) and AtAGO4 (Argonoute 4). The fourth protein that physically interacts with AtMBD6 is a histone-modifying enzyme, histone deacetylase 6 (AtHDA6), which is a known component of the RNA-mediated gene silencing system. Analysis of genomic DNA methylation in the atmbd6, atrps2c and atntf2 mutants, using methylation-sensitive PCR detected decreased DNA methylation at miRNA/siRNA producing loci, pseudogenes and other targets of RNA-directed DNA methylation. Our results indicate that AtMBD6 is involved in RNA-mediated gene silencing and it binds to RNA binding proteins like AtRPS2C, AtAGO4 and AtNTF2. AtMBD6 also interacts with histone deacetylase AtHDA6 that might have a role in chromatin condensation at the targets of RdDM.

  1. Exploring the molecular basis for selective binding of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Asp kinase toward its natural substrates and feedback inhibitors: a docking and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, M; Babajan, B; Anuradha, C M; Naveen, M; Rajasekhar, C; Madhusudana, P; Kumar, Chitta Suresh

    2010-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is still a major public health problem, compounded by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-TB co-infection and recent emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug resistant (XDR)-TB. In this context, aspartokinase of mycobacterium tuberculosis has drawn attention for designing novel anti-TB drugs. Asp kinase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of 4-phospho-L-aspartate from L-aspartate and involved in the branched biosynthetic pathway leading to the synthesis of amino acids lysine, threonine, methionine and isoleucine. An intermediate of lysine biosynthetic branch, mesodiaminopimelate is also a component of the peptidoglycan which is a component of bacterial cell wall. To interfere with the production of all these amino acids and cell wall, it is possible to inhibit Asp kinase activity. This can be achieved using Asp kinase inhibitors. In order to design novel Asp kinase inhibitors as effective anti-TB drugs, it is necessary to have an understanding of the binding sites of Asp kinase. As no crystal structure of the enzyme has yet been published, we built a homology model of Asp kinase using the crystallized Asp kinase from M. Jannaschii, as template structures (2HMF and 3C1M). After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and VERIFY-3D. The results of molecular docking studies with natural substrates, products and feedback inhibitors are in agreement with the published data and showed that ACT domain plays an important role in binding to ligands. Based on the docking conformations, pharmacophore model can be developed by probing the common features of ligands. By analyzing the results, ACT domain architecture, certain key residues that are responsible for binding to feedback inhibitors and natural substrates were identified. This would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Asp kinase and providing insights

  2. Usefulness of competitive inhibitors of protein binding for improving the pharmacokinetics of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-conjugated bisphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP), an agent for treatment of painful bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuma [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan)]|[Kanazawa University, Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa (Japan); Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan)]|[Kyushu University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuoka (Japan); Kawai, Keiichi [Kanazawa University, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kanazawa (Japan)]|[University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Yoshida, Fukui (Japan); Takamura, Norito [Kyushu University of Health and Welfare, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nobeoka (Japan); Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Saji, Hideo [Kyoto University, Department of Patho-Functional Bioanalysis, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiba, Kazuhiro; Mori, Hirofumi [Kanazawa University, Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2009-01-15

    We have developed a {sup 186}Re-mercaptoacetylglycylglycylglycine complex-conjugated bisphosphonate ({sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP) for the treatment of painful bone metastases. We assumed competitive inhibitors of protein binding to be useful for procuring a favorable biodistribution of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP for the palliation of bone pain because it has been reported that the concurrent administration of {sup 99m}Tc-MAG3 and drugs with high affinity for serum protein produced competitive displacement at specific binding sites and enhanced total clearance and tissue distribution. The displacement effects of several protein-binding inhibitors on the protein binding of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP were investigated. Biodistribution experiments were performed by intravenously administering {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP into rats with ceftriaxone as a competitive protein-binding inhibitor or saline. The protein binding of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP in rat serum, human serum, and a human serum albumin solution was significantly decreased by the addition of ceftriaxone, which has high affinity for binding site I on serum albumin. In the biodistribution experiments, pretreatment with ceftriaxone enhanced the clearance of the radioactivity of {sup 186}Re-MAG3-HBP in blood and nontarget tissues but had no effect on accumulation in bone. The findings suggested that the use of protein-binding competitive inhibitors would be effective in improving the pharmacokinetics of radiopharmaceuticals with high affinity for serum protein. (orig.)

  3. Derivation of a myeloid cell-binding adenovirus for gene therapy of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael O Alberti

    Full Text Available The gene therapy field is currently limited by the lack of vehicles that permit efficient gene delivery to specific cell or tissue subsets. Native viral vector tropisms offer a powerful platform for transgene delivery but remain nonspecific, requiring elevated viral doses to achieve efficacy. In order to improve upon these strategies, our group has focused on genetically engineering targeting domains into viral capsid proteins, particularly those based on adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5. Our primary strategy is based on deletion of the fiber knob domain, to eliminate broad tissue specificity through the human coxsackie-and-adenovirus receptor (hCAR, with seamless incorporation of ligands to re-direct Ad tropism to cell types that express the cognate receptors. Previously, our group and others have demonstrated successful implementation of this strategy in order to specifically target Ad to a number of surface molecules expressed on immortalized cell lines. Here, we utilized phage biopanning to identify a myeloid cell-binding peptide (MBP, with the sequence WTLDRGY, and demonstrated that MBP can be successfully incorporated into a knob-deleted Ad5. The resulting virus, Ad.MBP, results in specific binding to primary myeloid cell types, as well as significantly higher transduction of these target populations ex vivo, compared to unmodified Ad5. These data are the first step in demonstrating Ad targeting to cell types associated with inflammatory disease.

  4. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by RNA-binding proteins in vascular endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, HongBo; Deng, KeYu; Fu, MinGui

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is a term which implies the dysregulation of normal endothelial cell functions, including impairment of the barrier functions, control of vascular tone, disturbance of proliferative and migratory capacity of endothelial cells, as well as control of leukocyte trafficking. Endothelial dysfunction is an early step in vascular inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetic vascular complications, sepsis-induced or severe virus infection-induced organ injuries. The expressions of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules induced by various stimuli, such as modified lipids, smoking, advanced glycation end products and bacteria toxin, significantly contribute to the development of endothelial dysfunction. The transcriptional regulation of inflammatory cytokines and vascular adhesion molecules has been well-studied. However, the regulation of those gene expressions at post-transcriptional level is emerging. RNA-binding proteins have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression acting predominantly at the post-transcriptional level in microRNA-dependent or independent manners. This review summarizes the latest insights into the roles of RNA-binding proteins in controlling vascular endothelial cell functions and their contribution to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory diseases.

