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Sample records for binding improves target

  1. Improvement of Yarrowia lipolytica lipase enantioselectivity by using mutagenesis targeted to the substrate binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, F; Cambon, E; Dossat-Létisse, V; André, I; Croux, C; Nicaud, J M; Marty, A

    2009-07-06

    Lip2p lipase from Yarrowia lipolytica was shown to be an efficient catalyst for the resolution of 2-bromo-arylacetic acid esters, an important class of chemical intermediates in the pharmaceutical industry. Enantioselectivity of this lipase was improved by site-directed mutagenesis targeted to the substrate binding site. To guide mutagenesis experiments, the three-dimensional model of this lipase was built by homology modelling techniques by using the structures of lipases from Rhizomucor miehei and Thermomyces lanuginosa as templates. On the basis of this structural model, five amino acid residues (T88, V94, D97, V232, V285) that form the hydrophobic substrate binding site of the lipase were selected for site-directed mutagenesis. Position 232 was identified as crucial for the discrimination between enantiomers. Variant V232A displayed an enantioselectivity enhanced by one order of magnitude, whereas variant V232L exhibited a selectivity inversion. To further explore the diversity, position 232 was systematically replaced by the 19 possible amino acids. Screening of this library led to the identification of the V232S variant, which has a tremendously increased E value compared to the parental enzyme for the resolution of 2-bromo-phenylacetic acid ethyl ester (58-fold) and 2-bromo-o-tolylacetic acid ethyl ester (16-fold). In addition to the gain in enantioselectivity, a remarkable increase in velocity was observed (eightfold increase) for both substrates.

  2. Alzheimer's Therapeutics Targeting Amyloid Beta 1–42 Oligomers I: Abeta 42 Oligomer Binding to Specific Neuronal Receptors Is Displaced by Drug Candidates That Improve Cognitive Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J.; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F.; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1–42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors - i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD

  3. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers I: Abeta 42 oligomer binding to specific neuronal receptors is displaced by drug candidates that improve cognitive deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Staniszewski, Agnes; To, Lillian; Fa, Mauro; Teich, Andrew F; Saeed, Faisal; Wostein, Harrison; Walko, Thomas; Vaswani, Anisha; Wardius, Meghan; Syed, Zanobia; Ravenscroft, Jessica; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Finn, Patricia; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Miller, Miles; Johanson, Conrad; Stopa, Edward; Windisch, Manfred; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Arancio, Ottavio; LeVine, Harry; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic dysfunction and loss caused by age-dependent accumulation of synaptotoxic beta amyloid (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers is proposed to underlie cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Alterations in membrane trafficking induced by Abeta oligomers mediates reduction in neuronal surface receptor expression that is the basis for inhibition of electrophysiological measures of synaptic plasticity and thus learning and memory. We have utilized phenotypic screens in mature, in vitro cultures of rat brain cells to identify small molecules which block or prevent the binding and effects of Abeta oligomers. Synthetic Abeta oligomers bind saturably to a single site on neuronal synapses and induce deficits in membrane trafficking in neuronal cultures with an EC50 that corresponds to its binding affinity. The therapeutic lead compounds we have found are pharmacological antagonists of Abeta oligomers, reducing the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons in vitro, preventing spine loss in neurons and preventing and treating oligomer-induced deficits in membrane trafficking. These molecules are highly brain penetrant and prevent and restore cognitive deficits in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease. Counter-screening these compounds against a broad panel of potential CNS targets revealed they are highly potent and specific ligands of the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor. Brain concentrations of the compounds corresponding to greater than 80% receptor occupancy at the sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptor restore cognitive function in transgenic hAPP Swe/Ldn mice. These studies demonstrate that synthetic and human-derived Abeta oligomers act as pharmacologically-behaved ligands at neuronal receptors--i.e. they exhibit saturable binding to a target, they exert a functional effect related to their binding and their displacement by small molecule antagonists blocks their functional effect. The first-in-class small molecule receptor antagonists described here restore memory to normal in multiple AD models

  4. Improved Binding Activity of Antibodies against Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Chain-Related Gene A by Phage Display Technology for Cancer-Targeted Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achara Phumyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA is an NKG2D ligand that is over-expressed under cellular stress including cancer transformation and viral infection. High expression of MICA in cancer tissues or patients' sera is useful for prognostic or follow-up markers in cancer patients. In this study, phage display technology was employed to improve antigen-binding activities of anti-MICA monoclonal antibodies (WW2G8, WW6B7, and WW9B8. The 12 amino acid residues in the complementarity determining regions (CDRs on the V domain of the heavy chain CDR3 (HCDR3 of these anti-MICA antibodies were modified by PCR-random mutagenesis, and phages displaying mutated anti-MICA Fab were constructed. After seven rounds of panning, five clones of phages displaying mutant anti-MICA Fab which exhibited 3–7-folds higher antigen-binding activities were isolated. Two clones of the mutants (phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.1 and phage-displayed mutant Fab WW9B8.21 were confirmed to have antigen-binding specificity for cell surface MICA proteins by flow cytometry. These phage clones are able to recognize MICA in a native form according to positive results obtained by indirect ELISA and flow cytometry. Thus, these phage particles could be potentially used for further development of nanomedicine specifically targeting cancer cells expressing MICA proteins.

  5. A probabilistic approach to microRNA-target binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogul, Hasan, E-mail: hogul@baskent.edu.tr [Department of Computer Engineering, Baskent University, Baglica TR-06810, Ankara (Turkey); Umu, Sinan U. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Cankaya TR-06800, Ankara (Turkey); Bioinformatics Program, Informatics Institute, Middle East Technical University, Cankaya TR-06800, Ankara (Turkey); Tuncel, Y. Yener [Bioinformatics Program, Informatics Institute, Middle East Technical University, Cankaya TR-06800, Ankara (Turkey); Akkaya, Mahinur S. [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Cankaya TR-06800, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} A new probabilistic model is introduced for microRNA-target binding. {yields} The new model significantly outperforms RNAHybrid and miRTif. {yields} The experiments can unveil the effects of the type and directions of distinct base pairings. -- Abstract: Elucidation of microRNA activity is a crucial step in understanding gene regulation. One key problem in this effort is how to model the pairwise interactions of microRNAs with their targets. As this interaction is strongly mediated by their sequences, it is desired to set-up a probabilistic model to explain the binding preferences between a microRNA sequence and the sequence of a putative target. To this end, we introduce a new model of microRNA-target binding, which transforms an aligned duplex to a new sequence and defines the likelihood of this sequence using a Variable Length Markov Chain. It offers a complementary representation of microRNA-mRNA pairs for microRNA target prediction tools or other probabilistic frameworks of integrative gene regulation analysis. The performance of present model is evaluated by its ability to predict microRNA-target mRNA interaction given a mature microRNA sequence and a putative mRNA binding site. In regard to classification accuracy, it outperforms two recent methods based on thermodynamic stability and sequence complementarity. The experiments can also unveil the effects of base pairing types and non-seed region in duplex formation.

  6. Global analysis of small molecule binding to related protein targets.

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    Felix A Kruger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the integration of pharmacological data and homology information for a large scale analysis of small molecule binding to related targets. Differences in small molecule binding have been assessed for curated pairs of human to rat orthologs and also for recently diverged human paralogs. Our analysis shows that in general, small molecule binding is conserved for pairs of human to rat orthologs. Using statistical tests, we identified a small number of cases where small molecule binding is different between human and rat, some of which had previously been reported in the literature. Knowledge of species specific pharmacology can be advantageous for drug discovery, where rats are frequently used as a model system. For human paralogs, we demonstrate a global correlation between sequence identity and the binding of small molecules with equivalent affinity. Our findings provide an initial general model relating small molecule binding and sequence divergence, containing the foundations for a general model to anticipate and predict within-target-family selectivity.

  7. Regulation of Structural Dynamics within a Signal Recognition Particle Promotes Binding of Protein Targeting Substrates*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng; Kight, Alicia D.; Henderson, Rory; Jayanthi, Srinivas; Patel, Parth; Murchison, Marissa; Sharma, Priyanka; Goforth, Robyn L.; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh; Henry, Ralph L.; Heyes, Colin D.

    2015-01-01

    Protein targeting is critical in all living organisms and involves a signal recognition particle (SRP), an SRP receptor, and a translocase. In co-translational targeting, interactions among these proteins are mediated by the ribosome. In chloroplasts, the light-harvesting chlorophyll-binding protein (LHCP) in the thylakoid membrane is targeted post-translationally without a ribosome. A multidomain chloroplast-specific subunit of the SRP, cpSRP43, is proposed to take on the role of coordinating the sequence of targeting events. Here, we demonstrate that cpSRP43 exhibits significant interdomain dynamics that are reduced upon binding its SRP binding partner, cpSRP54. We showed that the affinity of cpSRP43 for the binding motif of LHCP (L18) increases when cpSRP43 is complexed to the binding motif of cpSRP54 (cpSRP54pep). These results support the conclusion that substrate binding to the chloroplast SRP is modulated by protein structural dynamics in which a major role of cpSRP54 is to improve substrate binding efficiency to the cpSRP. PMID:25918165

  8. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M; Agerbæk, Mette Ø; Al Nakouzi, Nader; Dahlbäck, Madeleine; Oo, Htoo Z; Lee, Sherry; Gustavsson, Tobias; Rich, Jamie R; Hedberg, Bradley J; Mao, Yang; Barington, Line; Pereira, Marina A; LoBello, Janine; Endo, Makoto; Fazli, Ladan; Soden, Jo; Wang, Chris K; Sander, Adam F; Dagil, Robert; Thrane, Susan; Holst, Peter J; Meng, Le; Favero, Francesco; Weiss, Glen J; Nielsen, Morten A; Freeth, Jim; Nielsen, Torsten O; Zaia, Joseph; Tran, Nhan L; Trent, Jeff; Babcook, John S; Theander, Thor G; Sorensen, Poul H; Daugaard, Mads

    2015-10-12

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can be specifically targeted by recombinant VAR2CSA (rVAR2). In tumors, placental-like CS chains are linked to a limited repertoire of cancer-associated proteoglycans including CD44 and CSPG4. The rVAR2 protein localizes to tumors in vivo and rVAR2 fused to diphtheria toxin or conjugated to hemiasterlin compounds strongly inhibits in vivo tumor cell growth and metastasis. Our data demonstrate how an evolutionarily refined parasite-derived protein can be exploited to target a common, but complex, malignancy-associated glycosaminoglycan modification.

  9. Influence of target concentration and background binding on in vitro selection of affinity reagents.

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    Jinpeng Wang

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid-based aptamers possess many useful features that make them a promising alternative to antibodies and other affinity reagents, including well-established chemical synthesis, reversible folding, thermal stability and low cost. However, the selection process typically used to generate aptamers (SELEX often requires significant resources and can fail to yield aptamers with sufficient affinity and specificity. A number of seminal theoretical models and numerical simulations have been reported in the literature offering insights into experimental factors that govern the effectiveness of the selection process. Though useful, these previous models have not considered the full spectrum of experimental factors or the potential impact of tuning these parameters at each round over the course of a multi-round selection process. We have developed an improved mathematical model to address this important question, and report that both target concentration and the degree of non-specific background binding are critical determinants of SELEX efficiency. Although smaller target concentrations should theoretically offer superior selection outcome, we show that the level of background binding dramatically affect the target concentration that will yield maximum enrichment at each round of selection. Thus, our model enables experimentalists to determine appropriate target concentrations as a means for protocol optimization. Finally, we perform a comparative analysis of two different selection methods over multiple rounds of selection, and show that methods with inherently lower background binding offer dramatic advantages in selection efficiency.

  10. Improving Target Characterization for Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, D. C.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Doss, F. W.; Krauland, C. M.; Distefano, C. A.

    2010-11-01

    We have fabricated and characterized targets for laboratory astrophysics since 2003, and have made improvements focusing on characterizing particular target features and their variances. Examples of measurements include machined features, material thickness and uniformity, location and thickness of glue, and mating conditions between adjacent materials. Measurements involve new technology and characterization methods, such as pre-shot radiography. More accurate characterization also leads to improvements in fabrication techniques, and helps integrate new technology into our build process. Quantifying variances more precisely also helps us better evaluate each fabrication method for both accuracy and consistency. We present these characterization methods and their impact on fabrication. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29034.

  11. Improved Targeting of Cancers with Nanotherapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, Christian; Watson, Andre; Kaplinsky, Joseph John;

    2017-01-01

    Targeted cancer nanotherapeutics offers numerous opportunities for the selective uptake of toxic chemotherapies within tumors and cancer cells. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as their small size, large surface-to-volume ratios, and the ability to achieve multivalency of targeting...... ligands on their surface, provide superior advantages for nanoparticle-based drug delivery to a variety of cancers. This review highlights various key concepts in the design of targeted nanotherapeutics for cancer therapy, and discusses physicochemical parameters affecting nanoparticle targeting, along...... with recent developments for cancer-targeted nanomedicines....

  12. Rational Design of an Epstein-Barr Virus Vaccine Targeting the Receptor-Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekiyo, Masaru; Bu, Wei; Joyce, M Gordon; Meng, Geng; Whittle, James R R; Baxa, Ulrich; Yamamoto, Takuya; Narpala, Sandeep; Todd, John-Paul; Rao, Srinivas S; McDermott, Adrian B; Koup, Richard A; Rossmann, Michael G; Mascola, John R; Graham, Barney S; Cohen, Jeffrey I; Nabel, Gary J

    2015-08-27

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represents a major global health problem. Though it is associated with infectious mononucleosis and ∼200,000 cancers annually worldwide, a vaccine is not available. The major target of immunity is EBV glycoprotein 350/220 (gp350) that mediates attachment to B cells through complement receptor 2 (CR2/CD21). Here, we created self-assembling nanoparticles that displayed different domains of gp350 in a symmetric array. By focusing presentation of the CR2-binding domain on nanoparticles, potent neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice and non-human primates. The structurally designed nanoparticle vaccine increased neutralization 10- to 100-fold compared to soluble gp350 by targeting a functionally conserved site of vulnerability, improving vaccine-induced protection in a mouse model. This rational approach to EBV vaccine design elicited potent neutralizing antibody responses by arrayed presentation of a conserved viral entry domain, a strategy that can be applied to other viruses.

  13. Improvement in a phenomenological formula for ground state binding energies

    CERN Document Server

    Gangopadhyay, G

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenological formula for ground state binding energy derived earlier (International Journal of Modern Physics E {\\bf 20} (2011) 179) has been modified. The parameters have been obtained by fitting the latest available tabulation of experimental values. The major modifications include a new term for pairing and introduction of a new neutron magic number at $N=160$. The new formula reduced the root mean square deviation to 363 keV, a substantial improvement over the previous version of the formula.

  14. Targeting Human Cancer by a Glycosaminoglycan Binding Malaria Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salanti, Ali; Clausen, Thomas M.; Agerbæk, Mette Ø.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum engineer infected erythrocytes to present the malarial protein, VAR2CSA, which binds a distinct type chondroitin sulfate (CS) exclusively expressed in the placenta. Here, we show that the same CS modification is present on a high proportion of malignant cells and that it can...

  15. Mitochondria-targeting for improved photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngen, Ethel J.

    , other strategies to target mitochondria for improved photodynamic activity were investigated. In a continuing project, we evaluated the ability of delocalized lipophilic cationic dyes to deliver photosensitizers to mitochondria by exploiting the membrane potential difference between the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Two conjugates: a porphyrin--rhodamine B conjugate (TPP--Rh) and a porphyrin-acridine orange conjugate (TPP--AO), each possessing a single delocalized lipophilic cation, were designed and synthesized. The conjugates were synthesized by conjugating a monohydroxy porphyrin (TPP-OH) to rhodamine B (Rh B) and acridine orange base (AO), respectively, via saturated hydrocarbon linkers. To evaluate the efficiency of the conjugates as photosensitizers, their photophysical properties and in vitro photodynamic activities were studied in comparison to those of TPP-OH, the parent porphyrin photosensitizer. Although fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) was observed in the conjugates, they were capable of generating singlet oxygen at rates comparable to TPP-OH. In a final project, we evaluated the photophysical potential of TPP-Rh to act as a two-photon photosensitizer for PDT. Two-photon PDT is a rational approach used to improve light penetration through the skin. Rhodamine B is an effective two-photon chromophore and could significantly improve the two-photon absorption of the porphyrin photosensitizer in the TPP-Rh dyad system following energy transfer. Thus the porphyrin--rhodamine B dyad (TPP--Rh), previously demonstrated to preferentially accumulate in the mitochondria, was photophysically evaluated as a potential two-photon photosensitizer. To evaluate the efficiency of TPP-Rh as a two-photon photosensitizer, its two-photon photophysical properties were compared with those of its individual components (Rh B and TPP-OH). This included: the two-photon cross sections (sigma 2), RET kinetics and dynamics and rates of singlet oxygen generation. A FRET efficiency of ~99

  16. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  17. Improved multilevel filters to enhance infrared small target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoping Wang; Tianxu Zhang; Luxin Yan; Man Wang; Jiawei Wu

    2011-01-01

    We propose improved multilevel filters (IMLFs) involving the absolute value operation into the algorithmic framework of traditional multilevel filters (MLFs) to improve the robustness of infrared small target enhancement techniques under a complex infrared cluttered background. Compared with the widely used small target enhancement methods which only deal with bright targets, the proposed technique can enhance the infrared small target, whether it is bright or dark. Experimental results verify that the proposed technique is efficient and practical.%@@ We propose improved multilevel filters (IMLFs) involving the absolute value operation into the algorithmic framework of traditional multilevel filters (MLFs) to improve the robustness of infrared small target enhancement techniques under a complex infrared cluttered background.Compared with the widely used small target enhancement methods which only deal with bright targets, the proposed technique can enhance the infrared small target, whether it is bright or dark.Experimental results verify that the proposed technique is efficient and practical.

  18. MBSTAR: multiple instance learning for predicting specific functional binding sites in microRNA targets

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    Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra; Ghosh, Dip; Mitra, Ramkrishna; Zhao, Zhongming

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) regulates gene expression by binding to specific sites in the 3'untranslated regions of its target genes. Machine learning based miRNA target prediction algorithms first extract a set of features from potential binding sites (PBSs) in the mRNA and then train a classifier to distinguish targets from non-targets. However, they do not consider whether the PBSs are functional or not, and consequently result in high false positive rates. This substantially affects the follow up functional validation by experiments. We present a novel machine learning based approach, MBSTAR (Multiple instance learning of Binding Sites of miRNA TARgets), for accurate prediction of true or functional miRNA binding sites. Multiple instance learning framework is adopted to handle the lack of information about the actual binding sites in the target mRNAs. Biologically validated 9531 interacting and 973 non-interacting miRNA-mRNA pairs are identified from Tarbase 6.0 and confirmed with PAR-CLIP dataset. It is found that MBSTAR achieves the highest number of binding sites overlapping with PAR-CLIP with maximum F-Score of 0.337. Compared to the other methods, MBSTAR also predicts target mRNAs with highest accuracy. The tool and genome wide predictions are available at http://www.isical.ac.in/~bioinfo_miu/MBStar30.htm.

  19. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

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    Zaneta Odrowaz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  20. Improvement of sciatic nerve regeneration using laminin-binding human NGF-beta.

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    Wenjie Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sciatic nerve injuries often cause partial or total loss of motor, sensory and autonomic functions due to the axon discontinuity, degeneration, and eventual death which finally result in substantial functional loss and decreased quality of life. Nerve growth factor (NGF plays a critical role in peripheral nerve regeneration. However, the lack of efficient NGF delivery approach limits its clinical applications. We reported here by fusing with the N-terminal domain of agrin (NtA, NGF-beta could target to nerve cells and improve nerve regeneration. METHODS: Laminin-binding assay and sustained release assay of NGF-beta fused with NtA (LBD-NGF from laminin in vitro were carried out. The bioactivity of LBD-NGF on laminin in vitro was also measured. Using the rat sciatic nerve crush injury model, the nerve repair and functional restoration by utilizing LBD-NGF were tested. FINDINGS: LBD-NGF could specifically bind to laminin and maintain NGF activity both in vitro and in vivo. In the rat sciatic nerve crush injury model, we found that LBD-NGF could be retained and concentrated at the nerve injury sites to promote nerve repair and enhance functional restoration following nerve damages. CONCLUSION: Fused with NtA, NGF-beta could bind to laminin specifically. Since laminin is the major component of nerve extracellular matrix, laminin binding NGF could target to nerve cells and improve the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

  1. Target Improves Efficiency in New Construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-03-01

    Target Corporation partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce annual energy consumption in new stores by at least 50% versus requirements set by ASHRAE/ANSI/IESNA Standard 90.1-20041 as part of DOE’s Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) program.

  2. Improved Techniques for Targeting Additional Observations to Improve Forecast Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    hniquesbased on targeted diabatic singular v ector analysis with a particular focus on severe weather ev en tsin the tropics and extratropics in the range 0...represented by targeted singular vectors, and model error is represented b y stochastic physics perturbations, can be relied on to include a member which is...linearized diabatic terms in the tangent model and the choice of analysis error covariance norm at initial time has on the structure of the singular

  3. Quinine binding by the cocaine-binding aptamer. Thermodynamic and hydrodynamic analysis of high-affinity binding of an off-target ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Oren; Yoo, Mina; Han, Chris; Palmo, Tsering; Beckham, Simone A; Wilce, Matthew C J; Johnson, Philip E

    2013-12-03

    The cocaine-binding aptamer is unusual in that it tightly binds molecules other than the ligand it was selected for. Here, we study the interaction of the cocaine-binding aptamer with one of these off-target ligands, quinine. Isothermal titration calorimetry was used to quantify the quinine-binding affinity and thermodynamics of a set of sequence variants of the cocaine-binding aptamer. We find that the affinity of the cocaine-binding aptamer for quinine is 30-40 times stronger than it is for cocaine. Competitive-binding studies demonstrate that both quinine and cocaine bind at the same site on the aptamer. The ligand-induced structural-switching binding mechanism of an aptamer variant that contains three base pairs in stem 1 is retained with quinine as a ligand. The short stem 1 aptamer is unfolded or loosely folded in the free form and becomes folded when bound to quinine. This folding is confirmed by NMR spectroscopy and by the short stem 1 construct having a more negative change in heat capacity of quinine binding than is seen when stem 1 has six base pairs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies of the free aptamer and both the quinine- and the cocaine-bound forms show that, for the long stem 1 aptamers, the three forms display similar hydrodynamic properties, and the ab initio shape reconstruction structures are very similar. For the short stem 1 aptamer there is a greater variation among the SAXS-derived ab initio shape reconstruction structures, consistent with the changes expected with its structural-switching binding mechanism.

  4. A knowledge-guided strategy for improving the accuracy of scoring functions in binding affinity prediction

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    Wang Renxiao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current scoring functions are not very successful in protein-ligand binding affinity prediction albeit their popularity in structure-based drug designs. Here, we propose a general knowledge-guided scoring (KGS strategy to tackle this problem. Our KGS strategy computes the binding constant of a given protein-ligand complex based on the known binding constant of an appropriate reference complex. A good training set that includes a sufficient number of protein-ligand complexes with known binding data needs to be supplied for finding the reference complex. The reference complex is required to share a similar pattern of key protein-ligand interactions to that of the complex of interest. Thus, some uncertain factors in protein-ligand binding may cancel out, resulting in a more accurate prediction of absolute binding constants. Results In our study, an automatic algorithm was developed for summarizing key protein-ligand interactions as a pharmacophore model and identifying the reference complex with a maximal similarity to the query complex. Our KGS strategy was evaluated in combination with two scoring functions (X-Score and PLP on three test sets, containing 112 HIV protease complexes, 44 carbonic anhydrase complexes, and 73 trypsin complexes, respectively. Our results obtained on crystal structures as well as computer-generated docking poses indicated that application of the KGS strategy produced more accurate predictions especially when X-Score or PLP alone did not perform well. Conclusions Compared to other targeted scoring functions, our KGS strategy does not require any re-parameterization or modification on current scoring methods, and its application is not tied to certain systems. The effectiveness of our KGS strategy is in theory proportional to the ever-increasing knowledge of experimental protein-ligand binding data. Our KGS strategy may serve as a more practical remedy for current scoring functions to improve their

  5. Will Interventions Targeting Conscientiousness Improve Aging Outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Tammy; Carstensen, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    The articles appearing in this special section discuss the role that conscientiousness may play in healthy aging. Growing evidence suggests that conscientious individuals live longer and healthier lives. However, the question remains whether this personality trait can be leveraged to improve long-term health outcomes. We argue that even though it…

  6. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyle, Ben; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare the ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the machine learning methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30% of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and fi...

  7. Rational targeting of subclasses of intermolecular interactions: elimination of nonspecific binding for analyte sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Jordan S; Richens, Joanna L; Vere, Kelly-Ann; O'Shea, Paul

    2014-08-12

    The ability to target and control intermolecular interactions is crucial in the development of several different technologies. Here we offer a tool to rationally design liquid media systems that can modulate specific intermolecular interactions. This has broad implications in deciphering the nature of intermolecular forces in complex solutions and offers insight into the forces that govern both specific and nonspecific binding in a given system. Nonspecific binding still continues to be a problem when dealing with analyte detection across a range of different detection technologies. Here, we exemplify the problem of nonspecific binding on model membrane systems and when dealing with low-abundance protein detection on commercially available SPR technology. A range of different soluble reagents that target specific subclasses of intermolecular interactions have been tested and optimized to virtually eliminate nonspecific binding while leaving specific interactions unperturbed. Thiocyanate ions are used to target nonpolar interactions, and small reagents such as glycylglycylglycine are used to modulate the dielectric constant, which targets charge-charge and dipole interactions. We show that with rational design and careful modulation these reagents offer a step forward in dissecting the intermolecular forces that govern binding, alongside offering nonspecific binding elimination in detection systems.

  8. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  9. Dissecting the expression relationships between RNA-binding proteins and their cognate targets in eukaryotic post-transcriptional regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishtala, Sneha; Neelamraju, Yaseswini; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2016-05-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) are pivotal in orchestrating several steps in the metabolism of RNA in eukaryotes thereby controlling an extensive network of RBP-RNA interactions. Here, we employed CLIP (cross-linking immunoprecipitation)-seq datasets for 60 human RBPs and RIP-ChIP (RNP immunoprecipitation-microarray) data for 69 yeast RBPs to construct a network of genome-wide RBP- target RNA interactions for each RBP. We show in humans that majority (~78%) of the RBPs are strongly associated with their target transcripts at transcript level while ~95% of the studied RBPs were also found to be strongly associated with expression levels of target transcripts when protein expression levels of RBPs were employed. At transcript level, RBP - RNA interaction data for the yeast genome, exhibited a strong association for 63% of the RBPs, confirming the association to be conserved across large phylogenetic distances. Analysis to uncover the features contributing to these associations revealed the number of target transcripts and length of the selected protein-coding transcript of an RBP at the transcript level while intensity of the CLIP signal, number of RNA-Binding domains, location of the binding site on the transcript, to be significant at the protein level. Our analysis will contribute to improved modelling and prediction of post-transcriptional networks.

  10. Human adenovirus 52 uses sialic acid-containing glycoproteins and the coxsackie and adenovirus receptor for binding to target cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annasara Lenman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most adenoviruses attach to host cells by means of the protruding fiber protein that binds to host cells via the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR protein. Human adenovirus type 52 (HAdV-52 is one of only three gastroenteritis-causing HAdVs that are equipped with two different fiber proteins, one long and one short. Here we show, by means of virion-cell binding and infection experiments, that HAdV-52 can also attach to host cells via CAR, but most of the binding depends on sialylated glycoproteins. Glycan microarray, flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and ELISA analyses reveal that the terminal knob domain of the long fiber (52LFK binds to CAR, and the knob domain of the short fiber (52SFK binds to sialylated glycoproteins. X-ray crystallographic analysis of 52SFK in complex with 2-O-methylated sialic acid combined with functional studies of knob mutants revealed a new sialic acid binding site compared to other, known adenovirus:glycan interactions. Our findings shed light on adenovirus biology and may help to improve targeting of adenovirus-based vectors for gene therapy.

  11. Binding Sites of miR-1273 Family on the mRNA of Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly Ivashchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined binding sites of 2,578 miRNAs in the mRNAs of 12,175 human genes using the MirTarget program. It found that the miRNAs of miR-1273 family have between 33 and 1,074 mRNA target genes, with a free hybridization energy of 90% or more of its maximum value. The miR-1273 family consists of miR-1273a, miR-1273c, miR-1273d, miR-1273e, miR-1273f, miR-1273g-3p, miR-1273g-5p, miR-1273h-3p, and miR-1273h-5p. Unique miRNAs (miR-1273e, miR-1273f, and miR-1273g-3p have more than 400 target genes. We established 99 mRNA nucleotide sequences that contain arranged binding sites for the miR-1273 family. High conservation of each miRNA binding site in the mRNA of the target genes was found. The arranged binding sites of the miR-1273 family are located in the 5′UTR, CDS, or 3′UTR of many mRNAs. Five repeating sites containing some of the miR-1273 family’s binding sites were found in the 3′UTR of several target genes. The oligonucleotide sequences of miR-1273 binding sites located in CDSs code for homologous amino acid sequences in the proteins of target genes. The biological role of unique miRNAs was also discussed.

  12. Tuning target selection algorithms to improve galaxy redshift estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Ben; Paech, Kerstin; Rau, Markus Michael; Seitz, Stella; Weller, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    We showcase machine learning (ML) inspired target selection algorithms to determine which of all potential targets should be selected first for spectroscopic follow-up. Efficient target selection can improve the ML redshift uncertainties as calculated on an independent sample, while requiring less targets to be observed. We compare seven different ML targeting algorithms with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) target order, and with a random targeting algorithm. The ML inspired algorithms are constructed iteratively by estimating which of the remaining target galaxies will be most difficult for the ML methods to accurately estimate redshifts using the previously observed data. This is performed by predicting the expected redshift error and redshift offset (or bias) of all of the remaining target galaxies. We find that the predicted values of bias and error are accurate to better than 10-30 per cent of the true values, even with only limited training sample sizes. We construct a hypothetical follow-up survey and find that some of the ML targeting algorithms are able to obtain the same redshift predictive power with 2-3 times less observing time, as compared to that of the SDSS, or random, target selection algorithms. The reduction in the required follow-up resources could allow for a change to the follow-up strategy, for example by obtaining deeper spectroscopy, which could improve ML redshift estimates for deeper test data.

  13. Genetic improvement of tomato by targeted control of fruit softening

    KAUST Repository

    Uluisik, Selman

    2016-07-25

    Controlling the rate of softening to extend shelf life was a key target for researchers engineering genetically modified (GM) tomatoes in the 1990s, but only modest improvements were achieved. Hybrids grown nowadays contain \\'non-ripening mutations\\' that slow ripening and improve shelf life, but adversely affect flavor and color. We report substantial, targeted control of tomato softening, without affecting other aspects of ripening, by silencing a gene encoding a pectate lyase. © 2016 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M.; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  15. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  16. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Puf RNA Binding Proteins and Their mRNA Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Gregory J; Brown, Patrick O; Herschlag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming of a gene's expression pattern by acquisition and loss of sequences recognized by specific regulatory RNA binding proteins may be a major mechanism in the evolution of biological regulatory programs. We identified that RNA targets of Puf3 orthologs have been conserved over 100-500 million years of evolution in five eukaryotic lineages. Focusing on Puf proteins and their targets across 80 fungi, we constructed a parsimonious model for their evolutionary history. This model entails extensive and coordinated changes in the Puf targets as well as changes in the number of Puf genes and alterations of RNA binding specificity including that: 1) Binding of Puf3 to more than 200 RNAs whose protein products are predominantly involved in the production and organization of mitochondrial complexes predates the origin of budding yeasts and filamentous fungi and was maintained for 500 million years, throughout the evolution of budding yeast. 2) In filamentous fungi, remarkably, more than 150 of the ancestral Puf3 targets were gained by Puf4, with one lineage maintaining both Puf3 and Puf4 as regulators and a sister lineage losing Puf3 as a regulator of these RNAs. The decrease in gene expression of these mRNAs upon deletion of Puf4 in filamentous fungi (N. crassa) in contrast to the increase upon Puf3 deletion in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) suggests that the output of the RNA regulatory network is different with Puf4 in filamentous fungi than with Puf3 in budding yeast. 3) The coregulated Puf4 target set in filamentous fungi expanded to include mitochondrial genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and other nuclear-encoded RNAs with mitochondrial function not bound by Puf3 in budding yeast, observations that provide additional evidence for substantial rewiring of post-transcriptional regulation. 4) Puf3 also expanded and diversified its targets in filamentous fungi, gaining interactions with the mRNAs encoding the mitochondrial electron transport

  17. Evolutionary Conservation and Diversification of Puf RNA Binding Proteins and Their mRNA Targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Hogan

    Full Text Available Reprogramming of a gene's expression pattern by acquisition and loss of sequences recognized by specific regulatory RNA binding proteins may be a major mechanism in the evolution of biological regulatory programs. We identified that RNA targets of Puf3 orthologs have been conserved over 100-500 million years of evolution in five eukaryotic lineages. Focusing on Puf proteins and their targets across 80 fungi, we constructed a parsimonious model for their evolutionary history. This model entails extensive and coordinated changes in the Puf targets as well as changes in the number of Puf genes and alterations of RNA binding specificity including that: 1 Binding of Puf3 to more than 200 RNAs whose protein products are predominantly involved in the production and organization of mitochondrial complexes predates the origin of budding yeasts and filamentous fungi and was maintained for 500 million years, throughout the evolution of budding yeast. 2 In filamentous fungi, remarkably, more than 150 of the ancestral Puf3 targets were gained by Puf4, with one lineage maintaining both Puf3 and Puf4 as regulators and a sister lineage losing Puf3 as a regulator of these RNAs. The decrease in gene expression of these mRNAs upon deletion of Puf4 in filamentous fungi (N. crassa in contrast to the increase upon Puf3 deletion in budding yeast (S. cerevisiae suggests that the output of the RNA regulatory network is different with Puf4 in filamentous fungi than with Puf3 in budding yeast. 3 The coregulated Puf4 target set in filamentous fungi expanded to include mitochondrial genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and other nuclear-encoded RNAs with mitochondrial function not bound by Puf3 in budding yeast, observations that provide additional evidence for substantial rewiring of post-transcriptional regulation. 4 Puf3 also expanded and diversified its targets in filamentous fungi, gaining interactions with the mRNAs encoding the mitochondrial electron

  18. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, S. D.; Graham, V. A.; Corbin-Lickfett, K.; Empig, C.; Schlunegger, K.; Bruce, C. B.; Easterbrook, L.; Hewson, R.

    2015-01-01

    Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab) has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus. PMID:25815346

  19. Effective Binding of a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody to Ebola Virus Infected Cells and Purified Virions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Dowall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus is responsible for causing severe hemorrhagic fevers, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, no antiviral or vaccine is licensed against Ebola virus. A phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody (PGN401, bavituximab has previously been shown to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity. Here, we demonstrate that PGN401 specifically binds to Ebola virus and recognizes infected cells. Our study provides the first evidence of phosphatidylserine-targeting antibody reactivity against Ebola virus.

  20. Function of the PEX19-binding site of human adrenoleukodystrophy protein as targeting motif in man and yeast. PMP targeting is evolutionarily conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, André; Lorenzen, Stephan; Landgraf, Christiane; Volkmer-Engert, Rudolf; Erdmann, Ralf; Rottensteiner, Hanspeter

    2005-06-01

    We predicted in human peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) the binding sites for PEX19, a key player in the topogenesis of PMPs, by virtue of an algorithm developed for yeast PMPs. The best scoring PEX19-binding site was found in the adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ALDP). The identified site was indeed bound by human PEX19 and was also recognized by the orthologous yeast PEX19 protein. Likewise, both human and yeast PEX19 bound with comparable affinities to the PEX19-binding site of the yeast PMP Pex13p. Interestingly, the identified PEX19-binding site of ALDP coincided with its previously determined targeting motif. We corroborated the requirement of the ALDP PEX19-binding site for peroxisomal targeting in human fibroblasts and showed that the minimal ALDP fragment targets correctly also in yeast, again in a PEX19-binding site-dependent manner. Furthermore, the human PEX19-binding site of ALDP proved interchangeable with that of yeast Pex13p in an in vivo targeting assay. Finally, we showed in vitro that most of the predicted binding sequences of human PMPs represent true binding sites for human PEX19, indicating that human PMPs harbor common PEX19-binding sites that do resemble those of yeast. Our data clearly revealed a role for PEX19-binding sites as PMP-targeting motifs across species, thereby demonstrating the evolutionary conservation of PMP signal sequences from yeast to man.

  1. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM.

  2. A polystyrene binding target-unrelated peptide isolated in the screening of phage display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2016-11-01

    Phage display is a powerful methodology for the identification of peptide ligands binding to any desired target. However, the selection of target-unrelated peptides (TUPs) appears as a huge problem in the screening of phage display libraries through biopanning. The phage-displayed peptide TLHPAAD has been isolated both in our laboratory and by another reserach group on completely different screening targets prompting us to hypothesize that it may be a potential TUP. In the current study, we analyzed the binding characteristics and propagation rate of phage clone displaying TLHPAAD peptide (SW-TUP clone). The results of ELISA experiment and phage recovery assay provided strong support for the notion that SW-TUP phage binds to polystyrene with a significantly higher affinity than control phage clones. Furthermore, this polystyrene binding was demonstrated to occur in a concentration- and pH-dependent mode. Characterization of the propagation profile of phage clones within a specified time course revealed no statistically significant difference between the amplification rate of SW-TUP and control phages. Our findings lead us to the conclusion that SW-TUP phage clone with the displayed peptide TLHPAAD is not a true target binder and its selection in biopanning experiments results from its bidning affinity to the polystyrene surface of the solid phase.

  3. Ligand-induced conformational changes: Improved predictions of ligand binding conformations and affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, T.M.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Iversen, L.F.

    2003-01-01

    A computational docking strategy using multiple conformations of the target protein is discussed and evaluated. A series of low molecular weight, competitive, nonpeptide protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors are considered for which the x-ray crystallographic structures in complex with protein...... tyrosine phosphatase 1 B (PTP1B) are known. To obtain a quantitative measure of the impact of conformational changes induced by the inhibitors, these were docked to the active site region of various structures of PTP1B using the docking program FlexX. Firstly, the inhibitors were docked to a PTP1B crystal...... predicted binding energy and a correct docking mode. Thirdly, to improve the predictability of the docking procedure in the general case, where only a single target protein structure is known, we evaluate an approach which takes possible protein side-chain conformational changes into account. Here, side...

  4. Streamline and Improve the Targeting of Education Tax Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institute for College Access & Success, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This one-page document presents The Institute for College Access & Success' (TICAS') recommendations for ways to improve the targeting of higher education tax benefits. The TICAS white paper, "Aligning the Means and the Ends: How to Improve Federal Student Aid and Increase College Access and Success," recommends almost entirely…

  5. Prenatal exposure to methylmercury alters development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral sympathetic target tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slotkin, T.A.; Orband, L.; Cowdery, T.; Kavlock, R.J.; Bartolome, J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of prenatal exposure to methylmercury on sympathetic neurotransmission, effects on development of adrenergic receptor binding sites in peripheral tissues was evaluated. In the liver, methylmercury produced a dose-dependent increase in alpha/sub 1/, alpha/sub 2/, and beta-receptor binding of radioliganda throughout the first 5 weeks of postnatal life. Similarly, renal alpha-receptor subtypes showed increased binding capabilities, but binding to alpha-receptor sites was reduced. At least some of the changes in receptors appear to be of functional significance, as physiological reactivity to adrenergic stimulation is altered in the same directions in these two tissues. The actions of methylmercury displayed tissue specificity in that the same receptor populations were largely unaffected in other tissues (lung, heart). These results suggest that methylmercury exposure in utero alters adrenergic responses through targeted effects on postsynaptic receptor populations in specific tissues.

  6. The design and performance of an improved target for MICE

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C N; Langlands, J; Overton, E; Robinson, M; Smith, P J; Barber, G; Long, K R; Shepherd, B; Capocci, E; MacWaters, C; Tarrant, J

    2016-01-01

    The linear motor driving the target for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment has been redesigned to improve its reliability and performance. A new coil-winding technique is described which produces better magnetic alignment and improves heat transport out of the windings. Improved field-mapping has allowed the more precise construction to be demonstrated, and an enhanced controller exploits the full features of the hardware, enabling increased acceleration and precision. The new user interface is described and analysis of performance data to monitor friction is shown to allow quality control of bearings and a measure of the ageing of targets during use.

  7. Operational Performance Improvements to BRIght Target Explorer Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung Yun

    The BRIght Target Explorer (BRITE)-Constellation is composed of six nano-satellites funded by Austria, Canada, and Poland, and each of them is equipped with an optical telescope that observes stars with visual magnitude +3.5 or brighter. BRITE-Constellation has provided numerous images of bright stars from Low Earth Orbit, which will eventually lead to investigation of origin of the Universe. This thesis presents the contribution of the author to BRITE mission, especially in BRITE Operations. The author performed antenna steering experiments on UniBRITE and BRITE-Toronto, to improve data downlink. To improve scientific data collection from BRITE satellites, the author computed available observation time for multiple targets every orbit, which resulted in collection of twice the amount of scientific data. Also, the author increased the available observation time for each target from 32 minutes to 48 minutes by improving the performance of the star tracker on-board BRITE-Toronto.

  8. Selective Targeting of G-Quadruplex Structures by a Benzothiazole-Based Binding Motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Ina; Karg, Beatrice; Dickerhoff, Jonathan; Sievers-Engler, Adrian; Lämmerhofer, Michael; Weisz, Klaus

    2017-03-09

    A benzothiazole derivative was identified as potent ligand for DNA G-quadruplex structures. Fluorescence titrations revealed selective binding to quadruplexes of different topologies including parallel, antiparallel and (3+1) hybrid structures. The parallel c-MYC sequence was found to constitute the preferred target with dissociation constants in the micromolar range. Binding of the benzothiazole-based ligand to c-MYC was structurally and thermodynamically characterized in detail by employing a comprehensive set of spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques. Job plot analyses and mass spectral data indicate non-cooperative ligand binding to form 1:1 and 2:1 complex stoichiometries. Whereas stacking interactions are suggested by optical methods, NMR chemical shift perturbations also indicate significant rearrangements of both 5'- and 3'-flanking sequences upon ligand binding. Additional isothermal calorimetry studies yield a thermodynamic profile of the ligand-quadruplex association and reveal enthalpic contributions to be the major driving force for binding. The structural and thermodynamic information obtained in the present work provides the basis for the rational development of benzothiazole derivatives as promising quadruplex binding agents.

  9. Characterization of the target DNA sequence for the DNA-binding domain of zinc finger protein 191

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haoyue Wang; Ruilin Sun; Guoxiang Liu; Minghui Yao; Jian Fei; Hebai Shen

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the DNA-binding properties of transcription factors are important in searching for the downstream genes regulated by these factors. In the present study, we report on the DNA-binding property of a Cys2His2-type transcription factor, zinc finger protein 191 (Zfp191), which has been newly found to play a significant role in mice.By constructing a fusion protein containing the DNA-binding domain of Zfp191,we characterized target DNA by determining the protein's binding specificity and dependence on zinc.The data showed that the DNA-binding domain of Zfp191can specifically bind to the TCAT repeat motif and that there is a cooperative effect among the target DNA's multiple binding sites.Furthermore,the binding reaction is dependent on zinc.This work provides a foundation for further studies on the role of Zfp191 in gene regulation and development.

  10. A peptide mimetic targeting trans-homophilic NCAM binding sites promotes spatial learning and neural plasticity in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kraev

    Full Text Available The key roles played by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM in plasticity and cognition underscore this membrane protein as a relevant target to develop cognitive-enhancing drugs. However, NCAM is a structurally and functionally complex molecule with multiple domains engaged in a variety of actions, which raise the question as to which NCAM fragment should be targeted. Synthetic NCAM mimetic peptides that mimic NCAM sequences relevant to specific interactions allow identification of the most promising targets within NCAM. Recently, a decapeptide ligand of NCAM--plannexin, which mimics a homophilic trans-binding site in Ig2 and binds to Ig3--was developed as a tool for studying NCAM's trans-interactions. In this study, we investigated plannexin's ability to affect neural plasticity and memory formation. We found that plannexin facilitates neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neuronal cultures and improves spatial learning in rats, both under basal conditions and under conditions involving a deficit in a key plasticity-promoting posttranslational modification of NCAM, its polysialylation. We also found that plannexin enhances excitatory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1, where it also increases the number of mushroom spines and the synaptic expression of the AMPAR subunits GluA1 and GluA2. Altogether, these findings provide compelling evidence that plannexin is an important facilitator of synaptic functional, structural and molecular plasticity in the hippocampal CA1 region, highlighting the fragment in NCAM's Ig3 module where plannexin binds as a novel target for the development of cognition-enhancing drugs.

  11. Studies on a Novel Minor-groove Targeting Artificial Nuclease: Synthesis and DNA Binding Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nucleases play an important role in molecular biology, for example, in DNA sequencing. Synthetic polyamide conjugates can be considered as a novel tool for the selective inhibition of gene expressions and also as potential drugs in anticancer or antiviral chemotherapy. In this article, the synthesis of a novel minor-groove targeting artificial nuclease, an oligopyrrol-containing compound, has been reported. It was found that this novel compound can bind DNA in AT-rich minor groove with high affinity and site specificity. DNA binding behavior was determined by using UV-Vis and CD. It is indicated that compound 6 can enhance the Tm of DNA from 80. 4 C to 84. 4 ℃ and that it possesses a high binding constant value(Kb = 3.05×104 L/mol).

  12. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  13. Analysis of mebendazole binding to its target biomolecule by laser flash photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornet, Dolors; Bosca, Francisco; Andreu, Jose M; Domingo, Luis R; Tormos, Rosa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Mebendazole (MBZ) and related anticancer benzimidazoles act binding the β-subunit of Tubulin (TU) before dimerization with α-TU with subsequent blocking microtubule formation. Laser flash photolysis (LFP) is a new tool to investigate drug-albumin interactions and to determine binding parameters such as affinity constant or population of binding sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interactions between the nonfluorescent mebendazole (MBZ) and its target biomolecule TU using this technique. Before analyzing the MBZ@TU complex it was needed to determine the photophysical properties of MBZ triplet excited state ((3)MBZ(⁎)) in different media. Hence, (3)MBZ(⁎) showed a transient absorption spectrum with maxima at 520 and 375 nm and a lifetime much longer in acetonitrile (12.5 μs) than in water (260 ns). The binding of MBZ to TU produces a greater increase of the lifetime of (3)MBZ(⁎) (25 μs). This fact and the strong electron acceptor capability observed for (3)MBZ* evidence that MBZ must not be located close to any electron donor amino acid of TU such as its tryptophan or cysteine residues. Adding increasing amounts of MBZ to aqueous TU was determined the MBZ-TU binding constant (2.0 ± 0.5 × 10(5)M(-1) at 298K) which decreased with increasing temperature. The LFP technique has proven to be a powerful tool to analyze the binding of drug-TU systems when the drug has a detectable triplet excited state. Results indicate that LFP could be the technique of choice to study the interactions of non-fluorescent drugs with their target biomolecules.

  14. Progress in antiandrogen design targeting hormone binding pocket to circumvent mutation based resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong eTian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR plays a critical role in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa. Current clinically used antiandrogens such as flutamide, bicalutamide, and newly approved enzalutamide mainly target the hormone binding pocket (HBP of AR. However, over time, drug resistance invariably develops and switches these antiandrogens from antagonist to agonist of the AR. Accumulated evidence indicates that AR mutation is an important cause for the drug resistance. This review will give an overview of the mutation based resistance of the current clinically used antiandrogens and the rational drug design to overcome the resistance, provides a promising strategy for the development of the new generation of antiandrogens targeting HBP.

  15. Clinical improvement in psoriasis with specific targeting of interleukin-23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopp, Tamara; Riedl, Elisabeth; Bangert, Christine;

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder that affects approximately 2-3% of the population worldwide and has severe effects on patients' physical and psychological well-being. The discovery that psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease has led to more targeted, effective therapies; recent...... advances have focused on the interleukin (IL)-12/23p40 subunit shared by IL-12 and IL-23. Evidence suggests that specific inhibition of IL-23 would result in improvement in psoriasis. Here we evaluate tildrakizumab, a monoclonal antibody that targets the IL-23p19 subunit, in a three-part, randomized......, placebo-controlled, sequential, rising multiple-dose phase I study in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis to provide clinical proof that specific targeting of IL-23p19 results in symptomatic improvement of disease severity in human subjects. A 75% reduction in the psoriasis area and severity index...

  16. Identifying targets for quality improvement in hospital antibiotic prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spreuwel, P.C. van; Blok, H.; Langelaar, M.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Mouton, J.W.; Natsch, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To audit antibiotic use in a university hospital and to identify targets for quality improvement in a setting with low antibiotic use and resistance rates. METHODOLOGY: A point-prevalence survey (PPS), using a patient-based audit tool for antibiotic use, was executed in the Radboud Unive

  17. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: focus on high-affinity binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura F; Klein, Anders B; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-01-15

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects of exogenous GHB are mediated by GABA subtype B (GABAB) receptors that bind GHB with low affinity. The existence of GHB high-affinity binding sites has been known for more than three decades, but the uncovering of their molecular identity has only recently begun. This has been prompted by the generation of molecular tools to selectively study high-affinity sites. These include both genetically modified GABAB knock-out mice and engineered selective GHB ligands. Recently, certain GABA subtype A (GABAA) receptor subtypes emerged as high-affinity GHB binding sites and potential physiological mediators of GHB effects. In this research update, a description of the various reported receptors for GHB is provided, including GABAB receptors, certain GABAA receptor subtypes and other reported GHB receptors. The main focus will thus be on the high-affinity binding targets for GHB and their potential functional roles in the mammalian brain.

  18. Characterization of EPPIN's semenogelin I binding site: a contraceptive drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Erick J R; Hamil, Katherine G; Richardson, Richard T; O'Rand, Michael G

    2012-09-01

    Epididymal protease inhibitor (EPPIN) is found on the surface of spermatozoa and works as a central hub for a sperm surface protein complex (EPPIN protein complex [EPC]) that inhibits sperm motility on the binding of semenogelin I (SEMG1) during ejaculation. Here, we identify EPPIN's amino acids involved in the interactions within the EPC and demonstrate that EPPIN's sequence C102-P133 contains the major binding site for SEMG1. Within the same region, the sequence F117-P133 binds the EPC-associated protein lactotransferrin (LTF). We show that residues Cys102, Tyr107, and Phe117 in the EPPIN C-terminus are required for SEMG1 binding. Additionally, residues Tyr107 and Phe117 are critically involved in the interaction between EPPIN and LTF. Our findings demonstrate that EPPIN is a key player in the protein-protein interactions within the EPC. Target identification is an important step toward the development of a novel male contraceptive, and the functionality of EPPIN's residues Cys102, Tyr107, and Phe117 offers novel opportunities for contraceptive compounds that inhibit sperm motility by targeting this region of the molecule.

  19. Expanding the dimensions of hyperspectral imagery to improve target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Mark Z.

    2016-10-01

    On-going research to improve hyperspectral target detection generally focuses on statistical detector performance, reduction of background or environmental contributions to at-sensor radiance, dimension reduction and many other mathematical or physical techniques. These efforts are all aimed at improving target identification in a single scene or data cube. This focus on single scene performance is driven directly by the airborne collection concept of operations (CONOPS) of a single pass per target location. Today's pushbroom and whiskbroom sensors easily achieve single passes and single collects over a target location. If multiple passes are flown for multiple collects on the same location, the time scale for revisit is several minutes. Emerging gimbaled hyperspectral imagers have the capability to collect multiple scans over the same target location in a time scale of seconds. The ability to scan the same location from slightly different collection geometries below the time scale of significant solar and atmospheric change forces us to reexamine the methods for target detection via the fundamental radiance equation. By expanding the radiance equation in the spatial and temporal dimensions, data from multiple hyperspectral images is used simultaneously for determining at-sensor radiance and surface leaving radiance with the ultimate goal of improving target detection. This research reexamines the fundamental radiance equation for multiple scan collection geometries expanding both the spatial and temporal domains. In addition, our assumptions for determining at-sensor radiance are revisited in light of the increased dimensionality. The expanded radiance equation is then applied to data collected by a gimbaled long wave infrared hyperspectral imager. Initial results and future work are discussed.

  20. Optimizing tumor targeting of the lipophilic EGFR-binding radiotracer SKI 243 using a liposomal nanoparticle delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Oula Penate; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Glekas, Athanasios; Punzalan, Blesida; Longo, Valerie; Gönen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Smith-Jones, Peter; Larson, Steven M

    2011-02-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) kinase-specific radiolabeled tracers could provide a means for non-invasively characterizing EGFR expression and signaling activity in patients' tumors before, during, and after therapy with EGFR inhibitors. Towards this goal, our group has developed PET tracers which irreversibly bind to EGFR. However, tumor uptake is relatively low because of both the lipophilicity of such tracers (e.g. the morpholino-[124I]-IPQA [SKI 212243]), with octanol-to-water partition coefficients of up to 4, and a short dwell time in the blood and significant hepatobiliary clearance and intestinal reuptake. Liposomal nanoparticle delivery systems may favorably alter the pharmacokinetic profile and improve tumor targeting of highly lipophilic but otherwise promising cancer imaging tracers, such as the EGFR inhibitor SKI 243. SKI 243 is therefore an interesting model molecule for incorporation into lipid-based nanoparticles, as it would not only improve their solubility but also increase the circulation time, availability and, potentially, targeting of tumors. In the current study, we compared the pharmacokinetics and tumor targeting of the bare EGFR kinase-targeting radiotracer SKI 212243 (SKI 243) with that of the same tracer embedded in liposomes. SKI 243 and liposomal SKI 243 are both taken up by tumor xenografts but liposomal SKI 243 remained in the blood longer and consequently exhibited a 3- to 6-fold increase in uptake in the tumor among several other organs.

  1. Improving Robotic Assembly of Planar High Energy Density Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudt, D.; Carlson, L.; Alexander, N.; Boehm, K.

    2016-10-01

    Increased quantities of planar assemblies for high energy density targets are needed with higher shot rates being implemented at facilities such as the National Ignition Facility and the Matter in Extreme Conditions station of the Linac Coherent Light Source. To meet this growing demand, robotics are used to reduce assembly time. This project studies how machine vision and force feedback systems can be used to improve the quantity and quality of planar target assemblies. Vision-guided robotics can identify and locate parts, reducing laborious manual loading of parts into precision pallets and associated teaching of locations. On-board automated inspection can measure part pickup offsets to correct part drop-off placement into target assemblies. Force feedback systems can detect pickup locations and apply consistent force to produce more uniform glue bond thickness, thus improving the performance of the targets. System designs and performance evaluations will be presented. Work supported in part by the US DOE under the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships Program (SULI) and ICF Target Fabrication DE-NA0001808.

  2. An improved SELEX technique for selection of DNA aptamers binding to M-type 11 of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamula, Camille L A; Peng, Hanyong; Wang, Zhixin; Tyrrell, Gregory J; Li, Xing-Fang; Le, X Chris

    2016-03-15

    Streptococcus pyogenes is a clinically important pathogen consisting of various serotypes determined by different M proteins expressed on the cell surface. The M type is therefore a useful marker to monitor the spread of invasive S. pyogenes in a population. Serotyping and nucleic acid amplification/sequencing methods for the identification of M types are laborious, inconsistent, and usually confined to reference laboratories. The primary objective of this work is to develop a technique that enables generation of aptamers binding to specific M-types of S. pyogenes. We describe here an in vitro technique that directly used live bacterial cells and the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) strategy. Live S. pyogenes cells were incubated with DNA libraries consisting of 40-nucleotides randomized sequences. Those sequences that bound to the cells were separated, amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), purified using gel electrophoresis, and served as the input DNA pool for the next round of SELEX selection. A specially designed forward primer containing extended polyA20/5Sp9 facilitated gel electrophoresis purification of ssDNA after PCR amplification. A counter-selection step using non-target cells was introduced to improve selectivity. DNA libraries of different starting sequence diversity (10(16) and 10(14)) were compared. Aptamer pools from each round of selection were tested for their binding to the target and non-target cells using flow cytometry. Selected aptamer pools were then cloned and sequenced. Individual aptamer sequences were screened on the basis of their binding to the 10 M-types that were used as targets. Aptamer pools obtained from SELEX rounds 5-8 showed high affinity to the target S. pyogenes cells. Tests against non-target Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Enterococcus species demonstrated selectivity of these aptamers for binding to S. pyogenes. Several aptamer sequences were found to bind

  3. Enhanced tumor-targeting selectivity by modulating bispecific antibody binding affinity and format valence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, Yariv; Sachsenmeier, Kris F.; Yang, Chunning; Hansen, Anna; Filderman, Jessica; Mulgrew, Kathy; Wu, Herren; Dall’Acqua, William F.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies are considered attractive bio-therapeutic agents owing to their ability to target two distinct disease mediators. Cross-arm avidity targeting of antigen double-positive cancer cells over single-positive normal tissue is believed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy, restrict major escape mechanisms and increase tumor-targeting selectivity, leading to reduced systemic toxicity and improved therapeutic index. However, the interplay of factors regulating target selectivity is not well understood and often overlooked when developing clinically relevant bispecific therapeutics. We show in vivo that dual targeting alone is not sufficient to endow selective tumor-targeting, and report the pivotal roles played by the affinity of the individual arms, overall avidity and format valence. Specifically, a series of monovalent and bivalent bispecific IgGs composed of the anti-HER2 trastuzumab moiety paired with affinity-modulated VH and VL regions of the anti-EGFR GA201 mAb were tested for selective targeting and eradication of double-positive human NCI-H358 non-small cell lung cancer target tumors over single-positive, non-target NCI-H358-HER2 CRISPR knock out tumors in nude mice bearing dual-flank tumor xenografts. Affinity-reduced monovalent bispecific variants, but not their bivalent bispecific counterparts, mediated a greater degree of tumor targeting selectivity, while the overall efficacy against the targeted tumor was not substantially affected. PMID:28067257

  4. ATRX directs binding of PRC2 to Xist RNA and Polycomb targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Kavitha; Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Ergun, Ayla; Del Rosario, Amanda; Jeon, Yesu; White, Forest; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Lee, Jeannie T

    2014-11-06

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) depends on the long noncoding RNA Xist and its recruitment of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2). PRC2 is also targeted to other sites throughout the genome to effect transcriptional repression. Using XCI as a model, we apply an unbiased proteomics approach to isolate Xist and PRC2 regulators and identified ATRX. ATRX unexpectedly functions as a high-affinity RNA-binding protein that directly interacts with RepA/Xist RNA to promote loading of PRC2 in vivo. Without ATRX, PRC2 cannot load onto Xist RNA nor spread in cis along the X chromosome. Moreover, epigenomic profiling reveals that genome-wide targeting of PRC2 depends on ATRX, as loss of ATRX leads to spatial redistribution of PRC2 and derepression of Polycomb responsive genes. Thus, ATRX is a required specificity determinant for PRC2 targeting and function.

