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Sample records for binding factor cbf

  1. Ectopic overexpression of SsCBF1, a CRT/DRE-binding factor from the nightshade plant Solanum lycopersicoides, confers freezing and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis.

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    Lili Zhang

    Full Text Available The C-repeat (CRT/dehydration-responsive element (DRE binding factor (CBF/DREB1 transcription factors play a key role in cold response. However, the detailed roles of many plant CBFs are far from fully understood. A CBF gene (SsCBF1 was isolated from the cold-hardy plant Solanum lycopersicoides. A subcellular localization study using GFP fusion protein indicated that SsCBF1 is localized in the nucleus. We delimited the SsCBF1 transcriptional activation domain to the C-terminal segment comprising amino acid residues 193-228 (SsCBF1(193-228. The expression of SsCBF1 could be dramatically induced by cold, drought and high salinity. Transactivation assays in tobacco leaves revealed that SsCBF1 could specifically bind to the CRT cis-elements in vivo to activate the expression of downstream reporter genes. The ectopic overexpression of SsCBF1 conferred increased freezing and high-salinity tolerance and late flowering phenotype to transgenic Arabidopsis. RNA-sequencing data exhibited that a set of cold and salt stress responsive genes were up-regulated in transgenic Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that SsCBF1 behaves as a typical CBF to contribute to plant freezing tolerance. Increased resistance to high-salinity and late flowering phenotype derived from SsCBF1 OE lines lend more credence to the hypothesis that plant CBFs participate in diverse physiological and biochemical processes related to adverse conditions.

  2. Functional Characterization of Hevea brasiliensis CRT/DRE Binding Factor 1 Gene Revealed Regulation Potential in the CBF Pathway of Tropical Perennial Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Han; Cai, Haibin; Fu, Haitian; An, Zewei; Fang, Jialin; Hu, Yanshi; Guo, Dianjing; Huang, Huasun

    2015-01-01

    Rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis) are susceptible to low temperature and therefore are only planted in the tropical regions. In the past few decades, although rubber trees have been successfully planted in the northern margin of tropical area in China, they suffered from cold injury during the winter. To understand the physiological response under cold stress, we isolated a C-repeat binding factor 1 (CBF1) gene from the rubber tree. This gene (HbCBF1) was found to respond to cold stress but not drought or ABA stress. The corresponding HbCBF1 protein showed CRT/DRE binding activity in gel shift experiment. To further characterize its molecular function, the HbCBF1 gene was overexpressed in Arabidopsis. The HbCBF1 over expression (OE) line showed enhanced cold resistance and relatively slow dehydration, and the expression of Arabidopsis CBF pathway downstream target genes, e.g. AtCOR15a and AtRD29a, were significantly activated under non-acclimation condition. These data suggest HbCBF1 gene is a functional member of the CBF gene family, and may play important regulation function in rubber tree. PMID:26361044

  3. Functional Characterization of Hevea brasiliensis CRT/DRE Binding Factor 1 Gene Revealed Regulation Potential in the CBF Pathway of Tropical Perennial Tree.

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    Han Cheng

    Full Text Available Rubber trees (Hevea brasiliensis are susceptible to low temperature and therefore are only planted in the tropical regions. In the past few decades, although rubber trees have been successfully planted in the northern margin of tropical area in China, they suffered from cold injury during the winter. To understand the physiological response under cold stress, we isolated a C-repeat binding factor 1 (CBF1 gene from the rubber tree. This gene (HbCBF1 was found to respond to cold stress but not drought or ABA stress. The corresponding HbCBF1 protein showed CRT/DRE binding activity in gel shift experiment. To further characterize its molecular function, the HbCBF1 gene was overexpressed in Arabidopsis. The HbCBF1 over expression (OE line showed enhanced cold resistance and relatively slow dehydration, and the expression of Arabidopsis CBF pathway downstream target genes, e.g. AtCOR15a and AtRD29a, were significantly activated under non-acclimation condition. These data suggest HbCBF1 gene is a functional member of the CBF gene family, and may play important regulation function in rubber tree.

  4. Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) in México: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Macías-Gallardo, Julio; Lutz-Presno, Julia; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Hernández-Arizpe, Ana; Montes-Montiel, Maryel; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2011-01-01

    Twenty one patients with CBF-AML presented prospectively in the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla (Puebla, México) between February 1995 and March 2010, 14 with the t(8;21)(q22;q22) and 7 with the inv(16)(p13;q22)/t(16;16)(p13;q22); they represent 13% of all cases of AML. The median age of the patients was 24 years (range 1 to 61). Seven of 14 patients with t(8;21)(q22;q22) had an M2 morphology whereas 3/7 with the inv(16) had an M4 morphology; in addition to the myeloid markers identified by flow-cytometry (surface CD13, surface CD33, and cytoplasmic myeloperoxidase) lymphoid markers were identified in the blast cells of 8/14 cases of the t(8;21) patients, but in no patient with the inv(16). Nineteen patients were treated with combined chemotherapy and 16 (84%) achieved a complete molecular remission. Seven patients were auto or allografted. Relapses presented in 10/16 patients. The median probability of overall survival (OS) has not been reached being above 165 months, whereas the 165-month probability of OS and leukemia-free survival was 52%; despite a tendency for a better outcome of patients with the t(8;21), there were no significant differences in survival of patients with either the t(8;21) or the inv(16). In this single institution experience in México, we found that the CBF variants of AML have a similar prevalence as compared with Caucasian populations, that the co-expression of lymphoid markers in the blast cells was frequent in the t(8;21) and that these two AML subtypes were associated with a relatively good long-term prognosis. Further studies are needed to describe with more detail the precise biological features of these molecular subtypes of acute leukemia.

  5. Identification,characterization and expression analysis of transcription factor (CBF) genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunfei CAO; Jiaojiao WANG; Li GUO; Kai XIAO

    2008-01-01

    The acclimation of plants to cold,salt and dehydration is involved in the action of the transcription factor (CBF) cold-response pathway.In this paper,nineteen rice CBF genes,including seven previously released and twelve unpublished novels,were identified and characterized.The multi-members of rice CBFs (OsCBF1 to OsCBF12) were divergent at the nucleotide and amino acid level.Expression analysis shows that five novel rice CBF genes (OsCBF1,OsCBF2,OsCBF3,OsCBF8,and OsCBF9) responded to short-term (1 h or 3 h) stresses of low temperature,salt stress and dehydration.The transcripts of OsCBF2,OsCBF8 and OsCBF9 in the roots were rapidly elevated when the plants were exposed to low temperatures,suggesting that they were possibly involved in low temperature responses in rice plants.Meanwhile,the expression level of OsCBF2 in leaves was enhanced when exposed to salt stress of 1-3 h,implying that OsCBF2 functioned as a transduction component in the salt stress signal cascade.Various expression patterns in OsCBF1,OsCBF2,OsCBF3,OsCBF8,and OsCBF9 under low temperature,salt and drought conditions,together with the different expression patterns between roots and leaves for each of these indicated that every rice CBF gene has unique and non-redundant functions in the response to the abiotic stresses.

  6. RNA-seq analysis of oil palm under cold stress reveals a different C-repeat binding factor (CBF) mediated gene expression pattern in Elaeis guineensis compared to other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xintao; Xiao, Yong; Xia, Wei; Mason, Annaliese S; Yang, Yaodong; Ma, Zilong; Peng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis as a tropical oil-crop is particularly sensitive to low temperature. Improvement of cold-tolerance may significantly increase the total cultivation area of this tropical oil-crop worldwide. We sequenced cold-treated and control (untreated) samples of Elaeis guineensis. De novo assembly generated 51,452 unigenes with an average length of 703 bp. Subsequently, these expressed sequences were functionally annotated. In the K category (transcription factors) of COG (Cluster of Orthologous Group) annotation, the largest proportion of genes induced and repressed at least two-fold under cold stress were from the AP2/ERE family, indicating that C-repeat binding factor, (CBFs, members of the AP2/ERE family) may play a central role in cold tolerance in Elaeis guineensis. Subsequently, the CBF-mediated signal transduction pathway was reconstructed based on transcriptome data and the gene expression profile involving the pathway was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). CBFs reached maximum transcript level both at medium (4 h) and long period time points (7 days), contrary to the expression pattern of CBFs in Arabidopsis and rice. Moreover, the promoters of downstream Cold Responsive gene (CORs) regulated by CBFs were analyzed. Conservation, mutation and absence of the DRE core motif were detected in the promoters of six CORs. These mutations in DRE motifs suggest that CORs may not be induced via cold stress in Elaeis guineensis.

  7. RNA-seq analysis of oil palm under cold stress reveals a different C-repeat binding factor (CBF mediated gene expression pattern in Elaeis guineensis compared to other species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xintao Lei

    Full Text Available Elaeis guineensis as a tropical oil-crop is particularly sensitive to low temperature. Improvement of cold-tolerance may significantly increase the total cultivation area of this tropical oil-crop worldwide. We sequenced cold-treated and control (untreated samples of Elaeis guineensis. De novo assembly generated 51,452 unigenes with an average length of 703 bp. Subsequently, these expressed sequences were functionally annotated. In the K category (transcription factors of COG (Cluster of Orthologous Group annotation, the largest proportion of genes induced and repressed at least two-fold under cold stress were from the AP2/ERE family, indicating that C-repeat binding factor, (CBFs, members of the AP2/ERE family may play a central role in cold tolerance in Elaeis guineensis. Subsequently, the CBF-mediated signal transduction pathway was reconstructed based on transcriptome data and the gene expression profile involving the pathway was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. CBFs reached maximum transcript level both at medium (4 h and long period time points (7 days, contrary to the expression pattern of CBFs in Arabidopsis and rice. Moreover, the promoters of downstream Cold Responsive gene (CORs regulated by CBFs were analyzed. Conservation, mutation and absence of the DRE core motif were detected in the promoters of six CORs. These mutations in DRE motifs suggest that CORs may not be induced via cold stress in Elaeis guineensis.

  8. RNA-seq analysis of oil palm under cold stress reveals a different C-repeat binding factor (CBF) mediated gene expression pattern in Elaeis guineensis compared to other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xintao; Xiao, Yong; Xia, Wei; Mason, Annaliese S; Yang, Yaodong; Ma, Zilong; Peng, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis as a tropical oil-crop is particularly sensitive to low temperature. Improvement of cold-tolerance may significantly increase the total cultivation area of this tropical oil-crop worldwide. We sequenced cold-treated and control (untreated) samples of Elaeis guineensis. De novo assembly generated 51,452 unigenes with an average length of 703 bp. Subsequently, these expressed sequences were functionally annotated. In the K category (transcription factors) of COG (Cluster of Orthologous Group) annotation, the largest proportion of genes induced and repressed at least two-fold under cold stress were from the AP2/ERE family, indicating that C-repeat binding factor, (CBFs, members of the AP2/ERE family) may play a central role in cold tolerance in Elaeis guineensis. Subsequently, the CBF-mediated signal transduction pathway was reconstructed based on transcriptome data and the gene expression profile involving the pathway was examined using real-time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). CBFs reached maximum transcript level both at medium (4 h) and long period time points (7 days), contrary to the expression pattern of CBFs in Arabidopsis and rice. Moreover, the promoters of downstream Cold Responsive gene (CORs) regulated by CBFs were analyzed. Conservation, mutation and absence of the DRE core motif were detected in the promoters of six CORs. These mutations in DRE motifs suggest that CORs may not be induced via cold stress in Elaeis guineensis. PMID:25479236

  9. DREB1/CBF transcription factors: their structure, function and role in abiotic stress tolerance in plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. Akhtar; A. Jaiswal; G. Taj; J. P. Jaiswal; M. I. Qureshi; N. K. Singh

    2012-12-01

    Drought, high salinity and low temperature are major abiotic stresses that influence survival, productivity and geographical distribution of many important crops across the globe. Plants respond to these environmental challenges via physiological, cellular and molecular processes, which results in adjusted metabolic and structural alterations. The dehydration-responsive-element-binding (DREB) protein / C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) belong to APETALA2 (AP2) family transcription factors that bind to DRE/CRT cis-element and regulate the expression of stress-responsive genes. DREB1/CBF genes, therefore, play an important role in increasing stress tolerance in plants and their deployment using transgenic technology seems to be a potential alternative in management of abiotic stresses in crop plants. This review is mainly focussed on the structural characteristics as well as transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to various abiotic stresses, with particular emphasis on the role of DREB1/CBF regulon in stress-responsive gene expression. The recent progress related to genetic engineering of DREB1/CBF transcription factors in various crops and model plants is also summarized.

  10. The Box H/ACA snoRNP Assembly Factor Shq1p is a Chaperone Protein Homologous to Hsp90 Cochaperones that Binds to the Cbf5p Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godin, Katherine S.; Walbott, Helene; Leulliot, Nicolas; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Varani, Gabriele

    2009-05-06

    Box H/ACA small nucleolar (sno) ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) are responsible for the formation of pseudouridine in a variety of RNAs and are essential for ribosome biogenesis, modification of spliceosomal RNAs, and telomerase stability. A mature snoRNP has been reconstituted in vitro and is composed of a single RNA and four proteins. However, snoRNP biogenesis in vivo requires multiple factors to coordinate a complex and poorly understood assembly and maturation process. Among the factors required for snoRNP biogenesis in yeast is Shq1p, an essential protein necessary for stable expression of box H/ACA snoRNAs. We have found that Shq1p consists of two independent domains that contain casein kinase 1 phosphorylation sites. We also demonstrate that Shq1p binds the pseudourydilating enzyme Cbf5p through the C-terminal domain, in synergy with the N-terminal domain. The NMR solution structure of the N-terminal domain has striking homology to the ‘Chord and Sgt1’ domain of known Hsp90 cochaperones, yet Shq1p does not interact with the yeast Hsp90 homologue in vitro. Surprisingly, Shq1p has stand-alone chaperone activity in vitro. This activity is harbored by the C-terminal domain, but it is increased by the presence of the N-terminal domain. These results provide the first evidence of a specific biochemical activity for Shq1p and a direct link to the H/ACA snoRNP.

  11. 梅花 CBF 转录因子的克隆及表达%Cloning and Expression of CBF Transcription Factor from Prunus mume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杰; 张启翔; 杨炜茹

    2012-01-01

    根据GenBank中与梅花同属的桃、甜樱桃等已发表CBFs转录因子序列设计简并引物,采用PCR和RTPCR方法,从梅花基因组DNA和cDNA中克隆CBF转录因子片段.结果表明,两种途径获得的CBF基因序列一致,基因全长821 bp,编码238个氨基酸,其氨基酸序列具有典型的CBF蛋白特征,包含保守的AP2/EREB DNA 结合结构域及CBF家族蛋白特征短多肽序列(PKK/RPAGRxKFxETRHP和DSAWR).氨基酸相似性分析结果表明,该基因与欧洲甜樱桃、矮扁桃等CBF转录因子相似性较高.相对荧光定量PCR结果显示,4℃低温胁迫下,其表达量符合CBF转录因子表达特点,随着胁迫时间的增长表达量呈上升趋势,8h时达峰值,说明该基因在低温胁迫下上调表达.%Primers were designed according to the CBF transcription factors of Peach (Prunus persica), Sweet cherry (Prunus avium) et al from GenBank. Fragments of CBF gene were isolated from Prunus mume by PCR and RT-PCR, The CBF gene was 821 bp long, encoding a putative protein of 238 amino acids;The amino acids sequence owns the characteristics of the CBF protein,which contains an AP2/EREB DNA-binding domain and two special short amino acids sequences;Similarity analysis showed that the nu-cleotide were highly similarity to that of P. avium, P. tenella et al. Relative real-time PCR experiment showed the expression of PmCBFl was coincidence with the expression characteristics of the CBF gene after exposed to 4℃. The expression of PmCBFl increased at beginning and achieved the highest after 8 hour,indicating PmCBFl was induced under low temperature stress.

  12. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA encoding a CBF transcription factor from E. globulus.

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    Gamboa, Maria C; Rasmussen-Poblete, Susana; Valenzuela, Pablo D T; Krauskopf, Erwin

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factors CBF/DREB play an important role during low temperature, drought and high-salt stress in higher plants. In this work, we isolated one full-length CBF cDNA clone from the angiosperm Eucalyptus globulus. The derived peptide sequence reveals that it encodes a transcriptional activator that has all the characteristic motifs present in CBF proteins previously described in Arabidopsis and tomato. RT-PCR analysis shows that EgCBF1 is transiently induced in E. globulus seedlings that had been exposed to low temperature within the first 15 min. These results suggest that the isolated CBF gene participates in the cold responsive pathway of E. globulus.

  13. Transcriptional profiling of Medicago truncatula under salt stress identified a novel CBF transcription factor MtCBF4 that plays an important role in abiotic stress responses

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    Su Zhen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salt stress hinders the growth of plants and reduces crop production worldwide. However, different plant species might possess different adaptive mechanisms to mitigate salt stress. We conducted a detailed pathway analysis of transcriptional dynamics in the roots of Medicago truncatula seedlings under salt stress and selected a transcription factor gene, MtCBF4, for experimental validation. Results A microarray experiment was conducted using root samples collected 6, 24, and 48 h after application of 180 mM NaCl. Analysis of 11 statistically significant expression profiles revealed different behaviors between primary and secondary metabolism pathways in response to external stress. Secondary metabolism that helps to maintain osmotic balance was induced. One of the highly induced transcription factor genes was successfully cloned, and was named MtCBF4. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MtCBF4, which belongs to the AP2-EREBP transcription factor family, is a novel member of the CBF transcription factor in M. truncatula. MtCBF4 is shown to be a nuclear-localized protein. Expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula was induced by most of the abiotic stresses, including salt, drought, cold, and abscisic acid, suggesting crosstalk between these abiotic stresses. Transgenic Arabidopsis over-expressing MtCBF4 enhanced tolerance to drought and salt stress, and activated expression of downstream genes that contain DRE elements. Over-expression of MtCBF4 in M. truncatula also enhanced salt tolerance and induced expression level of corresponding downstream genes. Conclusion Comprehensive transcriptomic analysis revealed complex mechanisms exist in plants in response to salt stress. The novel transcription factor gene MtCBF4 identified here played an important role in response to abiotic stresses, indicating that it might be a good candidate gene for genetic improvement to produce stress-tolerant plants.

  14. CIR, a corepressor of CBF1, binds to PAP-1 and effects alternative splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have reported that PAP-1, a product of a causative gene for autosomal retinitis pigmentosa, plays a role in splicing. In this study, CIR, a protein originally identified as a CBF1-interacting protein and reported to act as a transcriptional corepressor, was identified as a PAP-1 binding protein and its function as a splicing factor was investigated. In addition to a basic lysine and acidic serine-rich (BA) domain and a zinc knuckle-like motif, CIR has an arginine/serine dipeptide repeat (RS) domain in its C terminal region. The RS domain has been reported to be present in the superfamily of SR proteins, which are involved in splicing reactions. We generated CIR mutants with deletions of each BA and RS domain and studied their subcellular localizations and interactions with PAP-1 and other SR proteins, including SC35, SF2/ASF, and U2AF35. CIR was found to interact with U2AF35 through the BA domain, with SC35 and SF2/ASF through the RS domain, and with PAP-1 outside the BA domain in vivo and in vitro. CIR was found to be colocalized with SC35 and PAP-1 in nuclear speckles. Then the effect of CIR on splicing was investigated using the E1a minigene as a reporter in HeLa cells. Ectopic expression of CIR with the E1a minigene changed the ratio of spliced isoforms of E1a that were produced by alternative selection of 5'-splice sites. These results indicate that CIR is a member of the family of SR-related proteins and that CIR plays a role in splicing regulation

  15. Identification of a region which directs the monocytic activity of the colony-stimulating factor 1 (macrophage colony-stimulating factor) receptor promoter and binds PEBP2/CBF (AML1).

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, D E; Fujioka, K.; Hetherington, C J; Shapiro, L H; CHEN, H. M.; Look, A T; Tenen, D. G.

    1994-01-01

    The receptor for the macrophage colony-stimulating factor (or colony-stimulating factor 1 [CSF-1]) is expressed from different promoters in monocytic cells and placental trophoblasts. We have demonstrated that the monocyte-specific expression of the CSF-1 receptor is regulated at the level of transcription by a tissue-specific promoter whose activity is stimulated by the monocyte/B-cell-specific transcription factor PU.1 (D.-E. Zhang, C.J. Hetherington, H.-M. Chen, and D.G. Tenen, Mol. Cell. ...

  16. An apple rootstock overexpressing a peach CBF gene alters growth and flowering in the scion but does not impact cold hardiness or dormancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The C-repeat Binding Factor (CBF) transcription factor is involved in responses to low temperature and water deficit in many plant species. Overexpression of CBF genes leads to enhanced freezing tolerance and growth inhibition in many species. The overexpression of a peach CBF (PpCBF1) gene in a t...

  17. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

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    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  18. RNA-Seq Analysis of Oil Palm under Cold Stress Reveals a Different C-Repeat Binding Factor (CBF) Mediated Gene Expression Pattern in Elaeis guineensis Compared to Other Species

    OpenAIRE

    Xintao Lei; Yong Xiao; Wei Xia; Mason, Annaliese S.; Yaodong Yang; Zilong Ma; Ming Peng

    2014-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis as a tropical oil-crop is particularly sensitive to low temperature. Improvement of cold-tolerance may significantly increase the total cultivation area of this tropical oil-crop worldwide. We sequenced cold-treated and control (untreated) samples of Elaeis guineensis. De novo assembly generated 51,452 unigenes with an average length of 703 bp. Subsequently, these expressed sequences were functionally annotated. In the K category (transcription factors) of COG (Cluster of Or...

  19. The cbfs triple mutants reveal the essential functions of CBFs in cold acclimation and allow the definition of CBF regulons in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuxin; Ding, Yanglin; Shi, Yiting; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Gong, Zhizhong; Yang, Shuhua

    2016-10-01

    In Arabidopsis, the C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) have been extensively studied as key transcription factors in the cold stress response. However, their exact functions in the cold response remains unclear due to the lack of a null cbf triple mutant. In this study, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology to mutate CBF1 or CBF1/CBF2 in a cbf3 T-DNA insertion mutant to generate cbf1,3 double and cbf1 cbf2 cbf3 (cbfs) triple mutants. The response of the cbfs triple mutants to chilling stress is impaired. Furthermore, no significant difference in freezing tolerance was observed between the wild-type and the cbf1,3 and cbfs mutants without cold acclimation. However, the cbfs mutants were extremely sensitive to freezing stress after cold acclimation, and freezing sensitivity ranking was cbfs > cbf1,3 > cbf3. RNA-Seq analysis showed that 134 genes were CBF regulated, of which 112 were regulated positively and 22 negatively by CBFs. Our study reveals the essential functions of CBFs in chilling stress response and cold acclimation, as well as defines a set of genes as CBF regulon. It also provides materials for the genetic dissection of components in CBF-dependent cold signaling. PMID:27353960

  20. Identification and characterization of CBF/DREB1-related genes in Populus hopeiensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ze-liang; AN Xin-min; LI Bo; REN Yuan-yuan; JIANG Xi-bing; BO Wen-hao; ZHANG Zhi-yi

    2008-01-01

    The dehydration-responsive element-binding factor (DREB) is a plant-specific family of transcription factors and plays an important role in plant response and adaptation to abiotic stress. In the present work, two highly similar CBF/DREBl-like genes, designated as PhCBF4a and PhCBF4b, were identified from Populus hopeiensis. These two genes contain all conserved domains known to exist in other CBF/DREBI genes. In the AP2 domain, there is only one different amino acid residue between PhCBF4a and PhCBF4b, alanine or valine, a nonpolar amino acid, suggesting that PhCBF4a and PhCBF4b may have similar DNA binding ability. Their expression is induced by water-loss treatment and their expression patterns axe similar. Moreover, with a genomic DNA as template, the presence of the same bands in PCR products as those in expression pattern analysis indicated that PhCBF4a and PhCBF4b exist in the genome of P. hopeiensis. Their detailed functions are discussed and will need further study.

  1. Comparison of D2 receptor binding (123I-IBZM) and rCBF (99mTc-HMPAO) in extrapyramidal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this SPECT study was to determine whether there is a correlation between rCBF (99mTc-HMPAO) and D2 receptor binding (123I-IBZM) in disorders of the extrapyramidal system and in which situation the 99MTc-HMPAO scan could predict the outcome of the 123I-IBZM study. 13 patients with Parkinson's syndrome and 13 patients with hyperkinetic extrapyramidal disorders were studied. In all patients the two SPECT studies were performed within 2-7 days. ROIs were placed over the basal ganglia (BG), the frontal cortex (FC) and the cerebellum (CE). The ratios BG/FC and BG/CE were calculated. In both groups the scatter was lower when the frontal cortex was used as reference region. Among the patients with hyperkinetic extrapyramidal hyperkinetic extrapyramidal disorders the two patients with Huntington's chorea had lower rCBF and D2 receptor binding compared to other hyperkinetic extrapyramidal disorders. There was no correlation between D2 receptor binding and rCBF in the basal ganglia. The 99MTc-HMPAO studies did not provide clinically useful information, except in Huntington's chorea. (orig.)

  2. 不同浓度雌二醇对骨髓基质细胞分化过程中Cbfα1和PPAR-γ2 mRNA表达的影响%Effect of 17 beta-estradiol on the mRNA expression of core-binding factor alpha 1 and proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 in bone marrow stromal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金小岚; 袁成良; 侯建红; 钱江龙; 黄迎春

    2004-01-01

    /g蛋白(t=29,P<0.01).Ⅰ型胶原含量均随雌二醇浓度增加而降低.结论:雌二醇抑制体外培养的骨髓基质细胞向成骨细胞分化而促进其向脂肪细胞分化.%BACKGROUND: Bone remodeling rate increases precipitously at menopause, which may be explained that loss of sex steroids up-regulates the formation of osteoclasts and osteoblasts in the marrow by up-regulating the production and action of cytokines responsible for osteoclastogenesis and osteoblastogenesis.However, the molecular mechanism of 17β-estradiol(E2)on osteoblastogenesis is not clear yet.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of 17β-estradiol(E2) on the gene expression of core-binding factor alpha 1 (Cbfα1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2(PPAR-γ2) in rat bone marrow stromal cells exposured to the differentiation medium and to elucidate the role of E2 on osteoblastogenesis.DESIGN: A nonrandomized controlled experimental study was conducted.SETTING and PARTICIPANTS: All experiments were carried out in the Department of Laboratory, Chengdu Military Command General Hospital and Chengdu Bai' ao Biol-Tech Limited Company. Three-month-old female SD rat weighing (200 ± 20) g used to isolate bone marrow stromal cells was obtained from the Animal Center of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.INTERVENTION: Adherent bone marrow stromal cells were intervened with dexamethasome (DEX) 1 × 10-7 mol/L, 1, 25(OH)2D3 1 × 10-9 mol/L and different concentrations [ (0 - 1) × 10-6 mol/L] of E2.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The effects of E2 on the Cbfα1 and PPAR-γ2 gene expression were assayed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and demonstrated by Northern blot.RESULTS: A dose dependent inhibition of the expression of Cbfα1 mRNA in bone marrow stromal cell by E2 was discovered. When examined under various concentrations of E2 [ (0 - 1) × 10-6 mol/L], the expression of Cbfα1 mRNA decreased from (25.0 ± 3.3)% to (19.8 ± 2.2)% (t =2.62, P <0.05), (14.5±1.3)% (t=5.92, P

  3. Potential language and attentional networks revealed through factor analysis of rCBF data measured with SPECT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, T; Steinberg, B; Christensen, B;

    1992-01-01

    We used changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) to disclose regions involved in central auditory and language processing in the normal brain. rCBF was quantified with a fast-rotating, single-photon emission computerized tomograph (SPECT) and inhalation of 133Xe. rCBF data were obtained sim...

  4. Isolation and Characterization of a C-repeat Binding Transcription Factor from Maize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Wang; Yanzhong Luo; Lan Zhang; Jun Zhao; Zhiqiu Hu; Yunliu Fan; Chunyi Zhang

    2008-01-01

    C-repeat binding proteins (CBFs) are a group of transcription factors that have been proven to be important for stress tolerance in plants.Many of these transcription factors transactivate the promoters of cold-regulated genes via binding to low temperature- or dehydration-responsive cis-elements,thus conferring plants cold acclimation.In the present study,we Isolated a C-repeat binding transcription factor from maize using the yeast one-hybrid system with the C-repeat motif from the promoter of the Arabidopsis COR15a gene as bait.The isolated transcription factor is highly similar to the Arabidopsis CBF3 in their predicted amino acid sequences,and is therefore designated ZmCBF3.Point mutation analyses of the ZmCBF3-binding cis-element revealed (A/G)(C/T)CGAC as the core binding sequence.Expression analyses showed that ZmCBF3 was upregulated by both abscisic acid and low temperature,and was actively expressed during embryogenesis,suggesting that ZmCBF3 plays a role in stress response in maize.

  5. Abortive lytic reactivation of KSHV in CBF1/CSL deficient human B cell lines.

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    Barbara A Scholz

    Full Text Available Since Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV establishes a persistent infection in human B cells, B cells are a critical compartment for viral pathogenesis. RTA, the replication and transcription activator of KSHV, can either directly bind to DNA or use cellular DNA binding factors including CBF1/CSL as DNA adaptors. In addition, the viral factors LANA1 and vIRF4 are known to bind to CBF1/CSL and modulate RTA activity. To analyze the contribution of CBF1/CSL to reactivation in human B cells, we have successfully infected DG75 and DG75 CBF1/CSL knock-out cell lines with recombinant KSHV.219 and selected for viral maintenance by selective medium. Both lines maintained the virus irrespective of their CBF1/CSL status. Viral reactivation could be initiated in both B cell lines but viral genome replication was attenuated in CBF1/CSL deficient lines, which also failed to produce detectable levels of infectious virus. Induction of immediate early, early and late viral genes was impaired in CBF1/CSL deficient cells at multiple stages of the reactivation process but could be restored to wild-type levels by reintroduction of CBF1/CSL. To identify additional viral RTA target genes, which are directly controlled by CBF1/CSL, we analyzed promoters of a selected subset of viral genes. We show that the induction of the late viral genes ORF29a and ORF65 by RTA is strongly enhanced by CBF1/CSL. Orthologs of ORF29a in other herpesviruses are part of the terminase complex required for viral packaging. ORF65 encodes the small capsid protein essential for capsid shell assembly. Our study demonstrates for the first time that in human B cells viral replication can be initiated in the absence of CBF1/CSL but the reactivation process is severely attenuated at all stages and does not lead to virion production. Thus, CBF1/CSL acts as a global hub which is used by the virus to coordinate the lytic cascade.

  6. Heterology expression of the sweet pepper CBF3 gene confers elevated tolerance to chilling stress in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sha; Tang, Xian-Feng; Ma, Na-Na; Wang, Li-Yan; Meng, Qing-Wei

    2011-10-15

    Various studies have confirmed that the CBF (C-repeat binding factor) family of transcription factors has a key role in regulating many plants' responses to cold stress. Here we isolated CBF3 from sweet pepper (Capsicum frutescens). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein of CfCBF3 was targeted to the nucleus of the onion epidermis cell. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that CfCBF3 was expressed in leaves of sweet pepper and the expression was induced by low temperature, drought and salinity stresses but not by ABA. Overexpression of CfCBF3 under the control of the CaMV35S promoter in tobacco induced expression of orthologs of CBF3-targeted genes and increased chilling tolerance without a dwarf phenotype. Indeed it also led to multiple biochemical and physiological changes associated with chilling stress. Higher levels of proline (Pro) and soluble sugars and lower content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were observed in transgenic plants. Our results demonstrated that the increase in total unsaturated fatty acids, especially in phosphatidylglycerol (PG) was detected by overexpression of CfCBF3. During exposure to chilling stress, the transgenic lines were less susceptible to chilling-induced photoinhibition than wild-type (WT) plants. These results suggest that overexpression of CfCBF3 led to modification of the fatty acid unsaturation and alleviated the injuries under chilling stress.

  7. Transcriptome Profiling of Pediatric Core Binding Factor AML.

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    Chih-Hao Hsu

    Full Text Available The t(8;21 and Inv(16 translocations disrupt the normal function of core binding factors alpha (CBFA and beta (CBFB, respectively. These translocations represent two of the most common genomic abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, occurring in approximately 25% pediatric and 15% of adult with this malignancy. Both translocations are associated with favorable clinical outcomes after intensive chemotherapy, and given the perceived mechanistic similarities, patients with these translocations are frequently referred to as having CBF-AML. It remains uncertain as to whether, collectively, these translocations are mechanistically the same or impact different pathways in subtle ways that have both biological and clinical significance. Therefore, we used transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq to investigate the similarities and differences in genes and pathways between these subtypes of pediatric AMLs. Diagnostic RNA from patients with t(8;21 (N = 17, Inv(16 (N = 14, and normal karyotype (NK, N = 33 were subjected to RNA-seq. Analyses compared the transcriptomes across these three cytogenetic subtypes, using the NK cohort as the control. A total of 1291 genes in t(8;21 and 474 genes in Inv(16 were differentially expressed relative to the NK controls, with 198 genes differentially expressed in both subtypes. The majority of these genes (175/198; binomial test p-value < 10(-30 are consistent in expression changes among the two subtypes suggesting the expression profiles are more similar between the CBF cohorts than in the NK cohort. Our analysis also revealed alternative splicing events (ASEs differentially expressed across subtypes, with 337 t(8;21-specific and 407 Inv(16-specific ASEs detected, the majority of which were acetylated proteins (p = 1.5 x 10(-51 and p = 1.8 x 10(-54 for the two subsets. In addition to known fusions, we identified and verified 16 de novo fusions in 43 patients, including three fusions involving NUP98 in six

  8. The Indeterminate Domain Protein ROC1 Regulates Chilling Tolerance via Activation of DREB1B/CBF1 in Rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Mingzhu; Cheng, Shuai; Zhao, Baotian; Xuan, Yuanhu; Shao, Minglong

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress, including salinity, drought and cold, severely affect diverse aspects of plant development and production. Rice is an important crop that does not acclimate to cold; therefore, it is relatively sensitive to low temperature stress. Dehydration-responsive element-binding protein 1s (DREB1s)/C-repeat binding factors (CBFs) are well known for their function in cold tolerance, but the transcriptional regulation of CBFs remains elusive, especially in rice. Here, we performed a yeast one-hybrid assay using the promoter of CBF1, a cold-induced gene, to isolate transcriptional regulators of CBF1. Among the seven candidates identified, an indeterminate domain (IDD) protein named ROC1 (a regulator of CBF1) was further analyzed. The ROC1 transcript was induced by exogenously-treated auxin, while it was not altered by cold or ABA stimuli. ROC1-GFP was localized at the nucleus, and ROC1 showed trans-activation activity in yeast. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and ChIP analyses revealed that ROC1 directly bound to the promoter of CBF1. Furthermore, ROC1 mutants exhibited chilling-sensitive symptoms and inhibited cold-mediated induction of CBF1 and CBF3, indicating that ROC1 is a positive regulator of cold stress responses. Taken together, this study identified the CBF1 regulator, and the results are important for rice plant adaptation to chilling stress. PMID:26927068

  9. CBF/DREB转录因子与植物矮化的相关性研究进展%Research Progress of CBF/DREB Transcription Factor and Dwarfism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包永霞; 满达; 肖波; 韩烈保

    2011-01-01

    CBF/DREB转录因子即干旱应答元件结合蛋白,是一类可以调控多个与干旱、高盐及低温耐性有关的功能基因表达的转录因子家族.很多报道称CBF/DREB转录因子的过量表达使转基因植株产生矮化、晚花现象.着重探讨CBF/DREB转录因子与植物矮化现象相关性与其按化机理,并对草坪草育种新方向进行展望.

  10. PpCBF3 from Cold-Tolerant Kentucky Bluegrass Involved in Freezing Tolerance Associated with Up-Regulation of Cold-Related Genes in Transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Zhuang

    Full Text Available Dehydration-Responsive Element Binding proteins (DREB/C-repeat (CRT Binding Factors (CBF have been identified as transcriptional activators during plant responses to cold stress. The objective of this study was to determine the physiological roles of a CBF gene isolated from a cold-tolerant perennial grass species, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L., which designated as PpCBF3, in regulating plant tolerance to freezing stress. Transient transformation of Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll protoplast with PpCBF3-eGFP fused protein showed that PpCBF3 was localized to the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed that PpCBF3 was specifically induced by cold stress (4°C but not by drought stress [induced by 20% polyethylene glycol 6000 solution (PEG-6000] or salt stress (150 mM NaCl. Transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing PpCBF3 showed significant improvement in freezing (-20°C tolerance demonstrated by a lower percentage of chlorotic leaves, lower cellular electrolyte leakage (EL and H2O2 and O2.- content, and higher chlorophyll content and photochemical efficiency compared to the wild type. Relative mRNA expression level analysis by qRT-PCR indicated that the improved freezing tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing PpCBF3 was conferred by sustained activation of downstream cold responsive (COR genes. Other interesting phenotypic changes in the PpCBF3-transgenic Arabidopsis plants included late flowering and slow growth or 'dwarfism', both of which are desirable phenotypic traits for perennial turfgrasses. Therefore, PpCBF3 has potential to be used in genetic engineering for improvement of turfgrass freezing tolerance and other desirable traits.

  11. CBF mediates adenovirus Ela trans-activation by interaction at the C-terminal promoter targeting domain of conserved region 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoff, S N; Wu, B

    1994-12-01

    Genetic and biochemical evidence suggest that conserved region 3 (CR3) of the adenovirus Ela polypeptide can provide two distinct and separable functions: an N-terminal transcriptional activation region and a C-terminal promoter targeting region. It is thought that the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 interacts with promoter-specific transcription factors, thereby bringing the activation region of Ela CR3 in proximity of the promoter. Here we report that CBF, a CCAAT-box-binding factor that regulates hsp70 gene expression and mediates Ela trans-activation in vivo, interacts with the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 in vitro. Point mutations in Ela CR3 that are defective in stimulating transcription from the hsp70 promoter are also defective in stimulating transcription directed by a synthetic activator, GAL-CBF, composed of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 fused to CBF. These mutations fall into two classes with respect to their abilities to interact with CBF in vitro. Mutations in the transcriptional activation region of Ela CR3 do not affect binding to CBF, but mutation of the promoter targeting region of Ela CR3 prevents association with CBF in vitro.

  12. Down-regulation of MicroRNAs 222/221 in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia with Deranged Core-Binding Factor Subunits

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    Matteo Brioschi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Core-binding factor leukemia (CBFL is a subgroup of acutemyeloid leukemia (AML characterized by genetic mutations involving the subunits of the core-binding factor (CBF. The leukemogenesis model for CBFL posits that one, or more, gene mutations inducing increased cell proliferation and/or inhibition of apoptosis cooperate with CBF mutations for leukemia development. One of the most commonmutations associated with CBF mutations involves the KIT receptor. A high expression of KIT is a hallmark of a high proportion of CBFL. Previous studies indicate that microRNA (MIR 222/221 targets the 3′ untranslated region of the KIT messenger RNA and our observation that AML1 can bind the MIR-222/221 promoter, we hypothesized that MIR-222/221 represents the link between CBF and KIT. Here, we show that MIR-222/221 expression is upregulated after myeloid differentiation of normal bone marrow AC133+ stem progenitor cells. CBFL blasts with either t(8;21 or inv(16 CBF rearrangements with high expression levels of KIT (CD117 display a significantly lower level of MIR-222/221 expression than non-CBFL blasts. Consistently, we found that the t(8;21 AML1-MTG8 fusion protein binds the MIR-222/221 promoter and induces transcriptional repression of a MIR-222/221-LUC reporter. Because of the highly conserved sequence homology, we demonstrated concomitant MIR-222/221 down-regulation and KIT up-regulation in the 32D/WT1 mouse cell model carrying the AML1-MTG16 fusion protein. This study provides the first hint that CBFL-associated fusion proteins may lead to up-regulation of the KIT receptor by down-regulating MIR-222/221, thus explaining the concomitant occurrence of CBF genetic rearrangements and overexpression of wild type or mutant KIT in AML.

  13. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  14. Systemic mastocytosis uncommon in KIT D816V mutation positive core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas; Preiss, Birgitte; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The KIT D816V mutation is detected in the vast majority of adult cases of systemic mastocytosis (SM). The mutation is also frequently detected in core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) defined by the presence of t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1 or inv(16)(p13.1;q22)/t(16;16)(p...

  15. Copy number variation at the HvCBF4-HvCBF2 genomic segment is a major component of frost resistance in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Enrico; Morcia, Caterina; Pasquariello, Marianna; Mazzamurro, Valentina; Milc, Justyna Anna; Rizza, Fulvia; Terzi, Valeria; Pecchioni, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    A family of CBF transcription factors plays a major role in reconfiguring the plant transcriptome in response to low-freezing temperature in temperate cereals. In barley, more than 13 HvCBF genes map coincident with the major QTL FR-H2 suggesting them as candidates to explain the function of the locus. Variation in copy number (CNV) of specific HvCBFs was assayed in a panel of 41 barley genotypes using RT-qPCR. Taking advantage of an accurate phenotyping that combined Fv/Fm and field survival, resistance-associated variants within FR-H2 were identified. Genotypes with an increased copy number of HvCBF4 and HvCBF2 (at least ten and eight copies, respectively) showed greater frost resistance. A CAPS marker able to distinguish the CBF2A, CBF2B and CBF2A/B forms was developed and showed that all the higher-ranking genotypes in term of resistance harbour only CBF2A, while other resistant winter genotypes harbour also CBF2B, although at a lower CNV. In addition to the major involvement of the HvCBF4-HvCBF2 genomic segment in the proximal cluster of CBF elements, a negative role of HvCBF3 in the distal cluster was identified. Multiple linear regression models taking into account allelic variation at FR-H1/VRN-H1 explained 0.434 and 0.550 (both at p < 0.001) of the phenotypic variation for Fv/Fm and field survival respectively, while no interaction effect between CNV at the HvCBFs and FR-H1/VRN-H1 was found. Altogether our data suggest a major involvement of the CBF genes located in the proximal cluster, with no apparent involvement of the central cluster contrary to what was reported for wheat. PMID:27338258

  16. Copy number variation at the HvCBF4-HvCBF2 genomic segment is a major component of frost resistance in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Enrico; Morcia, Caterina; Pasquariello, Marianna; Mazzamurro, Valentina; Milc, Justyna Anna; Rizza, Fulvia; Terzi, Valeria; Pecchioni, Nicola

    2016-09-01

    A family of CBF transcription factors plays a major role in reconfiguring the plant transcriptome in response to low-freezing temperature in temperate cereals. In barley, more than 13 HvCBF genes map coincident with the major QTL FR-H2 suggesting them as candidates to explain the function of the locus. Variation in copy number (CNV) of specific HvCBFs was assayed in a panel of 41 barley genotypes using RT-qPCR. Taking advantage of an accurate phenotyping that combined Fv/Fm and field survival, resistance-associated variants within FR-H2 were identified. Genotypes with an increased copy number of HvCBF4 and HvCBF2 (at least ten and eight copies, respectively) showed greater frost resistance. A CAPS marker able to distinguish the CBF2A, CBF2B and CBF2A/B forms was developed and showed that all the higher-ranking genotypes in term of resistance harbour only CBF2A, while other resistant winter genotypes harbour also CBF2B, although at a lower CNV. In addition to the major involvement of the HvCBF4-HvCBF2 genomic segment in the proximal cluster of CBF elements, a negative role of HvCBF3 in the distal cluster was identified. Multiple linear regression models taking into account allelic variation at FR-H1/VRN-H1 explained 0.434 and 0.550 (both at p < 0.001) of the phenotypic variation for Fv/Fm and field survival respectively, while no interaction effect between CNV at the HvCBFs and FR-H1/VRN-H1 was found. Altogether our data suggest a major involvement of the CBF genes located in the proximal cluster, with no apparent involvement of the central cluster contrary to what was reported for wheat.

  17. Hypoxia induces osteogenesis-related activities and expression of core binding factor α1 in mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiao; Deng, Feng; Wang, Lu; Xiang, Xue-Rong; Zhou, Wen-Wen; Hu, Na; Xu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem sells (MSCs) have received much attention in the field of bone tissue engineering due to their biological capability to differentiate into osteogenic lineage cells. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1α) plays an important role in the MSC-related bone regeneration during hypoxia, while core binding factor alpha 1 (Cbfα1) is a transcription regulator that is involved in the chondrocyte differentiation and ossification. In the present study, we investigated the effects of hypoxia on biological capability of MSCs. MSCs were isolated from adult rabbit bone marrow, and were cultured in vitro under normoxia (air with 5% CO(2)) or hypoxia (5% CO(2) and 95% N(2)). The proliferation of MSCs, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and production of collagens type I and type III (Col I/III) were examined. The expression levels of HIF-1α and Cbfα1 were measured by real-time PCR and western blot analyses. We found that hypoxia significantly induced the proliferation of MSCs and increased ALP activity and the production of Col I/III. Moreover, hypoxia increased the expression of Cbfα1 mRNA after 12 h, whereas the expression of HIF-1α mRNA was increased after 1 h of hypoxia. Knockdown of HIF-1α expression with a small interfering RNA significantly increased the expression levels of Cbfα1 protein either under the normoxia or hypoxia condition. Our results indicate that hypoxia enhances MSCs to differentiate into osteogenic lineage cells and suggest that Cbfα1 may be negatively regulated by HIF-1α.

  18. Synthetic heparin-binding factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul O.; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2010-04-20

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain, and preferably two peptide chains branched from a dipeptide branch moiety composed of two trifunctional amino acid residues, which peptide chain or chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a linker, which may be a hydrophobic linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  19. Adaptive evolution of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berg Johannes

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The regulation of a gene depends on the binding of transcription factors to specific sites located in the regulatory region of the gene. The generation of these binding sites and of cooperativity between them are essential building blocks in the evolution of complex regulatory networks. We study a theoretical model for the sequence evolution of binding sites by point mutations. The approach is based on biophysical models for the binding of transcription factors to DNA. Hence we derive empirically grounded fitness landscapes, which enter a population genetics model including mutations, genetic drift, and selection. Results We show that the selection for factor binding generically leads to specific correlations between nucleotide frequencies at different positions of a binding site. We demonstrate the possibility of rapid adaptive evolution generating a new binding site for a given transcription factor by point mutations. The evolutionary time required is estimated in terms of the neutral (background mutation rate, the selection coefficient, and the effective population size. Conclusions The efficiency of binding site formation is seen to depend on two joint conditions: the binding site motif must be short enough and the promoter region must be long enough. These constraints on promoter architecture are indeed seen in eukaryotic systems. Furthermore, we analyse the adaptive evolution of genetic switches and of signal integration through binding cooperativity between different sites. Experimental tests of this picture involving the statistics of polymorphisms and phylogenies of sites are discussed.