  5. Comparative sequence analysis of double stranded RNA binding protein encoding gene of parapoxviruses from Indian camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Nagarajan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The dsRNA binding protein (RBP encoding gene of parapoxviruses (PPVs from the Dromedary camels, inhabitating different geographical region of Rajasthan, India were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using the primers of pseudocowpoxvirus (PCPV from Finnish reindeer and cloned into pGEM-T for sequence analysis. Analysis of RBP encoding gene revealed that PPV DNA from Bikaner shared 98.3% and 76.6% sequence identity at the amino acid level, with Pali and Udaipur PPV DNA, respectively. Reference strains of Bovine papular stomatitis virus (BPSV and PCPV (reindeer PCPV and human PCPV shared 52.8% and 86.9% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner, respectively. But different strains of orf virus (ORFV from different geographical areas of the world shared 69.5–71.7% amino acid identity with RBP gene of camel PPVs from Bikaner. These findings indicate that the camel PPVs described are closely related to bovine PPV (PCPV in comparison to caprine and ovine PPV (ORFV.

  6. DNA methylation in the CTCF-binding site I and the expression pattern of the H19 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esteves, Leda I C V; Javaroni, Afonso C; Nishimoto, Inês N

    2005-01-01

    Loss of allele-specific expression by the imprinted genes IGF2 and H19 has been correlated with a differentially methylated region (DMR) upstream to the H19 gene. The H19-DMR contains seven potential CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) binding sites. CTCF is a chromatin insulator and a multifunctional...... of imprinting. We detected a significant correlation (P = 0.041, Fisher's exact test) between H19 expression and tumor recurrence. Among H19 positive cases, six were T2, in which five developed recurrence and/or metastasis. Inversely, in the group of tumors that showed no H19 gene expression, 5 out of 24 were T...

  7. The calcium binding protein ALG-2 binds and stabilizes Scotin, a p53-inducible gene product localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draeby, Ingrid; Woods, Yvonne L; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2007-01-01

    ALG-2 (apoptosis linked gene 2 product) is a calcium binding protein for which no clear cellular function has been established. In this study we identified Scotin as a novel ALG-2 target protein containing 6 PXY and 4 PYP repeats, earlier identified in the ALG-2 binding regions of AIP1/ALIX and TSG......101, respectively. An in vitro synthesized C-terminal fragment of Scotin bound specifically to immobilized recombinant ALG-2 and tagged ALG-2 and Scotin were shown by immunoprecipitation to interact in MCF7 and U2OS cell lines. Furthermore ALG-2 bound to endogenous Scotin in extracts from mouse NIH3T3...

  8. Molecular cloning of MSSP-2, a c-myc gene single-strand binding protein: characterization of binding specificity and DNA replication activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, Toshiki; Nishita, Yoshinori; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported the human cDNA encoding MSSP-1, a sequence-specific double- and single-stranded DNA binding protein [Negishi, Nishita, Saëgusa, Kakizaki, Galli, Kihara, Tamai, Miyajima, Iguchi-Ariga and Ariga (1994) Oncogene, 9, 1133-1143]. MSSP-1 binds to a DNA replication origin/transcriptional enhancer of the human c-myc gene and has turned out to be identical with Scr2, a human protein which complements the defect of cdc2 kinase in S.pombe [Kataoka and Nojima (1994) Nucleic Ac...

  9. A scallop IGF binding protein gene: molecular characterization and association of variants with growth traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Feng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scallops represent economically important aquaculture shellfish. The identification of genes and genetic variants related to scallop growth could benefit high-yielding scallop breeding. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF system is essential for growth and development, with IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs serving as the major regulators of IGF actions. Although an effect of IGF on growth was detected in bivalve, IGFBP has not been reported, and members of the IGF system have not been characterized in scallop. RESULTS: We cloned and characterized an IGFBP (PyIGFBP gene from the aquaculture bivalve species, Yesso scallop (Patinopecten yessoensis, Jay, 1857. Its full-length cDNA sequence was 1,445 bp, with an open reading frame of 378 bp, encoding 125 amino acids, and its genomic sequence was 10,193 bp, consisting of three exons and two introns. The amino acid sequence exhibited the characteristics of IGFBPs, including multiple cysteine residues and relatively conserved motifs in the N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Expression analysis indicated that PyIGFBP was expressed in all the tissues and developmental stages examined, with a significantly higher level in the mantle than in other tissues and a significantly higher level in gastrulae and trochophore larvae than in other stages. Furthermore, three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were identified in this gene. SNP c.1054A>G was significantly associated with both shell and soft body traits in two populations, with the highest trait values in GG type scallops and lowest in AG type ones. CONCLUSION: We cloned and characterized an IGFBP gene in a bivalve, and this report also represents the first characterizing an IGF system gene in scallops. A SNP associated with scallop growth for both the shell and soft body was identified in this gene. In addition to providing a candidate marker for scallop breeding, our results also suggest the role of PyIGFBP in scallop growth.

  10. The Odorant Binding Protein Gene Family from the Genome of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Ping

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemosensory systems play key roles in the survival and reproductive success of insects. Insect chemoreception is mediated by two large and diverse gene superfamilies, chemoreceptors and odorant binding proteins (OBPs. OBPs are believed to transport hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the olfactory receptors. Results We identified a family of OBP-like genes in the silkworm genome and characterized their expression using oligonucleotide microarrays. A total of forty-four OBP genes were annotated, a number comparable to the 57 OBPs known from Anopheles gambiae and 51 from Drosophila melanogaster. As seen in other fully sequenced insect genomes, most silkworm OBP genes are present in large clusters. We defined six subfamilies of OBPs, each of which shows lineage-specific expansion and diversification. EST data and OBP expression profiles from multiple larvae tissues of day three fifth instars demonstrated that many OBPs are expressed in chemosensory-specific tissues although some OBPs are expressed ubiquitously and others exclusively in non-chemosensory tissues. Some atypical OBPs are expressed throughout development. These results reveal that, although many OBPs are chemosensory-specific, others may have more general physiological roles. Conclusion Silkworms possess a number of OBPs genes similar to other insects. Their expression profiles suggest that many OBPs may be involved in olfaction and gustation as well as general carriers of hydrophobic molecules. The expansion of OBP gene subfamilies and sequence divergence indicate that the silkworm OBP family acquired functional diversity concurrently with functional constraints. Further investigation of the OBPs of the silkworm could give insights in the roles of OBPs in chemoreception.