  5. RNA-binding protein IGF2BP3 targeting of oncogenic transcripts promotes hematopoietic progenitor proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanichamy, Jayanth Kumar; Tran, Tiffany M; Howard, Jonathan M; Contreras, Jorge R; Fernando, Thilini R; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Katzman, Sol; Toloue, Masoud; Yan, Weihong; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Sanford, Jeremy R; Rao, Dinesh S

    2016-04-01

    Posttranscriptional control of gene expression is important for defining both normal and pathological cellular phenotypes. In vitro, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) have recently been shown to play important roles in posttranscriptional regulation; however, the contribution of RBPs to cell specification is not well understood. Here, we determined that the RBP insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) is specifically overexpressed in mixed lineage leukemia-rearranged (MLL-rearranged) B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), which constitutes a subtype of this malignancy associated with poor prognosis and high risk of relapse. IGF2BP3 was required for the survival of B-ALL cell lines, as knockdown led to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Enforced expression of IGF2BP3 provided murine BM cells with a strong survival advantage, led to proliferation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, and skewed hematopoietic development to the B cell/myeloid lineage. Cross-link immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing uncovered the IGF2BP3-regulated transcriptome, which includes oncogenes MYC and CDK6 as direct targets. IGF2BP3 regulated transcripts via targeting elements within 3' untranslated regions (3'UTR), and enforced IGF2BP3 expression in mice resulted in enhanced expression of Myc and Cdk6 in BM. Together, our data suggest that IGF2BP3-mediated targeting of oncogenic transcripts may represent a critical pathogenetic mechanism in MLL-rearranged B-ALL and support IGF2BP3 and its cognate RNA-binding partners as potential therapeutic targets in this disease.

  6. Escherichia coli genome-wide promoter analysis: Identification of additional AtoC binding target elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolisis Fragiskos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on bacterial signal transduction systems have revealed complex networks of functional interactions, where the response regulators play a pivotal role. The AtoSC system of E. coli activates the expression of atoDAEB operon genes, and the subsequent catabolism of short-chain fatty acids, upon acetoacetate induction. Transcriptome and phenotypic analyses suggested that atoSC is also involved in several other cellular activities, although we have recently reported a palindromic repeat within the atoDAEB promoter as the single, cis-regulatory binding site of the AtoC response regulator. In this work, we used a computational approach to explore the presence of yet unidentified AtoC binding sites within other parts of the E. coli genome. Results Through the implementation of a computational de novo motif detection workflow, a set of candidate motifs was generated, representing putative AtoC binding targets within the E. coli genome. In order to assess the biological relevance of the motifs and to select for experimental validation of those sequences related robustly with distinct cellular functions, we implemented a novel approach that applies Gene Ontology Term Analysis to the motif hits and selected those that were qualified through this procedure. The computational results were validated using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assays to assess the in vivo binding of AtoC to the predicted sites. This process verified twenty-two additional AtoC binding sites, located not only within intergenic regions, but also within gene-encoding sequences. Conclusions This study, by tracing a number of putative AtoC binding sites, has indicated an AtoC-related cross-regulatory function. This highlights the significance of computational genome-wide approaches in elucidating complex patterns of bacterial cell regulation.

  7. Investigation of Starch Binding Domains for Improvement of Starch degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Camilla

    dikinase (GWD). GWD kan fosforylere i C-3 og C-6 positionen i glukose enhederne i stivelse, ved en dikinase reaktion der anvender β-fosfat fra ATP. Mutanter i Arabidopsis thaliana GWD1 udviser en stivelses overskud fænotype med en lavere stivelses nedbrydnings rate, hvilket påviser en forbindelse mellem......-hydrolyserende enzymer. Den overordnede struktur fundet hos CBM20 er ifølge en homologimodellering bevaret i GWD3-SBD og bindings site 1, som er involveret i initial binding er vel bevaret både i strukturen og på sekvens niveau. Sammenlignet med andre karakteriserede CBM20, så har GWD3-SBD et mindre loop i området...

  8. Improved Snake algorithm for complex target's boundary detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bao-jun; LI Dong

    2006-01-01

    The traditional Snake algorithm cannot effectively detect the object edge of an image with non-convex shapes or low SNR.This paper studies the characteristics of this type of image with complex shape target or noise and presents an improved Snake algorithm.The traditional Snake function model and operation strategy are improved by increasing new control energy functions,and the influencing weight of these energy factors is discussed.At the same time,a dynamic arrangement for the Snake points is used to adapt different target shapes.The simulation results indicate that the new Snake model greatly decreases the dependence on the Snake point's initial position and effectively overcomes noise influence.This method enhances the Snake algorithm's ability of detecting object edge.

  9. Modelling of binding free energy of targeted nanocarriers to cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S.; Eckmann, David M.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a numerical model based on Metropolis Monte Carlo and the weighted histogram analysis method that enables the calculation of the absolute binding free energy between functionalized nanocarriers (NC) and endothelial cell (EC) surfaces. The binding affinities are calculated according to the free energy landscapes. The model predictions quantitatively agree with the analogous measurements of specific antibody coated NCs (100 nm in diameter) to intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expressing EC surface in in vitro cell culture experiments. The model also enables an investigation of the effects of a broad range of parameters that include antibody surface coverage of NC, glycocalyx in both in vivo and in vitro conditions, shear flow and NC size. Using our model we explore the effects of shear flow and reproduce the shear-enhanced binding observed in equilibrium measurements in collagen-coated tube. Furthermore, our results indicate that the bond stiffness, representing the specific antibody-antigen interaction, significantly impacts the binding affinities. The predictive success of our computational protocol represents a sound quantitative approach for model driven design and optimization of functionalized NC in targeted vascular drug delivery.

  10. Anti-HIV double variable domain immunoglobulins binding both gp41 and gp120 for targeted delivery of immunoconjugates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan B Craig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous studies have identified the two target epitopes most effective for the delivery of cytotoxic immunoconjugates the CD4-binding site of gp120, and the hairpin loop of gp41. Here we construct and test tetravalent double variable domain immunoglobulin molecules (DVD-Igs that bind to both epitopes. METHODS: Synthetic genes that encode DVD-Igs utilizing V-domains derived from human anti-gp120 and anti-gp41 Abs were designed and expressed in 293F cells. A series of constructs tested different inter-V-linker domains and orientations of the two V domains. Antibodies were tested for binding to recombinant Ag and native Env expressed on infected cells, for neutralization of infectious HIV, and for their ability to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates to infected cells. FINDINGS: The outer V-domain was the major determinant of binding and functional activity of the DVD-Ig. Function of the inner V-domain and bifunctional binding required at least 15 AA in the inter-V-domain linker. A molecular model showing the spatial orientation of the two epitopes is consistent with this observation. Linkers that incorporated helical domains (A[EAAAK](nA resulted in more effective DVD-Igs than those based solely on flexible domains ([GGGGS](n. In general, the DVD-Igs outperformed the less effective parental antibody and equaled the activity of the more effective. The ability of the DVD-Igs to deliver cytotoxic immunoconjugates in the absence of soluble CD4 was improved over that of either parent. CONCLUSIONS: DVD-Igs can be designed that bind to both gp120 and gp41 on the HIV envelope. DVD-Igs are effective in delivering cytotoxic immunoconjugates. The optimal design of these DVD-Igs, in which both domains are fully functional, has not yet been achieved.

  11. Rubisco activity and regulation as targets for crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Martin A J; Andralojc, P John; Scales, Joanna C; Salvucci, Michael E; Carmo-Silva, A Elizabete; Alonso, Hernan; Whitney, Spencer M

    2013-01-01

    Rubisco (ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase) enables net carbon fixation through the carboxylation of RuBP. However, some characteristics of Rubisco make it surprisingly inefficient and compromise photosynthetic productivity. For example, Rubisco catalyses a wasteful reaction with oxygen that leads to the release of previously fixed CO(2) and NH(3) and the consumption of energy during photorespiration. Furthermore, Rubisco is slow and large amounts are needed to support adequate photosynthetic rates. Consequently, Rubisco has been studied intensively as a prime target for manipulations to 'supercharge' photosynthesis and improve both productivity and resource use efficiency. The catalytic properties of Rubiscos from diverse sources vary considerably, suggesting that changes in turnover rate, affinity, or specificity for CO(2) can be introduced to improve Rubisco performance in specific crops and environments. While attempts to manipulate plant Rubisco by nuclear transformation have had limited success, modifying its catalysis by targeted changes to its catalytic large subunit via chloroplast transformation have been much more successful. However, this technique is still in need of development for most major food crops including maize, wheat, and rice. Other bioengineering approaches for improving Rubisco performance include improving the activity of its ancillary protein, Rubisco activase, in addition to modulating the synthesis and degradation of Rubisco's inhibitory sugar phosphate ligands. As the rate-limiting step in carbon assimilation, even modest improvements in the overall performance of Rubisco pose a viable pathway for obtaining significant gains in plant yield, particularly under stressful environmental conditions.

  12. Improved target detection by IR dual-band image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomeit, U.; Ebert, R.

    2009-09-01

    Dual-band thermal imagers acquire information simultaneously in both the 8-12 μm (long-wave infrared, LWIR) and the 3-5 μm (mid-wave infrared, MWIR) spectral range. Compared to single-band thermal imagers they are expected to have several advantages in military applications. These advantages include the opportunity to use the best band for given atmospheric conditions (e. g. cold climate: LWIR, hot and humid climate: MWIR), the potential to better detect camouflaged targets and an improved discrimination between targets and decoys. Most of these advantages have not yet been verified and/or quantified. It is expected that image fusion allows better exploitation of the information content available with dual-band imagers especially with respect to detection of targets. We have developed a method for dual-band image fusion based on the apparent temperature differences in the two bands. This method showed promising results in laboratory tests. In order to evaluate its performance under operational conditions we conducted a field trial in an area with high thermal clutter. In such areas, targets are hardly to detect in single-band images because they vanish in the clutter structure. The image data collected in this field trial was used for a perception experiment. This perception experiment showed an enhanced target detection range and reduced false alarm rate for the fused images compared to the single-band images.

  13. Liposomal nanotransporter for targeted binding based on nucleic acid anchor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejdl, Lukas; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Kudr, Jiri; Ruttkay-Nedecky, Branislav; Konecna, Marie; Kopel, Pavel; Zitka, Ondrej; Hubalek, Jaromir; Kizek, Rene; Adam, Vojtech

    2014-02-01

    Microfluidic techniques have been developed intensively in recent years due to lower reagent consumption, faster analysis, and possibility of the integration of several analytical detectors into one chip. Electrochemical detectors are preferred in microfluidic systems, whereas liposomes can be used for amplification of the electrochemical signals. The aim of this study was to design a nanodevice for targeted anchoring of liposome as transport device. In this study, liposome with encapsulated Zn(II) was prepared. Further, gold nanoparticles were anchored onto the liposome surface allowing binding of thiol moiety-modified molecules (DNA). For targeted capturing of the transport device, DNA loops were used. DNA loops were represented by paramagnetic microparticles with oligo(DT)25 chain, on which a connecting DNA was bound. Capturing of transport device was subsequently done by hybridization to the loop. The individual steps were analyzed by electrochemistry and UV/Vis spectrometry. For detection of Zn(II) encapsulated in liposome, a microfluidic system was used. The study succeeded in demonstrating that liposome is suitable for the transport of Zn(II) and nucleic acids. Such transporter may be used for targeted binding using DNA anchor system.

  14. Targeting of cytosolic mRNA to mitochondria: naked RNA can bind to the mitochondrial surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Morgane; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Duchêne, Anne-Marie

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondria contain hundreds of proteins but only a few are encoded by the mitochondrial genome. The other proteins are nuclear-encoded and imported into mitochondria. These proteins can be translated on free cytosolic polysomes, then targeted and imported into mitochondria. Nonetheless, numerous cytosolic mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins are detected at the surface of mitochondria in yeast, plants and animals. The localization of mRNAs to the vicinity of mitochondria would be a way for mitochondrial protein sorting. The mechanisms responsible for mRNA targeting to mitochondria are not clearly identified. Sequences within the mRNA molecules (cis-elements), as well as a few trans-acting factors, have been shown to be essential for targeting of some mRNAs. In order to identify receptors involved in mRNA docking to the mitochondrial surface, we have developed an in vitro mRNA binding assay with isolated plant mitochondria. We show that naked mRNAs are able to bind to isolated mitochondria, and our results strongly suggest that mRNA docking to the plant mitochondrial outer membrane requires at least one component of TOM complex.

  15. Itraconazole Inhibits Enterovirus Replication by Targeting the Oxysterol-Binding Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen R.P.M. Strating

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Itraconazole (ITZ is a well-known antifungal agent that also has anticancer activity. In this study, we identify ITZ as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of enteroviruses (e.g., poliovirus, coxsackievirus, enterovirus-71, rhinovirus. We demonstrate that ITZ inhibits viral RNA replication by targeting oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP and OSBP-related protein 4 (ORP4. Consistently, OSW-1, a specific OSBP/ORP4 antagonist, also inhibits enterovirus replication. Knockdown of OSBP inhibits virus replication, whereas overexpression of OSBP or ORP4 counteracts the antiviral effects of ITZ and OSW-1. ITZ binds OSBP and inhibits its function, i.e., shuttling of cholesterol and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate between membranes, thereby likely perturbing the virus-induced membrane alterations essential for viral replication organelle formation. ITZ also inhibits hepatitis C virus replication, which also relies on OSBP. Together, these data implicate OSBP/ORP4 as molecular targets of ITZ and point to an essential role of OSBP/ORP4-mediated lipid exchange in virus replication that can be targeted by antiviral drugs.

  16. Direct binding targets of the stringent response alarmone (p)ppGpp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjee, Usheer; Ogata, Koji; Houry, Walid A

    2012-09-01

    The Escherichia coli stringent response, mediated by the alarmone ppGpp, is responsible for the reorganization of cellular transcription upon nutritional starvation and other stresses. These transcriptional changes occur mainly as a result of the direct effects of ppGpp and its partner transcription factor DksA on RNA polymerase. An often overlooked feature of the stringent response is the direct targeting of other proteins by ppGpp. Here we review the literature on proteins that are known to bind ppGpp and, based on sequence homology, X-ray crystal structures and in silico docking, we propose new potential protein binding targets for ppGpp. These proteins were found to fall into five main categories: (i) cellular GTPases, (ii) proteins involved in nucleotide metabolism, (iii) proteins involved in lipid metabolism, (iv) general metabolic proteins and (v) PLP-dependent basic aliphatic amino acid decarboxylases. Bioinformatic rationale is provided for expanding the role of ppGpp in regulating the activities of the cellular GTPases. Proteins involved in nucleotide and lipid metabolism and general metabolic proteins provide an interesting set of structurally varied stringent response targets. While the inhibition of some PLP-dependent decarboxylases by ppGpp suggests the existence of cross-talk between the acid stress and stringent response systems.

  17. Discovery of small-molecule inhibitors selectively targeting the DNA-binding domain of the human androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Dalal, Kush; Leblanc, Eric; Frewin, Kate; Ma, Dennis; Adomat, Hans; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2014-08-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is considered as a master regulator in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). As resistance to clinically used anti-AR drugs remains a major challenge for the treatment of advanced PCa, there is a pressing need for new anti-AR therapeutic avenues. In this study, we identified a binding site on the DNA binding domain (DBD) of the receptor and utilized virtual screening to discover a set of micromolar hits for the target. Through further exploration of the most potent hit (1), a structural analogue (6) was identified demonstrating 10-fold improved anti-AR potency. Further optimization resulted in a more potent synthetic analogue (25) with anti-AR potency comparable to a newly FDA-approved drug Enzalutamide. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that the developed inhibitors do interact with the intended target site. Importantly, the AR DBD inhibitors could effectively inhibit the growth of Enzalutamide-resistant cells as well as block the transcriptional activity of constitutively active AR splice variants, such as V7.

  18. Process safety improvement--quality and target zero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scyoc, Karl

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The "plan, do, check, act" improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  19. Process safety improvement-Quality and target zero

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Scyoc, Karl [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.) Inc., DNV Energy Solutions, 16340 Park Ten Place, Suite 100, Houston, TX 77084 (United States)], E-mail: karl.van.scyoc@dnv.com

    2008-11-15

    Process safety practitioners have adopted quality management principles in design of process safety management systems with positive effect, yet achieving safety objectives sometimes remain a distant target. Companies regularly apply tools and methods which have roots in quality and productivity improvement. The 'plan, do, check, act' improvement loop, statistical analysis of incidents (non-conformities), and performance trending popularized by Dr. Deming are now commonly used in the context of process safety. Significant advancements in HSE performance are reported after applying methods viewed as fundamental for quality management. In pursuit of continual process safety improvement, the paper examines various quality improvement methods, and explores how methods intended for product quality can be additionally applied to continual improvement of process safety. Methods such as Kaizen, Poke yoke, and TRIZ, while long established for quality improvement, are quite unfamiliar in the process safety arena. These methods are discussed for application in improving both process safety leadership and field work team performance. Practical ways to advance process safety, based on the methods, are given.

  20. Targeting of nucleotide-binding proteins by HAMLET--a conserved tumor cell death mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J C S; Nadeem, A; Rydström, A; Puthia, M; Svanborg, C

    2016-02-18

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) kills tumor cells broadly suggesting that conserved survival pathways are perturbed. We now identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET binding partners, accounting for about 35% of all HAMLET targets in a protein microarray comprising 8000 human proteins. Target kinases were present in all branches of the Kinome tree, including 26 tyrosine kinases, 10 tyrosine kinase-like kinases, 13 homologs of yeast sterile kinases, 4 casein kinase 1 kinases, 15 containing PKA, PKG, PKC family kinases, 15 calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases and 13 kinases from CDK, MAPK, GSK3, CLK families. HAMLET acted as a broad kinase inhibitor in vitro, as defined in a screen of 347 wild-type, 93 mutant, 19 atypical and 17 lipid kinases. Inhibition of phosphorylation was also detected in extracts from HAMLET-treated lung carcinoma cells. In addition, HAMLET recognized 24 Ras family proteins and bound to Ras, RasL11B and Rap1B on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Direct cellular interactions between HAMLET and activated Ras family members including Braf were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. As a consequence, oncogenic Ras and Braf activity was inhibited and HAMLET and Braf inhibitors synergistically increased tumor cell death in response to HAMLET. Unlike most small molecule kinase inhibitors, HAMLET showed selectivity for tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. The results identify nucleotide-binding proteins as HAMLET targets and suggest that dysregulation of the ATPase/kinase/GTPase machinery contributes to cell death, following the initial, selective recognition of HAMLET by tumor cells. The findings thus provide a molecular basis for the conserved tumoricidal effect of HAMLET, through dysregulation of kinases and oncogenic GTPases, to which tumor cells are addicted.

  1. Kaiso directs the transcriptional corepressor MTG16 to the Kaiso binding site in target promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlyn W Barrett

    Full Text Available Myeloid translocation genes (MTGs are transcriptional corepressors originally identified in acute myelogenous leukemia that have recently been linked to epithelial malignancy with non-synonymous mutations identified in both MTG8 and MTG16 in colon, breast, and lung carcinoma in addition to functioning as negative regulators of WNT and Notch signaling. A yeast two-hybrid approach was used to discover novel MTG binding partners. This screen identified the Zinc fingers, C2H2 and BTB domain containing (ZBTB family members ZBTB4 and ZBTB38 as MTG16 interacting proteins. ZBTB4 is downregulated in breast cancer and modulates p53 responses. Because ZBTB33 (Kaiso, like MTG16, modulates Wnt signaling at the level of TCF4, and its deletion suppresses intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc(Min mouse, we determined that Kaiso also interacted with MTG16 to modulate transcription. The zinc finger domains of Kaiso as well as ZBTB4 and ZBTB38 bound MTG16 and the association with Kaiso was confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation. MTG family members were required to efficiently repress both a heterologous reporter construct containing Kaiso binding sites (4×KBS and the known Kaiso target, Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7/Matrilysin. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation studies placed MTG16 in a complex occupying the Kaiso binding site on the MMP-7 promoter. The presence of MTG16 in this complex, and its contributions to transcriptional repression both required Kaiso binding to its binding site on DNA, establishing MTG16-Kaiso binding as functionally relevant in Kaiso-dependent transcriptional repression. Examination of a large multi-stage CRC expression array dataset revealed patterns of Kaiso, MTG16, and MMP-7 expression supporting the hypothesis that loss of either Kaiso or MTG16 can de-regulate a target promoter such as that of MMP-7. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of transcriptional control by ZBTB family members and broaden the scope

  2. De-novo identification of PPARgamma/RXR binding sites and direct targets during adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sabry Hamza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with abnormalities in endocrine signaling in adipose tissue and one of the key signaling affectors operative in these disorders is the nuclear hormone transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma. PPARgamma has pleiotropic functions affecting a wide range of fundamental biological processes including the regulation of genes that modulate insulin sensitivity, adipocyte differentiation, inflammation and atherosclerosis. To date, only a limited number of direct targets for PPARgamma have been identified through research using the well established pre-adipogenic cell line, 3T3-L1. In order to obtain a genome-wide view of PPARgamma binding sites, we applied the pair end-tagging technology (ChIP-PET to map PPARgamma binding sites in 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Coupling gene expression profile analysis with ChIP-PET, we identified in a genome-wide manner over 7700 DNA binding sites of the transcription factor PPARgamma and its heterodimeric partner RXR during the course of adipocyte differentiation. Our validation studies prove that the identified sites are bona fide binding sites for both PPARgamma and RXR and that they are functionally capable of driving PPARgamma specific transcription. Our results strongly indicate that PPARgamma is the predominant heterodimerization partner for RXR during late stages of adipocyte differentiation. Additionally, we find that PPARgamma/RXR association is enriched within the proximity of the 5' region of the transcription start site and this association is significantly associated with transcriptional up-regulation of genes involved in fatty acid and lipid metabolism confirming the role of PPARgamma as the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis. Evolutionary conservation analysis of these binding sites is greater when adjacent to up-regulated genes than down

  3. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Accardo A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Antonella Accardo,1 Luigi Aloj,2 Michela Aurilio,2 Giancarlo Morelli,1 Diego Tesauro11Centro interuniversitario di Ricerca sui Peptidi Bioattivi (CIRPeB, Department of Pharmacy and Istituto di Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBB CNR, University of Naples “Federico II”, 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Istituto Nazionale per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Fondazione “G. Pascale”, Napoli, ItalyAbstract: Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs; and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors.Keywords: receptors binding peptides, drug delivery

  4. Analysis and improvement of cyclotron thallium target room shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiloo, N; Raisali, G; Aslani, G

    2008-01-01

    Because of high neutron and gamma-ray intensities generated during bombardment of a thallium-203 target, a thallium target-room shield and different ways of improving it have been investigated. Leakage of neutron and gamma ray dose rates at various points behind the shield are calculated by simulating the transport of neutrons and photons using the Monte Carlo N Particle transport computer code. By considering target-room geometry, its associated shield and neutron and gamma ray source strengths and spectra, three designs for enhancing shield performance have been analysed: a shielding door at the maze entrance, covering maze walls with layers of some effective materials and adding a shadow-shield in the target room in front of the radiation source. Dose calculations were carried out separately for different materials and dimensions for all the shielding scenarios considered. The shadow-shield has been demonstrated to be one suitable for neutron and gamma dose equivalent reduction. A 7.5-cm thick polyethylene shadow-shield reduces both dose equivalent rate at maze entrance door and leakage from the shield by a factor of 3.

  5. Strategy to target the substrate binding site of SET domain protein methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kong T; Li, Fengling; Poda, Gennadiy; Smil, David; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu

    2013-03-25

    Protein methyltransferases (PMTs) are a novel gene family of therapeutic relevance involved in chromatin-mediated signaling and other biological mechanisms. Most PMTs are organized around the structurally conserved SET domain that catalyzes the methylation of a substrate lysine. A few potent chemical inhibitors compete with the protein substrate, and all are anchored in the channel recruiting the methyl-accepting lysine. We propose a novel strategy to design focused chemical libraries targeting the substrate binding site, where a limited number of warheads each occupying the lysine-channel of multiple enzymes would be decorated by different substituents. A variety of sequence and structure-based approaches used to analyze the diversity of the lysine channel of SET domain PMTs support the relevance of this strategy. We show that chemical fragments derived from published inhibitors are valid warheads that can be used in the design of novel focused libraries targeting other PMTs.

  6. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  7. Targeting the Diabetic Chaperome to Improve Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Rick T

    2016-08-01

    The chaperome constitutes a broad family of molecular chaperones and co-chaperones that facilitate the folding, refolding, and degradation of the proteome. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) promotes the folding of numerous oncoproteins to aid survival of malignant phenotypes, and small molecule inhibitors of the Hsp90 chaperone complex offer a viable approach to treat certain cancers. One therapeutic attribute of this approach is the selectivity of these molecules to target high affinity oncogenic Hsp90 complexes present in tumor cells, which are absent in nontransformed cells. This selectivity has given rise to the idea that disease may contribute to forming a stress chaperome that is functionally distinct in its ability to interact with small molecule Hsp90 modulators. Consistent with this premise, modulating Hsp90 improves clinically relevant endpoints of diabetic peripheral neuropathy but has little impact in nondiabetic nerve. The concept of targeting the "diabetic chaperome" to treat diabetes and its complications is discussed.

  8. In silico engineering and optimization of Transcription Activator-Like Effectors and their derivatives for improved DNA binding predictions.

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Marek J.

    2015-12-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) can be used as adaptable DNAbinding modules to create site-specific chimeric nucleases or synthetic transcriptional regulators. The central repeat domain mediates specific DNA binding via hypervariable repeat di-residues (RVDs). This DNA-Binding Domain can be engineered to bind preferentially to any user-selected DNA sequence if engineered appropriately. Therefore, TALEs and their derivatives have become indispensable molecular tools in site-specific manipulation of genes and genomes. This thesis revolves around two problems: in silico design and improved binding site prediction of TALEs. In the first part, a study is shown where TALEs are successfully designed in silico and validated in laboratory to yield the anticipated effects on selected genes. Software is developed to accompany the process of designing and prediction of binding sites. I expanded the functionality of the software to be used as a more generic set of tools for the design, target and offtarget searching. Part two contributes a method and associated toolkit developed to allow users to design in silico optimized synthetic TALEs with user-defined specificities for various experimental purposes. This method is based on a mutual relationship of three consecutive tandem repeats in the DNA-binding domain. This approach revealed positional and compositional bias behind the binding of TALEs to DNA. In conclusion, I developed methods, approaches, and software to enhance the functionality of synthetic TALEs, which should improve understanding of TALEs biology and will further advance genome-engineering applications in various organisms and cell types.

  9. Improved algorithm of ray tracing in ICF cryogenic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Yang, Yongying; Ling, Tong; Jiang, Jiabin

    2016-10-01

    The high precision ray tracing inside inertial confinement fusion (ICF) cryogenic targets plays an important role in the reconstruction of the three-dimensional density distribution by algebraic reconstruction technique (ART) algorithm. The traditional Runge-Kutta methods, which is restricted by the precision of the grid division and the step size of ray tracing, cannot make an accurate calculation in the case of refractive index saltation. In this paper, we propose an improved algorithm of ray tracing based on the Runge-Kutta methods and Snell's law of refraction to achieve high tracing precision. On the boundary of refractive index, we apply Snell's law of refraction and contact point search algorithm to ensure accuracy of the simulation. Inside the cryogenic target, the combination of the Runge-Kutta methods and self-adaptive step algorithm are employed for computation. The original refractive index data, which is used to mesh the target, can be obtained by experimental measurement or priori refractive index distribution function. A finite differential method is performed to calculate the refractive index gradient of mesh nodes, and the distance weighted average interpolation methods is utilized to obtain refractive index and gradient of each point in space. In the simulation, we take ideal ICF target, Luneberg lens and Graded index rod as simulation model to calculate the spot diagram and wavefront map. Compared the simulation results to Zemax, it manifests that the improved algorithm of ray tracing based on the fourth-order Runge-Kutta methods and Snell's law of refraction exhibits high accuracy. The relative error of the spot diagram is 0.2%, and the peak-to-valley (PV) error and the root-mean-square (RMS) error of the wavefront map is less than λ/35 and λ/100, correspondingly.

  10. Discovery of novel potent ΔF508-CFTR correctors that target the nucleotide binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odolczyk, Norbert; Fritsch, Janine; Norez, Caroline; Servel, Nathalie; da Cunha, Melanie Faria; Bitam, Sara; Kupniewska, Anna; Wiszniewski, Ludovic; Colas, Julien; Tarnowski, Krzysztof; Tondelier, Danielle; Roldan, Ariel; Saussereau, Emilie L; Melin-Heschel, Patricia; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Lukacs, Gergely L; Dadlez, Michal; Faure, Grazyna; Herrmann, Harald; Ollero, Mario; Becq, Frédéric; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Edelman, Aleksander

    2013-10-01

    The deletion of Phe508 (ΔF508) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR is the most common mutation associated with cystic fibrosis. The ΔF508-CFTR mutant is recognized as improperly folded and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Based on molecular dynamics simulation results, we hypothesized that interaction between ΔF508-NBD1 and housekeeping proteins prevents ΔF508-CFTR delivery to the plasma membrane. Based on this assumption we applied structure-based virtual screening to identify new low-molecular-weight compounds that should bind to ΔF508-NBD1 and act as protein-protein interaction inhibitors. Using different functional assays for CFTR activity, we demonstrated that in silico-selected compounds induced functional expression of ΔF508-CFTR in transfected HeLa cells, human bronchial CF cells in primary culture, and in the nasal epithelium of homozygous ΔF508-CFTR mice. The proposed compounds disrupt keratin8-ΔF508-CFTR interaction in ΔF508-CFTR HeLa cells. Structural analysis of ΔF508-NBD1 in the presence of these compounds suggests their binding to NBD1. We conclude that our strategy leads to the discovery of new compounds that are among the most potent correctors of ΔF508-CFTR trafficking defect known to date.

  11. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation.

  12. CART III: improved camouflage assessment using moving target indication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Thomas; Honke, Thomas; Müller, Markus

    2009-05-01

    In order to facilitate systematic, computer aided improvements of camouflage and concealment assessment methods, the software system CART (Camouflage Assessment in Real-Time) was built up for the camouflage assessment of objects in image sequences (see contributions to SPIE 2007 and SPIE 2008 [1], [2]). It works with visual-optical, infrared and SAR image sequences. The system comprises a semi-automatic annotation functionality for marking target objects (ground truth generation) including a propagation of those markings over the image sequence for static as well as moving scene objects, where the recording camera may be static or moving. The marked image regions are evaluated by applying user-defined feature extractors, which can easily be defined and integrated into the system via a generic software interface. This article presents further systematic enhancements made in the recent year and addresses particularly the task of the detection of moving vehicles by latest image exploitation methods for objective camouflage assessment in these cases. As a main topic, the loop was closed between the two natural opposites of reconnaissance and camouflage, which was realized by incorporating ATD (Automatic Target Detection) algorithms into the computer aided camouflage assessment. Since object (and sensor) movement is an important feature for many applications, different image-based MTI (Moving Target Indication) algorithms were included in the CART system, which rely on changes in the image plane from an image to the successive one (after camera movements are automatically compensated). Additionally, the MTI outputs over time are combined in a certain way which we call "snail track" algorithm. The results show that their output provides a valuable measurement for the conspicuity of moving objects and therefore is an ideal component in the camouflage assessment. It is shown that image-based MTI improvements lead to improvements in the camouflage assessment process.

  13. Targeted protein footprinting: where different transcription factors bind to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traviglia, S L; Datwyler, S A; Yan, D; Ishihama, A; Meares, C F

    1999-11-30

    Gene transcription is regulated through the interactions of RNA polymerase (RNAP) with transcription factors, such as the bacterial sigma proteins. We have devised a new strategy that relies on targeted protein footprinting to make an extensive survey of proximity to the protein surface. This involves attaching cutting reagents randomly to lysine residues on the surface of a protein such as sigma. The lysine-labeled sigma protein is then used to cleave the polypeptide backbones of the RNAP proteins at exposed residues adjacent to the sigma binding site. We used targeted protein footprinting to compare the areas near which sigma(70), sigma(54), sigma(38), sigma(E), NusA, GreA, and omega bind to the protein subunits of Escherichia coli RNAP. The sigma proteins and NusA cut sites in similar regions of the two large RNAP subunits, beta and beta', outlining a common surface. GreA cuts a larger set of sites, whereas omega shows no overlap with the others, cutting only the beta' subunit at a unique location.

  14. Role of intrinsic DNA binding specificity in defining target genes of the mammalian transcription factor PDX1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, Arthur; Ridner, Gabriela; Walker, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    PDX1 is a homeodomain transcription factor essential for pancreatic development and mature beta cell function. Homeodomain proteins typically recognize short TAAT DNA motifs in vitro: this binding displays paradoxically low specificity and affinity, given the extremely high specificity of action of these proteins in vivo. To better understand how PDX1 selects target genes in vivo, we have examined the interaction of PDX1 with natural and artificial binding sites. Comparison of PDX1 binding sites in several target promoters revealed an evolutionarily conserved pattern of nucleotides flanking the TAAT core. Using competitive in vitro DNA binding assays, we defined three groups of binding sites displaying high, intermediate and low affinity. Transfection experiments revealed a striking correlation between the ability of each sequence to activate transcription in cultured beta cells, and its ability to bind PDX1 in vitro. Site selection from a pool of oligonucleotides (sequence NNNTAATNNN) revealed a non-random preference for particular nucleotides at the flanking locations, resembling natural PDX1 binding sites. Taken together, the data indicate that the intrinsic DNA binding specificity of PDX1, in particular the bases adjacent to TAAT, plays an important role in determining the spectrum of target genes. PMID:14704343

  15. Improved nanoparticles preparation and drug release for liver targeted delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Weili

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nTargeted delivery of drugs and proteins to liver can be achieved via asialoglycoprotein receptor, which can recognize and combine the galactose- and N-acetygalatosamine-terminated glycoproteins. Glycosyl is usually conjugated with drugs directly to fabricate prodrugs or with nanoparticles encapsulated drugs via forming covalent bonds, while the covalent bonds may lead to some shortages for drug release. Therefore, we have a hypothesis that we can prepare nanoparticles for efficient targeting by glycosylation using galactosylated poly (L-glutamic acid (Gal-PLGA as a carrier to entrap the model drugs in nanoparticles core physically rather than forming covalent drug conjugation. The means of incorporation of drug in nanoparticles may improve drug release to maintain its activity, raise its therapeutic index and diminish the adverse effect. Based on previous researches, it is achievable to obtain nanoparticles that we hypothesize to prepare. Due to their nanometer-size and galactosyl, the nanoparticles may be a potential delivery system for passive and active targeting to liver parenchymal cells for therapy of hepatitis and liver cancer.

  16. Mechanistic models enable the rational use of in vitro drug-target binding kinetics for better drug effects in patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, W.E.; Wong, Y.C.; Nederpelt, I.; Heitman, L.H.; Danhof, M.; Graaf, van der P.H.; Gilissen, R.A.; de, Lange E.C.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Drug-target binding kinetics are major determinants of the time course of drug action for several drugs, as clearly described for the irreversible binders omeprazole and aspirin. This supports the increasing interest to incorporate newly developed high-throughput assays for drug-target

  17. Improving throughput for temporal target nomination using existing infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeth, Peter G.

    2007-04-01

    Earlier, we reported on predictive anomaly detection (PAD) for nominating targets within data streams generated by persistent sensing and surveillance. This technique is purely temporal and does not directly depend on the physics attendant on the sensed environment. Since PAD adapts to evolving data streams, there are no determinacy assumptions. We showed PAD to be general across sensor types, demonstrating it using synthetic chaotic data and in audio, visual, and infrared applications. Defense-oriented demonstrations included explosions, muzzle flashes, and missile and aircraft detection. Experiments were ground-based and air-to-air. As new sensors come on line, PAD offers immediate data filtering and target nomination. Its results can be taken individually, pixel by pixel, for spectral analysis and material detection/identification. They can also be grouped for shape analysis, target identification, and track development. PAD analyses reduce data volume by around 95%, depending on target number and size, while still retaining all target indicators. While PAD's code is simple when compared to physics codes, PAD tends to build a huge model. A PAD model for 512 x 640 frames may contain 19,660,800 Gaussian basis functions. (PAD models grow linearly with the number of pixels and the frequency content, in the FFT sense, of the sensed scenario's background data). PAD's complexity in terms of computational and data intensity is an example of what one sees in new algorithms now in the R&D pipeline, especially as DoD seeks capability that runs fully automatic, with little to no human interaction. Work is needed to improve algorithms' throughput while employing existing infrastructure, yet allowing for growth in the types of hardware employed. In this present paper, we discuss a generic cluster interface for legacy codes that can be partitioned at the data level. The discussion's foundation is the growth of PAD models to accommodate a particular scenario and the need to

  18. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  19. Discovery of binding proteins for a protein target using protein-protein docking-based virtual screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changsheng; Tang, Bo; Wang, Qian; Lai, Luhua

    2014-10-01

    Target structure-based virtual screening, which employs protein-small molecule docking to identify potential ligands, has been widely used in small-molecule drug discovery. In the present study, we used a protein-protein docking program to identify proteins that bind to a specific target protein. In the testing phase, an all-to-all protein-protein docking run on a large dataset was performed. The three-dimensional rigid docking program SDOCK was used to examine protein-protein docking on all protein pairs in the dataset. Both the binding affinity and features of the binding energy landscape were considered in the scoring function in order to distinguish positive binding pairs from negative binding pairs. Thus, the lowest docking score, the average Z-score, and convergency of the low-score solutions were incorporated in the analysis. The hybrid scoring function was optimized in the all-to-all docking test. The docking method and the hybrid scoring function were then used to screen for proteins that bind to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), which is a well-known therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. A protein library containing 677 proteins was used for the screen. Proteins with scores among the top 20% were further examined. Sixteen proteins from the top-ranking 67 proteins were selected for experimental study. Two of these proteins showed significant binding to TNFα in an in vitro binding study. The results of the present study demonstrate the power and potential application of protein-protein docking for the discovery of novel binding proteins for specific protein targets.

  20. Protection against chemotherapy-induced alopecia: targeting ATP-binding cassette transporters in the hair follicle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, Iain S; Pitre, Aaron; Schuetz, John D; Paus, Ralf

    2013-11-01

    Currently, efficacious treatments for chemotherapy-induced alopecia (hair loss) are lacking, and incidences of permanent hair loss following high-dose chemotherapy are on the increase. In this article, we describe mechanisms by which the pharmacological defense status of the hair follicle might be enhanced, thereby reducing the accumulation of cytotoxic cancer drugs and preventing or reducing hair loss and damage. We believe this could be achieved via the selective increase in ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter expression within the hair follicle epithelium, following application of topical agonists for regulatory nuclear receptors. Clinical application would require the development of hair follicle-targeted formulations, potentially utilizing nanoparticle technology. This novel approach has the potential to yield entirely new therapeutic options for the treatment and management of chemotherapy-induced alopecia, providing significant psychological and physical benefit to cancer patients.

  1. Redox-regulated cargo binding and release by the peroxisomal targeting signal receptor, Pex5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Changle; Hagstrom, Danielle; Polley, Soumi Guha; Subramani, Suresh

    2013-09-20

    In its role as a mobile receptor for peroxisomal matrix cargo containing a peroxisomal targeting signal called PTS1, the protein Pex5 shuttles between the cytosol and the peroxisome lumen. Pex5 binds PTS1 proteins in the cytosol via its C-terminal tetratricopeptide domains and delivers them to the peroxisome lumen, where the receptor·cargo complex dissociates. The cargo-free receptor is exported to the cytosol for another round of import. How cargo release and receptor recycling are regulated is poorly understood. We found that Pex5 functions as a dimer/oligomer and that its protein interactions with itself (homo-oligomeric) and with Pex8 (hetero-oligomeric) control the binding and release of cargo proteins. These interactions are controlled by a redox-sensitive amino acid, cysteine 10 of Pex5, which is essential for the formation of disulfide bond-linked Pex5 forms, for high affinity cargo binding, and for receptor recycling. Disulfide bond-linked Pex5 showed the highest affinity for PTS1 cargo. Upon reduction of the disulfide bond by dithiothreitol, Pex5 transitioned to a noncovalent dimer, concomitant with the partial release of PTS1 cargo. Additionally, dissipation of the redox balance between the cytosol and the peroxisome lumen caused an import defect. A hetero-oligomeric interaction between the N-terminal domain (amino acids 1-110) of Pex5 and a conserved motif at the C terminus of Pex8 further facilitates cargo release, but only under reducing conditions. This interaction is also important for the release of PTS1 proteins. We suggest a redox-regulated model for Pex5 function during the peroxisomal matrix protein import cycle.

  2. Binding and NMR structural studies on indoloquinoline-oligonucleotide conjugates targeting duplex DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Andrea; Riechert-Krause, Fanny; Weisz, Klaus

    2012-06-20

    An 11-phenyl-indolo[3,2-b]quinoline (PIQ) was tethered through an aminoalkyl linker to the 5'-end of four pyrimidine oligonucleotides with T/C scrambled sequences at their two 5'-terminal positions. Binding to different double-helical DNA targets formed parallel triple helices with a PIQ-mediated stabilization that strongly depends on pH and the terminal base triad at the 5'-triplex-duplex junction. The most effective stabilization was observed with a TAT triplet at the 5'-junction under low pH conditions, pointing to a protonated ligand with a high triplex binding affinity and unfavorable charge repulsions in the case of a terminal C(+)GC triplet at the junction. The latter preference of the PIQ ligand for TAT over CGC is alleviated yet still preserved at higher pH. Intercalation of PIQ at the 5'-triplex-duplex junction as suggested by the triplex melting experiments was confirmed by homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR structural studies on a specifically isotope-labeled triplex. The NMR analysis revealed two coexisting species that only differ by a 180° rotation of the indoloquinoline within the intercalation pocket. NOE-derived molecular models indicate extensive stacking interactions of the indoloquinoline moiety with the TAT base triplet and CG base pair at the junction and a phenyl substituent that is positioned in the major groove and oriented almost perpendicular to the plane of the indoloquinoline.

  3. Preferential binding of growth inhibitory prostaglandins by the target protein of a carcinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S.H.; Sorof, S. (Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))

    1990-12-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the principal target protein of the hepatic carcinogen N-(2-fluorenyl)acetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene) in rat liver. In addition, the cyclopentenone prostaglandins (PG), PGA, PGJ{sub 2}, and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2}, inhibit the growth of many cell types in vitro. This report describes the preferential binding of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins by L-FABP and the reversible inhibition of thymidine incorporation into DNA by PGA{sub 2} and {Delta}{sup 12}-PGJ{sub 2} in primary cultures of purified rat hepatocytes. As a model ligand, ({sup 3}H)PGA{sub 1} bound to L-FABP specifically, reversibly, rapidly, and with high affinity. Its dissociation constants were 134 nM (high affinity) and 3.6 {mu}M (low affinity). The high-affinity finding of ({sup 3}H)PGA{sup 1} correlated with their growth inhibitory activities reported previously and here. The in vitro actions of L-FABP are compatible with those of a specific and dissociable carrier of growth inhibitory prostaglandins in rat hepatocytes and suggest that the carcinogen may usurp the cellular machinery of the growth inhibitory prostaglandins.

  4. Development of New Drugs for an Old Target — The Penicillin Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luxen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to the worldwide appearance of drug-resistant strains. Bacteria have developed resistance to β-lactams by two main mechanisms: the production of β-lactamases, sometimes accompanied by a decrease of outer membrane permeability, and the production of low-affinity, drug resistant Penicillin Binding Proteins (PBPs. PBPs remain attractive targets for developing new antibiotic agents because they catalyse the last steps of the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan, which is unique to bacteria, and lies outside the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we summarize the “current state of the art” of non-β-lactam inhibitors of PBPs, which have being developed in an attempt to counter the emergence of β-lactam resistance. These molecules are not susceptible to hydrolysis by β-lactamases and thus present a real alternative to β-lactams. We present transition state analogs such as boronic acids, which can covalently bind to the active serine residue in the catalytic site. Molecules containing ring structures different from the β-lactam-ring like lactivicin are able to acylate the active serine residue. High throughput screening methods, in combination with virtual screening methods and structure based design, have allowed the development of new molecules. Some of these novel inhibitors are active against major pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and thus open avenues new for the discovery of novel antibiotics.

  5. An Improved Moving Multi-Human Target Detection Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Feng-Mei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the detection of moving multi-human targets, the major problems existing lie in the detection speed and precision. Fortunately, the HOG feature presents a very considerable effect on the detection accuracy. However, the problem of low detecting speed caused by its large amount of calculation prevents the HOG feature from being well applied in scenes where the real-time requirements are needed. Given this problem, this paper presents a method which combines the Gaussian mixture background model and HOG feature. This method solved firstly by the Gaussian mixture background model to detect the moving foreground in the video. And then use HOG+SVM to handle the moving foreground that has been detected. As a result, the amount of computation is reduced considerably and the real-time performance of the HOG algorithm is improved greatly. Verified by the experiment, the detection accuracy of this algorithm can reach 94%.

  6. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung pe...... treatment with ultrafine formulations of ICS will change the natural history of asthma and prevent airway remodelling in both the large and small airways.......Background and Aim:  Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...... periphery in adult asthma by means of ultrafine aerosols. Results:  Ultrafine formulations of inhaled corticosteroids have improved lung deposition up to at least 50 %, primarily in the peripheral airways. Ultrafine formulations of ICS provide equivalent asthma control to non-ultrafine ICS at approximately...

  7. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T; Henriksen, Niel M; Gilson, Michael K

    2015-08-13

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by nonoptimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery.

  8. Hybrid nanoparticles improve targeting to inflammatory macrophages through phagocytic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagalkot, Vaishali; Badgeley, Marcus A; Kampfrath, Thomas; Deiuliis, Jeffrey A; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Maiseyeu, Andrei

    2015-11-10

    Macrophages are innate immune cells with great phenotypic plasticity, which allows them to regulate an array of physiological processes such as host defense, tissue repair, and lipid/lipoprotein metabolism. In this proof-of-principle study, we report that macrophages of the M1 inflammatory phenotype can be selectively targeted by model hybrid lipid-latex (LiLa) nanoparticles bearing phagocytic signals. We demonstrate a simple and robust route to fabricate nanoparticles and then show their efficacy through imaging and drug delivery in inflammatory disease models of atherosclerosis and obesity. Self-assembled LiLa nanoparticles can be modified with a variety of hydrophobic entities such as drug cargos, signaling lipids, and imaging reporters resulting in sub-100nm nanoparticles with low polydispersities. The optimized theranostic LiLa formulation with gadolinium, fluorescein and "eat-me" phagocytic signals (Gd-FITC-LiLa) a) demonstrates high relaxivity that improves magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensitivity, b) encapsulates hydrophobic drugs at up to 60% by weight, and c) selectively targets inflammatory M1 macrophages concomitant with controlled release of the payload of anti-inflammatory drug. The mechanism and kinetics of the payload discharge appeared to be phospholipase A2 activity-dependent, as determined by means of intracellular Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). In vivo, LiLa targets M1 macrophages in a mouse model of atherosclerosis, allowing noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaque by MRI. In the context of obesity, LiLa particles were selectively deposited to M1 macrophages within inflamed adipose tissue, as demonstrated by single-photon intravital imaging in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that phagocytic signals can preferentially target inflammatory macrophages in experimental models of atherosclerosis and obesity, thus opening the possibility of future clinical applications that diagnose/treat these conditions. Tunable Li

  9. Binding of LL-37 to model biomembranes: insight into target vs host cell recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Rohit; Domanov, Yegor; Pietiäinen, Milla; Kontinen, Vesa P; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2008-04-01

    Pursuing the molecular mechanisms of the concentration dependent cytotoxic and hemolytic effects of the human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 on cells, we investigated the interactions of this peptide with lipids using different model membranes, together with fluorescence spectroscopy for the Trp-containing mutant LL-37(F27W). Minimum concentrations inhibiting bacterial growth and lipid interactions assessed by dynamic light scattering and monolayer penetration revealed the mutant to retain the characteristics of native LL-37. Although both LL-37 and the mutant intercalated effectively into zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine membranes the presence of acidic phospholipids caused augmented membrane binding. Interestingly, strongly attenuated intercalation of LL-37 into membranes containing both cholesterol and sphingomyelin (both at X=0.3) was observed. Accordingly, the distinction between target and host cells by LL-37 is likely to derive from i) acidic phospholipids causing enhanced association with the former cells as well as ii) from attenuated interactions with the outer surface of the plasma membrane of the peptide secreting host, imposed by its high content of cholesterol and sphingomyelin. Our results further suggest that LL-37 may exert its antimicrobial effects by compromising the membrane barrier properties of the target microbes by a mechanism involving cytotoxic oligomers, similarly to other peptides forming amyloid-like fibers in the presence of acidic phospholipids.

  10. Improved drug targeting of cancer cells by utilizing actively targetable folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zheyu; Li, Yan; Kohama, Kazuhiro; Oneill, Brian; Bi, Jingxiu

    2011-01-01

    Folic acid-conjugated albumin nanospheres (FA-AN) have been developed to provide an actively targetable drug delivery system for improved drug targeting of cancer cells with reduced side effects. The nanospheres were prepared by conjugating folic acid onto the surface of albumin nanospheres using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDAC) as a catalyst. To test the efficacy of these nanospheres as a potential delivery platform, doxorubicin-loaded albumin nanospheres (DOX-AN) and doxorubicin-loaded FA-AN (FA-DOX-AN) were prepared by entrapping DOX (an anthracycline, antibiotic drug widely used in cancer chemotherapy that works by intercalating DNA) into AN and FA-AN nanoparticles. Cell uptake of the DOX was then measured. The results show that FA-AN was incorporated into HeLa cells (tumor cells) only after 2.0h incubation, whereas HeLa cells failed to incorporate albumin nanospheres without conjugated folic acid after 4.0h incubation. When HeLa cells were treated with the DOX-AN, FA-DOX-AN nanoparticles or free DOX, cell viability decreased with increasing culture time (i.e. cell death increases with time) over a 70h period. Cell viability was always the lowest for free DOX followed by FA-DOX-AN4 and then DOX-AN. In a second set of experiments, HeLa cells washed to remove excess DOX after an initial incubation for 2h were incubated for 70h. The corresponding cell viability was slightly higher when the cells were treated with FA-DOX-AN or free DOX whilst cells treated with DOX-AN nanoparticles remained viable. The above experiments were repeated for non-cancerous, aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). As expected, cell viability of the HeLa cells (with FA receptor alpha, FRα) and AoSMC cells (without FRα) decreased rapidly with time in the presence of free DOX, but treatment with FA-DOX-AN resulted in selective killing of the tumor cells. These results indicated that FA-AN may be used as a promising actively targetable drug delivery system to improve drug

  11. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer's-Associated Aβ Oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C Wilcox

    Full Text Available Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs. AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer's dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs. This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL--a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer's model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can

  12. mirTarPri: improved prioritization of microRNA targets through incorporation of functional genomics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small (19-25 nt non-coding RNAs. This important class of gene regulator downregulates gene expression through sequence-specific binding to the 3'untranslated regions (3'UTRs of target mRNAs. Several computational target prediction approaches have been developed for predicting miRNA targets. However, the predicted target lists often have high false positive rates. To construct a workable target list for subsequent experimental studies, we need novel approaches to properly rank the candidate targets from traditional methods. We performed a systematic analysis of experimentally validated miRNA targets using functional genomics data, and found significant functional associations between genes that were targeted by the same miRNA. Based on this finding, we developed a miRNA target prioritization method named mirTarPri to rank the predicted target lists from commonly used target prediction methods. Leave-one-out cross validation has proved to be successful in identifying known targets, achieving an AUC score up to 0. 84. Validation in high-throughput data proved that mirTarPri was an unbiased method. Applying mirTarPri to prioritize results of six commonly used target prediction methods allowed us to find more positive targets at the top of the prioritized candidate list. In comparison with other methods, mirTarPri had an outstanding performance in gold standard and CLIP data. mirTarPri was a valuable method to improve the efficacy of current miRNA target prediction methods. We have also developed a web-based server for implementing mirTarPri method, which is freely accessible at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/mirTarPri.

  13. Anti-tumor agent calixarene 0118 targets human galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of carbohydrate binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dings, Ruud P.M.; Miller, Michelle C.; Nesmelova, Irina; Astorgues-Xerri, Lucile; Kumar, Nigam; Serova, Maria; Chen, Xuimei; Raymond, Eric; Hoye, Thomas R.; Mayo, Kevin H.

    2012-01-01

    Calix[4]arene compound 0118 is an angiostatic agent that inhibits tumor growth in mice. Although 0118 is a topomimetic of galectin-1-targeting angiostatic amphipathic peptide anginex, we had yet to prove that 0118 targets galectin-1. Galectin-1 is involved in pathological disorders like tumor endothelial cell adhesion and migration and therefore presents a relevant target for therapeutic intervention against cancer. Here, 15N-1H HSQC NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that 0118 indeed targets galectin-1 at a site away from the lectin’s carbohydrate binding site, and thereby attenuates lactose binding to the lectin. Flow cytometry and agglutination assays show that 0118 attenuates binding of galectin-1 to cell surface glycans, and the inhibition of cell proliferation by 0118 is found to be correlated with the cellular expression of the lectin. In general, our data indicate that 0118 targets galectin-1 as an allosteric inhibitor of glycan/carbohydrate binding. This work contributes to the clinical development of anti-tumor calixarene compound 0118. PMID:22575017

  14. A novel fibronectin binding motif in MSCRAMMs targets F3 modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha Prabhakaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BBK32 is a surface expressed lipoprotein and fibronectin (Fn-binding microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Previous studies from our group showed that BBK32 is a virulence factor in experimental Lyme disease and located the Fn-binding region to residues 21-205 of the lipoprotein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Studies aimed at identifying interacting sites between BBK32 and Fn revealed an interaction between the MSCRAMM and the Fn F3 modules. Further analysis of this interaction showed that BBK32 can cause the aggregation of human plasma Fn in a similar concentration-dependent manner to that of anastellin, the superfibronectin (sFn inducing agent. The resulting Fn aggregates are conformationally distinct from plasma Fn as indicated by a change in available thermolysin cleavage sites. Recombinant BBK32 and anastellin affect the structure of Fn matrices formed by cultured fibroblasts and inhibit endothelial cell proliferation similarly. Within BBK32, we have located the sFn-forming activity to a region between residues 160 and 175 which contains two sequence motifs that are also found in anastellin. Synthetic peptides mimicking these motifs induce Fn aggregation, whereas a peptide with a scrambled sequence motif was inactive, suggesting that these motifs represent the sFn-inducing sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that BBK32 induces the formation of Fn aggregates that are indistinguishable from those formed by anastellin. The results of this study provide evidence for how bacteria can target host proteins to manipulate host cell activities.

  15. Improving Global Multi-target Tracking with Local Updates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Anton; Gade, Rikke; Dick, Anthony;

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme to explicitly detect and resolve ambiguous situations in multiple target tracking. During periods of uncertainty, our method applies multiple local single target trackers to hypothesise short term tracks. These tracks are combined with the tracks obtained by a global multi......-target tracker, if they result in a reduction in the global cost function. Since tracking failures typically arise when targets become occluded, we propose a local data association scheme to maintain the target identities in these situations. We demonstrate a reduction of up to 50% in the global cost function...

  16. In Silico Characterization of the Binding Affinity of Dendrimers to Penicillin-Binding Proteins (PBPs): Can PBPs be Potential Targets for Antibacterial Dendrimers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Vepuri, Suresh B; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Kalhapure, Rahul; Suleman, Nadia; Govender, Thirumala

    2016-04-01

    We have shown that novel silver salts of poly (propyl ether) imine (PETIM) dendron and dendrimers developed in our group exhibit preferential antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus aureus. This led us to examine whether molecular modeling methods could be used to identify the key structural design principles for a bioactive lead molecule, explore the mechanism of binding with biological targets, and explain their preferential antibacterial activity. The current article reports the conformational landscape as well as mechanism of binding of generation 1 PETIM dendron and dendrimers to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in order to understand the antibacterial activity profiles of their silver salts. Molecular dynamics at different simulation protocols and conformational analysis were performed to elaborate on the conformational features of the studied dendrimers, as well as to create the initial structure for further binding studies. The results showed that for all compounds, there were no significant conformational changes due to variation in simulation conditions. Molecular docking calculations were performed to investigate the binding theme between the studied dendrimers and PBPs. Interestingly, in significant accordance with the experimental data, dendron and dendrimer with aliphatic cores were found to show higher activity against S. aureus than the dendrimer with an aromatic core. The latter showed higher activity against MRSA. The findings from this computational and molecular modeling report together with the experimental results serve as a road map toward designing more potent antibacterial dendrimers against resistant bacterial strains.

  17. The Target of β-Expansin EXPB1 in Maize Cell Walls from Binding and Solid-State NMR Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tuo; Chen, Yuning; Tabuchi, Akira; Cosgrove, Daniel J; Hong, Mei

    2016-12-01

    The wall-loosening actions of β-expansins are known primarily from studies of EXPB1 extracted from maize (Zea mays) pollen. EXPB1 selectively loosens cell walls (CWs) of grasses, but its specific binding target is unknown. We characterized EXPB1 binding to sequentially extracted maize CWs, finding that the protein primarily binds glucuronoarabinoxylan (GAX), the major matrix polysaccharide in grass CWs. This binding is strongly reduced by salts, indicating that it is predominantly electrostatic in nature. For direct molecular evidence of EXPB1 binding, we conducted solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance experiments using paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), which is sensitive to distances between unpaired electrons and nuclei. By mixing (13)C-enriched maize CWs with EXPB1 functionalized with a Mn(2+) tag, we measured Mn(2+)-induced PRE Strong (1)H and (13)C PREs were observed for the carboxyls of GAX, followed by more moderate PREs for carboxyl groups in homogalacturonan and rhamnogalacturonan-I, indicating that EXPB1 preferentially binds GAX In contrast, no PRE was observed for cellulose, indicating very weak interaction of EXPB1 with cellulose. Dynamics experiments show that EXPB1 changes GAX mobility in a complex manner: the rigid fraction of GAX became more rigid upon EXPB1 binding while the dynamic fraction became more mobile. Combining these data with previous results, we propose that EXPB1 loosens grass CWs by disrupting noncovalent junctions between highly substituted GAX and GAX of low substitution, which binds cellulose. This study provides molecular evidence of β-expansin's target in grass CWs and demonstrates a new strategy for investigating ligand binding for proteins that are difficult to express heterologously.

  18. A computational method for identification of vaccine targets from protein regions of conserved human leukocyte antigen binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Simon, Christian; Kudahl, Ulrich J.;

    2015-01-01

    target diverse regions in highly variable viral pathogens and this diversity may need to be addressed through redefinition of suitable peptide targets. Methods: We have developed a method for antigen assessment and target selection for polyvalent vaccines, with which we identified immune epitopes from...... the number of potential vaccine targets compared to the number of targets discovered using the traditional approach where low-frequency peptides are excluded. Conclusions: We developed a webserver with an intuitive visualization scheme for summarizing the T cell-based antigenic potential of any given protein......Background: Computational methods for T cell-based vaccine target discovery focus on selection of highly conserved peptides identified across pathogen variants, followed by prediction of their binding of human leukocyte antigen molecules. However, experimental studies have shown that T cells often...

  19. Phage display selects for amylases with improved low pH starch-binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaert, RMD; Beekwilder, J; Olsthoorn, R; Quax, WJ; Duin, Jan van

    2002-01-01

    Directed evolution of secreted industrial enzymes is hampered by the lack of powerful selection techniques. We have explored surface display to select for enzyme variants with improved binding performance on complex polymeric substrates. By a combination of saturation mutagenesis and phage display w

  20. Observation of unphosphorylated STAT3 core protein binding to target dsDNA by PEMSA and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Edwin; Shah, Rahi; Collie, Gavin W; Parkinson, Gary N; Palmer, Jonathan; Rahman, Khondaker M; Bui, Tam T; Drake, Alex F; Husby, Jarmila; Neidle, Stephen; Zinzalla, Giovanna; Thurston, David E; Wilderspin, Andrew F

    2013-04-02

    The STAT3 transcription factor plays a central role in a wide range of cancer types where it is over-expressed. Previously, phosphorylation of this protein was thought to be a prerequisite for direct binding to DNA. However, we have now shown complete binding of a purified unphosphorylated STAT3 (uSTAT3) core directly to M67 DNA, the high affinity STAT3 target DNA sequence, by a protein electrophoretic mobility shift assay (PEMSA). Binding to M67 DNA was inhibited by addition of increasing concentrations of a phosphotyrosyl peptide. X-ray crystallography demonstrates one mode of binding that is similar to that known for the STAT3 core phosphorylated at Y705.