  20. Melatonin induces the transcripts of CBF/DREB1s and their involvement in both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; He, Chaozu

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule that acts as an important secondary messenger in plant stress responses. However, the mechanism underlying the melatonin-mediated signaling pathway in plant stress responses has not been established. C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) encode transcription factors that play important roles in plant stress responses. This study has determined that endogenous melatonin and transcripts level of CBFs (AtCBF1, AtCBF2, and AtCBF3) in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses and by pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection. Moreover, both exogenous melatonin treatment and overexpression of CBFs conferred enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Notably, AtCBFs and exogenous melatonin treatment positively regulated the mRNA expression of several stress-responsive genes (COR15A, RD22, and KIN1) and accumulation of soluble sugars content such as sucrose in Arabidopsis under control and stress conditions. Additionally, exogenous sucrose also conferred improved resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Taken together, this study indicates that AtCBFs confer enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, and AtCBF-mediated signaling pathway and sugar accumulation may be involved in melatonin-mediated stress response in Arabidopsis, at least partially.

  1. Melatonin induces the transcripts of CBF/DREB1s and their involvement in both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Haitao; Qian, Yongqiang; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J; He, Chaozu

    2015-10-01

    Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a naturally occurring small molecule that acts as an important secondary messenger in plant stress responses. However, the mechanism underlying the melatonin-mediated signaling pathway in plant stress responses has not been established. C-repeat-binding factors (CBFs)/Drought response element Binding 1 factors (DREB1s) encode transcription factors that play important roles in plant stress responses. This study has determined that endogenous melatonin and transcripts level of CBFs (AtCBF1, AtCBF2, and AtCBF3) in Arabidopsis leaves were significantly induced by salt, drought, and cold stresses and by pathogen Pseudomonas syringe pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 infection. Moreover, both exogenous melatonin treatment and overexpression of CBFs conferred enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Notably, AtCBFs and exogenous melatonin treatment positively regulated the mRNA expression of several stress-responsive genes (COR15A, RD22, and KIN1) and accumulation of soluble sugars content such as sucrose in Arabidopsis under control and stress conditions. Additionally, exogenous sucrose also conferred improved resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Taken together, this study indicates that AtCBFs confer enhanced resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, and AtCBF-mediated signaling pathway and sugar accumulation may be involved in melatonin-mediated stress response in Arabidopsis, at least partially. PMID:26182834

  2. N-termini of fungal CSL transcription factors are disordered, enriched in regulatory motifs and inhibit DNA binding in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CSL (CBF1/RBP-Jκ/Suppressor of Hairless/LAG-1 transcription factors are the effector components of the Notch receptor signalling pathway, which is critical for metazoan development. The metazoan CSL proteins (class M can also function in a Notch-independent manner. Recently, two novel classes of CSL proteins, designated F1 and F2, have been identified in fungi. The role of the fungal CSL proteins is unclear, because the Notch pathway is not present in fungi. In fission yeast, the Cbf11 and Cbf12 CSL paralogs play antagonistic roles in cell adhesion and the coordination of cell and nuclear division. Unusually long N-terminal extensions are typical for fungal and invertebrate CSL family members. In this study, we investigate the functional significance of these extended N-termini of CSL proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identify 15 novel CSL family members from 7 fungal species and conduct bioinformatic analyses of a combined dataset containing 34 fungal and 11 metazoan CSL protein sequences. We show that the long, non-conserved N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins are likely disordered and enriched in phosphorylation sites and PEST motifs. In a case study of Cbf12 (class F2, we provide experimental evidence that the protein is proteolytically processed and that the N-terminus inhibits the Cbf12-dependent DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides insight into the characteristics of the long N-terminal tails of fungal CSL proteins that may be crucial for controlling DNA-binding and CSL function. We propose that the regulation of DNA binding by Cbf12 via its N-terminal region represents an important means by which fission yeast strikes a balance between the class F1 and class F2 paralog activities. This mode of regulation might be shared with other CSL-positive fungi, some of which are relevant to human disease and biotechnology.

  3. Identification of CBF14 and NAC2 Genes in Aegilops tauschii Associated with Resistance to Freezing Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoomi-Aladizgeh, Farhad; Aalami, Ali; Esfahani, Masoud; Aghaei, Mohamad Jaafar; Mozaffari, Khadijeh

    2015-06-01

    Low temperature as one of the most important environmental factors limits the productivity of plants across the world. Aegilops, as a wild species of Poaceae, contains low temperature-responsive genes. In this study, we analyzed morphological (wilting, chlorosis, and recovery) and physiological (ion leakage) characteristics to identification of a cold-tolerant genotype. In this experiment, we introduced two transcription factors (TFs) in Aegilops species for the first time. Bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that our nucleotide sequences have high similarity with CBF14 (C-repeat-binding factor) and NAC2 (NAM, ATAF, and CUC) in Triticum aestivum. Based on the physiological and morphological data, one genotype (Aladizgeh) was identified as the most resistant genotype which was selected for further gene expression analysis. The real-time PCR results indicated that the CBF14 gene was not expressed 3 h following cold treatment, but the highest expression was observed after 6, 12, and 24 h of cold treatment; however, a sudden decrease was observed in its expression after 30 h. The NAC2 gene also was not expressed 3 h after cold stress, but the highest expression was at 24 h and similar to the CBF14 gene; its expression suddenly decreased after 30 h. Our results indicated that this genotype can tolerate -4 °C for 3 h, but the CBF14 and NAC2 genes were activated when treated for longer durations. Expression of TFs studied in this experiment had decreased after 30 h, in which cell death seems to be the important reason.

  4. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF family in Eucalyptus grandis: an intriguing over-representation of stress-responsive DREB1/CBF genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P B Cao

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF family includes a large number of developmentally and physiologically important transcription factors sharing an AP2 DNA-binding domain. Among them DREB1/CBF and DREB2 factors are known as master regulators respectively of cold and heat/osmotic stress responses.The manual annotation of AP2/ERF family from Eucalyptus grandis, Malus, Populus and Vitis genomes allowed a complete phylogenetic study for comparing the structure of this family in woody species and the model Arabidopsis thaliana. Expression profiles of the whole groups of EgrDREB1 and EgrDREB2 were investigated through RNAseq database survey and RT-qPCR analyses.The structure and the size of the AP2/ERF family show a global conservation for the plant species under comparison. In addition to an expansion of the ERF subfamily, the tree genomes mainly differ with respect to the group representation within the subfamilies. With regard to the E. grandis DREB subfamily, an obvious feature is the presence of 17 DREB1/CBF genes, the maximum reported to date for dicotyledons. In contrast, only six DREB2 have been identified, which is similar to the other plants species under study, except for Malus. All the DREB1/CBF and DREB2 genes from E. grandis are expressed in at least one condition and all are heat-responsive. Regulation by cold and drought depends on the genes but is not specific of one group; DREB1/CBF group is more cold-inducible than DREB2 which is mainly drought responsive.These features suggest that the dramatic expansion of the DREB1/CBF group might be related to the adaptation of this evergreen tree to climate changes when it expanded in Australia.

  6. Nucleotide Polymorphism in the Drought Induced Transcription Factor CBF4 Region of Arabidopsis thaliana and Its Molecular Evolution Analyses%拟南芥抗旱转录因子CBF4基因区域的核苷酸多样性及其分子进化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝岗平; 吴忠义; 曹鸣庆; Georges Pelletier; Dominique Brunel; 黄丛林; 杨清

    2004-01-01

    以生长于不同气候条件下的17个拟南芥核心生态型为材料,分析了它们的抗旱转录因子CBF4 基因区域的序列多态性.结果表明:拟南芥CBF4基因区域具有高密度的单核苷酸多态性(SNP)和插入缺失(Indel),多态性频率为每35.8 bp一个 SNP,每143 bp一个Indel,基因非编码区的多态性是编码区的4倍;在编码区,SNP的频率为每96.4 bp一个SNP,其中发现25 av、203 av和244 av 3个生态型CBF4基因区域1 034位 (以GenBank登录号AB015478序列第19 696位的核苷酸为1)碱基变化:G(←→)T,引起第205位氨基酸变化:gly(←→)val.核苷酸多样性统计分析显示,该基因内部大范围内存在连锁不平衡(linkage disequilibrium,LD),5′端非编码区有一个重组.与拟南芥等的研究结果类似,选择压力对不同的区域作用不同.3′端非编码区核苷酸多样性程度最高,是平衡性选择的结果,编码区核苷酸变化符合中性突变假说,而5′端非编码区是自然选择作用的靶位点.

  7. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  8. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY)

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  9. Binding site turnover produces pervasive quantitative changes in transcription factor binding between closely related Drosophila species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Changes in gene expression play an important role in evolution, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying regulatory evolution are poorly understood. Here we compare genome-wide binding of the six transcription factors that initiate segmentation along the anterior-posterior axis in embryos of two closely related species: Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila yakuba. Where we observe binding by a factor in one species, we almost always observe binding by that factor to the orthologous sequence in the other species. Levels of binding, however, vary considerably. The magnitude and direction of the interspecies differences in binding levels of all six factors are strongly correlated, suggesting a role for chromatin or other factor-independent forces in mediating the divergence of transcription factor binding. Nonetheless, factor-specific quantitative variation in binding is common, and we show that it is driven to a large extent by the gain and loss of cognate recognition sequences for the given factor. We find only a weak correlation between binding variation and regulatory function. These data provide the first genome-wide picture of how modest levels of sequence divergence between highly morphologically similar species affect a system of coordinately acting transcription factors during animal development, and highlight the dominant role of quantitative variation in transcription factor binding over short evolutionary distances.

  10. Searching for transcription factor binding sites in vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Chih; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched in the past decade. Learning from known binding sites, new binding sites of a transcription factor in unannotated sequences can be identified. A number of search methods have been introduced over the years. However, one can rarely find one single method that performs the best on all the transcription factors. Instead, to identify the best method for a particular trans...

  11. 盐地碱蓬2个DREB1/CBF基因的克隆与表达调控分析%Cloning and Expression Analysis of TwoDREB1/CBF Genes inSuaeda salsaL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓波; 苏家乐; 贾新平; 梁丽建; 肖政; 邓衍明

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBFgenes were cloned fromSuaeda salsa L. At the same time, the sequence characteristics, subcellular localization and transcriptional activities of the two predicted DREB1/CBF proteins and their expression alteration in response to abiotic stress were analyzed.[Method]The fragments of twoDREB1/CBF genes were obtained by using the technique of homologous cloning. The full-length of cDNA sequences of the twoDREB1/CBFgenes were isolated by the method of rapid-amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and they were named asSsCBF1 andSsCBF2, respectively. The structures and functions of the two proteins encoded by SsCBFs were predicted by the bioinformatics software. In order to detect the subcellular localization of the two proteins, the coding sequences of the twoSsCBF genes were fused, respectively, downstream to theGFP sequence to obtain two expression vectors and they were separately transferred into onion epidermal cells by the biolistic method. The binding specificity of SsCBF1 and SsCBF2 to DRE/CRT cis-acting element and their transcriptional activities were investigated by using a yeast one-hybrid system. The expression of the twoSsCBFgenesin response to low temperature, NaCl,PEG and ABA were assessed by the real-time quantitative PCR.[Result]SsCBF1 encoded a peptide of 225 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 25.4 kD and apI of 4.84. SsCBF2encoded a predicted protein of 260 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 28.6 kD and a calculatedpI of 5.05. SsCBF1and SsCBF2both contained a typical AP2/ ERF domain andshared 53.5% and 45.4% identity at the levels of coding nucleotides and amino acids. However, the AP2/ ERF domains of the twoSsCBFgenes were highly similar and shared 76.2% and 87.3% identity at the levels of nucleotides and amino acids, respectively. SsCBF1 and SsCBF2 were classified into A-1 subgroup of the DREB subfamily and both localized to the nucleus. The two proteins were able to specifically bind to the DRE/CRT sequence

  12. Factor XII binding to endothelial cells depends on caveolae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Inger; Thomsen, Peter; van Deurs, Bo

    2004-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that factor XII (FXII) binds to cellular surfaces in the vascular system. One of the suggested receptors of this binding is the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored urokinase-like plasminogen activator (u-PAR) harbored in caveolae/lipid rafts. However, binding of FXII...... lipid rafts. Accordingly, cholesterol-depleted cells were found to bind significantly reduced amounts of FXII. These observations, combined with the presence of a minority of u-PAR in caveolae concomitant with FXII binding, indicate that FXII binding to u-PAR may be secondary and depends upon...

  13. Cis-regulatory element-based genome-wide identification of DREB1/CBF targets in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Zhao; Weizhong Liu; Yong Hu; Xianglin Liu; Yikun He

    2008-01-01

    Microarray analysis is used to identify transcriptional targets.However,the direct targets of transcription factors cannot be distin guished from indirect ones;further,genes with low-expression levels cannot be identified by this method.In the present study,we exploi the cis-element dehydration-responsive element(DRE)that is known to be responsible for the transcription of DRE binding factor](DREB1)targets in the promoter region of all Arabidopsis genes.Putative targets whose promoters contain the elements were verified by both microarray and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)analysis.Five new DREB 1/CBF direct targets were identified.Compared with traditional microarray analysis,our method is convenient and cost-effective for identifying the downstream targets of transcription factors.

  14. Effect of Nuclear Binding Energy to K Factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Zhao-Yu; GUO Ai-Qiang

    2007-01-01

    We modify the square of virtual photon four-momentum by using nuclear binding energy formula,and calculate the effect of nuclear binding energy to K factor and Compton subprocess and annihilate subprocess in A-A collision Drell-Yan process.The outcome indicates that the effect of nuclear binding energy to K factor is obvious in little x region and it would disappear gradually as x increases.

  15. Negative Example Aided Transcription Factor Binding Site Search

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2011-01-01

    Computational approaches to transcription factor binding site identification have been actively researched for the past decade. Negative examples have long been utilized in de novo motif discovery and have been shown useful in transcription factor binding site search as well. However, understanding of the roles of negative examples in binding site search is still very limited. We propose the 2-centroid and optimal discriminating vector methods, taking into account negative examples. Cross-val...

  16. Redox Signaling and CBF-Responsive Pathway Are Involved in Salicylic Acid-Improved Photosynthesis and Growth under Chilling Stress in Watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fei; Lu, Junyang; Gao, Min; Shi, Kai; Kong, Qiusheng; Huang, Yuan; Bie, Zhilong

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in plant response to abiotic stresses. This study investigated the potential role of SA in alleviating the adverse effects of chilling stress on photosynthesis and growth in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus). Chilling stress induced the simultaneous accumulation of free and conjugated SA in watermelon plants, and the chilling-induced SA production was attributed to the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase pathway. Applying SA at moderate concentrations induced chilling tolerance, whereas inhibition of SA biosynthesis by L-α-aminooxy-β-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP) increased the photooxidation of PS II under chilling stress in watermelon, resulting in reduced photosynthesis and growth. Chilling induced a transient increase in the ratios of reduced to oxidized glutathione and reduced ascorbate to dehydroascorbate. Then, the expression of antioxidant genes was upregulated, and the activities of antioxidant enzymes were enhanced. Furthermore, SA-induced chilling tolerance was associated with cellular glutathione and ascorbate homeostasis, which served as redox signals to regulate antioxidant metabolism under chilling stress. AOPP treatment stimulated the chilling-induced expression of cold-responsive genes, particularly via C-repeat binding factors CBF3 and CBF4. These results confirm the synergistic role of SA signaling and the CBF-dependent responsive pathway during chilling stress in watermelon. PMID:27777580

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a DREB1/CBF-like gene (GhDREB1L) from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bo; JIN LongGuo; LIU JinYuan

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factors DREB1s/CBFs play important roles in the regulation of plant resistance to environmental stresses and are quite useful for generating transgenic plants tolerant to these stresses. In the present work, a cDNA encoding DREB1/CBF-like protein (GhDREB1L) from cotton was isolated, and its sequence features, DNA binding preference, and expression patterns of the transcripts were also characterized. GhDREB1L contained one conserved AP2/ERF domain and its amino acid sequence was similar to the DREB1/CBF group of the DREB family from other plants. The DNA-binding domain of GhDREB1L was successfully expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that the purified GhDREB1L fusion protein had a specific binding activity with the previously characterized DRE element (core sequence, ACCGAC) and also with the DRE-like sequence (core sequence, GCCGAC) in the promoter of the dehydration-responsive late embryogenesis-abundant gene LEA D113. Semi-quantita- tive RT-PCR showed that GhDREB1L was induced in the cotton cotyledons by low temperature, as well as drought and NaCl treatments. These results suggested that the novel cotton GhDREB1L might play an important role in response to low temperature as well as drought and high salinity through binding to the DRE cis-element.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a DREB1/CBF-like gene (GhDREB1L) from cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factors DREB1s/CBFs play important roles in the regulation of plant resistance to environmental stresses and are quite useful for generating transgenic plants tolerant to these stresses. In the present work, a cDNA encoding DREB1/CBF-like protein (GhDREB1L) from cotton was isolated, and its sequence features, DNA binding preference, and expression patterns of the transcripts were also characterized. GhDREB1L contained one conserved AP2/ERF domain and its amino acid sequence was similar to the DREB1/CBF group of the DREB family from other plants. The DNA-binding domain of GhDREB1L was successfully expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that the purified GhDREB1L fusion protein had a specific binding activity with the previously characterized DRE ele-ment (core sequence, ACCGAC) and also with the DRE-like sequence (core sequence, GCCGAC) in the promoter of the dehydration-responsive late embryogenesis-abundant gene LEA D113. Semi-quantita- tive RT-PCR showed that GhDREB1L was induced in the cotton cotyledons by low temperature, as well as drought and NaCl treatments. These results suggested that the novel cotton GhDREB1L might play an important role in response to low temperature as well as drought and high salinity through binding to the DRE cis-element.

  19. Oil palm EgCBF3 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic tomato plants through modulation of the ethylene signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mortaza; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Abdul Aziz, Maheran; Namasivayam, Parameswari

    2016-09-01

    CBF/DREB1 is a group of transcription factors that are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. They belong to the AP2/ERF superfamily of plant-specific transcription factors. A gene encoding a new member of this group was isolated from ripening oil palm fruit and designated as EgCBF3. The oil palm fruit demonstrates the characteristics of a climacteric fruit like tomato, in which ethylene has a major impact on the ripening process. A transgenic approach was used for functional characterization of the EgCBF3, using tomato as the model plant. The effects of ectopic expression of EgCBF3 were analyzed based on expression profiling of the ethylene biosynthesis-related genes, anti-freeze proteins (AFPs), abiotic stress tolerance and plant growth and development. The EgCBF3 tomatoes demonstrated altered phenotypes compared to the wild type tomatoes. Delayed leaf senescence and flowering, increased chlorophyll content and abnormal flowering were the consequences of overexpression of EgCBF3 in the transgenic tomatoes. The EgCBF3 tomatoes demonstrated enhanced abiotic stress tolerance under in vitro conditions. Further, transcript levels of ethylene biosynthesis-related genes, including three SlACSs and two SlACOs, were altered in the transgenic plants' leaves and roots compared to that in the wild type tomato plant. Among the eight AFPs studied in the wounded leaves of the EgCBF3 tomato plants, transcript levels of SlOSM-L, SlNP24, SlPR5L and SlTSRF1 decreased, while expression of the other four, SlCHI3, SlPR1, SlPR-P2 and SlLAP2, were up-regulated. These findings indicate the possible functions of EgCBF3 in plant growth and development as a regulator of ethylene biosynthesis-related and AFP genes, and as a stimulator of abiotic stress tolerance.

  20. Oil palm EgCBF3 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic tomato plants through modulation of the ethylene signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mortaza; Abdullah, Siti Nor Akmar; Abdul Aziz, Maheran; Namasivayam, Parameswari

    2016-09-01

    CBF/DREB1 is a group of transcription factors that are mainly involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. They belong to the AP2/ERF superfamily of plant-specific transcription factors. A gene encoding a new member of this group was isolated from ripening oil palm fruit and designated as EgCBF3. The oil palm fruit demonstrates the characteristics of a climacteric fruit like tomato, in which ethylene has a major impact on the ripening process. A transgenic approach was used for functional characterization of the EgCBF3, using tomato as the model plant. The effects of ectopic expression of EgCBF3 were analyzed based on expression profiling of the ethylene biosynthesis-related genes, anti-freeze proteins (AFPs), abiotic stress tolerance and plant growth and development. The EgCBF3 tomatoes demonstrated altered phenotypes compared to the wild type tomatoes. Delayed leaf senescence and flowering, increased chlorophyll content and abnormal flowering were the consequences of overexpression of EgCBF3 in the transgenic tomatoes. The EgCBF3 tomatoes demonstrated enhanced abiotic stress tolerance under in vitro conditions. Further, transcript levels of ethylene biosynthesis-related genes, including three SlACSs and two SlACOs, were altered in the transgenic plants' leaves and roots compared to that in the wild type tomato plant. Among the eight AFPs studied in the wounded leaves of the EgCBF3 tomato plants, transcript levels of SlOSM-L, SlNP24, SlPR5L and SlTSRF1 decreased, while expression of the other four, SlCHI3, SlPR1, SlPR-P2 and SlLAP2, were up-regulated. These findings indicate the possible functions of EgCBF3 in plant growth and development as a regulator of ethylene biosynthesis-related and AFP genes, and as a stimulator of abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:27513726

  1. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chih; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provid...

  2. Alcohol Binding to the Odorant Binding Protein LUSH: Multiple Factors Affecting Binding Affinities

    OpenAIRE

    Ader, Lauren; Jones, David N. M.; Lin, Hai

    2010-01-01

    Density function theory (DFT) calculations have been carried out to investigate the binding of alcohols to the odorant binding protein LUSH from Drosophila melanogaster. LUSH is one of the few proteins known to bind to ethanol at physiologically relevant concentrations and where high-resolution structural information is available for the protein bound to alcohol at these concentrations. The structures of the LUSH–alcohol complexes identify a set of specific hydrogen-bonding interactions as cr...

  3. Effects of normal aging on regional CBF and CMRO2 in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxygen-15 continuous inhalation technique and positron emission tomography were used in order to investigate age-related changes of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen consumption (CMRO2). 27 patients aged 19 to 76 years without evidence of dementia, brain disease or vascular risk factors, were studied. Regional CBF and CMRO2 were calculated in seven different brain structures. In gray matter CBF and CMRO2 decreased with aging (respectively 18% and 17%, p2 was found to be diffuse but to affect principally the frontal and temporo-sylvian cortex. Neuronal loss and/or a diminished metabolic activity of residual neurons are the most likely hypotheses to explain these findings

  4. Statistic rCBF study of extrapyramidal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Hiroshi; Nakajima, Takashi; Fukuhara, Nobuyoshi [National Saigata Hospital, Ogata, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    We studied regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in 16 patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), 2 patients with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 2 patients with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), 2 patients with striatonigral degeneration, and 16 normal volunteers, using Three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP). Decreased rCBF in PD patients was shown in the posterior parietal and occipital cortex. Decreased rCBF in DLB was shown in the frontal, parietal and occipital cortex with relative sparing of the sensorimotor cortex.. Decreased rCBF in PSP was shown in the frontal cortex. Decreased rCBF in SND was shown in the frontal cortex and cerebellum. Statistic rCBF analysis using 3D-SSP was a useful measure for the early differential diagnosis of extrapyramidal disorders. (author)

  5. The Functional Consequences of Variation in Transcription Factor Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanovich, Darren A.; Pavlovic, Bryan; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Gilad, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    One goal of human genetics is to understand how the information for precise and dynamic gene expression programs is encoded in the genome. The interactions of transcription factors (TFs) with DNA regulatory elements clearly play an important role in determining gene expression outputs, yet the regulatory logic underlying functional transcription factor binding is poorly understood. Many studies have focused on characterizing the genomic locations of TF binding, yet it is unclear to what extent TF binding at any specific locus has functional consequences with respect to gene expression output. To evaluate the context of functional TF binding we knocked down 59 TFs and chromatin modifiers in one HapMap lymphoblastoid cell line. We then identified genes whose expression was affected by the knockdowns. We intersected the gene expression data with transcription factor binding data (based on ChIP-seq and DNase-seq) within 10 kb of the transcription start sites of expressed genes. This combination of data allowed us to infer functional TF binding. Using this approach, we found that only a small subset of genes bound by a factor were differentially expressed following the knockdown of that factor, suggesting that most interactions between TF and chromatin do not result in measurable changes in gene expression levels of putative target genes. We found that functional TF binding is enriched in regulatory elements that harbor a large number of TF binding sites, at sites with predicted higher binding affinity, and at sites that are enriched in genomic regions annotated as “active enhancers.” PMID:24603674

  6. The functional consequences of variation in transcription factor binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren A Cusanovich

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One goal of human genetics is to understand how the information for precise and dynamic gene expression programs is encoded in the genome. The interactions of transcription factors (TFs with DNA regulatory elements clearly play an important role in determining gene expression outputs, yet the regulatory logic underlying functional transcription factor binding is poorly understood. Many studies have focused on characterizing the genomic locations of TF binding, yet it is unclear to what extent TF binding at any specific locus has functional consequences with respect to gene expression output. To evaluate the context of functional TF binding we knocked down 59 TFs and chromatin modifiers in one HapMap lymphoblastoid cell line. We then identified genes whose expression was affected by the knockdowns. We intersected the gene expression data with transcription factor binding data (based on ChIP-seq and DNase-seq within 10 kb of the transcription start sites of expressed genes. This combination of data allowed us to infer functional TF binding. Using this approach, we found that only a small subset of genes bound by a factor were differentially expressed following the knockdown of that factor, suggesting that most interactions between TF and chromatin do not result in measurable changes in gene expression levels of putative target genes. We found that functional TF binding is enriched in regulatory elements that harbor a large number of TF binding sites, at sites with predicted higher binding affinity, and at sites that are enriched in genomic regions annotated as "active enhancers."

  7. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced. PMID:24415770

  8. Natural variation in CBF gene sequence, gene expression and freezing tolerance in the Versailles core collection of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunel Dominique

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants from temperate regions are able to withstand freezing temperatures due to a process known as cold acclimation, which is a prior exposure to low, but non-freezing temperatures. During acclimation, a large number of genes are induced, bringing about biochemical changes in the plant, thought to be responsible for the subsequent increase in freezing tolerance. Key regulatory proteins in this process are the CBF1, 2 and 3 transcription factors which control the expression of a set of target genes referred to as the "CBF regulon". Results To assess the role of the CBF genes in cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana, the CBF genes and their promoters were sequenced in the Versailles core collection, a set of 48 accessions that maximizes the naturally-occurring genetic diversity, as well as in the commonly used accessions Col-0 and WS. Extensive polymorphism was found in all three genes. Freezing tolerance was measured in all accessions to assess the variability in acclimated freezing tolerance. The effect of sequence polymorphism was investigated by evaluating the kinetics of CBF gene expression, as well as that of a subset of the target COR genes, in a set of eight accessions with contrasting freezing tolerance. Our data indicate that CBF genes as well as the selected COR genes are cold induced in all accessions, irrespective of their freezing tolerance. Although we observed different levels of expression in different accessions, CBF or COR gene expression was not closely correlated with freezing tolerance. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Versailles core collection contains significant natural variation with respect to freezing tolerance, polymorphism in the CBF genes and CBF and COR gene expression. Although there tends to be more CBF and COR gene expression in tolerant accessions, there are exceptions, reinforcing the idea that a complex network of genes is involved in freezing tolerance

  9. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  10. Expression of core-binding factor alpha 1 and collagen Ⅱ in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5%核心结合因子和Ⅱ型胶原在慢性肾脏病5期患者桡动脉中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余毅; 颜开萍; 王琰; 孙淑清; 陈今; 林开平; 易建伟

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨慢性肾脏病(CKD)5期患者桡动脉中核心结合因子(Cbfα-1)和Ⅱ型胶原(Col Ⅱ)表达及其与血管钙化发生的关系.方法 40例CKD5期患者在接受动-静脉内瘘手术时,留取一段桡动脉.对10例在本院接受胃大部切除术、肾功能正常患者,留取一段胃左动脉为对照组.钙盐沉积采用von Kossa染色法,根据von Kossa染色结果,CKD5期组又分为CKD5期无钙化组、轻中度钙化组和重度钙化组.Cbfα-1和ColⅡ的表达采用免疫组化染色法.同时测定血钙、磷、甲状旁腺激素(iPTH)、C反应蛋白(CRP)水平.结果 40例CKD5期患者中有17例(42.5%)出现血管钙化,主要发生在血管中膜,对照组均未见血管钙化发生.CKD5期轻中度钙化组和重度钙化组中,动脉中膜均有Cbfα-1、ColⅡ的阳性表达;23例CKD5 期无钙化组中,有18例(78.3%)至少有Cbfα-1、ColⅡ其中一种的阳性表达.对照组均无Cbfα-1、C0lⅡ的阳性表达.CKD5期轻中度钙化组和重度钙化组,血管中膜Cbfα-1、ColⅡ免疫组化的阳性率均显著高于CKD5期无钙化组,但轻中度钙化组和重度钙化组之间的差异无统计学意义.CRP、钙磷乘积与Cbfα-1、ColⅡ呈正相关;血磷与Cbfα-1(r=0.786,P<0.01)、ColⅡ(r=0.785,P<0.01)呈正相关.结论 CKD5期患者桡动脉钙化以中膜为主,钙化的动脉均有Cbfα-1、Col Ⅱ的高表达,且其表达早于组织学上血管钙化的发生.Cbfα-1和ColⅡ可能在血管钙化的发生、发展中起到了重要作用.%Objective To study the relationship between the medial artery calcification and expression of core-binding factor alpha 1 (Cbf α-1) and collagen Ⅱ (Col Ⅱ) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 5 patients.Methods Pieces of radial arteries were taken from 40 patients with CKD stage 5 during internal arteriovenous fistula operation.Ten patients with subtotal gastrectomy and normal renal function were chosen as control.The vessels were examined

  11. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

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    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  12. Low-temperature-induced expression of rice ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase is mediated by a C-repeat/dehydration-responsive element that specifically interacts with rice C-repeat-binding factor 3

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    Juan eLi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen recycling and redistribution are important for the environmental stress response of plants. In non nitrogen-fixing plants, ureide metabolism is crucial to nitrogen recycling from organic sources. Various studies have suggested that the rate-limiting components of ureide metabolism respond to environmental stresses. However, the underlying regulation mechanism is not well understood. In this report, rice ureidoglycolate amidohydrolase (OsUAH, which is a recently identified enzyme catalyzing the final step of ureide degradation, was identified as low-temperature- (LT but not abscisic acid- (ABA regulated. To elucidate the LT regulatory mechanism at the transcriptional level, we isolated and characterized the promoter region of OsUAH (POsUAH. Series deletions revealed that a minimal region between -522 and -420 relative to the transcriptional start site was sufficient for the cold induction of POsUAH. Detailed analyses of this 103-bp fragment indicated that a C-repeat/dehydration-responsive (CRT/DRE element localized at position -434 was essential for LT-responsive expression. A rice C-repeat-binding factors/DRE-binding proteins 1 (CBFs/DREB1s subfamily member, OsCBF3, was screened to specifically bind to the CRT/DRE element in the minimal region both in yeast one-hybrid assays and in in vitro gel-shift analysis. Moreover, the promoter could be exclusively trans-activated by the interaction between the CRT/DRE element and OsCBF3 in vivo. These findings may help to elucidate the regulation mechanism of stress-responsive ureide metabolism genes and provide an example of the member-specific manipulation of the CBF/DREB1 subfamily.

  13. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward;

    2014-01-01

    to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2...

  14. Architecture and RNA binding of the human negative elongation factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Seychelle M; Pöllmann, David; Caizzi, Livia; Hofmann, Katharina B; Rombaut, Pascaline; Zimniak, Tomasz; Herzog, Franz; Cramer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Transcription regulation in metazoans often involves promoter-proximal pausing of RNA polymerase (Pol) II, which requires the 4-subunit negative elongation factor (NELF). Here we discern the functional architecture of human NELF through X-ray crystallography, protein crosslinking, biochemical assays, and RNA crosslinking in cells. We identify a NELF core subcomplex formed by conserved regions in subunits NELF-A and NELF-C, and resolve its crystal structure. The NELF-AC subcomplex binds single-stranded nucleic acids in vitro, and NELF-C associates with RNA in vivo. A positively charged face of NELF-AC is involved in RNA binding, whereas the opposite face of the NELF-AC subcomplex binds NELF-B. NELF-B is predicted to form a HEAT repeat fold, also binds RNA in vivo, and anchors the subunit NELF-E, which is confirmed to bind RNA in vivo. These results reveal the three-dimensional architecture and three RNA-binding faces of NELF. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14981.001 PMID:27282391

  15. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins: a structural perspective

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    Briony eForbes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6 bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that influence processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by influencing gene transcription.IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, Linker and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP to date, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarises structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. It also highlights future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease.

  16. Biophysical fitness landscapes for transcription factor binding sites.

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    Allan Haldane

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic states and evolutionary trajectories available to cell populations are ultimately dictated by complex interactions among DNA, RNA, proteins, and other molecular species. Here we study how evolution of gene regulation in a single-cell eukaryote S. cerevisiae is affected by interactions between transcription factors (TFs and their cognate DNA sites. Our study is informed by a comprehensive collection of genomic binding sites and high-throughput in vitro measurements of TF-DNA binding interactions. Using an evolutionary model for monomorphic populations evolving on a fitness landscape, we infer fitness as a function of TF-DNA binding to show that the shape of the inferred fitness functions is in broad agreement with a simple functional form inspired by a thermodynamic model of two-state TF-DNA binding. However, the effective parameters of the model are not always consistent with physical values, indicating selection pressures beyond the biophysical constraints imposed by TF-DNA interactions. We find little statistical support for the fitness landscape in which each position in the binding site evolves independently, indicating that epistasis is common in the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, by correlating TF-DNA binding energies with biological properties of the sites or the genes they regulate, we are able to rule out several scenarios of site-specific selection, under which binding sites of the same TF would experience different selection pressures depending on their position in the genome. These findings support the existence of universal fitness landscapes which shape evolution of all sites for a given TF, and whose properties are determined in part by the physics of protein-DNA interactions.

  17. Variable structure motifs for transcription factor binding sites

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    Wernisch Lorenz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically, models of DNA-transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs have been based on relatively few known instances and have treated them as sites of fixed length using position weight matrices (PWMs. Various extensions to this model have been proposed, most of which take account of dependencies between the bases in the binding sites. However, some transcription factors are known to exhibit some flexibility and bind to DNA in more than one possible physical configuration. In some cases this variation is known to affect the function of binding sites. With the increasing volume of ChIP-seq data available it is now possible to investigate models that incorporate this flexibility. Previous work on variable length models has been constrained by: a focus on specific zinc finger proteins in yeast using restrictive models; a reliance on hand-crafted models for just one transcription factor at a time; and a lack of evaluation on realistically sized data sets. Results We re-analysed binding sites from the TRANSFAC database and found motivating examples where our new variable length model provides a better fit. We analysed several ChIP-seq data sets with a novel motif search algorithm and compared the results to one of the best standard PWM finders and a recently developed alternative method for finding motifs of variable structure. All the methods performed comparably in held-out cross validation tests. Known motifs of variable structure were recovered for p53, Stat5a and Stat5b. In addition our method recovered a novel generalised version of an existing PWM for Sp1 that allows for variable length binding. This motif improved classification performance. Conclusions We have presented a new gapped PWM model for variable length DNA binding sites that is not too restrictive nor over-parameterised. Our comparison with existing tools shows that on average it does not have better predictive accuracy than existing methods. However, it does

  18. Evolutionary computation for discovery of composite transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Fogel, Gary B.; Porto, V. William; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Craven, Andrew M.; Powers, David M.; Harlow, Harry B.; Su, Eric W.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated the use of evolutionary computation for the discovery of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoter regions upstream of coexpressed genes. However, it remained unclear whether or not composite TFBS elements, commonly found in higher organisms where two or more TFBSs form functional complexes, could also be identified by using this approach. Here, we present an important refinement of our previous algorithm and test the identification of composite elem...

  19. Cooperative binding of transcription factors promotes bimodal gene expression response.

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    Pablo S Gutierrez

    Full Text Available In the present work we extend and analyze the scope of our recently proposed stochastic model for transcriptional regulation, which considers an arbitrarily complex cis-regulatory system using only elementary reactions. Previously, we determined the role of cooperativity on the intrinsic fluctuations of gene expression for activating transcriptional switches, by means of master equation formalism and computer simulation. This model allowed us to distinguish between two cooperative binding mechanisms and, even though the mean expression levels were not affected differently by the acting mechanism, we showed that the associated fluctuations were different. In the present generalized model we include other regulatory functions in addition to those associated to an activator switch. Namely, we introduce repressive regulatory functions and two theoretical mechanisms that account for the biphasic response that some cis-regulatory systems show to the transcription factor concentration. We have also extended our previous master equation formalism in order to include protein production by stochastic translation of mRNA. Furthermore, we examine the graded/binary scenarios in the context of the interaction energy between transcription factors. In this sense, this is the first report to show that the cooperative binding of transcription factors to DNA promotes the "all-or-none" phenomenon observed in eukaryotic systems. In addition, we confirm that gene expression fluctuation levels associated with one of two cooperative binding mechanism never exceed the fluctuation levels of the other.

  20. Comprehensive human transcription factor binding site map for combinatory binding motifs discovery.

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    Arnoldo J Müller-Molina

    Full Text Available To know the map between transcription factors (TFs and their binding sites is essential to reverse engineer the regulation process. Only about 10%-20% of the transcription factor binding motifs (TFBMs have been reported. This lack of data hinders understanding gene regulation. To address this drawback, we propose a computational method that exploits never used TF properties to discover the missing TFBMs and their sites in all human gene promoters. The method starts by predicting a dictionary of regulatory "DNA words." From this dictionary, it distills 4098 novel predictions. To disclose the crosstalk between motifs, an additional algorithm extracts TF combinatorial binding patterns creating a collection of TF regulatory syntactic rules. Using these rules, we narrowed down a list of 504 novel motifs that appear frequently in syntax patterns. We tested the predictions against 509 known motifs confirming that our system can reliably predict ab initio motifs with an accuracy of 81%-far higher than previous approaches. We found that on average, 90% of the discovered combinatorial binding patterns target at least 10 genes, suggesting that to control in an independent manner smaller gene sets, supplementary regulatory mechanisms are required. Additionally, we discovered that the new TFBMs and their combinatorial patterns convey biological meaning, targeting TFs and genes related to developmental functions. Thus, among all the possible available targets in the genome, the TFs tend to regulate other TFs and genes involved in developmental functions. We provide a comprehensive resource for regulation analysis that includes a dictionary of "DNA words," newly predicted motifs and their corresponding combinatorial patterns. Combinatorial patterns are a useful filter to discover TFBMs that play a major role in orchestrating other factors and thus, are likely to lock/unlock cellular functional clusters.

  1. Incorporating evolution of transcription factor binding sites into annotated alignments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abha S Bais; Steffen Grossmann; Martin Vingron

    2007-08-01

    Identifying transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is essential to elucidate putative regulatory mechanisms. A common strategy is to combine cross-species conservation with single sequence TFBS annotation to yield ``conserved TFBSs”. Most current methods in this field adopt a multi-step approach that segregates the two aspects. Again, it is widely accepted that the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites differ from those of the surrounding sequence. Hence, it is desirable to have an approach that explicitly takes this factor into account. Although a plethora of approaches have been proposed for the prediction of conserved TFBSs, very few explicitly model TFBS evolutionary properties, while additionally being multi-step. Recently, we introduced a novel approach to simultaneously align and annotate conserved TFBSs in a pair of sequences. Building upon the standard Smith-Waterman algorithm for local alignments, SimAnn introduces additional states for profiles to output extended alignments or annotated alignments. That is, alignments with parts annotated as gaplessly aligned TFBSs (pair-profile hits) are generated. Moreover, the pair-profile related parameters are derived in a sound statistical framework. In this article, we extend this approach to explicitly incorporate evolution of binding sites in the SimAnn framework. We demonstrate the extension in the theoretical derivations through two position-specific evolutionary models, previously used for modelling TFBS evolution. In a simulated setting, we provide a proof of concept that the approach works given the underlying assumptions, as compared to the original work. Finally, using a real dataset of experimentally verified binding sites in human-mouse sequence pairs, we compare the new approach (eSimAnn) to an existing multi-step tool that also considers TFBS evolution. Although it is widely accepted that binding sites evolve differently from the surrounding sequences, most comparative TFBS identification

  2. A systems biology approach to transcription factor binding site prediction.

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    Xiang Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The elucidation of mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks holds great promise for both basic and translational research and remains one the greatest challenges to systems biology. Recent reverse engineering methods deduce regulatory interactions from large-scale mRNA expression profiles and cross-species conserved regulatory regions in DNA. Technical challenges faced by these methods include distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions, associating transcription regulators with predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs, identifying non-linearly conserved binding sites across species, and providing realistic accuracy estimates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We address these challenges by closely integrating proven methods for regulatory network reverse engineering from mRNA expression data, linearly and non-linearly conserved regulatory region discovery, and TFBS evaluation and discovery. Using an extensive test set of high-likelihood interactions, which we collected in order to provide realistic prediction-accuracy estimates, we show that a careful integration of these methods leads to significant improvements in prediction accuracy. To verify our methods, we biochemically validated TFBS predictions made for both transcription factors (TFs and co-factors; we validated binding site predictions made using a known E2F1 DNA-binding motif on E2F1 predicted promoter targets, known E2F1 and JUND motifs on JUND predicted promoter targets, and a de novo discovered motif for BCL6 on BCL6 predicted promoter targets. Finally, to demonstrate accuracy of prediction using an external dataset, we showed that sites matching predicted motifs for ZNF263 are significantly enriched in recent ZNF263 ChIP-seq data. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using an integrative framework, we were able to address technical challenges faced by state of the art network reverse engineering methods, leading to significant improvement in direct

  3. Saccharin and Cyclamate Inhibit Binding of Epidermal Growth Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L. S.

    1981-02-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled mouse epidermal growth factor (EGF) to 18 cell lines, including HeLa (human carcinoma), MDCK (dog kidney cells), HTC (rat hepatoma), K22 (rat liver), HF (human foreskin), GM17 (human skin fibroblasts), XP (human xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts), and 3T3-L1 (mouse fibroblasts), was inhibited by saccharin and cyclamate. The human cells were more sensitive to inhibition by these sweeteners than mouse or rat cells. EGF at doses far above the physiological levels reversed the inhibition in rodent cells but not in HeLa cells. In HeLa cells, the doses of saccharin and cyclamate needed for 50% inhibition were 3.5 and 9.3 mg/ml, respectively. Glucose, 2-deoxyglucose, sucrose, and xylitol did not inhibit EGF binding. Previous studies have shown that phorbol esters, strongly potent tumor promoters, also inhibit EGF binding to tissue culture cells. To explain the EGF binding inhibition by such greatly dissimilar molecules as phorbol esters, saccharin, and cyclamate, it is suggested that they operate through the activation of a hormone response control unit.

  4. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

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    Ilse Jongerius

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH, a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp, providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups.

  5. Distinct binding and immunogenic properties of the gonococcal homologue of meningococcal factor h binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongerius, Ilse; Lavender, Hayley; Tan, Lionel; Ruivo, Nicola; Exley, Rachel M; Caesar, Joseph J E; Lea, Susan M; Johnson, Steven; Tang, Christoph M

    2013-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of sepsis and meningitis. The bacterium recruits factor H (fH), a negative regulator of the complement system, to its surface via fH binding protein (fHbp), providing a mechanism to avoid complement-mediated killing. fHbp is an important antigen that elicits protective immunity against the meningococcus and has been divided into three different variant groups, V1, V2 and V3, or families A and B. However, immunisation with fHbp V1 does not result in cross-protection against V2 and V3 and vice versa. Furthermore, high affinity binding of fH could impair immune responses against fHbp. Here, we investigate a homologue of fHbp in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, designated as Gonococcal homologue of fHbp (Ghfp) which we show is a promising vaccine candidate for N. meningitidis. We demonstrate that Gfhp is not expressed on the surface of the gonococcus and, despite its high level of identity with fHbp, does not bind fH. Substitution of only two amino acids in Ghfp is sufficient to confer fH binding, while the corresponding residues in V3 fHbp are essential for high affinity fH binding. Furthermore, immune responses against Ghfp recognise V1, V2 and V3 fHbps expressed by a range of clinical isolates, and have serum bactericidal activity against N. meningitidis expressing fHbps from all variant groups. PMID:23935503

  6. Simultaneous Imaging of CBF Change and BOLD with Saturation-Recovery-T1 Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A neuroimaging technique based on the saturation-recovery (SR)-T1 MRI method was applied for simultaneously imaging blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) contrast and cerebral blood flow change (ΔCBF), which is determined by CBF-sensitive T1 relaxation rate change (ΔR1CBF). This technique was validated by quantitatively examining the relationships among ΔR1CBF, ΔCBF, BOLD and relative CBF change (rCBF), which was simultaneously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry under global ischemia and hypercapnia conditions, respectively, in the rat brain. It was found that during ischemia, BOLD decreased 23.1±2.8% in the cortical area; ΔR1CBF decreased 0.020±0.004s-1 corresponding to a ΔCBF decrease of 1.07±0.24 ml/g/min and 89.5±1.8% CBF reduction (n=5), resulting in a baseline CBF value (=1.18 ml/g/min) consistent with the literature reports. The CBF change quantification based on temperature corrected ΔR1CBF had a better accuracy than apparent R1 change (ΔR1app); nevertheless, ΔR1app without temperature correction still provides a good approximation for quantifying CBF change since perfusion dominates the evolution of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1app). In contrast to the excellent consistency between ΔCBF and rCBF measured during and after ischemia, the BOLD change during the post-ischemia period was temporally disassociated with ΔCBF, indicating distinct CBF and BOLD responses. Similar results were also observed for the hypercapnia study. The overall results demonstrate that the SR-T1 MRI method is effective for noninvasive and quantitative imaging of both ΔCBF and BOLD associated with physiological and/or pathological changes.