  11. Interaction between wheat alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitor and mammalian digestive enzymes: Kinetic, equilibrium and structural characterization of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccioloni, Massimiliano; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Ali, Ishtiaq; Bonfili, Laura; Cecarini, Valentina; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Angeletti, Mauro

    2016-12-15

    Alpha-amylase/trypsin bi-functional inhibitors (ATIs) are non-gluten protein components of wheat and other cereals that can hypersensitise the human gastrointestinal tract, eventually causing enteropathies in predisposed individuals. These inhibitory proteins can act both directly by targeting specific pro-inflammatory receptors, and indirectly by impairing the activity of digestive enzymes, the latter event causing the accumulation of undigested peptides with potential immunogenic properties. Herein, according to a concerted approach based on in vitro and in silico methods we characterized kinetics, equilibrium parameters and modes of binding of the complexes formed between wheat ATI and two representative mammalian digestive enzymes, namely trypsin and alpha-amylase. Interestingly, we demonstrated ATI to target both enzymes with independent binding sites and with moderately high affinity.

  12. On the inhibitor effects of bergamot juice flavonoids binding to the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR) enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopoldini, Monica; Malaj, Naim; Toscano, Marirosa; Sindona, Giovanni; Russo, Nino

    2010-10-13

    Density functional theory was applied to study the binding mode of new flavonoids as possible inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), an enzyme that catalyzes the four-electron reduction of HMGCoA to mevalonate, the committed step in the biosynthesis of sterols. The investigated flavonoid conjugates brutieridin and melitidin were recently quantified in the bergamot fruit extracts and identified to be structural analogues of statins, lipids concentration lowering drugs that inhibit HMGR. Computations allowed us to perform a detailed analysis of the geometrical and electronic features affecting the binding of these compounds, as well as that of the excellent simvastatin drug, to the active site of the enzyme and to give better insight into the inhibition process.

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat induces clinical responses with associated alterations in gene expression profiles in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Leigh; Pan, Yan; Smyth, Gordon K; George, Daniel J; McCormack, Chris; Williams-Truax, Roxanne; Mita, Monica; Beck, Joachim; Burris, Howard; Ryan, Gail; Atadja, Peter; Butterfoss, Dale; Dugan, Margaret; Culver, Kenneth; Johnstone, Ricky W; Prince, H Miles

    2008-07-15

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors can alter gene expression and mediate diverse antitumor activities. Herein, we report the safety and activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat (LBH589) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) and identify genes commonly regulated by panobinostat. Panobinostat was administered orally to patients with CTCL on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday of each week on a 28-day cycle. A dose of 30 mg was considered excessively toxic, and subsequent patients were treated at the expanded maximum tolerated dose of 20 mg. Biopsies from six patients taken 0, 4, 8, and 24 h after administration were subjected to microarray gene expression profiling and real-time quantitative PCR of selected genes. Patients attained a complete response (n = 2), attained a partial response (n = 4), achieved stable disease with ongoing improvement (n = 1), and progressed on treatment (n = 2). Microarray data showed distinct gene expression response profiles over time following panobinostat treatment, with the majority of genes being repressed. Twenty-three genes were commonly regulated by panobinostat in all patients tested. Panobinostat is well tolerated and induces clinical responses in CTCL patients. Microarray analyses of tumor samples indicate that panobinostat induces rapid changes in gene expression, and surprisingly more genes are repressed than are activated. A unique set of genes that can mediate biological responses such as apoptosis, immune regulation, and angiogenesis were commonly regulated in response to panobinostat. These genes are potential molecular biomarkers for panobinostat activity and are strong candidates for the future assessment of their functional role(s) in mediating the antitumor responses of panobinostat.

  14. A reduced-amide inhibitor of Pin1 binds in a conformation resembling a twisted-amide transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zhang, Yan; Mercedes-Camacho, Ana Y; Etzkorn, Felicia A

    2011-11-08

    The mechanism of the cell cycle regulatory peptidyl prolyl isomerase (PPIase), Pin1, was investigated using reduced-amide inhibitors designed to mimic the twisted-amide transition state. Inhibitors, R-pSer-Ψ[CH(2)N]-Pro-2-(indol-3-yl)ethylamine, 1 [R = fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl (Fmoc)] and 2 (R = Ac), of Pin1 were synthesized and bioassayed. Inhibitor 1 had an IC(50) value of 6.3 μM, which is 4.5-fold better for Pin1 than our comparable ground-state analogue, a cis-amide alkene isostere-containing inhibitor. The change of Fmoc to Ac in 2 improved aqueous solubility for structural determination and resulted in an IC(50) value of 12 μM. The X-ray structure of the complex of 2 bound to Pin1 was determined to 1.76 Å resolution. The structure revealed that the reduced amide adopted a conformation similar to the proposed twisted-amide transition state of Pin1, with a trans-pyrrolidine conformation of the prolyl ring. A similar conformation of substrate would be destabilized relative to the planar amide conformation. Three additional reduced amides, with Thr replacing Ser and l- or d-pipecolate (Pip) replacing Pro, were slightly weaker inhibitors of Pin1.

  15. The statin class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors demonstrate differential activation of the nuclear receptors PXR, CAR and FXR, as well as their downstream target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Katharine; Sanat, Faizah; Thumser, Alfred E; Coleman, Tanya; Plant, Nick

    2011-07-01

    The therapeutic class of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, the statins are central agents in the treatment of hypercholesterolaemia and the associated conditions of cardiovascular disease, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Although statin therapy is generally considered safe, a number of known adverse effects do occur, most commonly treatment-associated muscular pain. In vitro evidence also supports the potential for drug-drug interactions involving this class of agents, and to examine this a ligand-binding assay was used to determine the ability of six clinically used statins for their ability to directly activate the nuclear receptors pregnane X-receptor (PXR), farnesoid X-receptor (FXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), demonstrating a relative activation of PXR>FXR>CAR. Using reporter gene constructs, we demonstrated that this order of activation is mirrored at the transcriptional activation level, with PXR-mediated gene activation being pre-eminent. Finally, we described a novel regulatory loop, whereby activation of FXR by statins increases PXR reporter gene expression, potentially enhancing PXR-mediated responses. Delineating the molecular interactions of statins with nuclear receptors is an important step in understanding the full biological consequences of statin exposure. This demonstration of their ability to directly activate nuclear receptors, leading to nuclear receptor cross-talk, has important potential implications for their use within a polypharmacy paradigm.