  1. Screening of specific binding peptide targeting blood vessel of human esophageal cancer in vivo in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Min; WU Kai-chun; HAO Zhi-ming; GUO Chang-cun; YAO Jia-yin

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction remains a virulent malignancy with poor prognosis. Rapid progresses were made in chemotherapeutic agents and the development of molecular markers allowed better identification of candidates for targeted therapy. This study aimed to identify the candidate peptides used for anti-angiogenic therapy of esophageal cancer by in vivo screening C7C peptide library for peptides binding specifically to blood vessels of human esophageal cancer.Methods The phage displayed C7C peptide library was injected intravenously into mice bearing human esophageal tumor xenografts under renal capsule. After 5 rounds of screening, 13 clones were picked up individually and sequenced.During each round of screening, titers of phage recovery were calculated from tumor xenograft and control tissues.Homing of these 9 peptides to tumor vessel was detected by calculating phage titers in the tumor xenograft and control tissues (lung and spleen) after each phage was injected into mice model, and compared with the distribution of phage M13 and Ⅷ-related antigen in tumor xenograft by immunohistochemical staining. Comparisons among groups of data were made using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Bonferroni multiple comparisons test.Results The number of phage recovered from tumor tissue of each round increased gradually in tumor group while decreased in control groups (P <0.01 in tumor and spleen, P <0.05 in lung). Immunohistochemical staining showed similar staining pattern with M13 antibody or Ⅷ-related antigen antibody, suggesting that phages displaying the selected peptides could home to blood vessel of human esophageal cancer. According to their DNA, 9 corresponding peptide sequences were deduced. And the homing ability to blood vessel of phages displaying the selected peptides was confirmed by comparing with their recovery in tumor and control tissues. Two motifs, YSXNXW and PXNXXN, were also obtained by

  2. Extracorporeal adsorption therapy: A Method to improve targeted radiation delivered by radiometal-labeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemecek, Eneida R.; Green, Damian J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Pagal, John M.; Lin, Yukang; Gopal, A. K.; Durack, Lawrence D.; Rajendran, Joseph G.; Wilbur, D. S.; Nilsson, Rune; Sandberg, Bengt; Press, Oliver W.

    2008-04-01

    Many investigators have demonstrated the ability to treat hematologic malignancies with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting hematopoietic antigens such as anti-CD20 and anti-CD45. [1-5] Although the remission rates achieved with radioimmunotherapy (RIT) are relatively high, many patients subsequently relapse presumably due to suboptimal delivery of enough radiation to eradicate the malignancy. The dose-response of leukemia and lymphoma to radiation has been proven. Substantial amounts of radiation can be delivered by RIT if followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation to rescue the bone marrow from myeloablation.[ref] However, the maximum dose of RIT that can be used is still limited by toxicity to normal tissues affected by nonspecific delivery of radiation. Efforts to improve RIT focus on improving the therapeutic ratios of radiation in target versus non-target tissues by removing the fraction of radioisotope that fails to bind to target tissues and circulates freely in the bloodstream perfusing non-target tissues. Our group and others have explored several alternatives for removal of unbound circulating antibody. [refs] One such method, extracorporeal adsorption therapy (ECAT) consists of removing unbound antibody by a method similar to plasmapheresis after critical circulation time and distribution of antibody into target tissues have been achieved. Preclinical studies of ECAT in murine xenograft models demonstrated significant improvement in therapeutic ratios of radioactivity. Chen and colleagues demonstrated that a 2-hour ECAT procedure could remove 40 to 70% of the radioactivity from liver, lung and spleen. [ref] Although isotope concentration in the tumor was initially unaffected, a 50% decrease was noted approximately 36 hours after the procedure. This approach was also evaluated in a limited phase I pilot study of patients with refractory B-cell lymphoma. [ref] After radiographic confirmation of tumor localization of a test dose of anti-CD20

  3. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicortas Gunnarsson Lavinia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates.

  4. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  5. Bioimaging of nucleolin aptamer-containing 5-(N-benzylcarboxyamide)-2'-deoxyuridine more capable of specific binding to targets in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyue Yim; Kang, Hyungu; Ryu, Sung Ho; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jung Hwan; Kim, Soonhag

    2010-01-01

    Chemically modified nucleotides have been developed and applied into SELEX procedure to find a novel type of aptamers to fit with targets of interest. In this study, we directly performed chemical modification of 5-(N-benzylcarboxyamide)-2'-deoxyuridine (called 5-BzdU) in the AS1411 aptamer, which binds to the nucleolin protein expressed in cancer cells. Forty-seven compounds of AS1411-containing Cy3-labeled 5-BzdU (called Cy3-(5-BzdU)-modified-AS1411) were synthesized by randomly substituting thymidines one to twelve in AS1411 with Cy3-labeled 5-BzdU. Both statistically quantified fluorescence measurements and confocal imaging analysis demonstrated at least three potential compounds of interest: number 12, 29 and 41 that significantly increased the targeting affinity to cancer cells but no significant activity from normal healthy cells. These results suggest that the position and number of substituents in AS1411 are critical parameters to improve the aptamer function. In this study, we demonstrated that chemical modification of the existing aptamers enhanced the binding and targeting affinity to targets of interest without additional SELEX procedures.

  6. Bioimaging of Nucleolin Aptamer-Containing 5-(N-benzylcarboxyamide-2′-deoxyuridine More Capable of Specific Binding to Targets in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyue Yim Lee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemically modified nucleotides have been developed and applied into SELEX procedure to find a novel type of aptamers to fit with targets of interest. In this study, we directly performed chemical modification of 5-(N-benzylcarboxyamide-2′-deoxyuridine (called 5-BzdU in the AS1411 aptamer, which binds to the nucleolin protein expressed in cancer cells. Forty-seven compounds of AS1411-containing Cy3-labeled 5-BzdU (called Cy3-(5-BzdU-modified-AS1411 were synthesized by randomly substituting thymidines one to twelve in AS1411 with Cy3-labeled 5-BzdU. Both statistically quantified fluorescence measurements and confocal imaging analysis demonstrated at least three potential compounds of interest: number 12, 29 and 41 that significantly increased the targeting affinity to cancer cells but no significant activity from normal healthy cells. These results suggest that the position and number of substituents in AS1411 are critical parameters to improve the aptamer function. In this study, we demonstrated that chemical modification of the existing aptamers enhanced the binding and targeting affinity to targets of interest without additional SELEX procedures.

  7. An Improved GLRT Method for Target Detection in SAR Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yingyun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Automatic ground vehicle detection based on SAR imagery is one of the important military applications of SAR. A region-based generalized likelihood ratio test (GLRT method is proposed in this paper, and this method combines the GLRT detection theory and image segmentation technology. First, the SAR imagery is roughly segmented as land clutter region and potential target region through the split and merge procedure often used for processing the original images. Then, based on the segmentation results, the reasonable statistical models for the data in the two regions are built respectively. Finally, with the knowledge of statistical characteristics of clutter and target, GLRT detection method is applied to the each pixel in the potential target region to obtain more accurate detection results. Experimental results based on real SAR data show that the proposed method can effectively detect the ground vehicle targets from the land clutter with excellent accuracy and speed.

  8. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical pr

  9. Self-Assembly of Protein Monolayers Engineered for Improved Monoclonal Immunoglobulin G Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy H. Lakey

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial outer membrane proteins, along with a filling lipid molecule can be modified to form stable self-assembled monolayers on gold. The transmembrane domain of Escherichia coli outer membrane protein A has been engineered to create a scaffold protein to which functional motifs can be fused. In earlier work we described the assembly and structure of an antibody-binding array where the Z domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A was fused to the scaffold protein. Whilst the binding of rabbit polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG to the array is very strong, mouse monoclonal IgG dissociates from the array easily. This is a problem since many immunodiagnostic tests rely upon the use of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Here we describe a strategy to develop an antibody-binding array that will bind mouse monoclonal IgG with lowered dissociation from the array. A novel protein consisting of the scaffold protein fused to two pairs of Z domains separated by a long flexible linker was manufactured. Using surface plasmon resonance the self-assembly of the new protein on gold and the improved binding of mouse monoclonal IgG were demonstrated.

  10. Relative binding affinity of carboxylate-, phosphonate-, and bisphosphonate-functionalized gold nanoparticles targeted to damaged bone tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Ryan D. [Rush University Medical Center, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology (United States); Cole, Lisa E.; Roeder, Ryan K., E-mail: rroeder@nd.edu [University of Notre Dame, Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Bioengineering Graduate Program (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Functionalized Au NPs have received considerable recent interest for targeting and labeling cells and tissues. Damaged bone tissue can be targeted by functionalizing Au NPs with molecules exhibiting affinity for calcium. Therefore, the relative binding affinity of Au NPs surface functionalized with either carboxylate (l-glutamic acid), phosphonate (2-aminoethylphosphonic acid), or bisphosphonate (alendronate) was investigated for targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue in vitro. Targeted labeling of damaged bone tissue was qualitatively verified by visual observation and backscattered electron microscopy, and quantitatively measured by the surface density of Au NPs using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The surface density of functionalized Au NPs was significantly greater within damaged tissue compared to undamaged tissue for each functional group. Bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs exhibited a greater surface density labeling damaged tissue compared to glutamic acid- and phosphonic acid-functionalized Au NPs, which was consistent with the results of previous work comparing the binding affinity of the same functionalized Au NPs to synthetic hydroxyapatite crystals. Targeted labeling was enabled not only by the functional groups but also by the colloidal stability in solution. Functionalized Au NPs were stabilized by the presence of the functional groups, and were shown to remain well dispersed in ionic (phosphate buffered saline) and serum (fetal bovine serum) solutions for up to 1 week. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that bisphosphonate-functionalized Au NPs have potential for targeted delivery to damaged bone tissue in vitro and provide motivation for in vivo investigation.

  11. Improving your target-template alignment with MODalign.

    KAUST Repository

    Barbato, Alessandro

    2012-02-04

    SUMMARY: MODalign is an interactive web-based tool aimed at helping protein structure modelers to inspect and manually modify the alignment between the sequences of a target protein and of its template(s). It interactively computes, displays and, upon modification of the target-template alignment, updates the multiple sequence alignments of the two protein families, their conservation score, secondary structure and solvent accessibility values, and local quality scores of the implied three-dimensional model(s). Although it has been designed to simplify the target-template alignment step in modeling, it is suitable for all cases where a sequence alignment needs to be inspected in the context of other biological information. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Freely available on the web at http://modorama.biocomputing.it/modalign. Website implemented in HTML and JavaScript with all major browsers supported. CONTACT: jan.kosinski@uniroma1.it.

  12. Targeting the Prostate Cancer Microenvironment to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    corresponding to putative NF-κB binding regions in WNT16, IL-6 and IL-8, respectively (see the Supplementary Methods for the primer sequences). (h) Analysis of...in the WNT16B promoter region and confirmed their function using WNT16B promoter constructs. Compared to untreated cells, both RAD and tumor necrosis...Emmenegger U, Francia G, Chen L, Lee CR, Man S, et al. Low-dose metronomic combined with intermittent bolus-dose cyclo- phosphamide is an effective long-term

  13. Targeting small airways in asthma: Improvement in clinical benefit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Lange, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aim: Disease control is not achieved in a substantial proportion of patients with asthma. Recent advances in aerosol formulations and delivery devices may offer more effective therapy. This review will focus on the importance and potential clinical benefit of targeting the lung...

  14. Robust improvement of target resolution in azimuth and range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruggiano, M.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis addresses the development of a robust processing technique aimed at resolving and unmasking targets, in range and azimuth, embedded in the received signal of a single and monostatic rotating surveillance radar. The reason for the need of such technique is twofold. Firstly, there are seve

  15. Targeted binding of the M13 bacteriophage to thiamethoxam organic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Whirang; Fowler, Jeffrey D; Furst, Eric M

    2012-04-10

    Phage display screening with a combinatorial library was used to identify M13-type bacteriophages that express peptides with selective binding to organic crystals of thiamethoxam. The six most strongly binding phages exhibit at least 1000 times the binding affinity of wild-type M13 and express heptapeptide sequences that are rich in hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding amino acids and proline. Among the peptide sequences identified, M13 displaying the pIII domain heptapeptide ASTLPKA exhibits the strongest binding to thiamethoxam in competitive binding assays. Electron and confocal microscopy confirm the specific binding affinity of ASTLPKA to thiamethoxam. Using atomic force microscope (AFM) probes functionalized with ASTLPKA expressing phage, we found that the average adhesion force between the bacteriophage and a thiamethoxam surface is 1.47 ± 0.80 nN whereas the adhesion force of wild-type M13KE phage is 0.18 ± 0.07 nN. Such a strongly binding bacteriophage could be used to modify the surface chemistry of thiamethoxam crystals and other organic solids with a high degree of specificity.

  16. Accurate microRNA target prediction using detailed binding site accessibility and machine learning on proteomics data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eReczko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small regulatory genes regulating gene expression by targetingmessenger RNA. Though computational methods for miRNA target prediction are the prevailingmeans to analyze their function, they still miss a large fraction of the targeted genes and additionallypredict a large number of false positives. Here we introduce a novel algorithm called DIANAmicroT-ANN which combines multiple novel target site features through an artificial neural network(ANN and is trained using recently published high-throughput data measuring the change of proteinlevels after miRNA overexpression, providing positive and negative targeting examples. The featurescharacterizing each miRNA recognition element include binding structure, conservation level and aspecific profile of structural accessibility. The ANN is trained to integrate the features of eachrecognition element along the 3’ untranslated region into a targeting score, reproducing the relativerepression fold change of the protein. Tested on two different sets the algorithm outperforms otherwidely used algorithms and also predicts a significant number of unique and reliable targets notpredicted by the other methods. For 542 human miRNAs DIANA-microT-ANN predicts 120,000targets not provided by TargetScan 5.0. The algorithm is freely available athttp://microrna.gr/microT-ANN.

  17. Improvements in ICF target fabrication through high precision assembly and nondestructive characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obrey, Kimberly Ann Defriend [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmidt, Derek W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Valdez, Adelaida C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Capelli, Deanna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perea, Ron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Randolph, Blaine [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Felix [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Honnell, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Current ICF and HED targets are fielded on Omega, Z, and Trident, and future campaigns will be fielded on NIF. NIF will only field less than 2 shots per day. With such few experiments, target fabrication and target alignment accuracy, enhanced metrology and advanced component machining will be even more important. Future target designs are also becoming more complex and more stringent in terms of accuracy. Several steps have been taken to improve the fabrication and characterization of targets, such as instituting an automated assembly station with 3 mm tolerances, utilizing nondestructive characterization tools for rapid component metrology and target assembly, and advancing machining capabilities. Recapitalization of target fabrication infrastructure is continuous.

  18. Improving time to optimal Staphylococcus aureus treatment using a penicillin-binding protein 2a assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Sonia N; Wang, Sheila K; Gonzalez Zamora, Jose; Hanson, Amy P; Polisetty, Radhika S; Singh, Kamaljit

    2016-12-01

    The penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) assay is a quick, accurate and inexpensive test for determining methicillin susceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus. A pre-post-study design was conducted using a PBP2a assay with and without the impact of an antimicrobial stewardship intervention to improve time to optimal therapy for methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. Our results demonstrate significantly improved time to optimal therapy and support the use of a PBP2a assay as part of an programme for all healthcare facilities, especially those with limited resources.

  19. Acute myeloid leukemia targeting by myxoma virus in vivo depends on cell binding but not permissiveness to infection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlambayan, Gerard J; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R

    2012-05-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifically targets human AML cells. MYXV prevented chloroma formation and bone marrow engraftment of two human AML cell lines, KG-1 and THP-1. The reduction in human leukemia engraftment after ex vivo MYXV treatment was dose-dependent and required a minimum MOI of 3. Both AML cell lines demonstrated MYXV binding to leukemia cell membranes following co-incubation: however, evidence of productive MYXV infection was observed only in THP-1 cells. This observation, that KG-1 can be targeted in vivo even in the absence of in vitro permissive viral infection, contrasts with the current understanding of oncolytic virotherapy, which assumes that virus infection and productive replication is a requirement. Preventing MYXV binding to AML cells with heparin abrogated the purging capacity of MYXV, indicating that binding of infectious virus particles is a necessary step for effective viral oncolysis. Our results challenge the current dogma of oncolytic virotherapy and show that in vitro permissiveness to an oncolytic virus is not necessarily an accurate predictor of oncolytic potency in vivo.

  20. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Raquel; Xie, Qing; Zheng, Deyou; Cvekl, Ales; Morrow, Bernice E

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome). TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX) was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S) do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to further elucidate the molecular

  1. Mammalian TBX1 preferentially binds and regulates downstream targets via a tandem T-site repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Castellanos

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency or mutation of TBX1 is largely responsible for the etiology of physical malformations in individuals with velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS/22q11.2 deletion syndrome. TBX1 encodes a transcription factor protein that contains an evolutionarily conserved DNA binding domain termed the T-box that is shared with other family members. All T-box proteins, examined so far, bind to similar but not identical consensus DNA sequences, indicating that they have specific binding preferences. To identify the TBX1 specific consensus sequence, Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX was performed. In contrast to other TBX family members recognizing palindrome sequences, we found that TBX1 preferentially binds to a tandem repeat of 5'-AGGTGTGAAGGTGTGA-3'. We also identified a second consensus sequence comprised of a tandem repeat with a degenerated downstream site. We show that three known human disease-causing TBX1 missense mutations (F148Y, H194Q and G310S do not alter nuclear localization, or disrupt binding to the tandem repeat consensus sequences, but they reduce transcriptional activity in cell culture reporter assays. To identify Tbx1-downstream genes, we performed an in silico genome wide analysis of potential cis-acting elements in DNA and found strong enrichment of genes required for developmental processes and transcriptional regulation. We found that TBX1 binds to 19 different loci in vitro, which may correspond to putative cis-acting binding sites. In situ hybridization coupled with luciferase gene reporter assays on three gene loci, Fgf8, Bmper, Otog-MyoD, show that these motifs are directly regulated by TBX1 in vitro. Collectively, the present studies establish new insights into molecular aspects of TBX1 binding to DNA. This work lays the groundwork for future in vivo studies, including chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq to further elucidate the

  2. The matrix-binding domain of microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1 targets active connective tissue growth factor to a fibroblast-produced extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbaum, Justin S; Tranquillo, Robert T; Mecham, Robert P

    2010-11-10

    It is advantageous to use biomaterials in tissue engineering that stimulate extracellular matrix (ECM) production by the cellular component. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) stimulates type I collagen (COL1A1) transcription, but is functionally limited as a free molecule. Using a matrix-binding domain (MBD) from microfibril-associated glycoprotein-1, the fusion protein MBD-CTGF was targeted to the ECM and tested for COL1A1 transcriptional activation. MBD-CTGF produced by the ECM-synthesizing fibroblasts, or provided exogenously, localized to the elastic fiber ECM. MBD-CTGF, but not CTGF alone, led to a two-fold enhancement of COL1A1 expression. This study introduces a targeting technology that can be used to elevate collagen transcription in engineered tissues and thereby improve tissue mechanics.

  3. Stable Binding of the Conserved Transcription Factor Grainy Head to its Target Genes Throughout Drosophila melanogaster Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevil, Markus; Bondra, Eliana R; Schulz, Katharine N; Kaplan, Tommy; Harrison, Melissa M

    2017-02-01

    It has been suggested that transcription factor binding is temporally dynamic, and that changes in binding determine transcriptional output. Nonetheless, this model is based on relatively few examples in which transcription factor binding has been assayed at multiple developmental stages. The essential transcription factor Grainy head (Grh) is conserved from fungi to humans, and controls epithelial development and barrier formation in numerous tissues. Drosophila melanogaster, which possess a single grainy head (grh) gene, provide an excellent system to study this conserved factor. To determine whether temporally distinct binding events allow Grh to control cell fate specification in different tissue types, we used a combination of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq to elucidate the gene regulatory network controlled by Grh during four stages of embryonic development (spanning stages 5-17) and in larval tissue. Contrary to expectations, we discovered that Grh remains bound to at least 1146 genomic loci over days of development. In contrast to this stable DNA occupancy, the subset of genes whose expression is regulated by Grh varies. Grh transitions from functioning primarily as a transcriptional repressor early in development to functioning predominantly as an activator later. Our data reveal that Grh binds to target genes well before the Grh-dependent transcriptional program commences, suggesting it sets the stage for subsequent recruitment of additional factors that execute stage-specific Grh functions.

  4. Targeting the binding interface on a shared receptor subunit of a cytokine family enables the inhibition of multiple member cytokines with selectable target spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nata, Toshie; Basheer, Asjad; Cocchi, Fiorenza; van Besien, Richard; Massoud, Raya; Jacobson, Steven; Azimi, Nazli; Tagaya, Yutaka

    2015-09-11

    The common γ molecule (γc) is a shared signaling receptor subunit used by six γc-cytokines. These cytokines play crucial roles in the differentiation of the mature immune system and are involved in many human diseases. Moreover, recent studies suggest that multiple γc-cytokines are pathogenically involved in a single disease, thus making the shared γc-molecule a logical target for therapeutic intervention. However, the current therapeutic strategies seem to lack options to treat such cases, partly because of the lack of appropriate neutralizing antibodies recognizing the γc and, more importantly, because of the inherent and practical limitations in the use of monoclonal antibodies. By targeting the binding interface of the γc and cytokines, we successfully designed peptides that not only inhibit multiple γc-cytokines but with a selectable target spectrum. Notably, the lead peptide inhibited three γc-cytokines without affecting the other three or non-γc-cytokines. Biological and mutational analyses of our peptide provide new insights to our current understanding on the structural aspect of the binding of γc-cytokines the γc-molecule. Furthermore, we provide evidence that our peptide, when conjugated to polyethylene glycol to gain stability in vivo, efficiently blocks the action of one of the target cytokines in animal models. Collectively, our technology can be expanded to target various combinations of γc-cytokines and thereby will provide a novel strategy to the current anti-cytokine therapies against immune, inflammatory, and malignant diseases.

  5. Infrared target recognition based on improved joint local ternary pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junding; Wu, Xiaosheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, yet robust approach, named joint orthogonal combination of local ternary pattern, for automatic forward-looking infrared target recognition. It gives more advantages to describe the macroscopic textures and microscopic textures by fusing variety of scales than the traditional LBP-based methods. In addition, it can effectively reduce the feature dimensionality. Further, the rotation invariant and uniform scheme, the robust LTP, and soft concave-convex partition are introduced to enhance its discriminative power. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can achieve competitive results compared with the state-of-the-art methods.

  6. Improving the prediction of protein binding sites by combining heterogeneous data and Voronoi diagrams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez-Fuentes Narcis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein binding site prediction by computational means can yield valuable information that complements and guides experimental approaches to determine the structure of protein complexes. Predictions become even more relevant and timely given the current resolution of protein interaction maps, where there is a very large and still expanding gap between the available information on: (i which proteins interact and (ii how proteins interact. Proteins interact through exposed residues that present differential physicochemical properties, and these can be exploited to identify protein interfaces. Results Here we present VORFFIP, a novel method for protein binding site prediction. The method makes use of broad set of heterogeneous data and defined of residue environment, by means of Voronoi Diagrams that are integrated by a two-steps Random Forest ensemble classifier. Four sets of residue features (structural, energy terms, sequence conservation, and crystallographic B-factors used in different combinations together with three definitions of residue environment (Voronoi Diagrams, sequence sliding window, and Euclidian distance have been analyzed in order to maximize the performance of the method. Conclusions The integration of different forms information such as structural features, energy term, evolutionary conservation and crystallographic B-factors, improves the performance of binding site prediction. Including the information of neighbouring residues also improves the prediction of protein interfaces. Among the different approaches that can be used to define the environment of exposed residues, Voronoi Diagrams provide the most accurate description. Finally, VORFFIP compares favourably to other methods reported in the recent literature.

  7. Identifying New Drug Targets for Potent Phospholipase D Inhibitors: Combining Sequence Alignment, Molecular Docking, and Enzyme Activity/Binding Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakpa, Helene; Kulkarni, Aditya; Barrows-Murphy, Scheneque; Miller, Greg; Zhou, Weihong; Cho, Hyejin; Török, Béla; Stieglitz, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipase D enzymes cleave phospholipid substrates generating choline and phosphatidic acid. Phospholipase D from Streptomyces chromofuscus is a non-HKD (histidine, lysine, and aspartic acid) phospholipase D as the enzyme is more similar to members of the diverse family of metallo-phosphodiesterase/phosphatase enzymes than phospholipase D enzymes with active site HKD repeats. A highly efficient library of phospholipase D inhibitors based on 1,3-disubstituted-4-amino-pyrazolopyrimidine core structure was utilized to evaluate the inhibition of purified S. chromofuscus phospholipase D. The molecules exhibited inhibition of phospholipase D activity (IC50 ) in the nanomolar range with monomeric substrate diC4 PC and micromolar range with phospholipid micelles and vesicles. Binding studies with vesicle substrate and phospholipase D strongly indicate that these inhibitors directly block enzyme vesicle binding. Following these compelling results as a starting point, sequence searches and alignments with S. chromofuscus phospholipase D have identified potential new drug targets. Using AutoDock, inhibitors were docked into the enzymes selected from sequence searches and alignments (when 3D co-ordinates were available) and results analyzed to develop next-generation inhibitors for new targets. In vitro enzyme activity assays with several human phosphatases demonstrated that the predictive protocol was accurate. The strategy of combining sequence comparison, docking, and high-throughput screening assays has helped to identify new drug targets and provided some insight into how to make potential inhibitors more specific to desired targets.

  8. Improved definition of the mouse transcriptome via targeted RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussotti, Giovanni; Leonardi, Tommaso; Clark, Michael B; Mercer, Tim R; Crawford, Joanna; Malquori, Lorenzo; Notredame, Cedric; Dinger, Marcel E; Mattick, John S; Enright, Anton J

    2016-05-01

    Targeted RNA sequencing (CaptureSeq) uses oligonucleotide probes to capture RNAs for sequencing, providing enriched read coverage, accurate measurement of gene expression, and quantitative expression data. We applied CaptureSeq to refine transcript annotations in the current murine GRCm38 assembly. More than 23,000 regions corresponding to putative or annotated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and 154,281 known splicing junction sites were selected for targeted sequencing across five mouse tissues and three brain subregions. The results illustrate that the mouse transcriptome is considerably more complex than previously thought. We assemble more complete transcript isoforms than GENCODE, expand transcript boundaries, and connect interspersed islands of mapped reads. We describe a novel filtering pipeline that identifies previously unannotated but high-quality transcript isoforms. In this set, 911 GENCODE neighboring genes are condensed into 400 expanded gene models. Additionally, 594 GENCODE lncRNAs acquire an open reading frame (ORF) when their structure is extended with CaptureSeq. Finally, we validate our observations using current FANTOM and Mouse ENCODE resources.

  9. Night vision image fusion for target detection with improved 2D maximum entropy segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lian-fa; Liu, Ying-bin; Yue, Jiang; Zhang, Yi

    2013-08-01

    Infrared and LLL image are used for night vision target detection. In allusion to the characteristics of night vision imaging and lack of traditional detection algorithm for segmentation and extraction of targets, we propose a method of infrared and LLL image fusion for target detection with improved 2D maximum entropy segmentation. Firstly, two-dimensional histogram was improved by gray level and maximum gray level in weighted area, weights were selected to calculate the maximum entropy for infrared and LLL image segmentation by using the histogram. Compared with the traditional maximum entropy segmentation, the algorithm had significant effect in target detection, and the functions of background suppression and target extraction. And then, the validity of multi-dimensional characteristics AND operation on the infrared and LLL image feature level fusion for target detection is verified. Experimental results show that detection algorithm has a relatively good effect and application in target detection and multiple targets detection in complex background.

  10. Targeted Iron Chelation Will Improve Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    spinal cord injury there is limited improvement in locomotor function and increased spared of grey matter . Since iron accumulation occurs in a protracted...sparing, progenitor cell proliferation, oligodendrocyte genesis, neurons ( grey matter ), apoptosis, iron (months 3) We completed the...immunohistochemistry for white and grey matter tissue sparing, macrophage induced inflammation, oligodendrocyte genesis, iron accumulation, and neuron sparing. All

  11. Targeted reduction of advanced glycation improves renal function in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harcourt, Brooke E; Sourris, Karly C; Coughlan, Melinda T

    2011-01-01

    function and an inflammatory profile (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)) were improved following the low-AGE diet. Mechanisms of advanced glycation-related renal damage were investigated in a mouse model of obesity using the AGE...

  12. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-08-14

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome.

  13. Xanthohumol Improves Diet-induced Obesity and Fatty Liver by Suppressing Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Activation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Shingo; Inoue, Jun; Shimizu, Makoto; Sato, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are key transcription factors that stimulate the expression of genes involved in fatty acid and cholesterol biosynthesis. Here, we demonstrate that a prenylated flavonoid in hops, xanthohumol (XN), is a novel SREBP inactivator that reduces the de novo synthesis of fatty acid and cholesterol. XN independently suppressed the maturation of SREBPs of insulin-induced genes in a manner different from sterols. Our results suggest that XN impairs the endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi translocation of the SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP)-SREBP complex by binding to Sec23/24 and blocking SCAP/SREBP incorporation into common coated protein II vesicles. Furthermore, in diet-induced obese mice, dietary XN suppressed SREBP-1 target gene expression in the liver accompanied by a reduction of the mature form of hepatic SREBP-1, and it inhibited the development of obesity and hepatic steatosis. Altogether, our data suggest that XN attenuates the function of SREBP-1 by repressing its maturation and that it has the potential of becoming a nutraceutical food or pharmacological agent for improving metabolic syndrome. PMID:26140926

  14. A general strategy for antibody library screening via conversion of transient target binding into permanent reporter deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, Alexander; Heiseler, Tim; Maaß, Franziska; Fritz, Janine; Hofmeyer, Thomas; Glotzbach, Bernhard; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2014-02-01

    We report here a generally applicable method for the selective covalent attachment of a reporter molecule to a replicating entity that allows one to obtain specific binders from a single round of library screening. We show that selective biotinylation of phage particles displaying a binder to any given target can be achieved by application of a coupled enzyme reaction on the surface of the target-binding phage particles that includes a peroxidase, an oxidase and a catalase. Due to the covalent linkage of biotin together with the tight and stable interaction of biotin with streptavidin, very stringent wash conditions for removal of nonspecific binders can be applied. The method termed (3)CARD (triple catalytic reporter deposition) was successfully applied to single-round screening of a phage display library of camelid single-domain antibodies against three different target proteins.

  15. Dissecting the Binding Mode of Low Affinity Phage Display Peptide Ligands to Protein Targets by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Coupled to Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leurs, Ulrike; Lohse, Brian; Ming, Shonoi A;

    2014-01-01

    Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use of hydro......Phage display (PD) is frequently used to discover peptides capable of binding to biological protein targets. The structural characterization of peptide-protein complexes is often challenging due to their low binding affinities and high structural flexibility. Here, we investigate the use...

  16. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Nicholas J; Xu, Jinbin; Zeng, Chenbo; Kirk, Molly J; Mozzoni, Kelsie; Silky, Colleen; Rehak, Courtney; Yurko, Raymond; Look, Gary; Rishton, Gilbert; Safferstein, Hank; Cruchaga, Carlos; Goate, Alison; Cahill, Michael A; Arancio, Ottavio; Mach, Robert H; Craven, Rolf; Head, Elizabeth; LeVine, Harry; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Catalano, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Abeta) 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1) protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological effects of

  17. Alzheimer's therapeutics targeting amyloid beta 1-42 oligomers II: Sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate Abeta 42 oligomer binding and synaptotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J Izzo

    Full Text Available Amyloid beta (Abeta 1-42 oligomers accumulate in brains of patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI and disrupt synaptic plasticity processes that underlie memory formation. Synaptic binding of Abeta oligomers to several putative receptor proteins is reported to inhibit long-term potentiation, affect membrane trafficking and induce reversible spine loss in neurons, leading to impaired cognitive performance and ultimately to anterograde amnesia in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD. We have identified a receptor not previously associated with AD that mediates the binding of Abeta oligomers to neurons, and describe novel therapeutic antagonists of this receptor capable of blocking Abeta toxic effects on synapses in vitro and cognitive deficits in vivo. Knockdown of sigma-2/PGRMC1 (progesterone receptor membrane component 1 protein expression in vitro using siRNA results in a highly correlated reduction in binding of exogenous Abeta oligomers to neurons of more than 90%. Expression of sigma-2/PGRMC1 is upregulated in vitro by treatment with Abeta oligomers, and is dysregulated in Alzheimer's disease patients' brain compared to age-matched, normal individuals. Specific, high affinity small molecule receptor antagonists and antibodies raised against specific regions on this receptor can displace synthetic Abeta oligomer binding to synaptic puncta in vitro and displace endogenous human AD patient oligomers from brain tissue sections in a dose-dependent manner. These receptor antagonists prevent and reverse the effects of Abeta oligomers on membrane trafficking and synapse loss in vitro and cognitive deficits in AD mouse models. These findings suggest sigma-2/PGRMC1 receptors mediate saturable oligomer binding to synaptic puncta on neurons and that brain penetrant, small molecules can displace endogenous and synthetic oligomers and improve cognitive deficits in AD models. We propose that sigma-2/PGRMC1 is a key mediator of the pathological

  18. Murine hyperglycemic vasculopathy and cardiomyopathy: whole-genome gene expression analysis predicts cellular targets and regulatory networks influenced by mannose binding lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenhui eZou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hyperglycemia, in the absence of type 1 or 2 diabetes, is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have previously demonstrated a central role for mannose binding lectin (MBL-mediated cardiac dysfunction in acute hyperglycemic mice. In this study, we applied whole genome microarray data analysis to investigate MBL’s role in systematic gene expression changes. The data predict possible intracellular events taking place in multiple cellular compartments such as enhanced insulin signaling pathway sensitivity, promoted mitochondrial respiratory function, improved cellular energy expenditure and protein quality control, improved cytoskeleton structure and facilitated intracellular trafficking, all of which may contribute to the organismal health of MBL null mice against acute hyperglycemia. Our data show a tight association between gene expression profile and tissue function which might be a very useful tool in predicting cellular targets and regulatory networks connected with in vivo observations, providing clues for further mechanistic studies.

  19. Data for proteomic analysis of ATP-binding proteins and kinase inhibitor target proteins using an ATP probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Adachi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between ATP and ATP-binding proteins (ATPome are common and are required for most cellular processes. Thus, it is clearly important to identify and quantify these interactions for understanding basic cellular mechanisms and the pathogenesis of various diseases. We used an ATP competition assay (competition between ATP and acyl-ATP probes that enabled us to distinguish specific ATP-binding proteins from non-specific proteins (Adachi et al., 2014 [1]. As a result, we identified 539 proteins, including 178 novel ATP-binding protein candidates. We also established an ATPome selectivity profiling method for kinase inhibitors using our cataloged ATPome list. Normally only kinome selectivity is profiled in selectivity profiling of kinase inhibitors. In this data, we expand the profiled targets from the kinome to the ATPome through performance of ATPome selectivity profiling and obtained target profiles of staurosporine and (S-crizotinib. The data accompanying the manuscript on this approach (Adachi et al., 2014 [1] have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001200.

  20. Targeting Cell Membrane Lipid Rafts by Stoichiometric Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles With a Sphingolipid-Binding Domain Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramelle, David; Nieves, Daniel; Brun, Benjamin; Kraut, Rachel S; Fernig, David G

    2015-04-22

    A non-membrane protein-based nanoparticle agent for the tracking of lipid rafts on live cells is produced by stoichiometric functionalization of gold nanoparticles with a previously characterized sphingolipid- and cell membrane microdomain-binding domain peptide (SBD). The SBD peptide is inserted in a self-assembled monolayer of peptidol and alkane thiol ethylene glycol, on gold nanoparticles surface. The stoichiometric functionalization of nanoparticles with the SBD peptide, essential for single molecule tracking, is achieved by means of non-affinity nanoparticle purification. The SBD-nanoparticles have remarkable long-term resistance to electrolyte-induced aggregation and ligand-exchange and have no detectable non-specific binding to live cells. Binding and diffusion of SBD-nanoparticles bound to the membrane of live cells is measured by real-time photothermal microscopy and shows the dynamics of sphingolipid-enriched microdomains on cells membrane, with evidence for clustering, splitting, and diffusion over time of the SBD-nanoparticle labeled membrane domains. The monofunctionalized SBD-nanoparticle is a promising targeting agent for the tracking of lipid rafts independently of their protein composition and the labelling requires no prior modification of the cells. This approach has potential for further functionalization of the particles to manipulate the organization of, or targeting to microdomains that control signaling events and thereby lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

  1. Signatures of RNA binding proteins globally coupled to effective microRNA target sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Anders; Wen, Jiayu; Marks, Debora S

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), bound to Argonaute proteins (RISC), destabilize mRNAs through base-pairing with the mRNA. However, the gene expression changes after perturbations of these small RNAs are only partially explained by predicted miRNA/siRNA targeting. Targeting...

  2. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria.

  3. In Vitro bile acid binding of kale, mustard greens, broccoli, cabbage and green bell pepper improves with microwave cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bile acid binding potential of foods and food fractions has been related to lowering the risk of heart disease and that of cancer. Sautéing or steam cooking has been observed to significantly improve bile acid binding of green/leafy vegetables. It was hypothesized that microwave cooking could impr...

  4. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes ( = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields.

  5. High-stringency screening of target-binding partners using a microfluidic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soh, Hyongsok; Lou, Xinhui; Lagally, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The invention provides a method of screening a library of candidate agents by contacting the library with a target in a reaction mixture under a condition of high stringency, wherein the target includes a tag that responds to a controllable force applied to the tag, and passing the members of the library through a microfluidic device in a manner that exposes the library members to the controllable force, thereby displacing members of the library that are bound to the target relative to their unbound counterparts. Kits and systems for use with the methods of the invention are also provided.

  6. Conjugation of benzylvanillin and benzimidazole structure improves DNA binding with enhanced antileukemic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mudaris, Zena A; Majid, Aman S A; Ji, Dan; Al-Mudarris, Ban A; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang; Osman, Hasnah; Jamal Din, Shah Kamal Khan; Abdul Majid, Amin M S

    2013-01-01

    Benzyl-o-vanillin and benzimidazole nucleus serve as important pharmacophore in drug discovery. The benzyl vanillin (2-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) compound shows anti-proliferative activity in HL60 leukemia cancer cells and can effect cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Its apoptosis activity was due to disruption of mitochondrial functioning. In this study, we have studied a series of compounds consisting of benzyl vanillin and benzimidazole structures. We hypothesize that by fusing these two structures we can produce compounds that have better anticancer activity with improved specificity particularly towards the leukemia cell line. Here we explored the anticancer activity of three compounds namely 2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 2MP, N-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1H-benzimidazole, 2XP, and (R) and (S)-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl benzenesulfonate, 3BS and compared their activity to 2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, (Bn1), the parent compound. 2XP and 3BS induces cell death of U937 leukemic cell line through DNA fragmentation that lead to the intrinsic caspase 9 activation. DNA binding study primarily by the equilibrium binding titration assay followed by the Viscosity study reveal the DNA binding through groove region with intrinsic binding constant 7.39 µM/bp and 6.86 µM/bp for 3BS and 2XP respectively. 2XP and 3BS showed strong DNA binding activity by the UV titration method with the computational drug modeling showed that both 2XP and 3BS failed to form any electrostatic linkages except via hydrophobic interaction through the minor groove region of the nucleic acid. The benzylvanillin alone (Bn1) has weak anticancer activity even after it was combined with the benzimidazole (2MP), but after addition of another benzylvanillin structure (2XP), stronger activity was observed. Also, the combination of benzylvanillin with benzenesulfonate (3BS) significantly improved the

  7. Conjugation of benzylvanillin and benzimidazole structure improves DNA binding with enhanced antileukemic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zena A Al-Mudaris

    Full Text Available Benzyl-o-vanillin and benzimidazole nucleus serve as important pharmacophore in drug discovery. The benzyl vanillin (2-(benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde compound shows anti-proliferative activity in HL60 leukemia cancer cells and can effect cell cycle progression at G2/M phase. Its apoptosis activity was due to disruption of mitochondrial functioning. In this study, we have studied a series of compounds consisting of benzyl vanillin and benzimidazole structures. We hypothesize that by fusing these two structures we can produce compounds that have better anticancer activity with improved specificity particularly towards the leukemia cell line. Here we explored the anticancer activity of three compounds namely 2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazole, 2MP, N-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzyl-2-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-1H-benzimidazole, 2XP, and (R and (S-1-(2-benzyloxy-3-methoxyphenyl-2, 2, 2-trichloroethyl benzenesulfonate, 3BS and compared their activity to 2-benzyloxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, (Bn1, the parent compound. 2XP and 3BS induces cell death of U937 leukemic cell line through DNA fragmentation that lead to the intrinsic caspase 9 activation. DNA binding study primarily by the equilibrium binding titration assay followed by the Viscosity study reveal the DNA binding through groove region with intrinsic binding constant 7.39 µM/bp and 6.86 µM/bp for 3BS and 2XP respectively. 2XP and 3BS showed strong DNA binding activity by the UV titration method with the computational drug modeling showed that both 2XP and 3BS failed to form any electrostatic linkages except via hydrophobic interaction through the minor groove region of the nucleic acid. The benzylvanillin alone (Bn1 has weak anticancer activity even after it was combined with the benzimidazole (2MP, but after addition of another benzylvanillin structure (2XP, stronger activity was observed. Also, the combination of benzylvanillin with benzenesulfonate (3BS significantly improved

  8. Targeting Treatments to Improve Cognitive Function in Mood Disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Rush, A. John; Gerds, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    randomized placebo-controlled trials that 8 weeks of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment has beneficial effects on verbal memory across unipolar and bipolar disorder, with 58% of EPO-treated patients displaying a clinically relevant memory improvement as compared to 15% of those treated with placebo. METHODS: We...... ≥ .06). CONCLUSIONS: Baseline objectively assessed memory impairments and-to a lesser degree-subjective cognitive complaints increased the chances of treatment efficacy on cognition in unipolar and bipolar disorder. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00916552.......OBJECTIVE: There is no established efficacious treatment for cognitive dysfunction in unipolar and bipolar disorder. This may be partially due to lack of consensus regarding the need to screen for cognitive impairment in cognition trials or which screening criteria to use. We have demonstrated in 2...

  9. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP, a novel XTcf-3 specific target gene regulates neural development in Xenopus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wedlich Doris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As nuclear mediators of wnt/β-catenin signaling, Lef/Tcf transcription factors play important roles in development and disease. Although it is well established, that the four vertebrate Lef/Tcfs have unique functional properties, most studies unite Lef-1, Tcf-1, Tcf-3 and Tcf-4 and reduce their function to uniformly transduce wnt/β-catenin signaling for activating wnt target genes. In order to discriminate target genes regulated by XTcf-3 from those regulated by XTcf-4 or Lef/Tcfs in general, we performed a subtractive screen, using neuralized Xenopus animal cap explants. Results We identified cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP as novel XTcf-3 specific target gene. Furthermore, we show that knockdown of XTcf-3 by injection of an antisense morpholino oligonucleotide results in a general broadening of the anterior neural tissue. Depletion of XCIRP by antisense morpholino oligonucleotide injection leads to a reduced stability of mRNA and an enlargement of the anterior neural plate similar to the depletion of XTcf-3. Conclusion Distinct steps in neural development are differentially regulated by individual Lef/Tcfs. For proper development of the anterior brain XTcf-3 and the Tcf-subtype specific target XCIRP appear indispensable. Thus, regulation of anterior neural development, at least in part, depends on mRNA stabilization by the novel XTcf-3 target gene XCIRP.

  10. Selective inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 by targeting a substrate-specific secondary binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn-Wache, Kerstin; Bär, Joachim W; Hoffmann, Torsten; Wolf, Raik; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase 4/CD26 (DP4) is a multifunctional serine protease liberating dipeptide from the N-terminus of (oligo)peptides which can modulate the activity of these peptides. The enzyme is involved in physiological processes such as blood glucose homeostasis and immune response. DP4 substrate specificity is characterized in detail using synthetic dipeptide derivatives. The specificity constant k(cat)/K(m) strongly depends on the amino acid in P₁-position for proline, alanine, glycine and serine with 5.0 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.8 x 10⁴ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 3.6 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 1.1 x 10² M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. By contrast, kinetic investigation of larger peptide substrates yields a different pattern. The specific activity of DP4 for neuropeptide Y (NPY) cleavage comprising a proline in P₁-position is the same range as the k(cat)/K(m) values of NPY derivatives containing alanine or serine in P₁-position with 4 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, 9.5 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹ and 2.1 x 10⁵ M⁻¹ s⁻¹, respectively. The proposed existence of an additional binding region outside the catalytic center is supported by measurements of peptide substrates with extended chain length. This 'secondary' binding site interaction depends on the amino acid sequence in P₄'-P₈'-position. Interactions with this binding site could be specifically blocked for substrates of the GRF/glucagon peptide family. By contrast, substrates not belonging to this peptide family and dipeptide derivative substrates that only bind to the catalytic center of DP4 were not inhibited. This more selective inhibition approach allows, for the first time, to distinguish between substrate families by substrate-discriminating inhibitors.

  11. Learning representations for improved target identification, scene classification, and information fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flenner, Arjuna; Culp, Michael; McGee, Ryan; Flenner, Jennifer; Garcia-Cardona, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Object representation is fundamental to Automated Target Recognition (ATR). Many ATR approaches choose a basis, such as a wavelet or Fourier basis, to represent the target. Recently, advancements in Image and Signal processing have shown that object recognition can be improved if, rather than a assuming a basis, a database of training examples is used to learn a representation. We discuss learning representations using Non-parametric Bayesian topic models, and demonstrate how to integrate information from other sources to improve ATR. We apply the method to EO and IR information integration for vehicle target identification and show that the learned representation of the joint EO and IR information improves target identification by 4%. Furthermore, we demonstrate that we can integrate text and imagery data to direct the representation for mission specific tasks and improve performance by 8%. Finally, we illustrate integrating graphical models into representation learning to improve performance by 2%.

  12. Swarm Robots Search for Multiple Targets Based on an Improved Grouping Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qirong; Ding, Lu; Yu, Fangchao; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Yinghao; Tu, Haibo

    2017-03-14

    Swarm robots search for multiple targets in collaboration in unknown environments has been addressed in this paper. An improved grouping strategy based on constriction factors Particle Swarm Optimization is proposed. Robots are grouped under this strategy after several iterations of stochastic movements, which considers the influence range of targets and environmental information they have sensed. The group structure may change dynamically and each group focuses on searching one target. All targets are supposed to be found finally. Obstacle avoidance is considered during the search process. Simulation compared with previous method demonstrates the adaptability, accuracy and efficiency of the proposed strategy in multiple targets searching.

  13. Targeting oocyte maturation to improve fertility in older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X Johné

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive aging is an increasingly pressing problem facing women in modern society, due to delay in child bearing. According to Statistics Canada, 52% of all Canadian births in 2011 were by women aged 30 years and older, up from 24% in 1981 ( http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-209-x/2013001/article/11784-eng.htm ). Women older than 35 years of age experience significantly increased risks of infertility, miscarriage and congenital birth defects, mostly due to poor quality of the eggs. Increasingly sophisticated, and often invasive, assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) have helped millions of women to achieve reproductive success. However, by and large, ARTs do not address the fundamental issue of reproductive aging in women: age-related decline in egg quality. More importantly, ARTs are not, and will never be, the main solution for the general population. Here, I attempt to review the scientific literature on age-related egg quality decline, based mostly on studies in mice and in humans. Emphasis is given to the brief period of time called oocyte maturation, which occurs just prior to ovulation. The rationale for this emphasis is that oocyte maturation represents a critical window where unfavorable ovarian conditions in older females contribute significantly to the decline of egg quality, and that science-based intervention during oocyte maturation represents the best chance of improving egg quality in older women. Finally, I summarize our own work in recent years on peri-ovulatory putrescine supplementation as a possible remedy for reproductive aging.

  14. An improved cortex-like neuromorphic system for target recognitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitiridis, Aristeidis; Yuen, Peter; Hong, Kan; Chen, Tong; Ibrahim, Izzati; Jackman, James; James, David; Richardson, Mark

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports on the enhancement of biologically-inspired machine vision through a rotation invariance mechanism. Research over the years has suggested that rotation invariance is one of the fundamental generic elements of object constancy, a known generic visual ability of the human brain. Cortex-like vision unlike conventional pixel based machine vision is achieved by mimicking neuromorphic mechanisms of the primates' brain. In this preliminary study, rotation invariance is implemented through histograms from Gabor features of an object. The performance of rotation invariance in the neuromorphic algorithm is assessed by the classification accuracies of a test data set which consists of image objects in five different orientations. It is found that a much more consistent classification result over these five different oriented data sets has been achieved by the integrated rotation invariance neuromorphic algorithm compared to the one without. In addition, the issue of varying aspect ratios of input images to these models is also addressed, in an attempt to create a robust algorithm against a wider variability of input data. The extension of the present achievement is to improve the recognition accuracies while incorporating it to a series of different real-world scenarios which would challenge the approach accordingly.

  15. Alpha-bungarotoxin binding to target cell in a developing visual system by carboxylated nanodiamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Chen, Mei-Fang; Chen, Po-Yi; Lee, Tony J F; Cheng, Chia-Liang; Chang, Chia-Ching; Ho, Yen-Peng; Chao, Jui-I

    2008-05-21

    Biological molecules conjugating with nanoparticles are valuable for applications including bio-imaging, bio-detection, and bio-sensing. Nanometer-sized diamond particles have excellent electronic and chemical properties for bio-conjugation. In this study, we manipulated the carboxyl group produced on the surface of nanodiamond (carboxylated nanodiamond, cND) for conjugating with alpha-bungarotoxin (α-BTX), a neurotoxin derived from Bungarus multicinctus with specific blockade of alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR). The electrostatic binding of cND-α-BTX was mediated by the negative charge of the cND and the positive charge of the α-BTX in physiological pH conditions. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI/TOF-MS) spectra displayed that α-BTX proteins were conjugated with cND particles via non-covalent bindings. The green fluorescence of the cND particles combining with the red fluorescence of tetramethylrhodamine-labeled α-BTX presented a yellow color at the same location, which indicated that α-BTX proteins were conjugated with cND particles. Xenopus laevis's oocytes expressed the human α7-nAChR proteins by microinjection with α7-nAChR mRNA. The cND-α-BTX complexes were bound to α7-nAChR locating on the cell membrane of oocytes and human lung A549 cancer cells analyzed by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The choline-evoked α7-nAChR-mediated inward currents of the oocytes were blocked by cND-α-BTX complexes in a concentration-dependent manner using two-electrode voltage-clamp recording. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensity of cND-α-BTX binding on A549 cells could be quantified by flow cytometry. These results indicate that cND-conjugated α-BTX still preserves its biological activity in blocking the function of α7-nAChR, and provide a visual system showing the binding of α-BTX to α7-nAChR.

  16. New Anti-Nodal Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting the Nodal Pre-Helix Loop Involved in Cripto-1 Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalia Focà

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nodal is a potent embryonic morphogen belonging to the TGF-β superfamily. Typically, it also binds to the ALK4/ActRIIB receptor complex in the presence of the co-receptor Cripto-1. Nodal expression is physiologically restricted to embryonic tissues and human embryonic stem cells, is absent in normal cells but re-emerges in several human cancers, including melanoma, breast, and colon cancer. Our aim was to obtain mAbs able to recognize Nodal on a major CBR (Cripto-Binding-Region site and to block the Cripto-1-mediated signalling. To achieve this, antibodies were raised against hNodal(44–67 and mAbs generated by the hybridoma technology. We have selected one mAb, named 3D1, which strongly associates with full-length rhNodal (KD 1.4 nM and recognizes the endogenous protein in a panel of human melanoma cell lines by western blot and FACS analyses. 3D1 inhibits the Nodal-Cripto-1 binding and blocks Smad2/3 phosphorylation. Data suggest that inhibition of the Nodal-Cripto-1 axis is a valid therapeutic approach against melanoma and 3D1 is a promising and interesting agent for blocking Nodal-Cripto mediated tumor development. These findings increase the interest for Nodal as both a diagnostic and prognostic marker and as a potential new target for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Binding of human myeloperoxidase to red blood cells: Molecular targets and biophysical consequences at the plasma membrane level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorudko, Irina V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Mironova, Elena V; Kudryavtsev, Igor V; Gusev, Sergey A; Gusev, Alexander A; Chekanov, Andrey V; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Panasenko, Oleg M; Timoshenko, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an oxidant-producing enzyme that can also bind to cellular surface proteins. We found that band 3 protein and glycophorins A and B were the key MPO-binding targets of human red blood cells (RBCs). The interaction of MPO with RBC proteins was mostly electrostatic in nature because it was inhibited by desialation, exogenic sialic acid, high ionic strength, and extreme pH. In addition, MPO failed to interfere with the lectin-induced agglutination of RBCs, suggesting a minor role of glycan-recognizing mechanisms in MPO binding. Multiple biophysical properties of RBCs were altered in the presence of native (i.e., not hypochlorous acid-damaged) MPO. These changes included transmembrane potential, availability of intracellular Ca(2+), and lipid organization in the plasma membrane. MPO-treated erythrocytes became larger in size, structurally more rigid, and hypersensitive to acidic and osmotic hemolysis. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the plasma MPO concentration and RBC rigidity index in type-2 diabetes patients with coronary heart disease. These findings suggest that MPO functions as a mediator of novel regulatory mechanism in microcirculation, indicating the influence of MPO-induced abnormalities on RBC deformability under pathological stress conditions.

  18. Liver fatty acid binding protein is the mitosis-associated polypeptide target of a carcinogen in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassuk, J.A.; Tsichlis, P.N.; Sorof, S.

    1987-11-01

    Hepatocytes in normal rat liver were found previously to contain a cytoplasmic 14,000-dalton polypeptide (p14) that is associated with mitosis and is the principal early covalent target of activated metabolites of the carcinogen N-2-fluorenylacetamide (2-acetylaminofluorene). The level of immunohistochemically detected p14 was low when growth activity of hepatocytes was low, was markedly elevated during mitosis in normal and regenerating livers, but was very high throughout interphase during proliferation of hyperplastic and malignant hepatocytes induced in rat liver by a carcinogen (N-2-fluorenylacetamide or 3'-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene). The authors report here that p14 is the liver fatty acid binding protein. The nucleotide sequence of p14 cDNA clones, isolated by screening a rat liver cDNA library in bacteriophage lambdagt11 using p14 antiserum, was completely identical to part of the sequence reported for liver fatty acid binding protein. Furthermore, the two proteins shared the following properties: size of mRNA, amino acid composition, molecular size according to NaDodSO/sub 4/ gel electrophoresis, and electrophoretic mobilities in a Triton X-100/acetic acid/urea gel. The two polypeptides bound oleic acid similarly. Finally, identical elevations of cytoplasmic immunostain were detected specifically in mitotic hepatocytes with either antiserum. The collected findings are suggestive that liver fatty acid binding protein may carry ligands that promote hepatocyte division and may transport certain activated chemical carcinogens.

  19. GHB receptor targets in the CNS: Focus on high-affinity binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Tina; Eghorn, Laura Friis; Klein, Anders Bue;

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is an endogenous compound in the mammalian brain with both low- and high-affinity receptor targets. GHB is used clinically in the treatment of symptoms of narcolepsy and alcoholism, but also illicitly abused as the recreational drug Fantasy. Major pharmacological effects...

  20. Targeting Nuclear FGF Receptor to Improve Chemotherapy Response in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0404 TITLE: Targeting Nuclear FGF Receptor to Improve Chemotherapy Response in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Nuclear FGF Receptor to Improve Chemotherapy response 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Response in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer...patients post-chemotherapy treatment, validating our in vitro model. We determined that FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1) protein, but not FGF receptor 3 (FGFR3

  1. Research on video target tracking technology based on improved SIFT algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Zhemin; Guo, Zhijie; Yuang, Ye

    2017-01-01

    A novel target tracking algorithm based on improved SIFT (Scale Invariant Feature Transform (SIFT) algorithm is proposed in this paper. In order to improve real-time performance, the processing neighborhood of SIFT has been improved to decrease the complexity of calculation, and the dimension of the SIFT vector is set from 128 to 40. Simulations and experiments show this improved algorithm brings us low computation complexity and high tracking accuracy and robustness.

  2. Genetic fusion of single-chain variable fragments to partial spider silk improves target detection in micro- and nanoarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatikonda, Naresh; Delfani, Payam; Jansson, Ronnie; Petersson, Linn; Lindberg, Diana; Wingren, Christer; Hedhammar, My

    2016-03-01

    Immobilizing biomolecules with retained functionality and stability on solid supports is crucial for generation of sensitive immunoassays. However, upon use of conventional immobilization strategies, a major portion of the biomolecules (e.g. antibodies) frequently tends to lose their bioactivity. In this study, we describe a procedure to immobilize human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) via genetic fusion to partial spider silk, which have a high tendency to adhere to solid supports. Two scFvs, directed towards serum proteins, were genetically fused to partial spider silk proteins and expressed as silk fusion proteins in E. coli. Antigen binding ability of scFvs attached to a partial silk protein denoted RC was investigated using microarray analysis, whereas scFvs fused to the NC silk variant were examined using nanoarrays. Results from micro- and nanoarrays confirmed the functionality of scFvs attached to both RC and NC silk, and also for binding of targets in crude serum. Furthermore, the same amount of added scFv gives higher signal intensity when immobilized via partial spider silk compared to when immobilized alone. Together, the results suggest that usage of scFv-silk fusion proteins in immunoassays could improve target detection, in the long run enabling novel biomarkers to be detected in crude serum proteomes.

  3. Improved Low Power FPGA Binding of Datapaths from Data Flow Graphs with NSGA II -based Schedule Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BHUVANESWARI, M. C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs are increasingly being used to implement data path intensive algorithms for signal processing and image processing applications. In High Level Synthesis of Data Flow Graphs targeted at FPGAs, the effect of interconnect resources such as multiplexers must be considered since they contribute significantly to the area and switching power. We propose a binding framework for behavioral synthesis of Data Flow Graphs (DFGs onto FPGA targets with power reduction as the main criterion. The technique uses a multi-objective GA, NSGA II for design space exploration to identify schedules that have the potential to yield low-power bindings from a population of non-dominated solutions. A greedy constructive binding technique reported in the literature is adapted for interconnect minimization. The binding is further subjected to a perturbation process by altering the register and multiplexer assignments. Results obtained on standard DFG benchmarks indicate that our technique yields better power aware bindings than the constructive binding approach with little or no area overhead.