  7. Simultaneous Imaging of CBF Change and BOLD with Saturation-Recovery-T1 Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wang

    Full Text Available A neuroimaging technique based on the saturation-recovery (SR-T1 MRI method was applied for simultaneously imaging blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD contrast and cerebral blood flow change (ΔCBF, which is determined by CBF-sensitive T1 relaxation rate change (ΔR1CBF. This technique was validated by quantitatively examining the relationships among ΔR1CBF, ΔCBF, BOLD and relative CBF change (rCBF, which was simultaneously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry under global ischemia and hypercapnia conditions, respectively, in the rat brain. It was found that during ischemia, BOLD decreased 23.1±2.8% in the cortical area; ΔR1CBF decreased 0.020±0.004s-1 corresponding to a ΔCBF decrease of 1.07±0.24 ml/g/min and 89.5±1.8% CBF reduction (n=5, resulting in a baseline CBF value (=1.18 ml/g/min consistent with the literature reports. The CBF change quantification based on temperature corrected ΔR1CBF had a better accuracy than apparent R1 change (ΔR1app; nevertheless, ΔR1app without temperature correction still provides a good approximation for quantifying CBF change since perfusion dominates the evolution of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1app. In contrast to the excellent consistency between ΔCBF and rCBF measured during and after ischemia, the BOLD change during the post-ischemia period was temporally disassociated with ΔCBF, indicating distinct CBF and BOLD responses. Similar results were also observed for the hypercapnia study. The overall results demonstrate that the SR-T1 MRI method is effective for noninvasive and quantitative imaging of both ΔCBF and BOLD associated with physiological and/or pathological changes.

  8. Protein kinase A binds and activates heat shock factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Murshid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible transcription factors are regulated through batteries of posttranslational modifications that couple their activity to inducing stimuli. We have studied such regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, a key protein in control of the heat shock response, and a participant in carcinogenisis, neurological health and aging. As the mechanisms involved in the intracellular regulation of HSF1 in good health and its dysregulation in disease are still incomplete we are investigating the role of posttranslational modifications in such regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a proteomic study of HSF1 binding partners, we have discovered its association with the pleiotropic protein kinase A (PKA. HSF1 binds avidly to the catalytic subunit of PKA, (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on a novel serine phosphorylation site within its central regulatory domain (serine 320 or S320, both in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular PKAcα levels and phosphorylation of HSF1 at S320 were both required for HSF1 to be localized to the nucleus, bind to response elements in the promoter of an HSF1 target gene (hsp70.1 and activate hsp70.1 after stress. Reduction in PKAcα levels by small hairpin RNA led to HSF1 exclusion from the nucleus, its exodus from the hsp70.1 promoter and decreased hsp70.1 transcription. Likewise, null mutation of HSF1 at S320 by alanine substitution for serine led to an HSF1 species excluded from the nucleus and deficient in hsp70.1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings of PKA regulation of HSF1 through S320 phosphorylation add to our knowledge of the signaling networks converging on this factor and may contribute to elucidating its complex roles in the stress response and understanding HSF1 dysregulation in disease.

  9. Characterization of Binding Sites of Eukaryotic Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Qian; Jimmy Lin; Donald J. Zack

    2006-01-01

    To explore the nature of eukaryotic transcription factor (TF) binding sites and determine how they differ from surrounding DNA sequences, we examined four features associated with DNA binding sites: G+C content, pattern complexity,palindromic structure, and Markov sequence ordering. Our analysis of the regulatory motifs obtained from the TRANSFAC database, using yeast intergenic sequences as background, revealed that these four features show variable enrichment in motif sequences. For example, motif sequences were more likely to have palindromic structure than were background sequences. In addition, these features were tightly localized to the regulatory motifs, indicating that they are a property of the motif sequences themselves and are not shared by the general promoter "environment" in which the regulatory motifs reside. By breaking down the motif sequences according to the TF classes to which they bind, more specific associations were identified. Finally, we found that some correlations, such as G+C content enrichment, were species-specific, while others, such as complexity enrichment, were universal across the species examined. The quantitative analysis provided here should increase our understanding of protein-DNA interactions and also help facilitate the discovery of regulatory motifs through bioinformatics.

  10. Development of the Chinese Big Five Personality Inventory(CBF-PI) Ⅲ:Psychometric Properties of CBF-PI Brief Version%中国大五人格问卷的初步编制Ⅲ:简式版的制定及信效度检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王孟成; 戴晓阳; 姚树桥

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study aimed to create a brief inventory (CBF-PI-B) to assess the five dimensions based on Chinese Big Five Personality Inventory (CBF-PI).Methods: A set of good items were extracted from CBF-PI to form a brief scale.A total of 1221 college students were administered the CBF-PI.Other two samples including 54 and 53 college students completed both CBF-PI and NEO-PI-R or BFI, respectively.Results: ①CBF-PI-B included 40 items,which had good psychometric properties.Internal consistency reliabilities (Coefficient Alphas) of the CBF-PI-B ranging from 0.764(A) to 0.814(N); the mean was 0.793.②The test-retest reliabilities 10 weeks after were also excellent, ranging from 0.672 (A) to 0.811 (O); the mean was 0.742.③The CBF-PI brief version had clear factor structure.All items loaded above 0.40 on their intended factor.Five factors explained 43.49% of the total variance, and the variance explained by each factor at the same level, ranging from 8.16% to 9.15%.Equivalence coefficients between the CBF-PI and CBF-PI-B were above 0.85.④The factors of CBF-PI-B correlated strongly with relevant dimensions of NEO-PI-R and BFI, ranging from 0.358(A) to 0.846(C) and 0.584(A) to 0.826(N), respectively.Conclusion: CBF-PI-B has good psychometric properties, which could bo employed to relevant research.%目的:在中国大五人格问卷(CBF-PI)的基础上编制中国大五人格问卷简式版(Chinese Big Five PersonalityInventory brief version,CBF-PI-B ).方法:从CBF-PI中抽取部分条目组成测量大五人格维度的简式量表.结果:①CBF-PI-B含有40个条目,每个维度分别由8个条目测量;②简式版量表各维度具有较好的信度系数,内部一致性系数在0.764(宜人性)~0.814(神经质)之间,平均0.793;间隔10周的重测系数在0.672(宜人性)~0.811(开放性)之间,平均0.742.③简式版五因子结构较为清晰共可解释总方差变异的43.49%,各因子与完整版量表对应因子的相关均在0

  11. Minimalistic predictor of protein binding energy: contribution of solvation factor to protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeong-Mo; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Murphy, Sean; Lucarelli, Dennis; Lofranco, Leo L; Feldman, Andrew; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2015-02-17

    It has long been known that solvation plays an important role in protein-protein interactions. Here, we use a minimalistic solvation-based model for predicting protein binding energy to estimate quantitatively the contribution of the solvation factor in protein binding. The factor is described by a simple linear combination of buried surface areas according to amino-acid types. Even without structural optimization, our minimalistic model demonstrates a predictive power comparable to more complex methods, making the proposed approach the basis for high throughput applications. Application of the model to a proteomic database shows that receptor-substrate complexes involved in signaling have lower affinities than enzyme-inhibitor and antibody-antigen complexes, and they differ by chemical compositions on interfaces. Also, we found that protein complexes with components that come from the same genes generally have lower affinities than complexes formed by proteins from different genes, but in this case the difference originates from different interface areas. The model was implemented in the software PYTHON, and the source code can be found on the Shakhnovich group webpage: http://faculty.chemistry.harvard.edu/shakhnovich/software. PMID:25692584

  12. Prediction of nucleosome positioning based on transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianfu Yi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The DNA of all eukaryotic organisms is packaged into nucleosomes, the basic repeating units of chromatin. The nucleosome consists of a histone octamer around which a DNA core is wrapped and the linker histone H1, which is associated with linker DNA. By altering the accessibility of DNA sequences, the nucleosome has profound effects on all DNA-dependent processes. Understanding the factors that influence nucleosome positioning is of great importance for the study of genomic control mechanisms. Transcription factors (TFs have been suggested to play a role in nucleosome positioning in vivo. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR feature selection algorithm, the nearest neighbor algorithm (NNA, and the incremental feature selection (IFS method were used to identify the most important TFs that either favor or inhibit nucleosome positioning by analyzing the numbers of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in 53,021 nucleosomal DNA sequences and 50,299 linker DNA sequences. A total of nine important families of TFs were extracted from 35 families, and the overall prediction accuracy was 87.4% as evaluated by the jackknife cross-validation test. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with the notion that TFs are more likely to bind linker DNA sequences than the sequences in the nucleosomes. In addition, our results imply that there may be some TFs that are important for nucleosome positioning but that play an insignificant role in discriminating nucleosome-forming DNA sequences from nucleosome-inhibiting DNA sequences. The hypothesis that TFs play a role in nucleosome positioning is, thus, confirmed by the results of this study.

  13. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  14. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  15. Normal pressure hydrocephalus, (1). Pre- and post-operative r-CBF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusunoki, T.; Kose, S.; Noda, S.; Tamaki, N.; Matsumoto, S. (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Yamashita, H.

    1982-06-01

    Pre-and post-operative r-CBF was examined with the /sup 133/Xe inhalation method in 11 patients of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). In the effective shunt group consisting of 8 patients, the preoperative mean hemispheric CBF was slightly lower than normal, while depression of the r-CBF in the frontal and parietal lobes was considerable. However, in the non-effective shunt group consisting of 3 patients, the preoperative mean hemispheric CBF was significantly lower than normal, and the r-CBF in the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes was consistantly low. In the effective shunt group, about a 10% increase in the postoperative mean hemispheric CBF was noticed and the increased r-CBF was more prominent in the frontal and parietal lobes. However, the postoperative CBF did not increase in the non-effective shunt group. Improvement of symptoms did not always parallel the postoperatively increased mean hemispheric CBF. The possibility of predicting shunt effectiveness from the features of preoperative r-CBF study in NPH, the mechanism of the postoperative change in CBF, and the necessity of pathogenetic diagnosis of NPH for the evaluation of pre- and post-operative CBF study were discusses.

  16. Mutations and binding sites of human transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Kamanu, Frederick Kinyua

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in any genome may lead to phenotype characteristics that determine ability of an individual to cope with adaptation to environmental challenges. In studies of human biology, among the most interesting ones are phenotype characteristics that determine responses to drug treatments, response to infections, or predisposition to specific inherited diseases. Most of the research in this field has been focused on the studies of mutation effects on the final gene products, peptides, and their alterations. Considerably less attention was given to the mutations that may affect regulatory mechanism(s) of gene expression, although these may also affect the phenotype characteristics. In this study we make a pilot analysis of mutations observed in the regulatory regions of 24,667 human RefSeq genes. Our study reveals that out of eight studied mutation types, insertions are the only one that in a statistically significant manner alters predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs). We also find that 25 families of TFBSs have been altered by mutations in a statistically significant manner in the promoter regions we considered. Moreover, we find that the related transcription factors are, for example, prominent in processes related to intracellular signaling; cell fate; morphogenesis of organs and epithelium; development of urogenital system, epithelium, and tube; neuron fate commitment. Our study highlights the significance of studying mutations within the genes regulatory regions and opens way for further detailed investigations on this topic, particularly on the downstream affected pathways. 2012 Kamanu, Medvedeva, Schaefer, Jankovic, Archer and Bajic.

  17. Binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I in human myometrium and leiomyomata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of uterine myometrium and leiomyoma from 11 women were analyzed for the presence of epidermal growth factor receptors and insulin-like growth factor I receptors. In addition, the content of soluble insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGF-BP/PP12) was measured in the tissue cytosols. Cell membrane preparations of myoma tissue bound significantly more insulin-like growth factor I than did those of adjacent normal myometrium, whereas myoma tissue bound less epidermal growth factor than did the normal myometrium. The differences in both insulin-like growth factor I and epidermal growth factor binding were due to changes in receptor concentration rather than to alterations in receptor affinity. Neither myoma nor myometrial tissue contained detectable levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein. The changes in epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor I binding to the myometrium may play a role in the pathogenesis of uterine leiomyomata

  18. Mechanisms of in vivo binding site selection of the hematopoietic master transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thu-Hang; Minderjahn, Julia; Schmidl, Christian; Hoffmeister, Helen; Schmidhofer, Sandra; Chen, Wei; Längst, Gernot; Benner, Christopher; Rehli, Michael

    2013-07-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is crucial for the development of many hematopoietic lineages and its binding patterns significantly change during differentiation processes. However, the 'rules' for binding or not-binding of potential binding sites are only partially understood. To unveil basic characteristics of PU.1 binding site selection in different cell types, we studied the binding properties of PU.1 during human macrophage differentiation. Using in vivo and in vitro binding assays, as well as computational prediction, we show that PU.1 selects its binding sites primarily based on sequence affinity, which results in the frequent autonomous binding of high affinity sites in DNase I inaccessible regions (25-45% of all occupied sites). Increasing PU.1 concentrations and the availability of cooperative transcription factor interactions during lineage differentiation both decrease affinity thresholds for in vivo binding and fine-tune cell type-specific PU.1 binding, which seems to be largely independent of DNA methylation. Occupied sites were predominantly detected in active chromatin domains, which are characterized by higher densities of PU.1 recognition sites and neighboring motifs for cooperative transcription factors. Our study supports a model of PU.1 binding control that involves motif-binding affinity, PU.1 concentration, cooperativeness with neighboring transcription factor sites and chromatin domain accessibility, which likely applies to all PU.1 expressing cells.

  19. ADAM 12, a disintegrin metalloprotease, interacts with insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Z; Xu, Wei; Loechel, F;

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 binds the insulin-like growth factors with high affinity and modulates their actions. Proteolytic cleavage of IGFBP-3 may regulate insulin-like growth factor bioavailability. IGFBP-3 is extensively degraded in serum during pregnancy; however, a...

  20. MORPHEUS, a webtool for transcription factor binding analysis using position weight matrices with dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenio Gómez Minguet; Stéphane Segard; Céline Charavay; François Parcy

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use ...

  1. Evolutionary computation for discovery of composite transcription factor binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Gary B.; Porto, V. William; Varga, Gabor; Dow, Ernst R.; Craven, Andrew M.; Powers, David M.; Harlow, Harry B.; Su, Eric W.; Onyia, Jude E.; Su, Chen

    2008-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated the use of evolutionary computation for the discovery of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in promoter regions upstream of coexpressed genes. However, it remained unclear whether or not composite TFBS elements, commonly found in higher organisms where two or more TFBSs form functional complexes, could also be identified by using this approach. Here, we present an important refinement of our previous algorithm and test the identification of composite elements using NFAT/AP-1 as an example. We demonstrate that by using appropriate existing parameters such as window size, novel-scoring methods such as central bonusing and methods of self-adaptation to automatically adjust the variation operators during the evolutionary search, TFBSs of different sizes and complexity can be identified as top solutions. Some of these solutions have known experimental relationships with NFAT/AP-1. We also indicate that even after properly tuning the model parameters, the choice of the appropriate window size has a significant effect on algorithm performance. We believe that this improved algorithm will greatly augment TFBS discovery. PMID:18927103

  2. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  3. Dasatinib in high-risk core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a French Acute Myeloid Leukemia Intergroup trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boissel, Nicolas; Renneville, Aline; Leguay, Thibaut; Lefebvre, Pascale Cornillet; Recher, Christian; Lecerf, Thibaud; Delabesse, Eric; Berthon, Céline; Blanchet, Odile; Prebet, Thomas; Pautas, Cécile; Chevallier, Patrice; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Girault, Stéphane; Bonmati, Caroline; Guièze, Romain; Himberlin, Chantal; Randriamalala, Edouard; Preudhomme, Claude; Jourdan, Eric; Dombret, Hervé; Ifrah, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia is a favorable acute myeloid leukemia subset cytogenetically defined by t(8;21) or inv(16)/t(16;16) rearrangements, disrupting RUNX1 (previously CBFA/AML1) or CBFB transcription factor functions. The receptor tyrosine kinase KIT is expressed in the vast majority of these acute myeloid leukemias and frequent activating KIT gene mutations have been associated with a higher risk of relapse. This phase II study aimed to evaluate dasatinib as maintenance therapy in patients with core-binding factor acute myeloid leukemia in first hematologic complete remission, but at higher risk of relapse due to molecular disease persistence or recurrence. A total of 26 patients aged 18–60 years old previously included in the CBF-2006 trial were eligible to receive dasatinib 140 mg daily if they had a poor initial molecular response (n=18) or a molecular recurrence (n=8). The tolerance of dasatinib as maintenance therapy was satisfactory. The 2-year disease-free survival in this high-risk population of patients was 25.7%. All but one patient with molecular recurrence presented subsequent hematologic relapse. Patients with slow initial molecular response had a similar disease-free survival when treated with dasatinib (40.2% at 2 years) or without any maintenance (50.0% at 2 years). The disappearance of KIT gene mutations at relapse suggests that clonal devolution may in part explain the absence of efficacy observed with single-agent dasatinib in these patients (n. EudraCT: 2006-006555-12). PMID:25715404

  4. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    OpenAIRE

    Quader Saad; Huang Chun-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC) and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this pape...

  5. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [11C]BF-227 PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [11C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [11C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  6. In vivo detection of prion amyloid plaques using [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Nobuyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Shiga, Yusei; Itoyama, Yasuhito [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Sendai (Japan); Furumoto, Shozo [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology, Sendai (Japan); Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tashiro, Manabu [Tohoku University, Division of Cyclotron Nuclear Medicine, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Tsuboi, Yoshio [Fukuoka University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Fukuoka (Japan); Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Arai, Hiroyuki [Institute of Development, Aging, and Cancer, Tohoku University, Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Division of Brain Sciences, Sendai (Japan); Iwata, Ren [Tohoku University, Division of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Sendai (Japan); Kudo, Yukitsuka [Tohoku University, Innovation of New Biomedical Engineering Center, Sendai (Japan); Doh-ura, Katsumi [Tohoku University School of Medicine, Department of Prion Research, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2010-05-15

    In vivo detection of pathological prion protein (PrP) in the brain is potentially useful for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). However, there are no non-invasive ante-mortem means for detection of pathological PrP deposition in the brain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the amyloid imaging tracer BF-227 with positron emission tomography (PET) for the non-invasive detection of PrP amyloid in the brain. The binding ability of BF-227 to PrP amyloid was investigated using autoradiography and fluorescence microscopy. Five patients with TSEs, including three patients with Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS) and two patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), underwent [{sup 11}C]BF-227 PET scans. Results were compared with data from 10 normal controls and 17 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The regional to pons standardized uptake value ratio was calculated as an index of BF-227 retention. Binding of BF-227 to PrP plaques was confirmed using brain samples from autopsy-confirmed GSS cases. In clinical PET study, significantly higher retention of BF-227 was detected in the cerebellum, thalamus and lateral temporal cortex of GSS patients compared to that in the corresponding tissues of normal controls. GSS patients also showed higher retention of BF-227 in the cerebellum, thalamus and medial temporal cortex compared to AD patients. In contrast, the two CJD patients showed no obvious retention of BF-227 in the brain. Although [{sup 11}C]BF-227 is a non-specific imaging marker of cerebral amyloidosis, it is useful for in vivo detection of PrP plaques in the human brain in GSS, based on the regional distribution of the tracer. PET amyloid imaging might provide a means for both early diagnosis and non-invasive disease monitoring of certain forms of TSEs. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of algorithms for inferring positional weight matrix motifs of transcription factor binding sites using protein binding microarray data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaron Orenstein

    Full Text Available The new technology of protein binding microarrays (PBMs allows simultaneous measurement of the binding intensities of a transcription factor to tens of thousands of synthetic double-stranded DNA probes, covering all possible 10-mers. A key computational challenge is inferring the binding motif from these data. We present a systematic comparison of four methods developed specifically for reconstructing a binding site motif represented as a positional weight matrix from PBM data. The reconstructed motifs were evaluated in terms of three criteria: concordance with reference motifs from the literature and ability to predict in vivo and in vitro bindings. The evaluation encompassed over 200 transcription factors and some 300 assays. The results show a tradeoff between how the methods perform according to the different criteria, and a dichotomy of method types. Algorithms that construct motifs with low information content predict PBM probe ranking more faithfully, while methods that produce highly informative motifs match reference motifs better. Interestingly, in predicting high-affinity binding, all methods give far poorer results for in vivo assays compared to in vitro assays.

  8. Genome-scale study of the importance of binding site context for transcription factor binding and gene regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronne Hans

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of mRNA transcription is controlled by transcription factors that bind to specific DNA motifs in promoter regions upstream of protein coding genes. Recent results indicate that not only the presence of a motif but also motif context (for example the orientation of a motif or its location relative to the coding sequence is important for gene regulation. Results In this study we present ContextFinder, a tool that is specifically aimed at identifying cases where motif context is likely to affect gene regulation. We used ContextFinder to examine the role of motif context in S. cerevisiae both for DNA binding by transcription factors and for effects on gene expression. For DNA binding we found significant patterns of motif location bias, whereas motif orientations did not seem to matter. Motif context appears to affect gene expression even more than it affects DNA binding, as biases in both motif location and orientation were more frequent in promoters of co-expressed genes. We validated our results against data on nucleosome positioning, and found a negative correlation between preferred motif locations and nucleosome occupancy. Conclusion We conclude that the requirement for stable binding of transcription factors to DNA and their subsequent function in gene regulation can impose constraints on motif context.

  9. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  10. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    CERN Document Server

    Clifford, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through Position Weight Matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain a...

  11. Platelet binding sites for factor VIII in relation to fibrin and phosphatidylserine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gary E; Novakovic, Valerie A; Shi, Jialan; Rasmussen, Jan; Pipe, Steven W

    2015-09-01

    Thrombin-stimulated platelets expose very little phosphatidylserine (PS) but express binding sites for factor VIII (fVIII), casting doubt on the role of exposed PS as the determinant of binding sites. We previously reported that fVIII binding sites are increased three- to sixfold when soluble fibrin (SF) binds the αIIbβ3 integrin. This study focuses on the hypothesis that platelet-bound SF is the major source of fVIII binding sites. Less than 10% of fVIII was displaced from thrombin-stimulated platelets by lactadherin, a PS-binding protein, and an fVIII mutant defective in PS-dependent binding retained platelet affinity. Therefore, PS is not the determinant of most binding sites. FVIII bound immobilized SF and paralleled platelet binding in affinity, dependence on separation from von Willebrand factor, and mediation by the C2 domain. SF also enhanced activity of fVIII in the factor Xase complex by two- to fourfold. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) ESH8, against the fVIII C2 domain, inhibited binding of fVIII to SF and platelets but not to PS-containing vesicles. Similarly, mAb ESH4 against the C2 domain, inhibited >90% of platelet-dependent fVIII activity vs 35% of vesicle-supported activity. These results imply that platelet-bound SF is a component of functional fVIII binding sites. PMID:26162408

  12. A biophysical model for analysis of transcription factor interaction and binding site arrangement from genome-wide binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: How transcription factors (TFs interact with cis-regulatory sequences and interact with each other is a fundamental, but not well understood, aspect of gene regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a computational method to address this question, relying on the established biophysical principles. This method, STAP (sequence to affinity prediction, takes into account all combinations and configurations of strong and weak binding sites to analyze large scale transcription factor (TF-DNA binding data to discover cooperative interactions among TFs, infer sequence rules of interaction and predict TF target genes in new conditions with no TF-DNA binding data. The distinctions between STAP and other statistical approaches for analyzing cis-regulatory sequences include the utility of physical principles and the treatment of the DNA binding data as quantitative representation of binding strengths. Applying this method to the ChIP-seq data of 12 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, we found that the strength of TF-DNA binding could be significantly modulated by cooperative interactions among TFs with adjacent binding sites. However, further analysis on five putatively interacting TF pairs suggests that such interactions may be relatively insensitive to the distance and orientation of binding sites. Testing a set of putative Nanog motifs, STAP showed that a novel Nanog motif could better explain the ChIP-seq data than previously published ones. We then experimentally tested and verified the new Nanog motif. A series of comparisons showed that STAP has more predictive power than several state-of-the-art methods for cis-regulatory sequence analysis. We took advantage of this power to study the evolution of TF-target relationship in Drosophila. By learning the TF-DNA interaction models from the ChIP-chip data of D. melanogaster (Mel and applying them to the genome of D. pseudoobscura (Pse, we found that only about half of the

  13. Comparative evaluation of different methods for calculation of cerebral blood flow (CBF) in nonanesthetized rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by the extracranial detection of the radioactivity of 133Xe injected into an internal carotid artery has proved to be of considerable value for the investigation of cerebral circulation in conscious rabbits. Methods are described for calculating CBF from the curves of clearance of 133Xe, and include exponential analysis (two-component model), initial slope, and stochastic method. The different methods of curve analysis were compared in order to evaluate the fitness with the theoretical model. The initial slope and stochastic methods, compared with the biexponential model, underestimate the CBF by 35% and 46% respectively. Furthermore, the validity of recording the clearance curve for 10 min was tested by comparing these CBF values with those obtained from the whole curve. CBF values calculated with the shortened procedure are overestimated by 17%. A correlation exists between the ''10 min'' CBF values and the CBF calculated from the whole curve; in spite of that, the values are not accurate for limited animal populations or for single animals. The extent of the two main compartments into which the CBF is divided was also measured. There is no correlation between CBF values and the extent of the relative compartment. This fact suggests that these two parameters correspond to different biological entities

  14. Tenascin C promiscuously binds growth factors via its fifth fibronectin type III-like domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Laporte

    Full Text Available Tenascin C (TNC is an extracellular matrix protein that is upregulated during development as well as tissue remodeling. TNC is comprised of multiple independent folding domains, including 15 fibronectin type III-like (TNCIII domains. The fifth TNCIII domain (TNCIII5 has previously been shown to bind heparin. Our group has shown that the heparin-binding fibronectin type III domains of fibronectin (FNIII, specifically FNIII12-14, possess affinity towards a large number of growth factors. Here, we show that TNCIII5 binds growth factors promiscuously and with high affinity. We produced recombinant fragments of TNC representing the first five TNCIII repeats (TNCIII1-5, as well as subdomains, including TNCIII5, to study interactions with various growth factors. Multiple growth factors of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF family, the fibroblast growth factor (FGF family, the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β superfamily, the insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGF-BPs, and neurotrophins were found to bind with high affinity to this region of TNC, specifically to TNCIII5. Surface plasmon resonance was performed to analyze the kinetics of binding of TNCIII1-5 with TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, NT-3, and FGF-2. The promiscuous yet high affinity of TNC for a wide array of growth factors, mediated mainly by TNCIII5, may play a role in multiple physiological and pathological processes involving TNC.

  15. Competitive binding of transcription factors drives Mendelian dominance in regulatory genetic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, Adam H.; Johnson, Norman A.; Tulchinsky, Alexander Y.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new mechanism for allelic dominance in regulatory genetic interactions that we call binding dominance. We investigated a biophysical model of gene regulation, where the fractional occupancy of a transcription factor (TF) on the cis-regulated promoter site it binds to is determined by binding energy (-{\\Delta}G) and TF concentration. Transcription and gene expression proceed when the TF is bound to the promoter. In diploids, individuals may be heterozygous at the cis-site, at the T...

  16. Insulin-like growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 protease, and growth hormone-binding protein in lipodystrophic human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Steen B; Andersen, Ove; Hansen, Birgitte Rønde;

    2004-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-lipodystrophy is associated with impaired growth hormone (GH) secretion. It remains to be elucidated whether insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), IGFBP-3 protease, and GH-binding protein (GHBP) are abnormal in HIV-lipodystrophy....... These parameters were measured in overnight fasting serum samples from 16 Caucasian males with HIV-lipodystrophy (LIPO) and 15 Caucasian HIV-infected males without lipodystrophy (NONLIPO) matched for age, weight, duration of HIV infection, and antiretroviral therapy. In LIPO, abdominal fat mass and insulin...... of bioactive IGF-I in HIV-lipodystrophy....

  17. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-09-02

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  18. Functional comparison of the binding of factor H short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6) to factor H binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis and the binding of factor H SCR 18 to 20 to Neisseria gonorrhoeae porin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Lewis, Lisa A; Jarva, Hanna; Ram, Sanjay

    2009-05-01

    Both Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae recruit the alternative pathway complement inhibitory protein factor H (fH) to their surfaces to evade complement-dependent killing. Meningococci bind fH via fH binding protein (fHbp), a surface-exposed lipoprotein that is subdivided into three variant families based on one classification scheme. Chimeric proteins that comprise contiguous domains of fH fused to murine Fc were used to localize the binding site for all three fHbp variants on fH to short consensus repeat 6 (SCR 6). As expected, fH-like protein 1 (FHL-1), which contains fH SCR 6, also bound to fHbp-expressing meningococci. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified histidine 337 and histidine 371 in SCR 6 as important for binding to fHbp. These findings may provide the molecular basis for recent observations that demonstrated human-specific fH binding to meningococci. Differences in the interactions of fHbp variants with SCR 6 were evident. Gonococci bind fH via their porin (Por) molecules (PorB.1A or PorB.1B); sialylation of lipooligosaccharide enhances fH binding. Both sialylated PorB.1B- and (unsialylated) PorB.1A-bearing gonococci bind fH through SCR 18 to 20; PorB.1A can also bind SCR 6, but only weakly, as evidenced by a low level of binding of FHL-1 relative to that of fH. Using isogenic strains expressing either meningococcal fHbp or gonococcal PorB.1B, we discovered that strains expressing gonococcal PorB.1B in the presence of sialylated lipooligosaccharide bound more fH, more effectively limited C3 deposition, and were more serum resistant than their isogenic counterparts expressing fHbp. Differences in fH binding to these two related pathogens may be important for modulating their individual responses to host immune attack.

  19. CRITERIA FOR AN UPDATED CLASSIFICATION OF HUMAN TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR DNA-BINDING DOMAINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wingender, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    By binding to cis-regulatory elements in a sequence-specific manner, transcription factors regulate the activity of nearby genes. Here, we discuss the criteria for a comprehensive classification of human TFs based on their DNA-binding domains. In particular, classification of basic leucine zipper (b

  20. DNA-binding specificity and molecular functions of NAC transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi Asschenfeldt; Lo Leggio, Leila;

    2005-01-01

    The family of NAC (NAM/ATAF1,2/CUC2) transcription factors has been implicated in a wide range of plant processes, but knowledge on the DNA-binding properties of the family is limited. Using a reiterative selection procedure on random oligonucleotides, we have identified consensus binding sites...

  1. Inter-species chimeras of leukaemia inhibitory factor define a major human receptor-binding determinant.

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarek, C M; Layton, M. J.; Metcalf, D; Lock, P; Willson, T A; Gough, N M; Nicola, N A

    1993-01-01

    Human leukaemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) binds to both human and mouse LIF receptors (LIF-R), while mouse LIF (mLIF) binds only to mouse LIF-R. Moreover, hLIF binds with higher affinity to the mLIF-R than does mLIF. In order to define the regions of the hLIF molecule responsible for species-specific interaction with the hLIF-R and for the unusual high-affinity binding to the mLIF-R, a series of 15 mouse/human LIF hybrids has been generated. Perhaps surprisingly, both of these properties mappe...

  2. Evolving Transcription Factor Binding Site Models From Protein Binding Microarray Data

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2016-02-02

    Protein binding microarray (PBM) is a high-throughput platform that can measure the DNA binding preference of a protein in a comprehensive and unbiased manner. In this paper, we describe the PBM motif model building problem. We apply several evolutionary computation methods and compare their performance with the interior point method, demonstrating their performance advantages. In addition, given the PBM domain knowledge, we propose and describe a novel method called kmerGA which makes domain-specific assumptions to exploit PBM data properties to build more accurate models than the other models built. The effectiveness and robustness of kmerGA is supported by comprehensive performance benchmarking on more than 200 datasets, time complexity analysis, convergence analysis, parameter analysis, and case studies. To demonstrate its utility further, kmerGA is applied to two real world applications: 1) PBM rotation testing and 2) ChIP-Seq peak sequence prediction. The results support the biological relevance of the models learned by kmerGA, and thus its real world applicability.

  3. CONREAL web server : identification and visualization of conserved transcription factor binding sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berezikov, Eugene; Guryev, Victor; Cuppen, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    The use of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic footprinting approaches have become popular for the recognition of conserved and potentially functional sequences. Several algorithms have been developed for the identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), which are charac

  4. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  5. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcri...

  6. [Xenon CT CBF mapping derived from two minutes inhalation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshima, R; Toyohara, K; Ebisawa, T; Ishikawa, K; Karashima, H; Shimojo, S; Miyahara, T

    1988-04-01

    Although xenon enhanced CT method for local cerebral blood flow measurement has been brought into a clinical practice, the technique has inherent limitations including anesthetic effects and expensive cost of xenon by a large consumption. To overcome these problems a modified method with a short-duration inhalation was developed and its validity was attested. Siemens Somatom SF with a resolution of 256 X 256 pixels and a scan time of 10 seconds was used. The subjects inhaled 50% Xe/O2 gas mixture from an apparatus consisted of Douglas bag and an open circuit. Xenon concentration in the expired gas was continuously monitored and estimated for arterial blood concentration by using a hematocrit correction. PaCO2 was monitored throughout the study. At the starting point and the endpoint of the inhalation two scans were performed respectively. Thus obtained four images were processed for CT noise cancellation, summation and subtraction to produce an in vivo autoradiography image. Local CBF was calculated from equations derived from the autoradiographic technique with a fixed partition coefficient of lambda = 1. Computer simulation studies were performed to find the optimal scan point to obtain an autoradiographic image and to estimate the calculation errors of this method. One minute and forty-five seconds was found to be the optimal scan point to gain an autoradiographic image in view of a balance between linearity of CBF/enhancement curve and total amount of tissue enhancement. The theoretical errors due to the assumption for a fixed partition coefficient were calculated to be 8% underestimation for gray matter and 5% overestimation for white matter.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3401410

  7. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, E. S.; Akopov, S. B.; Didych, D. A.; Petrova, N. V.; Iarovaia, O. V.; Razin, S. V.; Nikolaev, L. G.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently – in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  8. Binding of Protein Factor CTCF within Chicken Genome Alpha-Globin Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, E S; Akopov, S B; Didych, D A; Petrova, N V; Iarovaia, O V; Razin, S V; Nikolaev, L G

    2016-01-01

    A systematic search for DNA fragments containing potential CTCF transcription factor binding sites in the chicken alpha-globin domain and its flanking regions was performed by means of the two-dimension electrophoretic mobility shift assay. For the alpha-globin domain fragments selected, the occupancy by the CTCF in erythroid and lymphoid chicken cells was tested by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Only one of 13 DNA fragments capable of CTCF binding in vitro was efficiently bound to this protein in vivo in erythroid cells, and somewhat less efficiently - in lymphoid cells. So, binding of CTCF to the DNA fragment in vitro in most cases does not mean that this fragment will be occupied by CTCF in the cell nucleus. Yet, CTCF binding in vivo, as a rule, is accompanied by the binding of the protein to this DNA region in vitro. During the erythroid differentiation, no significant changes in CTCF binding to the DNA fragments studied were detected. PMID:27099788

  9. Structural Basis for Negative Cooperativity in Growth Factor Binding to an EGF Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarado, Diego; Klein, Daryl E.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2010-09-27

    Transmembrane signaling by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) involves ligand-induced dimerization and allosteric regulation of the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. Crystallographic studies have shown how ligand binding induces dimerization of the EGFR extracellular region but cannot explain the high-affinity and low-affinity classes of cell-surface EGF-binding sites inferred from curved Scatchard plots. From a series of crystal structures of the Drosophila EGFR extracellular region, we show here how Scatchard plot curvature arises from negatively cooperative ligand binding. The first ligand-binding event induces formation of an asymmetric dimer with only one bound ligand. The unoccupied site in this dimer is structurally restrained, leading to reduced affinity for binding of the second ligand, and thus negative cooperativity. Our results explain the cell-surface binding characteristics of EGF receptors and suggest how individual EGFR ligands might stabilize distinct dimeric species with different signaling properties.

  10. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  11. Alpha-contingent EEG feedback reduces SPECT rCBF variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, Thomas; Steinberg, Bruce; Mulholland, Thomas;

    2005-01-01

    EEG feedback methods, which link the occurrence of alpha to the presentation of repeated visual stimuli, reduce the relative variability of subsequent, alpha-blocking event durations. The temporal association between electro-cortical field activation and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) led us...... to investigate whether the reduced variability of alpha-blocking durations with feedback is associated with a reduction in rCBF variability. Reduced variability in the rCBF response domain under EEG feedback control might have methodological implications for future brain-imaging studies. Visual stimuli were...... to quantify the variance-reducing effects of ACS across multiple, distributed areas of the brain. Both EEG and rCBF measures demonstrated decreased variability under ACS. This improved control was seen for localized as well as anatomically distributed rCBF measures....

  12. Assessment of cerebral blood flow autoregulation (CBF AR) with rheoencephalography (REG): studies in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of cerebral vasculature to regulate cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the face of changes in arterial blood pressure (SAP) or intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important guard against secondary ischemia in acute brain injuries, and official guidelines recommend that therapeutic decisions be guided by continuous monitoring of CBF autoregulation (AR). The common method for CBF AR monitoring, which rests on real-time derivation of the correlation coefficient (PRx) between slow oscillations in SAP and ICP is, however, rarely used in clinical practice because it requires invasive ICP measurements. This study investigated whether the correlation coefficient between SAP and the pulsatile component of the non-invasive transcranial bioimpedance signal (rheoencephalography, REG) could be used to assess the state and lower limit of CBF AR. The results from pigs and rhesus macaques affirm the utility of REG; however, additional animal and clinical studies are warranted to assess selectivity of automatic REG-based evaluation of CBF AR.

  13. Assessment of cerebral blood flow autoregulation (CBF AR) with rheoencephalography (REG): studies in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovic, Djordje; Bodo, Michael; Pearce, Frederick; van Albert, Stephen; Garcia, Alison; Settle, Tim; Armonda, Rocco

    2013-04-01

    The ability of cerebral vasculature to regulate cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the face of changes in arterial blood pressure (SAP) or intracranial pressure (ICP) is an important guard against secondary ischemia in acute brain injuries, and official guidelines recommend that therapeutic decisions be guided by continuous monitoring of CBF autoregulation (AR). The common method for CBF AR monitoring, which rests on real-time derivation of the correlation coefficient (PRx) between slow oscillations in SAP and ICP is, however, rarely used in clinical practice because it requires invasive ICP measurements. This study investigated whether the correlation coefficient between SAP and the pulsatile component of the non-invasive transcranial bioimpedance signal (rheoencephalography, REG) could be used to assess the state and lower limit of CBF AR. The results from pigs and rhesus macaques affirm the utility of REG; however, additional animal and clinical studies are warranted to assess selectivity of automatic REG-based evaluation of CBF AR.

  14. DNA methylation changes are a late event in acute promyelocytic leukemia and coincide with loss of transcription factor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoofs, Till; Rohde, Christian; Hebestreit, Katja;

    2013-01-01

    . Transcription factor-binding sites (eg, the c-myc-binding sites) were associated with low methylation. However, SUZ12- and REST-binding sites identified in embryonic stem cells were preferentially DNA hypermethylated in APL cells. Unexpectedly, PML-RARα-binding sites were also protected from aberrant DNA...

  15. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Regulates Aberrant Expression of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 3

    OpenAIRE

    TAKAOKA, MUNENORI; Harada, Hideki; Andl, Claudia D; Oyama, Kenji; Naomoto, Yoshio; Dempsey, Kelly L.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; El-Deiry, Wafik S; GRIMBERG, ADDA; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in esophageal carcinoma and its precursor lesions. To gain insights into how EGFR overexpression affects cellular functions in primary human esophageal cells, we performed gene expression profiling and identified insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 as the most up-regulated gene. IGFBP-3 regulates cell proliferation through both insulin-like growth factor-dependent and independent mechanisms. We found that IGF...

  16. DNA-MATRIX: a tool for constructing transcription factor binding sites Weight matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Prakash Singh,

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite considerable effort to date, DNA transcription factor binding sites prediction in whole genome remains a challenge for the researchers. Currently the genome wide transcription factor binding sites prediction tools required either direct pattern sequence or weight matrix. Although there are known transcription factor binding sites pattern databases and tools for genome level prediction but no tool for weight matrix construction. Considering this, we developed a DNA-MATRIX tool for searching putative transcription factor binding sites in genomic sequences. DNA-MATRIX uses the simple heuristic approach for weight matrix construction, which can be transformed into different formats as per the requirement of researcher’s for further genome wide prediction and therefore provides the possibility to identify the conserved known DNA binding sites in the coregulated genes and also to search for a great variety of different regulatory binding patterns. The user may construct and save specific weight or frequency matrices in different formats derived through user selected set of known motif sequences.

  17. Actinomycin D specifically inhibits the interaction between transcription factor Sp1 and its binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, M; Gniazdowski, M

    1998-01-01

    The mode of action of many anticancer drugs involves DNA interactions. We here examine the ability of actinomycin D to alter the specific binding of transcription factors Spl and NFkappaB to their DNA sequences. Employing an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, it is shown that actinomycin D inhibits complex formation between nuclear proteins present in the extracts from stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the Sp1-binding site. Actinomycin D is also able to induce disruption of preformed DNA-protein complexes, pointing to the importance of an equilibrium of three components: actinomycin D, protein and DNA for drug action. The effect of actinomycin D is sequence-specific, since no inhibition is observed for interaction of nuclear proteins with the NFkappaB binding site. The results support the view that DNA-binding drugs displaying high sequence-selectivity can exhibit distinct effects on the interaction between DNA and different DNA-binding proteins. PMID:9701497

  18. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  19. TINY, a DREB-Like Transcription Factor Binding to DRE Element

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹志方; 陈峰; 李洁; 李一勤; 周海梦; 张贵友; 刘强

    2001-01-01

    TINY isolated through a transposon-mutagenesis experiment designed to recover dominant gain-of-function alleles in Arabidopsis encodes a protein containing a putative DNA-binding domain which is conserved in AP2/EREBP transcription factors of plants. AP2/EREBP transcription factors play a variety of regulatory roles in several developmental processes and in response to biotic and environmental stresses. Using the yeast one-hybrid analysis system, we demonstrated that TINY could function as a DREB-like transcription factor specifically binding to the dehydration-responsive element (DRE) cis-acting element.

  20. Epidermal transformation leads to increased perlecan synthesis with heparin-binding-growth-factor affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tapanadechopone, P; Tumova, S; Jiang, X;

    2001-01-01

    . Despite this, the heparan sulphate of RT101- and JB6-derived perlecan bound fibroblast growth factor-1, -2, -4 and -7 and heparin-binding epidermal growth factor with similar affinity. Therefore abundant tumour-derived perlecan may support the angiogenic responses seen in vivo and be a key player...

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed...

  2. Insulin-like growth factors and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in mammary gland function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-mediated proliferation and survival are essential for normal development in the mammary gland during puberty and pregnancy. IGFs interact with IGF-binding proteins and regulate their function. The present review focuses on the role of IGFs and IGF-binding proteins in the mammary gland and describes how modulation of their actions occurs by association with hormones, other growth factors and the extracellular matrix. The review will also highlight the involvement of the IGF axis in breast cancer

  3. tRNA binding properties of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 from Encephalitozoon cuniculi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveau, Marie; Lazennec-Schurdevin, Christine; Panvert, Michel; Mechulam, Yves; Schmitt, Emmanuelle

    2010-10-12

    A critical consequence of the initiation of translation is the setting of the reading frame for mRNA decoding. In eukaryotic and archaeal cells, heterotrimeric initiation factor e/aIF2, in its GTP form, specifically binds Met-tRNA(i)(Met) throughout the translation initiation process. After start codon recognition, the factor, in its GDP-bound form, loses affinity for Met-tRNA(i)(Met) and eventually dissociates from the initiation complex. The role of each aIF2 subunit in tRNA binding has been extensively studied in archaeal systems. The isolated archaeal γ subunit is able to bind tRNA, but the α subunit is required for strong binding. Until now, difficulties during purification have hampered the study of the role of each of the three subunits of eukaryotic eIF2 in specific binding of the initiator tRNA. Here, we have produced the three subunits of eIF2 from Encephalitozoon cuniculi, isolated or assembled into heterodimers or into the full heterotrimer. Using assays following protection of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) against deacylation, we show that the eukaryotic γ subunit is able to bind by itself the initiator tRNA. However, the two peripheral α and β subunits are required for strong binding and contribute equally to tRNA binding affinity. The core domains of α and β probably act indirectly by stabilizing the tRNA binding site on the γ subunit. These results, together with those previously obtained with archaeal aIF2 and yeast eIF2, show species-specific distributions of the roles of the peripheral subunits of e/aIF2 in tRNA binding. PMID:20822097

  4. Pigment epithelium-derived factor binds to cell-surface F(1)-ATP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notari, Luigi; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S P

    2010-05-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to an as yet unknown protein on the surfaces of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a approximately 60 kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina with Bos taurus F(1)-ATP synthase beta-subunit, and that F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding of PEDF to F(1). Size-exclusion ultrafiltration assays showed that recombinant human PEDF formed a complex with recombinant yeast F(1). Real-time binding as determined by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that yeast F(1) interacted specifically and reversibly with human PEDF. Kinetic evaluations revealed high binding affinity for PEDF, in agreement with PEDF affinities for endothelial cell surfaces. PEDF blocked interactions between F(1) and angiostatin, another antiangiogenic factor, suggesting overlapping PEDF-binding and angiostatin-binding sites on F(1). Surfaces of endothelial cells exhibited affinity for PEDF-binding proteins of approximately 60 kDa. Antibodies to F(1)beta-subunit specifically captured PEDF-binding components in endothelial plasma membranes. The extracellular ATP synthesis activity of endothelial cells was examined in the presence of PEDF. PEDF significantly reduced the amount of extracellular ATP produced by endothelial cells, in agreement with direct interactions between cell-surface ATP synthase and PEDF. In addition to demonstrating that PEDF binds to cell-surface F(1), these results show that PEDF is a ligand for endothelial cell-surface F(1)F(o)-ATP synthase. They suggest that PEDF-mediated inhibition of ATP synthase may form part of the biochemical mechanisms by which PEDF exerts its antiangiogenic activity. PMID:20412062

  5. Competitive binding of viral E2 protein and mammalian core-binding factor to transcriptional control sequences of human papillomavirus type 8 and bovine papillomavirus type 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, H. M.; Steger, G; Pfister, H

    1997-01-01

    The promoter P7535 of human papillomavirus type 8 and the promoter P7185 of bovine papillomavirus type 1 are negatively regulated by viral E2 proteins via the promoter proximal binding sites P2 and BS1, respectively. Mutations of these E2 binding sites can reduce basal promoter activity. This suggests binding of a transcription-stimulating factor and may indicate that repression by E2 is due to competitive binding of viral and cellular proteins. A computer search revealed putative binding sit...