  16. SNP Analysis and Haplotype Identification in Chymotrypsin Inhibitor-2 (CI-2) Gene of Barley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Xiang-hui; WEI Yu-ming; JIANG Qian-tao; QI Peng-fei; ZHENG You-liang

    2009-01-01

    Barley chymotrypsin inhibitor-2 (CI-2) was considered to be a promising candidate for enhancing the nutritional value of other cereals by increasing its concentration as it is rich in lysine than any other storage protein. Also, it was proposed that CI-2 might play an important role in the inhibition of proteolytic enzymes from pests or pathogens as CI-2 can strongly inhibit chymotrypsin and subtilisin. In this study, a total of 93 CI-2 gene sequences were isolated from wild and cultivated barley. 48 SNPs and 4 indels were detected across the entire sequences. The frequency of SNPs in the non-coding region (1 out of 9 bases) was slightly higher than that in the coding region (1 out of 10.7 bases). In all, 33.3% of the candidate cSNPs resulted in amino acid changes. As a total, the 24 cSNPs resulted in 15 amino acid changes. Ten distinguishable haplotypes were detected, among which 3 haplotypes were shared in the most barley accessions, whereas the rest of the haplotypes appeared at a lower frequency. In addition, three haplotypes (haplotype 4, 8, and 9) were unique for single accessions. These results suggested that low diversity at the CI-2 locus was detected among the cultivated and wild barley.

  17. The microarray gene profiling analysis of glioblastoma cancer cells reveals genes affected by FAK inhibitor Y15 and combination of Y15 and temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace; Ho, Baotran; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Qiang, Hu; Golubovskaya, Vita

    2014-01-01

    Focal adhesion is known to be highly expressed and activated in glioma cells. Recently, we demonstrated that FAK autophosphorylation inhibitor, Y15 significantly decreased tumor growth of DBTRG and U87 cells, especially in combination with temozolomide. In the present report, we performed gene expression analysis in these cells to reveal genes affected by Y15, temozolomide and combination of Y15 and temozolomide. We tested the effect of Y15 on gene expression by Illumina Human HT12v4 microarray assay and detected 8087 and 6555 genes, which were significantly either up- or down-regulated by Y15-treatment in DBTRG and U87 cells, respectively (ptemozolomide and by combination of Y15 and temozolomide treatment in U87 cells. Among genes up-regulated by Y15 and temozolomide more significantly than by each agent alone were: COX7B; interferon, gamma-inducible transcript: IFI16; DDIT4; GADD45G and down-regulated: KIF3A, AKT1; ABL; JAK1, GLI3 and ALDH1A3. Thus, microarray gene expression analysis can be effective in establishing genes affected in response to FAK inhibitor alone and in response to combination of Y15 with temozolomide that is important for glioblastoma therapy.

  18. Epoxide-mediated CifR repression of cif gene expression utilizes two binding sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballok, Alicia E; Bahl, Christopher D; Dolben, Emily L; Lindsay, Allia K; St Laurent, Jessica D; Hogan, Deborah A; Madden, Dean R; O'Toole, George A

    2012-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon containing the cif gene. We have mapped these binding sites and found they are 27 bp in length, and they overlap the -10 and +1 sites of both the cifR and morB regulatory region and the start of transcription, respectively. In addition, we found that CifR binds to each repression site with differing affinity. Mutagenesis of these binding sites resulted in a loss of DNA binding in vitro, and mutation of one of these sites in vivo resulted in an increase in transcription of both the cif and cifR genes. We characterized cif and cifR gene expression in sputum and found that, whereas cif gene expression varied relative to an in vitro coculture control, cifR gene expression was consistently higher. Analysis of a longitudinal sample of CF isolates from nine patients revealed that Cif protein was expressed over time, although variably, and these changes could not be linked to mutations in the cifR gene or the promoters of these genes. Finally, we tested CifR responsiveness to other epoxides and showed that CifR can respond to multiple epoxides to various degrees.

  19. [Role of Allelic Genes of Matrix Metalloproteinases and Their Tissue Inhibitors in the Peptic Ulcer Disease Development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaymardanova, E Kh; Nurgalieva, A Kh; Khidiyatova, I M; Gabbasova, L V; Kuramshina, O A; Kryukova, A Ya; Sagitov, R B; Munasipov, F R; Khusnutdinova, E Kh

    2016-03-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract, mainly manifesting itself in the formation of the fairly persistent ulcer defect of the mucous membrane of the stomach and/or duodenum. Association analysis of common polymorphisms of matrix metalloproteinases genes MMP-1 (rs1799750, rs494379), MMP-2 (rs2285052), MMP-3 (rs3025058), MMP-9 (rs3918242, rs17576), and MMP-12 (rs2276109) and their tissue inhibitors TIMP-2 (rs8179090) and TIMP-3 (rs9619311) was carried out in 353 patients with a gastric ulcer or duodenal ulcer and in 325 unrelated healthy individuals from the Republic of Bashkortostan. Associations of polymorphic variants rs1799750 and rs494379 of gene MMP-1, rs3025058 of gene MMP-3, rs3918242 and rs17576 of gene MMP-9, and rs9619311 of gene TIMP-3 with the risk of peptic ulcer disease in Russians and Tatars were revealed.