  4. Probing binding and cellular activity of pyrrolidinone and piperidinone small molecules targeting the urokinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Timmy; Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Li, Liwei; Knabe, William Eric; Wang, Fang; Oh, Kyungsoo; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-12-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a cell-surface protein that is part of an intricate web of transient and tight protein interactions that promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Here, we evaluate the binding and biological activity of a new class of pyrrolidinone and piperidinone compounds, along with derivatives of previously-identified pyrazole and propylamine compounds. Competition assays revealed that the compounds displace a fluorescently labeled peptide (AE147-FAM) with inhibition constant (Ki ) values ranging from 6 to 63 μM. Structure-based computational pharmacophore analysis followed by extensive explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy calculations suggested the pyrazole-based and piperidinone-based compounds adopt different binding modes, despite their similar two-dimensional structures. In cells, pyrazole-based compounds showed significant inhibition of breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell proliferation, but piperidinone-containing compounds exhibited no cytotoxicity even at concentrations of 100 μM. One pyrazole-based compound impaired MDA-MB-231 invasion, adhesion, and migration in a concentration-dependent manner, while the piperidinone inhibited only invasion. The pyrazole derivative inhibited matrix metalloprotease-9 (gelatinase) activity in a concentration-dependent manner, while the piperidinone showed no effect suggesting different mechanisms for inhibition of cell invasion. Signaling studies further highlighted these differences, showing that pyrazole compounds completely inhibited ERK phosphorylation and impaired HIF1α and NF-κB signaling, while pyrrolidinones and piperidinones had no effect. Annexin V staining suggested that the effect of the pyrazole-based compound on proliferation was due to cell killing through an apoptotic mechanism. The compounds identified represent valuable leads in the design of further derivatives with higher affinities and

  5. Alkynol natural products target ALDH2 in cancer cells by irreversible binding to the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydenreuter, Wolfgang; Kunold, Elena; Sieber, Stephan A

    2015-11-11

    Falcarinol and stipudiol are natural products with potent anti-cancer activity found in several vegetables. Here, we use a chemical proteomic strategy to identify ALDH2 as a molecular target of falcarinol in cancer cells and confirm enzyme inhibition via covalent alkylation of the active site. Furthermore, the synthesis of stipudiol led to the observation that ALDH2 exhibits preference for alkynol-based binders. Inhibition of ALDH2 impairs detoxification of reactive aldehydes and limits oxidative stress response, two crucial pathways for cellular viability.

  6. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaeva, Tamara A.; Nicol, Clare; Cesur, Özlem [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Travé, Gilles [UMR 7242 CNRS-Université de Strasbourg, Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie, Boulevard Sébastien Brant, Illkirch 67412 (France); Blair, George Eric; Stonehouse, Nicola J., E-mail: n.j.stonehouse@leeds.ac.uk [School of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Faculty of Biological Sciences and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-24

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4) which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  7. An RNA Aptamer Targets the PDZ-Binding Motif of the HPV16 E6 Oncoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara A. Belyaeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16 is a high-risk DNA tumour virus which is the primary causative agent of cervical cancer. Cell transformation arises from deregulated expression of the E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 has been shown to bind a number of cellular proteins, including p53 and proteins containing a PDZ domain. This study reports the first RNA aptamers to E6. These have been employed as molecular tools to further investigate E6-p53 and E6-PDZ interactions. This study is focussed on two aptamers (termed F2 and F4 which induced apoptosis in cells derived from an HPV16-transformed cervical carcinoma. The molecules were able to inhibit the interaction between E6 and PDZ1 from Magi1, with F2 being the most effective inhibitor. Neither of the aptamers inhibited E6-p53 interaction or p53 degradation. This study shows the specificity of this approach and highlights the potential benefits of the E6 aptamers as potential therapeutic or diagnostic agents in the future.

  8. Calcium binding-mediated sustained release of minocycline from hydrophilic multilayer coatings targeting infection and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Zhang

    Full Text Available Infection and inflammation are common complications that seriously affect the functionality and longevity of implanted medical implants. Systemic administration of antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs often cannot achieve sufficient local concentration to be effective, and elicits serious side effects. Local delivery of therapeutics from drug-eluting coatings presents a promising solution. However, hydrophobic and thick coatings are commonly used to ensure sufficient drug loading and sustained release, which may limit tissue integration and tissue device communications. A calcium-mediated drug delivery mechanism was developed and characterized in this study. This novel mechanism allows controlled, sustained release of minocycline, an effective antibiotic and anti-inflammatory drug, from nanoscale thin hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers for over 35 days at physiologically relevant concentrations. pH-responsive minocycline release was observed as the chelation between minocycline and Ca(2+ is less stable at acidic pH, enabling 'smart' drug delivery in response to infection and/or inflammation-induced tissue acidosis. The release kinetics of minocycline can be controlled by varying initial loading, Ca(2+ concentration, and Ca(2+ incorporation into different layers, enabling facile development of implant coatings with versatile release kinetics. This drug delivery platform can potentially be used for releasing any drug that has high Ca(2+ binding affinity, enabling its use in a variety of biomedical applications.

  9. Nuclear TAR DNA-binding protein 43 A new target for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Zheng; Yujie Shi; Dongsheng Fan

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) inclusion bodies can be detected in the degener-ative neurons of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, we induced chronic oxidative stress in-jury by applying malonate to cultured mouse cortical motor neurons. In the later stages of the ma-lonate insult, TDP-43 expression reduced in the nuclei and transferred to the cytoplasm. This was accompanied by neuronal death, mimicking the pathological changes in TDP-43 that are seen in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interestingly, in the early stages of the response to ma-lonate treatment, nuclear TDP-43 expression increased, and neurons remained relatively intact, without inclusion bodies or fragmentation. Therefore, we hypothesized that the increase of nuclear TDP-43 expression might be a pro-survival factor against oxidative stress injury. This hypothesis was confirmed by an in vitro transgenic experiment, in which overexpression of wild type mouse TDP-43 in cultured cortical motor neurons significantly reduced malonate-induced neuronal death. Our findings suggest that the loss of function of TDP-43 is an important cause of neuronal dege-neration, and upregulation of nuclear TDP-43 expression might be neuroprotective in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

  10. Unexpected binding orientation of bulky-B-ring anti-androgens and implications for future drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Charles B; Jones, Amanda; Bohl, Casey E; Dalton, James T; Miller, Duane D

    2011-06-01

    Several new androgen receptor antagonists were synthesized and found to have varying activities across typically anti-androgen resistant mutants (Thr877 → Ala and Trp741 → Leu) and markedly improved potency over previously reported pan-antagonists. X-ray crystallography of a new anti-androgen in an androgen receptor mutant (Thr877 → Ala) shows that the receptor can accommodate the added bulk presented by phenyl to naphthyl substitution, casting doubt on previous reports of predicted binding orientation and the causes of antagonism in bulky-B-ring antagonists.

  11. Tracking Multiple Video Targets with an Improved GM-PHD Tracker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracking multiple moving targets from a video plays an important role in many vision-based robotic applications. In this paper, we propose an improved Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD tracker with weight penalization to effectively and accurately track multiple moving targets from a video. First, an entropy-based birth intensity estimation method is incorporated to eliminate the false positives caused by noisy video data. Then, a weight-penalized method with multi-feature fusion is proposed to accurately track the targets in close movement. For targets without occlusion, a weight matrix that contains all updated weights between the predicted target states and the measurements is constructed, and a simple, but effective method based on total weight and predicted target state is proposed to search the ambiguous weights in the weight matrix. The ambiguous weights are then penalized according to the fused target features that include spatial-colour appearance, histogram of oriented gradient and target area and further re-normalized to form a new weight matrix. With this new weight matrix, the tracker can correctly track the targets in close movement without occlusion. For targets with occlusion, a robust game-theoretical method is used. Finally, the experiments conducted on various video scenarios validate the effectiveness of the proposed penalization method and show the superior performance of our tracker over the state of the art.

  12. Tracking Multiple Video Targets with an Improved GM-PHD Tracker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Yu, Hui; Liu, Honghai; Li, Youfu

    2015-12-03

    Tracking multiple moving targets from a video plays an important role in many vision-based robotic applications. In this paper, we propose an improved Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) tracker with weight penalization to effectively and accurately track multiple moving targets from a video. First, an entropy-based birth intensity estimation method is incorporated to eliminate the false positives caused by noisy video data. Then, a weight-penalized method with multi-feature fusion is proposed to accurately track the targets in close movement. For targets without occlusion, a weight matrix that contains all updated weights between the predicted target states and the measurements is constructed, and a simple, but effective method based on total weight and predicted target state is proposed to search the ambiguous weights in the weight matrix. The ambiguous weights are then penalized according to the fused target features that include spatial-colour appearance, histogram of oriented gradient and target area and further re-normalized to form a new weight matrix. With this new weight matrix, the tracker can correctly track the targets in close movement without occlusion. For targets with occlusion, a robust game-theoretical method is used. Finally, the experiments conducted on various video scenarios validate the effectiveness of the proposed penalization method and show the superior performance of our tracker over the state of the art.

  13. Non-target adjacent stimuli classification improves performance of classical ERP-based brain computer interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceballos, G. A.; Hernández, L. F.

    2015-04-01

    Objective. The classical ERP-based speller, or P300 Speller, is one of the most commonly used paradigms in the field of Brain Computer Interfaces (BCI). Several alterations to the visual stimuli presentation system have been developed to avoid unfavorable effects elicited by adjacent stimuli. However, there has been little, if any, regard to useful information contained in responses to adjacent stimuli about spatial location of target symbols. This paper aims to demonstrate that combining the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli with standard classification (target versus non-target) significantly improves classical ERP-based speller efficiency. Approach. Four SWLDA classifiers were trained and combined with the standard classifier: the lower row, upper row, right column and left column classifiers. This new feature extraction procedure and the classification method were carried out on three open databases: the UAM P300 database (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Mexico), BCI competition II (dataset IIb) and BCI competition III (dataset II). Main results. The inclusion of the classification of non-target adjacent stimuli improves target classification in the classical row/column paradigm. A gain in mean single trial classification of 9.6% and an overall improvement of 25% in simulated spelling speed was achieved. Significance. We have provided further evidence that the ERPs produced by adjacent stimuli present discriminable features, which could provide additional information about the spatial location of intended symbols. This work promotes the searching of information on the peripheral stimulation responses to improve the performance of emerging visual ERP-based spellers.

  14. An improved method for TAL effectors DNA-binding sites prediction reveals functional convergence in TAL repertoires of Xanthomonas oryzae strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro L Pérez-Quintero

    Full Text Available Transcription Activators-Like Effectors (TALEs belong to a family of virulence proteins from the Xanthomonas genus of bacterial plant pathogens that are translocated into the plant cell. In the nucleus, TALEs act as transcription factors inducing the expression of susceptibility genes. A code for TALE-DNA binding specificity and high-resolution three-dimensional structures of TALE-DNA complexes were recently reported. Accurate prediction of TAL Effector Binding Elements (EBEs is essential to elucidate the biological functions of the many sequenced TALEs as well as for robust design of artificial TALE DNA-binding domains in biotechnological applications. In this work a program with improved EBE prediction performances was developed using an updated specificity matrix and a position weight correction function to account for the matching pattern observed in a validation set of TALE-DNA interactions. To gain a systems perspective on the large TALE repertoires from X. oryzae strains, this program was used to predict rice gene targets for 99 sequenced family members. Integrating predictions and available expression data in a TALE-gene network revealed multiple candidate transcriptional targets for many TALEs as well as several possible instances of functional convergence among TALEs.

  15. DNA nanostructure-decorated surfaces for enhanced aptamer-target binding and electrochemical cocaine sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanli; Pei, Hao; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Huang, Qing; Song, Shiping; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-10-01

    The sensitivity of aptamer-based electrochemical sensors is often limited by restricted target accessibility and surface-induced perturbation of the aptamer structure, which arise from imperfect packing of probes on the heterogeneous and locally crowded surface. In this study, we have developed an ultrasensitive and highly selective electrochemical aptamer-based cocaine sensor (EACS), based on a DNA nanotechnology-based sensing platform. We have found that the electrode surface decorated with an aptamer probe-pendant tetrahedral DNA nanostructure greatly facilitates cocaine-induced fusion of the split anticocaine aptamer. This novel design leads to a sensitive cocaine sensor with a remarkably low detection limit of 33 nM. It is also important that the tetrahedra-decorated surface is protein-resistant, which not only suits the enzyme-based signal amplification scheme employed in this work, but ensures high selectivity of this sensor when deployed in sera or other adulterated samples.

  16. An ABA-responsive DRE-binding protein gene from Setaria italica, SiARDP, the target gene of SiAREB, plays a critical role under drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Yue, Jing; Wu, Xiaowei; Xu, Cong; Yu, Jingjuan

    2014-10-01

    The DREB (dehydration-responsive element binding)-type transcription factors regulate the expression of stress-inducible genes by binding the DRE/CRT cis-elements in promoter regions. The upstream transcription factors that regulate the transcription of DREB transcription factors have not been clearly defined, although the function of DREB transcription factors in abiotic stress is known. In this study, an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive DREB-binding protein gene (SiARDP) was cloned from foxtail millet (Setaria italica). The transcript level of SiARDP increased not only after drought, high salt, and low temperature stresses, but also after an ABA treatment in foxtail millet seedlings. Two ABA-responsive elements (ABRE1: ACGTGTC; ABRE2: ACGTGGC) exist in the promoter of SiARDP. Further analyses showed that two ABA-responsive element binding (AREB)-type transcription factors, SiAREB1 and SiAREB2, could physically bind to the ABRE core element in vitro and in vivo. The constitutive expression of SiARDP in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced drought and salt tolerance during seed germination and seedling development, and overexpression of SiARDP in foxtail millet improved drought tolerance. The expression levels of target genes of SiARDP were upregulated in transgenic Arabidopsis and foxtail millet. These results reveal that SiARDP, one of the target genes of SiAREB, is involved in ABA-dependent signal pathways and plays a critical role in the abiotic stress response in plants.

  17. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  18. A cryptic targeting signal creates a mitochondrial FEN1 isoform with tailed R-Loop binding properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Kazak

    Full Text Available A growing number of DNA transacting proteins is found in the nucleus and in mitochondria, including the DNA repair and replication protein Flap endonuclease 1, FEN1. Here we show a truncated FEN1 isoform is generated by alternative translation initiation, exposing a mitochondrial targeting signal. The shortened form of FEN1, which we term FENMIT, localizes to mitochondria, based on import into isolated organelles, immunocytochemistry and subcellular fractionation. In vitro FENMIT binds to flap structures containing a 5' RNA flap, and prefers such substrates to single-stranded RNA. FENMIT can also bind to R-loops, and to a lesser extent to D-loops. Exposing human cells to ethidium bromide results in the generation of RNA/DNA hybrids near the origin of mitochondrial DNA replication. FENMIT is recruited to the DNA under these conditions, and is released by RNase treatment. Moreover, high levels of recombinant FENMIT expression inhibit mtDNA replication, following ethidium bromide treatment. These findings suggest FENMIT interacts with RNA/DNA hybrids in mitochondrial DNA, such as those found at the origin of replication.

  19. The rotaviral NSP3 protein stimulates translation of polyadenylated target mRNAs independently of its RNA-binding domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keryer-Bibens, Cecile, E-mail: cecile.keryer-bibens@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Legagneux, Vincent; Namanda-Vanderbeken, Allen [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Cosson, Bertrand [UPMC Universite de Paris 06, UMR 7150, Equipe Traduction Cycle Cellulaire et Developpement, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29682 Roscoff (France); CNRS, UMR 7150, Station Biologique de Roscoff, 29682 Roscoff (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Paillard, Luc [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France); Poncet, Didier [Virologie Moleculaire et Structurale, UMR CNRS, 2472, INRA, 1157, 91198 Gif sur Yvette (France); Osborne, H. Beverley, E-mail: beverley.osborne@univ-rennes1.fr [Universite de Rennes 1, IFR 140, Institut de Genetique et Developpement de Rennes, 35000 Rennes (France); CNRS, UMR 6061, equipe Expression Genetique et Developpement, 35000 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, 35000 Rennes (France)

    2009-12-11

    The non-structural protein 3 (NSP3) of rotaviruses is an RNA-binding protein that specifically recognises a 4 nucleotide sequence at the 3' extremity of the non-polyadenylated viral mRNAs. NSP3 also has a high affinity for eIF4G. These two functions are clearly delimited in separate domains the structures of which have been determined. They are joined by a central domain implicated in the dimerisation of the full length protein. The bridging function of NSP3 between the 3' end of the viral mRNA and eIF4G has been proposed to enhance the synthesis of viral proteins. However, this role has been questioned as knock-down of NSP3 did not impair viral protein synthesis. We show here using a MS2/MS2-CP tethering assay that a C-terminal fragment of NSP3 containing the eIF4G binding domain and the dimerisation domain can increase the expression of a protein encoded by a target reporter mRNA in HEK 293 cells. The amount of reporter mRNA in the cells is not significantly affected by the presence of the NSP3 derived fusion protein showing that the enhanced protein expression is due to increased translation. These results show that NSP3 can act as a translational enhancer even on a polyadenylated mRNA that should be a substrate for PABP1.

  20. The Use ofa Hydrophobic Binding Peptide Modified Lipid Nanocarrier Improving Tumor Distribution and Antitumor Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Yang, Xiucong; Lin, Zhiqiang; Gao, Shanyun; He, Bing; Mei, Bong; Wang, Dan; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Hua; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In addition to showing the specific interaction between a generalized ligand and its receptor and the electrostatic effect between positive cell-penetrating peptides and negative cell membranes, our last study demonstrated the hydrophobic interactivity between a hydrophobic binding peptide (HBP) and biomembranes to be favorable in drug delivery. To yield more evidence for this new strategy and to find more effective HBPs, here we designed and established a novel nanomedicine associated with cyclosporin A (CsA) because this peptide is electrically neutral, highly hydrophobic, very stable in vivo and safe at the given dose. First, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies showed a strong hydrophobic interaction between the CsA molecules and the lipid membrane. The lactate dehydrogenase release assay proved that CsA exhibited low toxicity to cell membranes. These facts encouraged us to explore the potential application of CsA as an HBP to actualize intracellular delivery of nanomedicines for tumor therapy. When conjugated to lipid nanocarriers, CsA significantly enhanced their binding with cells and,. consequently, increased the internalization of recoded nanomedicines into cells. The in vivo experiments further showed that the CsA-associated nanocarriers could achieve better delivery to tumor tissues and improve the tumor therapy of doxorubicin (DOX) compared to the nonmodified control; these findings were identical to the observations-in cell studies. In conclusion, CsA, a readily obtainable molecule with favorable characteristics, is indeed a good candidate for an HBP, and this study provides solid, novel evidence for the use of HBP-based nanocarriers as effective antitumor drug delivery systems.

  1. Biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of chondrocyte adhesion to scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Zhou, Jian; Shen, Longxiang; Ruan, Yuhui; Dong, Jian; Guo, Changan; Chen, Zhengrong

    2014-04-01

    The clinical need for improved treatment options for patients with cartilage injuries has motivated tissue-engineering studies aimed at the in vitro generation of cell-based implants with functional properties. The success of tissue-engineered repair of cartilage may depend on the rapid and efficient adhesion of transplanted cells to the scaffold. In the present study, chondrocyte-scaffold constructs were engineered by planting porcine chondrocytes into nonporous chitosan membranes and 3D porous chitosan scaffolds that were treated with or without biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system and avidin-biotin binding system. The spreading area, cell exfoliation rates, cell proliferation rates, histological analysis, DNA and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and mRNA expression were investigated to evaluate the efficiency of biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system for the improvement of cell adhesion to scaffolds in the cartilage tissue. The results showed that the biotin-conjugated anti-CD44 antibody-avidin binding system improved cell adhesion to scaffolds effectively. These studies suggest that this binding system has the potential to provide improved tissue-engineered cartilage for clinical applications.

  2. Identification of the RNA recognition element of the RBPMS family of RNA-binding proteins and their transcriptome-wide mRNA targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farazi, Thalia A; Leonhardt, Carl S; Mukherjee, Neelanjan; Mihailovic, Aleksandra; Li, Song; Max, Klaas E A; Meyer, Cindy; Yamaji, Masashi; Cekan, Pavol; Jacobs, Nicholas C; Gerstberger, Stefanie; Bognanni, Claudia; Larsson, Erik; Ohler, Uwe; Tuschl, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Recent studies implicated the RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (RBPMS) family of proteins in oocyte, retinal ganglion cell, heart, and gastrointestinal smooth muscle development. These RNA-binding proteins contain a single RNA recognition motif (RRM), and their targets and molecular function have not yet been identified. We defined transcriptome-wide RNA targets using photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP) in HEK293 cells, revealing exonic mature and intronic pre-mRNA binding sites, in agreement with the nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of the proteins. Computational and biochemical approaches defined the RNA recognition element (RRE) as a tandem CAC trinucleotide motif separated by a variable spacer region. Similar to other mRNA-binding proteins, RBPMS family of proteins relocalized to cytoplasmic stress granules under oxidative stress conditions suggestive of a support function for mRNA localization in large and/or multinucleated cells where it is preferentially expressed.

  3. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using μPAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer.

  4. S-layer fusion protein as a tool functionalizing emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes for antibody binding and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Küpcü, Seta; Breitwieser, Andreas; Gelbmann, Nicola; Schuster, Bernhard; Sleytr, Uwe B

    2015-04-01

    Selective targeting of tumor cells by nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems is highly desirable because it maximizes the drug concentration at the desired target while simultaneously protecting the surrounding healthy tissues. Here, we show a design for smart nanocarriers based on a biomimetic approach that utilizes the building principle of virus envelope structures. Emulsomes and CurcuEmulsomes comprising a tripalmitin solid core surrounded by phospholipid layers are modified by S-layer proteins that self-assemble into a two-dimensional array to form a surface layer. One significant advantage of this nanoformulation is that it increases the solubility of the lipophilic anti-cancer agent curcumin in the CurcuEmulsomes by a factor of 2700. In order to make the emulsomes specific for IgG, the S-layer protein is fused with two protein G domains. This S-layer fusion protein preserves its recrystallization characteristics, forming an ordered surface layer (square lattice with 13 nm unit-by-unit distance). The GG domains are presented in a predicted orientation and exhibit a selective binding affinity for IgG.

  5. A TOOL FOR STRATEGIC TARGET SETTING ON DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasushi; Katayama, Arata

    A tool for strategic development and improvement of remediation technologies was proposed to set a target specification by applying the RNSOIL, an evaluation index of remediation technologies for contaminated soil. Under the scenario of agricultural site contamination with dieldrin and its remediation, improving items and the target values of the bioremediation using charcoal material (charcoal bioremediation), as a developing technology, were determined. The development target was that the RNSOIL value of charcoal bioremediation fell below that of high temperature thermal desorption as a competing technology. Sensitivity assessments of the RNSOIL selected a remediation period and an incubation volume for bacterial growth and settlement in the charcoal as improving properties. Risk assessment and life cycle inventory analysis was introduced to determine a human health risk due to contaminant, and a total cost of remediation or a CO2 emission accompanied with remediation, as evaluating factors of RNSOIL, respectively. Assessment based on the RNSOIL was able to show clearly improving items for achieving the target or items with great effect for improvement.

  6. C. elegans RNA-binding protein GLD-1 recognizes its multiple targets using sequence, context, and structural information to repress translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doh, Jung H; Jung, Yuchae; Reinke, Valerie; Lee, Min-Ho

    2013-10-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans GLD-1, a maxi-KH motif containing RNA-binding protein, has various functions mainly during female germ cell development, suggesting that it likely controls the expression of a selective group of maternal mRNAs. To gain an insight into how GLD-1 specifically recognizes these mRNA targets, we identified 38 biochemically proven GLD-1 binding regions from multiple mRNA targets that are among over 100 putative targets co-immunoprecipitated with GLD-1. The sequence information of these regions revealed three over-represented and phylogenetically conserved sequence motifs. We found that two of the motifs, one of which is novel, are important for GLD-1 binding in several GLD-1 binding regions but not in other regions. Further analyses indicate that the importance of one of the sequence motifs is dependent on two aspects: (1) surrounding sequence information, likely acting as an accessory feature for GLD-1 to efficiently select the sequence motif and (2) RNA secondary structural environment where the sequence motif resides, which likely provides "binding-site accessibility" for GLD-1 to effectively recognize its targets. Our data suggest some mRNAs recruit GLD-1 by a distinct mechanism, which involves more than one sequence motif that needs to be embedded in the correct context and structural environment.

  7. Exploiting structural and topological information to improve prediction of RNA-protein binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zheng

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-protein interactions are important for a wide range of biological processes. Current computational methods to predict interacting residues in RNA-protein interfaces predominately rely on sequence data. It is, however, known that interface residue propensity is closely correlated with structural properties. In this paper we systematically study information obtained from sequences and structures and compare their contributions in this prediction problem. Particularly, different geometrical and network topological properties of protein structures are evaluated to improve interface residue prediction accuracy. Results We have quantified the impact of structural information on the prediction accuracy in comparison to the purely sequence based approach using two machine learning techniques: Naïve Bayes classifiers and Support Vector Machines. The highest AUC of 0.83 was achieved by a Support Vector Machine, exploiting PSI-BLAST profile, accessible surface area, betweenness-centrality and retention coefficient as input features. Taking into account that our results are based on a larger non-redundant data set, the prediction accuracy is considerably higher than reported in previous, comparable studies. A protein-RNA interface predictor (PRIP and the data set have been made available at http://www.qfab.org/PRIP. Conclusion Graph-theoretic properties of residue contact maps derived from protein structures such as betweenness-centrality can supplement sequence or structure features to improve the prediction accuracy for binding residues in RNA-protein interactions. While Support Vector Machines perform better on this task, Naïve Bayes classifiers also have been found to achieve good prediction accuracies but require much less training time and are an attractive choice for large scale predictions.

  8. Ice-Binding Protein Derived from Glaciozyma Can Improve the Viability of Cryopreserved Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Jun; Shim, Hye Eun; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Kang, Yong-Cheol; Hur, Young Baek

    2015-12-28

    Ice-binding proteins (IBPs) can inhibit ice recrystallization (IR), a major cause of cell death during cryopreservation. IBPs are hypothesized to improve cell viability after cryopreservation by alleviating the cryoinjury caused by IR. In our previous studies, we showed that supplementation of the freezing medium with the recombinant IBP of the Arctic yeast Glaciozyma sp. (designated as LeIBP) could reduce post-thaw hemolysis of human red blood cells and increase the survival of cryopreserved diatoms. Here, we showed that LeIBP could improve the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells. Human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), mouse fibroblasts (NIH/3T3), human preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1), Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1), and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were evaluated. These mammalian cells were frozen in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/fetal bovine serum (FBS) solution with or without 0.1 mg/ml LeIBP at a cooling rate of -1°C/min in a -80°C freezer overnight. The minimum effective concentration (0.1 mg/ml) of LeIBP was determined, based on the viability of HeLa cells after treatment with LeIBP during cryopreservation and the IR inhibition assay results. The post-thaw viability of mammalian cells was examined. In all cases, cell viability was significantly enhanced by more than 10% by LeIBP supplementation in 5% DMSO/5% FBS: viability increased by 20% for HeLa cells, 28% for NIH/3T3 cells, 21% for MC3T3-E1, 10% for CHO-K1, and 20% for HaCaT. Furthermore, addition of LeIBP reduced the concentrations of toxic DMSO and FBS down to 5%. Therefore, we demonstrated that LeIBP can increase the viability of cryopreserved mammalian cells by inhibiting IR.

  9. Evaluation of intestinal phosphate binding to improve the safety profile of oral sodium phosphate bowel cleansing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef Robijn

    Full Text Available Prior to colonoscopy, bowel cleansing is performed for which frequently oral sodium phosphate (OSP is used. OSP results in significant hyperphosphatemia and cases of acute kidney injury (AKI referred to as acute phosphate nephropathy (APN; characterized by nephrocalcinosis are reported after OSP use, which led to a US-FDA warning. To improve the safety profile of OSP, it was evaluated whether the side-effects of OSP could be prevented with intestinal phosphate binders. Hereto a Wistar rat model of APN was developed. OSP administration (2 times 1.2 g phosphate by gavage with a 12h time interval induced bowel cleansing (severe diarrhea and significant hyperphosphatemia (21.79 ± 5.07 mg/dl 6h after the second OSP dose versus 8.44 ± 0.97 mg/dl at baseline. Concomitantly, serum PTH levels increased fivefold and FGF-23 levels showed a threefold increase, while serum calcium levels significantly decreased from 11.29 ± 0.53 mg/dl at baseline to 8.68 ± 0.79 mg/dl after OSP. OSP administration induced weaker NaPi-2a staining along the apical proximal tubular membrane. APN was induced: serum creatinine increased (1.5 times baseline and nephrocalcinosis developed (increased renal calcium and phosphate content and calcium phosphate deposits on Von Kossa stained kidney sections. Intestinal phosphate binding (lanthanum carbonate or aluminum hydroxide was not able to attenuate the OSP induced side-effects. In conclusion, a clinically relevant rat model of APN was developed. Animals showed increased serum phosphate levels similar to those reported in humans and developed APN. No evidence was found for an improved safety profile of OSP by using intestinal phosphate binders.

  10. An integrative computational framework based on a two-step random forest algorithm improves prediction of zinc-binding sites in proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Zheng

    Full Text Available Zinc-binding proteins are the most abundant metalloproteins in the Protein Data Bank where the zinc ions usually have catalytic, regulatory or structural roles critical for the function of the protein. Accurate prediction of zinc-binding sites is not only useful for the inference of protein function but also important for the prediction of 3D structure. Here, we present a new integrative framework that combines multiple sequence and structural properties and graph-theoretic network features, followed by an efficient feature selection to improve prediction of zinc-binding sites. We investigate what information can be retrieved from the sequence, structure and network levels that is relevant to zinc-binding site prediction. We perform a two-step feature selection using random forest to remove redundant features and quantify the relative importance of the retrieved features. Benchmarking on a high-quality structural dataset containing 1,103 protein chains and 484 zinc-binding residues, our method achieved >80% recall at a precision of 75% for the zinc-binding residues Cys, His, Glu and Asp on 5-fold cross-validation tests, which is a 10%-28% higher recall at the 75% equal precision compared to SitePredict and zincfinder at residue level using the same dataset. The independent test also indicates that our method has achieved recall of 0.790 and 0.759 at residue and protein levels, respectively, which is a performance better than the other two methods. Moreover, AUC (the Area Under the Curve and AURPC (the Area Under the Recall-Precision Curve by our method are also respectively better than those of the other two methods. Our method can not only be applied to large-scale identification of zinc-binding sites when structural information of the target is available, but also give valuable insights into important features arising from different levels that collectively characterize the zinc-binding sites. The scripts and datasets are available at http://protein.cau.edu.cn/zincidentifier/.

  11. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Yard, Benito A.; Seelen, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function afte

  12. Improved OAM-Based Radar Targets Detection Using Uniform Concentric Circular Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingtuan Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Without any relative moves or beam scanning, the novel Orbital-Angular-Momentum- (OAM- based radar targets detection technique using uniform concentric circular arrays (UCCAs shows the azimuthal estimation ability, which provides new perspective for radar system design. However, the main estimation method, that is, Fast Fourier Transform (FFT, under this scheme suffers from low resolution. As a solution, this paper rebuilds the OAM-based radar targets detection model and introduces the multiple signal classification (MUSIC algorithm to improve the resolution for detecting targets within the main lobes. The spatial smoothing technique is proposed to tackle the coherent problem brought by the proposed model. Analytical study and simulation demonstrate the superresolution estimation capacity the MUSIC algorithm can achieve for detecting targets within the main lobes. The performance of the MUSIC algorithm to detect targets not illuminated by the main lobes is further evaluated. Despite the fact that MUSIC algorithm loses the resolution advantage under this case, its estimation is more robust than that of the FFT method. Overall, the proposed MUSIC algorithm for the OAM-based radar system demonstrates the superresolution ability for detecting targets within the main lobes and good robustness for targets out of the main lobes.

  13. Target Matching Recognition for Satellite Images Based on the Improved FREAK Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yantong Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite remote sensing image target matching recognition exhibits poor robustness and accuracy because of the unfit feature extractor and large data quantity. To address this problem, we propose a new feature extraction algorithm for fast target matching recognition that comprises an improved feature from accelerated segment test (FAST feature detector and a binary fast retina key point (FREAK feature descriptor. To improve robustness, we extend the FAST feature detector by applying scale space theory and then transform the feature vector acquired by the FREAK descriptor from decimal into binary. We reduce the quantity of data in the computer and improve matching accuracy by using the binary space. Simulation test results show that our algorithm outperforms other relevant methods in terms of robustness and accuracy.

  14. MicroRNA-490 regulates lung cancer metastasis by targeting poly r(C)-binding protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jindong; Feng, Qingchuan; Wei, Xudong; Yu, Yongkui

    2016-11-01

    Lung cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related mortality, with metastatic progression remaining the single largest cause of lung cancer mortality. Hence, it is imperative to determine reliable biomarkers of lung cancer prognosis. MicroRNA-490-3p has been previously reported to be a positive prognostic biomarker for hepatocellular cancer. However, its role in human lung cancer has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that hsa-miR-490-3p expression is significantly higher in human lung cancer tissue specimens and cell line. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of hsa-miR-490-3p showed that it regulates cell proliferation and is required for induction of in vitro migration and invasion-the latter being a hallmark of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. In situ analysis revealed that hsa-miR-490-3p targets poly r(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1), which has been previously shown to be a negative regulator of lung cancer metastasis. Reporter assays confirmed PCBP1 as a bona fide target of miR-490-3p, and metagenomic analysis revealed an inverse relation between expression of miR-490-3p and PCBP1 in metastatic lung cancer patients. In fact, PCBP1 expression, as detected by immunohistochemistry, was undetectable in advanced stages of lung cancer patients' brain and lymph node tissues. Xenograft tail vein colonization assays proved that high expression of miR-490-3p is a prerequisite for metastatic progression of lung cancer. Our results suggest that hsa-miR-490-3p might be a potential biomarker for lung cancer prognosis. In addition, we can also conclude that the lung cancer cells have evolved refractory mechanisms to downregulate the expression of the metastatic inhibitor, PCBP1.

  15. The RNA-binding protein PCBP2 facilitates gastric carcinoma growth by targeting miR-34a

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Cheng-En; Liu, Yong-Chao [Department of General Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Hui-Dong [Department of General Surgery, Shanghai Children’s Medical Center, Shanghai (China); Huang, Guang-Jian, E-mail: huanggjfdu@sina.com [Department of General Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-06-13

    Highlights: • PCBP2 is overexpressed in human gastric cancer. • PCBP2 high expression predicts poor survival. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. • PCBP2 regulates gastric cancer apoptosis by targeting miR-34a. - Abstract: Gastric carcinoma is the fourth most common cancer worldwide, with a high rate of death and low 5-year survival rate. However, the mechanism underling gastric cancer is still not fully understood. Here in the present study, we identify the RNA-binding protein PCBP2 as an oncogenic protein in human gastric carcinoma. Our results show that PCBP2 is up-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues, and that high level of PCBP2 predicts poor overall and disease-free survival. Knockdown of PCBP2 in gastric cancer cells inhibits cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro, whereas opposing results are obtained when PCBP2 is overexpressed. Our in vivo subcutaneous xenograft results also show that PCBP2 can critically regulate gastric cancer cell growth. In addition, we find that PCBP2-depletion induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via up-regulating expression of pro-apoptotic proteins and down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins. Mechanically, we identify that miR-34a as a target of PCBP2, and that miR-34a is critically essential for the function of PCBP2. In summary, PCBP2 promotes gastric carcinoma development by regulating the level of miR-34a.

  16. Sulfur Groups Improve the Performance of Triazole- and Triazolium-Based Interaction Units in Anion Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Pérez, Mónica; Velado, Marina; García-Puentes, Diego; Sáez, Elena; Vicent, Cristina; Fernández de la Pradilla, Roberto; Viso, Alma; de la Torre, María C; Sierra, Miguel A

    2017-03-17

    An NMR comparative study of 1,2,3-triazole and triazolium anion recognition units containing sulfoxide, sulfone, and sulfoximine groups at C4 unveils an enhancement in binding ability up to ≈1 kcal/mol in acetone-d6 correlated with a theoretical increase of H5 acidity. DFT calculations provide insight into binding modes in line with experimental data for these receptors.

  17. Routes to improve binding capacities of affinity resins demonstrated for Protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Egbert; Vajda, Judith

    2016-05-15

    Protein A chromatography is a well-established platform in downstream purification of monoclonal antibodies. Dynamic binding capacities are continuously increasing with almost every newly launched Protein A resin. Nevertheless, binding capacities of affinity chromatography resins cannot compete with binding capacities obtained with modern ion exchange media. Capacities of affinity resins are roughly 50% lower. High binding capacities of ion exchange media are supported by spacer technologies. In this article, we review existing spacer technologies of affinity chromatography resins. A yet known effective approach to increase the dynamic binding capacity of Protein A resins is oligomerization of the particular Protein A motifs. This resembles the tentacle technology used in ion exchange chromatography. Dynamic binding capacities of a hexameric ligand are roughly twice as high compared to capacities obtained with a tetrameric ligand. Further capacity increases up to 130mg/ml can be realized with the hexamer ligand, if the sodium phosphate buffer concentration is increased from 20 to 100mM. Equilibrium isotherms revealed a BET shape for the hexamer ligand at monoclonal antibody liquid phase concentrations higher than 9mg/ml. The apparent multilayer formation may be due to hydrophobic forces. Other quality attributes such as recovery, aggregate content, and overall purity of the captured monoclonal antibody are not affected.

  18. Insight into PreImplantation Factor (PIF* mechanism for embryo protection and development: target oxidative stress and protein misfolding (PDI and HSP through essential RIKP [corrected] binding site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eytan R Barnea

    Full Text Available Endogenous PIF, upon which embryo development is dependent, is secreted only by viable mammalian embryos, and absent in non-viable ones. Synthetic PIF (sPIF administration promotes singly cultured embryos development and protects against their demise caused by embryo-toxic serum. To identify and characterize critical sPIF-embryo protein interactions novel biochemical and bio-analytical methods were specifically devised.FITC-PIF uptake/binding by cultured murine and equine embryos was examined and compared with scrambled FITC-PIF (control. Murine embryo (d10 lysates were fractionated by reversed-phase HPLC, fractions printed onto microarray slides and probed with Biotin-PIF, IDE and Kv1.3 antibodies, using fluorescence detection. sPIF-based affinity column was developed to extract and identify PIF-protein interactions from lysates using peptide mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS. In silico evaluation examined binding of PIF to critical targets, using mutation analysis.PIF directly targets viable cultured embryos as compared with control peptide, which failed to bind. Multistep Biotin-PIF targets were confirmed by single-step PIF-affinity column based isolation. PIF binds protein disulfide isomerases a prolyl-4-hydroxylase β-subunit, (PDI, PDIA4, PDIA6-like containing the antioxidant thioredoxin domain. PIF also binds protective heat shock proteins (70&90, co-chaperone, BAG-3. Remarkably, PIF targets a common RIKP [corrected] site in PDI and HSP proteins. Further, single PIF amino acid mutation significantly reduced peptide-protein target bonding. PIF binds promiscuous tubulins, neuron backbones and ACTA-1,2 visceral proteins. Significant anti-IDE, while limited anti-Kv1.3b antibody-binding to Biotin-PIF positive lysates HPLC fractions were documented.Collectively, data identifies PIF shared targets on PDI and HSP in the embryo. Such are known to play a critical role in protecting against oxidative stress and protein misfolding. PIF-affinity-column is a

  19. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  20. Exploratory Study on the RNA-Binding Structural Motifs by Library Screening Targeting pre-miRNA-29 a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Takeo; Murata, Asako; Aikawa, Haruo; Harada, Yasue; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-16

    The metabolic stream of microRNA (miRNA) production, the so-called maturation process of miRNAs, became one of important metabolic paths for drug-targeting to modulate the expression of genes related to a number of diseases. We carried out discovery studies on small molecules binding to the precursor of miR-29a (pre-miR-29a) from a chemical library containing 41,119 compounds (AQ library) by the fluorescent indicator displacement (FID) assay using the xanthone derivative X2SdiMe as a fluorescent indicator. The FID assay provided 1075 compounds, which showed an increase of fluorescence. These compounds were subsequently submitted to a binding analysis in a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay on a pre-miR-29a immobilized surface. 21 hit compounds were identified with a good reproducibility in the binding. These compounds have not been reported to bind to RNA until now and can be classified into two groups on the basis of the kinetics in the binding. To gain more information on the motif structures that could be necessary for the binding to pre-miR-29a, 19 substructures were selected from the hit compounds. The substructure library (SS library) which consisted of 362 compounds was prepared from the AQ library. An SPR assay of the SS library on pre-miR-29a-immobilized surface suggested that five substructures could potentially be important structural motifs to bind to pre-miR-29a. These studies demonstrate that the combination of FID-based screening of chemical library and subsequent SPR assay would be one way for obtaining practical solutions for the discovery of molecules which bind to the target pre-miRNAs.

  1. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anil; Shim, Heejung; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  2. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Raj

    Full Text Available Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  3. Systems biology-embedded target validation: improving efficacy in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Drieke; Minke, Benedikt A; Fitzmaurice, William; Kholodenko, Boris N; Kolch, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is faced with a range of challenges with the ever-escalating costs of drug development and a drying out of drug pipelines. By harnessing advances in -omics technologies and moving away from the standard, reductionist model of drug discovery, there is significant potential to reduce costs and improve efficacy. Embedding systems biology approaches in drug discovery, which seek to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms of potential drug targets in a network context, will reduce attrition rates by earlier target validation and the introduction of novel targets into the currently stagnant market. Systems biology approaches also have the potential to assist in the design of multidrug treatments and repositioning of existing drugs, while stratifying patients to give a greater personalization of medical treatment.

  4. Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved Solar Power Forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Lehman, Brad; Simmons, Joseph; Campos, Edwin; Banunarayanan, Venkat

    2015-10-05

    Accurate solar power forecasting allows utilities to get the most out of the solar resources on their systems. To truly measure the improvements that any new solar forecasting methods can provide, it is important to first develop (or determine) baseline and target solar forecasting at different spatial and temporal scales. This paper aims to develop baseline and target values for solar forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output.

  5. Quantum Dots Encapsulated with Canine Parvovirus-Like Particles Improving the Cellular Targeted Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yan

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs have a promising prospect in live-cell imaging and sensing because of unique fluorescence features. QDs aroused significant interest in the bio-imaging field through integrating the fluorescence properties of QDs and the delivery function of biomaterial. The natural tropism of Canine Parvovirus (CPV to the transferrin receptor can target specific cells to increase the targeting ability of QDs in cell imaging. CPV virus-like particles (VLPs from the expression of the CPV-VP2 capsid protein in a prokaryotic expression system were examined to encapsulate the QDs and deliver to cells with an expressed transferrin receptor. CPV-VLPs were used to encapsulate QDs that were modified using 3-mercaptopropionic acid. Gel electrophoresis, fluorescence spectrum, particle size, and transmission electron microscopy verified the conformation of a complex, in which QDs were encapsulated in CPV-VLPs (CPV-VLPs-QDs. When incubated with different cell lines, CPV-VLPs-QDs significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of QDs and selectively labeled the cells with high-level transferrin receptors. Cell-targeted labeling was achieved by utilizing the specific binding between the CPV capsid protein VP2 of VLPs and cellular receptors. CPV-VLPs-QDs, which can mimic the native CPV infection, can recognize and attach to the transferrin receptors on cellular membrane. Therefore, CPV-VLPs can be used as carriers to facilitate the targeted delivery of encapsulated nanomaterials into cells via receptor-mediated pathways. This study confirmed that CPV-VLPs can significantly promote the biocompatibility of nanomaterials and could expand the application of CPV-VLPs in biological medicine.

  6. A Fab-Selective Immunoglobulin-Binding Domain from Streptococcal Protein G with Improved Half-Life Extension Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Unverdorben

    Full Text Available Half-life extension strategies have gained increasing interest to improve the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of protein therapeutics. Recently, we established an immunoglobulin-binding domain (IgBD from streptococcal protein G (SpGC3 as module for half-life extension. SpGC3 is capable of binding to the Fc region as well as the CH1 domain of Fab arms under neutral and acidic conditions.Using site-directed mutagenesis, we generated a Fab-selective mutant (SpGC3Fab to avoid possible interference with the FcRn-mediated recycling process and improved its affinity for mouse and human IgG by site-directed mutagenesis and phage display selections. In mice, this affinity-improved mutant (SpGC3FabRR conferred prolonged plasma half-lives compared with SpGC3Fab when fused to small recombinant antibody fragments, such as single-chain Fv (scFv and bispecific single-chain diabody (scDb. Hence, the SpGC3FabRR domain seems to be a suitable fusion partner for the half-life extension of small recombinant therapeutics.The half-life extension properties of SpGC3 can be retained by restricting binding to the Fab fragment of serum immunoglobulins and can be improved by increasing binding activity. The modified SpGC3 module should be suitable to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins and, thus to improve therapeutic activity.

  7. Controlled Release of Collagen-Binding SDF-1α Improves Cardiac Function after Myocardial Infarction by Recruiting Endogenous Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yannan; Li, Qingguo; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin; Xiao, Zhifeng; Dai, Jianwu

    2016-05-26

    Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) is a well-characterized chemokine that mobilizes stem cells homing to the ischemic heart, which is beneficial for cardiac regeneration. However, clinically administered native SDF-1α diffuses quickly, thus decreasing its local concentration, and results in side effects. Thus, a controlled release system for SDF-1α is required to produce an effective local concentration in the ischemic heart. In this study, we developed a recombinant chemokine, consisting of SDF-1α and a collagen-binding domain, which retains both the SDF-1α and collagen-binding activity (CBD-SDF-1α). In an in vitro assay, CBD-SDF-1α could specifically bind to a collagen gel and achieve sustained release. An intramyocardial injection of CBD-SDF-1α after acute myocardial infarction demonstrated that the protein was largely tethered in the ischemic area and that controlled release had been achieved. Furthermore, CBD-SDF-1α enhanced the recruitment of c-kit positive (c-kit(+)) stem cells, increased capillary density and improved cardiac function, whereas NAT-SDF-1α had no such beneficial effects. Our findings demonstrate that CBD-SDF-1α can specifically bind to collagen and achieve controlled release both in vitro and in vivo. Local delivery of this protein could mobilize endogenous stem cells homing to the ischemic heart and improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

  8. Improved prediction of drug-target interactions using regularized least squares integrating with kernel fusion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Yanli, E-mail: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; Bryant, Stephen H., E-mail: bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

    2016-02-25

    Identification of drug-target interactions (DTI) is a central task in drug discovery processes. In this work, a simple but effective regularized least squares integrating with nonlinear kernel fusion (RLS-KF) algorithm is proposed to perform DTI predictions. Using benchmark DTI datasets, our proposed algorithm achieves the state-of-the-art results with area under precision–recall curve (AUPR) of 0.915, 0.925, 0.853 and 0.909 for enzymes, ion channels (IC), G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and nuclear receptors (NR) based on 10 fold cross-validation. The performance can further be improved by using a recalculated kernel matrix, especially for the small set of nuclear receptors with AUPR of 0.945. Importantly, most of the top ranked interaction predictions can be validated by experimental data reported in the literature, bioassay results in the PubChem BioAssay database, as well as other previous studies. Our analysis suggests that the proposed RLS-KF is helpful for studying DTI, drug repositioning as well as polypharmacology, and may help to accelerate drug discovery by identifying novel drug targets. - Graphical abstract: Flowchart of the proposed RLS-KF algorithm for drug-target interaction predictions. - Highlights: • A nonlinear kernel fusion algorithm is proposed to perform drug-target interaction predictions. • Performance can further be improved by using the recalculated kernel. • Top predictions can be validated by experimental data.

  9. Ovarian cancer stem cells: Can targeted therapy lead to improved progression-free survival?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christen; L; Walters; Haygood; Rebecca; C; Arend; J; Michael; Straughn; Donald; J; Buchsbaum

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant effort and research funds, epithelial ovarian cancer remains a very deadly disease. There are no effective screening methods that discover early stage disease; the majority of patients are diagnosed with advanced disease. Treatment modalities consist primarily of radical debulking surgery followed by taxane and platinum-based chemotherapy. Newer therapies including limited targeted agents and intraperitoneal delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs have improved disease-free intervals, but failed to yield longlasting cures in most patients. Chemotherapeutic resistance, particularly in the recurrent setting, plagues the disease. Targeting the pathways and mechanisms behind the development of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer could lead to significant improvement in patient outcomes. In many malignancies, including blood and other solid tumors, there is a subgroup of tumor cells, separate from the bulk population, called cancer stem cells(CSCs). These CSCs are thought to be the cause of metastasis, recurrence and resistance. However, todate, ovarian CSCs have been difficult to identify, isolate, and target. It is felt by many investigators that finding a putative ovarian CSC and a chemotherapeutic agent to target it could be the key to a cure for this deadly disease. This review will focus on recent advances in this arena and discuss some of the controversies surrounding the concept.

  10. Pre-treatment with the NMDA receptor glycine-binding site antagonist L-701,324 improves pharmacosensitivity in a mouse kindling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellinger, Christina; Salvamoser, Josephine D; Soerensen, Jonna; van Vliet, Erwin A; Aronica, Eleonora; Gorter, Jan; Potschka, Heidrun

    2014-05-01

    The glycine co-agonist binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartat (NMDA) receptor is discussed as an interesting target for different central nervous system diseases. Antagonism at this co-agonist site has been suggested as an alternative to the use of non-competitive or competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, which are associated with a pronounced adverse effect profile in chronic epilepsy models and epilepsy patients. In the present study, we addressed the hypothesis that sub-chronic administration of the glycine-binding site antagonist L-701,324 might exert disease-modifying effects in fully kindled mice during a period with frequent seizure elicitation (massive kindling). Moreover, we analyzed whether L-701,324 exposure during this phase affects the subsequent response to an antiepileptic drug. L-701,324 treatment during the massive kindling phase did not affect ictogenesis. Mean seizure severity and cumulative seizure duration proved to be comparable between vehicle- and L-701,324-treated mice. Following withdrawal of L-701,324 seizure thresholds did not differ in a significant manner from those in animals that received vehicle injections. A low dosage of phenobarbital caused a significant increase of the generalized seizure threshold in the L-701,324 pre-treated group, whereas it did not exert a comparable effect in animals that received vehicle during the massive kindling phase. Analysis of P-glycoprotein in the hilus of the hippocampus revealed lower expression rates in L-701,324 pre-treated kindled mice. In conclusion, the data indicate that targeting of the NMDA receptor glycine-binding site does not result in anticonvulsant or disease-modifying effects. However, it might improve antiepileptic drug responses. The findings might be linked to an impact on P-glycoprotein expression. However, future studies are necessary to further evaluate the mechanisms and assess the potential of respective add-on approaches.

  11. Improving Target Detection in Visual Search Through the Augmenting Multi-Sensory Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    target detection, visual search James Merlo , Joseph E. Mercado, Jan B.F. Van Erp, Peter A. Hancock University of Central Florida 12201 Research Parkway...cued control condition (e.g. Fisher et al. 1989; Fisher and Tan 1989; Hofer, Palen, and Possolo 1993; Merlo and Hancock 2011; Sklar and Sarter 1999...by the improvements encountered in bi-modal forms of presentation ( Merlo , Duley, and Hancock 2010) and thus the present extension into the exploration

  12. Review of the Third Domain Receptor Binding Fragment of Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP): Plausible Binding of AFP to Lysophospholipid Receptor Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizejewski, G J

    2016-01-31

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a 69 kD fetal- and tumor-associated single-chain glycoprotein belonging to the albuminoid gene family. AFP functions as a carrier/transport molecule as well as a growth regulator and has been utilized as a clinical biomarker for both fetal defects and cancer growth. Lysophospholipids (LPLs) are plasma membrane-derived bioactive lipid signaling mediators composed of a small molecular weight single acyl carbon chain (palmitic, oleic acid) attached to a polar headgroup; they range in molecular mass from 250-750 daltons. The LPLs consist of either sphingosine-1-phosphate or lysophosphatidic acid, and mostly their choline, ethanolamine, serine or inositol derivatives. They are present only in vertebrates. These bioactive paracrine lipid mediators are ubiquitously distributed in tissues and are released from many different cell types (platelets, macrophages, monocytes, etc.) involved in developmental, physiological, and pathological processes. The LPLs bind to four different classes of G-protein coupled receptors described herein which transduce a multiple of cell effects encompassing activities such as morphogenesis, neural development, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis. The identification of potential binding sites of LPL receptors on the AFP third domain receptor binding fragment were derived by computer modeling analysis. It is conceivable, but not proven, that AFP might bind not only to the LPL receptors, but also to LPLs themselves since AFP binds medium and long chain fatty acids. It is proposed that some of the activities ascribed to AFP in the past might be due in part to the presence of bound LPLs and/or their receptors.

  13. Hand-held optical imager (Gen-2): improved instrumentation and target detectability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jean; Decerce, Joseph; Erickson, Sarah J; Martinez, Sergio L; Nunez, Annie; Roman, Manuela; Traub, Barbara; Flores, Cecilia A; Roberts, Seigbeh M; Hernandez, Estrella; Aguirre, Wenceslao; Kiszonas, Richard; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2012-08-01

    Hand-held optical imagers are developed by various researchers towards reflectance-based spectroscopic imaging of breast cancer. Recently, a Gen-1 handheld optical imager was developed with capabilities to perform two-dimensional (2-D) spectroscopic as well as three-dimensional (3-D) tomographic imaging studies. However, the imager was bulky with poor surface contact (~30%) along curved tissues, and limited sensitivity to detect targets consistently. Herein, a Gen-2 hand-held optical imager that overcame the above limitations of the Gen-1 imager has been developed and the instrumentation described. The Gen-2 hand-held imager is less bulky, portable, and has improved surface contact (~86%) on curved tissues. Additionally, the forked probe head design is capable of simultaneous bilateral reflectance imaging of both breast tissues, and also transillumination imaging of a single breast tissue. Experimental studies were performed on tissue phantoms to demonstrate the improved sensitivity in detecting targets using the Gen-2 imager. The improved instrumentation of the Gen-2 imager allowed detection of targets independent of their location with respect to the illumination points, unlike in Gen-1 imager. The developed imager has potential for future clinical breast imaging with enhanced sensitivity, via both reflectance and transillumination imaging.

  14. Earth Science Data and Models for Improved Targeting of Humanitarian Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly E.

    2011-01-01

    Humanitarian assistance to developing countries has long focused on countries that have political, economic and strategic interest to the United States. Recent changes in global security concerns have heightened the perception that humanitarian action is becoming increasingly politicized. This is seen to be largely driven by the 'global war on terror' along with a push by donors and the United Nations for closer integration between humanitarian action and diplomatic, military and other spheres of engagement in conflict and crisis-affected states (HPG 2010). As we enter an era of rising commodity prices and increasing uncertainty in global food production due to a changing climate, scientific data and analysis will be increasingly important to improve the targeting of humanitarian assistance. Earth science data enables appropriate humanitarian response to complex food emergencies that arise in regions outside the areas of current strategic and security focus. As the climate changes, new places will become vulnerable to food insecurity and will need emergency assistance. Earth science data and multidisciplinary models will enable an information-based comparison of need that goes beyond strategic and political considerations to identify new hotspots of food insecurity as they emerge. These analyses will improve aid targeting and timeliness while reducing strategic risk by highlighting new regions at risk of crisis in a rapidly changing world. Improved targeting with respect to timing and location could reduce cost while increasing the likelihood that those who need aid get it.

  15. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  16. Response of SCP-2L domain of human MFE-2 to ligand removal: binding site closure and burial of peroxisomal targeting signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensink, M F; Haapalainen, A M; Hiltunen, J K; Glumoff, T; Juffer, A H

    2002-10-11

    In the study of the structure and function relationship of human MFE-2, we have investigated the dynamics of human MFE-2SCP-2L (hSCP-2L) and its response to ligand removal. A comparison was made with homologous rabbit SCP-2. Breathing and a closing motion are found, identifiable with an adjustment in size and a closing off of the binding pocket. Crucial residues for structural integrity have been identified. Particularly mobile areas of the protein are loop 1 that is connecting helices A and C in space, and helix D, next to the entrance of the pocket. In hSCP-2L, the binding pocket gets occupied by Phe93, which is making a tight hydrophobic contact with Trp36. In addition, it is found that the C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) that is solvent exposed in the complexed structure becomes buried when no ligand is present. Moreover, an anti-correlation exists between burial of PTS1 and the size of the binding pocket. The results are in accordance with plant nsLTPs, where a similar accommodation of binding pocket size was found after ligand binding/removal. Furthermore, the calculations support the suggestion of a ligand-assisted targeting mechanism.

  17. A CAF40-binding motif facilitates recruitment of the CCR4-NOT complex to mRNAs targeted by Drosophila Roquin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgromo, Annamaria; Raisch, Tobias; Bawankar, Praveen; Bhandari, Dipankar; Chen, Ying; Kuzuoğlu-Öztürk, Duygu; Weichenrieder, Oliver; Izaurralde, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    Human (Hs) Roquin1 and Roquin2 are RNA-binding proteins that promote mRNA target degradation through the recruitment of the CCR4-NOT deadenylase complex and are implicated in the prevention of autoimmunity. Roquin1 recruits CCR4-NOT via a C-terminal region that is not conserved in Roquin2 or in invertebrate Roquin. Here we show that Roquin2 and Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) Roquin also interact with the CCR4-NOT complex through their C-terminal regions. The C-terminal region of Dm Roquin contains multiple motifs that mediate CCR4-NOT binding. One motif binds to the CAF40 subunit of the CCR4-NOT complex. The crystal structure of the Dm Roquin CAF40-binding motif (CBM) bound to CAF40 reveals that the CBM adopts an α-helical conformation upon binding to a conserved surface of CAF40. Thus, despite the lack of sequence conservation, the C-terminal regions of Roquin proteins act as an effector domain that represses the expression of mRNA targets via recruitment of the CCR4-NOT complex. PMID:28165457

  18. Loss of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal Tiam-1 pleckstrin homology domain prevents in vivo Rac1 activation without affecting membrane targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Mark A; Martinu, Lenka; Rossman, Kent L; Sondek, John; Lemmon, Mark A; Chou, Margaret M

    2003-03-28

    Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho family small GTPases invariably contain a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain that immediately follows their Dbl homology (DH) domain. Although the DH domain is responsible for GEF activity, the role of the PH domain is less clear. We previously reported that PH domains from several Dbl family members bind phosphoinositides with very low affinity (K(d) values in the 10 microM range). This suggests that, unlike several other PH domains, those from Dbl proteins will not function as independent membrane-targeting modules. To determine the functional relevance of low affinity phosphoinositide binding, we mutated the corresponding PH domain from Tiam-1 to abolish its weak, specific binding to phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate. We first confirmed in vitro that phosphoinositide binding by the isolated DH/PH domain was impaired by the mutations but that intrinsic GEF activity was unaffected. We then introduced the PH domain mutations into full-length Tiam-1 and found that its ability to activate Rac1 or serum response factor in vivo was abolished. Immunofluorescence studies showed that membrane targeting of Tiam-1 was essentially unaffected by mutations in the C-terminal PH domain. Our studies therefore indicate that low affinity phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate binding by the C-terminal PH domain may be critical for in vivo regulation and activity of Tiam-1 but that the PH domain exerts its regulatory effects without altering membrane targeting. We suggest instead that ligand binding to the PH domain induces conformational and/or orientational changes at the membrane surface that are required for maximum exchange activity of its adjacent DH domain.

  19. C. difficile 630Δerm Spo0A regulates sporulation, but does not contribute to toxin production, by direct high-affinity binding to target DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E Rosenbusch

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a Gram positive, anaerobic bacterium that can form highly resistant endospores. The bacterium is the causative agent of C. difficile infection (CDI, for which the symptoms can range from a mild diarrhea to potentially fatal pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Endospore formation in Firmicutes, including C. difficile, is governed by the key regulator for sporulation, Spo0A. In Bacillus subtilis, this transcription factor is also directly or indirectly involved in various other cellular processes. Here, we report that C. difficile Spo0A shows a high degree of similarity to the well characterized B. subtilis protein and recognizes a similar binding sequence. We find that the laboratory strain C. difficile 630Δerm contains an 18bp-duplication near the DNA-binding domain compared to its ancestral strain 630. In vitro binding assays using purified C-terminal DNA binding domain of the C. difficile Spo0A protein demonstrate direct binding to DNA upstream of spo0A and sigH, early sporulation genes and several other putative targets. In vitro binding assays suggest that the gene encoding the major clostridial toxin TcdB may be a direct target of Spo0A, but supernatant derived from a spo0A negative strain was no less toxic towards Vero cells than that obtained from a wild type strain, in contrast to previous reports. These results identify for the first time direct (putative targets of the Spo0A protein in C. difficile and make a positive effect of Spo0A on production of the large clostridial toxins unlikely.