  6. Effects of Heat Stress on Yeast Heat Shock Factor-Promoter Binding In Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning LI; Le-Min ZHANG; Ke-Qin ZHANG; Jing-Shi DENG; Ralf PR(A)NDL; Fritz SCH(O)FFL

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor-DNA interaction is critical for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced gene expression in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor (HSF) to the promoters of target genes ScSSA1, ScSSA4, HSP30 and HSP104, using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Previous work suggested that yeast HSF is constitutively bound to DNA at all temperatures. Expression of HSF target genes is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. However, our results indicated that HSF does not bind to the promoters of ScSSA4 and HSP30 at normal temperature (23 ℃). Binding to these promoters is rapidly induced by heat stress at 39 ℃. HSF binds to ScSSA1 and HSP104 promoters under non-stress conditions, but at a low level. Heat stress rapidly leads to a notable increase in the binding of HSF to these two genes. The kinetics of the level of HSF-promoter binding correlate well with the expression of target genes, suggesting that the expression of HSF target genes is at least partially the result of HSF-promoter binding stability and subsequent transcription stimulation.

  7. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    OpenAIRE

    Minli Xu; Zhengchang Su

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between ...

  8. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in glucose and lipid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ho-Seong

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 has roles in modulating the effect of IGFs by binding to IGFs and inhibiting cell proliferation in an IGF-independent manner. Although recent studies have been reported that IGFBP-3 has also roles in metabolic regulation, their exact roles in adipose tissue are poorly understood. In this review, we summarized the studies about the biological roles in glucose and lipid metabolism. IGFBP-3 overexpression in transgenic mice suggested that IGFB...

  9. Pigment Epithelium-derived Factor (PEDF) Binds to Cell-surface F1-ATP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    NOTARI, LUIGI; Arakaki, Naokatu; Mueller, David; Meier, Scott; Amaral, Juan; Becerra, S. Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a potent blocker of angiogenesis in vivo, and of endothelial cell migration and tubule formation, binds with high affinity to a yet unknown protein on the surface of endothelial cells. Given that protein fingerprinting suggested a match of a ~60-kDa PEDF-binding protein in bovine retina to Bos taurus F1-ATP synthase β-subunit, and that F1F0-ATP synthase components have been identified recently as cell-surface receptors, we examined the direct binding ...

  10. Klonierung, Sequenzierung und Charakterisierung der genetischen Determinante des CAMP-Faktors (=cbf-Gen) der Gruppe-B-Streptokokken (Streptococcus agalactiae)

    OpenAIRE

    Blankenstein, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    The CAMP reaction, a synergistic lysis of sheep erythrocytes by Staphylococcus aureus (beta-toxin) and group B streptococci (Streptococcus agalactiae) was first described in 1944 by Christie et al.. This phenomenon is caused by the CAMP-factor, an extra-cellular protein which role pathogenicity and virulence is still unknown. The focus of this work is the molecular isolation and characterization of the CAMP-factor gene of group B streptococci (cbf-Gene). First cloning attempts were made using...

  11. Spatial distribution of predicted transcription factor binding sites in Drosophila ChIP peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettie, Kade P; Dresch, Jacqueline M; Drewell, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    In the development of the Drosophila embryo, gene expression is directed by the sequence-specific interactions of a large network of protein transcription factors (TFs) and DNA cis-regulatory binding sites. Once the identity of the typically 8-10bp binding sites for any given TF has been determined by one of several experimental procedures, the sequences can be represented in a position weight matrix (PWM) and used to predict the location of additional TF binding sites elsewhere in the genome. Often, alignments of large (>200bp) genomic fragments that have been experimentally determined to bind the TF of interest in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies are trimmed under the assumption that the majority of the binding sites are located near the center of all the aligned fragments. In this study, ChIP/chip datasets are analyzed using the corresponding PWMs for the well-studied TFs; CAUDAL, HUNCHBACK, KNIRPS and KRUPPEL, to determine the distribution of predicted binding sites. All four TFs are critical regulators of gene expression along the anterio-posterior axis in early Drosophila development. For all four TFs, the ChIP peaks contain multiple binding sites that are broadly distributed across the genomic region represented by the peak, regardless of the prediction stringency criteria used. This result suggests that ChIP peak trimming may exclude functional binding sites from subsequent analyses.

  12. A Human Mitochondrial Transcription Factor Is Related to RNA Adenine Methyltransferases and Binds S-Adenosylmethionine

    OpenAIRE

    McCulloch, Vicki; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie L.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2002-01-01

    A critical step toward understanding mitochondrial genetics and its impact on human disease is to identify and characterize the full complement of nucleus-encoded factors required for mitochondrial gene expression and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. Two factors required for transcription initiation from a human mitochondrial promoter are h-mtRNA polymerase and the DNA binding transcription factor, h-mtTFA. However, based on studies in model systems, the existence of a second human mito...

  13. Cell-type specificity of ChIP-predicted transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håndstad Tony

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Context-dependent transcription factor (TF binding is one reason for differences in gene expression patterns between different cellular states. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identifies genome-wide TF binding sites for one particular context—the cells used in the experiment. But can such ChIP-seq data predict TF binding in other cellular contexts and is it possible to distinguish context-dependent from ubiquitous TF binding? Results We compared ChIP-seq data on TF binding for multiple TFs in two different cell types and found that on average only a third of ChIP-seq peak regions are common to both cell types. Expectedly, common peaks occur more frequently in certain genomic contexts, such as CpG-rich promoters, whereas chromatin differences characterize cell-type specific TF binding. We also find, however, that genotype differences between the cell types can explain differences in binding. Moreover, ChIP-seq signal intensity and peak clustering are the strongest predictors of common peaks. Compared with strong peaks located in regions containing peaks for multiple transcription factors, weak and isolated peaks are less common between the cell types and are less associated with data that indicate regulatory activity. Conclusions Together, the results suggest that experimental noise is prevalent among weak peaks, whereas strong and clustered peaks represent high-confidence binding events that often occur in other cellular contexts. Nevertheless, 30-40% of the strongest and most clustered peaks show context-dependent regulation. We show that by combining signal intensity with additional data—ranging from context independent information such as binding site conservation and position weight matrix scores to context dependent chromatin structure—we can predict whether a ChIP-seq peak is likely to be present in other cellular contexts.

  14. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, Troels T; Frellsen, Jes; Moltke, Ida;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory...... regime based on the occurrence of the modelled transcription factor binding sites. However there is little or no information available for guiding the end users choice of method. Furthermore it would be necessary to obtain several different software programs from various sources to make a well......-founded choice. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a software package, Asap, for fast searching with position weight matrices that include several standard methods for assessing over-representation. We have compared the ability of these methods to detect over-represented transcription factor binding sites in artificial...

  15. Differential Regulatory Mechanisms of CBF Regulon Between Nipponbare (Japonica) and 93-11 (Indica) During Cold Acclimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiao-wu; LI Yong-chao; LI Xiao-xiang; LIU Wen-qiang; MING Jun; LU Ting-ting; TAN Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Nine CBF/DREB1 homologous genes in rice were obtained by BLAST search in the NCBI database,which share conserved amino acid sequences with DREB1 protein in Arabidopsis.Three CBF genes organized in tandem,named OsCBF1,OsCBF2 and OsCBF3,showed a transient induction in the process of cold acclimation,much stronger in indica rice 93-11 compared with japonica rice Nipponbare.The candidate downstream genes OsLIP5 and OsLIP9 were induced in 93-11 but not in Nipponbare.The differential expression of CBF regulon might be caused by polymorphisms within promoter sequences between these two rice varieties.These results could be useful for utilization of CBF/DREB1 genes and illustration of differences in chilling tolerance between indica and japonica rice varieties.

  16. Acute marijuana effects on rCBF and cognition: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, D S; Block, R I; Flaum, M; Schultz, S K; Boles Ponto, L L; Watkins, G L; Hurtig, R R; Andreasen, N C; Hichwa, R D

    2000-11-27

    The effects of smoking marijuana on cognition and brain function were assessed with PET using H2(15)O. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in five recreational users before and after smoking a marijuana cigarette, as they repeatedly performed an auditory attention task. Blood flow increased following smoking in a number of paralimbic brain regions (e.g. orbital frontal lobes, insula, temporal poles) and in anterior cingulate and cerebellum. Large reductions in rCBF were observed in temporal lobe regions that are sensitive to auditory attention effects. Brain regions showing increased rCBF may mediate the intoxicating and mood-related effects of smoking marijuana, whereas reduction of task-related rCBF in temporal lobe cortices may account for the impaired cognitive functions associated with acute intoxication.

  17. 巨桉EgrCBF1和EgrCBF2基因的克隆和胁迫响应表达分析%Cloning of EgrCBF1 and EgrCBF2 Genes from Eucalyptus grandis and their Expression under Stresses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王京京; 童再康; 黄程前; 程龙军

    2012-01-01

    Two CBF genes named EgrCBFl and EgrCBF2 ( GenBank No. JQ068827 ; JQ068828 ) were isolated from Eucalyptus grandis seedlings under low temperature. Sequence analysis showed that EgrCBFl and EgrCBFl cDNA had 1 062 bp and 1 203 bp, respectively. The two genes encoded 220 and 196 amino acids, separately and both contained an AP2 domain. The results of homology comparison showed that EgrCBFl and EgrCBF2 protein shared 91% and 80% homology with EguCBFla. Spatial expression analyses showed that EgrCBFl expressed mainly in leaves and roots while EgrCBF2 expressed in all leaves, stems and roots. qRT-PCR result of EgrCBFl and EgrCBFl under 0 ℃ ,2 ℃ ,4 ℃ ,6 ℃ , and 8 ℃ revealed that they were both induced by low temperatures and reached the highest level at 2 ℃ . Time course of the genes expressions at 4 ℃ for 2 h,4 h,8 h,24 h,and 48 h showed that their expressions increased at the first and then decreased. Changes in EgrCBFl and EgrCBFl expression under 100 μmol · L-1 ABA, 200 mmol·L-1 NaCl and drought were also analyzed. The results showed EgrCBFl was up-regulated under drought stress and ABA treatment, while the expression of EgrCBF2 increased under drought and salt stress.%从低温诱导的巨桉幼苗中克隆到2条CBF的全长cDNA序列,命名为EgrCBF1和EgrCBF2,全长分别为1 062 bp和1 203 bp,编码220个氨基酸和196个氨基酸,命名为EgrCBF1和EgrCBF2(GenBank登录号分别为:JQ068827; JQ068828),都包含1个AP2结构域.2个基因编码的蛋白都与冈尼桉中CBF蛋白(DQ241820)具有很高的同源性,与EguCBF1a的同源性分别达到了91%和80%.RT-PCR分析表明,EgrCBF1主要在叶和根中表达,而EgrCBF2在叶、茎和根中都有表达.对不同低温条件(0,2,4,6,8℃)和4℃2,4,8,24,48 h处理下EgrCBF1和EgrCBF2的qRT-PCR分析表明:2个基因都受低温诱导,并在2℃时诱导水平达到最高;4℃下随低温时间的延长,它们的诱导表达特性都呈先升后降的趋势.在100 μmol·L-1 ABA,200 mmol

  18. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Gavin M; Wilson, Michael D; Moses, Alan M

    2016-06-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions.We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  19. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3: insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, insulin-like growth factor-1 carrier protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 [insulin-like growth factor-1 binding protein-3, SomatoKine] is a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) and binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which is the major circulating somatomedin (insulin-like growth factor) binding protein; binding protein-3 regulates the delivery of somatomedin-1 to target tissues. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 has potential as replacement therapy for somatomedin-1 which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure and traumatic injury, resulting in catabolism. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis; diseases associated with protein wasting including chronic renal failure, cachexia and severe trauma; and to attenuate cardiac dysfunction in a variety of disease states, including after severe burn trauma. Combined therapy with somatomedin-1 and somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 would prolong the duration of action of somatomedin-1 and would reduce or eliminate some of the undesirable effects associated with somatomedin-1 monotherapy. Somatomedin-1 is usually linked to binding protein-3 in the normal state of the body, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release somatomedin-1 as needed. Therefore, somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 is a self-dosing system and SomatoKine would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. Somatomedin-1 binding protein-3 was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on June 1 2000. Insmed and Avecia, UK, have signed an agreement for the manufacturing of SomatoKine and its components, IGF-1 and binding protein-3. CGMP clinical production of SomatoKine and its components will be done in Avecia's Advanced Biologics Centre, Billingham, UK, which manufactures recombinant-based medicines and vaccines with a capacity of up to 1000 litres. In 2003, manufacturing of SomatoKine is

  20. Prognostic value of rCBF measurements and CT in focal cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT is the most effective examination technique for studying the evolution of ischemic attacks, but if performed within the first 3 weeks it does not allow prognosis of possible evolution towards necrosis. CBF measurement and vasoreactivity tests under Althesin do allow this prognosis. Thirty patients whose evolution was checked clinically and by repeated CT examinations (89 in all) underwent CBF measurements (intra-arterial xenon 133) and vasoreactivity had completely disappeared (inverse steal), the infarct evolved towards necrosis. (orig.)

  1. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antonio L C; Wang, Harris H

    2016-04-01

    ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF)-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology. PMID:27104615

  2. The Role of Genome Accessibility in Transcription Factor Binding in Bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L C Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ChIP-seq enables genome-scale identification of regulatory regions that govern gene expression. However, the biological insights generated from ChIP-seq analysis have been limited to predictions of binding sites and cooperative interactions. Furthermore, ChIP-seq data often poorly correlate with in vitro measurements or predicted motifs, highlighting that binding affinity alone is insufficient to explain transcription factor (TF-binding in vivo. One possibility is that binding sites are not equally accessible across the genome. A more comprehensive biophysical representation of TF-binding is required to improve our ability to understand, predict, and alter gene expression. Here, we show that genome accessibility is a key parameter that impacts TF-binding in bacteria. We developed a thermodynamic model that parameterizes ChIP-seq coverage in terms of genome accessibility and binding affinity. The role of genome accessibility is validated using a large-scale ChIP-seq dataset of the M. tuberculosis regulatory network. We find that accounting for genome accessibility led to a model that explains 63% of the ChIP-seq profile variance, while a model based in motif score alone explains only 35% of the variance. Moreover, our framework enables de novo ChIP-seq peak prediction and is useful for inferring TF-binding peaks in new experimental conditions by reducing the need for additional experiments. We observe that the genome is more accessible in intergenic regions, and that increased accessibility is positively correlated with gene expression and anti-correlated with distance to the origin of replication. Our biophysically motivated model provides a more comprehensive description of TF-binding in vivo from first principles towards a better representation of gene regulation in silico, with promising applications in systems biology.

  3. The effect of education on rCBF changes in Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal SPECT study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the relationship of differing levels of education on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Fifty-three patients with AD followed-up for an average of 36 months were divided into the high-educated group (HE, ≥12 years of schooling) and low-educated group (LE, 123I]-iodoamphetamine and the SPECT data were analyzed by 3D-stereotactic surface projections. At initial evaluation, the HE group had greater rCBF deficits in the parietotemporal regions than did the LE group, even though both groups had comparable MMSE and FAST scores. When compared with initial SPECT, follow-up SPECT showed a significant rCBF reduction in widespread regions, including the frontal, parietal, temporal, and limbic lobes of the HE group, while it a significant rCBF reduction in scattered and small regions of the parietotemporal, cingulate, and occipital areas of the LE group, as the HE group had faster cognitive and functional decline than the LE group. The HE group showed lower rCBF at initial SPECT than the LE group, suggesting more advanced AD pathology. As a result, the HE group demonstrated a more extensive and severe reduction of rCBF on follow-up SPECT in association with faster cognitive and functional decline than the LE group. Our SPECT study provides stronger support for the cognitive reserve effects of education in AD. (orig.)

  4. Composite organization of the cobalamin binding and cubilin recognition sites of intrinsic factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedosov, Sergey N; Fedosova, Natalya U; Berglund, Lars;

    2005-01-01

    Intrinsic factor (IF(50)) is a cobalamin (Cbl)-transporting protein of 50 kDa, which can be cleaved into two fragments: the 30 kDa N-terminal peptide IF(30) and the 20 kDa C-terminal glycopeptide IF(20). Experiments on binding of Cbl to IF(30), IF(20), and IF(50) revealed comparable association...

  5. Binding of the Covalent Flavin Assembly Factor to the Flavoprotein Subunit of Complex II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklashina, Elena; Rajagukguk, Sany; Starbird, Chrystal A; McDonald, W Hayes; Koganitsky, Anna; Eisenbach, Michael; Iverson, Tina M; Cecchini, Gary

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli harbors two highly conserved homologs of the essential mitochondrial respiratory complex II (succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Aerobically the bacterium synthesizes succinate:quinone reductase as part of its respiratory chain, whereas under microaerophilic conditions, the quinol:fumarate reductase can be utilized. All complex II enzymes harbor a covalently bound FAD co-factor that is essential for their ability to oxidize succinate. In eukaryotes and many bacteria, assembly of the covalent flavin linkage is facilitated by a small protein assembly factor, termed SdhE in E. coli. How SdhE assists with formation of the covalent flavin bond and how it binds the flavoprotein subunit of complex II remain unknown. Using photo-cross-linking, we report the interaction site between the flavoprotein of complex II and the SdhE assembly factor. These data indicate that SdhE binds to the flavoprotein between two independently folded domains and that this binding mode likely influences the interdomain orientation. In so doing, SdhE likely orients amino acid residues near the dicarboxylate and FAD binding site, which facilitates formation of the covalent flavin linkage. These studies identify how the conserved SdhE assembly factor and its homologs participate in complex II maturation.

  6. JASPAR 2010: the greatly expanded open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Thongjuea, Supat; Kwon, Andrew T;

    2009-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is the leading open-access database of matrix profiles describing the DNA-binding patterns of transcription factors (TFs) and other proteins interacting with DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Its fourth major release is the largest expansion of the core database...

  7. Asap: a framework for over-representation statistics for transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troels T Marstrand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In studies of gene regulation the efficient computational detection of over-represented transcription factor binding sites is an increasingly important aspect. Several published methods can be used for testing whether a set of hypothesised co-regulated genes share a common regulatory regime based on the occurrence of the modelled transcription factor binding sites. However there is little or no information available for guiding the end users choice of method. Furthermore it would be necessary to obtain several different software programs from various sources to make a well-founded choice. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a software package, Asap, for fast searching with position weight matrices that include several standard methods for assessing over-representation. We have compared the ability of these methods to detect over-represented transcription factor binding sites in artificial promoter sequences. Controlling all aspects of our input data we are able to identify the optimal statistics across multiple threshold values and for sequence sets containing different distributions of transcription factor binding sites. CONCLUSIONS: We show that our implementation is significantly faster than more naïve scanning algorithms when searching with many weight matrices in large sequence sets. When comparing the various statistics, we show that those based on binomial over-representation and Fisher's exact test performs almost equally good and better than the others. An online server is available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/asap/.

  8. Identification of candidate transcription factor binding sites in the cattle genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    A resource that provides candidate transcription factor binding sites does not currently exist for cattle. Such data is necessary, as predicted sites may serve as excellent starting locations for future 'omics studies to develop transcriptional regulation hypotheses. In order to generate this resour...

  9. Binding of von Willebrand factor and plasma proteins to the eggshell of Schistosoma mansoni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dewalick, Saskia; Hensbergen, Paul J; Bexkens, Michiel L; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Hokke, Cornelis H; Deelder, André M; de Groot, Philip G; Tielens, Aloysius G M; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2014-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni eggs have to cross the endothelium and intestinal wall to leave the host and continue the life cycle. Mechanisms involved in this essential step are largely unknown. Here we describe direct binding to the S. mansoni eggshell of von Willebrand factor and other plasma proteins invo

  10. Mapping Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu residues involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiborg, Ove; Andersen, C; Knudsen, Charlotte Rohde;

    1996-01-01

    Two residues of Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu involved in binding of aminoacyl-tRNA were identified and subjected to mutational analysis. Lys-89 and Asn-90 were each replaced by either Ala or Glu. The four single mutants were denoted K89A, K89E, N90A, and N90E, respectively. The mutants w...

  11. NMR studies of the GTP/GDP binding domain of translation initiation factor IF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, Evgeny Vladimirovich

    2005-01-01

    Translation Initiation Factor 2 (IF2) plays an important role in the initiation stage of bacterial protein biosynthesis. This protein binds both fMet-tRNA and 30S ribosomal subunit in the presence of GTP, and it stimulates the formation of the 70S initiation complex. The NMR samples of the 15N-, 15N

  12. Purification and characterization of native human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6

    OpenAIRE

    Taferner, Andrea; Micutkova, Lucia; Hermann, Martin; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Pircher, Haymo

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are key regulators of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) mediated signal transduction and thereby can profoundly influence cellular phenotypes and cell fate. Whereas IGFBPs are extracellular proteins, intracellular activities were described for several IGFBP family members, such as IGFBP-3, which can be reinternalized by endocytosis and reaches the nucleus through routes that remain to be fully established. Within the family of IGFBPs, IGFBP-...

  13. SPIC: A novel similarity metric for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs based on information contents

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Zhou, Xiguo; Du, Chuanbin; Su, Zhengchang

    2013-01-01

    Background Discovering transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) is one of primary challenges to decipher complex gene regulatory networks encrypted in a genome. A set of short DNA sequences identified by a transcription factor (TF) is known as a motif, which can be expressed accurately in matrix form such as a position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) and a position frequency matrix. Very frequently, we need to query a motif in a database of motifs by seeking its similar motifs, merge similar ...

  14. Novel Bioluminescent Binding Assays for Ligand–Receptor Interaction Studies of the Fibroblast Growth Factor Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ge; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed novel bioluminescent binding assays for several protein/peptide hormones to study their interactions with receptors using the so far brightest NanoLuc reporter. To validate the novel bioluminescent binding assay using a variety of protein/peptide hormones, in the present work we applied it to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family using the prototype member FGF2 as an example. A fully active recombinant FGF2 retaining a unique exposed cysteine (Cys) residue was chemically conjugated with an engineered NanoLuc carrying a unique exposed Cys residue at the C-terminus via formation of an intermolecular disulfide linkage. The NanoLuc-conjugated FGF2 (FGF2-Luc) retained high binding affinity to the overexpressed FGFR1 and the endogenous FGF receptor with the calculated dissociation constants of 161 ± 21 pM (n = 3) and 25 ± 4 pM (n = 3), respectively. In competition binding assays using FGF2-Luc as a tracer, receptor-binding potencies of wild-type or mutant FGF2s were accurately quantified. Thus, FGF2-Luc represents a novel non-radioactive tracer for the quantitative measurement of ligand–receptor interactions in the FGF family. These data suggest that the novel bioluminescent binding assay can be applied to a variety of protein/peptide hormones for ligand–receptor interaction studies. PMID:27414797

  15. Conversion of MyoD to a Neurogenic Factor: Binding Site Specificity Determines Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham P. Fong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MyoD and NeuroD2, master regulators of myogenesis and neurogenesis, bind to a “shared” E-box sequence (CAGCTG and a “private” sequence (CAGGTG or CAGATG, respectively. To determine whether private-site recognition is sufficient to confer lineage specification, we generated a MyoD mutant with the DNA-binding specificity of NeuroD2. This chimeric mutant gained binding to NeuroD2 private sites but maintained binding to a subset of MyoD-specific sites, activating part of both the muscle and neuronal programs. Sequence analysis revealed an enrichment for PBX/MEIS motifs at the subset of MyoD-specific sites bound by the chimera, and point mutations that prevent MyoD interaction with PBX/MEIS converted the chimera to a pure neurogenic factor. Therefore, redirecting MyoD binding from MyoD private sites to NeuroD2 private sites, despite preserved binding to the MyoD/NeuroD2 shared sites, is sufficient to change MyoD from a master regulator of myogenesis to a master regulator of neurogenesis.

  16. Effect of positional dependence and alignment strategy on modeling transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quader Saad

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many consensus-based and Position Weight Matrix-based methods for recognizing transcription factor binding sites (TFBS are not well suited to the variability in the lengths of binding sites. Besides, many methods discard known binding sites while building the model. Moreover, the impact of Information Content (IC and the positional dependence of nucleotides within an aligned set of TFBS has not been well researched for modeling variable-length binding sites. In this paper, we propose ML-Consensus (Mixed-Length Consensus: a consensus model for variable-length TFBS which does not exclude any reported binding sites. Methods We consider Pairwise Score (PS as a measure of positional dependence of nucleotides within an alignment of TFBS. We investigate how the prediction accuracy of ML-Consensus is affected by the incorporation of IC and PS with a particular binding site alignment strategy. We perform cross-validations for datasets of six species from the TRANSFAC public database, and analyze the results using ROC curves and the Wilcoxon matched-pair signed-ranks test. Results We observe that the incorporation of IC and PS in ML-Consensus results in statistically significant improvement in the prediction accuracy of the model. Moreover, the existence of a core region among the known binding sites (of any length is witnessed by the pairwise coexistence of nucleotides within the core length. Conclusions These observations suggest the possibility of an efficient multiple sequence alignment algorithm for aligning TFBS, accommodating known binding sites of any length, for optimal (or near-optimal TFBS prediction. However, designing such an algorithm is a matter of further investigation.

  17. Estimating binding free energy of a putative growth factors EGF-VEGF complex - a computational bioanalytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Meng-Han; Chang, C Allen; Fischer, Wolfgang B

    2016-08-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and homodimeric vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) bind to cell surface receptors. They are responsible for cell growth and angiogenesis, respectively. Docking of the individual proteins as monomeric units using ZDOCK 2.3.2 reveals a partial blocking of the receptor binding site of VEGF by EGF. The receptor binding site of EGF is not affected by VEGF. The calculated binding energy is found to be intermediate between the binding energies calculated for Alzheimer's Aß42 and the barnase/barstar complex. PMID:26338536

  18. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration1

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Wei; Xiang, Cunli; Cazacu, Simona; Brodie, Chaya; Mikkelsen, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7) is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time...

  19. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Jiang; Cunli Xiang; Simona Cazacu; Chaya Brodie; Tom Mikkelsen

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7) is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time...

  20. Liver-type fatty acid binding protein interacts with hepatocyte nuclear factor

    OpenAIRE

    McIntosh, Avery L.; Petrescu, Anca D.; Hostetler, Heather A.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) regulates liver type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression. Conversely as shown herein, L-FABP structurally and functionally also interacts with HNF4α. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between Cy3-HNF4α (donor) and Cy5-L-FABP (acceptor) as well as FRET microscopy detected L-FABP in close proximity (~80 Å) to HNF4α, binding with high affinity Kd ~250–300 nM. Circular dichroism (CD) determined that the HNF4α/L-FABP interaction alte...

  1. H19 RNA binds four molecules of insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Steffen; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Nielsen, Jacob;

    2000-01-01

    H19 RNA is a major oncofetal 2.5-kilobase untranslated RNA of unknown function. The maternally expressed H19 gene is located 90 kilobase pairs downstream from the paternally expressed insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene on human chromosome 11 and mouse chromosome 7; and due to their recip......H19 RNA is a major oncofetal 2.5-kilobase untranslated RNA of unknown function. The maternally expressed H19 gene is located 90 kilobase pairs downstream from the paternally expressed insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) gene on human chromosome 11 and mouse chromosome 7; and due...... to their reciprocal imprinting and identical spatiotemporal expression, it is assumed that the two genes are functionally coupled. Here we show that human H19 RNA contains four attachment sites for the oncofetal IGF-II mRNA-binding protein (IMP) with apparent K(d) values in the 0.4-1.3 nm range. The multiple...... attachment sites are clustered within a 700-nucleotide segment encoded by exons 4 and 5. This 3'-terminal segment targets H19 RNA to lamellipodia and perinuclear regions in dispersed fibroblasts where IMP is also localized. The results suggest that IMP participates in H19 RNA localization and provides a link...

  2. Altered relationships between rCBF in different brain regions of never-treated schizophrenics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabri, O.; Schreckenberger, M.; Cremerius, U.; Dickmann, C.; Schulz, G.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Erkwoh, R.; Owega, A.; Sass, H. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Psychiatry

    1997-09-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the relations between regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) of different brain regions in acute schizophrenia and following neuroleptic treatment. Methods: Twenty-two never-treated, acute schizophrenic patients were examined with HMPAO brain SPECT and assessed psychopathologically, and reexamined following neuroleptic treatment (over 96.8 days) and psychopathological remission. rCBF was determined by region/cerebellar count quotients obtained from 98 irregular regions of interest (ROIs), summed up to 11 ROIs on each hemisphere. In acute schizophrenics, interregional rCBF correlations of each ROI to every other ROI were compared to the interregional correlations following neuroleptic treatment and to those of controls. Results: All significant correlations of rCBF ratios of different brain regions were exclusively positive in controls and patients. In controls, all ROIs of one hemisphere except the mesial temporal ROI correlated significantly to its contralateral ROI. Each hemisphere showed significant frontal-temporal correlations, as well as cortical-subcortical and some cortico-limbic. In contrast, in acute schizophrenics nearly every ROI correlated significantly with every other ROI, without a grouping or relation of the rCBF of certain ROIs as in controls. After neuroleptic treatment and clinical improvement, this diffuse pattern of correlations remained. Conclusions: These results indicate differences in the neuronal interplay between regions in schizophrenic and healthy subjects. In nevertreated schizophrenics, diffuse interregional rCBF correlations can be seen as a sign of change and dysfunction of the systems regulating specificity and diversity of the neuronal functions. Neuroleptic therapy and psychopathologic remission showed no normalizing effect on interregional correlations. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war es, die Beziehungen zwischen den rCBF-Werten von verschiedenen Hirnregionen bei noch nie

  3. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  4. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  5. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor).

    OpenAIRE

    Winkles, J A; Friesel, R; Burgess, W H; Howk, R; Mehlman, T; Weinstein, R.; T. MACIAG

    1987-01-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical vein endothelial cells, exp...

  6. Memory-provoked rCBF-SPECT as a diagnostic tool in Alzheimer's disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a primary degenerative disease that progressively affects all brain functions, with devastating consequences for the patient, the patient's family and society. Rest regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) could have a strategic role in differentiating between AD patients and normal controls, but its use for this purpose has a low discriminatory capacity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the diagnostic sensitivity of rCBF single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) could be increased by using an episodic memory task provocation, i.e. memory-provoked rCBF-SPECT (MP-SPECT). Eighteen persons (73.2±4.8 years) with mild AD and 18 healthy elderly (69.4±3.9 years) were included in the study. The subjects were injected with99mTc-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (HMPAO) during memory provocation with faces and names, followed by an rCBF-SPECT study. The rCBF99mTc-HMPAO SPECT images were analysed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM2). Peaks with a false discovery rate corrected value of 0.05 were considered significant. On MP-SPECT, the AD group showed a significant rCBF reduction in the left parietal cortex in comparison with healthy elderly. At rest, no significant group differences were seen. Memory provocation increased the sensitivity of rCBF-SPECT for the detection of AD-related blood flow changes in the brain at the group level. Further studies are needed to evaluate MP-SPECT as a diagnostic tool at the individual level. If a higher sensitivity for AD at the individual level is verified in future studies, a single MP-SPECT study might be sufficient in the clinical setting. (orig.)

  7. Quantitative models of the mechanisms that control genome-wide patterns of transcription factor binding during early Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    Full Text Available Transcription factors that drive complex patterns of gene expression during animal development bind to thousands of genomic regions, with quantitative differences in binding across bound regions mediating their activity. While we now have tools to characterize the DNA affinities of these proteins and to precisely measure their genome-wide distribution in vivo, our understanding of the forces that determine where, when, and to what extent they bind remains primitive. Here we use a thermodynamic model of transcription factor binding to evaluate the contribution of different biophysical forces to the binding of five regulators of early embryonic anterior-posterior patterning in Drosophila melanogaster. Predictions based on DNA sequence and in vitro protein-DNA affinities alone achieve a correlation of ∼0.4 with experimental measurements of in vivo binding. Incorporating cooperativity and competition among the five factors, and accounting for spatial patterning by modeling binding in every nucleus independently, had little effect on prediction accuracy. A major source of error was the prediction of binding events that do not occur in vivo, which we hypothesized reflected reduced accessibility of chromatin. To test this, we incorporated experimental measurements of genome-wide DNA accessibility into our model, effectively restricting predicted binding to regions of open chromatin. This dramatically improved our predictions to a correlation of 0.6-0.9 for various factors across known target genes. Finally, we used our model to quantify the roles of DNA sequence, accessibility, and binding competition and cooperativity. Our results show that, in regions of open chromatin, binding can be predicted almost exclusively by the sequence specificity of individual factors, with a minimal role for protein interactions. We suggest that a combination of experimentally determined chromatin accessibility data and simple computational models of transcription

  8. DNA binding by the plant-specific NAC transcription factors in crystal and solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Ditte Hededam; Lindemose, Søren; Grossmann, J. Günter;

    2012-01-01

    NAC (NAM/ATAF/CUC) plant transcription factors regulate essential processes in development, stress responses and nutrient distribution in important crop and model plants (rice, Populus, Arabidopsis), which makes them highly relevant in the context of crop optimization and bioenergy production...... transcription factors and the mammalian GCM (Glial cell missing) transcription factors, which all use a ß-strand motif for DNA-binding. The structure shows that the NAC domain inserts the edge of its core ß-sheet into the major groove, while leaving the DNA largely undistorted. The structure of the NAC...

  9. Wnts grasp the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 at two distinct binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerekes, Krisztina; Bányai, László; Patthy, László

    2015-10-01

    Wnts have a structure resembling a hand with "thumb" and "index" fingers that grasp the cysteine rich domains of Frizzled receptors at two distinct binding sites. In the present work we show that the WIF domain of Wnt Inhibitory Factor 1 is also bound by Wnts at two sites. Using C-terminal domains of Wnt5a and Wnt7a and arginine-scanning mutagenesis of the WIF domain we demonstrate that, whereas the N-terminal, lipid-modified "thumb" of Wnts interacts with the alkyl-binding site of the WIF domain, the C-terminal domain of Wnts (Wnt-CTD) binds to a surface on the opposite side of the WIF domain. PMID:26342861

  10. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  11. Adhesion properties of Lactobacillus rhamnosus mucus-binding factor to mucin and extracellular matrix proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Nakamata, Koichi; Ueno, Shintaro; Terao, Akari; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Fukuda, Kenji; Urashima, Tadasu; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously described potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains, isolated from fermented mare milk produced in Sumbawa Island, Indonesia, which showed high adhesion to porcine colonic mucin (PCM) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recently, mucus-binding factor (MBF) was found in the GG strain of L. rhamnosus as a mucin-binding protein. In this study, we assessed the ability of recombinant MBF protein from the FSMM22 strain, one of the isolates of L. rhamnosus from fermented Sumbawa mare milk, to adhere to PCM and ECM proteins by overlay dot blot and Biacore assays. MBF bound to PCM, laminin, collagen IV, and fibronectin with submicromolar dissociation constants. Adhesion of the FSMM22 mbf mutant strain to PCM and ECM proteins was significantly less than that of the wild-type strain. Collectively, these results suggested that MBF contribute to L. rhamnosus host colonization via mucin and ECM protein binding.

  12. 结缕草CBF基因的同源克隆及其转基因拟南芥的抗寒性验证%Cloning of Zoysiagrass CBF Gene and Validation of Cold Tolerance in Trans-genic Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯勋伟; 才宏伟

    2014-01-01

    结缕草是优良的暖季型草坪草之一,主要用于亚热带和热带地区的草坪种植。抗冷性是结缕草栽培范围的限制因子。本研究以日本最北部原产的结缕草品系为材料,根据其他植物的已知的抗寒基因 CBF 序列,通过同源克隆的方法获得结缕草中相对应的同源基因ZjCBF;根据和其他已报告的CBF序列的比对结果,确定ZjCBF基因属于CBF转录因子家族基因中CBF1型基因。利用半定量PCR和实时定量PCR分析该基因在寒冷条件下的表达情况,发现ZjCBF基因受冷胁迫的诱导,在4℃处理6 h时表达量最高。在此基础上,本研究构建了该基因的过表达载体,并将其转化到拟南芥中,通过低温冷处理实验发现,不论是否经过冷驯化,转 ZjCBF 基因植株由于 ZjCBF 的过量表达均比野生型植株抗寒性强。%Zoysiagrass is recognized as an excellent warm-season turfgrass and mainly used in subtropical and tropical regions. Cold stress is a major constraint factor for the cultivation of zoysiagrass. In this study, according to the sequences of cold tolerance gene CBF had been reported in other plant species, we cloned the corresponding homologous of the ZjCBF gene by homology cloning method in Zoysia japonica using a material originated from the most northern area of Japan. Based on the alignment re-sults compared with other reported CBF genes, we found the ZjCBF gene belongs to the CBF1 familiy. By semi-quantitative PCR and real-time quantitative PCR, we analyzed the expression level of the ZjCBF gene in the cold condition and found that ZjCBF was induced by cold stress, and the ZjCBF expression reached peak at six hours post 4°C treatment. In addition, we also con-structed ZjCBF over expression vector and generated transgenic Arabidopsis plants, with better cold tolerance than the wild-type, whether through cold acclimation or not.

  13. Binding of transcription factor GabR to DNA requires recognition of DNA shape at a location distinct from its cognate binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zyoud, Walid A.; Hynson, Robert MG.; Ganuelas, Lorraine A.; Coster, Adelle CF.; Duff, Anthony P.; Baker, Matthew AB.; Stewart, Alastair G.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Ho, Joshua WK.; Gaus, Katharina; Liu, Dali; Lee, Lawrence K.; Böcking, Till

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for transcription factor recognition of specific DNA base sequences are well characterized and recent studies demonstrate that the shape of these cognate binding sites is also important. Here, we uncover a new mechanism where the transcription factor GabR simultaneously recognizes two cognate binding sites and the shape of a 29 bp DNA sequence that bridges these sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle laser light scattering are consistent with a model where the DNA undergoes a conformational change to bend around GabR during binding. In silico predictions suggest that the bridging DNA sequence is likely to be bendable in one direction and kinetic analysis of mutant DNA sequences with biolayer interferometry, allowed the independent quantification of the relative contribution of DNA base and shape recognition in the GabR–DNA interaction. These indicate that the two cognate binding sites as well as the bendability of the DNA sequence in between these sites are required to form a stable complex. The mechanism of GabR–DNA interaction provides an example where the correct shape of DNA, at a clearly distinct location from the cognate binding site, is required for transcription factor binding and has implications for bioinformatics searches for novel binding sites. PMID:26681693

  14. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jeffrey M; Wampole, Matthew E; Thakur, Mathew L; Wickstrom, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of therapeutics targeting EGF

  15. Molecular determinants of epidermal growth factor binding: a molecular dynamics study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Sanders

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a member of the receptor tyrosine kinase family that plays a role in multiple cellular processes. Activation of EGFR requires binding of a ligand on the extracellular domain to promote conformational changes leading to dimerization and transphosphorylation of intracellular kinase domains. Seven ligands are known to bind EGFR with affinities ranging from sub-nanomolar to near micromolar dissociation constants. In the case of EGFR, distinct conformational states assumed upon binding a ligand is thought to be a determining factor in activation of a downstream signaling network. Previous biochemical studies suggest the existence of both low affinity and high affinity EGFR ligands. While these studies have identified functional effects of ligand binding, high-resolution structural data are lacking. To gain a better understanding of the molecular basis of EGFR binding affinities, we docked each EGFR ligand to the putative active state extracellular domain dimer and 25.0 ns molecular dynamics simulations were performed. MM-PBSA/GBSA are efficient computational approaches to approximate free energies of protein-protein interactions and decompose the free energy at the amino acid level. We applied these methods to the last 6.0 ns of each ligand-receptor simulation. MM-PBSA calculations were able to successfully rank all seven of the EGFR ligands based on the two affinity classes: EGF>HB-EGF>TGF-α>BTC>EPR>EPG>AR. Results from energy decomposition identified several interactions that are common among binding ligands. These findings reveal that while several residues are conserved among the EGFR ligand family, no single set of residues determines the affinity class. Instead we found heterogeneous sets of interactions that were driven primarily by electrostatic and Van der Waals forces. These results not only illustrate the complexity of EGFR dynamics but also pave the way for structure-based design of

  16. A Novel DNA Binding Mechanism for maf Basic Region-Leucine Zipper Factors Inferred from a MafA-DNA Complex Structure and Binding Specificities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Xun; Guanga, Gerald P; Wan, Cheng; Rose, Robert B [Z; (W Elec.); (NCSU)

    2012-11-13

    MafA is a proto-oncoprotein and is critical for insulin gene expression in pancreatic β-cells. Maf proteins belong to the AP1 superfamily of basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors. Residues in the basic helix and an ancillary N-terminal domain, the Extended Homology Region (EHR), endow maf proteins with unique DNA binding properties: binding a 13 bp consensus site consisting of a core AP1 site (TGACTCA) flanked by TGC sequences and binding DNA stably as monomers. To further characterize maf DNA binding, we determined the structure of a MafA–DNA complex. MafA forms base-specific hydrogen bonds with the flanking G–5C–4 and central C0/G0 bases, but not with the core-TGA bases. However, in vitro binding studies utilizing a pulse–chase electrophoretic mobility shift assay protocol revealed that mutating either the core-TGA or flanking-TGC bases dramatically increases the binding off rate. Comparing the known maf structures, we propose that DNA binding specificity results from positioning the basic helix through unique phosphate contacts. The EHR does not contact DNA directly but stabilizes DNA binding by contacting the basic helix. Collectively, these results suggest a novel multistep DNA binding process involving a conformational change from contacting the core-TGA to contacting the flanking-TGC bases.

  17. Promoter binding factors regulating cyclin B transcription in the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, J D; McBride, B; Katula, K S

    1995-10-01

    Cyclin B is a key regulatory protein of the cell cycle, central to the control of the G2/M transition. In the developing sea urchin embryo, the cyclin B gene is transcriptionally regulated in concert with changing patterns of cell division. In an effort to understand the mechanism controlling cyclin B expression during development, we have conducted an analysis of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus cyclin B gene promoter. DNase I foot-printing of the cyclin B upstream region revealed eight binding regions within 435 bp of the start of transcription; seven of these sites were within 215 bp. Found within these regions were consensus sequences for two CCAAT boxes, TATA, and E-boxes and sequences with some similarity to E2F and octamer binding motifs. Upstream sequences were functionally defined by generating cyclin B-CAT fusion genes, containing deletions and base specific mutations, and testing for relative levels of expression by gene transfer. Both CCAAT boxes were found to be essential for maximal levels of expression. A third binding site (PR7) with no recognizable consensus sequence was also found to act as a positive element. Our results suggest that protein binding to the E2F-like sequences may act to reduce expression. Protein binding was further characterized by gel mobility-shift and methylation interference. The CCAAT boxes were found to bind similar, if not identical, proteins. Sequence comparisons and methylation interference data indicate that the likely protein binding these CCAAT sequences is the characterized CCAAT-binding protein CP1. A probe containing site PR7 formed multiple gel shift complexes that, by methylation interference, appeared to be interrelated. One major complex was formed with an oligonucleotide containing the two E2F-like sequences. Protein binding to this probe was specific and required bases within the E2F-like sequences. Our results indicate that cyclin B is subject to positive and negative regulation, involving multiple factors

  18. Polymerase (Pol) III TATA Box-Binding Protein (TBP)-Associated Factor Brf Binds to a Surface on TBP Also Required for Activated Pol II Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Yuhong; Kassavetis, George A.; Bryant, Gene O.; Berk, Arnold J.

    1998-01-01

    The TATA box-binding protein (TBP) plays an essential role in transcription by all three eukaryotic nuclear RNA polymerases, polymerases (Pol) I, II, and III. In each case, TBP interacts with class-specific TBP-associated factors (TAFs) to form class-specific transcription initiation factors. For yeast Pol III transcription, TBP associates with Brf (from TFIIB-related factor) and B", two Pol III TAFs, to form Pol III transcription factor TFIIIB. Here, we identify TBP surface residues that are...

  19. Pooled ChIP-Seq Links Variation in Transcription Factor Binding to Complex Disease Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehranchi, Ashley K; Myrthil, Marsha; Martin, Trevor; Hie, Brian L; Golan, David; Fraser, Hunter B

    2016-04-21

    Cis-regulatory elements such as transcription factor (TF) binding sites can be identified genome-wide, but it remains far more challenging to pinpoint genetic variants affecting TF binding. Here, we introduce a pooling-based approach to mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for molecular-level traits. Applying this to five TFs and a histone modification, we mapped thousands of cis-acting QTLs, with over 25-fold lower cost compared to standard QTL mapping. We found that single genetic variants frequently affect binding of multiple TFs, and CTCF can recruit all five TFs to its binding sites. These QTLs often affect local chromatin and transcription but can also influence long-range chromosomal contacts, demonstrating a role for natural genetic variation in chromosomal architecture. Thousands of these QTLs have been implicated in genome-wide association studies, providing candidate molecular mechanisms for many disease risk loci and suggesting that TF binding variation may underlie a large fraction of human phenotypic variation. PMID:27087447

  20. Nonspecific transcription factor binding can reduce noise in the expression of downstream proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, M.; Bokes, P.; Fox, Z.; Singh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) interact with a multitude of binding sites on DNA and partner proteins inside cells. We investigate how nonspecific binding/unbinding to such decoy binding sites affects the magnitude and time-scale of random fluctuations in TF copy numbers arising from stochastic gene expression. A stochastic model of TF gene expression, together with decoy site interactions is formulated. Distributions for the total (bound and unbound) and free (unbound) TF levels are derived by analytically solving the chemical master equation under physiologically relevant assumptions. Our results show that increasing the number of decoy binding sides considerably reduces stochasticity in free TF copy numbers. The TF autocorrelation function reveals that decoy sites can either enhance or shorten the time-scale of TF fluctuations depending on model parameters. To understand how noise in TF abundances propagates downstream, a TF target gene is included in the model. Intriguingly, we find that noise in the expression of the target gene decreases with increasing decoy sites for linear TF-target protein dose-responses, even in regimes where decoy sites enhance TF autocorrelation times. Moreover, counterintuitive noise transmissions arise for nonlinear dose-responses. In summary, our study highlights the critical role of molecular sequestration by decoy binding sites in regulating the stochastic dynamics of TFs and target proteins at the single-cell level.

  1. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade. PMID:26285209

  2. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Gómez Minguet

    Full Text Available Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  3. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J;

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we...