  20. Regulation of granulosa cell cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART) binding and effect of CART signaling inhibitor on granulosa cell estradiol production during dominant follicle selection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Joseph K; Jimenez-Krassel, Fermin; Ireland, James J; Lv, Lihua; Smith, George W

    2013-12-01

    We previously established a potential role for cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CARTPT) in dominant follicle selection in cattle. CARTPT expression is elevated in subordinate versus dominant follicles, and treatment with the mature form of the CARTPT peptide (CART) decreases follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated granulosa cell estradiol production in vitro and follicular fluid estradiol and granulosa cell CYP19A1 mRNA in vivo. However, mechanisms that regulate granulosa cell CART responsiveness are not understood. In this study, we investigated hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in vitro and temporal regulation of granulosa cell CART-binding sites in bovine follicles collected at specific stages of a follicular wave. We also determined the effect of inhibition of CART receptor signaling in vivo on estradiol production in future subordinate follicles. Granulosa cell CART binding in vitro was increased by FSH, and this induction was blocked by estrogen receptor antagonist treatment. In follicles collected in vivo at specific stages of a follicular wave, granulosa cell CART binding in the F2 (second largest), future subordinate follicle increased during dominant follicle selection. Injection into the F2 follicle (at onset of diameter deviation) of an inhibitor of the o/i subclass of G proteins (previously shown to block CART actions in vitro) resulted in increased follicular fluid estradiol concentrations in vivo. Collectively, results demonstrate hormonal regulation of granulosa cell CART binding in vitro and temporal regulation of CART binding in subordinate follicles during dominant follicle selection. Results also suggest that CART signaling may help suppress estradiol-producing capacity of the F2 (subordinate) follicle during this time period.

  1. Neighboring genes for DNA-binding proteins rescue male sterility in Drosophila hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Marjorie A; Araripe, Luciana O; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-07-19

    Crosses between closely related animal species often result in male hybrids that are sterile, and the molecular and functional basis of genetic factors for hybrid male sterility is of great interest. Here, we report a molecular and functional analysis of HMS1, a region of 9.2 kb in chromosome 3 of Drosophila mauritiana, which results in virtually complete hybrid male sterility when homozygous in the genetic background of sibling species Drosophila simulans. The HMS1 region contains two strong candidate genes for the genetic incompatibility, agt and Taf1 Both encode unrelated DNA-binding proteins, agt for an alkyl-cysteine-S-alkyltransferase and Taf1 for a subunit of transcription factor TFIID that serves as a multifunctional transcriptional regulator. The contribution of each gene to hybrid male sterility was assessed by means of germ-line transformation, with constructs containing complete agt and Taf1 genomic sequences as well as various chimeric constructs. Both agt and Taf1 contribute about equally to HMS1 hybrid male sterility. Transgenes containing either locus rescue sterility in about one-half of the males, and among fertile males the number of offspring is in the normal range. This finding suggests compensatory proliferation of the rescued, nondysfunctional germ cells. Results with chimeric transgenes imply that the hybrid incompatibilities result from interactions among nucleotide differences residing along both agt and Taf1 Our results challenge a number of preliminary generalizations about the molecular and functional basis of hybrid male sterility, and strongly reinforce the role of DNA-binding proteins as a class of genes contributing to the maintenance of postzygotic reproductive isolation.

  2. The S-enantiomer of R,S-citalopram, increases inhibitor binding to the human serotonin transporter by an allosteric mechanism. Comparison with other serotonin transporter inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fenghua; Larsen, Mads Breum; Sánchez, Connie

    2005-01-01

    The interaction of the S- and R-enantiomers (escitalopram and R-citalopram) of citalopram, with high- and low-affinity binding sites in COS-1 cell membranes expressing human SERT (hSERT) were investigated. Escitalopram affinity for hSERT and its 5-HT uptake inhibitory potency was in the nanomolar...... range and approximately 40-fold more potent than R-citalopram. Escitalopram considerably stabilised the [3H]-escitalopram/SERT complex via an allosteric effect at a low-affinity binding site. The stereoselectivity between escitalopram and R-citalopram was approximately 3:1 for the [3H]-escitalopram....../hSERT complex. The combined effect of escitalopram and R-citalopram was additive. Paroxetine and sertraline mainly stabilised the [3H]-paroxetine/hSERT complex. Fluoxetine, duloxetine and venlafaxine have only minor effects. 5-HT stabilised the [125I]-RTI-55, [3H]-MADAM, [3H]-paroxetine, [3H]-fluoxetine and [3H...

  3. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance by mutagenesis of the TATA-binding protein gene and identification of novel genes associated with ethanol tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jungwoo; Bae, Ju Yun; Lee, Young Mi; Kwon, Hyeji; Moon, Hye-Yun; Kang, Hyun Ah; Yee, Su-Bog; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2011-08-01

    Since elevated ethanol is a major stress during ethanol fermentation, yeast strains tolerant to ethanol are highly desirable for the industrial scale ethanol production. A technology called global transcriptional machinery engineering (gTME), which exploits a mutant library of SPT15 encoding the TATA-binding protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alper et al., 2006; Science 314: 1565-1568), seems to a powerful tool for creating ethanol-tolerant strains. However, the ability of created strains to tolerate high ethanol on rich media remains unproven. In this study, a similar strategy was used to obtain five strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance (ETS1-5) of S. cerevisiae. Comparing global transcriptional profiles of two selected strains ETS2 and ETS3 with that of the control identified 42 genes that were commonly regulated with twofold change. Out of 34 deletion mutants available from a gene knockout library, 18 were ethanol sensitive, suggesting that these genes were closely associated with ethanol tolerance. Eight of them were novel with most being functionally unknown. To establish a basis for future industrial applications, strains iETS2 and iETS3 were created by integrating the SPT15 mutant alleles of ETS2 and ETS3 into the chromosomes, which also exhibited enhanced ethanol tolerance and survival upon ethanol shock on a rich medium. Fermentation with 20% glucose for 24 h in a bioreactor revealed that iETS2 and iETS3 grew better and produced approximately 25% more ethanol than a control strain. The ethanol yield and productivity were also substantially enhanced: 0.31 g/g and 2.6 g/L/h, respectively, for control and 0.39 g/g and 3.2 g/L/h, respectively, for iETS2 and iETS3. Thus, our study demonstrates the utility of gTME in generating strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance that resulted in increase of ethanol production. Strains with enhanced tolerance to other stresses such as heat, fermentation inhibitors, osmotic pressure, and so on, may be further created by

  4. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  5. Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein is involved in suppression of the adiponectin gene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X Z; Imachi, H; Lyu, J Y; Fukunaga, K; Sato, S; Ibata, T; Kobayashi, T; Yoshimoto, T; Kikuchi, F; Dong, T; Murao, K