  20. Selection of binding targets in parasites using phage-display and aptamer libraries in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Rosito Tonelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasite infections are largely dependent on interactions between pathogen and different host cell populations to guarantee a successful infectious process. This is particularly true for obligatory intracellular parasites as Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Leishmania, to name a few. Adhesion to and entry into the cell are essential steps requiring specific parasite and host cell molecules. The large amount of possible involved molecules poses additional difficulties for their identification by the classical biochemical approaches. In this respect, the search for alternative techniques should be pursued. Among them two powerful methodologies can be employed, both relying upon the construction of highly diverse combinatorial libraries of peptides or oligonucleotides that randomly bind with high affinity to targets on the cell surface and are selectively displaced by putative ligands. These are, respectively, the peptide-based phage display and the oligonucleotide-based aptamer techniques.The phage display technique has been extensively employed for the identification of novel ligands in vitro and in vivo in different areas such as cancer, vaccine development and epitope mapping. Particularly, phage display has been employed in the investigation of pathogen-host interactions. Although this methodology has been used for some parasites with encouraging results, in trypanosomatids its use is, as yet, scanty. RNA and DNA aptamers, developed by the SELEX process (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment, were described over two decades ago and since then contributed to a large number of structured nucleic acids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes or for the understanding of the cell biology. Similarly to the phage display technique scarce use of the SELEX process has been used in the probing of parasite-host interaction.In this review, an overall survey on the use of both phage display and aptamer technologies in different pathogenic

  1. Structure-based rational design of a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 decoy receptor with high binding affinity for a target protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Han

    Full Text Available Repeat proteins are increasingly attracting much attention as alternative scaffolds to immunoglobulin antibodies due to their unique structural features. Nonetheless, engineering interaction interface and understanding molecular basis for affinity maturation of repeat proteins still remain a challenge. Here, we present a structure-based rational design of a repeat protein with high binding affinity for a target protein. As a model repeat protein, a Toll-like receptor4 (TLR4 decoy receptor composed of leucine-rich repeat (LRR modules was used, and its interaction interface was rationally engineered to increase the binding affinity for myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD2. Based on the complex crystal structure of the decoy receptor with MD2, we first designed single amino acid substitutions in the decoy receptor, and obtained three variants showing a binding affinity (K(D one-order of magnitude higher than the wild-type decoy receptor. The interacting modes and contributions of individual residues were elucidated by analyzing the crystal structures of the single variants. To further increase the binding affinity, single positive mutations were combined, and two double mutants were shown to have about 3000- and 565-fold higher binding affinities than the wild-type decoy receptor. Molecular dynamics simulations and energetic analysis indicate that an additive effect by two mutations occurring at nearby modules was the major contributor to the remarkable increase in the binding affinities.

  2. TREHALOSE-BASED ADDITIVE IMPROVED INTER-PRIMER BINDING SITE REACTIONS FOR DNA ISOLATED FROM RECALCITRANT PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Lancíková

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose-based (TBT-PAR additive was tested in order to optimize PCR amplification for DNA isolated from recalcitrant plants. Retrotransposon-based inter-primer binding site reactions were significantly improved with TBT-PAR solution using genomic DNA isolated from flax (Linum usitatissimum L., genotypes Kyivskyi, Bethune grown in radio-contaminated and non-radioactive remediated Chernobyl experimental fields. Additionally, similar improvements were observed using 19 recalcitrant genotypes of maize (Zea mays L. and three genotypes of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius, Poepp. et Endl., genotypes PER05, ECU45, BOL22 grown in standard field conditions.

  3. A peptide mimetic targeting trans-homophilic NCAM binding sites promotes spatial learning and neural plasticity in the hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraev, Igor; Henneberger, Christian; Rossetti, Clara;

    2011-01-01

    a homophilic trans-binding site in Ig2 and binds to Ig3--was developed as a tool for studying NCAM's trans-interactions. In this study, we investigated plannexin's ability to affect neural plasticity and memory formation. We found that plannexin facilitates neurite outgrowth in primary hippocampal neuronal...

  4. Reformulating Tylocrebrine in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Targeted Polymeric Nanoparticles Improves Its Therapeutic Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtane, Ameya R; Wong, Henry L; Guru, Bharath Raja; Lis, Lev G; Georg, Gunda I; Gurvich, Vadim J; Panyam, Jayanth

    2015-08-03

    Several promising anticancer drug candidates have been sidelined owing to their poor physicochemical properties or unfavorable pharmacokinetics, resulting in high overall cost of drug discovery and development. Use of alternative formulation strategies that alleviate these issues can help advance new molecules to the clinic at a significantly lower cost. Tylocrebrine is a natural product with potent anticancer activity. Its clinical trial was discontinued following the discovery of severe central nervous system toxicities. To improve the safety and potency of tylocrebrine, we formulated the drug in polymeric nanoparticles targeted to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpressed on several types of tumors. Through in vitro studies in different cancer cell lines, we found that EGFR targeted nanoparticles were significantly more effective in killing tumor cells than the free drug. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies revealed that encapsulation in nanoparticles resulted in lower brain penetration and enhanced tumor accumulation of the drug. Further, targeted nanoparticles were characterized by significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory activity in a mouse xenograft model of epidermoid cancer. These results suggest that the therapeutic index of drugs that were previously considered unusable could be significantly improved by reformulation. Application of novel formulation strategies to previously abandoned drugs provides an opportunity to advance new molecules to the clinic at a lower cost. This can significantly increase the repertoire of treatment options available to cancer patients.

  5. Improving cancer therapies by targeting the physical and chemical hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2016-09-28

    Tumors are highly heterogeneous at the patient, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This multi-scale heterogeneity poses significant challenges for effective therapies, which ideally must not only distinguish between tumorous and healthy tissue, but also fully address the wide variety of tumorous sub-clones. Commonly used therapies either leverage a biological phenotype of cancer cells (e.g. high rate of proliferation) or indiscriminately kill all the cells present in a targeted volume. Tumor microenvironment (TME) targeting represents a promising therapeutic direction, because a number of TME hallmarks are conserved across different tumor types, despite the underlying genetic heterogeneity. Historically, TME targeting has largely focused on the cells that support tumor growth (e.g. vascular endothelial cells). However, by viewing the intrinsic physical and chemical alterations in the TME as additional therapeutic opportunities rather than barriers, a new class of TME-inspired treatments has great promise to complement or replace existing therapeutic strategies. In this review we summarize the physical and chemical hallmarks of the TME, and discuss how these tumor characteristics either currently are, or may ultimately be targeted to improve cancer therapies.

  6. Baseline and Target Values for PV Forecasts: Toward Improved Solar Power Forecasting: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Hodge, Bri-Mathias; Lu, Siyuan; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Lehman, Brad; Simmons, Joseph; Campos, Edwin; Banunarayanan, Venkat

    2015-08-05

    Accurate solar power forecasting allows utilities to get the most out of the solar resources on their systems. To truly measure the improvements that any new solar forecasting methods can provide, it is important to first develop (or determine) baseline and target solar forecasting at different spatial and temporal scales. This paper aims to develop baseline and target values for solar forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output. forecasting metrics. These were informed by close collaboration with utility and independent system operator partners. The baseline values are established based on state-of-the-art numerical weather prediction models and persistence models. The target values are determined based on the reduction in the amount of reserves that must be held to accommodate the uncertainty of solar power output.

  7. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  8. Evidence that a synthetic amyloid-ß oligomer-binding peptide (ABP) targets amyloid-ß deposits in transgenic mouse brain and human Alzheimer's disease brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Balu; Ito, Shingo; Atkinson, Trevor; Gaudet, Chantal; Ménard, Michel; Brown, Leslie; Whitfield, James

    2014-03-14

    The synthetic ~5 kDa ABP (amyloid-ß binding peptide) consists of a region of the 228 kDa human pericentrioloar material-1 (PCM-1) protein that selectively and avidly binds in vitro Aβ1-42 oligomers, believed to be key co-drivers of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not monomers (Chakravarthy et al., (2013) [3]). ABP also prevents Aß1-42 from triggering the apoptotic death of cultured human SHSY5Y neuroblasts, likely by sequestering Aß oligomers, suggesting that it might be a potential AD therapeutic. Here we support this possibility by showing that ABP also recognizes and binds Aβ1-42 aggregates in sections of cortices and hippocampi from brains of AD transgenic mice and human AD patients. More importantly, ABP targets Aβ1-42 aggregates when microinjected into the hippocampi of the brains of live AD transgenic mice.

  9. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF.

  10. Improved Bearings-Only Multi-Target Tracking with GM-PHD Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Song, Taek Lyul

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an improved nonlinear Gaussian mixture probability hypothesis density (GM-PHD) filter is proposed to address bearings-only measurements in multi-target tracking. The proposed method, called the Gaussian mixture measurements-probability hypothesis density (GMM-PHD) filter, not only approximates the posterior intensity using a Gaussian mixture, but also models the likelihood function with a Gaussian mixture instead of a single Gaussian distribution. Besides, the target birth model of the GMM-PHD filter is assumed to be partially uniform instead of a Gaussian mixture. Simulation results show that the proposed filter outperforms the GM-PHD filter embedded with the extended Kalman filter (EKF) and the unscented Kalman filter (UKF). PMID:27626423

  11. Targeting Multiple-Myeloma-Induced Immune Dysfunction to Improve Immunotherapy Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Rutella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a plasma cell malignancy associated with high levels of monoclonal (M protein in the blood and/or serum. MM can occur de novo or evolve from benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS. Current translational research into MM focuses on the development of combination therapies directed against molecularly defined targets and that are aimed at achieving durable clinical responses. MM cells have a unique ability to evade immunosurveillance through several mechanisms including, among others, expansion of regulatory T cells (Treg, reduced T-cell cytotoxic activity and responsiveness to IL-2, defects in B-cell immunity, and induction of dendritic cell (DC dysfunction. Immune defects could be a major cause of failure of the recent immunotherapy trials in MM. This article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular determinants of immune evasion in patients with MM and highlights how these pathways can be targeted to improve patients’ clinical outcome.

  12. Improved targeting of JAK2 leads to increased therapeutic efficacy in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Keller, Matthew; Marubayashi, Sachie; Shank, Kaitlyn; Rampal, Raajit; Qi, Jun; Kleppe, Maria; Patel, Hardik J.; Shah, Smit K.; Taldone, Tony; Bradner, James E.; Chiosis, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of JAK2/MPL mutations in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) led to clinical development of Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors for treatment of MPN. These inhibitors improve constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly but do not significantly reduce mutant allele burden in patients. We recently showed that chronic exposure to JAK inhibitors results in inhibitor persistence via JAK2 transactivation and persistent JAK–signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling. We performed genetic and pharmacologic studies to determine whether improved JAK2 inhibition would show increased efficacy in MPN models and primary samples. Jak2 deletion in vivo led to profound reduction in disease burden not seen with JAK inhibitors, and deletion of Jak2 following chronic ruxolitinib therapy markedly reduced mutant allele burden. This demonstrates that JAK2 remains an essential target in MPN cells that survive in the setting of chronic JAK inhibition. Combination therapy with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitor PU-H71 and ruxolitinib reduced total and phospho-JAK2 and achieved more potent inhibition of downstream signaling than ruxolitinib monotherapy. Combination treatment improved blood counts, spleen weights, and reduced bone marrow fibrosis compared with ruxolitinib alone. These data suggest alternate approaches that increase JAK2 targeting, including combination JAK/HSP90 inhibitor therapy, are warranted in the clinical setting. PMID:24470592

  13. Targeting the binding function 3 (BF3) site of the androgen receptor through virtual screening. 2. development of 2-((2-phenoxyethyl) thio)-1H-benzimidazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munuganti, Ravi Shashi Nayana; Leblanc, Eric; Axerio-Cilies, Peter; Labriere, Christophe; Frewin, Kate; Singh, Kriti; Hassona, Mohamed D H; Lack, Nathan A; Li, Huifang; Ban, Fuqiang; Tomlinson Guns, Emma; Young, Robert; Rennie, Paul S; Cherkasov, Artem

    2013-02-14

    The human androgen receptor (AR) is a proven therapeutic target in prostate cancer. All current antiandrogens, such as Bicalutamide, Flutamide, Nilutamide, and Enzalutamide, target the buried hydrophobic androgen binding pocket of this protein. However, effective resistance mechanisms against these therapeutics exist such as mutations occurring at the target site. To overcome these limitations, the surface pocket of the AR called binding function 3 (BF3) was characterized as an alternative target for small molecule therapeutics. A number of AR inhibitors directly targeting the BF3 were previously identified by us ( J. Med. Chem. 2011 . 54 , 8563 ). In the current study, based on the prior results, we have developed structure-activity relationships that allowed designing a series of 2-((2-phenoxyethyl)thio)-1H-benzimidazole and 2-((2-phenoxyethyl)thio)-1H-indole as lead BF3 inhibitors. Some of the developed BF3 ligands demonstrated significant antiandrogen potency against LNCaP and Enzalutamide-resistant prostate cancer cell lines.

  14. Nanoparticle Fullerene (C60) demonstrated stable binding with antibacterial potential towards probable targets of drug resistant Salmonella typhi - a computational perspective and in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skariyachan, Sinosh; Parveen, Asma; Garka, Shruti

    2016-11-23

    Salmonella typhi, a Gram negative bacterium, has become multidrug resistant (MDR) to wide classes of antibacterials which necessitate an alarming precaution. This study focuses on the binding potential and therapeutic insight of Nano-Fullerene C60 towards virulent targets of Salmonella typhi by computational prediction and preliminary in vitro assays. The clinical isolates of Salmonella typhi were collected and antibiotic susceptibility profiles were assessed. The drug targets of pathogen were selected by rigorous literature survey and gene network analysis by various metabolic network resources. Based on this study, 20 targets were screened and the 3D structures of few drug targets were retrieved from PDB and others were computationally predicted. The structures of nanoleads such as Fullerene C60, ZnO and CuO were retrieved from drug databases. The binding potential of these nanoleads towards all selected targets were predicted by molecular docking. The best docked conformations were screened and concept was investigated by preliminary bioassays. This study revealed that most of the isolates of Salmonella typhi were found to be MDR (p Salmonella typhi.

  15. Imidazole- and Benzimidazole-Based Inhibitors of the Kinase IspE : Targeting the Substrate-Binding Site and the Triphosphate-Binding Loop of the ATP Site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mombelli, Paolo; Le Chapelain, Camille; Munzinger, Noah; Joliat, Evelyne; Illarionov, Boris; Schweizer, W. Bernd; Hirsch, Anna K. H.; Fischer, Markus; Bacher, Adelbert; Diederich, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The enzymes of the mevalonate-independent biosynthetic pathway to isoprenoids are attractive targets for the development of new drug candidates, in particular against malaria and tuberculosis, because they are present in major human pathogens but not in humans. Herein, the structure-based design, sy

  16. A mammalian model for Laron syndrome produced by targeted disruption of the mouse growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene (the Laron mouse)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Yihua; Xu, Bixiong C.; Maheshwari, Hiralal G.; He, Li; Reed, Michael; Lozykowski, Maria; Okada, Shigeru; Cataldo, Lori; Coschigamo, Karen; Wagner, Thomas E.; Baumann, Gerhard; Kopchick, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Laron syndrome [growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome] is a hereditary dwarfism resulting from defects in the GH receptor (GHR) gene. GHR deficiency has not been reported in mammals other than humans. Many aspects of GHR dysfunction remain unknown because of ethical and practical limitations in studying humans. To create a mammalian model for this disease, we generated mice bearing a disrupted GHR/binding protein (GHR/BP) gene through a homologous gene targeting approach. Homozygous GHR/...

  17. IMPROVING BIOMASS LOGISTICS COST WITHIN AGRONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY CONSTRAINTS AND BIOMASS QUALITY TARGETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Richard Hess; Kevin L. Kenney; Christopher T. Wright; David J. Muth; William Smith

    2012-10-01

    Equipment manufacturers have made rapid improvements in biomass harvesting and handling equipment. These improvements have increased transportation and handling efficiencies due to higher biomass densities and reduced losses. Improvements in grinder efficiencies and capacity have reduced biomass grinding costs. Biomass collection efficiencies (the ratio of biomass collected to the amount available in the field) as high as 75% for crop residues and greater than 90% for perennial energy crops have also been demonstrated. However, as collection rates increase, the fraction of entrained soil in the biomass increases, and high biomass residue removal rates can violate agronomic sustainability limits. Advancements in quantifying multi-factor sustainability limits to increase removal rate as guided by sustainable residue removal plans, and mitigating soil contamination through targeted removal rates based on soil type and residue type/fraction is allowing the use of new high efficiency harvesting equipment and methods. As another consideration, single pass harvesting and other technologies that improve harvesting costs cause biomass storage moisture management challenges, which challenges are further perturbed by annual variability in biomass moisture content. Monitoring, sampling, simulation, and analysis provide basis for moisture, time, and quality relationships in storage, which has allowed the development of moisture tolerant storage systems and best management processes that combine moisture content and time to accommodate baled storage of wet material based upon “shelf-life.” The key to improving biomass supply logistics costs has been developing the associated agronomic sustainability and biomass quality technologies and processes that allow the implementation of equipment engineering solutions.

  18. Inhibition of human spermatozoa-zona pellucida binding by a combinatorially derived peptide from a synthetic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczenik, George; Garrisi, John; Cohen, Jacques

    2006-09-01

    Intact zona-free human oocytes were screened using a combinatorial peptide library selection protocol. Pieczenik Peptide Sequence 1 (PPS1) HEHRKRG binds human spermatozoa. A complementary and unique binding sequence HNSSLSPLATPA (PPS2) was developed from the first PPS1 ligand that binds to the human zona pellucida or oolemma. Cytoplasm-free zonae from unfertilized eggs were obtained and used as an assay system to test the effects of exposure to these two ligands. Spermatozoa were inserted into evacuated zonae and their behaviour and binding activity were assessed at regular intervals. The behaviour of spermatozoa exposed to PPS1 and unlabelled spermatozoa injected into unexposed zonae was similar as far as binding was concerned (50 and 54% binding), but PPS1 exposed spermatozoa had higher motility and displacement, marked by their escape from the zona pellucida. Zonae exposed to PPS2 inhibited the interaction between injected spermatozoa and the inside of the zona when compared with controls (8.3 and 53.8% attached respectively, P movie sequence taken approximately 30 min after injection of spermatozoa into empty human zonae pellucidae shows behaviour of non-manipulated spermatozoa into zonae not exposed or exposed to ligand. This may be purchased for viewing on the Internet at www.rbmonline.com/Article/2159 (free to web subscribers).

  19. Concise review: bullseye: targeting cancer stem cells to improve the treatment of gliomas by repurposing disulfiram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triscott, Joanna; Rose Pambid, Mary; Dunn, Sandra E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be at the root of cancer recurrence because they resist conventional therapies and subsequently reinitiate tumor cell growth. Thus, targeting CSCs could be the bullseye to successful cancer therapeutics in the future. Brain tumors are some of the most challenging types of cancer to treat and the median survival following the initial diagnosis is 12-18 months. Among the different types of brain tumors, glioblastoma (GBM) is considered the most aggressive and remains extremely difficult to treat. Despite surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, most patients develop refractory disease. Temozolomide (TMZ) is a chemotherapy used to treat GBM however resistance develops in most patients. The underlying mechanisms for TMZ resistance (TMZ-resistant) involve the expression of DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase. CSC genes such as Sox-2, BMI-1, and more recently Y-box binding protein-1 also play a role in resistance. In order to develop novel therapies for GBM, libraries of small interfering RNAs and off-patent drugs have been screened. Over the past few years, several independent laboratories identified disulfiram (DSF) as an off-patent drug that kills GBM CSCs. Reportedly DSF has several modes of action including its ability to inhibit aldehyde dehydrogenases, E3 ligase, polo-like kinase 1, and NFkB. Due to the fact that GBM is a disease of heterogeneity, chemotherapy with multitargeting properties may be the way of the future. In broader terms, DSF kills CSCs from a range of different cancer types further supporting the idea of repurposing it for "target practice."

  20. Target Localization Based on Improved DV-Hop Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The node localization technology of wireless sensor networks is essential and prerequisite to many applications, which it is one of the important support technologies for wireless sensor networks. The node localization is to get the position information of blind node by using location information of few known nodes and some special mechanisms. This paper primarily investigates a kind of target localization technology based on the improved DV-Hop algorithm in wireless sensor networks. We firstly compute the distances measured by RSSI and the mean value of one-hop distance. Then we can use the differences between the mean and the actual distance to get the error correction between the total distance and average one-hop distance. Replace trilateration with hybrid localization of MIN-MAX and weighted least square method. Finally, simulation experiment results show the improved algorithm can effectively carry out the network localization, thus has a certain of practical value

  1. Improving the Volume Dependence of Two-Body Binding Energies Calculated with Lattice QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davoudi, Zohreh

    2011-01-01

    Volume modifications to the binding of two-body systems in large cubic volumes of extent L depend upon the total momentum and exponentially upon the ratio of L to the size of the boosted system. Recent work by Bour et al determined the momentum dependence of the leading volume modifications to nonrelativistic systems with periodic boundary conditions imposed on the single-particle wavefunctions, enabling them to numerically determine the scattering of such bound states using a low-energy effective field theory and Luschers finite-volume method. The calculation of bound nuclear systems directly from QCD using Lattice QCD has begun, and it is important to reduce the systematic uncertainty introduced into such calculations by the finite spatial extent of the gauge-field configurations. We extend the work of Bour et al from nonrelativistic quantum mechanics to quantum field theory by generalizing the work of Luscher and of Gottlieb and Rummukainen to boosted two-body bound states. The volume modifications to bind...

  2. Identification and Evaluation of Novel Drug Targets against the Human Fungal Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus with Elaboration on the Possible Role of RNA-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekzadeh, Saeid; Sardari, Soroush; Azerang, Parisa; Khorasanizadeh, Dorsa; Amiri, Solmaz Agha; Azizi, Mohammad; Mohajerani, Nazanin; Khalaj, Vahid

    2017-01-01

    Bakground: Aspergillus fumigatus is an airborne opportunistic fungal pathogen that can cause fatal infections in immunocompromised patients. Although the current anti-fungal therapies are relatively efficient, some issues such as drug toxicity, drug interactions, and the emergence of drug-resistant fungi have promoted the intense research toward finding the novel drug targets. Methods: In search of new antifungal drug targets, we have used a bioinformatics approach to identify novel drug targets. We compared the whole proteome of this organism with yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to come up with 153 specific proteins. Further screening of these proteins revealed 50 potential molecular targets in A. fumigatus. Amongst them, RNA-binding protein (RBP) was selected for further examination. The aspergillus fumigatus RBP (AfuRBP), as a peptidylprolyl isomerase, was evaluated by homology modeling and bioinformatics tools. RBP-deficient mutant strains of A. fumigatus were generated and characterized. Furthermore, the susceptibility of these strains to known peptidylprolyl isomerase inhibitors was assessed. Results: AfuRBP-deficient mutants demonstrated a normal growth phenotype. MIC assay results using inhibitors of peptidylprolyl isomerase confirmed a higher sensitivity of these mutants compared to the wild type. Conclusion: Our bioinformatics approach revealed a number of fungal-specific proteins that may be considered as new targets for drug discovery purposes. Peptidylprolyl isomerase, as a possible drug target, was evaluated against two potential inhibitors, and the promising results were investigated mechanistically. Future studies would confirm the impact of such target on the antifungal discovery investigations PMID:28000798

  3. Improving environmental and social targeting through adaptive management in Mexico's payments for hydrological services program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Katharine R E; Alix-Garcia, Jennifer M; Shapiro-Garza, Elizabeth; Fine, Leah R; Radeloff, Volker C; Aronson, Glen; Castillo, Selene; Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos; Yañez-Pagans, Patricia

    2014-10-01

    Natural resource managers are often expected to achieve both environmental protection and economic development even when there are fundamental trade-offs between these goals. Adaptive management provides a theoretical structure for program administrators to balance social priorities in the presence of trade-offs and to improve conservation targeting. We used the case of Mexico's federal Payments for Hydrological Services program (PSAH) to illustrate the importance of adaptive management for improving program targeting. We documented adaptive elements of PSAH and corresponding changes in program eligibility and selection criteria. To evaluate whether these changes resulted in enrollment of lands of high environmental and social priority, we compared the environmental and social characteristics of the areas enrolled in the program with the characteristics of all forested areas in Mexico, all areas eligible for the program, and all areas submitted for application to the program. The program successfully enrolled areas of both high ecological and social priority, and over time, adaptive changes in the program's criteria for eligibility and selection led to increased enrollment of land scoring high on both dimensions. Three factors facilitated adaptive management in Mexico and are likely to be generally important for conservation managers: a supportive political environment, including financial backing and encouragement to experiment from the federal government; availability of relatively good social and environmental data; and active participation in the review process by stakeholders and outside evaluators.

  4. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G; Ploeg, Rutger J; Yard, Benito A; Seelen, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function after transplantation. Brain death (BD) was induced in Fisher rats by inflation of an epidurally placed balloon catheter and ventilated for 6h. BD animals were treated with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1) 1h before or 1h after BD. Kidney transplantation was performed and 7 days after transplantation animals were sacrificed. Plasma creatinine and urea were measured at days 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7 after transplantation. Renal function was significantly better at day 1 after transplantation in recipients receiving a sCR1 pre-treated donor kidney compared to recipients of a non-treated donor graft. Also treatment with sCR1, 1h after the diagnosis of BD, resulted in a better renal function after transplantation. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1beta and TGF-beta were significantly lower in renal allografts recovered from treated donors. This study shows that targeting complement activation, during BD in the donor, leads to an improved renal function after transplantation in the recipient.

  5. Improved soybean oil quality by targeted mutagenesis of the fatty acid desaturase 2 gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, William; Coffman, Andrew; Clasen, Benjamin M; Demorest, Zachary L; Lowy, Anita; Ray, Erin; Retterath, Adam; Stoddard, Thomas; Juillerat, Alexandre; Cedrone, Frederic; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2014-09-01

    Soybean oil is high in polyunsaturated fats and is often partially hydrogenated to increase its shelf life and improve oxidative stability. The trans-fatty acids produced through hydrogenation pose a health threat. Soybean lines that are low in polyunsaturated fats were generated by introducing mutations in two fatty acid desaturase 2 genes (FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B), which in the seed convert the monounsaturated fat, oleic acid, to the polyunsaturated fat, linoleic acid. Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) were engineered to recognize and cleave conserved DNA sequences in both genes. In four of 19 transgenic soybean lines expressing the TALENs, mutations in FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B were observed in DNA extracted from leaf tissue; three of the four lines transmitted heritable FAD2-1 mutations to the next generation. The fatty acid profile of the seed was dramatically changed in plants homozygous for mutations in both FAD2-1A and FAD2-1B: oleic acid increased from 20% to 80% and linoleic acid decreased from 50% to under 4%. Further, mutant plants were identified that lacked the TALEN transgene and only carried the targeted mutations. The ability to create a valuable trait in a single generation through targeted modification of a gene family demonstrates the power of TALENs for genome engineering and crop improvement.

  6. The C-terminus of H-Ras as a target for the covalent binding of reactive compounds modulating Ras-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeste, Clara L; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; Bray, Francesca; García de Lacoba, Mario; de la Torre, Beatriz G; Andreu, David; Ruiz-Sánchez, Antonio J; Pérez-Inestrosa, Ezequiel; García-Domínguez, Carlota A; Rojas, José M; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2011-01-06

    Ras proteins are crucial players in differentiation and oncogenesis and constitute important drug targets. The localization and activity of Ras proteins are highly dependent on posttranslational modifications at their C-termini. In addition to an isoprenylated cysteine, H-Ras, but not other Ras proteins, possesses two cysteine residues (C181 and C184) in the C-terminal hypervariable domain that act as palmitoylation sites in cells. Cyclopentenone prostaglandins (cyPG) are reactive lipidic mediators that covalently bind to H-Ras and activate H-Ras dependent pathways. Dienone cyPG, such as 15-deoxy-Δ(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) and Δ(12)-PGJ(2) selectively bind to the H-Ras hypervariable domain. Here we show that these cyPG bind simultaneously C181 and C184 of H-Ras, thus potentially altering the conformational tendencies of the hypervariable domain. Based on these results, we have explored the capacity of several bifunctional cysteine reactive small molecules to bind to the hypervariable domain of H-Ras proteins. Interestingly, phenylarsine oxide (PAO), a widely used tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, and dibromobimane, a cross-linking agent used for cysteine mapping, effectively bind H-Ras hypervariable domain. The interaction of PAO with H-Ras takes place in vitro and in cells and blocks modification of H-Ras by 15d-PGJ(2). Moreover, PAO treatment selectively alters H-Ras membrane partition and the pattern of H-Ras activation in cells, from the plasma membrane to endomembranes. These results identify H-Ras as a novel target for PAO. More importantly, these observations reveal that small molecules or reactive intermediates interacting with spatially vicinal cysteines induce intramolecular cross-linking of H-Ras C-terminus potentially contributing to the modulation of Ras-dependent pathways.

  7. Characterization of heparin-binding site of tissue transglutaminase: its importance in cell surface targeting, matrix deposition, and cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Collighan, Russell J; Pytel, Kamila; Rathbone, Daniel L; Li, Xiaoling; Griffin, Martin

    2012-04-13

    Tissue transglutaminase (TG2) is a multifunctional Ca(2+)-activated protein cross-linking enzyme secreted into the extracellular matrix (ECM), where it is involved in wound healing and scarring, tissue fibrosis, celiac disease, and metastatic cancer. Extracellular TG2 can also facilitate cell adhesion important in wound healing through a nontransamidating mechanism via its association with fibronectin, heparan sulfates (HS), and integrins. Regulating the mechanism how TG2 is translocated into the ECM therefore provides a strategy for modulating these physiological and pathological functions of the enzyme. Here, through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we have identified the HS-binding site of TG2 (202)KFLKNAGRDCSRRSSPVYVGR(222). We demonstrate the requirement of this binding site for translocation of TG2 into the ECM through a mechanism involving cell surface shedding of HS. By synthesizing a peptide NPKFLKNAGRDCSRRSS corresponding to the HS-binding site within TG2, we also demonstrate how this mimicking peptide can in isolation compensate for the RGD-induced loss of cell adhesion on fibronectin via binding to syndecan-4, leading to activation of PKCα, pFAK-397, and ERK1/2 and the subsequent formation of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton organization. A novel regulatory mechanism for TG2 translocation into the extracellular compartment that depends upon TG2 conformation and the binding of HS is proposed.

  8. RNA targeting by small molecule alkaloids: Studies on the binding of berberine and palmatine to polyribonucleotides and comparison to ethidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Maidul; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2008-03-01

    The binding affinity, energetics and conformational aspects of the interaction of isoquinoline alkaloids berberine and palmatine to four single stranded polyribonucleotides polyguanylic acid [poly(G)], polyinosinic acid [poly(I)], polycytidylic acid [poly(C)] and polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] were studied by absorption, fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry and circular dichroism spectroscopy and compared with ethidium. Berberine, palmatine and ethidium binds strongly with poly(G) and poly(I) with affinity in the order 10 5 M -1 while their binding to poly(C) and poly(U) were very weak or practically nil. The same conclusions have also emerged from isothermal titration calorimetric studies. The binding of all the three compounds to poly(C) and poly(I) was exothermic and favored by both negative enthalpy change and positive entropy change. Conformational change in the polymer associated with the binding was observed in poly(I) with all the three molecules and poly(U) with ethidium but not in poly(G) and poly(C) revealing differences in the orientation of the bound molecules in the hitherto different helical organization of these polymers. These fundamental results may be useful and serve as database for the development of futuristic RNA based small molecule therapeutics.

  9. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruoxi [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi [College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan Institute of Bioengineering, Wuhan 430415 (China); Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  10. DNA-Damage Response RNA-Binding Proteins (DDRBPs): Perspectives from a New Class of Proteins and Their RNA Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutertre, Martin; Vagner, Stéphan

    2016-09-29

    Upon DNA damage, cells trigger an early DNA-damage response (DDR) involving DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints, and late responses involving gene expression regulation that determine cell fate. Screens for genes involved in the DDR have found many RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), while screens for novel RBPs have identified DDR proteins. An increasing number of RBPs are involved in early and/or late DDR. We propose to call this new class of actors of the DDR, which contain an RNA-binding activity, DNA-damage response RNA-binding proteins (DDRBPs). We then discuss how DDRBPs contribute not only to gene expression regulation in the late DDR but also to early DDR signaling, DNA repair, and chromatin modifications at DNA-damage sites through interactions with both long and short noncoding RNAs.

  11. The reactive centre loop of corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a protease target for cortisol release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2014-03-25

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds more than 90% of circulating cortisol and is a non-inhibitory member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (SERPINS) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). At sites of inflammation neutrophil activation can release elastase which may cleave the RCL and result in cortisol release from CBG. The RCL sequence also has two theoretical chymotrypsin cleavage sites and we used a monoclonal antibody with specificity for the RCL to investigate chymotrypsin cleavage of CBG. Here we show, for the first time, rapid chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL of CBG, resulting in undetectable levels of intact CBG, whereas total CBG levels were unchanged. Coincident with both chymotrypsin and elastase cleavage there was an increase in the free cortisol fraction of serum to levels similar to when CBG had been inactivated by heat indicating total cortisol release from CBG. These findings demonstrate a new mechanism for cortisol release from its binding globulin.

  12. Beyond the binding site: in vivo identification of tbx2, smarca5 and wnt5b as molecular targets of CNBP during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Pablo; Margarit, Ezequiel; Mouguelar, Valeria S; Allende, Miguel L; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2013-01-01

    CNBP is a nucleic acid chaperone implicated in vertebrate craniofacial development, as well as in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2) and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) human muscle diseases. CNBP is highly conserved among vertebrates and has been implicated in transcriptional regulation; however, its DNA binding sites and molecular targets remain elusive. The main goal of this work was to identify CNBP DNA binding sites that might reveal target genes involved in vertebrate embryonic development. To accomplish this, we used a recently described yeast one-hybrid assay to identify DNA sequences bound in vivo by CNBP. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that these sequences are G-enriched and show high frequency of putative G-quadruplex DNA secondary structure. Moreover, an in silico approach enabled us to establish the CNBP DNA-binding site and to predict CNBP putative targets based on gene ontology terms and synexpression with CNBP. The direct interaction between CNBP and candidate genes was proved by EMSA and ChIP assays. Besides, the role of CNBP upon the identified genes was validated in loss-of-function experiments in developing zebrafish. We successfully confirmed that CNBP up-regulates tbx2b and smarca5, and down-regulates wnt5b gene expression. The highly stringent strategy used in this work allowed us to identify new CNBP target genes functionally important in different contexts of vertebrate embryonic development. Furthermore, it represents a novel approach toward understanding the biological function and regulatory networks involving CNBP in the biology of vertebrates.

  13. Beyond the binding site: in vivo identification of tbx2, smarca5 and wnt5b as molecular targets of CNBP during embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Armas

    Full Text Available CNBP is a nucleic acid chaperone implicated in vertebrate craniofacial development, as well as in myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2 and sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM human muscle diseases. CNBP is highly conserved among vertebrates and has been implicated in transcriptional regulation; however, its DNA binding sites and molecular targets remain elusive. The main goal of this work was to identify CNBP DNA binding sites that might reveal target genes involved in vertebrate embryonic development. To accomplish this, we used a recently described yeast one-hybrid assay to identify DNA sequences bound in vivo by CNBP. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that these sequences are G-enriched and show high frequency of putative G-quadruplex DNA secondary structure. Moreover, an in silico approach enabled us to establish the CNBP DNA-binding site and to predict CNBP putative targets based on gene ontology terms and synexpression with CNBP. The direct interaction between CNBP and candidate genes was proved by EMSA and ChIP assays. Besides, the role of CNBP upon the identified genes was validated in loss-of-function experiments in developing zebrafish. We successfully confirmed that CNBP up-regulates tbx2b and smarca5, and down-regulates wnt5b gene expression. The highly stringent strategy used in this work allowed us to identify new CNBP target genes functionally important in different contexts of vertebrate embryonic development. Furthermore, it represents a novel approach toward understanding the biological function and regulatory networks involving CNBP in the biology of vertebrates.

  14. Targeting polyIC to EGFR over-expressing cells using a dsRNA binding protein domain tethered to EGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Nufar; Lebendiker, Mario; Klein, Shoshana; Zigler, Maya; Langut, Yael; Levitzki, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Selective delivery of drugs to tumor cells can increase potency and reduce toxicity. In this study, we describe a novel recombinant chimeric protein, dsRBEC, which can bind polyIC and deliver it selectively into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. dsRBEC, comprises the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) of human PKR (hPKR), which serves as the polyIC binding moiety, fused to human EGF (hEGF), the targeting moiety. dsRBEC shows high affinity towards EGFR and triggers ligand-induced endocytosis of the receptor, thus leading to the selective internalization of polyIC into EGFR over-expressing tumor cells. The targeted delivery of polyIC by dsRBEC induced cellular apoptosis and the secretion of IFN-β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. dsRBEC-delivered polyIC is much more potent than naked polyIC and is expected to reduce the toxicity caused by systemic delivery of polyIC. PMID:27598772

  15. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  16. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xevi Biarnés

    Full Text Available Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs. Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38 by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  17. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biarnés, Xevi; Marchiori, Alessandro; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-08-25

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  18. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M;

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...

  19. Technical note: Protozoa-specific antibodies raised in sheep plasma bind to their target protozoa in the rumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Y J; Rea, S M; Popovski, S; Skillman, L C; Wright, A-D G

    2014-12-01

    Binding of IgG antibodies to Entodinium spp. in the rumen of sheep (Ovis aries) was investigated by adding IgG, purified from plasma, directly into the rumen. Plasma IgG was sourced from sheep that had or had not been immunized with a vaccine containing whole fixed Entodinium spp. cells. Ruminal fluid was sampled approximately 2 h after each antibody dosing. Binding of protozoa by a specific antibody was detected using an indirect fluorescent antibody test. An antibody titer in the ruminal fluid was determined by ELISA, and the concentration of ruminal fluid ammonia-N and ruminal pH were also determined. Entodinium spp. and total protozoa from IgG-infused sheep were enumerated by microscopic counts. Two-hourly additions of IgG maintained a low antibody titer in the rumen for 12 h and the binding of the antibody to the rumen protozoa was demonstrated. Increased ammonia-N concentrations and altered ruminal fluid pH patterns indicated that additional fermentation of protein was occurring in the rumen after addition of IgG. No reduction in numbers of Entodinium spp. was observed (P>0.05). Although binding of antibodies to protozoa has been demonstrated in the rumen, it is unclear how much cell death occurred. On the balance of probability, it would appear that the antibody was degraded or partially degraded, and the impact of this on protozoal populations and the measurement of a specific titer is also unclear.

  20. Favorable binding effect for improving the electrochemical performance of cobalt oxide anode for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wan Lin; Nguyen, Van Hiep; Gu, Hal-Bon, E-mail: kuku-linlin@hotmail.com

    2014-01-01

    Electrochemical characteristics of CoO anode are highly dependent on the use of binders. Its electrochemical reversibility is drastically improved by using poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) as a binder in comparison with the commonly used poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVdF) binder. PAA can effectively buffer the volume expansion of the CoO electrode during the lithium insertion and extraction, resulting in improving electrochemical characteristics of the electrode. The cyclic stability of CoO electrode with PAA binder is remarkably improved. Impedance of CoO electrode with PAA binder is much smaller than that of PVdF binder. Moreover, the reversible capacity reaches 860 mA h g{sup −1} at a current density of 50 mA g{sup −1}.

  1. Targeted observations to improve tropical cyclone track forecasts in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberson, Sim David

    In 1997, the National Hurricane Center and the Hurricane Research Division began conducting operational synoptic surveillance missions with the Gulfstream IV-SP jet aircraft to improve operational forecast models. During the first two years, twenty-four missions were conducted around tropical cyclones threatening the continental United States, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Global Positioning System dropwindsondes were released from the aircraft at 150--200 km intervals along the flight track in the tropical cyclone environment to obtain wind, temperature, and humidity profiles from flight level (around 150 hPa) to the surface. The observations were processed and formatted aboard the aircraft and transmitted to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). There, they were ingested into the Global Data Assimilation System that subsequently provides initial and time-dependent boundary conditions for numerical models that forecast tropical cyclone track and intensity. Three dynamical models were employed in testing the targeting and sampling strategies. With the assimilation into the numerical guidance of all the observations gathered during the surveillance missions, only the 12-h Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Hurricane Model forecast showed statistically significant improvement. Neither the forecasts from the Aviation run of the Global Spectral Model nor the shallow-water VICBAR model were improved with the assimilation of the dropwindsonde data. This mediocre result is found to be due mainly to the difficulty in operationally quantifying the storm-motion vector used to create accurate synthetic data to represent the tropical cyclone vortex in the models. A secondary limit on forecast improvements from the surveillance missions is the limited amount of data provided by the one surveillance aircraft in regular missions. The inability of some surveillance missions to surround the tropical cyclone with dropwindsonde observations is a possible

  2. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaoping

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E–binding protein 4 (4E-BP1 and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1 in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  3. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid.

  4. Cytosolic glutamine synthetase: a target for improvement of crop nitrogen use efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Hanne C; Eriksson, Dennis; Møller, Inge S; Schjoerring, Jan K

    2014-10-01

    Overexpression of the cytosolic enzyme glutamine synthetase 1 (GS1) has been investigated in numerous cases with the goal of improving crop nitrogen use efficiency. However, the outcome has generally been inconsistent. Here, we review possible reasons underlying the lack of success and conclude that GS1 activity may be downregulated via a chain of processes elicited by metabolic imbalances and environmental constraints. We suggest that a pivotal role of GS1 may be related to the maintenance of essential nitrogen (N) flows and internal N sensing during critical stages of plant development. A number of more refined overexpression strategies exploiting gene stacking combined with tissue and cell specific targeting to overcome metabolic bottlenecks are considered along with their potential in relation to new N management strategies.

  5. Targeted Help for Spoken Dialogue Systems: Intelligent Feedback Improves Naive Users' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockey, Beth Ann; Lemon, Oliver; Campana, Ellen; Hiatt, Laura; Aist, Gregory; Hieronymous, Jim; Gruenstein, Alexander; Dowding, John

    2003-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that providing naive users of a spoken dialogue system with immediate help messages related to their out-of-coverage utterances improves their success in using the system. A grammar-based recognizer and a Statistical Language Model (SLM) recognizer are run simultaneously. If the grammar-based recognizer suceeds, the less accurate SLM recognizer hypothesis is not used. When the grammar-based recognizer fails and the SLM recognizer produces a recognition hypothesis, this result is used by the Targeted Help agent to give the user feed-back on what was recognized, a diagnosis of what was problematic about the utterance, and a related in-coverage example. The in-coverage example is intended to encourage alignment between user inputs and the language model of the system. We report on controlled experiments on a spoken dialogue system for command and control of a simulated robotic helicopter.

  6. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance.

  7. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  8. Identifying lipidic emulsomes for improved oxcarbazepine brain targeting: In vitro and rat in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zaafarany, Ghada M; Soliman, Mahmoud E; Mansour, Samar; Awad, Gehanne A S

    2016-04-30

    Lipid-based nanovectors offer effective carriers for brain delivery by improving drug potency and reducing off-target effects. Emulsomes are nano-triglyceride (TG) carriers formed of lipid cores supported by at least one phospholipid (PC) sheath. Due to their surface active properties, PC forms bilayers at the aqueous interface, thereby enabling encapsulated drug to benefit from better bioavailability and stability. Emulsomes of oxcarbazepine (OX) were prepared, aimed to offer nanocarriers for nasal delivery for brain targeting. Different TG cores (Compritol(®), tripalmitin, tristearin and triolein) and soya phosphatidylcholine in different amounts and ratios were used for emulsomal preparation. Particles were modulated to generate nanocarriers with suitable size, charge, encapsulation efficiency and prolonged release. Cytotoxicity and pharmacokinetic studies were also implemented. Nano-spherical OX-emulsomes with maximal encapsulation of 96.75% were generated. Stability studies showed changes within 30.6% and 11.2% in the size and EE% after 3 months. MTT assay proved a decrease in drug toxicity by its encapsulation in emulsomes. Incorporation of OX into emulsomes resulted in stable nanoformulations. Tailoring emulsomes properties by modulating the surface charge and particle size produced a stable system for the lipophilic drug with a prolonged release profile and mean residence time and proved direct nose-to-brain transport in rats.

  9. e-Health Tools for Targeting and Improving Melanoma Screening: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilasha Tyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The key to improved prognosis for melanoma is early detection and diagnosis, achieved by skin surveillance and secondary prevention (screening. However, adherence to screening guidelines is low, with population-based estimates of approximately 26% for physician-based skin cancer screening and 20–25% for skin self-examination. The recent proliferation of melanoma detection “e-Health” tools, digital resources that facilitate screening in patients often outside of the clinical setting, may offer new strategies to promote adherence and expand the proportion and range of individuals performing skin self-examination. The purpose of this paper is to catalog and categorize melanoma screening e-Health tools to aid in the determination of their efficacy and potential for adoption. The availability and accessibility of such tools, their costs, target audience, and, where possible, information on their efficacy, will be discussed with potential benefits and limitations considered. While e-Health tools targeting melanoma screening are widely available, little has been done to formally evaluate their efficacy and ability to aid in overcoming screening barriers. Future research needs to formally evaluate the potential role of e-Health tools in melanoma prevention.

  10. e-Health Tools for Targeting and Improving Melanoma Screening: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Abhilasha; Miller, Kimberly; Cockburn, Myles

    2012-01-01

    The key to improved prognosis for melanoma is early detection and diagnosis, achieved by skin surveillance and secondary prevention (screening). However, adherence to screening guidelines is low, with population-based estimates of approximately 26% for physician-based skin cancer screening and 20-25% for skin self-examination. The recent proliferation of melanoma detection "e-Health" tools, digital resources that facilitate screening in patients often outside of the clinical setting, may offer new strategies to promote adherence and expand the proportion and range of individuals performing skin self-examination. The purpose of this paper is to catalog and categorize melanoma screening e-Health tools to aid in the determination of their efficacy and potential for adoption. The availability and accessibility of such tools, their costs, target audience, and, where possible, information on their efficacy, will be discussed with potential benefits and limitations considered. While e-Health tools targeting melanoma screening are widely available, little has been done to formally evaluate their efficacy and ability to aid in overcoming screening barriers. Future research needs to formally evaluate the potential role of e-Health tools in melanoma prevention.

  11. Targeting SR proteins improves SMN expression in spinal muscular atrophy cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claribel D Wee

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is one of the most common inherited causes of pediatric mortality. SMA is caused by deletions or mutations in the survival of motor neuron 1 (SMN1 gene, which results in SMN protein deficiency. Humans have a centromeric copy of the survival of motor neuron gene, SMN2, which is nearly identical to SMN1. However, SMN2 cannot compensate for the loss of SMN1 because SMN2 has a single-nucleotide difference in exon 7, which negatively affects splicing of the exon. As a result, most mRNA produced from SMN2 lacks exon 7. SMN2 mRNA lacking exon 7 encodes a truncated protein with reduced functionality. Improving SMN2 exon 7 inclusion is a goal of many SMA therapeutic strategies. The identification of regulators of exon 7 inclusion may provide additional therapeutic targets or improve the design of existing strategies. Although a number of regulators of exon 7 inclusion have been identified, the function of most splicing proteins in exon 7 inclusion is unknown. Here, we test the role of SR proteins and hnRNP proteins in SMN2 exon 7 inclusion. Knockdown and overexpression studies reveal that SRSF1, SRSF2, SRSF3, SRSF4, SRSF5, SRSF6, SRSF7, SRSF11, hnRNPA1/B1 and hnRNP U can inhibit exon 7 inclusion. Depletion of two of the most potent inhibitors of exon 7 inclusion, SRSF2 or SRSF3, in cell lines derived from SMA patients, increased SMN2 exon 7 inclusion and SMN protein. Our results identify novel regulators of SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, revealing potential targets for SMA therapeutics.

  12. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired “safe” harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in

  13. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  14. Precise genome modification via sequence-specific nucleases-mediated gene targeting for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongwei Sun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homology-directed repair (HDR. While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes’ encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired ‘safe’ harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9 systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential

  15. Molecular recognition: monomer of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 recognizes its dimer DNA binding target sites specifically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    It is widely believed that dimerization is a requirement for the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 to recognize its specific DNA target sites. We used the basic region (226-252) of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4, as both a monomeric peptide and a disulfide-linked dimer to investigate the interaction of the peptides with the DNA target sites AP-1 and CRE. CD and ITC experiments indicate that although the monomeric peptide GCN4-M has a weaker affinity with the DNA relative to the disulfide-linked dimer peptide GCN4-D, it recognizes AP-1 and CRE target sites specifically.

  16. GSK189254, a novel H3 receptor antagonist that binds to histamine H3 receptors in Alzheimer's disease brain and improves cognitive performance in preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhurst, Andrew D; Atkins, Alan R; Beresford, Isabel J; Brackenborough, Kim; Briggs, Michael A; Calver, Andrew R; Cilia, Jackie; Cluderay, Jane E; Crook, Barry; Davis, John B; Davis, Rebecca K; Davis, Robert P; Dawson, Lee A; Foley, Andrew G; Gartlon, Jane; Gonzalez, M Isabel; Heslop, Teresa; Hirst, Warren D; Jennings, Carol; Jones, Declan N C; Lacroix, Laurent P; Martyn, Abbe; Ociepka, Sandrine; Ray, Alison; Regan, Ciaran M; Roberts, Jennifer C; Schogger, Joanne; Southam, Eric; Stean, Tania O; Trail, Brenda K; Upton, Neil; Wadsworth, Graham; Wald, Jeffrey A; White, Trevor; Witherington, Jason; Woolley, Marie L; Worby, Angela; Wilson, David M

    2007-06-01

    6-[(3-Cyclobutyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepin-7-yl)oxy]-N-methyl-3-pyridinecarboxamide hydrochloride (GSK189254) is a novel histamine H(3) receptor antagonist with high affinity for human (pK(i) = 9.59 -9.90) and rat (pK(i) = 8.51-9.17) H(3) receptors. GSK189254 is >10,000-fold selective for human H(3) receptors versus other targets tested, and it exhibited potent functional antagonism (pA(2) = 9.06 versus agonist-induced changes in cAMP) and inverse agonism [pIC(50) = 8.20 versus basal guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate binding] at the human recombinant H(3) receptor. In vitro autoradiography demonstrated specific [(3)H]GSK189254 binding in rat and human brain areas, including cortex and hippocampus. In addition, dense H(3) binding was detected in medial temporal cortex samples from severe cases of Alzheimer's disease, suggesting for the first time that H(3) receptors are preserved in late-stage disease. After oral administration, GSK189254 inhibited cortical ex vivo R-(-)-alpha-methyl[imidazole-2,5(n)-(3)H]histamine dihydrochloride ([(3)H]R-alpha-methylhistamine) binding (ED(50) = 0.17 mg/kg) and increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in prefrontal and somatosensory cortex (3 mg/kg). Microdialysis studies demonstrated that GSK189254 (0.3-3 mg/kg p.o.) increased the release of acetylcholine, noradrenaline, and dopamine in the anterior cingulate cortex and acetylcholine in the dorsal hippocampus. Functional antagonism of central H(3) receptors was demonstrated by blockade of R-alpha-methylhistamine-induced dipsogenia in rats (ID(50) = 0.03 mg/kg p.o.). GSK189254 significantly improved performance of rats in diverse cognition paradigms, including passive avoidance (1 and 3 mg/kg p.o.), water maze (1 and 3 mg/kg p.o.), object recognition (0.3 and 1 mg/kg p.o.), and attentional set shift (1 mg/kg p.o.). These data suggest that GSK189254 may have therapeutic potential for the symptomatic treatment of dementia in Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders.

  17. Targeting the LRP5 pathway improves bone properties in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Christina M; Barber, Lauren A; Ayturk, Ugur M; Roberts, Heather J; Deal, Lauren E; Schwartz, Marissa A; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Zurakowski, David; Robling, Alexander G; Warman, Matthew L

    2014-10-01

    The cell surface receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) is a key regulator of bone mass and bone strength. Heterozygous missense mutations in LRP5 cause autosomal dominant high bone mass (HBM) in humans by reducing binding to LRP5 by endogenous inhibitors, such as sclerostin (SOST). Mice heterozygous for a knockin allele (Lrp5(p.A214V) ) that is orthologous to a human HBM-causing mutation have increased bone mass and strength. Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a skeletal fragility disorder predominantly caused by mutations that affect type I collagen. We tested whether the LRP5 pathway can be used to improve bone properties in animal models of OI. First, we mated Lrp5(+/p.A214V) mice to Col1a2(+/p.G610C) mice, which model human type IV OI. We found that Col1a2(+/p.G610C) ;Lrp5(+/p.A214V) offspring had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to Col1a2(+/p.G610C) ;Lrp5(+/+) littermates. The improved bone properties were not a result of altered mRNA expression of type I collagen or its chaperones, nor were they due to changes in mutant type I collagen secretion. Second, we treated Col1a2(+/p.G610C) mice with a monoclonal antibody that inhibits sclerostin activity (Scl-Ab). We found that antibody-treated mice had significantly increased bone mass and strength compared to vehicle-treated littermates. These findings indicate increasing bone formation, even without altering bone collagen composition, may benefit patients with OI.

  18. Structure of an N276-Dependent HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibody Targeting a Rare V5 Glycan Hole Adjacent to the CD4 Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibmer, Constantinos Kurt; Gorman, Jason; Anthony, Colin S.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Druz, Aliaksandr; York, Talita; Schmidt, Stephen D.; Labuschagne, Phillip; Louder, Mark K.; Bailer, Robert T.; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Mascola, John R.; Williamson, Carolyn; Moore, Penny L.; Kwong, Peter D.; Morris, Lynn (NHLS-South Africa); (NIH); (Witwatersrand); (KwaZulu-Natal)

    2016-08-31

    ABSTRACT

    All HIV-1-infected individuals develop strain-specific neutralizing antibodies to their infecting virus, which in some cases mature into broadly neutralizing antibodies. Defining the epitopes of strain-specific antibodies that overlap conserved sites of vulnerability might provide mechanistic insights into how broadly neutralizing antibodies arise. We previously described an HIV-1 clade C-infected donor, CAP257, who developed broadly neutralizing plasma antibodies targeting an N276 glycan-dependent epitope in the CD4 binding site. The initial CD4 binding site response potently neutralized the heterologous tier 2 clade B viral strain RHPA, which was used to design resurfaced gp120 antigens for single-B-cell sorting. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of CAP257-RH1, an N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site antibody representative of the early CD4 binding site plasma response in donor CAP257. The cocrystal structure of CAP257-RH1 bound to RHPA gp120 revealed critical interactions with the N276 glycan, loop D, and V5, but not with aspartic acid 368, similarly to HJ16 and 179NC75. The CAP257-RH1 monoclonal antibody was derived from the immunoglobulin-variable IGHV3-33 and IGLV3-10 genes and neutralized RHPA but not the transmitted/founder virus from donor CAP257. Its narrow neutralization breadth was attributed to a binding angle that was incompatible with glycosylated V5 loops present in almost all HIV-1 strains, including the CAP257 transmitted/founder virus. Deep sequencing of autologous CAP257 viruses, however, revealed minority variants early in infection that lacked V5 glycans. These glycan-free V5 loops are unusual holes in the glycan shield that may have been necessary for initiating this N276 glycan-dependent CD4 binding site B-cell lineage.

    IMPORTANCEThe conserved CD4 binding site on gp120 is a major target for HIV-1 vaccine design, but key events in the elicitation and maturation of

  19. A novel HMM-based method for detecting enriched transcription factor binding sites reveals RUNX3 as a potential target in pancreatic cancer biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Levkovitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC is one of the most intractable malignancies. In order to search for potential new therapeutic targets, we relied on computational methods aimed at identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs over-represented in the promoter regions of genes differentially expressed in PAC. Though many computational methods have been implemented to accomplish this, none has gained overall acceptance or produced proven novel targets in PAC. To this end we have developed DEMON, a novel method for motif detection. METHODOLOGY: DEMON relies on a hidden Markov model to score the appearance of sequence motifs, taking into account all potential sites in a promoter of potentially varying binding affinities. We demonstrate DEMON's accuracy on simulated and real data sets. Applying DEMON to PAC-related data sets identifies the RUNX family as highly enriched in PAC-related genes. Using a novel experimental paradigm to distinguish between normal and PAC cells, we find that RUNX3 mRNA (but not RUNX1 or RUNX2 mRNAs exhibits time-dependent increases in normal but not in PAC cells. These increases are accompanied by changes in mRNA levels of putative RUNX gene targets. CONCLUSIONS: The integrated application of DEMON and a novel differentiation system led to the identification of a single family member, RUNX3, which together with four of its putative targets showed a robust response to a differentiation stimulus in healthy cells, whereas this regulatory mechanism was absent in PAC cells, emphasizing RUNX3 as a promising target for further studies.

  20. Structural Insights into Membrane Targeting by the Flagellar Calcium-binding Protein (FCaBP) a Myristoylated and Palmitoylated Calcium Sensor in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J Wingard; J Ladner; M Vanarotti; A Fisher; H Robinson; K Buchanan; D Engman; J Ames

    2011-12-31

    The flagellar calcium-binding protein (FCaBP) of the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is targeted to the flagellar membrane where it regulates flagellar function and assembly. As a first step toward understanding the Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes important for membrane-targeting, we report here the x-ray crystal structure of FCaBP in the Ca{sup 2+}-free state determined at 2.2{angstrom} resolution. The first 17 residues from the N terminus appear unstructured and solvent-exposed. Residues implicated in membrane targeting (Lys-19, Lys-22, and Lys-25) are flanked by an exposed N-terminal helix (residues 26-37), forming a patch of positive charge on the protein surface that may interact electrostatically with flagellar membrane targets. The four EF-hands in FCaBP each adopt a 'closed conformation' similar to that seen in Ca{sup 2+}-free calmodulin. The overall fold of FCaBP is closest to that of grancalcin and other members of the penta EF-hand superfamily. Unlike the dimeric penta EF-hand proteins, FCaBP lacks a fifth EF-hand and is monomeric. The unstructured N-terminal region of FCaBP suggests that its covalently attached myristoyl group at the N terminus may be solvent-exposed, in contrast to the highly sequestered myristoyl group seen in recoverin and GCAP1. NMR analysis demonstrates that the myristoyl group attached to FCaBP is indeed solvent-exposed in both the Ca{sup 2+}-free and Ca{sup 2+}-bound states, and myristoylation has no effect on protein structure and folding stability. We propose that exposed acyl groups at the N terminus may anchor FCaBP to the flagellar membrane and that Ca{sup 2+}-induced conformational changes may control its binding to membrane-bound protein targets..