  4. Detection of growth factor binding to gelatin and heparin using a photonic crystal optical biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug-carrier interactions are important to protein controlled release systems to protect the protein from denaturation and ensure properly timed release. A novel photonic crystal biosensor was used to investigate a gelatin-protein controlled release system to determine the amount of protein bound to the carrier at physiological conditions. The Biomolecular Interaction Detection (BIND) system reflects a narrow band of wavelengths when white light is shone incident to the grating. As mass is deposited onto the surface, the peak wavelength value is shifted due to changes in the optical density of the biosensor. The BIND system was used to detect the binding of growth factors onto acidic gelatin, basic gelatin, and heparin on the sensor surface. Through a series of experiments, including functionalizing the sensor, adjusting the ionic strength of the solution, adjusting the substrate concentration, and minimizing non-specific signal, the adsorption of the gelatins and heparin on the sensor was enhanced. The binding interaction of recombinant human transforming growth factor (rhTGF)-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP)-2 with the two types of gelatin and heparin were investigated. The strength of the interaction between rhTGF-β1 and the substrates is in the following order: heparin > acidic gelatin > basic gelatin. RhBMP-2 bound to the substrates but with less intensity than TGF-β1: heparin > basic gelatin > acidic gelatin. This work provides support for the controlled release mechanism through degradation of the gelatin carrier.

  5. 椰子CBF基因的克隆研究%Study on Cloning of CBF Gene from Coconut (Cocos nucifera)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖勇; 杨耀东; 曹红星; 雷新涛; 范海阔; 赵松林; 马子龙

    2012-01-01

    In order to elucidate the molecular mechanism of coconuts cold resistance, this study designed primers according to the CBF gene sequence of oil palm, and then amplified the genomic DNA of Cocos nucifera by using PCR method. The PCR products were retrieved, linked, transformed and sequenced; finally, a DNA sequence of Cocos nucifera was obtained. This sequence had the highest identity (99%) with CBF gene of oil palm, and it was confirmed to be CBF gene. Through the clustering analysis of the cloned CBF gene of coconut and CBF genes of graminaceous crops, the high homology was found between the cloned CBF gene and HvCBF1, Os-DREB1E, HvCBF11, TaCBF11.%为了从分子水平上解析椰子抗寒的机理,以油棕的CBF基因序列设计引物,对椰子的基因组DNA进行PCR扩增,并对PCR产物进行回收、连接、转化以及测序,最后获得了1条DNA序列.这条序列与油棕的CBF基因的同源性高达99%,被证实为CBF基因.将克隆的椰子的CBF基因与禾本科作物的CBF基因进行聚类分析,结果显示:所克隆的CBF基因与HvCBF1、OsDREB1E、HvCB F11和TaCBF11具有较高的同源性.

  6. Quantitative Proteomics Identifies Serum Response Factor Binding Protein 1 as a Host Factor for Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisa Gerold

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV enters human hepatocytes through a multistep mechanism involving, among other host proteins, the virus receptor CD81. How CD81 governs HCV entry is poorly characterized, and CD81 protein interactions after virus binding remain elusive. We have developed a quantitative proteomics protocol to identify HCV-triggered CD81 interactions and found 26 dynamic binding partners. At least six of these proteins promote HCV infection, as indicated by RNAi. We further characterized serum response factor binding protein 1 (SRFBP1, which is recruited to CD81 during HCV uptake and supports HCV infection in hepatoma cells and primary human hepatocytes. SRFBP1 facilitates host cell penetration by all seven HCV genotypes, but not of vesicular stomatitis virus and human coronavirus. Thus, SRFBP1 is an HCV-specific, pan-genotypic host entry factor. These results demonstrate the use of quantitative proteomics to elucidate pathogen entry and underscore the importance of host protein-protein interactions during HCV invasion.

  7. New Insights into the Functions of Transcription Factors that Bind the RNA Polymerase Secondary Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenkin, Nikolay; Yuzenkova, Yulia

    2015-06-25

    Transcription elongation is regulated at several different levels, including control by various accessory transcription elongation factors. A distinct group of these factors interacts with the RNA polymerase secondary channel, an opening at the enzyme surface that leads to its active center. Despite investigation for several years, the activities and in vivo roles of some of these factors remain obscure. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the functions of the secondary channel binding factors in bacteria. In particular, we highlight the surprising role of global regulator DksA in fidelity of RNA synthesis and the resolution of RNA polymerase traffic jams by the Gre factor. These findings indicate a potential link between transcription fidelity and collisions of the transcription and replication machineries.

  8. Orthogonal matrix factorization enables integrative analysis of multiple RNA binding proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Stražar, Martin; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Ule, Jernej; Curk, Tomaž

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: RNA binding proteins (RBPs) play important roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression, including splicing, transport, polyadenylation and RNA stability. To model protein–RNA interactions by considering all available sources of information, it is necessary to integrate the rapidly growing RBP experimental data with the latest genome annotation, gene function, RNA sequence and structure. Such integration is possible by matrix factorization, where current approaches hav...

  9. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 promotes ovarian cancer cell invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Jinsong; Wang Huamin; Shmulevich Ilya; Mircean Cristian; Lee Eun-Ju; Niemistö Antti; Kavanagh John J; Lee Je-Ho; Zhang Wei

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) is overexpressed in ovarian malignant tissues and in the serum and cystic fluid of ovarian cancer patients, suggesting an important role of IGFBP2 in the biology of ovarian cancer. The purpose of this study was to assess the role of increased IGFBP2 in ovarian cancer cells. Results Using western blotting and tissue microarray analyses, we showed that IGFBP2 was frequently overexpressed in ovarian carcinomas compared wit...

  10. Reassessing the clinical efficacy of two MR quantitative DSC PWI CBF algorithms following cross-calibration with PET images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jean J.; Frayne, Richard; Smith, Michael R.

    2005-03-01

    Clinical cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps generated through dynamic- susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion imaging are currently cross-calibrated with PET studies. The cross-calibration is achieved by rescaling the MR CBF values so that normal white matter CBF corresponds to 22 ml/100 g/min. Examples are provided in this paper to show how this rescaling procedure changes both the clinical interpretation of CBF maps and the manner by which the performance of a given deconvolution algorithm should be assessed. (i) Singular-value decomposition-based (SVD) algorithms produce absolute CBF estimates that are inherently under-estimated for all tissue mean transit times (MTT) but, after rescaling, will generate CBF maps that are over-estimated for MTT >4.8 s. (ii) In principle, frequency-domain modelling techniques are expected to be inherently less sensitive to contrast recirculation biases than the time-domain SVD algorithms. However, it is shown that both CBF algorithms become greatly less sensitive to distortions from recirculation after clinical cross-calibration through rescaling has been performed. It is concluded that, when rescaling procedures are employed, it is relatively more important to develop deconvolution algorithms that produce CBF estimates with accuracies that vary little with MTT than to produce algorithms that provide inherently more accurate CBF estimates, but whose relative accuracy varies significantly with MTT. A portion of this work was presented at the 2004 Annual Scientific Meeting of the ISMRM, 15-21 May, Kyoto, Japan.

  11. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in man during perception of radiant warmth and heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryding, E; Eriksson, M B; Rosén, I; Ingvar, D H

    1985-08-01

    The present study concerns the effects of experimental pain (radiant warmth and heat pain) on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in pretrained subjects. The radiant warmth caused a general rCBF increase. However, if anxiety was avoided, heat pain caused the general rCBF level to return towards the level at rest. Thus, pain sensation per se may not cause a larger rCBF (and metabolic) response than that of the localized tactile stimulation, provided that the element of psychic apprehension and anxiety is eliminated or controlled.

  12. Antibody Responses in Patients with Staphylococcal Septicemia against Two Staphylococcus aureus Fibrinogen Binding Proteins: Clumping Factor and an Extracellular Fibrinogen Binding Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Palma, Marco; Söderquist, Bo; Flock, Jan-Ingmar; Möllby, Roland

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the serum antibody responses against two Staphylococcus aureus fibrinogen binding proteins, the cell-bound clumping factor (Clf) and an extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb). The material consisted of 105 consecutive serum samples from 41 patients suffering from S. aureus septicemia and 72 serum samples from healthy individuals. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed. Healthy individuals showed variable levels of antibodies against the studied antigens...

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor 2alpha binds to cobalt in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    2001-11-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activates the expression of genes that contain a hypoxia response element (HRE). The alpha subunit of the HIF transcription factors is degraded by proteasome pathways during normoxia, but stabilized under hypoxic conditions. It has previously been established that cobalt causes accumulation of HIF-2alpha and HIF-1alpha. However, little is known about the mechanism by which cobalt mimics hypoxia and stabilizes these transcription factors. We show here that cobalt binds directly to HIF-2alpha in vitro with a high affinity and in an oxygen-dependent manner. We found that HIF-2alpha, which had been stabilized with a proteasome inhibitor, could bind to cobalt, whereas hypoxia-stabilized HIF-2alpha could not. Mutations within the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-2alpha prevented cobalt binding and led to accumulation of HIF-2alpha during normoxia. This suggests that transition metal such as iron may play a role in regulation of HIF-2alpha in vivo. PMID:11688986

  14. pH modulates the binding of early growth response protein 1 transcription factor to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; Schuchardt, Brett J; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-08-01

    The transcription factor early growth response protein (EGR)1 orchestrates a plethora of signaling cascades involved in cellular homeostasis, and its downregulation has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Herein, using a battery of biophysical tools, we show that the binding of EGR1 to DNA is tightly regulated by solution pH. Importantly, the binding affinity undergoes an enhancement of more than an order of magnitude with an increase in pH from 5 to 8, implying that the deprotonation of an ionizable residue accounts for such behavior. This ionizable residue is identified as His382 by virtue of the fact that its replacement by nonionizable residues abolishes the pH dependence of the binding of EGR1 to DNA. Notably, His382 inserts into the major groove of DNA, and stabilizes the EGR1-DNA interaction via both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contacts. Remarkably, His382 is mainly conserved across other members of the EGR family, implying that histidine protonation-deprotonation may serve as a molecular switch for modulating the protein-DNA interactions that are central to this family of transcription factors. Collectively, our findings reveal an unexpected but a key step in the molecular recognition of the EGR family of transcription factors, and suggest that they may act as sensors of pH within the intracellular environment. PMID:23718776

  15. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  16. The relationship between transcription initiation RNAs and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Ryan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs are nuclear localized 18 nucleotide RNAs derived from sequences immediately downstream of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription start sites. Previous reports have shown that tiRNAs are intimately correlated with gene expression, RNA polymerase II binding and behaviors, and epigenetic marks associated with transcription initiation, but not elongation. Results In the present work, we show that tiRNAs are commonly found at genomic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites in human and mouse, and that CTCF sites that colocalize with RNAPII are highly enriched for tiRNAs. To directly investigate the relationship between tiRNAs and CTCF we examined tiRNAs originating near the intronic CTCF binding site in the human tumor suppressor gene, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene, also known as CDKN1A. Inhibition of CTCF-proximal tiRNAs resulted in increased CTCF localization and increased p21 expression, while overexpression of CTCF-proximal tiRNA mimics decreased CTCF localization and p21 expression. We also found that tiRNA-regulated CTCF binding influences the levels of trimethylated H3K27 at the alternate upstream p21 promoter, and affects the levels of alternate p21 (p21alt transcripts. Extending these studies to another randomly selected locus with conserved CTCF binding we found that depletion of tiRNA alters nucleosome density proximal to sites of tiRNA biogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that tiRNAs modulate local epigenetic structure, which in turn regulates CTCF localization.

  17. Storage of factor VIII variants with impaired von Willebrand factor binding in Weibel-Palade bodies in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maartje van den Biggelaar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Point mutations resulting in reduced factor VIII (FVIII binding to von Willebrand factor (VWF are an important cause of mild/moderate hemophilia A. Treatment includes desmopressin infusion, which concomitantly increases VWF and FVIII plasma levels, apparently from storage pools containing both proteins. The source of these VWF/FVIII co-storage pools and the mechanism of granule biogenesis are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied intracellular trafficking of FVIII variants implicated in mild/moderate hemophilia A together with VWF in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells. The role of VWF binding was addressed using FVIII variants displaying reduced VWF interaction. Binding studies using purified FVIII proteins revealed moderate (Arg2150His, Del2201, Pro2300Ser to severe (Tyr1680Phe, Ser2119Tyr VWF binding defects. Expression studies in HEK293 cells and primary endothelial cells revealed that all FVIII variants were present within VWF-containing organelles. Quantitative studies showed that the relative amount of FVIII storage was independent of various mutations. Substantial amounts of FVIII variants are co-stored in VWF-containing storage organelles, presumably by virtue of their ability to interact with VWF at low pH. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the potential of FVIII co-storage with VWF is not affected in mild/moderate hemophilia A caused by reduced FVIII/VWF interaction in the circulation. These data support the hypothesis that Weibel-Palade bodies comprise the desmopressin-releasable FVIII storage pool in vivo.

  18. Functional modulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 expression in melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Altaf A.; Majid, Shahana; Nosrati, Mehdi; deSemir, David; Federman, Scot; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) is a member of the IGFBP family, which regulates mitogenic and anti-apoptotic effects of insulin-like growth factors. In this report we evaluated the role of IGFBP3 in melanoma. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western and ELISA analysis indicated a significant downregulation of IGFBP3 expression in melanoma cell lines as compared to a normal melanocyte cell line. Melanoma cell lines treated with the demethylating agent 5-AZA-2′ deoxy...

  19. Characterization of transcription factors binding to-120 GATA motif of rat βbminy-globin promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović Sonja T.; Mitrović Tatjana; Karan-Đurašević Teodora; Nikčević Gordana T.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the regulation of rat adult βbminy-globin gene transcription. We used DNasel foot printing, gel mobility shift and super shift assays to characterize transcription factors involved in this regulation. In this study we analyzed GATA motif at-120 bp in the distal promoter of βbminy-globin gene. Footprint analysis revealed the binding of nuclear factors from MEL cells to the GATA motif. By using gel mobility shift assay two protein complexes were detected. ...

  20. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins in the Plasma of Growing Horses

    OpenAIRE

    Burk, John Robert

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) are modulators of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), which functions as a regulator of cartilage and bone development. Rapid growth and high starch diets have been associated with increased circulating concentrations of IGF-I, which lead to developmental orthopedic disorders in foals. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of age, diet, growth and season on plasma IGFBP and IGF-I concentrations from birth to 16 mo of age in...

  1. SELMAP - SELEX affinity landscape MAPping of transcription factor binding sites using integrated microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dana; Orenstein, Yaron; Golodnitsky, Rada; Pellach, Michal; Avrahami, Dorit; Wachtel, Chaim; Ovadia-Shochat, Avital; Shir-Shapira, Hila; Kedmi, Adi; Juven-Gershon, Tamar; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) alter gene expression in response to changes in the environment through sequence-specific interactions with the DNA. These interactions are best portrayed as a landscape of TF binding affinities. Current methods to study sequence-specific binding preferences suffer from limited dynamic range, sequence bias, lack of specificity and limited throughput. We have developed a microfluidic-based device for SELEX Affinity Landscape MAPping (SELMAP) of TF binding, which allows high-throughput measurement of 16 proteins in parallel. We used it to measure the relative affinities of Pho4, AtERF2 and Btd full-length proteins to millions of different DNA binding sites, and detected both high and low-affinity interactions in equilibrium conditions, generating a comprehensive landscape of the relative TF affinities to all possible DNA 6-mers, and even DNA10-mers with increased sequencing depth. Low quantities of both the TFs and DNA oligomers were sufficient for obtaining high-quality results, significantly reducing experimental costs. SELMAP allows in-depth screening of hundreds of TFs, and provides a means for better understanding of the regulatory processes that govern gene expression. PMID:27628341

  2. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  3. Engineering Factor Xa Inhibitor with Multiple Platelet-Binding Sites Facilitates its Platelet Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanjun; Li, Ruyi; Lin, Yuan; Shui, Mengyang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Huan; Wang, Yinye

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of antithrombotic drugs centralizes the effects in the thrombosis site and reduces the hemorrhage side effects in uninjured vessels. We have recently reported that the platelet-targeting factor Xa (FXa) inhibitors, constructed by engineering one Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif into Ancylostoma caninum anticoagulant peptide 5 (AcAP5), can reduce the risk of systemic bleeding than non-targeted AcAP5 in mouse arterial injury model. Increasing the number of platelet-binding sites of FXa inhibitors may facilitate their adhesion to activated platelets, and further lower the bleeding risks. For this purpose, we introduced three RGD motifs into AcAP5 to generate a variant NR4 containing three platelet-binding sites. NR4 reserved its inherent anti-FXa activity. Protein-protein docking showed that all three RGD motifs were capable of binding to platelet receptor αIIbβ3. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that NR4 has more opportunities to interact with αIIbβ3 than single-RGD-containing NR3. Flow cytometry analysis and rat arterial thrombosis model further confirmed that NR4 possesses enhanced platelet targeting activity. Moreover, NR4-treated mice showed a trend toward less tail bleeding time than NR3-treated mice in carotid artery endothelium injury model. Therefore, our data suggest that engineering multiple binding sites in one recombinant protein is a useful tool to improve its platelet-targeting efficiency. PMID:27432161

  4. Number of active transcription factor binding sites is essential for the Hes7 oscillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Angelis Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is commonly accepted that embryonic segmentation of vertebrates is regulated by a segmentation clock, which is induced by the cycling genes Hes1 and Hes7. Their products form dimers that bind to the regulatory regions and thereby repress the transcription of their own encoding genes. An increase of the half-life of Hes7 protein causes irregular somite formation. This was shown in recent experiments by Hirata et al. In the same work, numerical simulations from a delay differential equations model, originally invented by Lewis, gave additional support. For a longer half-life of the Hes7 protein, these simulations exhibited strongly damped oscillations with, after few periods, severely attenuated the amplitudes. In these simulations, the Hill coefficient, a crucial model parameter, was set to 2 indicating that Hes7 has only one binding site in its promoter. On the other hand, Bessho et al. established three regulatory elements in the promoter region. Results We show that – with the same half life – the delay system is highly sensitive to changes in the Hill coefficient. A small increase changes the qualitative behaviour of the solutions drastically. There is sustained oscillation and hence the model can no longer explain the disruption of the segmentation clock. On the other hand, the Hill coefficient is correlated with the number of active binding sites, and with the way in which dimers bind to them. In this paper, we adopt response functions in order to estimate Hill coefficients for a variable number of active binding sites. It turns out that three active transcription factor binding sites increase the Hill coefficient by at least 20% as compared to one single active site. Conclusion Our findings lead to the following crucial dichotomy: either Hirata's model is correct for the Hes7 oscillator, in which case at most two binding sites are active in its promoter region; or at least three binding sites are active, in which

  5. The sensitivity of CT and rCBF-studies for the pathology of strokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A localized pathology of the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and the morphology of the brain tissue can be visualized by the use of new techniques in radiology and nuclear medicine: measurements of rCBF by radioactive diffusible isotopes, of the densitiy of the brain tissue, by CT, and of the cerebral metabolism regionally by positron-emission tomography. Having studied 475 stroke patients par rCBF measurements and 335 by CT we think it useful to compare the value of these two methods in revealing information on the pathology underlying focal disorders of brain functions due to stroke. (orig./VJ)

  6. A novel alignment-free method for comparing transcription factor binding site motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minli Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factor binding site (TFBS motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family.

  7. A Novel Alignment-Free Method for Comparing Transcription Factor Binding Site Motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2010-01-01

    Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) motifs can be accurately represented by position frequency matrices (PFM) or other equivalent forms. We often need to compare TFBS motifs using their PFMs in order to search for similar motifs in a motif database, or cluster motifs according to their binding preference. The majority of current methods for motif comparison involve a similarity metric for column-to-column comparison and a method to find the optimal position alignment between the two compared motifs. In some applications, alignment-free methods might be preferred; however, few such methods with high accuracy have been described. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we describe a novel alignment-free method for quantifying the similarity of motifs using their PFMs by converting PFMs into k-mer vectors. The motifs could then be compared by measuring the similarity among their corresponding k-mer vectors. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that our method in general achieves similar performance or outperforms the existing methods for clustering motifs according to their binding preference and identifying similar motifs of transcription factors of the same family. PMID:20098703

  8. A structural-based strategy for recognition of transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisi Xu

    Full Text Available Scanning through genomes for potential transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs is becoming increasingly important in this post-genomic era. The position weight matrix (PWM is the standard representation of TFBSs utilized when scanning through sequences for potential binding sites. However, many transcription factor (TF motifs are short and highly degenerate, and methods utilizing PWMs to scan for sites are plagued by false positives. Furthermore, many important TFs do not have well-characterized PWMs, making identification of potential binding sites even more difficult. One approach to the identification of sites for these TFs has been to use the 3D structure of the TF to predict the DNA structure around the TF and then to generate a PWM from the predicted 3D complex structure. However, this approach is dependent on the similarity of the predicted structure to the native structure. We introduce here a novel approach to identify TFBSs utilizing structure information that can be applied to TFs without characterized PWMs, as long as a 3D complex structure (TF/DNA exists. This approach utilizes an energy function that is uniquely trained on each structure. Our approach leads to increased prediction accuracy and robustness compared with those using a more general energy function. The software is freely available upon request.

  9. Identification of potential nuclear reprogramming and differentiation factors by a novel selection method for cloning chromatin-binding proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuWang; AihuaZheng; LingYi; ChongrenXu; MingxiaoDing; HongkuiDeng

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear reprogramming is critical for animal cloning and stem cell creation through nuclear transfer, which requires extensive remodeling of chromosomal architecture involving dramatic changes in chromatin-binding proteins. To understand the mechanism of nuclear reprogramming, it is critical to identify chromatin-binding factors specify the reprogramming process. In this report, we have developed a high-throughput selection method, based on T7 phage display and chromatin immunoprecipitation, to isolate chromatin-binding factors expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells using primary mouse embryonic fibroblast chromatin. Seven chromatin-binding proteins have been isolated by this method. We have also isolated several chromatin-binding proteins involved in hepatocyte differentiation. Our method provides a powerful tool to rapidly and selectively identify chromatin-binding proteins. The method can be used to study epigenetic modification of chromatin during nuclear reprogramming, cell differentiation, and transdifferentiation.

  10. Structural basis for S-adenosylmethionine binding and methyltransferase activity by mitochondrial transcription factor B1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guja, Kip E; Venkataraman, Krithika; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Shi, Hui; Mejia, Edison; Hambardjieva, Elena; Karzai, A Wali; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2013-09-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factor B (TFB) proteins are homologous to KsgA/Dim1 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) methyltransferases. The mammalian TFB1, mitochondrial (TFB1M) factor is an essential protein necessary for mitochondrial gene expression. TFB1M mediates an rRNA modification in the small ribosomal subunit and thus plays a role analogous to KsgA/Dim1 proteins. This modification has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions leading to maternally inherited deafness, aminoglycoside sensitivity and diabetes. Here, we present the first structural characterization of the mammalian TFB1 factor. We have solved two X-ray crystallographic structures of TFB1M with (2.1 Å) and without (2.0 Å) its cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine. These structures reveal that TFB1M shares a conserved methyltransferase core with other KsgA/Dim1 methyltransferases and shed light on the structural basis of S-adenosyl-L-methionine binding and methyltransferase activity. Together with mutagenesis studies, these data suggest a model for substrate binding and provide insight into the mechanism of methyl transfer, clarifying the role of this factor in an essential process for mitochondrial function. PMID:23804760

  11. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 delays replicative senescence of human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas; Li, Chen;

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be induced by a variety of mechanisms, and recent data suggest a key role for cytokine networks to maintain the senescent state. Here, we have used a proteomic LC-MS/MS approach to identify new extracellular regulators of senescence in human fibroblasts. We identified 26...... extracellular proteins with significantly different abundance in conditioned media from young and senescent fibroblasts. Among these was insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6), which was chosen for further analysis. When IGFBP-6 gene expression was downregulated, cell proliferation was inhibited...... and apoptotic cell death was increased. Furthermore, downregulation of IGFBP-6 led to premature entry into cellular senescence. Since IGFBP-6 overexpression increased cellular lifespan, the data suggest that IGFBP-6, in contrast to other IGF binding proteins, is a negative regulator of cellular...

  12. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  13. Complement factor H binding by different Lyme disease and relapsing fever Borrelia in animals and human

    OpenAIRE

    Gil Horacio; Camafeita Emilio; Escudero Raquel; Bhide Mangesh R; Jado Isabel; Anda Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Borreliae employ multiple immune evasive strategies such as binding to complement regulatory proteins [factor H (fH) and factor H like-1 (FHL1)], differential regulation of surface membrane proteins, antigenic variation, and binding of plasminogen/plasmin and matrix metalloproteinases. As a complement regulatory subunit, fH serves as a cofactor for the factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b. fH binding by Borrelia has been correlated with pathogenesis as well as with host diver...

  14. Transcription Factors Bind Thousands of Active and InactiveRegions in the Drosophila Blastoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao-Yong; MacArthur, Stewart; Bourgon, Richard; Nix, David; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, Venky N.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Stapleton, Mark; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Ogawa, Nobuo; Inwood, William; Sementchenko, Victor; Beaton, Amy; Weiszmann, Richard; Celniker, Susan E.; Knowles, David W.; Gingeras, Tom; Speed, Terence P.; Eisen, Michael B.; Biggin, Mark D.

    2008-01-10

    Identifying the genomic regions bound by sequence-specific regulatory factors is central both to deciphering the complex DNA cis-regulatory code that controls transcription in metazoans and to determining the range of genes that shape animal morphogenesis. Here, we use whole-genome tiling arrays to map sequences bound in Drosophila melanogaster embryos by the six maternal and gap transcription factors that initiate anterior-posterior patterning. We find that these sequence-specific DNA binding proteins bind with quantitatively different specificities to highly overlapping sets of several thousand genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. Specific high- and moderate-affinity in vitro recognition sequences for each factor are enriched in bound regions. This enrichment, however, is not sufficient to explain the pattern of binding in vivo and varies in a context-dependent manner, demonstrating that higher-order rules must govern targeting of transcription factors. The more highly bound regions include all of the over forty well-characterized enhancers known to respond to these factors as well as several hundred putative new cis-regulatory modules clustered near developmental regulators and other genes with patterned expression at this stage of embryogenesis. The new targets include most of the microRNAs (miRNAs) transcribed in the blastoderm, as well as all major zygotically transcribed dorsal-ventral patterning genes, whose expression we show to be quantitatively modulated by anterior-posterior factors. In addition to these highly bound regions, there are several thousand regions that are reproducibly bound at lower levels. However, these poorly bound regions are, collectively, far more distant from genes transcribed in the blastoderm than highly bound regions; are preferentially found in protein-coding sequences; and are less conserved than highly bound regions. Together these observations suggest that many of these poorly-bound regions are not involved in early

  15. Cyclosporine A, FK506, and NIM811 ameliorate prolonged CBF reduction and impaired neurovascular coupling after cortical spreading depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Piilgaard; Witgen, Brent Marvin; Rasmussen, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    ), and neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling were unaffected by all three drugs under control conditions. NIM811 augmented the rise in CBF observed during CSD. Cyclosporine A and FK506 ameliorated the persistent decrease in CBF after CSD. All three drugs prevented disruption of neurovascular coupling after CSD...

  16. Determination of relative CMRO2 from CBF and BOLD changes: significant increase of oxygen consumption rate during visual stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, S.G.; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H.B.;

    1999-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect in functional magnetic resonance imaging depends on at least partial uncoupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) changes. By measuring CBF and BOLD simultaneously, the relative change in CMRO2 can b...

  17. Identification of a functional hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 binding site in the neutral ceramidase promoter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maltesen, Henrik R; Troelsen, Jesper T; Olsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The brush border membrane of the differentiated small intestinal epithelial cell is studded with membrane bound hydrolytic ectoenzymes involved in digestion. Previous studies of the regulation of genes encoding brush border enzymes have especially implicated the transcription factors hepatocyte...... nuclear factor HNF-1 and Cdx2. Recent genome-wide studies have, however, also identified HNF-4a as a transcription factor with a high number of target genes in the differentiated small intestinal epithelial cell. The Asah2 gene encodes neutral ceramidase, which is a hydrolytic brush border enzyme involved...... in ceramide digestion. It was the purpose of the present work to experimentally verify the functional importance of a HNF-4a binding site predicted by bioinformatic analysis to be present in the Asah2 promoter. Using supershift analysis, HNF-4a overexpression, and HNF-4a knockdown experiments it was confirmed...

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication with artificial transcription factors targeting the highly conserved primer-binding site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.R. Eberhardy; J. Goncalves; S. Coelho; D.J. Segal; B. Berkhout; C.F. Barbas

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) primer-binding site (PBS) is a highly conserved region in the HIV genome and represents an attractive target for the development of new anti-HIV therapies. In this study, we designed four artificial zinc finger transcription factors to bind at or adjac

  19. Dwarfism and impaired gut development in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Hammer, Niels A; Nielsen, Jacob;

    2004-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 1 (IMP1) belongs to a family of RNA-binding proteins implicated in mRNA localization, turnover, and translational control. Mouse IMP1 is expressed during early development, and an increase in expression occurs around embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5). T...

  20. The nucleotide-binding site of bacterial translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) as a metabolic sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milon, P.; Tischenko, E.V.; Tomsic, J.; Caserta, E.; Folkers, G.E.; La Teana, A.; Rodnina, M.V.; Pon, C.L.; Boelens, R.; Gualerzi, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Translational initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a guanine nucleotide-binding protein that can bind guanosine 3′,5′-(bis) diphosphate (ppGpp), an alarmone involved in stringent response in bacteria. In cells growing under optimal conditions, the GTP concentration is very high, and that of ppGpp very low.

  1. Regulation of Nucleosome Architecture and Factor Binding Revealed by Nuclease Footprinting of the ESC Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainer, Sarah J; Fazzio, Thomas G

    2015-10-01

    Functional interactions between gene regulatory factors and chromatin architecture have been difficult to directly assess. Here, we use micrococcal nuclease (MNase) footprinting to probe the functions of two chromatin-remodeling complexes. By simultaneously quantifying alterations in small MNase footprints over the binding sites of 30 regulatory factors in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we provide evidence that esBAF and Mbd3/NuRD modulate the binding of several regulatory proteins. In addition, we find that nucleosome occupancy is reduced at specific loci in favor of subnucleosomes upon depletion of esBAF, including sites of histone H2A.Z localization. Consistent with these data, we demonstrate that esBAF is required for normal H2A.Z localization in ESCs, suggesting esBAF either stabilizes H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes or promotes subnucleosome to nucleosome conversion by facilitating H2A.Z deposition. Therefore, integrative examination of MNase footprints reveals insights into nucleosome dynamics and functional interactions between chromatin structure and key gene-regulatory factors.

  2. Monitoring CBF in clinical routine by dynamic single photon emission tomography (SPECT) of inhaled xenon-133

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiyama, H; Christensen, J; Skyhøj Olsen, T;

    1986-01-01

    A very simple and low-cost brain dedicated, rapidly rotating Single Photon Emission Tomograph SPECT is described. Its use in following patients with ischemic stroke is illustrated by two middle cerebral artery occlusion cases, one with persistent occlusion and low CBF in MCA territory, and one with...

  3. Effect of memantine on CBF and CMRO2 in patients with early Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghammer, P; Vafaee, M; Ostergaard, K;

    2008-01-01

    Objectives –  Parkinson’s disease (PD) may be associated with increased energy metabolism in overactive regions of the basal ganglia. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist memantine would decrease regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) an...

  4. Structural analysis and DNA binding of the HMG domains of the human mitochondrial transcription factor A

    OpenAIRE

    Gangelhoff, Todd A.; Mungalachetty, Purnima S.; Nix, Jay C.; Mair E A Churchill

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is central to assembly and initiation of the mitochondrial transcription complex. Human mtTFA (h-mtTFA) is a dual high mobility group box (HMGB) protein that binds site-specifically to the mitochondrial genome and demarcates the promoters for recruitment of h-mtTFB1, h-mtTFB2 and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase. The stoichiometry of h-mtTFA was found to be a monomer in the absence of DNA, whereas it formed a dimer in the complex with the light...

  5. Detection of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in porcine serum

    OpenAIRE

    Masnikosa Romana; Baričević Ivona; Lagundžin Dragana; Nedić Olgica

    2010-01-01

    Multiple insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are found in sera of various species. This study was conducted to investigate whether IGFBPs in porcine serum could be detected using antibodies and antisera raised against human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -4. Western ligand blot procedure was used for the identification of c in porcine serum. The results presented in this work showed that the heterologous antibodies can be used to identify IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3, but not IGFBP-4 in...

  6. Nucleotide excision repair is impaired by binding of transcription factors to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Mularoni, Loris; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; López-Bigas, Núria

    2016-04-14

    Somatic mutations are the driving force of cancer genome evolution. The rate of somatic mutations appears to be greatly variable across the genome due to variations in chromatin organization, DNA accessibility and replication timing. However, other variables that may influence the mutation rate locally are unknown, such as a role for DNA-binding proteins, for example. Here we demonstrate that the rate of somatic mutations in melanomas is highly increased at active transcription factor binding sites and nucleosome embedded DNA, compared to their flanking regions. Using recently available excision-repair sequencing (XR-seq) data, we show that the higher mutation rate at these sites is caused by a decrease of the levels of nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity. Our work demonstrates that DNA-bound proteins interfere with the NER machinery, which results in an increased rate of DNA mutations at the protein binding sites. This finding has important implications for our understanding of mutational and DNA repair processes and in the identification of cancer driver mutations.

  7. Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 binds to entire mitochondrial DNA and negatively regulates mitochondrial gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Huang; Min Yu; Yang Jiao; Jie Ma; Mingxing Ma; Zehua Wang; Hong Wu; Deyong Tan

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription termination factor 2 (mTERF2) is a mitochondriai matrix protein that binds to the mitochondriai DNA.Previous studies have shown that overexpression of mTERF2 can inhibit cell proliferation, but the mechanism has not been well defined so far.This study aimed to present the binding pattern of mTERF2 to the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in vivo, and investigated the biological function of mTERF2 on the replication of mtDNA, mRNA transcription, and protein translation.The mTERF2 binding to entire mtDNA was identified via the chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis.The mtDNA replication efficiency and expression levels of mitochondria genes were significantly inhibited when the mTERF2 was overexpressed in HeLa cells.The inhibition level of mtDNA content was the same with the decreased levels of mRNA and mitochondrial protein expression.Overall, the mTERF2 might be a cell growth inhibitor based on its negative effect on mtDNA replication, which eventually own-regulated all of the oxidative phosphorylation components in the mitochondria that were essential for the cell's energy metabolism.

  8. HOCOMOCO: A comprehensive collection of human transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2012-11-21

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site (TFBS) models are crucial for computational reconstruction of transcription regulatory networks. In existing repositories, a TF often has several models (also called binding profiles or motifs), obtained from different experimental data. Having a single TFBS model for a TF is more pragmatic for practical applications. We show that integration of TFBS data from various types of experiments into a single model typically results in the improved model quality probably due to partial correction of source specific technique bias. We present the Homo sapiens comprehensive model collection (HOCOMOCO, http://autosome.ru/HOCOMOCO/, http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ hocomoco/) containing carefully hand-curated TFBS models constructed by integration of binding sequences obtained by both low- and high-throughput methods. To construct position weight matrices to represent these TFBS models, we used ChIPMunk software in four computational modes, including newly developed periodic positional prior mode associated with DNA helix pitch. We selected only one TFBS model per TF, unless there was a clear experimental evidence for two rather distinct TFBS models. We assigned a quality rating to each model. HOCOMOCO contains 426 systematically curated TFBS models for 401 human TFs, where 172 models are based on more than one data source. The Author(s) 2012.

  9. The Influence of Adnectin Binding on the Extracellular Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Roxana E.; Chen, Guodong; Ahn, Joomi; Houel, Stephane; Wei, Hui; Mo, Jingjie; Tao, Li; Cohen, Daniel; Xie, Dianlin; Lin, Zheng; Morin, Paul E.; Doyle, Michael L.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.

    2014-12-01

    The precise and unambiguous elucidation and characterization of interactions between a high affinity recognition entity and its cognate protein provides important insights for the design and development of drugs with optimized properties and efficacy. In oncology, one important target protein has been shown to be the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) through the development of therapeutic anticancer antibodies that are selective inhibitors of EGFR activity. More recently, smaller protein derived from the 10th type III domain of human fibronectin termed an adnectin has also been shown to inhibit EGFR in clinical studies. The mechanism of EGFR inhibition by either an adnectin or an antibody results from specific binding of the high affinity protein to the extracellular portion of EGFR (exEGFR) in a manner that prevents phosphorylation of the intracellular kinase domain of the receptor and thereby blocks intracellular signaling. Here, the structural changes induced upon binding were studied by probing the solution conformations of full length exEGFR alone and bound to a cognate adnectin through hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX MS). The effects of binding in solution were identified and compared with the structure of a bound complex determined by X-ray crystallography.

  10. LASAGNA-Search: an integrated web tool for transcription factor binding site search and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chic; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2013-03-01

    The release of ChIP-seq data from the ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements (modENCODE) projects has significantly increased the amount of transcription factor (TF) binding affinity information available to researchers. However, scientists still routinely use TF binding site (TFBS) search tools to scan unannotated sequences for TFBSs, particularly when searching for lesser-known TFs or TFs in organisms for which ChIP-seq data are unavailable. The sequence analysis often involves multiple steps such as TF model collection, promoter sequence retrieval, and visualization; thus, several different tools are required. We have developed a novel integrated web tool named LASAGNA-Search that allows users to perform TFBS searches without leaving the web site. LASAGNA-Search uses the LASAGNA (Length-Aware Site Alignment Guided by Nucleotide Association) algorithm for TFBS alignment. Important features of LASAGNA-Search include (i) acceptance of unaligned variable-length TFBSs, (ii) a collection of 1726 TF models, (iii) automatic promoter sequence retrieval, (iv) visualization in the UCSC Genome Browser, and (v) gene regulatory network inference and visualization based on binding specificities. LASAGNA-Search is freely available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23599922

  11. Selective influence of Sox2 on POU transcription factor binding in embryonic and neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistri, Tapan Kumar; Devasia, Arun George; Chu, Lee Thean; Ng, Wei Ping; Halbritter, Florian; Colby, Douglas; Martynoga, Ben; Tomlinson, Simon R; Chambers, Ian; Robson, Paul; Wohland, Thorsten

    2015-09-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) identity is orchestrated by co-operativity between the transcription factors (TFs) Sox2 and the class V POU-TF Oct4 at composite Sox/Oct motifs. Neural stem cells (NSCs) lack Oct4 but express Sox2 and class III POU-TFs Oct6, Brn1 and Brn2. This raises the question of how Sox2 interacts with POU-TFs to transcriptionally specify ESCs versus NSCs. Here, we show that Oct4 alone binds the Sox/Oct motif and the octamer-containing palindromic MORE equally well. Sox2 binding selectively increases the affinity of Oct4 for the Sox/Oct motif. In contrast, Oct6 binds preferentially to MORE and is unaffected by Sox2. ChIP-Seq in NSCs shows the MORE to be the most enriched motif for class III POU-TFs, including MORE subtypes, and that the Sox/Oct motif is not enriched. These results suggest that in NSCs, co-operativity between Sox2 and class III POU-TFs may not occur and that POU-TF-driven transcription uses predominantly the MORE cis architecture. Thus, distinct interactions between Sox2 and POU-TF subclasses distinguish pluripotent ESCs from multipotent NSCs, providing molecular insight into how Oct4 alone can convert NSCs to pluripotency.

  12. Theory on the mechanisms of combinatorial binding of transcription factors with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical framework on the mechanism of combinatorial binding of transcription factors (TFs) with their specific binding sites on DNA. We consider three possible mechanisms viz. monomer, hetero-oligomer and coordinated recruitment pathways. In the monomer pathway, combinatorial TFs search for their targets in an independent manner and the protein-protein interactions among them will be insignificant. The protein-protein interactions are very strong so that the hetero-oligomer complex of TFs as a whole searches for the cognate sites in case of hetero-oligomer pathway. The TF which arrived first will recruit the adjacent TFs in a sequential manner in the recruitment pathway. The free energy released from the protein-protein interactions among TFs will be in turn utilized to stabilize the TFs-DNA complex. Such coordinated binding of TFs in fact emerges as the cooperative effect. Monomer and hetero-oligomer pathways are efficient only when few TFs are involved in the combinatorial regulation. Detai...

  13. Nuclear factor I revealed as family of promoter binding transcription activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plasari Genta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiplex experimental assays coupled to computational predictions are being increasingly employed for the simultaneous analysis of many specimens at the genome scale, which quickly generates very large amounts of data. However, inferring valuable biological information from the comparisons of very large genomic datasets still represents an enormous challenge. Results As a study model, we chose the NFI/CTF family of mammalian transcription factors and we compared the results obtained from a genome-wide study of its binding sites with chromatin structure assays, gene expression microarray data, and in silico binding site predictions. We found that NFI/CTF family members preferentially bind their DNA target sites when they are located around transcription start sites when compared to control datasets generated from the random subsampling of the complete set of NFI binding sites. NFI proteins preferably associate with the upstream regions of genes that are highly expressed and that are enriched in active chromatin modifications such as H3K4me3 and H3K36me3. We postulate that this is a causal association and that NFI proteins mainly act as activators of transcription. This was documented for one member of the family (NFI-C, which revealed as a more potent gene activator than repressor in global gene expression analysis. Interestingly, we also discovered the association of NFI with the tri-methylation of lysine 9 of histone H3, a chromatin marker previously associated with the protection against silencing of telomeric genes by NFI. Conclusion Taken together, we illustrate approaches that can be taken to analyze large genomic data, and provide evidence that NFI family members may act in conjunction with specific chromatin modifications to activate gene expression.

  14. Genome-wide analysis reveals positional-nucleosome-oriented binding pattern of pioneer factor FOXA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhenqing; Chen, Zhong; Sunkel, Benjamin; Frietze, Seth; Huang, Tim H.-M.; Wang, Qianben; Jin, Victor X.

    2016-01-01

    The compaction of nucleosomal structures creates a barrier for DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) to access their cognate cis-regulatory elements. Pioneer factors (PFs) such as FOXA1 are able to directly access these cis-targets within compact chromatin. However, how these PFs interplay with nucleosomes remains to be elucidated, and is critical for us to understand the underlying mechanism of gene regulation. Here, we have conducted a computational analysis on a strand-specific paired-end ChIP-exo (termed as ChIP-ePENS) data of FOXA1 in LNCaP cells by our novel algorithm ePEST. We find that FOXA1 chromatin binding occurs via four distinct border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), with a preferential footprint boundary patterns relative to FOXA1 motif orientation. In addition, from this analysis three fundamental nucleotide positions (oG, oS and oH) emerged as major determinants for blocking exo-digestion and forming these four distinct border modes. By integrating histone MNase-seq data, we found an astonishingly consistent, ‘well-positioned’ configuration occurs between FOXA1 motifs and dyads of nucleosomes genome-wide. We further performed ChIP-seq of eight chromatin remodelers and found an increased occupancy of these remodelers on FOXA1 motifs for all four border modes (or footprint boundary patterns), indicating the full occupancy of FOXA1 complex on the three blocking sites (oG, oS and oH) likely produces an active regulatory status with well-positioned phasing for protein binding events. Together, our results suggest a positional-nucleosome-oriented accessing model for PFs seeking target motifs, in which FOXA1 can examine each underlying DNA nucleotide and is able to sense all potential motifs regardless of whether they face inward or outward from histone octamers along the DNA helix axis. PMID:27458208

  15. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  16. Discovery, optimization and validation of an optimal DNA-binding sequence for the Six1 homeodomain transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubing; Nandi, Soumyadeep; Martel, André; Antoun, Alen; Ioshikhes, Ilya; Blais, Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    The Six1 transcription factor is a homeodomain protein involved in controlling gene expression during embryonic development. Six1 establishes gene expression profiles that enable skeletal myogenesis and nephrogenesis, among others. While several homeodomain factors have been extensively characterized with regards to their DNA-binding properties, relatively little is known of the properties of Six1. We have used the genomic binding profile of Six1 during the myogenic differentiation of myoblasts to obtain a better understanding of its preferences for recognizing certain DNA sequences. DNA sequence analyses on our genomic binding dataset, combined with biochemical characterization using binding assays, reveal that Six1 has a much broader DNA-binding sequence spectrum than had been previously determined. Moreover, using a position weight matrix optimization algorithm, we generated a highly sensitive and specific matrix that can be used to predict novel Six1-binding sites with highest accuracy. Furthermore, our results support the idea of a mode of DNA recognition by this factor where Six1 itself is sufficient for sequence discrimination, and where Six1 domains outside of its homeodomain contribute to binding site selection. Together, our results provide new light on the properties of this important transcription factor, and will enable more accurate modeling of Six1 function in bioinformatic studies.

  17. Isolation of bovine corneal keratan sulfate and its growth factor and morphogen binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, Amanda; Yang, Bo; Solakyildirim, Kemal; Yee, Vienna; Li, Lingyun; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    Keratan sulfate (KS) is an important glycosaminoglycan that is found in cartilage, reproductive tissues, and neural tissues. Corneal KS glycosaminoglycan is found N-linked to lumican, keratocan and mimecan proteoglycans, and has been widely studied by investigators interested in corneal development and diseases. Recently, the availability of corneal KS has become severely limited, owing to restrictions on the shipment of bovine central nervous system byproducts across international borders in an effort to prevent additional cases of mad cow disease. We report a simple method for the purification of multi-milligram quantities of bovine corneal KS, and characterize its structural properties. We also examined its protein-binding properties, and discovered that corneal KS bound with high affinity to fibroblast growth factor-2 and sonic hedgehog, a growth factor and a morphogen involved in corneal development and healing. PMID:23402351

  18. Pluripotency factor binding and Tsix expression act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesterova Tatyana B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expression of Xist, the master regulator of X chromosome inactivation, is extinguished in pluripotent cells, a process that has been linked to programmed X chromosome reactivation. The key pluripotency transcription factors Nanog, Oct4 and Sox2 are implicated in Xist gene extinction, at least in part through binding to an element located in Xist intron 1. Other pathways, notably repression by the antisense RNA Tsix, may also be involved. Results Here we employ a transgene strategy to test the role of the intron 1 element and Tsix in repressing Xist in ES cells. We find that deletion of the intron 1 element causes a small increase in Xist expression and that simultaneous deletion of the antisense regulator Tsix enhances this effect. Conclusion We conclude that Tsix and pluripotency factors act synergistically to repress Xist in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. Double mutants do not exhibit maximal levels of Xist expression, indicating that other pathways also play a role.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirman, Irena; Whelan, Richard Larry; Jain, Suvinit;

    2005-01-01

    Epithelial cell growth regulation has been reported to be altered in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. The cell growth regulatory factor, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3), may be partly responsible for this phenomenon. So far, IGFBP-3 levels have been assessed...... as values of total protein, which is a sum of bioactive intact 43- to 45-kDa protein and its inactive proteolytic cleavage fragments. We aimed to assess the levels of intact IGFBP-3 and its cleaving protease MMP-9 in IBD. Patients with IBD and controls were included. Total plasma IGFBP-3 concentration...... and MMP-9 levels were determined in ELISA. The concentration of intact IGFBP-3 was significantly decreased in patients with moderate to severe IBD activity compared to those in remission or controls. Of note, a dramatic depletion of intact IGFBP-3 was found in 7.4% of patients with IBD. Zymography...