    2017-04-01

    Prolactin regulatory element-binding protein (PREB), a member of the WD-repeat protein family, has been recognized as a transcriptional factor that regulates prolactin promoter activity in the anterior pituitary of rats. PREB is expressed not only in the pituitary but also in various other tissues, including the adipose tissue. Previous studies have shown that PREB acts as a transcriptional regulator and suppresses the expression of the adiponectin gene in cultured 3T3L1 preadipocytes. The aim of this study was to further examine the potential role of PREB in adipose tissue in vivo. Transgenic mice that overexpressing PREB (PREB transgenic mice) were generated. Insulin resistance was evaluated in PREB transgenic mice using glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Adiponectin expression in the adipose tissue was examined by western blot analysis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The expression levels of stearoyl-CoA desaturase (Scd) and adiponectin receptor 2(ADIPOR2) were quantified by qPCR. Glucose and insulin tolerance tests revealed insulin resistance in PREB transgenic mice. Serum adiponectin and leptin concentrations were decreased. Adiponectin gene expression was decreased in the adipose tissue, which was confirmed by the downregulation of the adiponectin-dependent hepatic Scd gene and upregulation of the ADIPOR2 gene in the liver of PREB transgenic mice. We also found that pioglitazone, an agonist for the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-r, improved the insulin resistance in the PREB transgenic mice after a 10-day feeding period. These results demonstrated that PREB might contribute to the regulation of adiponectin gene expression in vivo.

  6. Expression of the familial Mediterranean fever gene and activity of the C5a inhibitor in human primary fibroblast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzner, Y; Abedat, S; Shapiro, E; Eisenberg, S; Bar-Gil-Shitrit, A; Stepensky, P; Calco, S; Azar, Y; Urieli-Shoval, S

    2000-07-15

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an inherited disease whose manifestations are acute but reversible attacks of sterile inflammation affecting synovial and serosal spaces. The FMF gene (MEFV) was recently cloned, and it codes for a protein (pyrin/marenostrin) homologous to known nuclear factors. We previously reported the deficient activity of a C5a/interleukin (IL)-8 inhibitor, a physiologic regulator of inflammatory processes, in FMF serosal and synovial fluids. We now describe the concomitant expression of MEFV and C5a/IL-8-inhibitor activity in primary cultures of human fibroblasts. Fibroblasts grown from synovial and peritoneal tissues displayed C5a/IL-8-inhibitor activity that could be further induced with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and IL-1 beta. Very low levels of chemotactic inhibitor were evident in skin fibroblast cultures or in peritoneal and skin fibroblasts obtained from FMF patients. MEFV was expressed in peritoneal and skin fibroblasts at a lower level than in neutrophils and could be further induced by PMA and IL-1 beta. In the FMF cultures, the MEFV transcript carried the M694V mutation, consistent with the genetic defect found in patients with this disease. MEFV was also expressed in other cell lines that do not produce C5a/IL-8 inhibitor. These findings suggest that human primary fibroblast cultures express MEFV and produce C5a/IL-8-inhibitor activity. The interrelationship between pyrin, the MEFV product, and the C5a/IL-8 inhibitor requires further investigation. (Blood. 2000;96:727-731)

  7. Paying the Price of Desolvation in Solvent-Exposed Protein Pockets: Impact of Distal Solubilizing Groups on Affinity and Binding Thermodynamics in a Series of Thermolysin Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Jonathan; Krimmer, Stefan G; Heine, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2017-07-13

    In lead optimization, open, solvent-exposed protein pockets are often disregarded as prospective binding sites. Because of bulk-solvent proximity, researchers are instead enticed to attach charged polar groups at inhibitor scaffolds to improve solubility and pharmacokinetic properties. It is rarely considered that solvent effects from water reorganization in the first hydration shell of protein-ligand complexes can have a significant impact on binding. We investigate the thermodynamic fingerprint of thermolysin inhibitors featuring terminal charged ammonium groups that are gradually pulled from a distal, solvent-exposed position into the flat, bowl-shaped S2' pocket. Even for the most remote attachment, costs for partial desolvation of the polar group next to the protein-solvent interface are difficult to compensate by interactions with the protein or surrounding water molecules. Through direct comparison with hydrophobic analogues, a significant 180-fold affinity loss was recorded, which questions popular strategies to attach polar ligand-solubilizing groups at the exposed terminus of substituents accommodated in flat open pockets.

  8. Identification of Tight-Binding Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 Inhibitors in Aqueous Extracts of Marine Invertebrates by the Combination of Enzymatic and Interaction-Based Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Sarduy, Emir; Guerra, Yasel; Covaleda Cortés, Giovanni; Avilés, Francesc Xavier; Chávez Planes, María A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural products from marine origin constitute a very promising and underexplored source of interesting compounds for modern biotechnological and pharmaceutical industries. However, their evaluation is quite challenging and requires specifically designed assays to reliably identify the compounds of interest in a highly heterogeneous and interfering context. In the present study, we describe a general strategy for the confident identification of tight-binding protease inhibitors in the aqueous extracts of 62 Cuban marine invertebrates, using Plasmodium falciparum hemoglobinases Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 as model enzymes. To this end, we first developed a screening strategy that combined enzymatic with interaction-based assays and then validated screening conditions using five reference extracts. Interferences were evaluated and minimized. The results from the massive screening of such extracts, the validation of several hits by a variety of interaction-based assays and the purification and functional characterization of PhPI, a multifunctional and reversible tight-binding inhibitor for Plasmepsin II and Falcipain 2 from the gorgonian Plexaura homomalla, are presented. PMID:28430158

  9. Epigenetic silencing of the XAF1 gene is mediated by the loss of CTCF binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria-Acosta, Georgina; Vazquez-Santillan, Karla; Jimenez-Hernandez, Luis; Muñoz-Galindo, Laura; Maldonado, Vilma; Martinez-Ruiz, Gustavo Ulises; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    XAF1 is a tumour suppressor gene that compromises cell viability by modulating different cellular events such as mitosis, cell cycle progression and apoptosis. In cancer, the XAF1 gene is commonly silenced by CpG-dinucleotide hypermethylation of its promoter. DNA demethylating agents induce transcriptional reactivation of XAF1, sensitizing cancer cells to therapy. The molecular mechanisms that mediate promoter CpG methylation have not been previously studied. Here, we demonstrate that CTCF interacts with the XAF1 promoter in vivo in a methylation-sensitive manner. By transgene assays, we demonstrate that CTCF mediates the open-chromatin configuration of the XAF1 promoter, inhibiting both CpG-dinucleotide methylation and repressive histone posttranslational modifications. In addition, the absence of CTCF in the XAF1 promoter inhibits transcriptional activation induced by well-known apoptosis activators. We report for the first time that epigenetic silencing of the XAF1 gene is a consequence of the loss of CTCF binding. PMID:26443201