  1. Improvement of a gene targeting system for genetic manipulation in Penicillium digitatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian XU; Cong-yi ZHU; Ming-shang WANG; Xue-peng SUN; Hong-ye LI

    2014-01-01

    本文题目:一种高效的柑橘绿霉菌基因敲除体系的构建Improvement of a gene targeting system for genetic manipulation in Penicillium digitatum研究目的:提高柑橘绿霉菌基因敲除效率。创新要点:低效的基因敲除与丝状真菌非同源末端链接(NHEJ)的DNA双链断裂修复途径有关。为提高柑橘绿霉病菌基因敲除效率,本研究利用农杆菌介导的转化体系,获得NHEJ途径中关键因子Ku80的缺失突变体(ΔPdKu80)。研究方法:与野生型菌株相比,以ΔPdKu80作为出发菌株,提高柑橘绿霉病菌PdbrlA和PdmpkA的基因敲除效率(见表1)。重要结论:ΔPdKu80的营养生长、产孢和致病性与野生型菌株基本一致。ΔPdKu80作为出发菌株,能显著提高柑橘绿霉菌的敲除效率。%Penicillium digitatum is the most important pathogen of postharvest citrus. Gene targeting can be done in P. digitatum using homologous recombination via Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation (ATMT), but the frequencies are often very low. In the present study, we replaced the Ku80 homolog (a gene of the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway) with the hygromycin resistance cassette (hph) by ATMT. No significant change in vegetative growth, conidiation, or pathogenicity was observed in Ku80-deficient strain (∆PdKu80) of P. digitatum. However, using∆PdKu80 as a targeting strain, the gene-targeting frequencies for both genes PdbrlA and PdmpkA were significantly increased. These results suggest that Ku80 plays an important role in homologous inte-gration and the created∆PdKu80 strain would be a good candidate for rapid gene function analysis in P. digitatum.

  2. Discovery of selective inhibitors of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 by targeting the enzyme DNA-binding cleft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossmann, Bradley R; Abdelmalak, Monica; Lopez, Sophia; Tender, Gabrielle; Yan, Chunli; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe; Ivanov, Ivaylo

    2016-07-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2) processes protein/DNA adducts resulting from abortive DNA topoisomerase II (Top2) activity. TDP2 inhibition could provide synergism with the Top2 poison class of chemotherapeutics. By virtual screening of the NCI diversity small molecule database, we identified selective TDP2 inhibitors and experimentally verified their selective inhibitory activity. Three inhibitors exhibited low-micromolar IC50 values. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed a common binding mode for these inhibitors, involving association to the TDP2 DNA-binding cleft. MM-PBSA per-residue energy decomposition identified important interactions of the compounds with specific TDP2 residues. These interactions could provide new avenues for synthetic optimization of these scaffolds.

  3. Elucidation of a C-Rich Signature Motif in Target mRNAs of RNA-Binding Protein TIAR▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Henry S.; Kuwano, Yuki; Zhan, Ming; Pullmann, Rudolf; Mazan-Mamczarz, Krystyna; Li, Huai; Kedersha, Nancy; Anderson, Paul; Wilce, Matthew C J; Gorospe, Myriam; Wilce, Jacqueline A.

    2007-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TIAR (related to TIA-1 [T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1]) was shown to associate with subsets of mRNAs bearing U-rich sequences in their 3′ untranslated regions. TIAR can function as a translational repressor, particularly in response to cytotoxic agents. Using unstressed colon cancer cells, collections of mRNAs associated with TIAR were isolated by immunoprecipitation (IP) of (TIAR-RNA) ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes, identified by microarray analysis, an...

  4. Novel Prostate Specific Antigen plastic antibody designed withcharged binding sites for an improved protein binding and itsapplication in a biosensor of potentiometric transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Rebelo, Tânia S. C. R.; Santos, C.; Costa-Rodrigues, J.; Fernandes, M. H.; Noronha, João P. C.; Sales, M. Goreti F.

    2014-01-01

    This work shows that the synthesis of protein plastic antibodies tailored with selected charged monomersaround the binding site enhances protein binding. These charged receptor sites are placed over a neutralpolymeric matrix, thus inducing a suitable orientation the protein reception to its site. This is confirmed bypreparing control materials with neutral monomers and also with non-imprinted template. This concepthas been applied here to Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), the protein of choice...

  5. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-11-01

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses.

  6. VP40 of the Ebola Virus as a Target for EboV Therapy: Comprehensive Conformational and Inhibitor Binding Landscape from Accelerated Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmith, Marissa; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2017-03-01

    The first account of the dynamic features of the loop region of VP40 of the Ebola virus was studied using accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and reported herein. Among the proteins of the Ebola virus, the matrix protein (VP40) plays a significant role in the virus lifecycle thereby making it a promising therapeutic target. Of interest is the newly elucidated N-terminal domain loop region of VP40 comprising residues K127, T129, and N130 which when mutated to alanine have demonstrated an unrecognized role for N-terminal domain-plasma membrane interaction for efficient VP40-plasma membrane localization, oligomerization, matrix assembly, and egress. The molecular understanding of the conformational features of VP40 in complex with a known inhibitor still remains elusive. Using accelerated molecular dynamics approaches, we conducted a comparative study on VP40 apo and bound systems to understand the conformational features of VP40 at the molecular level and to determine the effect of inhibitor binding with the aid of a number of post-dynamic analytical tools. Significant features were seen in the presence of an inhibitor as per molecular mechanics/generalized born surface area binding free energy calculations. Results revealed that inhibitor binding to VP40 reduces the flexibility and mobility of the protein as supported by root mean square fluctuation and root mean square deviation calculations. The study revealed a characteristic "twisting" motion and coiling of the loop region of VP40 accompanied by conformational changes in the dimer interface upon inhibitor binding. We believe that results presented in this study will ultimately provide useful insight into the binding landscape of VP40 which could assist researchers in the discovery of potent Ebola virus inhibitors for anti-Ebola therapies.

  7. Dynamic Conformational Change Regulates the Protein-DNA Recognition: An Investigation on Binding of a Y-Family Polymerase to Its Target DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiakun; Liu, Fei; Maxwell, Brian A.; Wang, Yong; Suo, Zucai; Wang, Haijun; Han, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4) during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates. PMID:25188490

  8. Intestine-targeted DGAT1 inhibition improves obesity and insulin resistance without skin aberrations in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Tsuda

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1 catalyzes the final committed step in triglyceride biosynthesis. DGAT1 null mice are known to be resistant to diet-induced obesity, and more insulin sensitive relative to the wild-type; however, the mice exhibit abnormalities in the skin. This work determined whether the intestine-targeted DGAT1 inhibitor could improve obesity and insulin resistance without skin aberrations in mice. DESIGN AND METHODS: We synthesized 2 DGAT1 inhibitors: Compound A, described in the patent application from the Japan Tobacco, and Compound B (A-922500, reported by Abbott Laboratories. Both compounds were evaluated for inhibitory activities against DGAT1 enzymes and effects on the skin in mice in vivo. Compound B was further investigated for effects on obesity and insulin resistance in diet-induced-obese (DIO mice. RESULTS: The 2 compounds comparably inhibited the DGAT1 enzyme activity and the cellular triglyceride synthesis in vitro, while they showed different distribution patterns in mice in vivo. Compound A, which distributed systemically, caused skin aberrations, while Compound B, which preferentially distributed to the intestine, improved obesity and insulin resistance without skin aberrations in DIO mice. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the intestine is the key tissue in which DGAT1 plays a role in promoting obesity and insulin resistance.

  9. Proteomics meets blood banking: identification of protein targets for the improvement of platelet quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Devine, Dana V

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics has brought new perspectives to the fields of hematology and transfusion medicine in the last decade. The steady improvement of proteomic technology is propelling novel discoveries of molecular mechanisms by studying protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein interactions. This review article focuses on the application of proteomics to the identification of molecular mechanisms leading to the deterioration of blood platelets during storage - a critical aspect in the provision of platelet transfusion products. Several proteomic approaches have been employed to analyse changes in the platelet protein profile during storage and the obtained data now need to be translated into platelet biochemistry in order to connect the results to platelet function. Targeted biochemical applications then allow the identification of points for intervention in signal transduction pathways. Once validated and placed in a transfusion context, these data will provide further understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms leading to platelet storage lesion. Future aspects of proteomics in blood banking will aim to make use of protein markers identified for platelet storage lesion development to monitor proteome changes when alterations such as the use of additive solutions or pathogen reduction strategies are put in place in order to improve platelet quality for patients.

  10. Metabolomics as a tool for target identification in strain improvement: the influence of phenotype definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaksma, Machtelt; Bijlsma, Sabina; Coulier, Leon; Punt, Peter J; van der Werf, Mariët J

    2011-01-01

    For the optimization of microbial production processes, the choice of the quantitative phenotype to be optimized is crucial. For instance, for the optimization of product formation, either product concentration or productivity can be pursued, potentially resulting in different targets for strain improvement. The choice of a quantitative phenotype is highly relevant for classical improvement approaches, and even more so for modern systems biology approaches. In this study, the information content of a metabolomics dataset was determined with respect to different quantitative phenotypes related to the formation of specific products. To this end, the production of two industrially relevant products by Aspergillus niger was evaluated: (i) the enzyme glucoamylase, and (ii) the more complex product group of secreted proteases, consisting of multiple enzymes. For both products, six quantitative phenotypes associated with activity and productivity were defined, also taking into account different time points of sampling during the fermentation. Both linear and nonlinear relationships between the metabolome data and the different quantitative phenotypes were considered. The multivariate data analysis tool partial least-squares (PLS) was used to evaluate the information content of the datasets for all the different quantitative phenotypes defined. Depending on the product studied, different quantitative phenotypes were found to have the highest information content in specific metabolomics datasets. A detailed analysis of the metabolites that showed strong correlation with these quantitative phenotypes revealed that various sugar derivatives correlated with glucoamylase activity. For the reduction of protease activity, mainly as-yet-unidentified compounds correlated.

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massel, Karen; Campbell, Bradley C.; Mace, Emma S.; Tai, Shuaishuai; Tao, Yongfu; Worland, Belinda G.; Jordan, David R.; Botella, Jose R.; Godwin, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum) is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and utilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT) genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR) genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum. PMID:27826302

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing Reveals Potential New Targets for Improving Nitrogen Uptake and Utilization in Sorghum bicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Massel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N fertilizers are a major agricultural input where more than 100 million tons are supplied annually. Cereals are particularly inefficient at soil N uptake, where the unrecovered nitrogen causes serious environmental damage. Sorghum bicolor (sorghum is an important cereal crop, particularly in resource-poor semi-arid regions, and is known to have a high NUE in comparison to other major cereals under limited N conditions. This study provides the first assessment of genetic diversity and signatures of selection across 230 fully sequenced genes putatively involved in the uptake and mobilization of N from a diverse panel of sorghum lines. This comprehensive analysis reveals an overall reduction in diversity as a result of domestication and a total of 128 genes displaying signatures of purifying selection, thereby revealing possible gene targets to improve NUE in sorghum and cereals alike. A number of key genes appear to have been involved in selective sweeps, reducing their sequence diversity. The ammonium transporter (AMT genes generally had low allelic diversity, whereas a substantial number of nitrate/peptide transporter 1 (NRT1/PTR genes had higher nucleotide diversity in domesticated germplasm. Interestingly, members of the distinct race Guinea margaritiferum contained a number of unique alleles, and along with the wild sorghum species, represent a rich resource of new variation for plant improvement of NUE in sorghum.

  13. Bioimaging of Nucleolin Aptamer-Containing 5-(N-benzylcarboxyamide)-2′-deoxyuridine More Capable of Specific Binding to Targets in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kyue Yim Lee; Hyungu Kang; Sung Ho Ryu; Dong Soo Lee; Jung Hwan Lee; Soonhag Kim

    2010-01-01

    Chemically modified nucleotides have been developed and applied into SELEX procedure to find a novel type of aptamers to fit with targets of interest. In this study, we directly performed chemical modification of 5-(N-benzylcarboxyamide)-2′-deoxyuridine (called 5-BzdU) in the AS1411 aptamer, which binds to the nucleolin protein expressed in cancer cells. Forty-seven compounds of AS1411-containing Cy3-labeled 5-BzdU (called Cy3-(5-BzdU)-modified-AS1411) were synthesized by randomly substitutin...

  14. Improving the quality of proton beams via double targets driven by an intense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Xu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme is proposed to improve the quality of proton beams via ultra-intense laser pulse interacting with double plasma targets, which consist of a pre-target with relatively low density and a main target with high density. Both one- and two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations show that, the using of an appropriate pre-target can help to obtain a much stronger longitudinal charge separation field in contrast to using only the main target. And proton beam with lower momentum divergence, better monochromaticity and collimation, as well as higher current density is generated. Moreover, due to the strengthened coupling between the laser pulse and targets, the energy conversion from laser pulse to protons is also increased.

  15. Engineered antibody CH2 domains binding to nucleolin: Isolation, characterization and improvement of aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, De-Zhi; Gong, Rui; Zheng, Jun; Chen, Xi-Hai; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Zhao, Qi

    2017-02-12

    Smaller recombinant antibody fragments are now emerging as alternatives of conventional antibodies. Especially, immunoglobulin (Ig) constant CH2 domain and engineered CH2 with improved stability are promising as scaffolds for selection of specific binders to various antigens. We constructed a yeast display library based on an engineered human IgG1 CH2 scaffold with diversified loop regions. A group of CH2 binders were isolated from this yeast display library by panning against nucleolin, which is a tumor-associated antigen involved in cell proliferation, tumor cell growth and angiogenesis. Out of 20 mutants, we selected 3 clones exhibiting relatively high affinities to nucleolin on yeasts. However, recombinant CH2 mutants aggregated when they were expressed. To find the mechanism of the aggregation, we employed computational prediction approaches through structural homology models of CH2 binders. The analysis of potential aggregation prone regions (APRs) and solvent accessible surface areas (ASAs) indicated two hydrophobic residues, Val264 and Leu309, in the β-sheet, in which replacement of both charged residues led to significantly decrease of the protein aggregation. The newly identified CH2 binders could be improved to use as candidate therapeutics or research reagents in the future.

  16. Does Targeted Education of Emergency Physicians Improve Their Comfort Level in Treating Psychiatric Patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda J Walker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We determined if targeted education of emergency physicians (EPsregarding the treatment of mental illness will improve their comfort level in treatingpsychiatric patients boarding in the emergency department (ED awaiting admission.Methods: We performed a pilot study examining whether an educational interventionwould change an EP’s comfort level in treating psychiatric boarder patients (PBPs. Weidentified a set of psychiatric emergencies that typically require admission or treatmentbeyond the scope of practice of emergency medicine. Diagnoses included majordepression, schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar affective disorder, generalanxiety disorder, suicidal ideation, and criminal behavior. We designed equivalentsurveys to be used before and after an educational intervention. Each survey consistedof 10 scenarios of typical psychiatric patients. EPs were asked to rate their comfort levelsin treating the described patients on a visual analogue scale. We calculated summaryscores for the non intervention survey group (NINT and intervention survey group (INTand compared them using Student’s t-test.Results: Seventy-nine percent (33/42 of eligible participants completed the preinterventionsurvey (21 attendings, 12 residents and comprised the NINT group. Fiftyfivepercent (23/42 completed the post-intervention survey (16 attendings, 7 residentscomprising the INT group. A comparison of summary scores between ‘NINT’ and ‘INT’groups showed a highly significant improvement in comfort levels with treating thepatients described in the scenarios (P = 0.003. Improvements were noted on separateanalysis for faculty (P = 0.039 and for residents (P = 0.012. Results of a sensitivityanalysis excluding one highly significant scenario showed decreased, but still importantdifferences between the NINT and INT groups for all participants and for residents, butnot for faculty (all: P = 0.05; faculty: P = 0.25; residents: P = 0

  17. Discovery of the first small molecule inhibitor of human DDX3 specifically designed to target the RNA binding site: towards the next generation HIV-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marco; Falchi, Federico; Garbelli, Anna; Samuele, Alberta; Bernardo, Vincenzo; Paolucci, Stefania; Baldanti, Fausto; Schenone, Silvia; Manetti, Fabrizio; Maga, Giovanni; Botta, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Efficacy of currently approved anti-HIV drugs is hampered by mutations of the viral enzymes, leading invariably to drug resistance and chemotherapy failure. Recent data suggest that cellular co-factors also represent useful targets for anti-HIV therapy. Here we describe the identification of the first small molecules specifically designed to inhibit the HIV-1 replication by targeting the RNA binding site of the human DEAD-Box RNA helicase DDX3. Optimization of a easily synthetically accessible hit (1) identified by application of a high-throughput docking approach afforded the promising compounds 6 and 8 which proved to inhibit both the helicase and ATPase activity of DDX3 and to reduce the viral load of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) infected with HIV-1.

  18. Continuous Monitoring and Intrafraction Target Position Correction During Treatment Improves Target Coverage for Patients Undergoing SBRT Prostate Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D. Michael, E-mail: lovelocm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Messineo, Alessandra P. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cox, Brett W. [North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, New York (United States); Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Zelefsky, Michael J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the potential benefits of continuous monitoring of prostate position and intervention (CMI) using 2-mm displacement thresholds during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment to those of a conventional image-guided procedure involving single localization prior to treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine patients accrued to a prostate SBRT dose escalation protocol were implanted with radiofrequency transponder beacons. The planning target volume (PTV) margin was 5 mm in all directions, except for 3 mm in the posterior direction. The prostate was kept within 2 mm of its planned position by the therapists halting dose delivery and, if necessary, correcting the couch position. We computed the number, type, and time required for interventions and where the prostate would have been during dose delivery had there been, instead, a single image-guided setup procedure prior to each treatment. Distributions of prostate displacements were computed as a function of time. Results: After the initial setup, 1.7 interventions per fraction were required, with a concomitant increase in time for dose delivery of approximately 65 seconds. Small systematic drifts in prostate position in the posterior and inferior directions were observed in the study patients. Without CMI, intrafractional motion would have resulted in approximately 10% of patients having a delivered dose that did not meet our clinical coverage requirement, that is, a PTV D95 of >90%. The posterior PTV margin required for 95% of the dose to be delivered with the target positioned within the PTV was computed as a function of time. The margin necessary was found to increase by 2 mm every 5 minutes, starting from the time of the imaging procedure. Conclusions: CMI using a tight 2-mm displacement threshold was not only feasible but was found to deliver superior PTV coverage compared with the conventional image-guided procedure in the SBRT setting.

  19. Targeting regulatory T cells to improve vaccine immunogenicity in early life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorjoh eNdure

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Human newborns and infants are bombarded with multiple pathogens on leaving the sterile intra-uterine environment, and yet have suboptimal innate immunity and limited immunological memory, thus leading to increased susceptibility to infections in early life. They are thus the target age group for a host of vaccines against common bacterial and viral pathogens. They are also the target group for many vaccines in development, including those against tuberculosis (TB, malaria and HIV infection. However, neonatal and infant responses to many vaccines are suboptimal, and in the case of the polysaccharide vaccines, it has been necessary to develop the alternative conjugated formulations in order to induce immunity in early life. Immunoregulatory factors are an intrinsic component of natural immunity necessary to dampen or control immune responses, with the caveat that they may also decrease immunity to infections or lead to chronic infection. This review explores the key immunoregulatory factors at play in early life, with a particular emphasis on regulatory T cells (Tregs. It goes on to explore the role that Tregs play in limting vaccine immunogenicity, and describes animal and human studies in which Tregs have been depleted in order to enhance vaccine responses. A deeper understanding of the role that Tregs play in limiting or controlling vaccine induced immunity would provide strategies to improve vaccine immunogenicity in this critical age group. New adjuvants and drugs are being developed that can transiently suppress Treg function, and their use as part of human vaccination strategies against infections is becoming a real prospect for the future.

  20. MRI to CT prostate registration for improved targeting in cancer external beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commandeur, Frederic; Simon, Antoine; Mathieu, Romain; Nassef, Mohamed; Ospina, Juan David; Rolland, Yan; Haigron, Pascal; De Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2016-06-16

    External radiotherapy is a major clinical treatment for localized prostate cancer. Currently, computed tomography (CT) is used to delineate the prostate and to plan the radiotherapy treatment. However, CT images suffer from a poor soft tissue contrast and do not allow an accurate organ delineation. On the contrary, Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides rich details and high soft tissue contrast, allowing tumor detection. Thus, the intra-individual propagation of MRI delineations towards the planning CT may improve tumor targeting. In this paper we introduce a new method to propagate MRI prostate delineations to the planning CT. In a first step, a random forest (RF) classification is performed to coarsely detect the prostate in the CT images, yielding a prostate probability membership for each voxel and a prostate hard segmentation. Then the registration is performed using a new similarity metric which maximizes the probability and the collinearity between the normals of the MR existing contour and the contour resulting from the CT classification. A first study on synthetic data was performed to analyze the influence of the metric parameters with different levels of noise. Then, the method was also evaluated on real MR-CT data using manual alignments and intraprostatic fiducial markers and compared to a classically used mutual information (MI) approach. The proposed metric outperformed MI by 7% in terms of Dice score coefficient (DSC), by 3.14 mm the Hausdorff Distance (HD) and 2.13 mm the markers position errors (MPE). Finally, the impact of registration uncertainties on the treatment planning was evaluated, demonstrating the potential advantage of the proposed approach in a clinical setup to define a precise target.

  1. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  2. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: improving target volume delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkelbach, Jan; Menze, Bjoern H.; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A.

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma differ from many other tumors in the sense that they grow infiltratively into the brain tissue instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In current clinical practice, a uniform margin, typically two centimeters, is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease that is not directly assessable through imaging. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth, which arises from different factors: anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain. The target volume for radiotherapy planning can be defined as an isoline of the simulated tumor cell density. This paper analyzes the model with respect to implications for target volume definition and identifies its most critical components. A retrospective study involving ten glioblastoma patients treated at our institution has been performed. To illustrate the main findings of the study, a detailed case study is presented for a glioblastoma located close to the falx. In this situation, the falx represents a boundary for migrating tumor cells, whereas the corpus callosum provides a route for the tumor to spread to the contralateral hemisphere. We further discuss the sensitivity of the model with respect to the input parameters. Correct segmentation of the brain appears to be the most

  3. Impact of Targeted Ocean Observations for Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Hurricane Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, G. R.; Srinivasan, A.; Kourafalou, V. H.; Yang, H.; Le Henaff, M.; Atlas, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The accuracy of hurricane intensity forecasts produced by coupled forecast models is influenced by errors and biases in SST forecasts produced by the ocean model component and the resulting impact on the enthalpy flux from ocean to atmosphere that powers the storm. Errors and biases in fields used to initialize the ocean model seriously degrade SST forecast accuracy. One strategy for improving ocean model initialization is to design a targeted observing program using airplanes and in-situ devices such as floats and drifters so that assimilation of the additional data substantially reduces errors in the ocean analysis system that provides the initial fields. Given the complexity and expense of obtaining these additional observations, observing system design methods such as OSSEs are attractive for designing efficient observing strategies. A new fraternal-twin ocean OSSE system based on the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used to assess the impact of targeted ocean profiles observed by hurricane research aircraft, and also by in-situ float and drifter deployments, on reducing errors in initial ocean fields. A 0.04-degree HYCOM simulation of the Gulf of Mexico is evaluated as the nature run by determining that important ocean circulation features such as the Loop Current and synoptic cyclones and anticyclones are realistically simulated. The data-assimilation system is run on a 0.08-degree HYCOM mesh with substantially different model configuration than the nature run, and it uses a new ENsemble Kalman Filter (ENKF) algorithm optimized for the ocean model's hybrid vertical coordinates. The OSSE system is evaluated and calibrated by first running Observing System Experiments (OSEs) to evaluate existing observing systems, specifically quantifying the impact of assimilating more than one satellite altimeter, and also the impact of assimilating targeted ocean profiles taken by the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research aircraft in the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater

  4. Avoiding the ventricle : a simple step to improve accuracy of anatomical targeting during deep brain stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zrinzo, Ludvic; van Hulzen, Arjen L. J.; Gorgulho, Alessandra A.; Limousin, Patricia; Staal, Michiel J.; De Salles, Antonio A. F.; Hariz, Marwan I.

    2009-01-01

    Object. The authors examined the accuracy of anatomical targeting during electrode implantation for deep brain stimulation in functional neurosurgical procedures. Special attention was focused on the impact that ventricular involvement of the electrode trajectory had on targeting accuracy. Methods.

  5. Bioengineered Chinese hamster ovary cells with Golgi-targeted 3-O-sulfotransferase-1 biosynthesize heparan sulfate with an antithrombin-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Payel; Li, Guoyun; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Xue; Baik, Jong Youn; Gemmill, Trent R; Sharfstein, Susan T; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-12-27

    HS3st1 (heparan sulfate 3-O-sulfotransferase isoform-1) is a critical enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the antithrombin III (AT)-binding site in the biopharmaceutical drug heparin. Heparin is a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan that shares a common biosynthetic pathway with heparan sulfate (HS). Although only granulated cells, such as mast cells, biosynthesize heparin, all animal cells are capable of biosynthesizing HS. As part of an effort to bioengineer CHO cells to produce heparin, we previously showed that the introduction of both HS3st1 and NDST2 (N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase isoform-2) afforded HS with a very low level of anticoagulant activity. This study demonstrated that untargeted HS3st1 is broadly distributed throughout CHO cells and forms no detectable AT-binding sites, whereas Golgi-targeted HS3st1 localizes in the Golgi and results in the formation of a single type of AT-binding site and high anti-factor Xa activity (137 ± 36 units/mg). Moreover, stable overexpression of HS3st1 also results in up-regulation of 2-O-, 6-O-, and N-sulfo group-containing disaccharides, further emphasizing a previously unknown concerted interplay between the HS biosynthetic enzymes and suggesting the need to control the expression level of all of the biosynthetic enzymes to produce heparin in CHO cells.

  6. Straightforward selection of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies targeting the conserved CD4 and coreceptor binding sites of HIV-1 gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Julie; Kessler, Pascal; Bouchet, Jérôme; Combes, Olivier; Ramos, Oscar Henrique Pereira; Barin, Francis; Baty, Daniel; Martin, Loïc; Benichou, Serge; Chames, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Few broadly neutralizing antibodies targeting determinants of the HIV-1 surface envelope glycoprotein (gp120) involved in sequential binding to host CD4 and chemokine receptors have been characterized. While these epitopes show low diversity among various isolates, HIV-1 employs many strategies to evade humoral immune response toward these sensitive sites, including a carbohydrate shield, low accessibility to these buried cavities, and conformational masking. Using trimeric gp140, free or bound to a CD4 mimic, as immunogens in llamas, we selected a panel of broadly neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) that bind to either the CD4 or the coreceptor binding site (CD4BS and CoRBS, respectively). When analyzed as monomers or as homo- or heteromultimers, the best sdAb candidates could not only neutralize viruses carrying subtype B envelopes, corresponding to the Env molecule used for immunization and selection, but were also efficient in neutralizing a broad panel of envelopes from subtypes A, C, G, CRF01_AE, and CRF02_AG, including tier 3 viruses. Interestingly, sdAb multimers exhibited a broader neutralizing activity spectrum than the parental sdAb monomers. The extreme stability and high recombinant production yield combined with their broad neutralization capacity make these sdAbs new potential microbicide candidates for HIV-1 transmission prevention.

  7. Signal-on electrochemical detection of antibiotics at zeptomole level based on target-aptamer binding triggered multiple recycling amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Su; Yu, Jinghua; Guo, Yuna; Xu, Ying; Huang, Jiadong

    2016-06-15

    In the work, a signal-on electrochemical DNA sensor based on multiple amplification for ultrasensitive detection of antibiotics has been reported. In the presence of target, the ingeniously designed hairpin probe (HP1) is opened and the polymerase-assisted target recycling amplification is triggered, resulting in autonomous generation of secondary target. It is worth noting that the produced secondary target could not only hybridize with other HP1, but also displace the Helper from the electrode. Consequently, methylene blue labeled HP2 forms a "close" probe structure, and the increase of signal is monitored. The increasing current provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection for antibiotics down to 1.3 fM. To our best knowledge, such work is the first report about multiple recycling amplification combing with signal-on sensing strategy, which has been utilized for quantitative determination of antibiotics. It would be further used as a general strategy associated with more analytical techniques toward the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes. Thus, it holds great potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensing platform for the applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnostics, and clinical biomedicine.

  8. Affinity-based release of polymer-binding peptides from hydrogels with the target segments of peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serizawa, Takeshi; Fukuta, Hiroki; Date, Takaaki; Sawada, Toshiki

    2016-02-01

    Peptides with affinities for the target segments of polymer hydrogels were identified by biological screening using phage-displayed peptide libraries, and these peptides exhibited an affinity-based release capability from hydrogels. The results from cell culture assays demonstrated the sustained anticancer effects of the drug-conjugated peptides that were released from the hydrogels.

  9. Improved MODIS Dark Target aerosol optical depth algorithm over land: angular effect correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) product retrieved from MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements has greatly benefited scientific research in climate change and air quality due to its high quality and large coverage over the globe. However, the current product (e.g., Collection 6) over land needs to be further improved. The is because AOD retrieval still suffers large uncertainty from the surface reflectance (e.g., anisotropic reflection) although the impacts of the surface reflectance have been largely reduced using the Dark Target (DT) algorithm. It has been shown that the AOD retrieval over dark surface can be improved by considering surface bidirectional distribution reflectance function (BRDF) effects in previous study. However, the relationship of the surface reflectance between visible and shortwave infrared band that applied in the previous study can lead to an angular dependence of the AOD retrieval. This has at least two reasons. The relationship based on the assumption of isotropic reflection or Lambertian surface is not suitable for the surface bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). However, although the relationship varies with the surface cover type by considering the vegetation index NDVISWIR, this index itself has a directional effect and affects the estimation of the surface reflection, and it can lead to some errors in the AOD retrieval. To improve this situation, we derived a new relationship for the spectral surface BRF in this study, using 3 years of data from AERONET-based Surface Reflectance Validation Network (ASRVN). To test the performance of the new algorithm, two case studies were used: 2 years of data from North America and 4 months of data from the global land. The results show that the angular effects of the AOD retrieval are largely reduced in most cases, including fewer occurrences of negative retrievals. Particularly, for the global land case, the AOD retrieval was improved by the new algorithm compared to the

  10. Covalent Binding of Heparin to Functionalized PET Materials for Improved Haemocompatibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metod Kolar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The hemocompatibility of vascular grafts made from poly(ethylene terephthalate (PET is insufficient due to the rapid adhesion and activation of blood platelets that occur upon incubation with whole blood. PET polymer was treated with NHx radicals created by passing ammonia through gaseous plasma formed by a microwave discharge, which allowed for functionalization with amino groups. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy characterization using derivatization with 4-chlorobenzaldehyde indicated that approximately 4% of the –NH2 groups were associated with the PET surface after treatment with the gaseous radicals. The functionalized polymers were coated with an ultra-thin layer of heparin and incubated with fresh blood. The free-hemoglobin technique, which is based on the haemolysis of erythrocytes, indicated improved hemocompatibility, which was confirmed by imaging the samples using confocal optical microscopy. A significant decrease in number of adhered platelets was observed on such samples. Proliferation of both human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human microvascular endothelial cells was enhanced on treated polymers, especially after a few hours of cell seeding. Thus, the technique represents a promising substitute for wet-chemical modification of PET materials prior to coating with heparin.

  11. Targeting the Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii Cell Wall Using Lectins: Study of the Carbohydrate-Binding Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamella de Brito Ximenes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is considered to be the major cause of cryptococcosis in immunosuppressed patients. Understanding cell wall glycoproteins using lectins is of medical interest and can contribute to specific therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carbohydrates on the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii clinical isolates, using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-lectin binding protocol. Thirty yeast strains stocked in the culture collection were cultivated for 2 days at 30 °C with shaking. Cells were obtained by centrifugation, washed in phosphate-buffered saline, and a suspension of 107 cells/mL was obtained. To determine the binding profile of lectins, concanavalin A (Con A, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I, and peanut agglutinin (PNA conjugated to fluorescein were used. All the tested clinical isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii were intensely stained by WGA, moderately stained by Con A, and weakly stained by PNA and UEA-I. Thus, Cryptococcus can be detected in clinical specimens such as blood and cerebrospinal fluid using the fluorescent lectin WGA, which may be considered as an option for detection in cases of suspected cryptococcosis with low laboratory sensitivity. Future applications may be developed using this basic tool.

  12. MicroRNA-181b targets cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 in gastric adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Yang, Qian; Kong, Wei-Qing; Liu, Tao; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2012-07-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators. In our previous study, we found that miR-181b was significantly downregulated in human gastric adenocarcinoma tissue samples compared to the adjacent normal gastric tissues. In this study, we confirm the down-regulation of miR-181b in human gastric cancer cell lines versus the gastric epithelial cells. Overexpression of miR-181b suppressed the proliferation and colony formation rate of gastric cancer cells. miR-181b downregulated the expression of cAMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB1) by binding its 3' untranslated region. Overexpression of CREB1 counteracted the suppression of growth in gastric cancer cells caused by ectopic expression of miR-181b. These results indicate that miR-181b may function as a tumor suppressor in gastric adenocarcinoma cells through negative regulation of CREB1.

  13. Neutron scattering with deuterium labeling reveals the nature of complexes formed by Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and their regulatory targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering with deuterium labeling is extremely useful for studying the structures of complex biomolecular assemblies in solution. The different neutron scattering properties of their isotopes of hydrogen combines with the ability to uniformly label biomolecules with deuterium allow one to characterize the structures and relative dispositions of the individual components of an assembly using methods of {open_quotes}contrast variation.{close_quotes} We have applied these techniques to studies of the evolutionarily related dumbbell-shaped Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins calmodulin and troponin C and their interactions with the target proteins whose activities they regulate. Ca{sup 2+} is one of the simplest of nature`s messengers used in the communication pathways between physiological stimulus and cellular response. The signaling mechanism generally involves Ca{sup 2+} binding to a protein and inducing a conformational change that transmits a signal to modify the activity of a specific target protein. Ca{sup 2+} is thus important in the regulation of a diverse array of intracellular responses, including neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, the degradation of glycogen to glucose to generate energy, microtubule assembly, membrane phosphorylation, etc. It is the conformational language of the Ca{sup 2+} induced signal transduction that we have sought to understand because of its central importance to biochemical regulation and, hence, to healthy cellular function.

  14. Host-Primed Ebola Virus GP Exposes a Hydrophobic NPC1 Receptor-Binding Pocket, Revealing a Target for Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A. Bornholdt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The filovirus surface glycoprotein (GP mediates viral entry into host cells. Following viral internalization into endosomes, GP is cleaved by host cysteine proteases to expose a receptor-binding site (RBS that is otherwise hidden from immune surveillance. Here, we present the crystal structure of proteolytically cleaved Ebola virus GP to a resolution of 3.3 Å. We use this structure in conjunction with functional analysis of a large panel of pseudotyped viruses bearing mutant GP proteins to map the Ebola virus GP endosomal RBS at molecular resolution. Our studies indicate that binding of GP to its endosomal receptor Niemann-Pick C1 occurs in two distinct stages: the initial electrostatic interactions are followed by specific interactions with a hydrophobic trough that is exposed on the endosomally cleaved GP1 subunit. Finally, we demonstrate that monoclonal antibodies targeting the filovirus RBS neutralize all known filovirus GPs, making this conserved pocket a promising target for the development of panfilovirus therapeutics.

  15. Expression, characterization, and evaluation of a RANK-binding single chain fraction variable: an osteoclast targeting drug delivery strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newa, Madhuri; Lam, Michael; Bhandari, Krishna Hari; Xu, Biwen; Doschak, Michael R

    2014-01-06

    A single chain Fraction variable (scFv) employs antibody-like target recognition specificity. Osteoclasts, responsible for bone resorption, express Receptor Activator of Nuclear factor Kappa B (RANK) receptors. This study aimed to express, characterize, and evaluate scFv against RANK receptors that may serve as a platform to target osteoclasts. Using phage display technology, scFv against RANK receptor was expressed and characterized by DNA sequencing, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight (MALDI TOF), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The potential for cytotoxicity was evaluated using an MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay, and its cross reactivity was evaluated using ELISA. Osteoclast-like cells were generated from RAW 264.7 cells, and the osteoclast targeting ability of scFv was evaluated using immunocytochemistry. ScFv's antiresorptive efficacy was studied using a tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) assay and resorption assay. Anti-RANK scFv was successfully expressed and characterized. No cross reactivity with other tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) members and no cytotoxic effect on a non-RANK bearing cell line were observed. It showed specificity toward a RANK receptor and an inhibitory effect on osteoclast activity. With the increase in development trends for biologics as therapeutics and growing knowledge on the importance of osteoclast targeted therapy, this study may provide a drug delivery strategy to target osteoclasts, thereby leading to a promising therapy for resorptive bone diseases.

  16. Improvement of Hydrodynamics-Based Gene Transfer of Nonviral DNA Targeted to Murine Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an important organ for supporting the life of an individual. Gene transfer toward this organ has been attempted in many laboratories to date; however, there have been few reports on improved liver-targeted gene delivery by using a nonviral vector. In this study, we examined the effect of various types of gene delivery carriers on enhancing the uptake and gene expression of exogenous DNA in murine hepatocytes when a hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HGD is performed via tail-vein injection. Mice were singly injected with a large amount of phosphate-buffered saline containing reporter plasmid DNA and/or with a gene delivery carrier. One day after the gene delivery, the animals' livers were dissected and subjected to biochemical, histochemical, and molecular biological analyses. The strongest signal from the reporter plasmid DNA was observed when the DNA was mixed with a polyethylenimine- (PEI- based reagent. Coinjection with pCRTEIL (a loxP-floxed reporter construct and pTR/NCre (a liver-specific Cre expression vector resulted in the liver-specific recombination of pCRTEIL. The combination of PEI with HGD would thus be a valuable tool for liver-specific manipulation to examine the function of a gene of interest in the liver and for creating liver disease models.

  17. Late sodium current is a new therapeutic target to improve contractility and rhythm in failing heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undrovinas, Albertas; Maltsev, Victor A

    2008-10-01

    Most cardiac Na+ channels open transiently within milliseconds upon membrane depolarization and are responsible for the excitation propagation. However, some channels remain active during hundreds of milliseconds, carrying the so-called persistent or late Na+ current (I(NaL)) throughout the action potential plateau. I(NaL) is produced by special gating modes of the cardiac-specific Na+ channel isoform. Experimental data accumulated over the past decade show the emerging importance of this late current component for the function of both normal and especially failing myocardium, where I(NaL) is reportedly increased. Na+ channels represent a multi-protein complex and its activity is determined not only by the pore-forming alpha subunit but also by its auxiliary beta subunits, cytoskeleton, and by Ca2+ signaling and trafficking proteins. Remodeling of this protein complex and intracellular signaling pathways may lead to alterations of I(NaL) in pathological conditions. Increased I(NaL) and the corresponding Na+ influx in failing myocardium contribute to abnormal repolarization and an increased cell Ca2+ load. Interventions designed to correct I(NaL) rescue normal repolarization and improve Ca2+ handling and contractility of the failing cardiomyocytes. New therapeutic strategies to target both arrhythmias and deficient contractility in HF may not be limited to the selective inhibition of I(NaL) but also include multiple indirect, modulatory (e.g. Ca(2+)- or cytoskeleton- dependent) mechanisms of I(NaL) function.

  18. Targeting Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism to Improve Glucose Metabolism in Cardiometabolic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan W.E. Jocken

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With Type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease prevalence on the rise, there is a growing need for improved strategies to prevent or treat obesity and insulin resistance, both of which are major risk factors for these chronic diseases. Impairments in adipose tissue lipid metabolism seem to play a critical role in these disorders. In the classical picture of intracellular lipid breakdown, cytosolic lipolysis was proposed as the sole mechanism for triacylglycerol hydrolysis in adipocytes. Recent evidence suggests involvement of several hormones, membrane receptors, and intracellular signalling cascades, which has added complexity to the regulation of cytosolic lipolysis. Interestingly, a specific form of autophagy, called lipophagy, has been implicated as alternative lipolytic pathway. Defective regulation of cytosolic lipolysis and lipophagy might have substantial effects on lipid metabolism, thereby contributing to adipose tissue dysfunction, insulin resistance, and related cardiometabolic (cMet diseases. This review will discuss recent advances in our understanding of classical lipolysis and lipophagy in adipocyte lipid metabolism under normal and pathological conditions. Furthermore, the question of whether modulation of adipocyte lipolysis and lipophagy might be a potential therapeutic target to combat cMet disorders will be addressed.

  19. Identification of novel knockout targets for improving terpenoids biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiqiang; Meng, Hailin; Li, Jing; Wang, Jianfeng; Li, Qian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Yansheng

    2014-01-01

    Many terpenoids have important pharmacological activity and commercial value; however, application of these terpenoids is often limited by problems associated with the production of sufficient amounts of these molecules. The use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) for the production of heterologous terpenoids has achieved some success. The objective of this study was to identify S. cerevisiae knockout targets for improving the synthesis of heterologous terpeniods. On the basis of computational analysis of the S. cerevisiae metabolic network, we identified the knockout sites with the potential to promote terpenoid production and the corresponding single mutant was constructed by molecular manipulations. The growth rates of these strains were measured and the results indicated that the gene deletion had no adverse effects. Using the expression of amorphadiene biosynthesis as a testing model, the gene deletion was assessed for its effect on the production of exogenous terpenoids. The results showed that the dysfunction of most genes led to increased production of amorphadiene. The yield of amorphadiene produced by most single mutants was 8-10-fold greater compared to the wild type, indicating that the knockout sites can be engineered to promote the synthesis of exogenous terpenoids.

  20. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  1. Improved Therapeutic Efficacy in Bone and Joint Disorders by Targeted Drug Delivery to Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

     Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered achievable using acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides known as acidic oligopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic oligopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged enzymes (tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, β-glucuronidase, and N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) and decoy receptors (endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products and etanercept) to assess whether these would improve therapeutic efficacy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including enzymes and decoy receptors, were efficiently delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs on bone and joint disorders, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug from the acidic oligopeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs.

  2. Targeted Application of Human Genetic Variation Can Improve Red Blood Cell Production from Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giani, Felix C; Fiorini, Claudia; Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ludwig, Leif S; Salem, Rany M; Jobaliya, Chintan D; Regan, Stephanie N; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Liang, Ge; Steinberg-Shemer, Orna; Guo, Michael H; Esko, Tõnu; Tong, Wei; Brugnara, Carlo; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Weiss, Mitchell J; Zon, Leonard I; Chou, Stella T; French, Deborah L; Musunuru, Kiran; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-01-07

    Multipotent and pluripotent stem cells are potential sources for cell and tissue replacement therapies. For example, stem cell-derived red blood cells (RBCs) are a potential alternative to donated blood, but yield and quality remain a challenge. Here, we show that application of insight from human population genetic studies can enhance RBC production from stem cells. The SH2B3 gene encodes a negative regulator of cytokine signaling and naturally occurring loss-of-function variants in this gene increase RBC counts in vivo. Targeted suppression of SH2B3 in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells enhanced the maturation and overall yield of in-vitro-derived RBCs. Moreover, inactivation of SH2B3 by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing in human pluripotent stem cells allowed enhanced erythroid cell expansion with preserved differentiation. Our findings therefore highlight the potential for combining human genome variation studies with genome editing approaches to improve cell and tissue production for regenerative medicine.

  3. Should the sympathetic nervous system be a target to improve cardiometabolic risk in obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Elisabeth A; Straznicky, Nora E; Dixon, John B; Lambert, Gavin W

    2015-07-15

    The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays a key role in both cardiovascular and metabolic regulation; hence, disturbances in SNS regulation are likely to impact on both cardiovascular and metabolic health. With excess adiposity, in particular when visceral fat accumulation is present, sympathetic activation commonly occurs. Experimental investigations have shown that adipose tissue releases a large number of adipokines, cytokines, and bioactive mediators capable of stimulating the SNS. Activation of the SNS and its interaction with adipose tissue may lead to the development of hypertension and end-organ damage including vascular, cardiac, and renal impairment and in addition lead to metabolic abnormalities, especially insulin resistance. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss and exercise programs considerably improve the cardiovascular and metabolic profile of subjects with obesity and decrease their cardiovascular risk, but unfortunately weight loss is often difficult to achieve and sustain. Pharmacological and device-based approaches to directly or indirectly target the activation of the SNS may offer some benefit in reducing the cardiometabolic consequences of obesity. Preliminary evidence is encouraging, but more trials are needed to investigate whether sympathetic inhibition could be used in obesity to reverse or prevent cardiometabolic disease development. The purpose of this review article is to highlight the current knowledge of the role that SNS plays in obesity and its associated metabolic disorders and to review the potential benefits of sympathoinhibition on metabolic and cardiovascular functions.

  4. Identification of aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding targets in mouse hepatic tissue treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Raymond; Celius, Trine [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Forgacs, Agnes L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Dere, Edward [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); MacPherson, Laura [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Harper, Patricia [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zacharewski, Timothy [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Matthews, Jason, E-mail: jason.matthews@utoronto.ca [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Genome-wide, promoter-focused ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) binding sites was conducted in 8-week old female C57BL/6 treated with 30 {mu}g/kg/body weight 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for 2 h and 24 h. These studies identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. A total of 430 AHR-bound regions were common between the two time points, corresponding to 403 unique genes. Comparison with previous AHR ChIP-chip studies in mouse hepatoma cells revealed that only 62 of the putative target genes overlapped with the 2 h AHR-bound regions in vivo. Transcription factor binding site analysis revealed an over-representation of aryl hydrocarbon response elements (AHREs) in AHR-bound regions with 53% (2 h) and 68% (24 h) of them containing at least one AHRE. In addition to AHREs, E2f-Myc activator motifs previously implicated in AHR function, as well as a number of other motifs, including Sp1, nuclear receptor subfamily 2 factor, and early growth response factor motifs were also identified. Expression microarray studies identified 133 unique genes differentially regulated after 4 h treatment with TCDD. Of which, 39 were identified as AHR-bound genes at 2 h. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on the 39 AHR-bound TCDD responsive genes identified potential perturbation in biological processes such as lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and endocrine system development as a result of TCDD-mediated AHR activation. Our findings identify direct AHR target genes in vivo, highlight in vitro and in vivo differences in AHR signaling and show that AHR recruitment does not necessarily result in changes in target gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic AHR binding after 2 h and 24 h of TCDD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 430 regions were common to both time points and highly enriched with

  5. Interventions that target improvements in mental health for parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A narrative review.

    OpenAIRE

    Da Paz, NS; Wallander, JL

    2017-01-01

    Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggest that one in 68 children is affected. With convincing evidence that parenting a child with ASD is associated with elevated distress and mental health problems, researchers have begun to investigate treatments that directly target parents' psychological well-being. We conducted a narrative review of studies that empirically tested the effects of interventions targeting improvements in the mental health of parents of children with ASD. Follow...

  6. A peptide binding to the β-site of APP improves spatial memory and attenuates Aβ burden in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-gao Yang

    Full Text Available Amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1, an aspartyl protease, initiates processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP into β-amyloid (Aβ; the peptide likely contributes to development of Alzheimer's disease (AD. BACE1 is an attractive therapeutic target for AD treatment, but it exhibits other physiological activities and has many other substrates besides APP. Thus, inhibition of BACE1 function may cause adverse side effects. Here, we present a peptide, S1, isolated from a peptide library that selectively inhibits BACE1 hydrolytic activity by binding to the β-proteolytic site on APP and Aβ N-terminal. The S1 peptide significantly reduced Aβ levels in vitro and in vivo and inhibited Aβ cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. When applied to APPswe/PS1dE9 double transgenic mice by intracerebroventricular injection, S1 significantly improved the spatial memory as determined by the Morris Water Maze, and also attenuated their Aβ burden. These results indicate that the dual-functional peptide S1 may have therapeutic potential for AD by both reducing Aβ generation and inhibiting Aβ cytotoxicity.

  7. Acute Myeloid Leukemia Targeting by Myxoma Virus In Vivo Depends on Cell Binding But Not Permissiveness to Infection In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Madlambayan, Gerard J.; Bartee, Eric; Kim, Manbok; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Meacham, Amy; Scott, Edward W.; McFadden, Grant; Cogle, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Some oncolytic viruses, such as myxoma virus (MYXV), can selectively target malignant hematopoietic cells, while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. This capacity for discrimination creates an opportunity to use oncolytic viruses as ex vivo purging agents of autologous hematopoietic cell grafts in patients with hematologic malignancies. However, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses select malignant hematopoietic cells are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated how MYXV specifi...

  8. Production of Alexa Fluor 488-labeled reovirus and characterization of target cell binding, competence, and immunogenicity of labeled virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecek, Ronald J; Busch, Ryan; Lin, Hong; Pal, Kasturi; Cunningham, Cynthia A; Cuff, Christopher F

    2006-07-31

    Respiratory enteric orphan virus (reovirus) has been used to study many aspects of the biology and genetics of viruses, viral infection, pathogenesis, and the immune response to virus infection. This report describes the functional activity of virus labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, a stable fluorescent dye. Matrix assisted laser desorption-time of flight analysis indicated that Alexa Fluor 488 labeled the outer capsid proteins of reovirus. Labeled virus bound to murine L929 fibroblasts as determined by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, and the specificity of binding were demonstrated by competitive inhibition with non-labeled virus. Labeled reovirus induced apoptosis and cytopathic effect in infected L929 cells. Mice infected with labeled virus mounted robust serum antibody and CD8(+) T-cell responses, indicating that labeled virus retained immunogenicity in vivo. These results indicate that Alexa Fluor 488-labeled virus provides a powerful new tool to analyze reovirus infection in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Impact on outcome of a targeted performance improvement programme in haemodynamically unstable patients with a pelvic fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Z B; Maytham, G D; Koers, L; Bates, P; Brohi, K; Tai, N R M

    2014-08-01

    We describe the impact of a targeted performance improvement programme and the associated performance improvement interventions, on mortality rates, error rates and process of care for haemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures. Clinical care and performance improvement data for 185 adult patients with exsanguinating pelvic trauma presenting to a United Kingdom Major Trauma Centre between January 2007 and January 2011 were analysed with univariate and multivariate regression and compared with National data. In total 62 patients (34%) died from their injuries and opportunities for improved care were identified in one third of deaths. Three major interventions were introduced during the study period in response to the findings. These were a massive haemorrhage protocol, a decision-making algorithm and employment of specialist pelvic orthopaedic surgeons. Interventions which improved performance were associated with an annual reduction in mortality (odds ratio 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.44 to 0.93), p = 0.02), a reduction in error rates (p = 0.024) and significant improvements in the targeted processes of care. Exsanguinating patients with pelvic trauma are complex to manage and are associated with high mortality rates; implementation of a targeted performance improvement programme achieved sustained improvements in mortality, error rates and trauma care in this group of severely injured patients.

  10. Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency and cost-effectiveness of targeted genomic enrichment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shearer A Eliot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted genomic enrichment (TGE is a widely used method for isolating and enriching specific genomic regions prior to massively parallel sequencing. To make effective use of sequencer output, barcoding and sample pooling (multiplexing after TGE and prior to sequencing (post-capture multiplexing has become routine. While previous reports have indicated that multiplexing prior to capture (pre-capture multiplexing is feasible, no thorough examination of the effect of this method has been completed on a large number of samples. Here we compare standard post-capture TGE to two levels of pre-capture multiplexing: 12 or 16 samples per pool. We evaluated these methods using standard TGE metrics and determined the ability to identify several classes of genetic mutations in three sets of 96 samples, including 48 controls. Our overall goal was to maximize cost reduction and minimize experimental time while maintaining a high percentage of reads on target and a high depth of coverage at thresholds required for variant detection. Results We adapted the standard post-capture TGE method for pre-capture TGE with several protocol modifications, including redesign of blocking oligonucleotides and optimization of enzymatic and amplification steps. Pre-capture multiplexing reduced costs for TGE by at least 38% and significantly reduced hands-on time during the TGE protocol. We found that pre-capture multiplexing reduced capture efficiency by 23 or 31% for pre-capture pools of 12 and 16, respectively. However efficiency losses at this step can be compensated by reducing the number of simultaneously sequenced samples. Pre-capture multiplexing and post-capture TGE performed similarly with respect to variant detection of positive control mutations. In addition, we detected no instances of sample switching due to aberrant barcode identification. Conclusions Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency of TGE experiments with respect to hands-on time

  11. Nanocrystalline Cellulose Improves the Biocompatibility and Reduces the Wear Debris of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene via Weak Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiwen; Feng, Qiang; Sun, Jiashu; Gao, Feng; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Zhong; Li, Xiaohong; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-26

    The doping of biocompatible nanomaterials into ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) to improve the biocompatibility and reduce the wear debris is of great significance to prolonging implantation time of UHMWPE as the bearing material for artificial joints. This study shows that UHMWPE can form a composite with nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC, a hydrophilic nanosized material with a high aspect ratio) by ball-milling and hot-pressing. Compared to pure UHMWPE, the NCC/UHMWPE composite exhibits improved tribological characteristics with reduced generation of wear debris. The underlying mechanism is related to the weak binding between hydrophilic NCC and hydrophobic UHMWPE. The hydrophilic, rigid NCC particles tend to detach from the UHMWPE surface during friction, which could move with the rubbing surface, serve as a thin lubricant layer, and protect the UHMWPE substrate from abrasion. The biological safety of the NCC/UHMWPE composite, as tested by MC3T3-E1 preosteoblast cells and macrophage RAW264.7 cells, is high, with significantly lower inflammatory responses/cytotoxicity than pure UHMWPE. The NCC/UHMWPE composite therefore could be a promising alternative to the current UHMWPE for bearing applications.

  12. An improved low-temperature equation of state model for integrated IFE target-chamber response simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heltemes, Thad; Moses, Gregory

    2010-11-01

    A new quotidian equation of state model (QEOS) has been developed to perform integrated inertial fusion energy (IFE) target explosion-chamber response simulations. This QEOS model employs a scaled binding energy model for the ion EOS and utilizes both n- and l-splitting for determining the ionization state and electron EOS. This QEOS model, named BADGER, can perform both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE EOS calculations. BADGER has been integrated with the 1-D radiation hydrodynamics code BUCKY to simulate the chamber response of an exploding indirect-drive deuterium-tritium (DT) target, xenon gas-filled chamber and tungsten first-wall armor. The simulated system is a prototypical configuration for the LIFE reactor study being conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL).

  13. Periluminal Distribution of HIV-Binding Target Cells and Gp340 in the Oral, Cervical and Sigmoid/Rectal Mucosae: A Mapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patyka, Mariia; Malamud, Daniel; Weissman, Drew; Abrams, William R; Kurago, Zoya

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that the transmission of HIV is most likely to occur via rectal or vaginal routes, and rarely through oral exposure. However, the mechanisms of virus entry at mucosal surfaces remain incompletely understood. Prophylactic strategies against HIV infection may be attainable once gaps in current knowledge are filled. To address these gaps, we evaluated essentially normal epithelial surfaces and mapped the periluminal distribution of CD4+ HIV target cells, including T cells and antigen-presenting cells, and an HIV-binding molecule gp340 that can be expressed by epithelial cells in secreted and cell-associated forms. Immunohistochemistry for CD4, CD16, CD3, CD1a and gp340 in human oral, rectal/sigmoid and cervical mucosal samples from HIV-negative subjects demonstrated that periluminal HIV target cells were more prevalent at rectal/sigmoid and endocervical surfaces lined by simple columnar epithelium, than at oral and ectocervical surfaces covered by multilayered stratified squamous epithelium (pHIV target cells, together with periluminal epithelial cell-associated gp340 appear to be most accessible for HIV transmission at rectal/sigmoid and endocervical surfaces. Our data help define vulnerable structural features of mucosal sites exposed to HIV.

  14. Targeting cellular memory to reprogram the epigenome, restore potential, and improve somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilertsen, K J; Power, R A; Harkins, L L; Misica, P

    2007-03-01

    possibility of targeting cellular memory, and in particular inducing demethylation of a somatic nucleus prior to nuclear transfer, to enable reprogramming events typically carried out by oocyte factors and thereby improve developmental competence of SCNT-reconstructed embryos. Several recent published reviews of SCNT, cellular reprogramming and genomic demethylation served as valuable sources for the authors and are recommended as supplemental reading. These include the following: Bird, A., 2002. DNA methylation patterns and epigenetic memory. Gen. Dev. 16, 6-21; Grafi, G., 2004. How cells dedifferentiate: a lesson from plants. Dev. Biol. 268, 1-6; Latham, K.E., 2005. Early and delayed aspects of nuclear reprogramming during cloning. Biol. Cell 97, 119-132; Lyko, F., Brown, R., 2005. DNA methyltransferase inhibitors and the development of epigenetic cancer therapies. J.Natl. Cancer Inst. 97, 1498-1506; Morgan, H.D., Santos, F., Green, K., Dean, W., Reik, W., 2005. Epigenetic reprogramming in mammals. Hum. Mol. Gen. 14, R47-R58; Szyf, M., 2005. DNA methylation and demethylation as targets for anticancer therapy. Biochemistry 70, 533-549; Buszczak, M., Spradling, A.C., 2006. Searching chromatin for stem cell identity. Cell 125, 233-236; Gurdon, J.B., 2006. From nuclear transfer to nuclear reprogramming: the reversal of cell differentiation. Annu. Rev. Cell. Dev. Biol. 22, 1-22; Yoo, C.B., Jones, P.A., 2006. Epigenetic therapy of cancer: past, present and future. Nat. Rev. 5, 37-50.

  15. Peptide binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex class I resolved into an array of apparently independent subspecificities: quantitation by peptide libraries and improved prediction of binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    size are distributed into positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries (PSCPL) to develop a highly efficient, universal and unbiased approach to address MHC specificity. The PSCPL approach appeared qualitatively and quantitatively superior to other currently used strategies. The average effect...... of any amino acid in each position was quantitated, allowing a detailed description of extended peptide binding motifs including primary and secondary anchor residues. It also identified disfavored residues which were found to be surprisingly important in shaping MHC class I specificity. Assuming...

  16. Health outcomes in acromegaly: depression and anxiety are promising targets for improving reduced quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Jacobus Geraedts

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available IINTRODUCTION. Remission criteria of acromegaly are based on biochemical variables, i.e. normalization of increased hormone levels. However, the established reduction in Quality of Life (QoL is suggested to be independent of biochemical control. The aim of this study was to test which aspects predict Qol best in acromegaly. METHODS/Design. This is a prospective cohort study in 80 acromegalic patients, with a cross-sectional and longitudinal part. The main outcome measure was health-related quality of life (QoL, measured by a generic and a disease-specific questionnaire (the SF-36 and AcroQol. Main predictors were age, gender, biochemical control, disease characteristics, treatment modalities and psychopathology. RESULTS. Our cohort of 80 acromegalics had a mean age 54.7 ± 12.3 years with an average disease duration of 10.8 ± 10.0 years. Ratio macro-/microadenoma was 54/26. In adjusted mixed method models, we found that psychopathology significantly predicts QoL in acromegaly (in models including the variables age, gender, disease duration, tumor size, basal hormone levels, relevant treatment modalities and relevant comorbidities, with a higher degree of psychopathology indicating a lower QoL (depression vs. AcroQoL: B=-1.175, p<0.001, depression vs. SF36: B=-1.648, p<0.001, anxiety vs. AcroQoL: B=-0.399, p<0.001, anxiety vs. SF36: B=-0.661, p<0.001. The explained variances demonstrate superiority of psychopathology over biochemical control and other variables in predicting QoL in our models. DISCUSSION. Superiority of psychopathology over biochemical control calls for a more extensive approach regarding diagnosing depression and anxiety in pituitary adenomas to improve QoL. Depressive symptoms and anxiety are modifiable factors that might provide valuable targets for possible future treatment interventions.