  20. Human vascular smooth muscle cells both express and respond to heparin-binding growth factor I (endothelial cell growth factor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkles, J.A.; Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Howk, R.; Mehlman, T.; Weinstein, R.; Maciag, T.

    1987-10-01

    The control of vascular endothelial and muscle cell proliferation is important in such processes as tumor angiogenesis, wound healing, and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Class I heparin-binding growth factor (HBGF-I) is a potent mitogen and chemoattractant for human endothelial cells in vitro and will induce angiogenesis in vivo. RNA gel blot hybridization experiments demonstrate that cultured human vascular smooth muscle cells, but not human umbilical cells also synthesize an HBGF-I mRNA. Smooth muscle cells also synthesize an HBGF-I-like polypeptide since (i) extract prepared from smooth muscle cells will compete with /sup 125/I-labeled HBGF-I for binding to the HBGF-I cell surface receptor, and (ii) the competing ligand is eluted from heparin-Sepharose affinity resin at a NaCl concentration similar to that required by purified bovine brain HBGF-I and stimulates endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, like endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells possess cell-surface-associated HBGF-I receptors and respond to HBGF-I as a mitogen. These results indicate the potential for an additional autocrine component of vascular smooth muscle cell growth control and establish a vessel wall source of HBGF-I for endothelial cell division in vivo.

  1. HOCOMOCO: expansion and enhancement of the collection of transcription factor binding sites models

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2015-11-19

    Models of transcription factor (TF) binding sites provide a basis for a wide spectrum of studies in regulatory genomics, from reconstruction of regulatory networks to functional annotation of transcripts and sequence variants. While TFs may recognize different sequence patterns in different conditions, it is pragmatic to have a single generic model for each particular TF as a baseline for practical applications. Here we present the expanded and enhanced version of HOCOMOCO (http://hocomoco.autosome.ru and http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/hocomoco10), the collection of models of DNA patterns, recognized by transcription factors. HOCOMOCO now provides position weight matrix (PWM) models for binding sites of 601 human TFs and, in addition, PWMs for 396 mouse TFs. Furthermore, we introduce the largest up to date collection of dinucleotide PWM models for 86 (52) human (mouse) TFs. The update is based on the analysis of massive ChIP-Seq and HT-SELEX datasets, with the validation of the resulting models on in vivo data. To facilitate a practical application, all HOCOMOCO models are linked to gene and protein databases (Entrez Gene, HGNC, UniProt) and accompanied by precomputed score thresholds. Finally, we provide command-line tools for PWM and diPWM threshold estimation and motif finding in nucleotide sequences.

  2. Leveraging cross-species transcription factor binding site patterns: from diabetes risk loci to disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N; Klocke, Bernward; Grallert, Harald; Glunk, Viktoria; Berulava, Tea; Lee, Heekyoung; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Fadista, Joao; Ehlers, Kerstin; Wahl, Simone; Hoffmann, Christoph; Qian, Kun; Rönn, Tina; Riess, Helene; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Bretschneider, Nancy; Schroeder, Timm; Skurk, Thomas; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Spieler, Derek; Klingenspor, Martin; Seifert, Martin; Kern, Michael J; Mejhert, Niklas; Dahlman, Ingrid; Hansson, Ola; Hauck, Stefanie M; Blüher, Matthias; Arner, Peter; Groop, Leif; Illig, Thomas; Suhre, Karsten; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-01-16

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed numerous risk loci associated with diverse diseases. However, identification of disease-causing variants within association loci remains a major challenge. Divergence in gene expression due to cis-regulatory variants in noncoding regions is central to disease susceptibility. We show that integrative computational analysis of phylogenetic conservation with a complexity assessment of co-occurring transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) can identify cis-regulatory variants and elucidate their mechanistic role in disease. Analysis of established type 2 diabetes risk loci revealed a striking clustering of distinct homeobox TFBS. We identified the PRRX1 homeobox factor as a repressor of PPARG2 expression in adipose cells and demonstrate its adverse effect on lipid metabolism and systemic insulin sensitivity, dependent on the rs4684847 risk allele that triggers PRRX1 binding. Thus, cross-species conservation analysis at the level of co-occurring TFBS provides a valuable contribution to the translation of genetic association signals to disease-related molecular mechanisms. PMID:24439387

  3. Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein 7 Mediates Glioma Cell Growth and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP-7 is the only member of the IGFBP superfamily that binds strongly to insulin, suggesting that IGFBP-7 may have different functions from other IGFBPs. Unlike other IGFBPs, the expression and functions of IGFBP-7 in glioma tumors have not been reported. Using cDNA microarray analysis, we found that expression of IGFBP-7 correlated with the grade of glioma tumors and the overall patient survival. This finding was further validated by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. We used RNAi to examine the role of IGFBP-7 in glioma cells, inhibiting IGFBP-7 expression by short interfering RNA transfection. Cell proliferation was suppressed after IGFBP-7 expression was inhibited for 5 days, and glioma cell growth was stimulated consistently by the addition of recombinant IGFBP-7 protein. Moreover, glioma cell migration was attenuated by IGFBP-7 depletion but enhanced by IGFBP-7 overexpression and addition. Overexpression of AKT1 in IGFBP-7-overxpressed cells attenuated the IGFBP-7-promoted migration and further enhanced inhibition of IGFBP-7 depletion on the migration. Phosphorylation of AKT and Erk1/2 was also inversely regulated by IGFBP-7 expression. These two factors together suggest that IGFBP-7 can regulate glioma cell migration through the AKT-ERK pathway, thereby playing an important role in glioma growth and migration.

  4. DPI-ELISA: a fast and versatile method to specify the binding of plant transcription factors to DNA in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaban Christina

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 10% of all genes in eukaryote genomes are predicted to encode transcription factors. The specific binding of transcription factors to short DNA-motifs influences the expression of neighbouring genes. However, little is known about the DNA-protein interaction itself. To date there are only a few suitable methods to characterise DNA-protein-interactions, among which the EMSA is the method most frequently used in laboratories. Besides EMSA, several protocols describe the effective use of an ELISA-based transcription factor binding assay e.g. for the analysis of human NFκB binding to specific DNA sequences. Results We provide a unified protocol for this type of ELISA analysis, termed DNA-Protein-Interaction (DPI-ELISA. Qualitative analyses with His-epitope tagged plant transcription factors expressed in E. coli revealed that EMSA and DPI-ELISA result in comparable and reproducible data. The binding of AtbZIP63 to the C-box and AtWRKY11 to the W2-box could be reproduced and validated by both methods. We next examined the physical binding of the C-terminal DNA-binding domains of AtWRKY33, AtWRKY50 and AtWRKY75 to the W2-box. Although the DNA-binding domain is highly conserved among the WRKY proteins tested, the use of the DPI-ELISA discloses differences in W2-box binding properties between these proteins. In addition to these well-studied transcription factor families, we applied our protocol to AtBPC2, a member of the so far uncharacterised plant specific Basic Pentacysteine transcription factor family. We could demonstrate binding to GA/TC-dinucleotide repeat motifs by our DPI-ELISA protocol. Different buffers and reaction conditions were examined. Conclusions We successfully applied our DPI-ELISA protocol to investigate the DNA-binding specificities of three different classes of transcription factors from Arabidopsis thaliana. However, the analysis of the binding affinity of any DNA-binding protein to any given DNA

  5. Two cell surface proteins bind the sponge Microciona prolifera aggregation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varner, J A; Burger, M M; Kaufman, J F

    1988-06-15

    Two extracellular matrix cell surface proteins which bind the proteoglycan-like aggregation factor from the marine sponge Microciona prolifera (MAF) and which may function as physiological receptors for MAF were identified and characterized for the first time. By probing nitrocellulose blots of nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate gels containing whole sponge cell protein with iodinated MAF, a 210- and a 68-kDa protein, which have native molecular masses of approximately 200-400 and 70 kDa, were identified. MAF binding to blots is species-specific. It is also sensitive to reduction and is completely abolished by pretreatment of live cells with proteases, as was cellular aggregation, indicating that the 210- and 68-kDa proteins may be located on the cell surface. The additional observations that the 68 kDa is an endoglycosidase F-sensitive glycoprotein and that antisera against whole sponge cells or membranes can immunoprecipitate the 210 kDa when prebound to intact cells are consistent with a cell surface location. Both proteins can be isolated from sponge cell membranes and from the sponge skeleton (insoluble extracellular matrix), but the 210-kDa MAF-binding protein can also be found in the soluble extracellular matrix (buffer washes of cells and skeleton) as well. A third MAF-binding protein of molecular mass 95 kDa was also found in the sponge extracellular matrix but rarely on cells. Both of the cell-associated 210- and 68-kDa proteins are nonintegral membrane proteins, based on Triton X-114 phase separation, flotation of liposomes containing sponge membrane lysates, and their extraction from membranes by buffer washes. Both proteins bind MAF affinity resins, indicating that they each exhibit a moderate affinity for MAF under native conditions. They can also be separated from each other and from the bulk of the protein in an octylpolyoxyethylene extract of membranes by fast protein liquid chromatography Mono Q anion exchange chromatography, as assessed by native

  6. Analysis of Specific Binding and Subcellular Localization of Wheat ERF Transcription Factor W17

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yun-xiang; LIU Pei; XU Zhao-shi; CHEN Ming; LI Lian-cheng; CHEN Yao-feng; XIONG Xiang-jin; MA You-zhi

    2008-01-01

    The study aims to detect the subcellular localization of ERF (ethylene-responsive element binding factor) transcription factor W17 protein, the interaction between W17 and cis-acting regulatory elements GCC-box and DRE in vitro, the binding and transactivating ability in vivo, and the role of W17 in higher plant stress-signal pathway. Recombinant plasmid W17/163hGFP was introduced into onion epidermal cells by the particle bombardment method with a PDS1000/He. Transformed cells were incubated for 24h at 22℃ in the dark and green fluorescence was monitored under a confocal microscope. The gene W17 was fused N-terminus of GST (glutathione-S-transferase) in prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-4T-1 and then transformed into E. coli strain BL21 (DE3). IPTG (0.5mmol L-1) was added to induce the expression of recombinant GST/W17 for 3h. The fused proteins were purified by GST purification columns, and then subjected to gel retardation assay with a 32P-labeled GCC or DRE sequence. The different reporter and effector plasmids were introduced into tobacco leaves through agroinfiltration, then transformed leaves stained by X-Gluc, faded with 75% alcohol and monitored under a Stereozooming microscope. The GFP fused with W17 protein was localized in the nuclei; SDS-PAGE assay demonstrated that the fused protein GST/W17 could be induced and purified with molecular weight at around 42.2kD under the induction of IPTG. Purified fused protein was able to specifically bind to both the wild-type GCC-box and DRE element, but had no interaction with either the mutant DRE or GCC-box; W17 protein can bind to GCC-box and transactive downstream GUS gene in vivo. W17 can localize into the nuclei, and it may be involved not only in biotic stresses controlled by GCC-box, but also in abiotic stresses (e. g., salt-) induced signaling pathway.

  7. Lyso-Sulfatide Binds Factor Xa and Inhibits Thrombin Generation by the Prothrombinase Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Yegneswaran

    Full Text Available Blood coagulation reactions are strongly influenced by phospholipids, but little is known about the influence of sphingolipids on coagulation mechanisms. Lysosulfatide (lyso-SF (sulfogalactosyl sphingosine prolonged factor Xa (fXa 1-stage plasma clotting assays, showing it had robust anticoagulant activity. In studies using purified clotting factors, lyso-SF inhibited >90% of prothrombin (II activation for reaction mixtures containing fXa/factor Va (fVa/II, and also inhibited II activation generation by fXa/ phospholipids and by Gla-domainless-fXa/fVa/phospholipids. When lyso-SF analogs were tested, results showed that N-acetyl-sulfatide was not anticoagulant, implying that the free amine group was essential for the anticoagulant effects of lyso-SF. Lyso-SF did not inhibit fXa enzymatic hydrolysis of small peptide substrates, showing it did not directly inhibit the fXa activity. In surface plasmon resonance studies, lyso-SF bound to immobilized inactivated fXa as well as inactivated Gla-domainless-fXa. Confirming this lyso-SF:fXa interaction, fluorescence studies showed that fluorescently-labeled-fXa in solution bound to lyso-SF. Thus, lyso-SF is an anticoagulant lipid that inhibits fXa when this enzyme is bound to either phospholipids or to fVa. Mechanisms for inhibition of procoagulant activity are likely to involve lyso-SF binding to fXa domain(s that are distinct from the fXa Gla domain. This suggests that certain sphingolipids, including lyso-SF and some of its analogs, may down-regulate fXa activity without inhibiting the enzyme's active site or binding to the fXa Gla domain.

  8. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anil; Shim, Heejung; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  9. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Raj

    Full Text Available Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  10. FISim: A new similarity measure between transcription factor binding sites based on the fuzzy integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cano Carlos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulatory motifs describe sets of related transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs and can be represented as position frequency matrices (PFMs. De novo identification of TFBSs is a crucial problem in computational biology which includes the issue of comparing putative motifs with one another and with motifs that are already known. The relative importance of each nucleotide within a given position in the PFMs should be considered in order to compute PFM similarities. Furthermore, biological data are inherently noisy and imprecise. Fuzzy set theory is particularly suitable for modeling imprecise data, whereas fuzzy integrals are highly appropriate for representing the interaction among different information sources. Results We propose FISim, a new similarity measure between PFMs, based on the fuzzy integral of the distance of the nucleotides with respect to the information content of the positions. Unlike existing methods, FISim is designed to consider the higher contribution of better conserved positions to the binding affinity. FISim provides excellent results when dealing with sets of randomly generated motifs, and outperforms the remaining methods when handling real datasets of related motifs. Furthermore, we propose a new cluster methodology based on kernel theory together with FISim to obtain groups of related motifs potentially bound by the same TFs, providing more robust results than existing approaches. Conclusion FISim corrects a design flaw of the most popular methods, whose measures favour similarity of low information content positions. We use our measure to successfully identify motifs that describe binding sites for the same TF and to solve real-life problems. In this study the reliability of fuzzy technology for motif comparison tasks is proven.

  11. In vitro RNA-binding assay for studying trans-factors for RNA editing in chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikanai, Toshiharu; Okuda, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    In plant organelles, specific C residues are modified to U by RNA editing. Short RNA sequences surrounding the target site (i.e., cis-elements) are recognized by trans-factors, which were recently shown to be pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. PPR proteins consist of tandem arrays of a highly degenerate unit of 35 (pentatrico) amino acids, and PPR motifs are believed to recognize specific RNA sequences. In Arabidopsis thaliana, more than 450 sites are edited in mitochondria and plastids, and a similar number of PPR proteins are encoded in the nuclear genome. To study how the tandem array of a PPR motif facilitates the recognition of RNA sequences, an efficient biochemical strategy is an in vitro binding assay of recombinant PPR proteins with target RNA. This analysis is especially powerful with a combination of in vivo analyses based on the phenotypes of mutants and transgenic plants. In this chapter, we describe methods for the expression of recombinant PPR proteins in Escherichia coli, preparation of probe RNAs, and RNA gel shift assays. These methods can also be utilized for other RNA-binding proteins.

  12. Dynamic DNA binding licenses a repair factor to bypass roadblocks in search of DNA lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Maxwell W; Kim, Yoori; Williams, Gregory M; Huck, John D; Surtees, Jennifer A; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2016-01-01

    DNA-binding proteins search for specific targets via facilitated diffusion along a crowded genome. However, little is known about how crowded DNA modulates facilitated diffusion and target recognition. Here we use DNA curtains and single-molecule fluorescence imaging to investigate how Msh2-Msh3, a eukaryotic mismatch repair complex, navigates on crowded DNA. Msh2-Msh3 hops over nucleosomes and other protein roadblocks, but maintains sufficient contact with DNA to recognize a single lesion. In contrast, Msh2-Msh6 slides without hopping and is largely blocked by protein roadblocks. Remarkably, the Msh3-specific mispair-binding domain (MBD) licences a chimeric Msh2-Msh6(3MBD) to bypass nucleosomes. Our studies contrast how Msh2-Msh3 and Msh2-Msh6 navigate on a crowded genome and suggest how Msh2-Msh3 locates DNA lesions outside of replication-coupled repair. These results also provide insights into how DNA repair factors search for DNA lesions in the context of chromatin. PMID:26837705

  13. Analysis of the DNA-binding and dimerization activities of Neurospora crassa transcription factor NUC-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Y; Metzenberg, R L

    1994-12-01

    NUC-1, a positive regulatory protein of Neurospora crassa, controls the expression of several unlinked target genes involved in phosphorus acquisition. The carboxy-terminal end of the NUC-1 protein has sequence similarity to the helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors. Bacterially expressed and in vitro-synthesized proteins, which consist of the carboxy-terminal portion of NUC-1, bind specifically to upstream sequences of two of its target genes, pho2+ and pho-4+. These upstream sequences contain the core sequence, CACGTG, a target for many helix-loop-helix proteins. A large loop region (47 amino acids) separates the helix I and helix II domains. Mutations and deletion within the loop region did not interfere with the in vitro or in vivo functions of the protein. Immediately carboxy-proximal to the helix II domain, the NUC-1 protein contains an atypical zipper domain which is essential for function. This domain consists of a heptad repeat of alanine and methionine rather than leucine residues. Analysis of mutant NUC-1 proteins suggests that the helix II and the zipper domains are essential for the protein dimerization, whereas the basic and the helix I domains are involved in DNA binding. The helix I domain, even though likely to participate in dimer formation while NUC-1 is bound to DNA, is not essential for in vitro dimerization.

  14. Bidirectional Transcription Arises from Two Distinct Hubs of Transcription Factor Binding and Active Chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Benjamin S; Gilchrist, Daniel A; Nechaev, Sergei; Muse, Ginger W; Burkholder, Adam; Fargo, David C; Adelman, Karen

    2015-06-18

    Anti-sense transcription originating upstream of mammalian protein-coding genes is a well-documented phenomenon, but remarkably little is known about the regulation or function of anti-sense promoters and the non-coding RNAs they generate. Here we define at nucleotide resolution the divergent transcription start sites (TSSs) near mouse mRNA genes. We find that coupled sense and anti-sense TSSs precisely define the boundaries of a nucleosome-depleted region (NDR) that is highly enriched in transcription factor (TF) motifs. Notably, as the distance between sense and anti-sense TSSs increases, so does the size of the NDR, the level of signal-dependent TF binding, and gene activation. We further discover a group of anti-sense TSSs in macrophages with an enhancer-like chromatin signature. Interestingly, this signature identifies divergent promoters that are activated during immune challenge. We propose that anti-sense promoters serve as platforms for TF binding and establishment of active chromatin to further regulate or enhance sense-strand mRNA expression.

  15. Using DNA duplex stability information for transcription factor binding site discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordân, Raluca; Hartemink, Alexander J

    2008-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site discovery is an important step in understanding transcriptional regulation. Many computational tools have already been developed, but their success in detecting TF motifs is still limited. We believe one of the main reasons for the low accuracy of current methods is that they do not take into account the structural aspects of TF-DNA interaction. We have previously shown that knowledge about the structural class of the TF and information about nucleosome occupancy can be used to improve motif discovery. Here, we demonstrate the benefits of using information about the DNA double-helical stability for motif discovery. We notice that, in general, the energy needed to destabilize the DNA double helix is higher at TF binding sites than at random DNA sites. We use this information to derive informative positional priors that we incorporate into a motif finding algorithm. When applied to yeast ChIP-chip data, the new informative priors improve the performance of the motif finder significantly when compared to priors that do not use the energetic stability information.

  16. The binding of the anticoagulation factor Ⅰ from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus to activated factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Anticoagulation factor Ⅰ (ACF Ⅰ) from the venom of Agkistrodon acutus prolonged plasma prothrombin time (PPT) with dose-dependent manner and exhibited marked anticoagulant activity only at the concentration higher than its critical concentration (12 nmol/L). It was discovered that ACFⅠ formed a 1:1 complex with activated coagulation factor (FⅩa) in the presence of Ca2+ ions by the method of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both native ACFⅠ and decalcified ACFⅠ failed to form complexes with FⅩa in the absence of Ca2+. Sr2+ ions were able to replace Ca2+ ions in the binding of ACFⅠ to FⅩa, but both Ba2+ ions and Tb3+ ions were ineffective. ACFⅠ was a new member of the Ⅸ/Ⅹ-bp family in the C-type lectin superfamily, and had a amino acid composition similar to the other members of this family. It was composed of 251 amino acid residues with a molecular weight of 29 603.6 u on non-reducing condition, determined by MALDI-TOF-MS, and a molecular weight of 14.7 ku on reducing condition, determined by the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE).

  17. CDNA cloning and mRNA expression of the six mouse insulin-like growth factor binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin); C. Groffen (Cora); J.W. van Neck (Han); E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) comprise a family of six distinct proteins which modulate insulin-like growth factor action. We have isolated cDNAs encoding the six mouse IGFBPs (mIGFBPs). In addition, we studied the mRNA expression of the six mIGFBPs during deve

  18. Focal hyperemia followed by spreading oligemia and impaired activation of rCBF in classic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Larsen, B; Lauritzen, M

    1981-01-01

    migraine was similarly followed during his only classic attack. The attacks were initiated by focal hyperemia in 3 patients. During prodromes all patients displayed occipitoparietal rCBF reduction (oligemia), but in only 1 case did the reduction approach critical values. Oligemia gradually spread...... anteriorly in the course of 15 to 45 minutes. In 4 patients a global oligemia was observed. In 4 patients severe headache was present concomitantly with oligemia and with no sign of hyperemia or nonhomogeneous brain perfusion. The normal rCBF increase during cortical activity (hand movement, speech, and...... similar activities) was impaired in 6 patients. The results indicate that the vasospastic model of the migraine attack is too simplistic....

  19. A Nonradioactive Method for Detecting DNA-binding Activity of Nuclear Transcription Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张宁; 徐永健; 张珍祥; 熊维宁

    2003-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of a nonradioactive electrophoresis mobility shift assay fordetecting nuclear transcription factor, double-stranded oligonucleotides encoding the consensus tar-get sequence of NF-κB were labled with DIG by terminal transferase. After nuclear protein stimula-ted with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or PMA and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDT C)electrophoresed on 8 % nondenaturing poliacrylamide gel together with oligeonucleotide probe, theywere electro-blotted nylon membrane positively charged. Anti-DIG-AP antibody catalyzed chemilu-minescent substrate CSPD to image on X-film. The results showed that nuclear proteins binded spe-cifically to the NF-κB consensus sequence in the EMSA by chemiluminescent technique method andthe activity of NF-κB in PMA group was more than that in PMA+PDTC group. It is suggestedthat detection of NF-κB by EMSA with chemiluminescent technique is feasible and simple, whichcan be performed in ordinary laboratories.

  20. Predicting Polymerase Ⅱ Core Promoters by Cooperating Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Eukaryotic Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Tu MA; Min-Ping QIAN; Hai-Xu TANG

    2004-01-01

    Several discriminate functions for predicting core promoters that based on the potential cooperation between transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are discussed. It is demonstrated that the promoter predicting accuracy is improved when the cooperation among TFBSs is taken into consideration.The core promoter region of a newly discovered gene CKLFSF1 is predicted to locate more than 1.5 kb far away from the 5′ end of the transcript and in the last intron of its upstream gene, which is experimentally confirmed later. The core promoters of 3402 human RefSeq sequences, obtained by extending the mRNAs in human genome sequences, are predicted by our algorithm, and there are about 60% of the predicted core promoters locating within the ± 500 bp region relative to the annotated transcription start site.

  1. Expression and Critical Role of Interleukin Enhancer Binding Factor 2 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shaobing; Jiang, Xu; Ding, Chaofeng; Du, Chengli; Owusu-Ansah, Kwabena Gyabaah; Weng, Xiaoyu; Hu, Wendi; Peng, Chuanhui; Lv, Zhen; Tong, Rongliang; Xiao, Heng; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Wu, Jian; Zheng, Shusen

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin enhancer binding factor 2 (ILF2), a transcription factor, regulates cell growth by inhibiting the stabilization of mRNA. Currently, its role has gained recognition as a factor in the tumorigenic process. However, until now, little has been known about the detailed role ILF2 plays in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we investigated the expression levels of ILF2 in HCC tissue with Western blot and immunohistochemical assays. To examine the effect of ILF2 on liver cancer cell growth and apoptosis, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting ILF2 were recombined to create lentiviral overexpression vectors. Our results showed higher expression levels of ILF2 mRNA and ILF2 protein in HCC tissue compared with matched peritumoral tissue. Expression of ILF2 may regulate cell growth and apoptosis in liver cancer cells via regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 related ovarian killer (Bok), Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX), and cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (cIAP1). Moreover, we inoculated nude mice with liver cancer cells to investigate the effect of ILF2 on tumorigenesis in vivo. As expected, a rapid growth was observed in cancer cells inoculated with a lentiviral vector coding Flag-ILF2 (Lenti-ILF2) compared with the control cells. Hence, these results promote a better understanding of ILF2’s potential role as a therapeutic target in HCC. PMID:27556459

  2. Emerging role of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiel M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Maaged Akiel, Devaraja Rajasekaran, Rachel Gredler, Ayesha Siddiq, Jyoti Srivastava, Chadia Robertson, Nidhi Himanshu Jariwala, Paul B Fisher, Devanand SarkarDepartment of Human and Molecular Genetics, Massey Cancer Center, VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USAAbstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a vicious and highly vascular cancer with a dismal prognosis. It is a life-threatening illness worldwide that ranks fifth in terms of cancer prevalence and third in cancer deaths. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage by which time conventional therapies are no longer effective. Targeted molecular therapies, such as the multikinase inhibitor sorafenib, provide a modest increase in survival for advanced HCC patients and display significant toxicity. Thus, there is an immense need to identify novel regulators of HCC that might be targeted effectively. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF axis is commonly abnormal in HCC. Upon activation, the IGF axis controls metabolism, tissue homeostasis, and survival. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7 is a secreted protein of a family of low-affinity IGF-binding proteins termed “IGFBP-related proteins” that have been identified as a potential tumor suppressor in HCC. IGFBP7 has been implicated in regulating cellular proliferation, senescence, and angiogenesis. In this review, we provide a comprehensive discussion of the role of IGFBP7 in HCC and the potential use of IGFBP7 as a novel biomarker for drug resistance and as an effective therapeutic strategy.Keywords: HCC, IGFBP7, gene therapy, angiogenesis, senescence, apoptosis

  3. Nuclear actions of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Robert C

    2015-09-10

    In addition to its actions outside the cell, cellular uptake and nuclear import of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has been recognized for almost two decades, but knowledge of its nuclear actions has been slow to emerge. IGFBP-3 has a functional nuclear localization signal and interacts with the nuclear transport protein importin-β. Within the nucleus IGFBP-3 appears to have a role in transcriptional regulation. It can bind to the nuclear receptor, retinoid X receptor-α and several of its dimerization partners, including retinoic acid receptor, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). These interactions modulate the functions of these receptors, for example inhibiting VDR-dependent transcription in osteoblasts and PPARγ-dependent transcription in adipocytes. Nuclear IGFBP-3 can be detected by immunohistochemistry in cancer and other tissues, and its presence in the nucleus has been shown in many cell culture studies to be necessary for its pro-apoptotic effect, which may also involve interaction with the nuclear receptor Nur77, and export from the nucleus. IGFBP-3 is p53-inducible and in response to DNA damage, forms a complex with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), translocating to the nucleus to interact with DNA-dependent protein kinase. Inhibition of EGFR kinase activity or downregulation of IGFBP-3 can inhibit DNA double strand-break repair by nonhomologous end joining. IGFBP-3 thus has the ability to influence many cell functions through its interactions with intranuclear pathways, but the importance of these interactions in vivo, and their potential to be targeted for therapeutic benefit, require further investigation. PMID:26074086

  4. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya.

  5. In silico cloning and characterization of the TGA (TGACG MOTIF-BINDING FACTOR) transcription factors subfamily in Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrovo Espín, Fabio Marcelo; Peraza-Echeverria, Santy; Fuentes, Gabriela; Santamaría, Jorge M

    2012-05-01

    The TGA transcription factors belong to the subfamily of bZIP group D that play a major role in disease resistance and development. Most of the TGA identified in Arabidopsis interact with the master regulator of SAR, NPR1 that controls the expression of PR genes. As a first approach to determine the possible involvement of these transcription factors in papaya defense, we characterized Arabidopsis TGA orthologs from the genome of Carica papaya cv. SunUp. Six orthologs CpTGA1 to CpTGA6, were identified. The predicted CpTGA proteins were highly similar to AtTGA sequences and probably share the same DNA binding properties and transcriptional regulation features. The protein sequences alignment evidenced the presence of conserved domains, characteristic of this group of transcription factors. The phylogeny showed that CpTGA evolved into three different subclades associated with defense and floral development. This is the first report of basal expression patterns assessed by RT-PCR, from the whole subfamily of CpTGA members in different tissues from papaya cv. Maradol mature plants. Overall, CpTGA1, CpTGA3 CpTGA6 and CpTGA4 showed a basal expression in all tissues tested; CpTGA2 expressed strongly in all tissues except in petioles while CpTGA5 expressed only in petals and to a lower extent in petioles. Although more detailed studies in anthers and other floral structures are required, we suggest that CpTGA5 might be tissue-specific, and it might be involved in papaya floral development. On the other hand, we report here for the first time, the expression of the whole family of CpTGA in response to salicylic acid (SA). The expression of CpTGA3, CpTGA4 and CpTGA6 increased in response to SA, what would suggest its involvement in the SAR response in papaya. PMID:22410205

  6. The wing in yeast heat shock transcription factor (HSF) DNA-binding domain is required for full activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cicero, Marco P.; T. Hubl, Susan; Harrison, Celia J.; Littlefield, Otis; Hardy, Jeanne A.; Nelson, Hillary C. M.

    2001-01-01

    The yeast heat shock transcription factor (HSF) belongs to the winged helix family of proteins. HSF binds DNA as a trimer, and additional trimers can bind DNA co-operatively. Unlike other winged helix–turn–helix proteins, HSF’s wing does not appear to contact DNA, as based on a previously solved crystal structure. Instead, the structure implies that the wing is involved in protein–protein interactions, possibly within a trimer or between adjacent trimers. To unders...

  7. The HMG-box mitochondrial transcription factor xl-mtTFA binds DNA as a tetramer to activate bidirectional transcription.

    OpenAIRE

    Antoshechkin, I; Bogenhagen, D F; Mastrangelo, I A

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial HMG-box transcription factor xl-mtTFA activates bidirectional transcription by binding to a site separating two core promoters in Xenopus laevis mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Three independent approaches were used to study the higher order structure of xl-mtTFA binding to this site. First, co-immunoprecipitation of differentially tagged recombinant mtTFA derivatives established that the protein exists as a multimer. Second, in vitro chemical cross-linking experiments provided e...

  8. Nuclear Factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the posttranscriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3' untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several noncoding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tande...

  9. Nuclear factor 90 uses an ADAR2-like binding mode to recognize specific bases in dsRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Jayachandran, Uma; Grey, Heather; Cook, Atlanta

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factors 90 and 45 (NF90 and NF45) form a protein complex involved in the post-transcriptional control of many genes in vertebrates. NF90 is a member of the dsRNA binding domain (dsRBD) family of proteins. RNA binding partners identified so far include elements in 3′ untranslated regions of specific mRNAs and several non-coding RNAs. In NF90, a tandem pair of dsRBDs separated by a natively unstructured segment confers dsRNA binding activity. We determined a crystal structure of the tan...

  10. Aggravation of post-ischemic liver injury by overexpression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3

    OpenAIRE

    Lu Zhou; Hyoung-Won Koh; Ui-Jin Bae; Byung-Hyun Park

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is known to inhibit reperfusion-induced apoptosis. IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is the major circulating carrier protein for IGF-1 and induces apoptosis. In this study, we determined if IGFBP-3 was important in the hepatic response to I/R. To deliver IGFBP-3, we used an adenovirus containing IGFBP-3 cDNA (AdIGFBP-3) or an IGFBP-3 mutant devoid of IGF binding affinity but retaining IGFBP-3 receptor binding ability (AdIGFBP-3GGG). Mice subjected to I/R in...

  11. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Janet L.; Grossman, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep ...

  12. Usefulness of rCBF SPECT in patients with encephalitis. Comparison study with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagamachi, Shigeki; Jinnouchi, Seishi; Flores, L.G. II; Kodama, Takao; Itokazu, Naoya; Nakahara, Hiroshi; Ohnishi, Takashi; Futami, Shigemi; Watanabe, Katsushi [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    Twenty-nine rCBF SPECT study was done in 17 patients with encephalitis. Five of 6 patients (83.3%) showed regional high uptake in acute phase within a week after onset and 16 of 23 studies (69.6%) showed regional low uptake in subacute and chronic phase. Six of 19 lesions (31.6%) with regional high uptake changed to low uptake and 11 lesions (57.9%) improved to normal uptake on follow up studies. Seventeen of 51 lesions with low uptake (33.3%) improved to normal uptake. On the comparative study with MRI, 8 of 18 (44.4%) high uptake area showed cortical thickness or high intensity on T{sub 2} weighted images. Thirty-six of 74 low uptake area (48.6%) showed cortical thickness, brain atrophy or high intensity on T{sub 2} weighted images. Forty-eight of 212 regions (22.6%) with normal MRI findings showed abnormal accumulation of cerebral tracer on rCBF SPECT studies. rCBF SPECT was useful tool for diagnosis and follow up management in patients with encephalitis. (author)

  13. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering. PMID:23954806

  14. Oxidative stress effect on progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) binding to PIBF-receptor in lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Haba, Carlos; Palacio, José R; Palkovics, Tamas; Szekeres-Barthó, Júlia; Morros, Antoni; Martínez, Paz

    2014-01-01

    Receptor-ligand binding is an essential interaction for biological function. Oxidative stress can modify receptors and/or membrane lipid dynamics, thus altering cell physiological functions. The aim of this study is to analyze how oxidative stress may alter receptor-ligand binding and lipid domain distribution in the case of progesterone-induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor. For membrane fluidity regionalization analysis of MEC-1 lymphocytes, two-photon microscopy was used in individual living cells. Lymphocytes were also double stained with AlexaFluor647/progesterone-induced blocking factor and Laurdan to evaluate -induced blocking factor/progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor distribution in the different membrane domains, under oxidative stress. A new procedure has been developed which quantitatively analyzes the regionalization of a membrane receptor among the lipid domains of different fluidity in the plasma membrane. We have been able to establish a new tool which detects and evaluates lipid raft clustering from two-photon microscopy images of individual living cells. We show that binding of progesterone-induced blocking factor to progesterone-induced blocking factor-receptor causes a rigidification of plasma membrane which is related to an increase of lipid raft clustering. However, this clustering is inhibited under oxidative stress conditions. In conclusion, oxidative stress decreases membrane fluidity, impairs receptor-ligand binding and reduces lipid raft clustering.

  15. Cyclosporine A, FK506, and NIM811 ameliorate prolonged CBF reduction and impaired neurovascular coupling after cortical spreading depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henning Piilgaard; Witgen, Brent Marvin; Rasmussen, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is associated with mitochondrial depolarization, increasing intracellular Ca(2+), and the release of free fatty acids, which favor opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and activation of calcineurin (CaN). Here, we test the hypothesis...... and the specific CaN blocker FK506. Cortical spreading depression was induced in rat frontal cortex. Electrocortical activity was recorded by glass microelectrodes, CBF by laser Doppler flowmetry, and tissue oxygen tension with polarographic microelectrodes. Electrocortical activity, basal CBF, CMRO(2......), and neurovascular and neurometabolic coupling were unaffected by all three drugs under control conditions. NIM811 augmented the rise in CBF observed during CSD. Cyclosporine A and FK506 ameliorated the persistent decrease in CBF after CSD. All three drugs prevented disruption of neurovascular coupling after CSD...

  16. Cerebral blood flow in asymptomatic individuals; Relationship with cerebrovascular risk factors and magnetic resonance imaging signal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Yoshinari; Iiji, Osamu; Ashida, Keiichi; Imaizumi, Masatoshi (National Osaka Hospital (Japan))

    1993-04-01

    We studied the relationship between cortical grey matter flow (CBF) and age, cerebrovascular risk factors and the severity of subcortical hypersignals (HS, hyperintensity score in MRI) in 47 asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors. Multiple regression analysis revealed that HS was most strongly related to CBF, and that hematocrit, age and evidence of ischemic change detected in the electrocardiogram also appeared to be independent determinants of CBF. Both the severity and location of hypersignals were correlated with CBF. The most significant negative correlation observed was that between CBF and HS in the basal ganglia-thalamic region, where the degree of signal abnormality was modest. Decreased CBF in asymptomatic subjects with cerebrovascular risk factors may be related to microcirculatory disturbance associated with elevated hematocrit and an increase in the number of risk factors, and functional suppression of cerebral cortex due to the neuronal disconnection associated with subcortical lesions. In addition, impaired cerebral circulation may be related to MRI signal abnormalities. (author).

  17. Rapid dynamics of general transcription factor TFIIB binding during preinitiation complex assembly revealed by single-molecule analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengjian; English, Brian P.; Grimm, Jonathan B.; Kazane, Stephanie A.; Hu, Wenxin; Tsai, Albert; Inouye, Carla; You, Changjiang; Piehler, Jacob; Schultz, Peter G.; Lavis, Luke D.; Revyakin, Andrey; Tjian, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Transcription of protein-encoding genes in eukaryotic cells requires the coordinated action of multiple general transcription factors (GTFs) and RNA polymerase II (Pol II). A “step-wise” preinitiation complex (PIC) assembly model has been suggested based on conventional ensemble biochemical measurements, in which protein factors bind stably to the promoter DNA sequentially to build a functional PIC. However, recent dynamic measurements in live cells suggest that transcription factors mostly interact with chromatin DNA rather transiently. To gain a clearer dynamic picture of PIC assembly, we established an integrated in vitro single-molecule transcription platform reconstituted from highly purified human transcription factors and complemented it by live-cell imaging. Here we performed real-time measurements of the hierarchal promoter-specific binding of TFIID, TFIIA, and TFIIB. Surprisingly, we found that while promoter binding of TFIID and TFIIA is stable, promoter binding by TFIIB is highly transient and dynamic (with an average residence time of 1.5 sec). Stable TFIIB–promoter association and progression beyond this apparent PIC assembly checkpoint control occurs only in the presence of Pol II–TFIIF. This transient-to-stable transition of TFIIB-binding dynamics has gone undetected previously and underscores the advantages of single-molecule assays for revealing the dynamic nature of complex biological reactions. PMID:27798851

  18. Can the detection of misery perfusion in chronic cerebrovascular disease be based on reductions in baseline CBF and vasoreactivity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazawa, Hidehiko; Kobayashi, Masato; Pagani, Marco; Yonekura, Yoshiharu [University of Fukui, Biomedical Imaging Research Center, Matcuoka-cho, Fukui (Japan); Tsuchida, Tatsuro [Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, Department of Radiology, Fukui (Japan); Arai, Yoshikazu; Isozaki, Makoto [University of Fukui, Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Fukui (Japan)

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify whether decreases in baseline regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and in residual cerebral vasoreactivity (CVR), assessed by the acetazolamide (ACZ) challenge, can detect misery perfusion in patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease (CVD). Oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and other haemodynamic parameters were measured in 115 patients (64{+-}9 years old) with unilateral cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease (>70% stenosis) using {sup 15}O-gas and water PET. A significant elevation of OEF, by greater than the mean+2SD compared with healthy controls, was defined as misery perfusion. CBF, CVR determined by percent change in CBF after ACZ administration, OEF and other haemodynamic parameters in the territories of the bilateral middle cerebral arteries were analysed. Diagnostic accuracy for the detection of misery perfusion using the criteria determined by baseline CBF and CVR was evaluated in all patients and in only those patients with occlusive lesions. Ten of 24 patients with misery perfusion showed a significant reduction in CVR. Using criteria determined by significant decreases in CVR and baseline CBF, misery perfusion was detected with a sensitivity of 42% and a specificity of 95% in all patients. In patients with occlusive lesions (n=50), sensitivity was higher but specificity was slightly lower. The diagnostic accuracy of the threshold determined by baseline CBF alone was similar in all patients and in only those patients with occlusive lesions, and was higher than that achieved using the asymmetry index of OEF. Reductions in CVR and baseline CBF in the ACZ challenge for CVD would detect misery perfusion with high specificity. Reduction in baseline rCBF is more accurate than reduction in CVR alone for the detection of misery perfusion. (orig.)

  19. Regional partition coefficient of water in patients with cerebrovascular disease and its effect on rCBF assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Kenji; Hattori, Naoya; Katoh, Chietsugu; Shiga, Tohru; KURODA, Satoshi; Kubo, Naoki; Usui, Reiko; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation with C15O2 PET usually assumes a single tissue compartment model and a fixed brain-blood partition coefficient of water. However, the partition coefficient may change in pathological conditions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the changes of partition coefficient of water in pathological regions and its effect on regional CBF assessment. Methods: Study protocol included 22 patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease to compare p...

  20. Usefulness of CBF measurement in the hyperacute phase of ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrombolytic therapy has emerged as a new treatment option in the hyperacute stage of ischemic stroke. Although a 15% increase in meaningful recovery has been observed at three months, it can also trigger devastating hemorrhagic transformations. Therefore, it is important to select suitable patients to undergo this treatment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement by xenon-enhanced CT (Xe-CT) in patients with acute ischemic stroke as well as its potential in identifying the occluded artery and the stroke subtype. In effect, this study examines the potential for Xe-CT to select the appropriate candidates for thrombolytic therapy. In 36 sequential patients (average age: 64.1±13.1) with sudden-onset of ischemic stroke (except for lacunar stroke) who had presented to our hospital within two hours after the onset, we performed Xe-CT and MRI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). A selective cerebral angiography was also done if further evaluation was warranted. We examined the sensitivity of Xe-CT in demonstrating the ischemic area compared with that of DWI, its potential to identify the stroke subtype, its ability to determine infarction and hemorrhage based on CBF thresholds, and its contribution to selection of thrombolysis candidates. Xe-CT was completed safely in 31 out of 34 patients (91%). Within three hours after symptom onset, Xe-CT detected the ischemic area in most of the patients (94%), whereas DWI failed to do so in 24%. Of 14 patients who underwent both Xe-CT and angiography, the diagnosis of the stroke subtype determined by Xe-CT was confirmed to be correct by angiography in 11 patients (79%). The CBF threshold of non-hemorrhagic infarction in the gray matter became constant (19 ml/100 g/min) at 3-5 hours after the onset. In hemorrhagic infarction, however, the threshold was initially found to be lower (9 ml/100 g/min) at 3-5 hours and reaching comparable levels with non-hemorrhagic subtypes

  1. Nε-lysine acetylation of a bacterial transcription factor inhibits Its DNA-binding activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy Thao

    Full Text Available Evidence suggesting that eukaryotes and archaea use reversible N(ε-lysine (N(ε-Lys acetylation to modulate gene expression has been reported, but evidence for bacterial use of N(ε-Lys acetylation for this purpose is lacking. Here, we report data in support of the notion that bacteria can control gene expression by modulating the acetylation state of transcription factors (TFs. We screened the E. coli proteome for substrates of the bacterial Gcn5-like protein acetyltransferase (Pat. Pat acetylated four TFs, including the RcsB global regulatory protein, which controls cell division, and capsule and flagellum biosynthesis in many bacteria. Pat acetylated residue Lys180 of RcsB, and the NAD(+-dependent Sir2 (sirtuin-like protein deacetylase (CobB deacetylated acetylated RcsB (RcsB(Ac, demonstrating that N(ε-Lys acetylation of RcsB is reversible. Analysis of RcsB(Ac and variant RcsB proteins carrying substitutions at Lys180 provided biochemical and physiological evidence implicating Lys180 as a critical residue for RcsB DNA-binding activity. These findings further the likelihood that reversible N(ε-Lys acetylation of transcription factors is a mode of regulation of gene expression used by all cells.

  2. SQUAMOSA Promoter-Binding Protein-Like Transcription Factors: Star Players for Plant Growth and Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Chen; Zenglin Zhang; Danmei Liu; Kai Zhang; Aili Li; Long Mao

    2010-01-01

    SQUAMOSA Promoter-Binding Protein.Like (SPL) genes encode plant-specific transcription factors that play important roles in plant phase transition, flower and fruit development, plant architecture, gibberellins signaling, sporogenesis, and response to copper and fungal toxins. In Arabidopsis, many SPL genes are post-transcriptionally regulated by the microRNA (miRNA) miR156, among which AtSPL9 in turn positively regulates the expression of the second miRNA miR172. This miR156-AtSPL9-miR172 regulatory pathway plays critical roles during juvenile to adult leaf development and the miR156-SPLs feedback interaction persists all through the plant development, which may be conserved in other plants. In the present paper, we provide a concise review on the most recent progress in the regulatory mechanisms associated with plant SPL transcription factors, especially in relation to miRNAs. The potential application of these discoveries in agriculture is briefly discussed.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor II: complexity of biosynthesis and receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammeltoft, S; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, F C;

    1991-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) belongs to the insulin family of peptides and acts as a growth factor in many fetal tissues and tumors. The gene expression of IGF-II is initiated at three different promoters which gives rise to multiple transcripts. In a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line...... the 4.8-kb mRNA is translated to IGF-II. The cell line secretes two forms of immunoreactive and bioactive IGF-II to the medium of molecular size 10 kd and 7.5 kd which may be involved in autocrine control of cell growth. IGF-II binds to two receptors on the surface of many cell types: the IGF-I receptor...... and the mannose-6-phosphate (Man-6-P)/IGF-II receptor. There is consensus that the cellular effects of IGF-II are mediated by the IGF-I receptor via activation of its intrinsic tyrosine kinase. The Man-6-P/IGF-II receptor is involved in endocytosis of lysosomal enzymes and IGF-II. In selected cell types, however...