  10. In vivo suppression of vein graft disease by nonviral, electroporation-mediated, gene transfer of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 linked to the amino terminal fragment of urokinase (TIMP-1.ATF), a cell-surface directed matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eefting, Daniel; de Vries, Margreet R; Grimbergen, Jos M; Karper, Jacco C; van Bockel, J Hajo; Quax, Paul H A

    2010-02-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) migration and proliferation are important in the development of intimal hyperplasia, the major cause of vein graft failure. Proteases of the plasminogen activator (PA) system and of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) system are pivotal in extracellular matrix degradation and, by that, SMC migration. Previously, we demonstrated that inhibition of both protease systems simultaneously with viral gene delivery of the hybrid protein TIMP-1.ATF, consisting of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and the receptor-binding amino terminal fragment (ATF) of urokinase, reduces SMC migration and neointima formation in an in vitro restenosis model using human saphenous vein cultures more efficiently than both protease systems separately. Because use of viral gene delivery is difficult in clinical application, this study used nonviral delivery of TIMP-1.ATF plasmid to reduce vein graft disease in a murine bypass model. Nonviral gene transfer by electroporation was used to avert major disadvantages of viral gene delivery, such as immune responses and short-term expression. Plasmids encoding ATF, TIMP-1, TIMP-1.ATF, or luciferase, as a control, were injected and electroporated in both calf muscles of hypercholesterolemic apolipoprotein E3-Leiden (APOE*3Leiden) mice (n = 8). One day after electroporation, a venous interposition of a donor mouse was placed into the carotid artery of a recipient mouse. In this model, vein graft thickening develops with features of accelerated atherosclerosis. Vein grafts were harvested 4 weeks after electroporation and surgery, and histologic analysis of the vessel wall was performed. Electroporation-mediated overexpression of the plasmid vectors resulted in a prolonged expression of the transgenes and resulted in a significant reduction of vein graft thickening (ATF: 36% +/- 9%, TIMP-1: 49% +/- 5%, TIMP-1.ATF: 58% +/- 5%; P ATF-treated mice. Intramuscular electroporation of TIMP-1.ATF inhibits vein graft

  11. Necdin, a p53-target gene, is an inhibitor of p53-mediated growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Lafontaine

    Full Text Available In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT, a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability.

  12. Discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor of human DDX3 specifically designed to target the RNA binding site: towards the next generation HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marco; Falchi, Federico; Garbelli, Anna; Samuele, Alberta; Bernardo, Vincenzo; Paolucci, Stefania; Baldanti, Fausto; Schenone, Silvia; Manetti, Fabrizio; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Efficacy of currently approved anti-HIV drugs is hampered by mutations of the viral enzymes, leading invariably to drug resistance and chemotherapy failure. Recent data suggest that cellular co-factors also represent useful targets for anti-HIV therapy. Here we describe the identification of the first small molecules specifically designed to inhibit the HIV-1 replication by targeting the RNA binding site of the human DEAD-Box RNA helicase DDX3. Optimization of a easily synthetically accessible hit (1) identified by application of a high-throughput docking approach afforded the promising compounds 6 and 8 which proved to inhibit both the helicase and ATPase activity of DDX3 and to reduce the viral load of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with HIV-1.

  13. Update of the human secretoglobin (SCGB gene superfamily and an example of 'evolutionary bloom' of androgen-binding protein genes within the mouse Scgb gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Brian C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The secretoglobins (SCGBs comprise a family of small, secreted proteins found in animals exclusively of mammalian lineage. There are 11 human SCGB genes and five pseudogenes. Interestingly, mice have 68 Scgb genes, four of which are highly orthologous to human SCGB genes; the remainder represent an 'evolutionary bloom' and make up a large gene family represented by only six counterparts in humans. SCGBs are found in high concentrations in many mammalian secretions, including fluids of the lung, lacrimal gland, salivary gland, prostate and uterus. Whereas the biological activities of most individual SCGBs have not been fully characterised, what already has been discovered suggests that this family has an important role in the modulation of inflammation, tissue repair and tumorigenesis. In mice, the large Scgb1b and Scgb2b gene families encode the androgen-binding proteins, which have been shown to play a role in mate selection. Although much has been learned about SCGBs in recent years, clearly more research remains to be done to allow a better understanding of the roles of these proteins in human health and disease. Such information is predicted to reveal valuable novel drug targets for the treatment of inflammation, as well as designing biomarkers that might identify tissue damage or cancer.

  14. Comparison of current docking tools for the simulation of inhibitor binding by the transmembrane domain of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lape, Michael; Elam, Christopher; Paula, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Inhibitors of the transmembrane protein sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) are invaluable tools for the study of the enzyme’s physiological functions and they have been recognized as a promising new class of anticancer agents. For the discovery of novel enzyme inhibitors, small molecule docking for virtual screens of large compound libraries has become increasingly important. Since the performance of various docking routines varies considerably, depending on the target and the chemical nature of the ligand, we critically evaluated the performance of four frequently used programs – GOLD, AutoDock, Surflex-Dock, and FRED – for the docking of SERCA inhibitors based on the structures of thapsigargin, di-tert-butylhydroquinone, and cyclopiazonic acid. Evaluation criteria were docking accuracy using crystal structures as references, docking reproducibility, and correlation between docking scores and known bioactivities. The best overall results were obtained by GOLD and FRED. Docking runs with conformationally flexible binding sites produced no significant improvement of the results. PMID:20167416

  15. Inhibitors incorporating zinc-binding groups target the GlcNAc-PI de-N-acetylase in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Nuha Z; Crossman, Arthur T; Sullivan, Lauren; Ferguson, Michael A J; Urbaniak, Michael D