  17. Targeting the inflammasome and adenosine type-3 receptors improves outcome of antibiotic therapy in murine anthrax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serguei; G; Popov; Taissia; G; Popova; Fatah; Kashanchi; Charles; Bailey

    2011-01-01

    AIM:To establish whether activation of adenosine type-3 receptors(A3Rs)and inhibition of interleukin- 1β-induced inflammation is beneficial in combination with antibiotic therapy to increase survival of mice challenged with anthrax spores. METHODS:DBA/2 mice were challenged with Bacillus anthracis spores of the toxigenic Sterne strain 43F2. Survival of animals was monitored for 15 d.Ciprofloxacin treatment(50 mg/kg,once daily,intraperitoneally) was initiated at day+1 simultaneously with the ad- ministration of inhibitors,and continued for 10 d.Two doses(2.5 mg/kg and 12.5 mg/kg)of acetyl-tyrosylvalyl-alanyl-aspartyl-chloromethylketone(YVAD)and three doses(0.05,0.15 and 0.3 mg/kg)of 1-[2-Chloro- 6-[[(3-iodophenyl)methyl]amino]-9H-purin-9-yl]-1- deoxy-N-methyl-β-D-ribofuranuronamide(Cl-IB-MECA) were tested.Animals received YVAD on days 1-4,and Cl-IB-MECA on days 1-10 once daily,subcutaneously. Human lung epithelial cells in culture were challenged with spores or edema toxin and the effects of IB-MECAon phosphorylation of AKT and generation of cAMP were tested. RESULTS:We showed that the outcome of antibiotic treatment in a murine anthrax model could be substantially improved by co-administration of the caspase-1/4 inhibitor YVAD and the A3R agonist Cl-IB-MECA.Combination treatment with these substances and ciprofloxacin resulted in up to 90%synergistic protection.All untreated mice died,and antibiotic alone protected only 30% of animals.We conclude that both substances target the aberrant host signaling that underpins anthrax mortality. CONCLUSION:Our findings suggest new possibilities for combination therapy of anthrax with antibiotics,A3R agonists and caspase-1 inhibitors.

  18. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a period of nonadherence and decreased the time from nonadherence to adherence.

  19. Iron-binding E3 ligase mediates iron response in plants by targeting basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selote, Devarshi; Samira, Rozalynne; Matthiadis, Anna; Gillikin, Jeffrey W; Long, Terri A

    2015-01-01

    Iron uptake and metabolism are tightly regulated in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), BRUTUS (BTS), which contains three hemerythrin (HHE) domains and a Really Interesting New Gene (RING) domain, interacts with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are capable of forming heterodimers with POPEYE (PYE), a positive regulator of the iron deficiency response. BTS has been shown to have E3 ligase capacity and to play a role in root growth, rhizosphere acidification, and iron reductase activity in response to iron deprivation. To further characterize the function of this protein, we examined the expression pattern of recombinant ProBTS::β-GLUCURONIDASE and found that it is expressed in developing embryos and other reproductive tissues, corresponding with its apparent role in reproductive growth and development. Our findings also indicate that the interactions between BTS and PYE-like (PYEL) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors occur within the nucleus and are dependent on the presence of the RING domain. We provide evidence that BTS facilitates 26S proteasome-mediated degradation of PYEL proteins in the absence of iron. We also determined that, upon binding iron at the HHE domains, BTS is destabilized and that this destabilization relies on specific residues within the HHE domains. This study reveals an important and unique mechanism for plant iron homeostasis whereby an E3 ubiquitin ligase may posttranslationally control components of the transcriptional regulatory network involved in the iron deficiency response.

  20. Saturated fatty acids regulate retinoic acid signalling and suppress tumorigenesis by targeting fatty acid-binding protein 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Liraz; Wang, Zeneng; Doud, Mary Kathryn; Hazen, Stanley L; Noy, Noa

    2015-11-23

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFA) serve as energy sources, components of cell membranes and precursors for signalling molecules. Here we show that these biological compounds also regulate gene expression and that they do so by controlling the transcriptional activities of the retinoic acid (RA)-activated nuclear receptors RAR and PPARβ/δ. The data indicate that these activities of LCFA are mediated by FABP5, which delivers ligands from the cytosol to nuclear PPARβ/δ. Both saturated and unsaturated LCFA (SLCFA, ULCFA) bind to FABP5, thereby displacing RA and diverting it to RAR. However, while SLCFA inhibit, ULCFA activate the FABP5/PPARβ/δ pathway. We show further that, by concomitantly promoting the activation of RAR and inhibiting the activation of PPARβ/δ, SLCFA suppress the oncogenic properties of FABP5-expressing carcinoma cells in cultured cells and in vivo. The observations suggest that compounds that inhibit FABP5 may constitute a new class of drugs for therapy of certain types of cancer.

  1. Sliding and target location of DNA-binding proteins:an NMR view of the lac repressor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loth, Karine [Utrecht University, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, NMR Spectroscopy (Netherlands); Gnida, Manuel; Romanuka, Julija [Paderborn University, Department of Chemistry (Germany); Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf, E-mail: r.boelens@uu.nl [Utrecht University, Bijvoet Center for Biomolecular Research, NMR Spectroscopy (Netherlands)

    2013-05-15

    In non-specific lac headpiece-DNA complexes selective NMR line broadening is observed that strongly depends on length and composition of the DNA fragments. This broadening involves amide protons found in the non-specific lac-DNA structure to be interacting with the DNA phosphate backbone, and can be ascribed to DNA sliding of the protein along the DNA. This NMR exchange broadening has been used to estimate the 1D diffusion constant for sliding along non-specific DNA. The observed 1D diffusion constant of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -12} cm{sup 2}/s is two orders of magnitude smaller than derived from previous kinetic experiments, but falls in the range of values determined more recently using single molecule methods. This strongly supports the notion that sliding could play at most a minor role in the association kinetics of binding of lac repressor to lac operator and that other processes such as hopping and intersegment transfer contribute to facilitate the DNA recognition process.

  2. Sliding and target location of DNA-binding proteins: an NMR view of the lac repressor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Karine; Gnida, Manuel; Romanuka, Julija; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    In non-specific lac headpiece-DNA complexes selective NMR line broadening is observed that strongly depends on length and composition of the DNA fragments. This broadening involves amide protons found in the non-specific lac-DNA structure to be interacting with the DNA phosphate backbone, and can be ascribed to DNA sliding of the protein along the DNA. This NMR exchange broadening has been used to estimate the 1D diffusion constant for sliding along non-specific DNA. The observed 1D diffusion constant of 4×10(-12) cm(2)/s is two orders of magnitude smaller than derived from previous kinetic experiments, but falls in the range of values determined more recently using single molecule methods. This strongly supports the notion that sliding could play at most a minor role in the association kinetics of binding of lac repressor to lac operator and that other processes such as hopping and intersegment transfer contribute to facilitate the DNA recognition process.

  3. Structure of the Legionella Virulence Factor, SidC Reveals a Unique PI(4P-Specific Binding Domain Essential for Its Targeting to the Bacterial Phagosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Luo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila delivers nearly 300 effector proteins into host cells for the establishment of a replication-permissive compartment known as the Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV. SidC and its paralog SdcA are two effectors that have been shown to anchor on the LCV via binding to phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate [PI(4P] to facilitate the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. We recently reported that the N-terminal SNL (SidC N-terminal E3 Ligase domain of SidC is a ubiquitin E3 ligase, and its activity is required for the recruitment of ER proteins to the LCV. Here we report the crystal structure of SidC (1-871. The structure reveals that SidC contains four domains that are packed into an arch-like shape. The P4C domain (PI(4P binding of SidC comprises a four α-helix bundle and covers the ubiquitin ligase catalytic site of the SNL domain. Strikingly, a pocket with characteristic positive electrostatic potentials is formed at one end of this bundle. Liposome binding assays of the P4C domain further identified the determinants of phosphoinositide recognition and membrane interaction. Interestingly, we also found that binding with PI(4P stimulates the E3 ligase activity, presumably due to a conformational switch induced by PI(4P from a closed form to an open active form. Mutations of key residues involved in PI(4P binding significantly reduced the association of SidC with the LCV and abolished its activity in the recruitment of ER proteins and ubiquitin signals, highlighting that PI(4P-mediated targeting of SidC is critical to its function in the remodeling of the bacterial phagosome membrane. Finally, a GFP-fusion with the P4C domain was demonstrated to be specifically localized to PI(4P-enriched compartments in mammalian cells. This domain shows the potential to be developed into a sensitive and accurate PI(4P probe in living cells.

  4. Auditory Stream Segregation Improves Infants' Selective Attention to Target Tones Amid Distracters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nicholas A.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of auditory stream segregation in the selective attention to target tones in infancy. Using a task adapted from Bregman and Rudnicky's 1975 study and implemented in a conditioned head-turn procedure, infant and adult listeners had to discriminate the temporal order of 2,200 and 2,400 Hz target tones presented alone,…

  5. Improved glucose metabolism in vitro and in vivo by an allosteric monoclonal antibody that increases insulin receptor binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Corbin

    Full Text Available Previously we reported studies of XMetA, an agonist antibody to the insulin receptor (INSR. We have now utilized phage display to identify XMetS, a novel monoclonal antibody to the INSR. Biophysical studies demonstrated that XMetS bound to the human and mouse INSR with picomolar affinity. Unlike monoclonal antibody XMetA, XMetS alone had little or no agonist effect on the INSR. However, XMetS was a strong positive allosteric modulator of the INSR that increased the binding affinity for insulin nearly 20-fold. XMetS potentiated insulin-stimulated INSR signaling ∼15-fold or greater including; autophosphorylation of the INSR, phosphorylation of Akt, a major enzyme in the metabolic pathway, and phosphorylation of Erk, a major enzyme in the growth pathway. The enhanced signaling effects of XMetS were more pronounced with Akt than with Erk. In cultured cells, XMetS also enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose transport. In contrast to its effects on the INSR, XMetS did not potentiate IGF-1 activation of the IGF-1 receptor. We studied the effect of XMetS treatment in two mouse models of insulin resistance and diabetes. The first was the diet induced obesity mouse, a hyperinsulinemic, insulin resistant animal, and the second was the multi-low dose streptozotocin/high-fat diet mouse, an insulinopenic, insulin resistant animal. In both models, XMetS normalized fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance. In concert with its ability to potentiate insulin action at the INSR, XMetS reduced insulin and C-peptide levels in both mouse models. XMetS improved the response to exogenous insulin without causing hypoglycemia. These data indicate that an allosteric monoclonal antibody can be generated that markedly enhances the binding affinity of insulin to the INSR. These data also suggest that an INSR monoclonal antibody with these characteristics may have the potential to both improve glucose metabolism in insulinopenic type 2 diabetes mellitus and correct

  6. Membrane testosterone binding sites in prostate carcinoma as a potential new marker and therapeutic target: Study in paraffin tissue sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoropoulos Panayiotis A

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Steroid action is mediated, in addition to classical intracellular receptors, by recently identified membrane sites, that generate rapid non-genomic effects. We have recently identified a membrane androgen receptor site on prostate carcinoma cells, mediating testosterone rapid effects on the cytoskeleton and secretion within minutes. Methods The aim of this study was to investigate whether membrane androgen receptors are differentially expressed in prostate carcinomas, and their relationship to the tumor grade. We examined the expression of membrane androgen receptors in archival material of 109 prostate carcinomas and 103 benign prostate hyperplasias, using fluorescein-labeled BSA-coupled testosterone. Results We report that membrane androgen receptors are preferentially expressed in prostate carcinomas, and they correlate to their grade using the Gleason's microscopic grading score system. Conclusion We conclude that membrane androgen receptors may represent an index of tumor aggressiveness and possibly specific targets for new therapeutic regimens.

  7. The haloarchaeal MCM proteins: bioinformatic analysis and targeted mutagenesis of the β7-β8 and β9-β10 hairpin loops and conserved zinc binding domain cysteines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana P Kristensen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The hexameric MCM complex is the catalytic core of the replicative helicase in eukaryotic and archaeal cells. Here we describe the first in vivo analysis of archaeal MCM protein structure and function relationships using the genetically tractable haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii as a model system. Hfx. volcanii encodes a single MCM protein that is part of the previously identified core group of haloarchaeal MCM proteins. Three structural features of the N-terminal domain of the Hfx. volcanii MCM protein were targeted for mutagenesis: the β7-β8 and β9-β10 β-hairpin loops and putative zinc binding domain. Five strains carrying single point mutations in the β7-β8 β-hairpin loop were constructed, none of which displayed impaired cell growth under normal conditions or when treated with the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C. However, short sequence deletions within the β7-β8 β-hairpin were not tolerated and neither was replacement of the highly conserved residue glutamate 187 with alanine. Six strains carrying paired alanine substitutions within the β9-β10 β-hairpin loop were constructed, leading to the conclusion that no individual amino acid within that hairpin loop is absolutely required for MCM function, although one of the mutant strains displays greatly enhanced sensitivity to mitomycin C. Deletions of two or four amino acids from the β9-β10 β-hairpin were tolerated but mutants carrying larger deletions were inviable. Similarly, it was not possible to construct mutants in which any of the conserved zinc binding cysteines was replaced with alanine, underlining the likely importance of zinc binding for MCM function. The results of these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using Hfx. volcanii as a model system for reverse genetic analysis of archaeal MCM protein function and provide important confirmation of the in vivo importance of conserved structural features identified by previous bioinformatic, biochemical and structural

  8. Safety of elective colorectal cancer surgery : Non-surgical complications and colectomies are targets for quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, Daniel; Ten Berge, Martijn G.; Snijders, Heleen S.; Van Leersum, Nicoline J.; Fiocco, Marta; Wiggers, Theo; Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.; Wouters, Michel W. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mortality following severe complications (failure-to-rescue, FTR) is targeted in surgical quality improvement projects. Rates may differ between colon- and rectal cancer resections. Methods Analysis of patients undergoing elective colon and rectal cancer resections registered in the Dutch

  9. The DNA binding parvulin Par17 is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a recently evolved prepeptide uniquely present in Hominidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayer Peter

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The parvulin-type peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Par14 is highly conserved in all metazoans. The recently identified parvulin Par17 contains an additional N-terminal domain whose occurrence and function was the focus of the present study. Results Based on the observation that the human genome encodes Par17, but bovine and rodent genomes do not, Par17 exon sequences from 10 different primate species were cloned and sequenced. Par17 is encoded in the genomes of Hominidae species including humans, but is absent from other mammalian species. In contrast to Par14, endogenous Par17 was found in mitochondrial and membrane fractions of human cell lysates. Fluorescence of EGFP fusions of Par17, but not Par14, co-localized with mitochondrial staining. Par14 and Par17 associated with isolated human, rat and yeast mitochondria at low salt concentrations, but only the Par17 mitochondrial association was resistant to higher salt concentrations. Par17 was imported into mitochondria in a time and membrane potential-dependent manner, where it reached the mitochondrial matrix. Moreover, Par17 was shown to bind to double-stranded DNA under physiological salt conditions. Conclusion Taken together, the DNA binding parvulin Par17 is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by the most recently evolved mitochondrial prepeptide known to date, thus adding a novel protein constituent to the mitochondrial proteome of Hominidae.

  10. LIBP-Pred: web server for lipid binding proteins using structural network parameters; PDB mining of human cancer biomarkers and drug targets in parasites and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Munteanu, Cristian R; Postelnicu, Lucian; Prado-Prado, Francisco; Gestal, Marcos; Pazos, Alejandro

    2012-03-01

    Lipid-Binding Proteins (LIBPs) or Fatty Acid-Binding Proteins (FABPs) play an important role in many diseases such as different types of cancer, kidney injury, atherosclerosis, diabetes, intestinal ischemia and parasitic infections. Thus, the computational methods that can predict LIBPs based on 3D structure parameters became a goal of major importance for drug-target discovery, vaccine design and biomarker selection. In addition, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) contains 3000+ protein 3D structures with unknown function. This list, as well as new experimental outcomes in proteomics research, is a very interesting source to discover relevant proteins, including LIBPs. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no general models to predict new LIBPs based on 3D structures. We developed new Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models based on 3D electrostatic parameters of 1801 different proteins, including 801 LIBPs. We calculated these electrostatic parameters with the MARCH-INSIDE software and they correspond to the entire protein or to specific protein regions named core, inner, middle, and surface. We used these parameters as inputs to develop a simple Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) classifier to discriminate 3D structure of LIBPs from other proteins. We implemented this predictor in the web server named LIBP-Pred, freely available at , along with other important web servers of the Bio-AIMS portal. The users can carry out an automatic retrieval of protein structures from PDB or upload their custom protein structural models from their disk created with LOMETS server. We demonstrated the PDB mining option performing a predictive study of 2000+ proteins with unknown function. Interesting results regarding the discovery of new Cancer Biomarkers in humans or drug targets in parasites have been discussed here in this sense.

  11. Kinome-wide Selectivity Profiling of ATP-competitive Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Inhibitors and Characterization of Their Binding Kinetics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingsong; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Hur, Wooyoung; Niepel, Mario; Westover, Kenneth; Thoreen, Carson C.; Wang, Jinhua; Ni, Jing; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Vogel, Kurt; Riddle, Steve; Waller, David L.; Traynor, Ryan; Sanda, Takaomi; Zhao, Zheng; Kang, Seong A.; Zhao, Jean; Look, A. Thomas; Sorger, Peter K.; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2012-01-01

    An intensive recent effort to develop ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors has resulted in several potent and selective molecules such as Torin1, PP242, KU63794, and WYE354. These inhibitors are being widely used as pharmacological probes of mTOR-dependent biology. To determine the potency and specificity of these agents, we have undertaken a systematic kinome-wide effort to profile their selectivity and potency using chemical proteomics and assays for enzymatic activity, protein binding, and disruption of cellular signaling. Enzymatic and cellular assays revealed that all four compounds are potent inhibitors of mTORC1 and mTORC2, with Torin1 exhibiting ∼20-fold greater potency for inhibition of Thr-389 phosphorylation on S6 kinases (EC50 = 2 nm) relative to other inhibitors. In vitro biochemical profiling at 10 μm revealed binding of PP242 to numerous kinases, although WYE354 and KU63794 bound only to p38 kinases and PI3K isoforms and Torin1 to ataxia telangiectasia mutated, ATM and Rad3-related protein, and DNA-PK. Analysis of these protein targets in cellular assays did not reveal any off-target activities for Torin1, WYE354, and KU63794 at concentrations below 1 μm but did show that PP242 efficiently inhibited the RET receptor (EC50, 42 nm) and JAK1/2/3 kinases (EC50, 780 nm). In addition, Torin1 displayed unusually slow kinetics for inhibition of the mTORC1/2 complex, a property likely to contribute to the pharmacology of this inhibitor. Our results demonstrated that, with the exception of PP242, available ATP-competitive compounds are highly selective mTOR inhibitors when applied to cells at concentrations below 1 μm and that the compounds may represent a starting point for medicinal chemistry efforts aimed at developing inhibitors of other PI3K kinase-related kinases. PMID:22223645

  12. Stage-specific adhesion of Leishmania promastigotes to sand fly midguts assessed using an improved comparative binding assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The binding of Leishmania promastigotes to the midgut epithelium is regarded as an essential part of the life-cycle in the sand fly vector, enabling the parasites to persist beyond the initial blood meal phase and establish the infection. However, the precise nature of the promastigote stage(s that mediate binding is not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To address this issue we have developed an in vitro gut binding assay in which two promastigote populations are labelled with different fluorescent dyes and compete for binding to dissected sand fly midguts. Binding of procyclic, nectomonad, leptomonad and metacyclic promastigotes of Leishmania infantum and L. mexicana to the midguts of blood-fed, female Lutzomyia longipalpis was investigated. The results show that procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes do not bind to the midgut epithelium in significant numbers, whereas nectomonad and leptomonad promastigotes both bind strongly and in similar numbers. The assay was then used to compare the binding of a range of different parasite species (L. infantum, L. mexicana, L. braziliensis, L. major, L. tropica to guts dissected from various sand flies (Lu. longipalpis, Phlebotomus papatasi, P. sergenti. The results of these comparisons were in many cases in line with expectations, the natural parasite binding most effectively to its natural vector, and no examples were found where a parasite was unable to bind to its natural vector. However, there were interesting exceptions: L. major and L. tropica being able to bind to Lu. longipalpis better than L. infantum; L. braziliensis was able to bind to P. papatasi as well as L. major; and significant binding of L. major to P. sergenti and L. tropica to P. papatasi was observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results demonstrate that Leishmania gut binding is strictly stage-dependent, is a property of those forms found in the middle phase of development (nectomonad and leptomonad

  13. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design.

  14. Research progress on target therapeutic agents of HER-2 extracellular ligand-binding domain in breast cancer%乳腺癌HER-2胞外配体结合区靶点治疗的研究进展*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟锦绣; 李亚梅(综述); 关晏星(审校)

    2013-01-01

    The target therapeutic agents of HER-2 extracellular ligand-binding domain have become the core of breast cancer research. A small peptide molecule and an anti-HER2 extracellular domain monoclonal antibody conjugated with protein toxins, radioisotopes, and chemotherapeutic drugs (immunoconjugate) can improve efficacy and reduce systemic toxicity. Vaccines based on HER-2 extracellular region should protect patients from HER-2-overexpressing breast cancer growth. In this review, studies on targeted-block therapies of the HER-2 extracellular ligand-binding domain in breast cancer were discussed to provide references for clinical applications.%针对乳腺癌HER-2受体胞外结合区的靶点治疗成为当今研究的热点。小分子多肽、HER-2胞外结合区的单抗药物及其与蛋白毒素、放射性核素,化疗药物的偶联物即免疫偶联物既能增强药物的有效性,又可减少对正常组织的毒害。HER-2胞外区肽疫苗可有效预防HER-2高表达乳腺癌的生长。本文将对乳腺癌HER-2胞外区靶向阻断治疗的研究进行综述,为相应的临床应用提供参考。

  15. Improved targeting of JAK2 leads to increased therapeutic efficacy in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Genetic deletion of JAK2 in vivo shows that MPN cells remain fully dependent on JAK2 signaling for survival.Dual JAK2 targeting with JAK and HSP90 inhibitors offers increased efficacy in murine models and primary samples.

  16. Multiple Maneuvering Target Tracking by Improved Particle Filter Based on Multiscan JPDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiple maneuvering target tracking algorithm based on a particle filter is addressed. The equivalent-noise approach is adopted, which uses a simple dynamic model consisting of target state and equivalent noise which accounts for the combined effects of the process noise and maneuvers. The equivalent-noise approach converts the problem of maneuvering target tracking to that of state estimation in the presence of nonstationary process noise with unknown statistics. A novel method for identifying the nonstationary process noise is proposed in the particle filter framework. Furthermore, a particle filter based multiscan Joint Probability Data Association (JPDA filter is proposed to deal with the data association problem in a multiple maneuvering target tracking. In the proposed multiscan JPDA algorithm, the distributions of interest are the marginal filtering distributions for each of the targets, and these distributions are approximated with particles. The multiscan JPDA algorithm examines the joint association events in a multiscan sliding window and calculates the marginal posterior probability based on the multiscan joint association events. The proposed algorithm is illustrated via an example involving the tracking of two highly maneuvering, at times closely spaced and crossed, targets, based on resolved measurements.

  17. High throughput functional assays of the variant antigen PfEMP1 reveal a single domain in the 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum genome that binds ICAM1 with high affinity and is targeted by naturally acquired neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew V Oleinikov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes bind endothelial receptors to sequester in vascular beds, and binding to ICAM1 has been implicated in cerebral malaria. Binding to ICAM1 may be mediated by the variant surface antigen family PfEMP1: for example, 6 of 21 DBLbetaC2 domains from the IT4 strain PfEMP1 repertoire were shown to bind ICAM1, and the PfEMP1 containing these 6 domains are all classified as Group B or C type. In this study, we surveyed binding of ICAM1 to 16 DBLbetaC2 domains of the 3D7 strain PfEMP1 repertoire, using a high throughput Bioplex assay format. Only one DBL2betaC2 domain from the Group A PfEMP1 PF11_0521 showed strong specific binding. Among these 16 domains, DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 best preserved the residues previously identified as conserved in ICAM1-binding versus non-binding domains. Our analyses further highlighted the potential role of conserved residues within predominantly non-conserved flexible loops in adhesion, and, therefore, as targets for intervention. Our studies also suggest that the structural/functional DBLbetaC2 domain involved in ICAM1 binding includes about 80 amino acid residues upstream of the previously suggested DBLbetaC2 domain. DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 binding to ICAM1 was inhibited by immune sera from east Africa but not by control US sera. Neutralizing antibodies were uncommon in children but common in immune adults from east Africa. Inhibition of binding was much more efficient than reversal of binding, indicating a strong interaction between DBL2betaC2(PF11_0521 and ICAM1. Our high throughput approach will significantly accelerate studies of PfEMP1 binding domains and protective antibody responses.

  18. Improving Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia by Targeting Cognition and Metacognition with Computerized Cognitive Remediation: A Multiple Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibaudeau, Élisabeth; Cellard, Caroline; Reeder, Clare; Wykes, Til; Ivers, Hans; Maziade, Michel; Lavoie, Marie-Audrey; Pothier, William; Achim, Amélie M

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in theory of mind (ToM) (i.e., the ability to infer the mental states of others) and cognition. Associations have often been reported between cognition and ToM, and ToM mediates the relationship between impaired cognition and impaired functioning in schizophrenia. Given that cognitive deficits could act as a limiting factor for ToM, this study investigated whether a cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) that targets nonsocial cognition and metacognition could improve ToM in schizophrenia. Four men with schizophrenia received CRT. Assessments of ToM, cognition, and metacognition were conducted at baseline and posttreatment as well as three months and 1 year later. Two patients reached a significant improvement in ToM immediately after treatment whereas at three months after treatment all four cases reached a significant improvement, which was maintained through 1 year after treatment for all three cases that remained in the study. Improvements in ToM were accompanied by significant improvements in the most severely impaired cognitive functions at baseline or by improvements in metacognition. This study establishes that a CRT program that does not explicitly target social abilities can improve ToM.

  19. Improving Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia by Targeting Cognition and Metacognition with Computerized Cognitive Remediation: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellard, Caroline; Reeder, Clare; Wykes, Til; Ivers, Hans; Maziade, Michel; Lavoie, Marie-Audrey; Pothier, William

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in theory of mind (ToM) (i.e., the ability to infer the mental states of others) and cognition. Associations have often been reported between cognition and ToM, and ToM mediates the relationship between impaired cognition and impaired functioning in schizophrenia. Given that cognitive deficits could act as a limiting factor for ToM, this study investigated whether a cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) that targets nonsocial cognition and metacognition could improve ToM in schizophrenia. Four men with schizophrenia received CRT. Assessments of ToM, cognition, and metacognition were conducted at baseline and posttreatment as well as three months and 1 year later. Two patients reached a significant improvement in ToM immediately after treatment whereas at three months after treatment all four cases reached a significant improvement, which was maintained through 1 year after treatment for all three cases that remained in the study. Improvements in ToM were accompanied by significant improvements in the most severely impaired cognitive functions at baseline or by improvements in metacognition. This study establishes that a CRT program that does not explicitly target social abilities can improve ToM. PMID:28246557

  20. Preparation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the DNA-binding domain of the Ets transcription factor in complex with target DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Teruya; Toma, Sachiko; Ikemizu, Shinji; Kai, Hirofumi; Yamagata, Yuriko, E-mail: yamagata@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 862-0973 (Japan)

    2008-03-01

    The complex between the Ets domain of Ets2 and its target DNA has been crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution. The Ets2 transcription factor is a member of the Ets transcription-factor family. Ets2 plays a role in the malignancy of cancer and in Down’s syndrome by regulating the transcription of various genes. The DNA-binding domain of Ets2 (Ets domain; ETSD), which contains residues that are highly conserved among Ets transcription-factor family members, was expressed as a GST-fusion protein. The aggregation of ETSD produced after thrombin cleavage could be prevented by treatment with NDSB-195 (nondetergent sulfobetaine 195). ETSD was crystallized in complex with DNA containing the Ets2 target sequence (GGAA) by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The best crystals were grown using 25% PEG 3350, 80 mM magnesium acetate, 50 mM sodium cacodylate pH 5.0/5.5 as the reservoir at 293 K. The crystals belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 85.89, b = 95.52, c = 71.89 Å, β = 101.7° and a V{sub M} value of 3.56 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 3.0 Å.

  1. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  2. Targeted codon optimization improves translational fidelity for an Fc fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Katariina M; Zhang, Zhongqi; Michaels, Mark Leo; Belouski, Ed; Hong, Robert W; Shah, Bhavana; Berge, Mark; Barkhordarian, Hedieh; Le, Eleanor; Smith, Steve; Winters, Dwight; Abroson, Frank; Hecht, Randy; Liu, Jennifer

    2012-11-01

    High levels of translational errors, both truncation and misincorporation in an Fc-fusion protein were observed. Here, we demonstrate the impact of several commercially available codon optimization services, and compare to a targeted strategy. Using the targeted strategy, only codons known to have translational errors are modified. For an Fc-fusion protein expressed in Escherichia coli, the targeted strategy, in combination with appropriate fermentation conditions, virtually eliminated misincorporation (proteins produced with a wrong amino acid sequence), and reduced the level of truncation. The use of full optimization using commercially available strategies reduced the initial errors, but introduced different misincorporations. However, truncation was higher using the targeted strategy than for most of the full optimization strategies. This targeted approach, along with monitoring of translation fidelity and careful attention to fermentation conditions is key to minimizing translational error and ensuring high-quality expression. These findings should be useful for other biopharmaceutical products, as well as any other transgenic constructs where protein quality is important.

  3. A simplified procedure for antibody engineering by yeast surface display: Coupling display levels and target binding by ribosomal skipping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeschik, Julius; Hinz, Steffen C; Könning, Doreen; Pirzer, Thomas; Becker, Stefan; Zielonka, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2017-02-01

    Yeast surface display is a valuable, widely used method for protein engineering. However, current yeast display applications rely on the staining of epitope tags in order to verify full-length presentation of the protein of interest on the cell surface. We aimed at developing a modified yeast display approach that relies on ribosomal skipping, thereby enabling the translation of two proteins from one open reading frame and, in that manner, generating an intracellular fluorescence signal. This improved setup is based on a 2A sequence that is encoded between the protein to be displayed and a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP). The intracellular GFP fluorescence signal of yeast cells correlates with full-length protein presentation and omits the need for the immunofluorescence detection of epitope tags. For method validation, shark-derived IgNAR variable domains (vNAR) were subjected to affinity maturation using the 2A-GFP system. Yeast library screening of full-length vNAR variants which were detected via GFP expression yielded the same high-affinity binder that had previously been isolated by our group using the conventional epitope tag-based display format. The presented method obviates the need for additional immunofluorescence cell staining, offering an easy and cost-friendly alternative to conventional epitope tag detections.

  4. Environmental benignity of a pesticide in soft colloidal hydrodispersive nanometric form with improved toxic precision towards the target organisms than non-target organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, A P B; Sastry, Thotapalli P; Manigandan, Subramani; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2017-02-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases are of major concern as they cause devastating health effects, morbidity, and mortality in the human population. Conventional pesticides have failed to curb the mosquito population due to the development of insensitivity in mosquitoes. Hence, higher dosages of pesticides along with their toxic solubilizers have been employed, which have led to raise in pesticide pollution load, environmental toxicity, and human health concerns. As a realisation for the requirement of alternative pesticides, the present study has involved in the formulation of a hydrodispersive nanometric colloidal form of deltamethrin (NDM), a type-II pyrethroid pesticide, from its hydroimmisicible parental form (PDM). The mean hydrodynamic diameter of the droplets was found to be 30.6±4.6nm by dynamic light scattering study (DLS). High-resolution transmission electron micrographs have revealed the spherical structure of the droplets with a size range of 35-40nm. The NDM was found to possess sedimentation resistance, intrinsic and hydrodispersive stability. The toxicity of NDM and PDM was comparatively investigated on target organisms (Culex tritaeniorhynchus and Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes) and non-target organisms (Allium cepa - Bioindicator of toxicants and Rhizobium sp. - Soil bacteria). As comparative to PDM, NDM has exerted higher efficacy on adult mosquito and larval population, even at low-level concentrations. However, in the case of non-target organisms, the NDM toxicity was lower than PDM. Comprehensively, the study has concluded the potential advantage of formulating conventional pesticides into nanometric soft colloidal form for the improved toxic precision on target organisms (mosquitoes). This ensures the ability of NDM to combat against the mosquito population even at lower concentrations, thereby reducing the pesticide exposure load towards the environment and human population.

  5. Imidazoline binding sites in the endocrine pancreas: can they fulfil their potential as targets for the development of new insulin secretagogues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, N G; Chan, S L

    2001-09-01

    A variety of compounds containing an imidazoline ring have the ability to stimulate insulin secretion. Many of these also improve glycaemia in experimental models of type 2 diabetes and in man, suggesting that this class may be useful in the development of new orally active anti-diabetic drugs. However, the mechanisms by which imidazolines promote insulin secretion have not been clarified. The response does not appear to be due to the binding of ligands to either of the two major types of "imidazoline receptor" defined by pharmacological criteria (I1 and I2 sites) but may result from interaction with a novel imidazoline binding site. One such site has been identified in association with the ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel in the beta-cell and has been designated "I3". Electrophysiological and biochemical evidence suggest that the I3 site may be intrinsic to the ion-conducting pore component, Kir6.2, of the K(ATP) channel, but the effects of imidazoline ligands on insulin secretion can be dissociated from the regulation of Kir6.2. Indeed, there is increasing evidence that some imidazolines can control exocytosis directly, both in beta-cells and in pancreatic alpha-cells. Thus, it is proposed that a further imidazoline binding site is primarily responsible for control of hormone secretion. Evidence is reviewed which suggests that this site occupies a central position within an amplification pathway that also mediates the effects of cAMP in the beta-cell. Characterisation of this site should provide the stimulus for the design of new insulin secretagogues that are devoid of K(ATP) channel-blocking properties.

  6. Metabolomics as a tool for target identification in strain improvement: The influence of phenotype definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braaksma, M.; Bijlsma, S.; Coulier, L.; Punt, P.J.; Werf, M.J. van der

    2011-01-01

    For the optimization of microbial production processes, the choice of the quantitative phenotype to be optimized is crucial. For instance, for the optimization of product formation, either product concentration or productivity can be pursued, potentially resulting in different targets for strain imp

  7. Improving Student Writing Using a Web-Based Targeted Approach to Grammar System (TAGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Notes that the need to teach basic grammar has increased as journalism programs expand their focus to match workforce skills. Proposes that a Web-based Targeted Approach to Grammar System (TAGS) is a development in grammar checkers that is useful for teaching and learning. Discusses a pedagogical approach to using TAGS via the Web. (PM)

  8. Medicinal chemistry based approaches and nanotechnology-based systems to improve CNS drug targeting and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlieghe, Patrick; Khrestchatisky, Michel

    2013-05-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is protected by various barriers, which regulate nervous tissue homeostasis and control the selective and specific uptake, efflux, and metabolism of endogenous and exogenous molecules. Among these barriers is the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a physical and physiological barrier that filters very efficiently and selectively the entry of compounds from the blood to the brain and protects nervous tissue from harmful substances and infectious agents present in the bloodstream. The BBB also prevents the entry of potential drugs. As a result, various drug targeting and delivery strategies are currently being developed to enhance the transport of drugs from the blood to the brain. Following a general introduction, we briefly overview in this review article the fundamental physiological properties of the BBB. Then, we describe current strategies to bypass the BBB (i.e., invasive methods, alternative approaches, and temporary opening) and to cross it (i.e., noninvasive approaches). This section is followed by a chapter addressing the chemical and technological solutions developed to cross the BBB. A special emphasis is given to prodrug-targeting approaches and targeted nanotechnology-based systems, two promising strategies for BBB targeting and delivery of drugs to the brain.

  9. A deficiency in cold-inducible RNA-binding protein accelerates the inflammation phase and improves wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo, Juan Pablo; Jacob, Asha; Yang, Weng Lang; Wang, Zhimin; Yen, Hao Ting; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Wang, Ping

    2016-02-01

    Chronic or non-healing wounds are a major concern in clinical practice and these wounds are mostly associated with diabetes, and venous and pressure ulcers. Wound healing is a complex process involving overlapping phases and the primary phase in this complex cascade is the inflammatory state. While inflammation is necessary for wound healing, a prolonged inflammatory phase leads to impaired healing. Cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRP) belongs to a family of cold-shock proteins that are expressed in high levels under stress conditions. Recently, we demonstrated that a deficiency in CIRP led to decreased inflammation and mortality in an experimental model of hemorrhagic shock. Thus, we hypothesized that a deficiency in CIRP would accelerate the inflammatory phase and lead to an improvement in cutaneous wound healing. In this study, to examine this hypothesis, a full-thickness wound was created on the dorsum of wild-type (WT) and CIRP-/- mice. The wound size was measured every other day for 14 days. The wound area was significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice by day 9 and continued to decrease until day 14 compared to the WT mice. In a separate cohort, mice were sacrificed on days 3 and 7 after wounding and the skin tissues were harvested for histological analysis and RNA measurements. On day 3, the mRNA expression of tumor necrossis factor (TNF)-α in the skin tissues was increased by 16-fold in the WT mice, whereas these levels were increased by 65-fold in the CIRP-/- mice. Of note on day 7, while the levels of TNF-α remained high in the WT mice, these levels were significantly decreased in the CIRP-/- mice. The histological analysis of the wounded skin tissue indicated an improvement as early as day 3 in the CIRP-/- mice, whereas in the WT mice, infiltrated immune cells were still present on day 7. On day 7 in the CIRP-/- mice, Gr-1 expression was low and CD31 expression was high, whereas in the WT mice, Gr-1 expression was high and CD31 expression was low

  10. RNA targeting by DNA binding drugs: structural, conformational and energetic aspects of the binding of quinacrine and DAPI to A-form and H(L)-form of poly(rC).poly(rG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rangana; Hossain, Maidul; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2007-12-01

    A key step in the rational design of new RNA binding small molecules necessitates a complete elucidation of the molecular aspects of the binding of existing molecules to RNA structures. This work focuses towards the understanding of the interaction of a DNA intercalator, quinacrine and a minor groove binder 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) with the right handed Watson-Crick base paired A-form and the left-handed Hoogsteen base paired H(L)-form of poly(rC).poly(rG) evaluated by multifaceted spectroscopic and viscometric techniques. The energetics of their interaction has also been elucidated by isothermal titration calorimetry. Results of this study converge to suggest that (i) quinacrine intercalates to both A-form and H(L)-form of poly(rC).poly(rG); (ii) DAPI shows both intercalative and groove-binding modes to the A-form of the RNA but binds by intercalative mode to the H(L)-form. Isothermal calorimetric patterns of quinacrine binding to both the forms of RNA and of DAPI binding to the H(L)-form are indicative of single binding while the binding of DAPI to the A-form reveals two kinds of binding. The binding of both the drugs to both conformations of RNA is exothermic; while the binding of quinacrine to both conformations and DAPI to the A-form (first site) is entropy driven, the binding of DAPI to the second site of A-form and H(L)-conformation is enthalpy driven. Temperature dependence of the binding enthalpy revealed that the RNA-ligand interaction reactions are accompanied by small heat capacity changes that are nonetheless significant. We conclude that the binding affinity characteristics and energetics of interaction of these DNA binding molecules to the RNA conformations are significantly different and may serve as data for the development of effective structure selective RNA-based antiviral drugs.

  11. Molecular Recognition of the Catalytic Zinc(II) Ion in MMP-13: Structure-Based Evolution of an Allosteric Inhibitor to Dual Binding Mode Inhibitors with Improved Lipophilic Ligand Efficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Thomas; Riedl, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc dependent endopeptidases which play a crucial role in a multitude of severe diseases such as cancer and osteoarthritis. We employed MMP-13 as the target enzyme for the structure-based design and synthesis of inhibitors able to recognize the catalytic zinc ion in addition to an allosteric binding site in order to increase the affinity of the ligand. Guided by molecular modeling, we optimized an initial allosteric inhibitor by addition of linker fragments and weak zinc binders for recognition of the catalytic center. Furthermore we improved the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) of the initial inhibitor by adding appropriate zinc binding fragments to lower the clogP values of the inhibitors, while maintaining their potency. All synthesized inhibitors showed elevated affinity compared to the initial hit, also most of the novel inhibitors displayed better LLE. Derivatives with carboxylic acids as the zinc binding fragments turned out to be the most potent inhibitors (compound 3 (ZHAWOC5077): IC50 = 134 nM) whereas acyl sulfonamides showed the best lipophilic ligand efficiencies (compound 18 (ZHAWOC5135): LLE = 2.91).

  12. Maintenance Therapy in Ovarian Cancer with Targeted Agents Improves PFS and OS: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Qian

    Full Text Available Maintenance therapy with targeted agents for prolonging remission for ovarian cancer patients remains controversial. As a result, a meta-analysis was conducted to assess the effectiveness and safety of using maintenance therapy with targeted agents for the treatment of ovarian cancer.From inception to January 2015, we searched for randomized, controlled trials (RCTs using the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, the Cochrane Library, Clinicaltrials.gov and EBSCO. Eligible trials included RCTs that evaluated standard chemotherapy which was either followed or not followed by targeted maintenance in patients with ovarian cancer who had been previously receiving adjunctive treatments, such as cytoreductive surgery and standard chemotherapy. The outcome measures included progression-free survival (PFS, overall survival (OS and incidence of adverse events.A total of 13 RCTs, which were published between 2006 and 2014, were found to be in accordance with our inclusion criteria. The primary meta-analysis indicated that both PFS and OS were statistically and significantly improved in the targeted maintenance therapy group as compared to the control group (PFS: HR = 0.84, 95%CI: 0.75 to 0.95, p = 0.001; OS: HR = 0.91, 95%CI: 0.84 to 0.98, p = 0.02. When taking safety into consideration, the use of targeted agents was significantly correlated with increased risks of fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, and hypertension. However, no significant differences were found in incidence rates of abdominal pain, constipation or joint pain.Our results indicate that targeted maintenance therapy clearly improves the survival of ovarian cancer patients but may also increase the incidence of adverse events. Additional randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter investigations will be required on a larger cohort of patients to verify our findings.

  13. Arabidopsis miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins bind to GT cis-elements and mediate gibberellin-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis under light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhaoxue; Hu, Xupeng; Cai, Wenjuan; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Qian; Yang, Hongquan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Jirong

    2014-08-01

    An extraordinarily precise regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge on the complex regulatory mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis is very limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins (SCL6/22/27) negatively regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis via an unknown mechanism. Here we showed that SCLs inhibit the expression of the key gene encoding protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) in light-grown plants, but have no significant effect on protochlorophyllide biosynthesis in etiolated seedlings. Histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants expressing pSCL27::rSCL27-GUS revealed that SCL27-GUS accumulates at high levels and suppresses chlorophyll biosynthesis at the leaf basal proliferation region during leaf development. Transient gene expression assays showed that the promoter activity of PORC is indeed regulated by SCL27. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR assays showed that SCL27 binds to the promoter region of PORC in vivo. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SCL27 is directly interacted with G(A/G)(A/T)AA(A/T)GT cis-elements of the PORC promoter. Furthermore, genetic analysis showed that gibberellin (GA)-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis is mediated, at least in part, by SCLs. We demonstrated that SCL27 interacts with DELLA proteins in vitro and in vivo by yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analysis and found that their interaction reduces the binding activity of SCL27 to the PORC promoter. Additionally, we showed that SCL27 activates MIR171 gene expression, forming a feedback regulatory loop. Taken together, our data suggest that the miR171-SCL module is critical for mediating GA-DELLA signaling in the coordinate regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and leaf growth in light.

  14. Ligand-binding mass spectrometry to study biotransformation of fusion protein drugs and guide immunoassay development: strategic approach and application to peptibodies targeting the thrombopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael P; Gegg, Colin; Walker, Kenneth; Spahr, Christopher; Ortiz, Robert; Patel, Vimal; Yu, Steven; Zhang, Liana; Lu, Hsieng; DeSilva, Binodh; Lee, Jean W

    2010-12-01

    The knowledge of in vivo biotransformation (e.g., proteolysis) of protein therapeutic candidates reveals structural liabilities that impact stability. This information aids the development and confirmation of ligand-binding assays with the required specificity for bioactive moieties (including intact molecule and metabolites) for appropriate PK profiling. Furthermore, the information can be used for re-engineering of constructs to remove in vivo liabilities in order to design the most stable candidates. We have developed a strategic approach of ligand-binding mass spectrometry (LBMS) to study biotransformation of fusion proteins of peptides fused to human Fc ("peptibodies") using anti-human Fc immunoaffinity capture followed by tiered mass spectrometric interrogation. LBMS offers the combined power of selectivity of ligand capture with the specificity and detailed molecular-level information of mass spectrometry. In this paper, we demonstrate the preclinical application of LBMS to three peptibodies, AMG531 (romiplostim), AMG195(linear), and AMG195(loop), that target the thrombopoietin receptor. The data show that ligand capture offers excellent sample cleanup and concentration of intact peptibodies and metabolites for subsequent query by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for identification of in vivo proteolytic points. Additional higher-resolution analysis by nanoscale liquid chromatography interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is required for identification of heterogeneous metabolites. Five proteolytic points are accurately identified for AMG531 and two for AMG195(linear), while AMG195(loop) is the most stable construct in rats. We recommend the use of LBMS to assess biotransformation and in vivo stability during early preclinical phase development for all novel fusion proteins.

  15. CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and downstream human placental growth hormone genes are targets for dysregulation in pregnancies complicated by maternal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in "normal" pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this "resistance," suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m(2)) versus lean (BMI 20-25 kg/m(2)) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development.

  16. CCAAT-enhancer-binding Protein β (C/EBPβ) and Downstream Human Placental Growth Hormone Genes Are Targets for Dysregulation in Pregnancies Complicated by Maternal Obesity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakili, Hana; Jin, Yan; Menticoglou, Savas; Cattini, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Human chorionic somatomammotropin (CS) and placental growth hormone variant (GH-V) act as metabolic adaptors in response to maternal insulin resistance, which occurs in “normal” pregnancy. Maternal obesity can exacerbate this “resistance,” suggesting that CS, GH-V, or transcription factors that regulate their production might be targets. The human CS genes, hCS-A and hCS-B, flank the GH-V gene. A significant decrease in pre-term placental CS/GH-V RNA levels was observed in transgenic mice containing the CS/GH-V genes in a model of high fat diet (HFD)-induced maternal obesity. Similarly, a decrease in CS/GH-V RNA levels was detected in term placentas from obese (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 35 kg/m2) versus lean (BMI 20–25 kg/m2) women. A specific decrease in transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) RNA levels was also seen with obesity; C/EBPβ is required for mouse placenta development and is expressed, like CS and GH-V, in syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding of C/EBPβ to the CS gene downstream enhancer regions, which by virtue of their position distally flank the GH-V gene, was reduced in placenta chromatin from mice on a HFD and in obese women; a corresponding decrease in RNA polymerase II associated with CS/GH-V promoters was also observed. Detection of decreased endogenous CS/GH-V RNA levels in human placental tumor cells treated with C/EBPβ siRNA is consistent with a direct effect. These data provide evidence for CS/GH-V dysregulation in acute HFD-induced obesity in mouse pregnancy and chronic obesity in human pregnancy and implicate C/EBPβ, a factor associated with CS regulation and placental development. PMID:23782703

  17. An Improved Interacting Multiple Model Filtering Algorithm Based on the Cubature Kalman Filter for Maneuvering Target Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Gannan

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the tracking accuracy, model estimation accuracy and quick response of multiple model maneuvering target tracking, the interacting multiple models five degree cubature Kalman filter (IMM5CKF) is proposed in this paper. In the proposed algorithm, the interacting multiple models (IMM) algorithm processes all the models through a Markov Chain to simultaneously enhance the model tracking accuracy of target tracking. Then a five degree cubature Kalman filter (5CKF) evaluates the surface integral by a higher but deterministic odd ordered spherical cubature rule to improve the tracking accuracy and the model switch sensitivity of the IMM algorithm. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm exhibits quick and smooth switching when disposing different maneuver models, and it also performs better than the interacting multiple models cubature Kalman filter (IMMCKF), interacting multiple models unscented Kalman filter (IMMUKF), 5CKF and the optimal mode transition matrix IMM (OMTM-IMM).

  18. An Improved Interacting Multiple Model Filtering Algorithm Based on the Cubature Kalman Filter for Maneuvering Target Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the tracking accuracy, model estimation accuracy and quick response of multiple model maneuvering target tracking, the interacting multiple models five degree cubature Kalman filter (IMM5CKF is proposed in this paper. In the proposed algorithm, the interacting multiple models (IMM algorithm processes all the models through a Markov Chain to simultaneously enhance the model tracking accuracy of target tracking. Then a five degree cubature Kalman filter (5CKF evaluates the surface integral by a higher but deterministic odd ordered spherical cubature rule to improve the tracking accuracy and the model switch sensitivity of the IMM algorithm. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm exhibits quick and smooth switching when disposing different maneuver models, and it also performs better than the interacting multiple models cubature Kalman filter (IMMCKF, interacting multiple models unscented Kalman filter (IMMUKF, 5CKF and the optimal mode transition matrix IMM (OMTM-IMM.

  19. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Bevan, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.

  20. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Roekel Henk S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis is currently the most successful method in rats, although it is still very laborious and expensive. Results As ENU-induced DNA damage is normally recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR system, we hypothesized that the effectiveness of the target-selected mutagenesis approach could be improved by using a MMR-deficient genetic background. Indeed, Msh6 knockout rats were found to be more sensitive to ENU treatment and the germ line mutation rate was boosted more than two-fold to 1 mutation per 585 kb. In addition, the molecular mutation spectrum was found to be changed in favor of generating knockout-type alleles by ~20%, resulting in an overall increase in efficiency of ~2.5 fold. The improved effectiveness was demonstrated by high throughput mutation discovery in 70 Mb of sequence in a set of only 310 mutant F1 rats. This resulted in the identification of 89 mutations of which four introduced a premature stopcodon and 64 resulted in amino acid changes. Conclusion Taken together, we show that the use of a MMR-deficient background considerably improves ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis in the rat, thereby reducing animal use as well as screening costs. The use of a mismatch repair-deficient genetic background for improving mutagenesis and target-selected knockout efficiency is in principle applicable to any organism of interest.

  1. Improved generation of rat gene knockouts by target-selected mutagenesis in mismatch repair-deficient animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boxtel, Ruben; Toonen, Pim W; Verheul, Mark; van Roekel, Henk S; Nijman, Isaac J; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2008-01-01

    Background The laboratory rat (Rattus norvegicus) is one of the preferred model organisms in physiological and pharmacological research, although the availability of specific genetic models, especially gene knockouts, is limited. N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-driven target-selected mutagenesis is currently the most successful method in rats, although it is still very laborious and expensive. Results As ENU-induced DNA damage is normally recognized by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we hypothesized that the effectiveness of the target-selected mutagenesis approach could be improved by using a MMR-deficient genetic background. Indeed, Msh6 knockout rats were found to be more sensitive to ENU treatment and the germ line mutation rate was boosted more than two-fold to 1 mutation per 585 kb. In addition, the molecular mutation spectrum was found to be changed in favor of generating knockout-type alleles by ~20%, resulting in an overall increase in efficiency of ~2.5 fold. The improved effectiveness was demonstrated by high throughput mutation discovery in 70 Mb of sequence in a set of only 310 mutant F1 rats. This resulted in the identification of 89 mutations of which four introduced a premature stopcodon and 64 resulted in amino acid changes. Conclusion Taken together, we show that the use of a MMR-deficient background considerably improves ENU-driven target-selected mutagenesis in the rat, thereby reducing animal use as well as screening costs. The use of a mismatch repair-deficient genetic background for improving mutagenesis and target-selected knockout efficiency is in principle applicable to any organism of interest. PMID:18840264

  2. Rapamycin/sodium hyaluronate binding on nano-hydroxyapatite coated titanium surface improves MC3T3-E1 osteogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Dong, Jian Yong; Yue, Lin Lin; Liu, Shao Hua; Wan, Yi; Liu, Hong; Tan, Wan Ye; Guo, Qian Qian; Zhang, Dong

    2017-01-01

    Endosseous titanium (Ti) implant failure due to poor biocompatibility of implant surface remains a major problem for osseointegration. Improving the topography of Ti surface may enhance osseointegration, however, the mechanism remains unknown. To investigate the effect of modified Ti surface on osteogenesis, we loaded rapamycin (RA) onto nano-hydroxyapatite (HAp) coated Ti surface which was acid-etched, alkali-heated and HAp coated sequentially. Sodium hyaluronate (SH) was employed as an intermediate layer for the load of RA, and a steady release rate of RA was maintained. Cell vitality of MC3T3-E1 was assessed by MTT. Osteogenesis of MC3T3-E1 on this modified Ti surface was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralization and related osteogenesis genes osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), Collagen-I and Runx2. The result revealed that RA/SH-loaded nano-HAp Ti surface was innocent for cell vitality and even more beneficial for cell osteogenesis in vitro. Furthermore, osteogenesis of MC3T3-E1 showed significant association with the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) phosphorylation by RA, which required further study about the mechanism. The approach to this modified Ti surface presented in this paper has high research value for the development of Ti-based implant. PMID:28182765

  3. Recent studies to improve release properties from thick isotope separator on-line fission targets

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, C; Verney, D; Bajeat, O; Ibrahim, F; Clapier, F; Cottereau, E; Donzaud, C; Ducourtieux, M; Essabaa, S; Guillemaud-Müller, D; Hosni, F; Lefort, H; Le Blanc, F; Müller, A C

    2003-01-01

    In the framework of the PARRNe program (Production d'Atomes Radioactifs Riches en Neutrons) of IPN Orsay, various techniques are currently used to characterize the release properties of elements of interest from a UC//X target. On-line studies have been carried out with two plasma ion sources: a Nier-Bernas and a hot plasma ISOLDE- type (the ISOLDE collaboration kindly supplied us a MK5 ion source for these studies). In parallel, the analysis of the chemical and structure properties of some UC//X samples as function of heating conditions has been carried out. Such data are essential to determine optimal conditions for the production of isotopes by the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) technique. First results are presented here for Kr and Ag. Investigations for other kinds of fission targets are planned.

  4. A screening method for prioritizing non-target invertebrates for improved biosafety testing of transgenic crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jacqui H; Ramankutty, Padmaja; Barraclough, Emma I; Malone, Louise A

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a screening method that can be used during the problem formulation phase of risk assessment to identify and prioritize non-target invertebrates for risk analysis with any transgenic plant. In previously published protocols for this task, five criteria predominated. These criteria have been combined by our method in a simple model which assesses: (1) the possible level of risk presented by the plant to each invertebrate species (through measurements of potential hazard and exposure, the two principal criteria); (2) the hypothetical environmental impact of this risk (determined by the currently known status of the species' population in the ecosystem and its potential resilience to environmental perturbations); (3) the estimated economic, social and cultural value of each species; and (4) the assessed ability to conduct tests with the species. The screening method uses information on each of these criteria entered into a specially designed database that was developed using Microsoft Access 2003. The database holds biological and ecological information for each non-target species, as well as information about the transgenic plant that is the subject of the risk assessment procedure. Each piece of information is then ranked on the basis of the value of the information to each criterion being measured. This ranking system is flexible, allowing the method to be easily adapted for use in any agro-ecosystem and with any plant modification. A model is then used to produce a Priority Ranking of Non-Target Invertebrates (PRONTI) score for each species, which in turn allows the species to be prioritized for risk assessment. As an example, the method was used to prioritize non-target invertebrates for risk assessment of a hypothetical introduction of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry1Ac-expressing Pinus radiata trees into New Zealand.

  5. Membrane binding domains

    OpenAIRE

    Hurley, James H.

    2006-01-01

    Eukaryotic signaling and trafficking proteins are rich in modular domains that bind cell membranes. These binding events are tightly regulated in space and time. The structural, biochemical, and biophysical mechanisms for targeting have been worked out for many families of membrane binding domains. This review takes a comparative view of seven major classes of membrane binding domains, the C1, C2, PH, FYVE, PX, ENTH, and BAR domains. These domains use a combination of specific headgroup inter...

  6. Does targeting manual therapy and/or exercise improve patient outcomes in nonspecific low back pain? A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjøsund Hanne L

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A central element in the current debate about best practice management of non-specific low back pain (NSLBP is the efficacy of targeted versus generic (non-targeted treatment. Many clinicians and researchers believe that tailoring treatment to NSLBP subgroups positively impacts on patient outcomes. Despite this, there are no systematic reviews comparing the efficacy of targeted versus non-targeted manual therapy and/or exercise. This systematic review was undertaken in order to determine the efficacy of such targeted treatment in adults with NSLBP. Method MEDLINE, EMBASE, Current Contents, AMED and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were electronically searched, reference lists were examined and citation tracking performed. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLPB that used trial designs capable of providing robust information on targeted treatment (treatment effect modification for the outcomes of activity limitation and pain. Included trials needed to be hypothesis-testing studies published in English, Danish or Norwegian. Method quality was assessed using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group. Results Four high-quality randomized controlled trials of targeted manual therapy and/or exercise for NSLBP met the inclusion criteria. One study showed statistically significant effects for short-term outcomes using McKenzie directional preference-based exercise. Research into subgroups requires much larger sample sizes than traditional two-group trials and other included studies showed effects that might be clinically important in size but were not statistically significant with their samples sizes. Conclusions The clinical implications of these results are that they provide very cautious evidence supporting the notion that treatment targeted to subgroups of patients with NSLBP may improve patient outcomes. The results of the

  7. Improved targeting of the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} integrin by multimerisation of RGD peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkgraaf, Ingrid [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Utrecht University, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, P.O. Box 80082, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kruijtzer, John A.W.; Liskamp, Rob M.J. [Utrecht University, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, P.O. Box 80082, Utrecht (Netherlands); Liu, Shuang [Purdue University, School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Soede, Annemieke C.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Corstens, Frans H.M.; Boerman, Otto C. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    The integrin {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is expressed on sprouting endothelial cells and on various tumour cell types. Due to the restricted expression of {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} in tumours, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} is considered a suitable receptor for tumour targeting. In this study the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding characteristics of an {sup 111}In-labelled monomeric, dimeric and tetrameric RGD analogue were compared. A monomeric (E-c(RGDfK)), dimeric (E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}), and tetrameric (E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2}) RGD peptide were synthesised, conjugated with DOTA and radiolabelled with {sup 111}In. In vitro {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} binding characteristics were determined in a competitive binding assay. In vivo {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} targeting characteristics of the compounds were assessed in mice with SK-RC-52 xenografts. The IC{sub 50} values for DOTA-E-c(RGDfK), DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}, and DOTA-E{l_brace}E[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2}{r_brace}{sub 2}were 120 nM, 69.9 nM and 19.6 nM, respectively. At all time points, the tumour uptake of the dimer was significantly higher as compared to that of the monomer. At 8 h p.i., tumour uptake of the tetramer (7.40 {+-}1.12%ID/g) was significantly higher than that of the monomer (2.30 {+-}0.34%ID/g), p <0.001, and the dimer (5.17 {+-}1.22%ID/g), p <0.05. At 24 h p.i., the tumour uptake was significantly higher for the tetramer (6.82 {+-}1.41%ID/g) than for the dimer (4.22 {+-}0.96%ID/g), p <0.01, and the monomer (1.90 {+-}0.29%ID/g), p <0.001. Multimerisation of c(RGDfK) resulted in enhanced affinity for {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3} as determined in vitro. Tumour uptake of a tetrameric RGD peptide was significantly higher than that of the monomeric and dimeric analogues, presumably owing to the enhanced statistical likelihood for rebinding to {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}. (orig.)