  4. Genotypic analysis of meningococcal factor h-binding protein from non-culture clinical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Clark

    Full Text Available Factor H-Binding Protein (fHbp is an outer membrane protein antigen included in two novel meningococcal group B vaccines and, as such, is an important typing target. Approximately 50% of meningococcal disease cases in England and Wales are confirmed using real-time PCR on non-culture clinical specimens only. Protocols for typing fHbp from this subset of cases have not yet been established. Here we present a nested PCR-based assay designed to amplify and sequence fHbp from non-culture clinical specimens. From analytical sensitivity experiments carried out using diluted DNA extracts, an estimated analytical sensitivity limit of 6 fg/µL of DNA (<3 genome copies/µL was calculated. The sensitivity of the assay was shown to be comparable to the ctrA-directed real-time PCR assay currently used to confirm invasive disease diagnoses from submitted clinical specimens. A panel of 96 diverse, patient-matched clinical specimen/isolate pairs from invasive disease cases was used to illustrate the breadth of strain coverage for the assay. All fHbp alleles sequenced from the isolates matched those derived from previous whole genome analyses. The first-round PCR primer binding sites are highly conserved, however an exceptional second-round PCR primer site mismatch in one validation isolate prevented amplification. In this case, amplification from the corresponding clinical specimen was achieved, suggesting that the use of a nested PCR procedure may compensate for any minor mismatches in round-two primer sites. The assay was successful at typing 91/96 (94.8% of the non-culture clinical specimens in this study and exhibits sufficient sensitivity to type fHbp from the vast majority of non-culture clinical specimens received by the Meningococcal Reference Unit, Public Health England.

  5. Pipeline for Efficient Mapping of Transcription Factor Binding Sites and Comparison of Their Models

    KAUST Repository

    Ba alawi, Wail

    2011-06-01

    The control of genes in every living organism is based on activities of transcription factor (TF) proteins. These TFs interact with DNA by binding to the TF binding sites (TFBSs) and in that way create conditions for the genes to activate. Of the approximately 1500 TFs in human, TFBSs are experimentally derived only for less than 300 TFs and only in generally limited portions of the genome. To be able to associate TF to genes they control we need to know if TFs will have a potential to interact with the control region of the gene. For this we need to have models of TFBS families. The existing models are not sufficiently accurate or they are too complex for use by ordinary biologists. To remove some of the deficiencies of these models, in this study we developed a pipeline through which we achieved the following: 1. Through a comparison analysis of the performance we identified the best models with optimized thresholds among the four different types of models of TFBS families. 2. Using the best models we mapped TFBSs to the human genome in an efficient way. The study shows that a new scoring function used with TFBS models based on the position weight matrix of dinucleotides with remote dependency results in better accuracy than the other three types of the TFBS models. The speed of mapping has been improved by developing a parallelized code and shows a significant speed up of 4x when going from 1 CPU to 8 CPUs. To verify if the predicted TFBSs are more accurate than what can be expected with the conventional models, we identified the most frequent pairs of TFBSs (for TFs E4F1 and ATF6) that appeared close to each other (within the distance of 200 nucleotides) over the human genome. We show unexpectedly that the genes that are most close to the multiple pairs of E4F1/ATF6 binding sites have a co-expression of over 90%. This indirectly supports our hypothesis that the TFBS models we use are more accurate and also suggests that the E4F1/ATF6 pair is exerting the

  6. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van;

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... regulatory networks of 12 NAC transcription factors. Our data offer specific single-base resolution fingerprints for most TFs studied and indicate that NAC DNA-binding specificities might be predicted from their DNA-binding domain's sequence. The developed methodology, including the application...... with the workflow associated with functional modules offer a strong resource to unravel the regulatory potential of NAC genes and that this workflow could be used to study other families of transcription factors....

  7. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 modulates muscle differentiation through an insulin-like growth factor-dependent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are a family of six secreted proteins which bind to and modulate the actions of insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and -II). IGFBP-5 is more conserved than other IGFBPs characterized to date, and is expressed in adult rodent muscle and in the developing myotome. We have shown previously that C2 myoblasts secrete IGFBP-5 as their sole IGFBP. Here we use these cells to study the function of IGFBP-5 during myogenesis, a process s...

  8. Identification and characterization of GIP1, an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that enhances the DNA binding affinity and reduces the oligomeric state of G-box binding factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul C. SEHNKE; Beth J. LAUGHNER; Carla R. LYERLY LINEBARGER; William B. GURLEY; Robert J.FERL

    2005-01-01

    Environmental control of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) and other stress response genes in plants is in part brought about by transcriptional regulation involving the G-box cis-acting DNA element and bZIP G-box Binding Factors (GBFs).The mechanisms of GBF regulation and requirements for additional factors in this control process are not well understood.In an effort to identify potential GBF binding and control partners, maize GBF1 was used as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of an A. thaliana cDNA library. GBF Interacting Protein 1 (GIP1) arose from the screen as a 496 amino acid protein with a predicted molecular weight of 53,748 kDa that strongly interacts with GBFs. Northern analysis of A.thaliana tissue suggests a 1.8-1.9 kb GIP1 transcript, predominantly in roots. Immunolocalization studies indicate that GIP1 protein is mainly localized to the nucleus. In vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays using an Adh G-box DNA probe and recombinant A. thaliana GBF3 or maize GBF1, showed that the presence of GIP1 resulted in a tenfold increase in GBF DNA binding activity without altering the migration, suggesting a transient association between GIP1 and GBF. Addition of GIP1 to intentionally aggregated GBF converted GBF to lower molecular weight macromolecular complexes and GIP1 also refolded denatured rhodanese in the absence of ATP. These data suggest GIP1 functions to enhance GBF DNA binding activity by acting as a potent nuclear chaperone or crowbar, and potentially regulates the multimeric state of GBFs, thereby contributing to bZIP-mediated gene regulation.

  9. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein from human decidua inhibits the binding and biological action of IGF-I in cultured choriocarcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The placenta expresses genes for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and possesses IGF-receptors, suggesting that placental growth is regulated by IGFs in an autocrine manner. We have previously shown that human decidua, but not placenta, synthesizes and secretes a 34 K IGF-binding protein (34 K IGF-BP) called placental protein 12. We now used human choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cell monolayer cultures and recombinant (Thr59)IGF-I as a model to study whether the decidual 34 K IGF-BP is able to modulate the receptor binding and biological activity of IGFs in trophoblasts. JEG-3 cells, which possess type I IGF receptors, were unable to produce IGF-BPs. Purified 34 K IGF-BP specifically bound [125I]iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. Multiplication-stimulating activity had 2.5% the potency of (Thr59)IGF-I, and insulin had no effect on the binding of [125I] iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I. 34 K IGF-BP inhibited the binding of [125I] iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I to JEG-3 monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner by forming with the tracer a soluble complex that could not bind to the cell surface as demonstrated by competitive binding and cross-linking experiments. After incubating the cell monolayers with [125I]iodo-(Thr59)IGF-I in the presence of purified binding protein, followed by cross-linking, no affinity labeled bands were seen on autoradiography. In contrast, an intensely labeled band at 40 K was detected when the incubation medium was analyzed, suggesting that (Thr59)IGF-I and 34 K IGF-BP formed a complex in a 1:1 molar ratio. Also, 34 K IGF-BP inhibited both basal and IGF-I-stimulated uptake of alpha-[3H]aminoisobutyric acid in JEG-3 cells. RNA analysis revealed that IGF-II is expressed in JEG-3 cells

  10. Characterization of Diverse Subvariants of the Meningococcal Factor H (fH) Binding Protein for Their Ability To Bind fH, To Mediate Serum Resistance, and To Induce Bactericidal Antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. Seib; B. Brunelli; B. Brogioni; E. Palumbo; S. Bambini; A. Muzzi; F. Dimarcello; S. Marchi; A. van den Ende; B. Aricó; S. Savino; M. Scarselli; M. Comanducci; R. Rappuoli; M.M. Giuliani; M. Pizza

    2011-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a commensal of the human nasopharynx but is also a major cause of septicemia and meningitis. The meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp) binds human factor H (fH), enabling down-regulation of complement activation on the bacterial surface. fHbp is a component of two s

  11. A ChIP-Seq benchmark shows that sequence conservation mainly improves detection of strong transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Håndstad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transcription factors are important controllers of gene expression and mapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBS is key to inferring transcription factor regulatory networks. Several methods for predicting TFBS exist, but there are no standard genome-wide datasets on which to assess the performance of these prediction methods. Also, it is believed that information about sequence conservation across different genomes can generally improve accuracy of motif-based predictors, but it is not clear under what circumstances use of conservation is most beneficial. RESULTS: Here we use published ChIP-seq data and an improved peak detection method to create comprehensive benchmark datasets for prediction methods which use known descriptors or binding motifs to detect TFBS in genomic sequences. We use this benchmark to assess the performance of five different prediction methods and find that the methods that use information about sequence conservation generally perform better than simpler motif-scanning methods. The difference is greater on high-affinity peaks and when using short and information-poor motifs. However, if the motifs are specific and information-rich, we find that simple motif-scanning methods can perform better than conservation-based methods. CONCLUSIONS: Our benchmark provides a comprehensive test that can be used to rank the relative performance of transcription factor binding site prediction methods. Moreover, our results show that, contrary to previous reports, sequence conservation is better suited for predicting strong than weak transcription factor binding sites.

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2, 28 kDa an 24 kDa insulin-like growth factor binding protein levels are decreased in fluid of dominant follicles, obtained from normal and polycystic ovaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin); D.J. Lindenbergh-Kortleve (Dicky); T.D. Pache; E.C. Zwarthoff (Ellen); B.C.J.M. Fauser (Bart); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn order to investigate potential changes in insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) during human follicle maturation, we examined the IGFBP profiles in follicular fluid from follicles in different stages of maturation. Samples were obtained from ovaries of women with regula

  13. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in preterm infants with retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manizheh Mostafa Gharehbaghi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP is the main cause of visual impairment in preterm newborn infants. Objective: This study was conducted to determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 is associated with proliferative ROP and has a role in pathogenesis of the disease in premature infants. Materials and Methods: A total of 71 preterm infants born at or before 32 weeks of gestation participated in this study. Studied patients consisted of 41 neonates without vaso-proliferative findings of ROP as the control group and 30 preterm infants with evidence of severe ROP in follow up eye examination as the case group. Blood samples obtained from these infants 6-8 weeks after birth and blood levels of IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Results: The mean gestation age and birth weight of the studied patients were 28.2±1.6 weeks and 1120.7±197 gram in the case group and 28.4±1.6 weeks and 1189.4±454 gram in the control group (P=0.25 and P=0.44 respectively. The infants in the case group had significantly lower Apgar score at first and 5 min after birth. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein -3 (IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with proliferative ROP than the patients without ROP [592.5±472.9 vs. 995.5±422.2 ng/ml (P=0.009]. Using a cut-off point 770.45 ng/ml for the plasma IGFBP-3, we obtained a sensitivity of 65.9% and a specificity of 66.7% in the preterm infants with vasoproliferative ROP. Conclusion: Our data demonstrated that the blood levels IGFBP-3 was significantly lower in the patients with ROP and it is suspected that IGFBP-3 deficiency in the premature infants may have a pathogenetic role in proliferative ROP.

  14. The Association between Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 Levels and Clinical Prognosis in Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Yaşar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent studies report that the insulin-like growth factor system may be involved in stroke pathogenesis, and is reported to increase myelination, maturation, cell proliferation and neuronal sprouting of the central nervous system. The aim of the present study is to demonstrate the role of insulin-like growth factor system in ischemic stroke pathogenesis and its association with the prognosis by investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels in patients diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke. METHODS: : Sixty-eight patients and 20 healthy individuals were included to this study. Clinical evaluation of the patients was performed according to National Institute of Health Stroke Scale and functional outcomes were graded according to Modified Rankin Scale. Bamford classification was used for the clinical classification of ischemic strokes, and the TOAST system for etiological classification. Each patient's levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 were measured on the first, fifth and thirtieth day of ischemic stroke. RESULTS: Only the levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 on the day of 5 were significantly decreased compared to the control group. The decrease in IGF-1 values was associated with an increased risk of death and was accompanied by clinical worsening and decreased functionality. CONCLUSION: It has been concluded that the levels of investigating insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 may affect mortality risk, clinical condition and functionality outcomes in patients presenting with ischemic stroke, and further studies are needed for the investigation of different effects of insulin-like growth factor-1 in future.

  15. Low prevalence of antibodies and other plasma factors binding to CC chemokines and IL-2 in HIV-positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, C N; Svenson, M; Schade Larsen, C;

    2000-01-01

    Neutralizing cytokine antibodies are found in healthy and diseased individuals, including patients treated with recombinant cytokines. Identification of CCR-5 as co-receptor for HIV has focused interest on CC chemokines and their potential therapeutic use. Chemokine-binding components in plasma...... of HIV-infected patients were therefore assessed by radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay. IgG from 4/505 HIV patients and 9/2000 healthy controls (p>0.05) bound rMIP-1alpha and rMIP-1beta, but not rRANTES. No other plasma factors bound the chemokines. The antibodies inhibited receptor binding of both...... chemokines. There was no association between presence of antibodies and disease stage or HIV progression rate. Three of 11 patients treated with rIL-2 developed IgG antibodies suppressing cellular binding and growth promotion of rIL-2. Hence, circulating factors, including antibodies MIP-1alpha/MIP-1beta...

  16. Cloning of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor cDNA and expression of recombinant soluble TNF-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extracellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ)

  17. Creating PWMs of transcription factors using 3D structure-based computation of protein-DNA free binding energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegmaier Philip

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of transcription factor-DNA binding patterns is crucial for understanding gene transcription. Numerous DNA-binding proteins are annotated as transcription factors in the literature, however, for many of them the corresponding DNA-binding motifs remain uncharacterized. Results The position weight matrices (PWMs of transcription factors from different structural classes have been determined using a knowledge-based statistical potential. The scoring function calibrated against crystallographic data on protein-DNA contacts recovered PWMs of various members of widely studied transcription factor families such as p53 and NF-κB. Where it was possible, extensive comparison to experimental binding affinity data and other physical models was made. Although the p50p50, p50RelB, and p50p65 dimers belong to the same family, particular differences in their PWMs were detected, thereby suggesting possibly different in vivo binding modes. The PWMs of p63 and p73 were computed on the basis of homology modeling and their performance was studied using upstream sequences of 85 p53/p73-regulated human genes. Interestingly, about half of the p63 and p73 hits reported by the Match algorithm in the altogether 126 promoters lay more than 2 kb upstream of the corresponding transcription start sites, which deviates from the common assumption that most regulatory sites are located more proximal to the TSS. The fact that in most of the cases the binding sites of p63 and p73 did not overlap with the p53 sites suggests that p63 and p73 could influence the p53 transcriptional activity cooperatively. The newly computed p50p50 PWM recovered 5 more experimental binding sites than the corresponding TRANSFAC matrix, while both PWMs showed comparable receiver operator characteristics. Conclusions A novel algorithm was developed to calculate position weight matrices from protein-DNA complex structures. The proposed algorithm was extensively validated

  18. Transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha up-regulates microRNA let-7a-1 in lung cancer cells by direct binding

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yani; Zhao, Jian; Hu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Lina; Liang, Liming; Chen, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Aims The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) and microRNA (miRNA) let-7a-1 act as tumor suppressors in many types of cancers including lung cancer. In the present study, we aim to investigate whether let-7a-1 is a novel important target of C/EBPα in lung cancer cells. Methods The DNA sequence of the 2.1 kb let-7a-1 promoter was analyzed with MatInspector 4.1 (http://www.genomatix.de). Human lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299, and human cervical cancer cell line H...

  19. Predicting transcription factor binding sites using local over-representation and comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touzet Hélène

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying cis-regulatory elements is crucial to understanding gene expression, which highlights the importance of the computational detection of overrepresented transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in coexpressed or coregulated genes. However, this is a challenging problem, especially when considering higher eukaryotic organisms. Results We have developed a method, named TFM-Explorer, that searches for locally overrepresented TFBSs in a set of coregulated genes, which are modeled by profiles provided by a database of position weight matrices. The novelty of the method is that it takes advantage of spatial conservation in the sequence and supports multiple species. The efficiency of the underlying algorithm and its robustness to noise allow weak regulatory signals to be detected in large heterogeneous data sets. Conclusion TFM-Explorer provides an efficient way to predict TFBS overrepresentation in related sequences. Promising results were obtained in a variety of examples in human, mouse, and rat genomes. The software is publicly available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/TFM-Explorer.

  20. FootprintDB: Analysis of Plant Cis-Regulatory Elements, Transcription Factors, and Binding Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sebastian, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    FootprintDB is a database and search engine that compiles regulatory sequences from open access libraries of curated DNA cis-elements and motifs, and their associated transcription factors (TFs). It systematically annotates the binding interfaces of the TFs by exploiting protein-DNA complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Each entry in footprintDB is thus a DNA motif linked to the protein sequence of the TF(s) known to recognize it, and in most cases, the set of predicted interface residues involved in specific recognition. This chapter explains step-by-step how to search for DNA motifs and protein sequences in footprintDB and how to focus the search to a particular organism. Two real-world examples are shown where this software was used to analyze transcriptional regulation in plants. Results are described with the aim of guiding users on their interpretation, and special attention is given to the choices users might face when performing similar analyses. PMID:27557773

  1. Myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2A expression is downregulated during temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunyi; Wu, Xuling; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Jinxian

    2016-09-01

    Myocyte-specific enhancer binding factor 2A (MEF2A) is a multifunctional nuclear protein that regulates synaptogenesis, dendritic morphogenesis, and neuronal survival. This study aimed to investigate the expression pattern of MEF2A in epileptogenic processes. MEF2A expression was detected in 20 temporal neocortex tissue samples from patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and 20 samples from trauma patients without epilepsy by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, double-label immunofluorescent staining, and western blot analysis. In addition, the expression patterns of MEF2A in the hippocampus and adjacent cortex of a lithium-pilocarpine-induced TLE rat model and control rats were examined. MEF2A was found to be expressed in the nuclei of neurons but not in the dendrites of neurons and astrocytes. MEF2A expression was significantly downregulated in temporal neocortex of humans and rats with TLE compared to the control groups. In addition, in the lithium-pilocarpine-induced TLE model, MEF2A expression dynamically decreased within 2 months. Taken together, these data suggest that MEF2A is involved in the pathogenesis of TLE. PMID:26439092

  2. rVISTA 2.0: Evolutionary Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2004-01-28

    Identifying and characterizing the patterns of DNA cis-regulatory modules represents a challenge that has the potential to reveal the regulatory language the genome uses to dictate transcriptional dynamics. Several studies have demonstrated that regulatory modules are under positive selection and therefore are often conserved between related species. Using this evolutionary principle we have created a comparative tool, rVISTA, for analyzing the regulatory potential of noncoding sequences. The rVISTA tool combines transcription factor binding site (TFBS) predictions, sequence comparisons and cluster analysis to identify noncoding DNA regions that are highly conserved and present in a specific configuration within an alignment. Here we present the newly developed version 2.0 of the rVISTA tool that can process alignments generated by both zPicture and PipMaker alignment programs or use pre-computed pairwise alignments of seven vertebrate genomes available from the ECR Browser. The rVISTA web server is closely interconnected with the TRANSFAC database, allowing users to either search for matrices present in the TRANSFAC library collection or search for user-defined consensus sequences. rVISTA tool is publicly available at http://rvista.dcode.org/.

  3. Model-based Comparative Prediction of Transcription-Factor Binding Motifs in Anabolic Responses in Bone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andy; B.; Chen; Kazunori; Hamamura; Guohua; Wang; Weirong; Xing; Subburaman; Mohan; Hiroki; Yokota; Yunlong; Liu

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory mechanism that controls the alteration of global gene expression patterns continues to be a challenging task in computational biology. We previously developed an ant algorithm, a biologically-inspired computational technique for microarray data, and predicted putative transcription-factor binding motifs (TFBMs) through mimicking interactive behaviors of natural ants. Here we extended the algorithm into a set of web-based software, Ant Modeler, and applied it to investigate the transcriptional mechanism underlying bone formation. Mechanical loading and administration of bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) are two known treatments to strengthen bone. We addressed a question: Is there any TFBM that stimulates both "anabolic responses of mechanical loading" and "BMP-mediated osteogenic signaling"? Although there is no significant overlap among genes in the two responses, a comparative model-based analysis suggests that the two independent osteogenic processes employ common TFBMs, such as a stress responsive element and a motif for peroxisome proliferator-activated recep- tor (PPAR). The post-modeling in vitro analysis using mouse osteoblast cells sup- ported involvements of the predicted TFBMs such as PPAR, Ikaros 3, and LMO2 in response to mechanical loading. Taken together, the results would be useful to derive a set of testable hypotheses and examine the role of specific regulators in complex transcriptional control of bone formation.

  4. Comparative Analysis of Regulatory Motif Discovery Tools for Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In the post-genomic era, identification of specific regulatory motifs or transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in non-coding DNA sequences, which is essential to elucidate transcriptional regulatory networks, has emerged as an obstacle that frustrates many researchers. Consequently, numerous motif discovery tools and correlated databases have been applied to solving this problem. However, these existing methods, based on different computational algorithms, show diverse motif prediction efficiency in non-coding DNA sequences. Therefore, understanding the similarities and differences of computational algorithms and enriching the motif discovery literatures are important for users to choose the most appropriate one among the online available tools. Moreover, there still lacks credible criterion to assess motif discovery tools and instructions for researchers to choose the best according to their own projects. Thus integration of the related resources might be a good approach to improve accuracy of the application. Recent studies integrate regulatory motif discovery tools with experimental methods to offer a complementary approach for researchers, and also provide a much-needed model for current researches on transcriptional regulatory networks. Here we present a comparative analysis of regulatory motif discovery tools for TFBSs.

  5. The acid-labile subunit of human ternary insulin-like growth factor binding protein complex in serum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Møller, S; Mosfeldt-Laursen, E;

    1998-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is predominantly bound in the trimeric complex comprised of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and acid-labile subunit (ALS). Circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS are believed to reflect the GH secretory status, but the clinical use of...

  6. JASPAR, the open access database of transcription factor-binding profiles: new content and tools in the 2008 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryne, J.C.; Valen, E.; Tang, M.H.E.;

    2008-01-01

    JASPAR is a popular open-access database for matrix models describing DNA-binding preferences for transcription factors and other DNA patterns. With its third major release, JASPAR has been expanded and equipped with additional functions aimed at both casual and power users. The heart of the JASPAR...

  7. Identification and characterization of a pituitary corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein by chemical cross-linking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nishimura, E; Billestrup, Nils; Perrin, M;

    1987-01-01

    A corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein has been identified based on the chemical cross-linking of ovine [Nle21,m-125I-Tyr32]CRF (125I-oCRF) to bovine anterior pituitary membranes using disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS). The apparent molecular weight of the cross-linked complex...

  8. Prognostic Significance of Lymphoid Enhancer-Binding Factor-1 Expression in Egyptian Adult B-Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Aly, Rabab M.; Ansaf B. Yousef

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Lymphoid enhancer-binding factor-1 (LEF-1) is a key transcription factor of wingless-type (Wnt) signaling in various tumors and it is associated with a number of malignant diseases such as leukemia. We explored the expression profile of LEF-1 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and determined its specific prognostic significance in this disease. Materials and Methods: We studied LEF-1 expression in 56 newly diagnosed B-acute ALL adult patients using real-time quantitative polymer...

  9. Reassessing the Role of Staphylococcus aureus Clumping Factor and Fibronectin-Binding Protein by Expression in Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Que, Yok-Ai; François, Patrice; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Entenza, José-Manuel; Vaudaux, Pierre; Moreillon, Philippe

    2001-01-01

    Since Staphylococcus aureus expresses multiple pathogenic factors, studying their individual roles in single-gene-knockout mutants is difficult. To circumvent this problem, S. aureus clumping factor A (clfA) and fibronectin-binding protein A (fnbA) genes were constitutively expressed in poorly pathogenic Lactococcus lactis using the recently described pOri23 vector. The recombinant organisms were tested in vitro for their adherence to immobilized fibrinogen and fibronectin and in vivo for the...

  10. Andrographolide interferes with binding of nuclear factor-κB to DNA in HL-60-derived neutrophilic cells

    OpenAIRE

    María A. Hidalgo; Romero, Alex; Figueroa, Jaime; Cortés, Patricia; Concha, Ilona I; Hancke, Juan L.; Burgos, Rafael A

    2005-01-01

    Andrographolide, the major active component from Andrographis paniculata, has shown to possess anti-inflammatory activity. Andrographolide inhibits the expression of several proinflammatory proteins that exhibit a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding site in their gene.In the present study, we analyzed the effect of andrographolide on the activation of NF-κB induced by platelet-activating factor (PAF) and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) in HL-60 cells differentiated to neutro...

  11. Modulation of enteroviral proteinase cleavage of poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) by conformation and PABP-associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Carlos I.; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) causes a drastic inhibition of cellular cap-dependant protein synthesis due to the cleavage of translation factors eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly (A) binding protein (PABP). Only about half of cellular PABP is cleaved by viral 2A and 3C proteinases during infection. We have investigated PABP cleavage determinants that regulate this partial cleavage. PABP cleavage kinetics analyses indicate that PABP exists in multiple conformations, some of which are resistan...

  12. Serum levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilczak, N; Ramsaransing, GSM; Mostert, J; Chesik, D; De Keyser, J

    2005-01-01

    Using radioimmunoassay we measured serum levels of insulin- like growth factor ( IGF)- 1 and IGF binding protein ( IGFBP)- 3 in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis ( MS) and a benign course ( Expanded Disability Status Scale ( EDSS) less than or equal to 3 despite > 10 years disease duration)

  13. Cell surface syndecan-1 contributes to binding and function of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) on epithelial tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualon, Tobias; Lue, Hongqi; Groening, Sabine; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Jahr, Holger; Denecke, Bernd; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Ludwig, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Surface expressed proteoglycans mediate the binding of cytokines and chemokines to the cell surface and promote migration of various tumor cell types including epithelial tumor cells. We here demonstrate that binding of the chemokine-like inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) to epithelial lung and breast tumor cell lines A549 and MDA-MB231 is sensitive to enzymatic digestion of heparan sulphate chains and competitive inhibition with heparin. Moreover, MIF interaction with heparin was confirmed by chromatography and a structural comparison indicated a possible heparin binding site. These results suggested that proteoglycans carrying heparan sulphate chains are involved in MIF binding. Using shRNA-mediated gene silencing, we identified syndecan-1 as the predominant proteoglycan required for the interaction with MIF. MIF binding was decreased by induction of proteolytic shedding of syndecan-1, which could be prevented by inhibition of the metalloproteinases involved in this process. Finally, MIF induced the chemotactic migration of A549 cells, wound closure and invasion into matrigel without affecting cell proliferation. These MIF-induced responses were abrogated by heparin or by silencing of syndecan-1. Thus, our study indicates that syndecan-1 on epithelial tumor cells promotes MIF binding and MIF-mediated cell migration. This may represent a relevant mechanism through which MIF enhances tumor cell motility and metastasis.

  14. Promoter recognition in archaea is mediated by transcription factors: identification of transcription factor aTFB from Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus as archaeal TATA-binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Gohl, H P; Gröndahl, B; Thomm, M

    1995-01-01

    At least two transcription factors, aTFB and aTFA, are required for accurate and faithful in vitro transcription of homologous templates in cell-free extracts from the methanogenic Archaeon Methanococcus thermolithotrophicus. We have recently shown that the function of aTFB can be replaced by eucaryal TATA-binding proteins. Here we demonstrate using template commitment experiments that promoter recognition in an Archaeon is mediated by transcription factors. The archaeal TATA box was identifi...

  15. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  16. Computational Study of the Binding Mechanism of Actin-Depolymerizing Factor 1 with Actin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xue; Dong, Chun-Hai; Yang, Jian Ming; Yao, Xiao Jun

    2016-01-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein. It plays important roles in cellular function and exists either in the monomeric (G-actin) or polymeric form (F-actin). Members of the actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin protein family bind to both G-actin and F-actin and play vital roles in actin dynamics by manipulating the rates of filament polymerization and depolymerization. It has been reported that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants of actin-depolymerizing factor 1 (ADF1) in Arabidopsis thaliana decreased the binding affinity of ADF for the actin monomer. To investigate the binding mechanism and dynamic behavior of the ADF1-actin complex, we constructed a homology model of the AtADF1-actin complex based on the crystal structure of AtADF1 and the twinfilin C-terminal ADF-H domain in a complex with a mouse actin monomer. The model was then refined for subsequent molecular dynamics simulations. Increased binding energy of the mutated system was observed using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area and Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-GB/PBSA) methods. To determine the residues that make decisive contributions to the ADF1 actin-binding affinity, per-residue decomposition and computational alanine scanning analyses were performed, which provided more detailed information on the binding mechanism. Root-mean-square fluctuation and principal component analyses confirmed that the S6D and R98A/K100A mutants induced an increased conformational flexibility. The comprehensive molecular insight gained from this study is of great importance for understanding the binding mechanism of ADF1 and G-actin. PMID:27414648

  17. The unsialylated subpopulation of recombinant activated factor VII binds to the asialo-glycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) on primary rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seested, Torben; Nielsen, Hanne M; Christensen, Erik I; Appa, Rupa S

    2010-12-01

    Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa; NovoSeven®) is a heterogeneously glycosylated serine protease used for treatment of haemophiliacs with inhibitors. The drug substance contains a subpopulation consisting of ~20% of rFVIIa molecules which are unsialylated and consists of carbohydrate moieties with terminally exposed galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc). Recently, data from an in situ perfused liver model showed that a subpopulation of rFVIIa, appearing to be unsialylated rFVIIa, was cleared by the liver, thus suggesting a carbohydrate-moiety mediated mechanism. The parenchymal cells of the liver, hepatocytes, are known to abundantly express functional carbohydrate-specific receptors and in this study we therefore used primary rat hepatocytes to study binding and intracellular fate of rFVIIa at a cellular level. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that rFVIIa was distributed into distinct intracellular vesicles and electron microscopic autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated rFVIIa distributed only into cytoplasmic free vesicles resembling endosomes and lysosomes. These findings suggest that endocytosis of rFVIIa in hepatocytes could be partly mediated via initial membrane binding to a receptor. Quantitative binding studies showed that the presence of excess unlabelled asialo-orosomucoid, asialo-rFVIIa and GalNAc significantly decreased binding of 125I-rFVIIa. An antibody which specifically binds to the carbohydrate recognition domain of the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) significantly decreased binding of asialo-rFVIIa by ~36% and rFVIIa by ~19%. Together our data showed that a receptor-mediated mechanism involving the ASGPR is able to bind a subpopulation of unsialylated rFVIIa, while a hepatic mechanism for binding and clearing sialylated rFVIIa is still unknown.

  18. DNA binding during expanded bed adsorption and factors affecting adsorbent aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Mathiasen, N.; Hobley, Timothy John

    2008-01-01

    tolerance of anion exchangers when binding DNA. However, more importantly. with the adsorbents examined here. attempts to reduce bed aggregation by feedstock conditioning with added salt may increase DNA binding leading to a reduction in expanded bed adsorption performance compromising protein capture...... ligand densities to be examined. Very high dynamic binding capacities at 10% breakthrough were found in the absence of added salt. However, the highest binding capacities (similar to 10 and similar to 19mg DNA ml(-1) gel) were found in buffers containing added salt at concentrations of either 0.25 or 0......) even though the dynamic binding capacity was reduced as DNA concentration was increased. The extent of bed contraction during DNA loading was found to be a function of added salt concentration and ligand density of the adsorbent. The results imply that ligand density significantly affects the salt...

  19. Cobalt inhibits the interaction between hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha and von Hippel-Lindau protein by direct binding to hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yong; Hilliard, George; Ferguson, Tsuneo; Millhorn, David E

    2003-05-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) activates the expression of genes that contain a hypoxia response element. The alpha-subunits of the HIF transcription factors are degraded by proteasomal pathways during normoxia but are stabilized under hypoxic conditions. The von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) mediates the ubiquitination and rapid degradation of HIF-alpha (including HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha). Post-translational hydroxylation of a proline residue in the oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain of HIF-alpha is required for the interaction between HIF and VHL. It has previously been established that cobalt mimics hypoxia and causes accumulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. However, little is known about the mechanism by which this occurs. In an earlier study, we demonstrated that cobalt binds directly to the ODD domain of HIF-2alpha. Here we provide the first evidence that cobalt inhibits pVHL binding to HIF-alpha even when HIF-alpha is hydroxylated. Deletion of 17 amino acids within the ODD domain of HIF-2alpha that are required for pVHL binding prevented the binding of cobalt and stabilized HIF-2alpha during normoxia. These findings show that cobalt mimics hypoxia, at least in part, by occupying the VHL-binding domain of HIF-alpha and thereby preventing the degradation of HIF-alpha. PMID:12606543

  20. LGALS3BP, lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein, induces vascular endothelial growth factor in human breast cancer cells and promotes angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccolo, Enza; Tinari, Nicola; Semeraro, Daniela; Traini, Sara; Fichera, Imma; Cumashi, Albana; La Sorda, Rossana; Spinella, Francesca; Bagnato, Anna; Lattanzio, Rossano; D'Egidio, Maurizia; Di Risio, Annalisa; Stampolidis, Pavlos; Piantelli, Mauro; Natoli, Clara; Ullrich, Axel; Iacobelli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum or tissue levels of lectin galactoside-binding soluble 3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) have been associated with short survival and development of metastasis in a variety of human cancers. However, the role of LGALS3BP, particularly in the context of tumor-host relationships, is still missing. Here, we show that LGALS3BP knockdown in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells leads to a decreased adhesion to fibronectin, a reduced transendothelial migration and, more importantly, a reduced expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Production of VEGF, that was restored by exposure of silenced cells to recombinant LGALS3BP, required an intact PI3k/Akt signaling. Furthermore, we show that LGALS3BP was able to directly stimulate HUVEC tubulogenesis in a VEGF-independent, galectin-3-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis of human breast cancer tissues revealed a correlation among LGALS3BP expression, VEGF expression, and blood vessel density. We propose that in addition to its prometastatic role, LGALS3BP secreted by breast cancer cells functions critically as a pro-angiogenic factor through a dual mechanism, i.e by induction of tumor VEGF and stimulation of endothelial cell tubulogenesis.

  1. Non-p53 p53RE binding protein, a human transcription factor functionally analogous to P53

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Xiaoya; Levine, Arnold J.; Lu, Hua

    1998-01-01

    The transactivation activity of the p53 tumor suppressor protein is critical for regulating cell growth and apoptosis. We describe the identification of a transcription factor that is functionally similar to p53 and contains the same DNA binding and transcription activities specific for the p53 responsive DNA element (p53RE). This protein was highly purified through chromatography from HeLa cell extracts. The purified protein was able to bind specifically to the p53RE derived from a p21waf1 p...

  2. Proteolysis of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1, -2 and -4 : function of fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Katrin

    2012-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) stimulate cell growth, survival and differentiation, and have insulin-like activity. A family of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-1 through -6) bind to IGFs with high affinity and modulate their activity in the circulation and locally at cell-surface receptors. IGFBPs can potentiate or inhibit IGF-activity. Proteolysis is recognised as the predominant mechanism for IGF release from IGFBPs. IGFBPs have also IGF-independent effects, through the ...

  3. mRNA decay factor AUF1 binds the internal ribosomal entry site of enterovirus 71 and inhibits virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available AU-rich element binding factor 1 (AUF1 has a role in the replication cycles of different viruses. Here we demonstrate that AUF1 binds the internal ribosome entry site (IRES of enterovirus 71 (EV71 and negatively regulates IRES-dependent translation. During EV71 infection, AUF1 accumulates in the cytoplasm where viral replication occurs, whereas AUF1 localizes predominantly in the nucleus in mock-infected cells. AUF1 knockdown in infected cells increases IRES activity and synthesis of viral proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that AUF1 interacts with the EV71 IRES to negatively regulate viral translation and replication.

  4. Binding of IgM rheumatoid factor to group A, C and G streptococci with IgG Fc receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, A K; Christensen, P; Svensson, M L

    1986-01-01

    The possibility that IgM rheumatoid factors bind to streptococci was studied. Using a sequence of Sephadex G200 gel filtration, protein A-Sepharose CL-4B chromatography and preparatory electrophoresis, IgM was isolated from the sera of 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and then radiolabelled with 125I. There was significant binding of radiolabelled IgM to group-A streptococci types M1, M15 and M22, and to a group-C and a group-G strain, all expressing IgG Fc receptors, but none to Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli or to 11 other strains of streptococci without IgG Fc receptors. The radiolabelled IgM was separated by affinity chromatography on a column containing human IgG. Types M1 and M15 bound the fraction retained on the column, whereas M22 bound both this fraction and the non-retained fraction. Commercial human IgG, even at high concentrations, did not inhibit binding. The binding reaction, which is perhaps triggered either by the IgM rheumatoid factor or by IgG complexed with rheumatoid factor, could be a useful tool for removal of anti-immunoglobulin from the blood of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Identifying functional transcription factor binding sites in yeast by considering their positional preference in the promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jou Lai

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site (TFBS identification plays an important role in deciphering gene regulatory codes. With comprehensive knowledge of TFBSs, one can understand molecular mechanisms of gene regulation. In the recent decades, various computational approaches have been proposed to predict TFBSs in the genome. The TFBS dataset of a TF generated by each algorithm is a ranked list of predicted TFBSs of that TF, where top ranked TFBSs are statistically significant ones. However, whether these statistically significant TFBSs are functional (i.e. biologically relevant is still unknown. Here we develop a post-processor, called the functional propensity calculator (FPC, to assign a functional propensity to each TFBS in the existing computationally predicted TFBS datasets. It is known that functional TFBSs reveal strong positional preference towards the transcriptional start site (TSS. This motivates us to take TFBS position relative to the TSS as the key idea in building our FPC. Based on our calculated functional propensities, the TFBSs of a TF in the original TFBS dataset could be reordered, where top ranked TFBSs are now the ones with high functional propensities. To validate the biological significance of our results, we perform three published statistical tests to assess the enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO terms, the enrichment of physical protein-protein interactions, and the tendency of being co-expressed. The top ranked TFBSs in our reordered TFBS dataset outperform the top ranked TFBSs in the original TFBS dataset, justifying the effectiveness of our post-processor in extracting functional TFBSs from the original TFBS dataset. More importantly, assigning functional propensities to putative TFBSs enables biologists to easily identify which TFBSs in the promoter of interest are likely to be biologically relevant and are good candidates to do further detailed experimental investigation. The FPC is implemented as a web tool at http://santiago.ee.ncku.edu.tw/FPC/.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 influences pancreatic cancer cell growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah K Johnson; Randy S Haun

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the functional significance of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) overexpression in pancreatic cancer (PaC).METHODS: The effects of IGFBP-5 on cell growth were assessed by stable transfection of BxPC-3 and PANC-1 cell lines and measuring cell number and DNA synthesis. Alterations in the cell cycle were assessed by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses.Changes in cell survival and signal transduction were evaluated after mitogen activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor treatment.RESULTS: After serum depr ivat ion, IGFBP-5 expression increased both cell number and DNA synthesis in BxPC-3 cells, but reduced cell number in PANC-1 cells. Consistent with this observation, cell cycle analysis of IGFBP-5-expressing cells revealed accelerated cell cycle progression in BxPC-3 and G2/M arrest of PANC-1 cells. Signal transduction analysis revealed that Akt activation was increased in BxPC-3, but reduced in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. Inhibition of PI3K with LY294002 suppressed extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 and -2 (ERK1/2) activation in BxPC-3, but enhanced ERK1/2 activation in PANC-1 cells that express IGFBP-5. When MEK1/2 was blocked, Akt activation remained elevated in IGFBP-5 expressing PaC cells; however, inhibition of PI3K or MEK1/2 abrogated IGFBP-5-mediated cell survival.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that IGFBP-5 expression affects the cell cycle and survival signal pathways and thus it may be an important mediator of PaC cell growth.

  7. Activation of Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Factors by Fenofibrate and Gemfibrozil Stimulate Myelination in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhei Nishimura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocytes are major myelin-producing cells and play essential roles in the function of a healthy nervous system. However, they are also one of the most vulnerable neural cell types in the central nervous system (CNS, and myelin abnormalities in the CNS are found in a wide variety of neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, adrenoleukodystrophy, and schizophrenia. There is an urgent need to identify small molecular weight compounds that can stimulate myelination. In this study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis to identify pharmacodynamic effects common to miconazole and clobetasol, which have been shown to stimulate myelination by mouse oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Of the genes differentially expressed in both miconazole- and clobetasol-treated mouse OPCs compared with untreated cells, we identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs common to both drug treatments. Gene ontology analysis revealed that these DEGs are significantly associated with the sterol biosynthetic pathway, and further bioinformatics analysis suggested that sterol regulatory element binding factors (SREBFs might be key upstream regulators of the DEGs. In silico screening of a public database for chemicals associated with SREBF activation identified fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα agonist, as a drug that increases the expression of known SREBF targets, raising the possibility that fenofibrate may also stimulate myelination. To test this, we performed in vivo imaging of zebrafish expressing a fluorescent reporter protein under the control of the myelin basic protein (mbp promoter. Treatment of zebrafish with fenofibrate significantly increased expression of the fluorescent reporter compared with untreated zebrafish. This increase was attenuated by co-treatment with fatostatin, a specific inhibitor of SREBFs, confirming that the fenofibrate effect was mediated via SREBFs. Furthermore, incubation

  8. Progesterone-induced blocking factor activates STAT6 via binding to a novel IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Noemi; Halasz, Melinda; Polgar, Beata; Poehlmann, Tobias G; Markert, Udo R; Palkovics, Tamas; Keszei, Marton; Par, Gabriella; Kiss, Katalin; Szeberenyi, Jozsef; Grama, Laszlo; Szekeres-Bartho, Julia

    2006-01-15

    Progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF) induces Th2-dominant cytokine production. Western blotting and EMSA revealed phosphorylation as well as nuclear translocation of STAT6 and inhibition of STAT4 phosphorylation in PIBF-treated cells. The silencing of STAT6 by small interfering RNA reduced the cytokine effects. Because the activation of the STAT6 pathway depends on the ligation of IL-4R, we tested the involvement of IL-4R in PIBF-induced STAT6 activation. Although PIBF does not bind to IL-4R, the blocking of the latter with an Ab abolished PIBF-induced STAT6 activation, whereas the blocking of the IL-13R had no effect. PIBF activated suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 and inhibited IL-12-induced suppressor of cytokine signaling-1 activation. The blocking of IL-4R counteracted all the described effects, suggesting that the PIBF receptor interacts with IL-4R alpha-chain, allowing PIBF to activate the STAT6 pathway. PIBF did not phosphorylate Jak3, suggesting that the gamma-chain is not needed for PIBF signaling. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed a colocalization and at 37 degrees C a cocapping of the FITC PIBF-activated PIBF receptor and PE anti-IL-4R-labeled IL-4R. After the digestion of the cells with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, the STAT6-activating effect of PIBF was lost, whereas that of IL-4 remained unaltered. These data suggest the existence of a novel type of IL-4R composed of the IL-4R alpha-chain and the GPI-anchored PIBF receptor. PMID:16393965

  9. Chromatin remodeling occurs independent of transcription factor binding during 5-azacytidine reactivation of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, L.K.; Litt, M.D.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A novel system of differential gene expression in mammals is established during normal female embryogenesis by X chromosome inactivation. Studies of 5-aza-2{prime}-deoxycytidine (5aCdr)-induced reactivation of genes on the inactive human X chromosome strongly implicate DNA methylation in maintaining the transcriptional repression of discrete loci on the inactive X. During the process of 5aCdr-induced reactivation of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the inactive X chromosome, changes in nuclease sensitivity of chromatin in the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene and HPRT mRNA levels have been analyzed from 0-72 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Increased nuclease sensitivity is first detectable at 6 hrs. and reaches a maximum at 24 hrs. after initial exposure to 5aCdr, while the appearance of HPRT mRNA levels is first detectable by RT-PCR at 24 hrs. and reaches a maximum of 48 hrs. after 5aCdr exposure. Thus, the change in chromatin structure of the 5{prime} region as a result of 5aCdr treatment appears to occur prior to active transcription of the gene. However, it is unclear if the remodeling of chromatin requires the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region, or if the binding of transcription factors is only required for transcription of the HPRT gene. We now have assayed the binding of transcription factors to the 5{prime} region of the HPRT gene on the inactive X chromosome during 5aCdr reactivation. We find that the change in chromatin structure as a result of 5aCdr treatment occurs independent of transcription factor binding, and that the binding of factors is correlated with active transcription of the gene rather than remodeling of chromatin structure. These data suggest that the differential binding of transcriptional activators (and differential expression of the HPRT gene) to the active and inactive HPRT genes is modulated by the accessibility of their binding sites due to chromatin structure.

  10. Klebsiella 'modifying factor': binding studies with HLA-B27+ and B27- lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Trapani, J A; McKenzie, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis that extracts of some klebsiella organisms bind selectively to the lymphocytes of HLA-B27+ individuals and induce the appearance of new antigens, attempts were made to detect the binding of klebsiella products to HLA-B27+ and B27- lymphocytes by a number of different techniques. Firstly, blocking of the binding of two different HLA-B27 specific monoclonal antibodies to HLA-B27+ lymphocytes has been examined following exposure of the lymphocytes to a cell-free culture filtrate fro...