    2012-03-01

    Disruption of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis is genetically and chemically validated as a drug target against the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The N-acetylglucosamine-phosphatidylinositol de-N-acetylase (deNAc) is a zinc metalloenzyme responsible for the second step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol biosynthesis. We recently reported the synthesis of eight deoxy-2-C-branched monosaccharides containing carboxylic acid, hydroxamic acid, or N-hydroxyurea substituents at the C2 position that may act as zinc-binding groups. Here, we describe the synthesis of a glucocyclitol-phospholipid incorporating a hydroxamic acid moiety and report the biochemical evaluation of the monosaccharides and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid as inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc in the cell-free system and against recombinant enzyme. Monosaccharides with carboxylic acid or hydroxamic acid substituents were found to be the inhibitors of the trypanosome deNAc with IC(50) values 0.1-1.5mM and the glucocyclitol-phospholipid was found to be a dual inhibitor of the deNAc and the α1-4-mannose transferase with an apparent IC(50)= 19±0.5μm. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Using thermodynamic integration MD simulation to compute relative protein-ligand binding free energy of a GSK3β kinase inhibitor and its analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsing-Chou; Hsu, Wen-Chi; Liu, An-Lun; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Sun, Ying-Chieh

    2014-06-01

    Thermodynamic integration molecular dynamics simulation was used to investigate how TI-MD simulation preforms in reproducing relative protein-ligand binding free energy of a pair of analogous GSK3β kinase inhibitors of available experimental data (see Fig. 1), and to predict the affinity for other analogs. The computation for the pair gave a ΔΔG of 1.0 kcal/mol, which was in reasonably good agreement with the experimental value of -0.1 kcal/mol. The error bar was estimated at 0.5 kcal/mol. Subsequently, we employed the same protocol to proceed with simulations to find analogous inhibitors with a stronger affinity. Four analogs with a substitution at one site inside the binding pocket were the first to be tried, but no significant enhancement in affinity was found. Subsequent simulations for another 7 analogs was focused on substitutions at the benzene ring of another site, which gave two analogs (analogs 9 and 10) with ΔΔG values of -0.6 and -0.8 kcal/mol, respectively. Both analogs had a OH group at the meta position and another OH group at the ortho position at the other side of the benzene ring, as shown in Table 3. To explore further, another 4 analogs with this characteristic were investigated. Three analogs with ΔΔG values of -2.2, -1.7 and -1.2 kcal/mol, respectively, were found. Hydrogen bond analysis suggested that the additional hydrogen bonds of the added OH groups with Gln185 and/or Asn64, which did not appear in the reference inhibitor or as an analog with one substitution only in the examined cases, were the main contributors to an enhanced affinity. A prediction for better inhibitors should interest experimentalists of enzyme and/or cell assays. Analysis of the interactions between GSK3β kinase and the investigated analogs will be useful in the design of GSK3β kinase inhibitors for compounds of this class. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Small-molecule inhibitors suppress the expression of both type III secretion and amylovoran biosynthesis genes in Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Elofsson, Michael; Sundin, George W; Zhao, Youfu

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) and exopolysaccharide (EPS) amylovoran are two essential pathogenicity factors in Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of the serious bacterial disease fire blight. In this study, small molecules that inhibit T3SS gene expression in E. amylovora under hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity)-inducing conditions were identified and characterized using green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. These compounds belong to salicylidene acylhydrazides and also inhibit amylovoran production. Microarray analysis of E. amylovora treated with compounds 3 and 9 identified a total of 588 significantly differentially expressed genes. Among them, 95 and 78 genes were activated and suppressed by both compounds, respectively, when compared with the dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) control. The expression of the majority of T3SS genes in E. amylovora, including hrpL and the avrRpt2 effector gene, was suppressed by both compounds. Compound 3 also suppressed the expression of amylovoran precursor and biosynthesis genes. However, both compounds induced significantly the expression of glycogen biosynthesis genes and siderophore biosynthesis, regulatory and transport genes. Furthermore, many membrane, lipoprotein and exported protein-encoding genes were also activated by both compounds. Similar expression patterns were observed for compounds 1, 2 and 4. Using crab apple flower as a model, compound 3 was capable of reducing disease development in pistils. These results suggest a common inhibition mechanism shared by salicylidene acylhydrazides and indicate that small-molecule inhibitors that disable T3SS function could be explored to control fire blight disease.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  19. Structural Insights into Linear Tri-ubiquitin Recognition by A20-Binding Inhibitor of NF-κB, ABIN-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Meng; Lin, Su-Chang; Hong, Jhen-Yi; Su, Tsung-Wei; Kuo, Bai-Jiun; Chang, Wei-Hsin; Tu, Yi-Fan; Lo, Yu-Chih

    2017-01-03

    Recognition of linear polyubiquitin by specific ubiquitin-binding proteins plays an important role in mediating nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling. A20 binding proteins, ABINs, recognize linear polyubiquitin and A20 through UBAN and AHD1, respectively, for the inhibition of NF-κB activation. Here we report the crystal structure of the AHD1-UBAN fragment of ABIN2 in complex with linear tri-ubiquitin, which reveals a 2:1 stoichiometry of the complex. Structural analyses together with mutagenesis, pull-down, and isothermal titration calorimetry assays show that the hABIN2:tri-ubiquitin interaction is mainly through the primary ubiquitin-binding site, and also through the secondary ubiquitin-binding site under a high local protein concentration. Surprisingly, three ubiquitin units could form a right-handed helical trimer to bridge two ABIN2 dimers. The residues around the M1-linkage are crucial for ABIN2 to recognize tri-ubiquitin. The tri-ubiquitin bridging two ABIN2 dimers model suggests a possible higher-order signaling complex assembled between M1-linked polyubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin-binding proteins, and effector signaling proteins in signal transduction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten; Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Møller, Jesper Bonnet

    G target genes. SSX2 further negatively regulates the level of the PcG-associated histone mark H3K27me3 in melanoma cells, and there is a clear inverse correlation between SSX2/3 expression and H3K27me3 in spermatogenesis. SSX2 does not affect the overall composition and stability of PcG complexes, but SSX......2-mediated derepression of the PcG target gene ATF3 is associated with widespread binding of SSX2 to this gene and a reduction in BMI1 and histone H3K27me3 at the proximal promoter. SSX2 bind