  8. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyzed the functionality of the different protein binding domains of one of these glycogen targeting subunits, namely PPP1R3D (R6) and studied how binding properties of different domains affect its glycogenic properties. We have found that the PP1 binding domain of R6 comprises a conserved RVXF motif (R102VRF) located at the N-terminus of the protein. We have also identified a region located at the C-terminus of R6 (W267DNND) that is involved in binding to the PP1 glycogenic substrates. Our results indicate that although binding to PP1 and glycogenic substrates are independent processes, impairment of any of them results in lack of glycogenic activity of R6. In addition, we have characterized a novel site of regulation in R6 that is involved in binding to 14-3-3 proteins (RARS74LP). We present evidence indicating that when binding of R6 to 14-3-3 proteins is prevented, R6 displays hyper-glycogenic activity although is rapidly degraded by the lysosomal pathway. These results define binding to 14-3-3 proteins as an additional pathway in the control of the glycogenic properties of R6.

  9. Improving the MVA vaccine potential by deleting the viral gene coding for the IL-18 binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Falivene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modified Vaccinia Ankara (MVA is an attenuated strain of Vaccinia virus (VACV currently employed in many clinical trials against HIV/AIDS and other diseases. MVA still retains genes involved in host immune response evasion, enabling its optimization by removing some of them. The aim of this study was to evaluate cellular immune responses (CIR induced by an IL-18 binding protein gene (C12L deleted vector (MVAΔC12L. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were immunized with different doses of MVAΔC12L or MVA wild type (MVAwt, then CIR to VACV epitopes in immunogenic proteins were evaluated in spleen and draining lymph nodes at acute and memory phases (7 and 40 days post-immunization respectively. Compared with parental MVAwt, MVAΔC12L immunization induced a significant increase of two to three-fold in CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cell responses to different VACV epitopes, with increased percentage of anti-VACV cytotoxic CD8(+ T-cells (CD107a/b(+ during the acute phase of the response. Importantly, the immunogenicity enhancement was also observed after MVAΔC12L inoculation with different viral doses and by distinct routes (systemic and mucosal. Potentiation of MVA's CIR was also observed during the memory phase, in correlation with a higher protection against an intranasal challenge with VACV WR. Of note, we could also show a significant increase in the CIR against HIV antigens such as Env, Gag, Pol and Nef from different subtypes expressed from two recombinants of MVAΔC12L during heterologous DNA prime/MVA boost vaccination regimens. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates the relevance of IL-18 bp contribution in the immune response evasion during MVA infection. Our findings clearly show that the deletion of the viral IL-18 bp gene is an effective approach to increase MVA vaccine efficacy, as immunogenicity improvements were observed against vector antigens and more importantly to HIV antigens.

  10. Inhibition of Axl improves the targeted therapy against ALK-mutated neuroblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Fei [Department of Neurology, Sichuan Medical Science Institute and Sichuan Provincial Hospital, Chengdu 610072 (China); Li, Hongling [Department of Radiotherapy, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Sun, Yong, E-mail: sunfanqi2010@163.com [Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery, Huai’an First People’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Huai’an 223300 (China)

    2014-11-28

    Highlights: • First reported Axl is co-expressed with ALK in neuroblastoma tissues and cell lines. • Axl activation promotes cell growth and impairs the efficiency of ALK inhibitor. • Further found silence of Axl leads to increased sensitivity to ALK inhibitors. • Axl inhibitor promotes the efficiency of targeted therapy in vitro and in vivo. • Axl activation should be considered in the clinical application of ALK inhibitors. - Abstract: Neuroblastoma (NB) patients harboring mutated ALK can be expected to potentially benefit from targeted therapy based on ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), such as crizotinib and ceritinib. However, the effect of the treatment varies with different individuals, although with the same genic changes. Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is expressed in a variety of human cancers, but little data are reported in NB, particularly in which carrying mutated ALK. In this study, we focus on the roles of Axl in ALK-mutated NB for investigating rational therapeutic strategy. We found that Axl is expressed in ALK-positive NB tissues and cell lines, and could be effectively activated by its ligand GAS6. Ligand-dependent Axl activation obviously rescued crizotinib-mediated suppression of cell proliferation in ALK-mutated NB cells. Genetic inhibition of Axl with specific small interfering RNA markedly increased the sensitivity of cells to ALK-TKIs. Furthermore, a small-molecule inhibitor of Axl significantly enhanced ALK-targeted therapy, as an increased frequency of apoptosis was observed in NB cells co-expressing ALK and Axl. Taken together, our results demonstrated that activation of Axl could lead to insensitivity to ALK inhibitors, and dual inhibition of ALK and Axl might be a potential therapeutic strategy against ALK-mutated NB.

  11. Morpholino antisense oligonucleotides targeting intronic repressor Element1 improve phenotype in SMA mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Erkan Y.; Miller, Madeline R.; Robbins, Kate L.; Lombardi, Abby M.; Atkinson, Arleigh K.; Brehm, Amanda J.; Lorson, Christian L.

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of Survival Motor Neuron-1 (SMN1). In all SMA patients, a nearly identical copy gene called SMN2 is present, which produces low levels of functional protein owing to an alternative splicing event. To prevent exon-skipping, we have targeted an intronic repressor, Element1 (E1), located upstream of SMN2 exon 7 using Morpholino-based antisense oligonucleotides (E1MO-ASOs). A single intracerebroventricular injection i...

  12. Targeting L-Selectin to Improve Neurologic and Urologic Function After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Significance: We have identified robust locomotor recovery in both mild and severe spinal cord injured mice that received DFA up to 3 hours following...60mg/kg and 40mg/kg DFA is occurring at the target site of interest: the injured spinal cord . As with the plasma data, lower doses of DFA exhibited...no significant changes to L-selectin levels in the injured spinal cord . Taken together, these data suggest that the 40mg/kg dose of DFA is the

  13. Interconnection of post-transcriptional regulation: The RNA-binding protein Hfq is a novel target of the Lon protease in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Lucía; Breidenstein, Elena B M; Taylor, Patrick K; Bains, Manjeet; de la Fuente-Núñez, César; Fang, Yuan; Foster, Leonard J; Hancock, Robert E W

    2016-01-01

    Besides being a major opportunistic human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be found in a wide range of environments. This versatility is linked to complex regulation, which is achieved through the action of transcriptional regulators, and post-transcriptional regulation by intracellular proteases including Lon. Indeed, lon mutants in this species show defects in motility, biofilm formation, pathogenicity and fluoroquinolone resistance. Here, the proteomic approach stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was used to search for novel proteolytic targets. One of the proteins that accumulated in the lon mutant was the RNA-binding protein Hfq. Further experiments demonstrated the ability of Lon to degrade Hfq in vitro. Also, overexpression of the hfq gene in the wild-type strain led to partial inhibition of swarming, swimming and twitching motilities, indicating that Hfq accumulation could contribute to the phenotypes displayed by Lon mutants. Hfq overexpression also led to the upregulation of the small regulatory RNA PhrS. Analysis of the phenotypes of strains lacking or overexpressing this sRNA indicated that the Lon protease might be indirectly regulating the levels and activity of sRNAs via Hfq. Overall, this study revealed new links in the complex regulatory chain that controls multicellular behaviours in P. aeruginosa.

  14. [(3) H]-L685,458 binding sites are abundant in multiple peripheral organs in rats: implications for safety assessment of putative γ-secretase targeting drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Ying; Li, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Ling; Mou, Lin; Cai, Yan; Huang, He; Luo, Xue-Gang; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2014-12-01

    γ-Secretase is a multimeric enzyme complex that carries out proteolytic processing to a variety of cellular proteins. It is currently explored as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Mechanism-based toxicity needs to be thoroughly evaluated for γ-secretase inhibitory and/or modulatory drugs. This study comparatively assessed putative γ-secretase catalytic sites in rat peripheral tissues relative to brain and explored an effort of its pharmacological inhibition on hair regeneration. Using [(3) H]-labelled L685,458, a potent γ-secretase inhibitor, as probe, we found more abundant presence of γ-secretase binding sites in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, hair follicle, pituitary gland, ovary and testis, as compared to the brain. Local application of L658,458 delayed vibrissal regrowth following whisker removal. These results suggest that γ-secretase may execute important biological functions in many peripheral systems, as in the brain. The development of γ-secretase inhibitors/modulators for AD and cancer therapy should include close monitoring of toxicological panels for hepatic, gastrointestinal, endocrinal and reproductive functions.

  15. Bni1p implicated in cytoskeletal control is a putative target of Rho1p small GTP binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, H; Tanaka, K; Mino, A; Umikawa, M; Imamura, H; Fujiwara, T; Fujita, Y; Hotta, K; Qadota, H; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y; Takai, Y

    1996-11-15

    The RHO1 gene encodes a homolog of mammalian RhoA small GTP binding protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rho1p is localized at the growth sites, including the bud tip and the cytokinesis site, and is required for bud formation. We have recently shown that Pkc1p, a yeast homolog of mammalian protein kinase C, and glucan synthase are targets of Rho1p. Using the two-hybrid screening system, we cloned a gene encoding a protein which interacted with the GTP-bound form of Rho1p. This gene was identified as BNI1, known to be implicated in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity in S.cerevisiae. Bni1p shares homologous domains (FH1 and FH2 domains) with proteins involved in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity, including formin of mouse, capu and dia of Drosophila and FigA of Aspergillus. A temperature-sensitive mutation in which the RHO1 gene was replaced by the mammalian RhoA gene showed a synthetically lethal interaction with the bni1 mutation and the RhoA bni1 mutant accumulated cells with a deficiency in cytokinesis. Furthermore, this synthetic lethality was caused by the incapability of RhoA to activate Pkc1p, but not glucan synthase. These results suggest that Rho1p regulates cytoskeletal reorganization at least through Bni1p and Pkc1p.

  16. Ventilator-associated pneumonia and pressure ulcer prevention as targets for quality improvement in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    The health care culture must change. Florence Nightingale wrote [8] "deep-rooted and universal is the conviction that to give a medicine is to be doing something, or rather everything and to give air, warmth, cleanliness etc. is to do nothing." Hygiene care practices and mobility activities are fundamental and independent care components in the nursing profession. When implemented using available evidence, they can significantly improve patient outcomes. It is time to claim and demonstrate the importance of consistent delivery of the fundamentals of basic nursing care. Interventional patient hygiene is an effective framework to ensure the the basics of nursing care are consistently applied to improve patient outcomes.

  17. Folic Acid-Chitosan Conjugated Nanoparticles for Improving Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To prepare folic acid-chitosan conjugated nanoparticles (FA-CS NPs and evaluate their targeting specificity on tumor cells. Methods. Chitosan (CS NPs were prepared by ionic cross linking method, and folic acid (FA was conjugated with CS NPs by electrostatic interaction. The properties of NPs were investigated, and doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox as a model drug was encapsulated for investigating drug release pattern in vitro. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of FA-CS NPs were also investigated. Results. The results reveal that the obtained FA-CS NPs were monodisperse nanoparticles with suitable average size and positive surface charge. Dox was easily loaded into FA-CS NPs, and the release pattern showed a long and biphasic drug release. Noticeable phagocytosis effect was observed in the presence of rhodamine B-labeled FA-CSNPs when incubating with the folate receptor-positive SMMC-7221 cells. Conclusion. Compared with the unmodified CS NPs, FA-CS NPs showed much higher cell uptaking ability due to the known folate-receptor mediated endocytosis. FA-CS NPs provide a potential way to enhance the using efficiency of antitumor drug by folate receptor mediated targeting delivery.

  18. In vivo targeting of antigens to maturing dendritic cells via the DEC-205 receptor improves T cell vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura C; Bonnyay, David P; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M; Steinman, Ralph M

    2004-03-15

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic alpha-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the alphaDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models.

  19. In Vivo Targeting of Antigens to Maturing Dendritic Cells via the DEC-205 Receptor Improves T Cell Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Laura C.; Bonnyay, David P.; Charalambous, Anna; Darguste, Dara I.; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Soares, Helena; Brimnes, Marie K.; Moltedo, Bruno; Moran, Thomas M.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-01-01

    The prevention and treatment of prevalent infectious diseases and tumors should benefit from improvements in the induction of antigen-specific T cell immunity. To assess the potential of antigen targeting to dendritic cells to improve immunity, we incorporated ovalbumin protein into a monoclonal antibody to the DEC-205 receptor, an endocytic receptor that is abundant on these cells in lymphoid tissues. Simultaneously, we injected agonistic α-CD40 antibody to mature the dendritic cells. We found that a single low dose of antibody-conjugated ovalbumin initiated immunity from the naive CD4+ and CD8+ T cell repertoire. Unexpectedly, the αDEC-205 antigen conjugates, given s.c., targeted to dendritic cells systemically and for long periods, and ovalbumin peptide was presented on MHC class I for 2 weeks. This was associated with stronger CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity relative to other forms of antigen delivery, even when the latter was given at a thousand times higher doses. In parallel, the mice showed enhanced resistance to an established rapidly growing tumor and to viral infection at a mucosal site. By better harnessing the immunizing functions of maturing dendritic cells, antibody-mediated antigen targeting via the DEC-205 receptor increases the efficiency of vaccination for T cell immunity, including systemic and mucosal resistance in disease models. PMID:15024047

  20. Targeted modifications of foot-and-mouth disease virus; towards improved vaccine candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullberg, Maria; Polacek, Charlotta; Bøtner, Anette

    these into susceptible cells it is possible to rescue specifically altered FMDVs. We have used this approach to generate modified viruses that have particular properties; these studies can assist in the development of improved and safer vaccines to protect against FMDV. For example, we have made changes to the leader (L...

  1. Improving the Targeting of Treatment: Evidence from College Remediation. NBER Working Paper No. 18457

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Clayton, Judith; Crosta, Peter M.; Belfield, Clive R.

    2012-01-01

    At an annual cost of roughly $7 billion nationally, remedial coursework is one of the single largest interventions intended to improve outcomes for underprepared college students. But like a costly medical treatment with non-trivial side effects, the value of remediation overall depends upon whether those most likely to benefit can be identified…

  2. How can we improve targeting of frail elderly patients to a geriatric day-hospital rehabilitation program?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Allen R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The optimal patient selection of frail elderly persons undergoing rehabilitation in Geriatric Day Hospital (GDH programs remains uncertain. This study was done to identify potential predictors of rehabilitation outcomes for these patients. Methods This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of patients admitted to the rehabilitation program of our GDH, in Montreal, Canada, over a five year period. The measures considered were: Barthel Index, Older Americans Resources and Services, Folstein Mini Mental Status Exam, Timed Up & Go (TUG, 6-minute walk test (6 MWT, Gait speed, Berg Balance, grip strength and the European Quality of life - 5 Dimensions. Successful improvement with rehabilitation was defined as improvement in three or more tests of physical function. Logistic regression analysis using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC was employed to select the optimal model for making predictions of rehabilitation success. Results A total of 335 patients were studied, but only 233 patients had a complete data set suitable for the predictive model. Average age was 81 years and patients attended the GDH an average of 24 visits. Significant changes were found in several measures of physical performance for many patients ranging from improved gait speed in 21.3% to improved TUG in 62.7% of the cohort. Fifty-eight percent of patients attained successful improvement with rehabilitation by our criteria. This group was characterized by lower test scores on admission. Using BIC, the best predictor model was the 6 MWT [OR: 0.994 per meter walked (95% CI: 0.990-0.997]. Conclusions The GDH rehabilitation program is effective in improving patients' physical performance. Although no single measure was found to be sufficiently predictive to help target candidates appropriately, the 6 MWT showed a trend to significance. Further research will be done to elucidate the utility of a composite 'rehab appropriateness index' and the role of

  3. CRACC-targeting Fc-fusion protein induces activation of NK cells and DCs and improves T cell immune responses to antigenic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Rastall, David P W; Chen, Weimin; Seregin, Sergey S; Pereira-Hicks, Cristiane; Godbehere, Sarah; Kaminski, Norbert E; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2016-06-08

    The CD2-like receptor activating cytotoxic cell (CRACC) receptor is a member of the SLAM family of receptors that are found on several types of immune cells. We previously demonstrated that increasing the abundance of the adaptor protein EAT-2 during vaccination enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses to vaccine antigens. Engagement of the CRACC receptor in the presence of the EAT-2 adaptor generally results in immune cell activation, while activating CRACC signaling in cells that lack EAT-2 adaptor inhibits their effector and regulatory functions. As EAT-2 is the only SAP adaptor that interacts with the CRACC receptor, we hypothesized that technologies that specifically modulate CRACC signaling during vaccination may also improve antigen specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we constructed a CRACC-targeting Fc fusion protein and included it in vaccination attempts. Indeed, mice co-vaccinated with the CRACC-Fc fusion protein and an adenovirus vaccine expressing the HIV-Gag protein had improved Gag-specific T cell responses, as compared to control mice. These responses are characterized by increased numbers of Gag-specific tetramer+ CD8+ T cells and increases in production of IFNγ, TNFα, and IL2, by Gag-specific CD8+ T cells. Moreover, our results revealed that use of the CRACC-Fc fusion protein enhances vaccine-elicited innate immune responses, as characterized by increased dendritic cells (DCs) maturation and IFNγ production from NK cells. This study highlights the importance of CRACC signaling during the induction of an immune response generally, and during vaccinations specifically, and also lends insight into the mechanisms underlying our prior results noting EAT-2-dependent improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  4. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding.

  5. Targeted deep sequencing improves outcome stratification in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia with low risk cytogenetic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo, Laura; Garcia, Olga; Arnan, Montse; Xicoy, Blanca; Fuster, Francisco; Cabezón, Marta; Coll, Rosa; Ademà, Vera; Grau, Javier; Jiménez, Maria-José; Pomares, Helena; Marcé, Sílvia; Mallo, Mar; Millá, Fuensanta; Alonso, Esther; Sureda, Anna; Gallardo, David; Feliu, Evarist; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Solé, Francesc; Zamora, Lurdes

    2016-01-01

    Clonal cytogenetic abnormalities are found in 20-30% of patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), while gene mutations are present in >90% of cases. Patients with low risk cytogenetic features account for 80% of CMML cases and often fall into the low risk categories of CMML prognostic scoring systems, but the outcome differs considerably among them. We performed targeted deep sequencing of 83 myeloid-related genes in 56 CMML patients with low risk cytogenetic features or uninformative conventional cytogenetics (CC) at diagnosis, with the aim to identify the genetic characteristics of patients with a more aggressive disease. Targeted sequencing was also performed in a subset of these patients at time of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation. Overall, 98% of patients harbored at least one mutation. Mutations in cell signaling genes were acquired at time of AML progression. Mutations in ASXL1, EZH2 and NRAS correlated with higher risk features and shorter overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). Patients with SRSF2 mutations associated with poorer OS, while absence of TET2 mutations (TET2wt) was predictive of shorter PFS. A decrease in OS and PFS was observed as the number of adverse risk gene mutations (ASXL1, EZH2, NRAS and SRSF2) increased. On multivariate analyses, CMML-specific scoring system (CPSS) and presence of adverse risk gene mutations remained significant for OS, while CPSS and TET2wt were predictive of PFS. These results confirm that mutation analysis can add prognostic value to patients with CMML and low risk cytogenetic features or uninformative CC. PMID:27486981

  6. The improving effects on hepatic fibrosis of interferon-γ liposomes targeted to hepatic stellate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinghua; Yan, Zhiqiang; Li, Feng; Lu, Weiyue; Wang, Jiyao; Guo, Chuanyong

    2012-07-01

    No satisfactory anti-fibrotic therapies have yet been applied clinically. One of the main reasons is the inability to specifically target the responsible cells to produce an available drug concentration and the side-effects. Exploiting the key role of the activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in both hepatic fibrogenesis and over-expression of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), we constructed targeted sterically stable liposomes (SSLs) modified by a cyclic peptide (pPB) with affinity for the PDGFR-β to deliver interferon (IFN)-γ to HSCs. The pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed satisfactory size distribution. In vitro pPB-SSL could be taken up by activated HSCs. The study of tissue distribution via living-body animal imaging showed that the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ mostly accumulated in the liver until 24 h. Furthermore, the pPB-SSL-IFN-γ showed more significant remission of hepatic fibrosis. In vivo the histological Ishak stage, the semiquantitative score for collagen in fibrotic liver and the serum levels of collagen type IV-C in fibrotic rats treated with pPB-SSL-IFN-γ were less than those treated with SSL-IFN-γ, IFN-γ and the control group. In vitro pPB-SSL-IFN-γ was also more effective in suppressing activated HSC proliferation and inducing apoptosis of activated HSCs. Thus the data suggest that pPB-SSL-IFN-γ might be a more effective anti-fibrotic agent and a new opportunity for clinical therapy of hepatic fibrosis.

  7. Improved bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides by addition of amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libardo, M Daben; Cervantes, Jorge L; Salazar, Juan C; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2014-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates to help circumvent antibiotic resistance, which is an increasing clinical problem. Amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs are known to actively form reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon metal binding. The combination of these two peptidic constructs could lead to a novel class of dual-acting antimicrobial agents. To test this hypothesis, a set of ATCUN binding motifs were screened for their ability to induce ROS formation, and the most potent were then used to modify AMPs with different modes of action. ATCUN binding motif-containing derivatives of anoplin (GLLKRIKTLL-NH2), pro-apoptotic peptide (PAP; KLAKLAKKLAKLAK-NH2), and sh-buforin (RAGLQFPVGRVHRLLRK-NH2) were synthesized and found to be more active than the parent AMPs against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria. The lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for the ATCUN-anoplin peptides are attributed to the higher pore-forming activity along with their ability to cause ROS-induced membrane damage. The addition of the ATCUN motifs to PAP also increases its ability to disrupt membranes. DNA damage is the major contributor to the activity of the ATCUN-sh-buforin peptides. Our findings indicate that the addition of ATCUN motifs to AMPs is a simple strategy that leads to AMPs with higher antibacterial activity and possibly to more potent, usable antibacterial agents.

  8. Mammalian cell-based optimization of the biarsenical-binding tetracysteine motif for improved fluorescence and affinity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Brent R; Giepmans, Ben N G; Adams, Stephen R; Tsien, Roger Y

    2005-01-01

    Membrane-permeant biarsenical dyes such as FlAsH and ReAsH fluoresce upon binding to genetically encoded tetracysteine motifs expressed in living cells, yet spontaneous nonspecific background staining can prevent detection of weakly expressed or dilute proteins. If the affinity of the tetracysteine

  9. Steam Cooking Significantly Improves in Vitro Bile Acid Binding of Beets, Eggplant, Asparagus, Carrots, Green Beans and Cauliflower

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative healthful potential of cooked beets, okra, eggplant, asparagus, carrots, green beans, cauliflower and turnips was evaluated by determining their in vitro bile acid binding using a mixture of bile acids secreted in human bile at a duodenal physiological pH of 6.3. Six treatments and two...

  10. Air-to-Air Target Acquisition: Factors and Means of Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    and an atmospheric modelo B t - Bb VISTARAQ C - b derived from input quantities and an B atmospheric model Bt Bb RAE/BAC C B derived from input...comparison of two display densities led to the sug- gestion that search time is a function of the square root of the number and density of nontargets...horizon- tal evasive maneuvers are possible. Vertical maneu- vers are treated concisely and some t,-ntative sug- gestions for the improvement of flight

  11. Interventions that target improvements in mental health for parents of children with autism spectrum disorders: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Paz, Nikko S; Wallander, Jan L

    2017-02-01

    Prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggest that one in 68 children is affected. With convincing evidence that parenting a child with ASD is associated with elevated distress and mental health problems, researchers have begun to investigate treatments that directly target parents' psychological well-being. We conducted a narrative review of studies that empirically tested the effects of interventions targeting improvements in the mental health of parents of children with ASD. Following a range of search strategies, a total of 13 studies, seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and six pre-post test designs, met inclusion criteria. We calculated and reported effect sizes for all RCTs. On average, treatment produced medium to large effect sizes with improvements in parenting stress and general health, and reductions in depression and anxiety. Interventions that appeared promising included: Stress Management and Relaxation Techniques, Expressive Writing, Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. However, only one study conducted a follow-up assessment >3months post intervention. Study populations primarily consisted of English-speaking mothers, ages 39 to 42years. Conclusions were limited by small sample sizes, homogeneity of sample population, and reliance on self-report. Therefore, this body of research contains significant limitations in need of improvement for this field to move forward and benefit a sizable number of parents.

  12. Functional Roles of microRNAs in Agronomically Important Plants-Potential as Targets for Crop Improvement and Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djami-Tchatchou, Arnaud T; Sanan-Mishra, Neeti; Ntushelo, Khayalethu; Dubery, Ian A

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression, mainly through cleavage and/or translation inhibition of the target mRNAs during or after transcription. miRNAs play important roles by regulating a multitude of biological processes in plants which include maintenance of genome integrity, development, metabolism, and adaptive responses toward environmental stresses. The increasing population of the world and their food demands requires focused efforts for the improvement of crop plants to ensure sustainable food production. Manipulation of mRNA transcript abundance via miRNA control provides a unique strategy for modulating differential plant gene expression and miRNAs are thus emerging as the next generation targets for genetic engineering for improvement of the agronomic properties of crops. However, a deeper understanding of its potential and the mechanisms involved will facilitate the design of suitable strategies to obtain the desirable traits with minimum trade-offs in the modified crops. In this regard, this review highlights the diverse roles of conserved and newly identified miRNAs in various food and industrial crops and recent advances made in the uses of miRNAs to improve plants of agronomically importance so as to significantly enhance crop yields and increase tolerance to various environmental stress agents of biotic-or abiotic origin.

  13. Targeting Immunological Restrainers: Understanding the Immunology Behind Combination Chemoimmunotherapy to Improve the Treatment of Malignant Mesothelioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    aggressive, incurable  asbestos ‐induced cancer  that is increasing in incidence globally.  Treatment  for mesothelioma is predominantly palliative, with...Improve the Treatment of Malignant Mesothelioma PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Professor Bruce Robinson, University of Western Australia CONTRACTING...the Treatment of Malignant Mesothelioma W81XWH-12-1-0344 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER Bmce Robinson Se. TASK NUMBER Sf

  14. Structured hydrological analysis for targeting fallow evaporation to improve water productivity at the irrigation system level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides results of an application of a holistic systematic approach of water accounting using remote sensing and GIS coupled with ground water modeling to evaluate water saving options by tracking non-beneficial evaporation in the Liuyuankou Irrigation System (LIS of China. Groundwater rise is a major issue in the LIS, where groundwater levels have risen alarmingly close to the ground surface (within 1 m near the Yellow River. The lumped water balance analysis showed high fallow evaporation losses and which need to be reduced for improving water productivity.

    The seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETs was estimated by applying the SEBAL algorithm for eighteen NOAA AVHRR-12 images over the year of 1990–1991. This analysis was aided by the unsupervised land use classification applied to two Landsat 5 TM images of the study area. SEBAL results confirmed that a significant amount (116.7 MCM of water can be saved by reducing ETs from fallow land which will result in improved water productivity at the irrigation system. The water accounting indicator (for the analysis period shows that the process fraction per unit of depleted water (PFdepleted is 0.52 for LIS, meaning that 52% of the depleted water is consumed by agricultural crops and 48% is lost through non-process depletion.

    Finally, the groundwater modeling was applied to simulate three land use and water management interventions to assess their effectiveness for both water savings and impact on the groundwater in LIS. MODFLOW's Zone Budget code calculates the groundwater budget of user-specified subregions, the exchange of flows between subregions and also calculates a volumetric water budget for the entire model at the end of each time step. The simulation results showed that fallow evaporation could be reduced between 14.2% (25.51 MCM and 45.3% (81.36 MCM by interventions such as canal lining and ground

  15. Review of novel therapeutic targets for improving heart failure treatment based on experimental and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsu, Kwadwo Osei; Owusu, Isaac Kofi; Buabeng, Kwame Ohene; Reidpath, Daniel Diamond; Kadirvelu, Amudha

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a major public health priority due to its epidemiological transition and the world’s aging population. HF is typified by continuous loss of contractile function with reduced, normal, or preserved ejection fraction, elevated vascular resistance, fluid and autonomic imbalance, and ventricular dilatation. Despite considerable advances in the treatment of HF over the past few decades, mortality remains substantial. Pharmacological treatments including β-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, and aldosterone antagonists have been proven to prolong the survival of patients with HF. However, there are still instances where patients remain symptomatic, despite optimal use of existing therapeutic agents. This understanding that patients with chronic HF progress into advanced stages despite receiving optimal treatment has increased the quest for alternatives, exploring the roles of additional pathways that contribute to the development and progression of HF. Several pharmacological targets associated with pathogenesis of HF have been identified and novel therapies have emerged. In this work, we review recent evidence from proposed mechanisms to the outcomes of experimental and clinical studies of the novel pharmacological agents that have emerged for the treatment of HF. PMID:27350750

  16. Improving molecular diagnosis of aniridia and WAGR syndrome using customized targeted array-based CGH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallespín, Elena; Villaverde, Cristina; Martín-Arenas, Rubén; Vélez-Monsalve, Camilo; Lorda-Sánchez, Isabel; Nevado, Julián; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Lapunzina, Pablo; Ayuso, Carmen; Corton, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Chromosomal deletions at 11p13 are a frequent cause of congenital Aniridia, a rare pan-ocular genetic disease, and of WAGR syndrome, accounting up to 30% of cases. First-tier genetic testing for newborn with aniridia, to detect 11p13 rearrangements, includes Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) and karyotyping. However, neither of these approaches allow obtaining a complete picture of the high complexity of chromosomal deletions and breakpoints in aniridia. Here, we report the development and validation of a customized targeted array-based comparative genomic hybridization, so called WAGR-array, for comprehensive high-resolution analysis of CNV in the WAGR locus. Our approach increased the detection rate in a Spanish cohort of 38 patients with aniridia, WAGR syndrome and other related ocular malformations, allowing to characterize four undiagnosed aniridia cases, and to confirm MLPA findings in four additional patients. For all patients, breakpoints were accurately established and a contiguous deletion syndrome, involving a large number of genes, was identified in three patients. Moreover, we identified novel microdeletions affecting 3' PAX6 regulatory regions in three families with isolated aniridia. This tool represents a good strategy for the genetic diagnosis of aniridia and associated syndromes, allowing for a more accurate CNVs detection, as well as a better delineation of breakpoints. Our results underline the clinical importance of performing exhaustive and accurate analysis of chromosomal rearrangements for patients with aniridia, especially newborns and those without defects in PAX6 after diagnostic screening. PMID:28231309

  17. Improving mapping and SNP-calling performance in multiplexed targeted next-generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElSharawy Abdou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared to classical genotyping, targeted next-generation sequencing (tNGS can be custom-designed to interrogate entire genomic regions of interest, in order to detect novel as well as known variants. To bring down the per-sample cost, one approach is to pool barcoded NGS libraries before sample enrichment. Still, we lack a complete understanding of how this multiplexed tNGS approach and the varying performance of the ever-evolving analytical tools can affect the quality of variant discovery. Therefore, we evaluated the impact of different software tools and analytical approaches on the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in multiplexed tNGS data. To generate our own test model, we combined a sequence capture method with NGS in three experimental stages of increasing complexity (E. coli genes, multiplexed E. coli, and multiplexed HapMap BRCA1/2 regions. Results We successfully enriched barcoded NGS libraries instead of genomic DNA, achieving reproducible coverage profiles (Pearson correlation coefficients of up to 0.99 across multiplexed samples, with Conclusions We recommend applying our general ‘two-step’ mapping approach for more efficient SNP discovery in tNGS. Our study has also shown the benefit of computing inter-sample SNP-concordances and inspecting read alignments in order to attain more confident results.

  18. Dispersion-correcting potentials can significantly improve the bond dissociation enthalpies and noncovalent binding energies predicted by density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiLabio, Gino A., E-mail: Gino.DiLabio@nrc.ca [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of British Columbia, Okanagan, 3333 University Way, Kelowna, British Columbia V1V 1V7 (Canada); Koleini, Mohammad [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2014-05-14

    Dispersion-correcting potentials (DCPs) are atom-centered Gaussian functions that are applied in a manner that is similar to effective core potentials. Previous work on DCPs has focussed on their use as a simple means of improving the ability of conventional density-functional theory methods to predict the binding energies of noncovalently bonded molecular dimers. We show in this work that DCPs developed for use with the LC-ωPBE functional along with 6-31+G(2d,2p) basis sets are capable of simultaneously improving predicted noncovalent binding energies of van der Waals dimer complexes and covalent bond dissociation enthalpies in molecules. Specifically, the DCPs developed herein for the C, H, N, and O atoms provide binding energies for a set of 66 noncovalently bonded molecular dimers (the “S66” set) with a mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.21 kcal/mol, which represents an improvement of more than a factor of 10 over unadorned LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) and almost a factor of two improvement over LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) used in conjunction with the “D3” pairwise dispersion energy corrections. In addition, the DCPs reduce the MAE of calculated X-H and X-Y (X,Y = C, H, N, O) bond dissociation enthalpies for a set of 40 species from 3.2 kcal/mol obtained with unadorned LC-ωPBE/6-31+G(2d,2p) to 1.6 kcal/mol. Our findings demonstrate that broad improvements to the performance of DFT methods may be achievable through the use of DCPs.

  19. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  20. Animal Protection and Structural Studies of a Consensus Sequence Vaccine Targeting the Receptor Binding Domain of the Type IV Pilus of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Daniel J.; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Irvin, Randall T.; Hodges, Robert S. (Alberta); (Colorado)

    2008-09-23

    One of the main obstacles in the development of a vaccine against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the requirement that it is protective against a wide range of virulent strains. We have developed a synthetic-peptide consensus-sequence vaccine (Cs1) that targets the host receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the type IV pilus of P. aeruginosa. Here, we show that this vaccine provides increased protection against challenge by the four piliated strains that we have examined (PAK, PAO, KB7 and P1) in the A.BY/SnJ mouse model of acute P. aeruginosa infection. To further characterize the consensus sequence, we engineered Cs1 into the PAK monomeric pilin protein and determined the crystal structure of the chimeric Cs1 pilin to 1.35 {angstrom} resolution. The substitutions (T130K and E135P) used to create Cs1 do not disrupt the conserved backbone conformation of the pilin RBD. In fact, based on the Cs1 pilin structure, we hypothesize that the E135P substitution bolsters the conserved backbone conformation and may partially explain the immunological activity of Cs1. Structural analysis of Cs1, PAK and K122-4 pilins reveal substitutions of non-conserved residues in the RBD are compensated for by complementary changes in the rest of the pilin monomer. Thus, the interactions between the RBD and the rest of the pilin can either be mediated by polar interactions of a hydrogen bond network in some strains or by hydrophobic interactions in others. Both configurations maintain a conserved backbone conformation of the RBD. Thus, the backbone conformation is critical in our consensus-sequence vaccine design and that cross-reactivity of the antibody response may be modulated by the composition of exposed side-chains on the surface of the RBD. This structure will guide our future vaccine design by focusing our investigation on the four variable residue positions that are exposed on the RBD surface.

  1. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  2. Natural products to improve quality of life targeting for colon drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjo

    2012-03-01

    The colon is largely being investigated as a site for administration of protein and peptides, which are degraded by digestive enzymes in the upper GIT. Also for local diseases of the colon such as inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and ameobiasis, drug administration to the site of action can not only reduce the dose to be administered, but also decrease the side effects. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) such as Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Intestinal bacteria initiate the activation of intestinal inflammatory processes, which are mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. Increased chemokine expression has also been observed in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Future trials of specific agents capable of inhibiting chemokine synthesis and secretion or blocking chemokine-chemokine receptor interaction will be important to study in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Many important bioactive compounds have been discovered from natural sources using bioactivity directed fractionation and isolation (BDFl) Continuing discovery has also been facilitated by the recent development of new bioassay methods. These bioactive compounds are mostly plant secondary metabolites, and many naturally occurring pure compounds have become medicines, dietary supplements, and other useful commercial products. The present review includes various approaches investigated for colon drug delivery and their site specificity. To achieve successful colonic delivery, a drug needs to be protected from absorption and the environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract and then be abruptly released into the proximal colon, which is considered the optimum site for colon targeted delivery of drugs.

  3. Targeted agri-environment schemes significantly improve the population size of common farmland bumblebee species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas J; Holland, John M; Hughes, William O H; Goulson, Dave

    2015-04-01

    Changes in agricultural practice across Europe and North America have been associated with range contractions and local extinction of bumblebees (Bombus spp.). A number of agri-environment schemes have been implemented to halt and reverse these declines, predominantly revolving around the provision of additional forage plants. Although it has been demonstrated that these schemes can attract substantial numbers of foraging bumblebees, it remains unclear to what extent they actually increase bumblebee populations. We used standardized transect walks and molecular techniques to compare the size of bumblebee populations between Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) farms implementing pollinator-friendly schemes and Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) control farms. Bumblebee abundance on the transect walks was significantly higher on HLS farms than ELS farms. Molecular analysis suggested maximum foraging ranges of 566 m for Bombus hortorum, 714 m for B. lapidarius, 363 m for B. pascuorum and 799 m for B. terrestris. Substantial differences in maximum foraging range were found within bumblebee species between farm types. Accounting for foraging range differences, B. hortorum (47 vs 13 nests/km(2) ) and B. lapidarius (45 vs 22 nests/km(2) ) were found to nest at significantly greater densities on HLS farms than ELS farms. There were no significant differences between farm type for B. terrestris (88 vs 38 nests/km(2) ) and B. pascuorum (32 vs 39 nests/km(2) ). Across all bumblebee species, HLS management had a significantly positive effect on bumblebee nest density. These results show that targeted agri-environment schemes that increase the availability of suitable forage can significantly increase the size of wild bumblebee populations.

  4. Controlled and targeted release of antigens by intelligent shell for improving applicability of oral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Zhanzhuang; Hu, Chaohua; Bellis, Susan L; Yang, Wendi; Su, Yintao; Zhang, Xinyan; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    Conventional oral vaccines with simple architecture face barriers with regard to stimulating effective immunity. Here we describe oral vaccines with an intelligent phase-transitional shielding layer, poly[(methyl methacrylate)-co-(methyl acrylate)-co-(methacrylic acid)]-poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PMMMA-PLGA), which can protect antigens in the gastro-intestinal tract and achieve targeted vaccination in the large intestine. With the surface immunogenic protein (SIP) from group B Streptococcus (GBS) entrapped as the antigen, oral administration with PMMMA-PLGA (PTRBL)/Trx-SIP nanoparticles stimulated robust immunity in tilapia, an animal with a relatively simple immune system. The vaccine succeeded in protecting against Streptococcus agalactiae, a pathogen of worldwide importance that threatens human health and is transmitted in water with infected fish. After oral vaccination with PTRBL/Trx-SIP, tilapia produced enhanced levels of SIP specific antibodies and displayed durability of immune protection. 100% of the vaccinated tilapia were protected from GBS infection, whereas the control groups without vaccines or vaccinated with Trx-SIP only exhibited respective infection rates of 100% or >60% within the initial 5 months after primary vaccination. Experiments in vivo demonstrated that the recombinant antigen Trx-SIP labeled with FITC was localized in colon, spleen and kidney, which are critical sites for mounting an immune response. Our results revealed that, rather than the size of the nanoparticles, it is more likely that the negative charge repulsion produced by ionization of the carboxyl groups in PMMMA shielded the nanoparticles from uptake by small intestinal epithelial cells. This system resolves challenges arising from gastrointestinal damage to antigens, and more importantly, offers a new approach applicable for oral vaccination.

  5. Improved Plant-based Production of E1 endoglucanase Using Potato: Expression Optimization and Tissue Targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ziyu [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hooker, Brian S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Anderson, Daniel B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomas, Steven R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2000-06-01

    Optimization of Acidothermus cellulolyticus endoglucanase (E1) gene expression in transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was examined in this study, where the E1 coding sequence was transcribed under control of a leaf specific promoter (tomato RbcS-3C) or the Mac promoter (a hybrid promoter of mannopine synthase promoter and cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enhancer region). Average E1 activity in leaf extracts of potato transformants, in which E1 protein was targeted by a chloroplast signal peptide and an apoplast signal peptide were much higher than those by an E1 native signal peptide and a vacuole signal peptide. E1 protein accumulated up to 2.6% of total leaf soluble protein, where E1 gene was under control of the RbcS-3C promoter, alfalfa mosaic virus 5-untranslated leader, and RbcS-2A signal peptide. E1 protein production, based on average E1 activity and E1 protein accumulation in leaf extracts, is higher in potato than those measured previously in transgenic tobacco bearing the same transgene constructs. Comparisons of E1 activity, protein accumulation, and relative mRNA levels showed that E1 expression under control of tomato RbcS-3C promoter was specifically localized in leaf tissues, while E1 gene was expressed in both leaf and tuber tissues under control of Mac promoter. This suggests dual-crop applications in which potato vines serve as enzyme production `bioreactors' while tubers are preserved for culinary applications.

  6. Targeting SAMHD1 with the Vpx protein to improve cytarabine therapy for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Nikolas; Rudd, Sean G; Ljungblad, Linda; Sanjiv, Kumar; Myrberg, Ida Hed; Paulin, Cynthia B J; Heshmati, Yaser; Hagenkort, Anna; Kutzner, Juliane; Page, Brent D G; Calderón-Montaño, José M; Loseva, Olga; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Bulli, Lorenzo; Axelsson, Hanna; Tesi, Bianca; Valerie, Nicholas C K; Höglund, Andreas; Bladh, Julia; Wiita, Elisée; Sundin, Mikael; Uhlin, Michael; Rassidakis, Georgios; Heyman, Mats; Tamm, Katja Pokrovskaja; Warpman-Berglund, Ulrika; Walfridsson, Julian; Lehmann, Sören; Grandér, Dan; Lundbäck, Thomas; Kogner, Per; Henter, Jan-Inge; Helleday, Thomas; Schaller, Torsten

    2017-02-01

    The cytostatic deoxycytidine analog cytarabine (ara-C) is the most active agent available against acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Together with anthracyclines, ara-C forms the backbone of AML treatment for children and adults. In AML, both the cytotoxicity of ara-C in vitro and the clinical response to ara-C therapy are correlated with the ability of AML blasts to accumulate the active metabolite ara-C triphosphate (ara-CTP), which causes DNA damage through perturbation of DNA synthesis. Differences in expression levels of known transporters or metabolic enzymes relevant to ara-C only partially account for patient-specific differential ara-CTP accumulation in AML blasts and response to ara-C treatment. Here we demonstrate that the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase SAM domain and HD domain 1 (SAMHD1) promotes the detoxification of intracellular ara-CTP pools. Recombinant SAMHD1 exhibited ara-CTPase activity in vitro, and cells in which SAMHD1 expression was transiently reduced by treatment with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) protein Vpx were dramatically more sensitive to ara-C-induced cytotoxicity. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated disruption of the gene encoding SAMHD1 sensitized cells to ara-C, and this sensitivity could be abrogated by ectopic expression of wild-type (WT), but not dNTPase-deficient, SAMHD1. Mouse models of AML lacking SAMHD1 were hypersensitive to ara-C, and treatment ex vivo with Vpx sensitized primary patient-derived AML blasts to ara-C. Finally, we identified SAMHD1 as a risk factor in cohorts of both pediatric and adult patients with de novo AML who received ara-C treatment. Thus, SAMHD1 expression levels dictate patient sensitivity to ara-C, providing proof-of-concept that the targeting of SAMHD1 by Vpx could be an attractive therapeutic strategy for potentiating ara-C efficacy in hematological malignancies.

  7. Radiotherapy planning for glioblastoma based on a tumor growth model: Improving target volume delineation

    CERN Document Server

    Unkelbach, Jan; Konukoglu, Ender; Dittmann, Florian; Le, Matthieu; Ayache, Nicholas; Shih, Helen A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma are known to infiltrate the brain parenchyma instead of forming a solid tumor mass with a defined boundary. Only the part of the tumor with high tumor cell density can be localized through imaging directly. In contrast, brain tissue infiltrated by tumor cells at low density appears normal on current imaging modalities. In clinical practice, a uniform margin is applied to account for microscopic spread of disease. The current treatment planning procedure can potentially be improved by accounting for the anisotropy of tumor growth: Anatomical barriers such as the falx cerebri represent boundaries for migrating tumor cells. In addition, tumor cells primarily spread in white matter and infiltrate gray matter at lower rate. We investigate the use of a phenomenological tumor growth model for treatment planning. The model is based on the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation, which formalizes these growth characteristics and estimates the spatial distribution of tumor cells in normal appearing regions of the brain...

  8. Targeting GRP75 improves HSP90 inhibitor efficacy by enhancing p53-mediated apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weiwei; Yan, Lichong; Yang, Ling; Liu, Xiaoyu; E, Qiukai; Gao, Peiye; Ye, Xiaofei; Liu, Wen; Zuo, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) inhibitors are potential drugs for cancer therapy. The inhibition of HSP90 on cancer cell growth largely through degrading client proteins, like Akt and p53, therefore, triggering cancer cell apoptosis. Here, we show that the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG can induce the expression of GRP75, a member of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family, which, in turn, attenuates the anti-growth effect of HSP90 inhibition on cancer cells. Additionally, 17-AAG enhanced binding of GRP75 and p53, resulting in the retention of p53 in the cytoplasm. Blocking GRP75 with its inhibitor MKT-077 potentiated the anti-tumor effects of 17-AAG by disrupting the formation of GRP75-p53 complexes, thereby facilitating translocation of p53 into the nuclei and leading to the induction of apoptosis-related genes. Finally, dual inhibition of HSP90 and GRP75 was found to significantly inhibit tumor growth in a liver cancer xenograft model. In conclusion, the GRP75 inhibitor MKT-077 enhances 17-AAG-induced apoptosis in HCCs and increases p53-mediated inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Dual targeting of GRP75 and HSP90 may be a useful strategy for the treatment of HCCs.

  9. Targeting GRP75 improves HSP90 inhibitor efficacy by enhancing p53-mediated apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Guo

    Full Text Available Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 inhibitors are potential drugs for cancer therapy. The inhibition of HSP90 on cancer cell growth largely through degrading client proteins, like Akt and p53, therefore, triggering cancer cell apoptosis. Here, we show that the HSP90 inhibitor 17-AAG can induce the expression of GRP75, a member of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 family, which, in turn, attenuates the anti-growth effect of HSP90 inhibition on cancer cells. Additionally, 17-AAG enhanced binding of GRP75 and p53, resulting in the retention of p53 in the cytoplasm. Blocking GRP75 with its inhibitor MKT-077 potentiated the anti-tumor effects of 17-AAG by disrupting the formation of GRP75-p53 complexes, thereby facilitating translocation of p53 into the nuclei and leading to the induction of apoptosis-related genes. Finally, dual inhibition of HSP90 and GRP75 was found to significantly inhibit tumor growth in a liver cancer xenograft model. In conclusion, the GRP75 inhibitor MKT-077 enhances 17-AAG-induced apoptosis in HCCs and increases p53-mediated inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Dual targeting of GRP75 and HSP90 may be a useful strategy for the treatment of HCCs.

  10. SEE HYDROPOWER Project, targeted to improve water resource management for a growing renewable energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peviani, Maximo; Alterach, Julio; Danelli, Andrea

    2010-05-01

    problem, and there is a strong need of a more accurate planning and management optimization of the resources. The partnership includes a well balance mixing of public administrations, agencies ruling hydropower development, water bodies conservation and scientific institutions having the most advanced technology applied to water management and hydropower generation. Furthermore, a permanent "consultant panel" integrated by target groups representatives from different European countries are involved in key decisions and meetings, that guaranty a concrete regional scale participation. The present work reports the overall strategy of the project and the description of the main informatic tools that are under development and implementation in five pilot regions, located in Italy, Austria, Romania, Slovenia and Greece. Keywords: WFD Directive, RES-e Directive, water multi-purpose uses, renewable energy, small hydropower production, environmental balance, minimum environmental flow, flood protection

  11. Experimental conditions improving in-solution target enrichment for ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Dávalos, Diana I; Llamas, Bastien; Gaunitz, Charleen; Fages, Antoine; Gamba, Cristina; Soubrier, Julien; Librado, Pablo; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine; Pruvost, Mélanie; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Alquraishi, Saleh A; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A S; Scheu, Amelie; Beneke, Norbert; Ludwig, Arne; Cooper, Alan; Willerslev, Eske; Orlando, Ludovic

    2016-08-27

    High-throughput sequencing has dramatically fostered ancient DNA research in recent years. Shotgun sequencing, however, does not necessarily appear as the best-suited approach due to the extensive contamination of samples with exogenous environmental microbial DNA. DNA capture-enrichment methods represent cost-effective alternatives that increase the sequencing focus on the endogenous fraction, whether it is from mitochondrial or nuclear genomes, or parts thereof. Here, we explored experimental parameters that could impact the efficacy of MYbaits in-solution capture assays of ~5000 nuclear loci or the whole genome. We found that varying quantities of the starting probes had only moderate effect on capture outcomes. Starting DNA, probe tiling, the hybridization temperature and the proportion of endogenous DNA all affected the assay, however. Additionally, probe features such as their GC content, number of CpG dinucleotides, sequence complexity and entropy and self-annealing properties need to be carefully addressed during the design stage of the capture assay. The experimental conditions and probe molecular features identified in this study will improve the recovery of genetic information extracted from degraded and ancient remains.

  12. Novel albendazole-chitosan nanoparticles for intestinal absorption enhancement and hepatic targeting improvement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Xiao-qing; Ren, Wei-xin; Chen, Yuan-lan; Yu, Yang; Zhang, Jian-kang; Bawudong, Dilimulati; Gu, Jun-peng; Xu, Xiao-dong; Zhang, Xue-nong

    2013-08-01

    To improve the treatment of helminthiasis, filariasis, and colorectal cancer, albendazole-associated chitosan nanoparticles (ABZ-CS-NPs) were prepared using the emulsion crosslinking volatile technique with contained sodium tripolyphosphate as the crosslinking agent and Poloxamer 188 as the auxiliary solvent. The structural characteristics of the NPs were determined using X-ray diffraction to analyze the interaction between CS and the drug. The NPs were then evaluated in terms of their physicochemical characteristics, drug release behavior, in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters, and biodistribution in animal studies. ABZ-loaded NPs with a uniformly spherical particle sizes (157.8 ± 2.82 nm) showed efficient drug loading, encapsulated efficiency, and high physical stability. The drug release from ABZ-CS-NPs was extended over several periods. Kinetic models were then fitted to determine the release mechanisms. ABZ and its metabolite albendazole sulfoxide (ABZSX) were analyzed in rats with mebendazole as the internal standard using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Compared with the ABZ suspension groups, the relative bioavailability values of ABZ and ABZSX were 146.05 and 222.15%, respectively. In addition, the plasma concentration versus time curve is consistent with that of the two compartment models in the plasma concentration versus time curve. The results indicate that the ABZ-loaded NPs are promising novel ABZ candidates for passive diffusion in the treatment of hydatid cysts in the liver via oral administration.

  13. Improving cold storage and processing traits in potato through targeted gene knockout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Benjamin M; Stoddard, Thomas J; Luo, Song; Demorest, Zachary L; Li, Jin; Cedrone, Frederic; Tibebu, Redeat; Davison, Shawn; Ray, Erin E; Daulhac, Aurelie; Coffman, Andrew; Yabandith, Ann; Retterath, Adam; Haun, William; Baltes, Nicholas J; Mathis, Luc; Voytas, Daniel F; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Cold storage of potato tubers is commonly used to reduce sprouting and extend postharvest shelf life. However, cold temperature stimulates the accumulation of reducing sugars in potato tubers. Upon high-temperature processing, these reducing sugars react with free amino acids, resulting in brown, bitter-tasting products and elevated levels of acrylamide--a potential carcinogen. To minimize the accumulation of reducing sugars, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to silence the vacuolar invertase gene (VInv), which encodes a protein that breaks down sucrose to glucose and fructose. Because RNAi often results in incomplete gene silencing and requires the plant to be transgenic, here we used transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) to knockout VInv within the commercial potato variety, Ranger Russet. We isolated 18 plants containing mutations in at least one VInv allele, and five of these plants had mutations in all VInv alleles. Tubers from full VInv-knockout plants had undetectable levels of reducing sugars, and processed chips contained reduced levels of acrylamide and were lightly coloured. Furthermore, seven of the 18 modified plant lines appeared to contain no TALEN DNA insertions in the potato genome. These results provide a framework for using TALENs to quickly improve traits in commercially relevant autotetraploid potato lines.

  14. Reading Parallel Texts in the Target Language: A Way to Improve Literary Translation Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazanin Shadman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was an attempt to investigate the effect of reading Persian literary texts on the quality of literary translations. To this end, 52 students majoring in English translation were randomly assigned to two groups. A Comprehensive English Language Test (CELT was administered to check the homogeneity of the participants. The treatment for the experimental group consisted of reading 60 Persian short stories and poems. In the meantime, the control group went through their ordinary course curriculum. Both groups were asked to translate extracts of two short stories. The translations were then rated. Through statistical analysis, it was revealed that reading Persian literary works, indeed, improves the quality of literary translations. Therefore, to promote a more fruitful instruction on literary translation, it is suggested that translation teachers attempt to consider reading Persian literary works as part of the curriculum and ask students to read Persian texts to the extent possible, so that more qualified translations would be rendered in the area of literature.

  15. Real-time and label free determination of ligand binding-kinetics to primary cancer tissue specimens; a novel tool for the assessment of biomarker targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Thomas Mandel; Ayres Pereira, Marina; Oo, Htoo Zarni;

    2016-01-01

    In clinical oncology, diagnosis and evaluation of optimal treatment strategies are mostly based on histopathological examination combined with immunohistochemical (IHC) expression analysis of cancer-associated antigens in formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue biopsies. However, informative...... of epitopes available, this readout offers a quantitative and unbiased readout for in situ binding-avidity and amount of binding epitopes. In summary, this method adds a new and important dimension to classical IHC-based molecular pathology by adding information about the binding characteristics...... IHC analysis depends on both the specificity and affinity of the binding reagent, which are inherently difficult to quantify in situ. Here we describe a label-free method that allows for the direct and real-time assessment of molecular binding kinetics in situ on FFPE tissue specimens using quartz...

  16. Improving the glycosyltransferase activity of Agrobacterium tumefaciens glycogen synthase by fusion of N-terminal starch binding domains (SBDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Mariana; Wayllace, Nahuel Z; Valdez, Hugo A; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Busi, María V

    2013-10-01

    Glycogen and starch, the major storage carbohydrate in most living organisms, result mainly from the action of starch or glycogen synthases (SS or GS, respectively, EC 2.4.1.21). SSIII from Arabidopsis thaliana is an SS isoform with a particular modular organization: the C-terminal highly conserved glycosyltransferase domain is preceded by a unique specific region (SSIII-SD) which contains three in tandem starch binding domains (SBDs, named D1, D2 and D3) characteristic of polysaccharide degrading enzymes. N-terminal SBDs have a probed regulatory role in SSIII activity, showing starch binding ability and modulating the catalytic properties of the enzyme. On the other hand, GS from Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a simple primary structure organization, characterized only by the highly conserved glycosyltransferase domain and lacking SBDs. To further investigate the functional role of A. thaliana SSIII-SD, three chimeric proteins were constructed combining the SBDs from A. thaliana with the GS from A. tumefaciens. Recombinant proteins were expressed in and purified to homogeneity from Escherichia coli cells in order to be kinetically characterized. Furthermore, we tested the ability to restore in vivo glycogen biosynthesis in transformed E. coli glgA(-) cells, deficient in GS. Results show that the D3-GS chimeric enzyme showed increased capacity of glycogen synthesis in vivo with minor changes in its kinetics parameters compared to GS.

  17. Improved Activation toward Primary Colorectal Cancer Cells by Antigen-Specific Targeting Autologous Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Schlimper

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy of malignant diseases with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells showed promise in a number of trials; the activation of CIK cells from cancer patients towards their autologous cancer cells still needs to be improved. Here, we generated CIK cells ex vivo from blood lymphocytes of colorectal cancer patients and engineered those cells with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR with an antibody-defined specificity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA. CIK cells thereby gained a new specificity as defined by the CAR and showed increase in activation towards CEA+ colon carcinoma cells, but less in presence of CEA− cells, indicated by increased secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Redirected CIK activation was superior by CAR-mediated CD28-CD3ζ than CD3ζ signaling only. CAR-engineered CIK cells from colon carcinoma patients showed improved activation against their autologous, primary carcinoma cells from biopsies resulting in more efficient tumour cell lysis. We assume that adoptive therapy with CAR-modified CIK cells shows improved selectivity in targeting autologous tumour lesions.

  18. Prostate cancer stem cell-targeted efficacy of a new-generation taxoid, SBT-1214 and novel polyenolic zinc-binding curcuminoid, CMC2.24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina I Botchkina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among men. Multiple evidence suggests that a population of tumor-initiating, or cancer stem cells (CSCs is responsible for cancer development and exceptional drug resistance, representing a highly important therapeutic target. The present study evaluated CSC-specific alterations induced by new-generation taxoid SBT-1214 and a novel polyenolic zinc-binding curcuminoid, CMC2.24, in prostate CSCs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The CD133(high/CD44(high phenotype was isolated from spontaneously immortalized patient-derived PPT2 cells and highly metastatic PC3MM2 cells. Weekly treatment of the NOD/SCID mice bearing PPT2- and PC3MM3-induced tumors with the SBT-1214 led to dramatic suppression of tumor growth. Four of six PPT2 and 3 of 6 PC3MM2 tumors have shown the absence of viable cells in residual tumors. In vitro, SBT-1214 (100 nM-1 µM; for 72 hr induced about 60% cell death in CD133(high/CD44(+/high cells cultured on collagen I in stem cell medium (in contrast, the same doses of paclitaxel increased proliferation of these cells. The cytotoxic effects were increased when SBT-1214 was combined with the CMC2.24. A stem cell-specific PCR array assay revealed that this drug combination mediated massive inhibition of multiple constitutively up-regulated stem cell-related genes, including key pluripotency transcription factors. Importantly, this drug combination induced expression of p21 and p53, which were absent in CD133(high/CD44(high cells. Viable cells that survived this treatment regimen were no longer able to induce secondary spheroids, exhibited significant morphological abnormalities and died in 2-5 days. CONCLUSIONS: We report here that the SBT-1214 alone, or in combination with CMC2.24, possesses significant activity against prostate CD133(high/CD44(+/high tumor-initiating cells. This drug combination efficiently inhibits expression of the majority of stem cell-related genes and

  19. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyz...

  20. Improved Particle Filter for Passive Target Tracking%改进粒子滤波在被动目标跟踪中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓小龙; 谢剑英; 杨煜普

    2005-01-01

    As a new method for dealing with any nonlinear or non-Gaussian distributions, based on the Monte Carlo methods and Bayesian filtering, particle filters (PF) are favored by researchers and widely applied in many fields. Based on particle filtering, an improved extended Kalman filter (EKF) proposal distribution is presented. Evaluation of the weights is simplified and other improved techniques including the residual resampling step and Markov Chain Monte Carlo method are introduced for target tracking. Performances of the EKF, basic PF and the improved PF are compared in target tracking examples. The simulation results confirm that the improved particle filter outperforms the others.

  1. Novel targeted nuclear imaging agent for gastric cancer diagnosis: glucose-regulated protein 78 binding peptide-guided 111In-labeled polymeric micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng CC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Chia Cheng,1,2,* Chiung-Fang Huang,3,4,* Ai-Sheng Ho,5 Cheng-Liang Peng,6 Chun-Chao Chang,7,8 Fu-Der Mai,1,9 Ling-Yun Chen,10 Tsai-Yueh Luo,2 Jungshan Chang1,11,121Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 2Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taoyuan, 3School of Dental Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 4Division of Family and Operative Dentistry, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 5Division of Gastroenterology, Cheng Hsin General Hospital, Taipei, 6Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 7Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Biochemistry, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 10Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, 11Neuroscience Research Center, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei, 12Research Center for Biomedical Implants and Microsurgery Devices, Taipei