  11. Coupling of folding and DNA-binding in the bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimeric transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Deegan, Brian J; Farooq, Amjad

    2008-05-01

    In response to mitogenic stimuli, the heterodimeric transcription factor Jun-Fos binds to the promoters of a diverse array of genes involved in critical cellular responses such as cell growth and proliferation, cell cycle regulation, embryogenic development and cancer. In so doing, Jun-Fos heterodimer regulates gene expression central to physiology and pathology of the cell in a specific and timely manner. Here, using the technique of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), we report detailed thermodynamics of the bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer to synthetic dsDNA oligos containing the TRE and CRE consensus promoter elements. Our data suggest that binding of the bZIP domains to both TRE and CRE is under enthalpic control and accompanied by entropic penalty at physiological temperatures. Although the bZIP domains bind to both TRE and CRE with very similar affinities, the enthalpic contributions to the free energy of binding to CRE are more favorable than TRE, while the entropic penalty to the free energy of binding to TRE is smaller than CRE. Despite such differences in their thermodynamic signatures, enthalpy and entropy of binding of the bZIP domains to both TRE and CRE are highly temperature-dependent and largely compensate each other resulting in negligible effect of temperature on the free energy of binding. From the plot of enthalpy change versus temperature, the magnitude of heat capacity change determined is much larger than that expected from the direct association of bZIP domains with DNA. This observation is interpreted to suggest that the basic regions in the bZIP domains are largely unstructured in the absence of DNA and only become structured upon interaction with DNA in a coupled folding and binding manner. Our new findings are rationalized in the context of 3D structural models of bZIP domains of Jun-Fos heterodimer in complex with dsDNA oligos containing the TRE and CRE consensus sequences. Taken together, our study demonstrates that enthalpy is

  12. A study of cerebral hemodynamics in various cerebrovascular disorders by means of rCBF measurement with single photon emission computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Xe-133 inhalation method, regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured for the purpose of analyzing the pathophysiology of various cerebrovascular disorders. Included in this series were 38 normal volunteers (N), 72 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease (ICD), 16 with subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), 9 with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), 6 with Moyamoya disease (MD), and 4 with hypertensive intracerebral hematoma (HIH). In the N group, rCBF was independent of sex and laterality. Increased rCBF was observed in the frontal region, as compared with other regions. A significantly increased rCBF was observed in the thirties decade of life; the difference in rCBF was, however, not statistically significant above the age of 30 years. In the ICD group, rCBF decreased in association with severer disorder. In cases of severe disorder, a significantly decreased rCBF was observed in the whole area, as compared with the control group. SPECT allowed early detection of decreased rCBF due to vaso-spasm in the SAH group. The groups of AVM, MD, and HIH showed decreased rCBF in the surrounding areas of the lesions. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Nonlinearity arising from noncooperative transcription factor binding enhances negative feedback and promotes genetic oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Lengyel, Iván M; Oates, Andrew C; Morelli, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    We study the effects of multiple binding sites in the promoter of a genetic oscillator. We evaluate the regulatory function of a promoter with multiple binding sites in the absence of cooperative binding, and consider different hypotheses for how the number of bound repressors affects transcription rate. Effective Hill exponents of the resulting regulatory functions reveal an increase in the nonlinearity of the feedback with the number of binding sites. We identify optimal configurations that maximize the nonlinearity of the feedback. We use a generic model of a biochemical oscillator to show that this increased nonlinearity is reflected in enhanced oscillations, with larger amplitudes over wider oscillatory ranges. Although the study is motivated by genetic oscillations in the zebrafish segmentation clock, our findings may reveal a general principle for gene regulation.

  14. Dynamic changes in binding of immunoglobulin heavy chain 3' regulatory region to protein factors during class switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Ju, Zhongliang; Hassan, Rabih; Volpi, Sabrina A; Emelyanov, Alexander V; Birshtein, Barbara K

    2011-08-19

    The 3' regulatory region (3' RR) of the Igh locus works at long distances on variable region (V(H)) and switch region (I) region promoters to initiate germ line (non-coding) transcription (GT) and promote class switch recombination (CSR). The 3' RR contains multiple elements, including enhancers (hs3a, hs1.2, hs3b, and hs4) and a proposed insulator region containing CTCF (CCCTC-binding factor) binding sites, i.e. hs5/6/7 and the downstream region ("38"). Notably, deletion of each individual enhancer (hs3a-hs4) has no significant phenotypic consequence, suggesting that the 3' RR has considerable structural flexibility in its function. To better understand how the 3' RR functions, we identified transcription factor binding sites and used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to monitor their occupancy in splenic B cells that initiate GT and undergo CSR (LPS±IL4), are deficient in GT and CSR (p50(-/-)), or do not undergo CSR despite efficient GT (anti-IgM+IL4). Like 3' RR enhancers, hs5-7 and the 38 region were observed to contain multiple Pax5 binding sites (in addition to multiple CTCF sites). We found that the Pax5 binding profile to the 3' RR dynamically changed during CSR independent of the specific isotype to which switching was induced, and binding focused on hs1.2, hs4, and hs7. CTCF-associated and CTCF-independent cohesin interactions were also identified. Our observations are consistent with a scaffold model in which a platform of active protein complexes capable of facilitating GT and CSR can be formed by varying constellations of 3' RR elements.

  15. Predicting sequence and structural specificities of RNA binding regions recognized by splicing factor SRSF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA-binding proteins (RBPs play diverse roles in eukaryotic RNA processing. Despite their pervasive functions in coding and noncoding RNA biogenesis and regulation, elucidating the sequence specificities that define protein-RNA interactions remains a major challenge. Recently, CLIP-seq (Cross-linking immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing has been successfully implemented to study the transcriptome-wide binding patterns of SRSF1, PTBP1, NOVA and fox2 proteins. These studies either adopted traditional methods like Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation (MEME to discover the sequence consensus of RBP's binding sites or used Z-score statistics to search for the overrepresented nucleotides of a certain size. We argue that most of these methods are not well-suited for RNA motif identification, as they are unable to incorporate the RNA structural context of protein-RNA interactions, which may affect to binding specificity. Here, we describe a novel model-based approach--RNAMotifModeler to identify the consensus of protein-RNA binding regions by integrating sequence features and RNA secondary structures. Results As an example, we implemented RNAMotifModeler on SRSF1 (SF2/ASF CLIP-seq data. The sequence-structural consensus we identified is a purine-rich octamer 'AGAAGAAG' in a highly single-stranded RNA context. The unpaired probabilities, the probabilities of not forming pairs, are significantly higher than negative controls and the flanking sequence surrounding the binding site, indicating that SRSF1 proteins tend to bind on single-stranded RNA. Further statistical evaluations revealed that the second and fifth bases of SRSF1octamer motif have much stronger sequence specificities, but weaker single-strandedness, while the third, fourth, sixth and seventh bases are far more likely to be single-stranded, but have more degenerate sequence specificities. Therefore, we hypothesize that nucleotide specificity and

  16. /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor specific binding to placentas and fetal membranes from varoius pregnancy states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, G.E.; Siddiqi, T.A.; Rao, Ch. V.; Carman, F.R.

    1988-01-01

    Specific binding of /sup 125/I-human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) to homogenates of term human placentas and fetal membranes from normal and appropriate for gestational age (N = 20), intrauterine growth retarded (N = 9), twin (N = 11), White class AB diabetic (N = 12), and large for gestational age (N = 13) pregnancies was measured. In all pregnancy states, placentas bound approximately four times more /sup 125/I-hEGF than did fetal membranes (P<0.0001). There was no significant differnce in /sup 125/I-hEGF binding to fetal membranes from the various pregnancy states (P<0.05). /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding to placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies was significantly greater compared with placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies (P<0.05). The binding to placentas from pregnancies complicated by White class AB diabetes or large for gestational age infants, on the other hand, was not significantly different from that to placentas from normal and appropriate for gestational age pregnancies. /sup 125/I-hEGF specific binding did not differ between placentas from intrauterine growth retarded or twin pregnancies (P<0.05). Placental and fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding did not vary with fetal sex, maternal race, placental weight, or gestational age between 37 to 42 weeks (P<0.05). Placental but not fetal membrane /sup 125/I-hEGF binding increased with increasing infant weight when appropriate for gestational age and large for gestational age infants were included (P<0.05, r = 0.38, N = 32) but not for intrauterine growth retarded, appropriate for gestational age, or large for gestational age infants alone.

  17. Calcium modulates promoter occupancy by the Entamoeba histolytica Ca2+-binding transcription factor URE3-BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Leo, Megan; Line, C Genghis; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2003-02-14

    The Entamoeba histolytica upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) binds to the URE3 sequence of the Gal/GalNAc-inhibitable lectin hgl5 and ferredoxin 1 (fdx) gene promoters. This binding can be inhibited in vitro by addition of calcium. Two EF-hand motifs, which are associated with the ability to bind calcium, are present in the amino acid sequence of URE3-BP. Mutation of the second EF-hand motif in URE3-BP resulted in the loss of calcium inhibition of DNA binding as monitored by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that URE3-BP was physically bound to the hgl5 and fdx promoters in vivo. Parasite intracellular calcium concentrations were altered by changes in extracellular calcium. Promoter occupancy was lost when intracellular calcium levels were increased by coordinate increases in extracellular calcium. Increased intracellular calcium also resulted in decreased levels of URE3-BP mRNA. Together these results demonstrate that changes in extracellular calcium result in changes in URE3-BP mRNA and in the ability of URE3-BP to bind to URE3-containing promoters. Modulation of URE3-BP by calcium may represent an important mechanism of control of gene expression in E. histolytica.

  18. Binding of Streptococcus mutans SR protein to human monocytes: production of tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1, and interleukin 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soell, M; Holveck, F; Schöller, M; Wachsmann, R D; Klein, J P

    1994-05-01

    To examine the possible implication of protein SR, an I/II-related antigen from Streptococcus mutans OMZ 175 (serotype f), in inflammatory reactions, we tested the immunomodulatory effects of protein SR on human monocytes. Using biotinylated protein, we provide evidence that protein SR binds to human monocytes in dose-, time-, and calcium-dependent manners through specific interactions. These results were confirmed by competition experiments using either soluble human monocyte extract or anti-SR immunoglobulin G. Binding occurred through lectin-like interactions between SR and carbohydrate portions of monocyte membrane glycoproteins, since binding could be inhibited by several sugars, especially fucose and N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), which were confirmed by ligand blotting to be the primer ligands recognized by SR on human monocyte extracts. The ability of protein SR to stimulate the production of cytokines by human circulating monocytes was then examined. The release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 1 beta, and interleukin 6 is time and dose dependent and not affected by the addition of polymyxin B. Activation of monocytes resulted from specific binding of SR to NANA and fucose present on cell surface glycoproteins since TNF-alpha release could be inhibited by sialidase and pronase treatment of monocytes and by NANA and fucose. These results confirm that sialic acid and fucose present on cell surface macromolecules and especially glycoproteins are needed for the binding of SR to monocytes and for the release of TNF-alpha. PMID:8168943

  19. Latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein-3 and fibulin-1C interact with the extracellular domain of the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidels Leon

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The membrane-bound cell-surface precursor and soluble forms of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF contribute to many cellular developmental processes. The widespread occurrence of HB-EGF in cell and tissue types has led to observations of its role in such cellular and tissue events as tumor formation, cell migration, extracellular matrix formation, wound healing, and cell adherence. Several studies have reported the involvement of such extracellular matrix proteins as latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein, TGF-β, and fibulin-1 in some of these processes. To determine whether HB-EGF interacts with extracellular matrix proteins we used the extracellular domain of proHB-EGF in a yeast two-hybrid system to screen a monkey kidney cDNA library. cDNA clones containing nucleotide sequences encoding domains of two proteins were obtained and their derived amino acid sequences were evaluated. Results From ≈ 3 × 106 screened monkey cDNA clones, cDNA clones were recovered that contained nucleotide sequences encoding domains of the monkey latent transforming growth factorbinding protein-3 (MkLTBP-3 and fibulin-1C protein. The amino acid sequence derived from the MkLTBP-3 gene shared 98.6% identity with human LTBP-3 and 86.7% identity with mouse LTBP-3 amino acid sequences. The amino acid sequence derived from the monkey fibulin-1C gene shared 97.2% identity with human fibulin-1C. Yeast two-hybrid screens indicate that LTBP-3 and fibulin-1C interact with proHB-EGF through their calcium-binding EGF-like modules. Conclusions The interactions of the extracellular domain of proHB-EGF with LTBP-3 and fibulin-1C suggest novel functions for HB-EGF between cell and tissue surfaces.

  20. Structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I with reduced affinity for serum binding proteins and the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) have been prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of a synthetic IGF-I gene and subsequent expression and purification of the mutant protein from the conditioned media of transformed yeast. [Phe-1, Val1, Asn2, Gln3, His4, Ser8, His9, Glu12, Tyr15, Leu16]IGF-I (B-chain mutant), in which the first 16 amino acids of hIGF-I were replaced with the first 17 amino acids of the B-chain of insulin, has >1000-, 100-, and 2-fold reduced potency for human serum binding proteins, the rat liver type 2 IGF receptor, and the human placental type 1 IGF receptor, respectively. The B-chain mutant also has 4-fold increased affinity for the human placental insulin receptor. [Gln3, Ala4] IGF-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins, but is equipotent to hIGF-I at the types 1 and 2 IGF and insulin receptors. [Tyr15, Leu16] IGH-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins and 10-fold increased affinity for the insulin receptor. The peptide in which these four-point mutations are combined, [Gln3, Ala4, Tyr15,Leu16]IGF-I, has 600-fold reduced affinity for the serum binding proteins. All four of these mutants stimulate DNA synthesis in the rat vascular smooth muscle cell line A10 with potencies reflecting their potency at the type 1 IGF receptor. These studies identify some of the domains of hIGF-I which are responsible for maintaining high affinity binding with the serum binding protein and the type 2 IGF receptor. In addition, These peptides will be useful in defining the role of the type 2 IGF receptor and serum binding proteins in the physiological actions of hIGF-I

  1. Defining the binding region in factor H to develop a therapeutic factor H-Fc fusion protein against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy M. Wong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi cause a range of illnesses including otitis media, sinusitis, and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infections that contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance and are themselves often intractable to standard antibiotic treatment regimens. We investigated a strategy to exploit binding of the complement inhibitor Factor H (FH to NTHi as a functional target for an immunotherapeutic containing the NTHi binding domain of FH fused to the Fc domain of IgG1. Chimeric proteins containing the regions that most FH-binding bacteria use to engage human FH, domains 6 and 7 (FH6,7/Fc and/or 18 through 20 (FH18-20/Fc, were evaluated for binding to NTHi. FH6,7/Fc bound strongly to each of seven NTHi clinical isolates tested and efficiently promoted complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. FH18-20/Fc bound weakly to three of the strains but did not promote complement dependent killing. Outer-membrane protein P5 has been implicated in FH binding by NTHi, and FH6,7/Fc binding was greatly diminished in five of seven P5 deficient isogenic mutant strains tested, implicating an alternative FH binding protein in some strains. Binding of FH18-20/Fc was decreased in the P5 mutant of one strain. A murine model was used to evaluate potential therapeutic application of FH6,7/Fc. FH6,7/Fc efficiently promoted binding of C3 to NTHi exposed to mouse serum, and intranasal delivery of FH6,7/Fc resulted in significantly enhanced clearance of NTHi from the lung. Moreover, a P5 deficient mutant was attenuated for survival in the lung model, suggesting that escape mutants lacking P5 would be less likely to replace strains susceptible to FH6,7/Fc. These results provide evidence for the potential utility of FH6,7/Fc as a therapeutic against NTHi lung infection. FH binding is a common property of many respiratory tract pathogens and FH/Fc chimeras may represent promising alternative or adjunctive

  2. Defining the Binding Region in Factor H to Develop a Therapeutic Factor H-Fc Fusion Protein against Non-Typeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sandy M; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Ram, Sanjay; Akerley, Brian J

    2016-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) cause a range of illnesses including otitis media, sinusitis, and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, infections that contribute to the problem of antibiotic resistance and are themselves often intractable to standard antibiotic treatment regimens. We investigated a strategy to exploit binding of the complement inhibitor Factor H (FH) to NTHi as a functional target for an immunotherapeutic containing the NTHi binding domain of FH fused to the Fc domain of IgG1. Chimeric proteins containing the regions that most FH-binding bacteria use to engage human FH, domains 6 and 7 (FH6,7/Fc) and/or 18 through 20 (FH18-20/Fc), were evaluated for binding to NTHi. FH6,7/Fc bound strongly to each of seven NTHi clinical isolates tested and efficiently promoted complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. FH18-20/Fc bound weakly to three of the strains but did not promote complement dependent killing. Outer-membrane protein P5 has been implicated in FH binding by NTHi, and FH6,7/Fc binding was greatly diminished in five of seven P5 deficient isogenic mutant strains tested, implicating an alternative FH binding protein in some strains. Binding of FH18-20/Fc was decreased in the P5 mutant of one strain. A murine model was used to evaluate potential therapeutic application of FH6,7/Fc. FH6,7/Fc efficiently promoted binding of C3 to NTHi exposed to mouse serum, and intranasal delivery of FH6,7/Fc resulted in significantly enhanced clearance of NTHi from the lung. Moreover, a P5 deficient mutant was attenuated for survival in the lung model, suggesting that escape mutants lacking P5 would be less likely to replace strains susceptible to FH6,7/Fc. These results provide evidence for the potential utility of FH6,7/Fc as a therapeutic against NTHi lung infection. FH binding is a common property of many respiratory tract pathogens and FH/Fc chimeras may represent promising alternative or adjunctive therapeutics against such

  3. Brain regions involved in voluntary movements as revealed by radioisotopic mapping of CBF or CMR-glucose changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Ingvar, D H

    1990-01-01

    Mapping of cortical and subcortical grey matter active during voluntary movements by means of measurements of local increases of CBF or CMR-Glucose is reviewed. Most of the studies concern observations in man during hand movements using the intracarotid Xenon-133 injection technique, an approach...... area SMA on both sides increase in CBF/CMR-glucose and even internally ("mentally") going through the trained movements, causes such changes; complex purposeful movements also activate the premotor cortex, a response that is bilateral with greatest response contralaterally. Studies in patients...

  4. A selective, slow binding inhibitor of factor VIIa binds to a nonstandard active site conformation and attenuates thrombus formation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Alan G; Eigenbrot, Charles; Goldsmith, Richard; Robarge, Kirk; Artis, Dean R; Flygare, John; Rawson, Thomas; Sutherlin, Daniel P; Kadkhodayan, Saloumeh; Beresini, Maureen; Elliott, Linda O; DeGuzman, Geralyn G; Banner, David W; Ultsch, Mark; Marzec, Ulla; Hanson, Stephen R; Refino, Canio; Bunting, Stuart; Kirchhofer, Daniel

    2005-03-11

    The serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) in complex with its cellular cofactor tissue factor (TF) initiates the blood coagulation reactions. TF.FVIIa is also implicated in thrombosis-related disorders and constitutes an appealing therapeutic target for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. To this end, we generated the FVIIa active site inhibitor G17905, which displayed great potency toward TF.FVIIa (Ki = 0.35 +/- 0.11 nM). G17905 did not appreciably inhibit 12 of the 14 examined trypsin-like serine proteases, consistent with its TF.FVIIa-specific activity in clotting assays. The crystal structure of the FVIIa.G17905 complex provides insight into the molecular basis of the high selectivity. It shows that, compared with other serine proteases, FVIIa is uniquely equipped to accommodate conformational disturbances in the Gln217-Gly219 region caused by the ortho-hydroxy group of the inhibitor's aminobenzamidine moiety located in the S1 recognition pocket. Moreover, the structure revealed a novel, nonstandard conformation of FVIIa active site in the region of the oxyanion hole, a "flipped" Lys192-Gly193 peptide bond. Macromolecular substrate activation assays demonstrated that G17905 is a noncompetitive, slow-binding inhibitor. Nevertheless, G17905 effectively inhibited thrombus formation in a baboon arterio-venous shunt model, reducing platelet and fibrin deposition by approximately 70% at 0.4 mg/kg + 0.1 mg/kg/min infusion. Therefore, the in vitro potency of G17905, characterized by slow binding kinetics, correlated with efficacious antithrombotic activity in vivo. PMID:15632123

  5. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 inhibition of prostate cancer growth involves suppression of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, B; Lee, K-W; Anzo, M; Zhang, B; Zi, X; Tao, Y; Shiry, L; Pollak, M; Lin, S; Cohen, P

    2007-03-15

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is a multifunctional protein that induces apoptosis utilizing both insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We investigated the effects of IGFBP-3 on tumor growth and angiogenesis utilizing a human CaP xenograft model in severe-combined immunodeficiency mice. A 16-day course of IGFBP-3 injections reduced tumor size and increased apoptosis and also led to a reduction in the number of vessels stained with CD31. In vitro, IGFBP-3 inhibited both vascular endothelial growth factor- and IGF-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells vascular network formation in a matrigel assay. This action is primarily IGF independent as shown by studies utilizing the non-IGFBP-binding IGF-1 analog Long-R3. Additionally, we used a fibroblast growth factor-enriched matrigel-plug assay and chick allantoic membrane assays to show that IGFBP-3 has potent antiangiogenic actions in vivo. Finally, overexpression of IGFBP-3 or the non-IGF-binding GGG-IGFBP-3 mutant in Zebrafish embryos confirmed that both IGFBP-3 and the non-IGF-binding mutant inhibited vessel formation in vivo, indicating that the antiangiogenic effect of IGFBP-3 is an IGF-independent phenomenon. Together, these studies provide the first evidence that IGFBP-3 has direct, IGF-independent inhibitory effects on angiogenesis providing an additional mechanism by which it exerts its tumor suppressive effects and further supporting its development for clinical use in the therapy of patients with prostate cancer. PMID:16983336

  6. IGF binding protein 2 is a cell-autonomous factor supporting survival and migration of acute leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoli; Zheng, Junke; Zou, Yizhou; Song, Chun; Hu, Xuemei; Zhang, Cheng Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The role of IGF binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) in cancer development is intriguing. Previously we identified IGFBP2 as an extrinsic factor that supports the activity of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Methods and results Here we investigated the role of IGFBP2 in in human leukemia cells and in the retroviral AML1-ETO9a transplantation acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mouse model. Results IGFBP2 is highly expressed in certain human AML and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. Inhibiti...

  7. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 (Igfbp5) compromises survival, growth, muscle development, and fertility in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Salih, Dervis A. M.; Tripathi, Gyanendra; Holding, Cathy; Szestak, Tadge A. M.; Gonzalez, M. Ivelisse; Carter, Emma J.; Cobb, Laura J.; Eisemann, Joan E.; Pell, Jennifer M.

    2004-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are essential for development; bioavailable IGF is tightly regulated by six related IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). Igfbp5 is the most conserved and is developmentally up-regulated in key lineages and pathologies; in vitro studies suggest that IGFBP-5 functions independently of IGF interaction. Genetic ablation of individual Igfbps has yielded limited phenotypes because of substantial compensation by remaining family members. Therefore, to reveal Igfbp5 a...

  8. Interaction of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 and BAX in Mitochondria Promotes Male Germ Cell Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Yue; Lee, Kuk-Wha; Swerdloff, Ronald; Hwang, David; Cobb, Laura J.; Sinha Hikim, Amiya; Lue, Yan He; Cohen, Pinchas; Wang, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Germ cell apoptosis is crucial for spermatogenesis and can be triggered by various stimuli, including intratesticular hormone deprivation. This study proposes a role for insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in male germ cell apoptosis. Groups of adult Sprague-Dawley male rats received one of the following treatments for 5 days: (i) daily intratesticular (IT) injections with saline (control); (ii) a single subcutaneous injection of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonis...

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein (IGFBP) and IGFBP-related Protein Gene Families

    OpenAIRE

    Rodgers, Buel D.; Roalson, Eric H.; Thompson, Cullen

    2007-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) activity is regulated by six high affinity binding proteins (IGFBPs) and possibly by some of the nine IGFBP-related proteins (IGFBP-rPs). To determine the phylogenetic relationship of this proposed gene superfamily, we conducted maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian inference analyses on a matrix of amino acid sequences from a diversity of vertebrate species. A single most likely phylogram, ML bootstrap, and Bayesian consensus tree of 10,000,000 generations rev...

  10. Loss of Interdependent Binding by the FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 Forkhead Transcription Factors Culminates in Perturbation of Active Chromatin Marks and Binding of Transcriptional Regulators at Insulin-sensitive Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalley, Akua; Schill, Daniel; Hatta, Mitsutoki; Johnson, Nicole; Cirillo, Lisa Ann

    2016-04-15

    FoxO1 binds to insulin response elements located in the promoters of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), activating their expression. Insulin-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO1 promotes cytoplasmic translocation, inhibiting FoxO1-mediated transactivation. We have previously demonstrated that FoxO1 opens and remodels chromatin assembled from the IGFBP1 promoter via a highly conserved winged helix motif. This finding, which established FoxO1 as a "pioneer" factor, suggested a model whereby FoxO1 chromatin remodeling at regulatory targets facilitates binding and recruitment of additional regulatory factors. However, the impact of FoxO1 phosphorylation on its ability to bind chromatin and the effect of FoxO1 loss on recruitment of neighboring transcription factors at its regulatory targets in liver chromatin is unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that an amino acid substitution that mimics insulin-mediated phosphorylation of a serine in the winged helix DNA binding motif curtails FoxO1 nucleosome binding. We also demonstrate that shRNA-mediated loss of FoxO1 binding to the IGFBP1 and G6Pase promoters in HepG2 cells significantly reduces binding of RNA polymerase II and the pioneer factors FoxA1/A2. Knockdown of FoxA1 similarly reduced binding of RNA polymerase II and FoxO1. Reduction in acetylation of histone H3 Lys-27 accompanies loss of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 binding. Interdependent binding of FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 possibly entails cooperative binding because FoxO1 and FoxA1/A2 facilitate one another's binding to IGFPB1 promoter DNA. These results illustrate how transcription factors can nucleate transcriptional events in chromatin in response to signaling events and suggest a model for regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism through interdependent FoxO/FoxA binding.

  11. Integration host factor and LuxR synergistically bind DNA to coactivate quorum-sensing genes in Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparian, Ryan R; Olney, Stephen G; Hustmyer, Christine M; Rowe-Magnus, Dean A; van Kessel, Julia C

    2016-09-01

    The cell-cell signaling process called quorum sensing allows bacteria to control behaviors in response to changes in population density. In Vibrio harveyi, the master quorum-sensing transcription factor LuxR is a member of the TetR family of transcription factors that both activates and represses genes to coordinate group behaviors, including bioluminescence. Here, we show that integration host factor (IHF) is a key coactivator of the luxCDABE bioluminescence genes that is required together with LuxR for precise timing and expression levels of bioluminescence during quorum sensing. IHF binds to multiple sites in the luxCDABE promoter and bends the DNA in vitro. IHF and LuxR synergistically bind luxCDABE promoter DNA at overlapping, essential binding sites that are required for maximal gene expression in vivo. RNA-seq analysis demonstrated that IHF regulates 300 genes in V. harveyi, and among these are a core set of 19 genes that are also directly bound and regulated by LuxR. We validated these global analyses by demonstrating that both IHF and LuxR are required for transcriptional activation of the osmotic stress response genes betIBA-proXWV. These data suggest that IHF plays an integral role in one mechanism of transcriptional activation by the LuxR-type family of quorum-sensing regulators in vibrios. PMID:27191515

  12. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell–specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte–specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte–specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell–regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell–specific transcriptional activity. PMID:26808502

  13. Lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind the Gata3 Tce1 enhancer to mediate lineage-specific programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Sakie; Mizuno, Seiya; Oishi, Hisashi; Ku, Chia-Jui; Hermann, Mary; Hosoya, Tomonori; Takahashi, Satoru; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The transcription factor GATA3 is essential for the genesis and maturation of the T cell lineage, and GATA3 dysregulation has pathological consequences. Previous studies have shown that GATA3 function in T cell development is regulated by multiple signaling pathways and that the Notch nuclear effector, RBP-J, binds specifically to the Gata3 promoter. We previously identified a T cell-specific Gata3 enhancer (Tce1) lying 280 kb downstream from the structural gene and demonstrated in transgenic mice that Tce1 promoted T lymphocyte-specific transcription of reporter genes throughout T cell development; however, it was not clear if Tce1 is required for Gata3 transcription in vivo. Here, we determined that the canonical Gata3 promoter is insufficient for Gata3 transcriptional activation in T cells in vivo, precluding the possibility that promoter binding by a host of previously implicated transcription factors alone is responsible for Gata3 expression in T cells. Instead, we demonstrated that multiple lineage-affiliated transcription factors bind to Tce1 and that this enhancer confers T lymphocyte-specific Gata3 activation in vivo, as targeted deletion of Tce1 in a mouse model abrogated critical functions of this T cell-regulatory element. Together, our data show that Tce1 is both necessary and sufficient for critical aspects of Gata3 T cell-specific transcriptional activity.

  14. The presence of a pregnenolone-binding factor in the copulatory organ of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria migratorioides R. & F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paesen, G; Novak, F; Swevers, L; De Clerck, D; De Loof, A

    1988-12-01

    The presence of binding sites for nonecdysteroid steroids was investigated in the cytosol of several tissues of the migratory locust, Locusta migratoria migratorioides. Binding of androgens was not observed. Most tissues, however, showed nonsaturable binding of estrogens and in some tissues saturable progestin binding could be demonstrated. A pregnenolone binder, that was found to be present in the male copulatory organ, was further studied. It showed a dissociation constant of 4.4 (+/- 1.6) X 10(-8) M. This is the first report of a nonecdysteroid steroid-binding factor in an insect tissue. PMID:3240850

  15. Cloning, sequence analysis and expression of a cDNA encoding a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP-2).

    OpenAIRE

    Binkert, C; Landwehr, J; Mary, J L; J. Schwander; Heinrich, G

    1989-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors bind with high affinity to specific binding proteins in extracellular fluids. To identify structural characteristics of IGF-binding proteins that might define their physiological roles, we determined the complete primary structure of a novel human IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-2) from a cloned cDNA. The cDNA encodes a 328 amino acid IGF-binding protein precursor which contains a 39-residue signal peptide. The mature 289 amino acid IGFBP-2 has a predicted Mr of 31,325....

  16. Nuclear factor I acts as a transcription factor on the MMTV promoter but competes with steroid hormone receptors for DNA binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggemeier, U; Rogge, L.; Winnacker, E L; Beato, M

    1990-01-01

    Several steroid hormones induce transcription of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter, through an interaction of their respective receptors with the hormone responsive elements (HREs) in the long terminal repeat (LTR) region. The molecular mechanism underlying transcriptional activation is not known, but binding of nuclear factor I (NFI) to a site adjacent to the HRE appears to be required for efficient transcription of the MMTV promoter. In JEG-3 choriocarcinoma cells the MMTV promo...

  17. Serum insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 levels and metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors in young adults and children born small for gestational age

    OpenAIRE

    Kort, Sandra; Doorn, Jaap van; Sande, Ad; Leunissen, Ralph; Hokken-Koelega, Anita

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-2 might protect against cardiovascular disease. Small for gestational age (SGA) birth could be associated with a higher risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in later life. No data are available on the relationship between serum IGFBP-2 levels and cardiovascular risk factors in young adults and children born SGA. Objective: The aim of the study was to determine circulating IGFBP-2 levels in subjects born SGA and to inv...

  18. Functional interaction of CCAAT/enhancer-binding-protein-α basic region mutants with E2F transcription factors and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowenz-Leutz, Elisabeth; Schuetz, Anja; Liu, Qingbin; Knoblich, Maria; Heinemann, Udo; Leutz, Achim

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) regulates cell cycle arrest and terminal differentiation of neutrophils and adipocytes. Mutations in the basic leucine zipper domain (bZip) of C/EBPα are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. A widely used murine transforming C/EBPα basic region mutant (BRM2) entails two bZip point mutations (I294A/R297A). BRM2 has been discordantly described as defective for DNA binding or defective for interaction with E2F. We have separated the two BRM2 mutations to shed light on the intertwined reciprocity between C/EBPα-E2F-DNA interactions. Both, C/EBPα I294A and R297A retain transactivation capacity and interaction with E2F-DP. The C/EBPα R297A mutation destabilized DNA binding, whereas the C/EBPα I294A mutation enhanced binding to DNA. The C/EBPα R297A mutant, like BRM2, displayed enhanced interaction with E2F-DP but failed to repress E2F-dependent transactivation although both mutants were readily suppressed by E2F1 for transcription through C/EBP cis-regulatory sites. In contrast, the DNA binding enhanced C/EBPα I294A mutant displayed increased repression of E2F-DP mediated transactivation and resisted E2F-DP mediated repression. Thus, the efficient repression of E2F dependent S-phase genes and the activation of differentiation genes reside in the balanced DNA binding capacity of C/EBPα.

  19. The rice transcription factor IDEF1 directly binds to iron and other divalent metals for sensing cellular iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Itai, Reiko Nakanishi; Aung, May Sann; Senoura, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2012-01-01

    Iron is essential for most living organisms and its availability often determines survival and proliferation. The Oryza sativa (rice) transcription factor IDEF1 plays a crucial role in regulating iron deficiency-induced genes involved in iron homeostasis. In the present report, we found characteristic histidine-asparagine repeat and proline-rich regions in IDEF1 and its homolog in Hordeum vulgare (barley), HvIDEF1. An immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography assay revealed that IDEF1 and HvIDEF1 bind to various divalent metals, including Fe(2+) and Ni(2+) . Recombinant IDEF1 protein expressed in Escherichia coli contained mainly Fe and Zn. This metal-binding activity of IDEF1 was almost abolished by deletion of the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions, but DNA-binding and trans-activation functions were not impaired by the deletion. Transgenic rice plants constitutively overexpressing IDEF1 without these metal-binding domains failed to cause pleiotropic effects conferred by overexpression of full-length IDEF1, including a low germination rate, impaired seedling growth, tolerance to iron deficiency in hydroponic culture, and enhanced expression of various iron deficiency-inducible genes. Impairment of the transcriptional regulation of IDEF1 by deletion of the metal-binding domains occurred primarily at an early stage of iron deficiency. These results suggest that the histidine-asparagine and proline-rich regions in rice IDEF1 directly bind to divalent metals and sense the cellular metal ion balance caused by changes in iron availability. PMID:21880076

  20. Fibrinogen binding sites P336 and Y338 of clumping factor A are crucial for Staphylococcus aureus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabet Josefsson

    Full Text Available We have earlier shown that clumping factor A (ClfA, a fibrinogen binding surface protein of Staphylococcus aureus, is an important virulence factor in septic arthritis. When two amino acids in the ClfA molecule, P(336 and Y(338, were changed to serine and alanine, respectively, the fibrinogen binding property was lost. ClfAP(336Y(338 mutants have been constructed in two virulent S. aureus strains Newman and LS-1. The aim of this study was to analyze if these two amino acids which are vital for the fibrinogen binding of ClfA are of importance for the ability of S. aureus to generate disease. Septic arthritis or sepsis were induced in mice by intravenous inoculation of bacteria. The clfAP(336Y(338 mutant induced significantly less arthritis than the wild type strain, both with respect to severity and frequency. The mutant infected mice developed also a much milder systemic inflammation, measured as lower mortality, weight loss, bacterial growth in kidneys and lower IL-6 levels. The data were verified with a second mutant where clfAP(336 and Y(338 were changed to alanine and serine respectively. When sepsis was induced by a larger bacterial inoculum, the clfAP(336Y(338 mutants induced significantly less septic death. Importantly, immunization with the recombinant A domain of ClfAP(336SY(338A mutant but not with recombinant ClfA, protected against septic death. Our data strongly suggest that the fibrinogen binding activity of ClfA is crucial for the ability of S. aureus to provoke disease manifestations, and that the vaccine potential of recombinant ClfA is improved by removing its ability to bind fibrinogen.

  1. DIFFERENT REQUIREMENTS OF THE KINASE AND UHM DOMAINS OF KIS FOR ITS NUCLEAR LOCALIZATION AND BINDING TO SPLICING FACTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Manceau, Valérie; Kielkopf, Clara L.; Sobel, André; Maucuer, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    The protein kinase KIS is made by the juxtaposition of a unique kinase domain and a C-terminal domain with a U2AF Homology Motif (UHM), a sequence motif for protein interaction initially identified in the heterodimeric pre-mRNA splicing factor U2AF. This domain of KIS is closely related to the C-terminal UHM domain of the U2AF large subunit, U2AF65. KIS phosphorylates the splicing factor SF1, which in turn enhances SF1 binding to U2AF65 and the 3′ splice site, an event known to take place at ...

  2. Microphysiometry Studies of Rapid Binding of Insulin-Like Growth Factor I by Parental and Transfected Mammary Epithelial Cell Lines

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Rose Marie

    1998-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death of women in the U.S. today. Members of the family of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are proposed to play a major role in the development and subsequent uncontrolled proliferation of breast cancer cells. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is known to be a potent mitogen for mammary epithelial cells. IGF-I acts by binding to cell surface receptors, thereby stimulating a cascade of events leading to cell division. In the interest of inte...

  3. Transcription Factors KLF1 and KLF2 Positively Regulate Embryonic and Fetal β-Globin Genes through Direct Promoter Binding*

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef N Alhashem; Vinjamur, Divya S.; Basu, Mohua; Klingmüller, Ursula; Gaensler, Karin M. L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2011-01-01

    Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) control cell differentiation and embryonic development. KLF1 (erythroid Krüppel-like factor) plays essential roles in embryonic and adult erythropoiesis. KLF2 is a positive regulator of the mouse and human embryonic β-globin genes. KLF1 and KLF2 have highly homologous zinc finger DNA-binding domains. They have overlapping roles in embryonic erythropoiesis, as demonstrated using single and double KO mouse models. Ablation of the KLF1 or KLF2 gene causes embryonic le...

  4. Extracellular matrix contains insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5: potentiation of the effects of IGF-I

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been shown to serve as carrier proteins for the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and to modulate their biologic effects. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a reservoir for IGF-I and IGF-II, we examined the ECM of cultured human fetal fibroblasts and found that IGFBP-5 was incorporated intact into ECM, while mostly inert proteolytic fragments were found in the medium. In contrast, two other forms of IGFBP that are s...

  5. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and implications in catabolic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Lindgren, Björn

    1997-01-01

    This thesis has studied the regulation of IGFBP-1 (insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1), which is one factor regulating the bioavailability of IGF-I with special interest how IGFBP-1 is regulated in vitro and in humans, especially in diabetes and catabolic conditions. The IGFBP-1 cDNA was cloned and used for studies in human hepatoma cells, HepG2, which showed that both insulin and IGF-I could decrease IGFBP-1 in the cell conditioned medium. IGF-I inhibited also IGF...

  6. Potentiation of Growth Factor Signaling by Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein-3 in Breast Epithelial Cells Requires Sphingosine Kinase Activity*

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Janet L; Mike Z. Lin; Eileen M. McGowan; Baxter, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism underlying potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR1) signaling by IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) in MCF-10A breast epithelial cells, focusing on a possible involvement of the sphingosine kinase (SphK) system. IGFBP-3 potentiated EGF-stimulated EGF receptor activation and DNA synthesis, and this was blocked by inhibitors of SphK activity or small interference RNA-mediated silencing of SphK1...

  7. Posttranslational regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 in normal and transformed human fibroblasts. Insulin-like growth factor dependence and biological studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, C A; Kiefer, M C; Zapf, J

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 (IGFBP-4) is a 24-26-kD protein expressed by a variety of cell types in vivo and in vitro. Treatment of normal adult human fibroblasts with 10 nM insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) for 24 h resulted in an 85% decrease in endogenous IGFBP-4, as assessed by Western ligand blot analysis of the conditioned medium. Incubation of human fibroblast-conditioned medium (HFCM) with IGF-II under cell-free conditions led to a similar loss of IGFBP-4. This p...

  8. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  9. The thumb subdomain of yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase is involved in processivity, transcript fidelity and mitochondrial transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, Gilberto; Sousa, Rui; Brieba, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    Single subunit RNA polymerases have evolved 2 mechanisms to synthesize long transcripts without falling off a DNA template: binding of nascent RNA and interactions with an RNA:DNA hybrid. Mitochondrial RNA polymerases share a common ancestor with T-odd bacteriophage single subunit RNA polymerases. Herein we characterized the role of the thumb subdomain of the yeast mtRNA polymerase gene (RPO41) in complex stability, processivity, and fidelity. We found that deletion and point mutants of the thumb subdomain of yeast mtRNA polymerase increase the synthesis of abortive transcripts and the probability that the polymerase will disengage from the template during the formation of the late initial transcription and elongation complexes. Mutations in the thumb subdomain increase the amount of slippage products from a homopolymeric template and, unexpectedly, thumb subdomain deletions decrease the binding affinity for mitochondrial transcription factor (Mtf1). The latter suggests that the thumb subdomain is part of an extended binding surface area involved in binding Mtf1.

  10. Heterogeneous dynamics in DNA site discrimination by the structurally homologous DNA-binding domains of ETS-family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gaofei; Tolic, Ana; Bashkin, James K; Poon, Gregory M K

    2015-04-30

    The ETS family of transcription factors exemplifies current uncertainty in how eukaryotic genetic regulators with overlapping DNA sequence preferences achieve target site specificity. PU.1 and Ets-1 represent archetypes for studying site discrimination by ETS proteins because their DNA-binding domains are the most divergent in sequence, yet they share remarkably superimposable DNA-bound structures. To gain insight into the contrasting thermodynamics and kinetics of DNA recognition by these two proteins, we investigated the structure and dynamics of site discrimination by their DNA-binding domains. Electrophoretic mobilities of complexes formed by the two homologs with circularly permuted binding sites showed significant dynamic differences only for DNA complexes of PU.1. Free solution measurements by dynamic light scattering showed PU.1 to be more dynamic than Ets-1; moreover, dynamic changes are strongly coupled to site discrimination by PU.1, but not Ets-1. Interrogation of the protein/DNA interface by DNA footprinting showed similar accessibility to dimethyl sulfate for PU.1/DNA and Ets-1/DNA complexes, indicating that the dynamics of PU.1/DNA complexes reside primarily outside that interface. An information-based analysis of the two homologs' binding motifs suggests a role for dynamic coupling in PU.1's ability to enforce a more stringent sequence preference than Ets-1 and its proximal sequence homologs.

  11. Theory on the mechanism of rapid binding of transcription factor proteins at specific-sites on DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Murugan, Rajamanickam

    2014-01-01

    We develop revised theoretical ideas on the mechanism by which the transcription factor proteins locate their specific binding sites on DNA faster than the three-dimensional (3D) diffusion controlled rate limit. We demonstrate that the 3D-diffusion controlled rate limit can be enhanced when the protein molecule reads several possible binding stretches of the template DNA via one-dimensional (1D) diffusion upon each 3D-diffusion mediated collision or nonspecific binding event. The overall enhancement of site-specific association rate is directly proportional to the maximum possible sliding length (LA, square root of (6Do/kr) where Do is the 1D-diffusion coefficient and kr is the dissociation rate constant associated with the nonspecific DNA-protein complex) associated with the 1D-diffusion of protein molecule along DNA. Upon considering several possible mechanisms we find that the DNA binding proteins can efficiently locate their cognate sites on DNA by switching across fast-moving, slow-moving and reading sta...

  12. The usefulness of CBF brain SPECT in forensic medicine. A description of four cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to show the applications of cerebral blood flow SPECT scanning in forensic medicine using four cases: two suspects and two victims of crime. Cerebral blood flow studies were performed with the use of 99mTc-ECD and a triple head gammacamera. Qualitative and quantitative analysis was performed, utilising an asymmetry index for unilateral perfusion deficits and a comparison to cerebellar perfusion for assessing the regional cerebral perfusion. For assessing the normal values, a control group of 30 patients was studied. In these cases CBF SPECT scanning proved its usefulness in medico-legal argument and played an important role in formulating the final forensic expertTMs opinion. Radionuclide cerebral blood flow studies may play a role in forensic medicine, where this method it is mostly under-utilised at present. (author)

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida CBF10-2, a Soil Isolate with Bioremediation Potential in Agricultural and Industrial Environmental Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rupa; Damania, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBF10-2 is a microorganism isolated from farmland soil in Fairchild, TX, found to degrade high-impact xenobiotics, including organophosphate insecticides, petroleum hydrocarbons, and both monocyclic and polycyclic aromatics. The versatility of CBF10-2 makes it useful for multipurpose bioremediation of contaminated sites in agricultural and industrial environments. PMID:27417844

  14. A3 domain region 1803-1818 contributes to the stability of activated factor VIII and includes a binding site for activated factor IX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2013-09-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803-1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803-1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803-1810 and FVIII/FV 1811-1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811-1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811-1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803-1810 and 1811-1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  15. A3 Domain Region 1803–1818 Contributes to the Stability of Activated Factor VIII and Includes a Binding Site for Activated Factor IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloem, Esther; Meems, Henriet; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B.

    2013-01-01

    A recent chemical footprinting study in our laboratory suggested that region 1803–1818 might contribute to A2 domain retention in activated factor VIII (FVIIIa). This site has also been implicated to interact with activated factor IX (FIXa). Asn-1810 further comprises an N-linked glycan, which seems incompatible with a role of the amino acids 1803–1818 for FIXa or A2 domain binding. In the present study, FVIIIa stability and FIXa binding were evaluated in a FVIII-N1810C variant, and two FVIII variants in which residues 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 are replaced by the corresponding residues of factor V (FV). Enzyme kinetic studies showed that only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 has a decreased apparent binding affinity for FIXa. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that fluorescent FIXa exhibits impaired complex formation with only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 on lipospheres. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Phe-1816 contributes to the interaction with FIXa. To evaluate FVIIIa stability, the FVIII/FV chimeras were activated by thrombin, and the decline in cofactor function was followed over time. FVIII/FV 1803–1810 and FVIII/FV 1811–1818 but not FVIII-N1810C showed a decreased FVIIIa half-life. However, when the FVIII variants were activated in presence of FIXa, only FVIII/FV 1811–1818 demonstrated an enhanced decline in cofactor function. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the FVIII variants K1813A/K1818A, E1811A, and F1816A exhibit enhanced dissociation after activation. The results together demonstrate that the glycan at 1810 is not involved in FVIII cofactor function, and that Phe-1816 of region 1811–1818 contributes to FIXa binding. Both regions 1803–1810 and 1811–1818 contribute to FVIIIa stability. PMID:23884417

  16. Cloning of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor cDNA and expression of recombinant soluble TNF-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P.W.; Barrett, K.; Chantry, D.; Turner, M.; Feldmann, M. (Charing Cross Sunley Research Centre, Hammersmith, London (England))

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNF{alpha} with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extracellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNF{alpha} with an affinity of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNF{alpha} or lymphotoxin (TNF{beta}).

  17. Cloning of Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor cDNA and Expression of Recombinant Soluble TNF-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Patrick W.; Barrett, Kathy; Chantry, David; Turner, Martin; Feldmann, Marc

    1990-10-01

    The cDNA for one of the receptors for human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been isolated. This cDNA encodes a protein of 455 amino acids that is divided into an extracellular domain of 171 residues and a cytoplasmic domain of 221 residues. The extracellular domain has been engineered for expression in mammalian cells, and this recombinant derivative binds TNFα with high affinity and inhibits its cytotoxic activity in vitro. The TNF receptor exhibits similarity with a family of cell surface proteins that includes the nerve growth factor receptor, the human B-cell surface antigen CD40, and the rat T-cell surface antigen OX40. The TNF receptor contains four cysteine-rich subdomains in the extra-cellular portion. Mammalian cells transfected with the entire TNF receptor cDNA bind radiolabeled TNFα with an affinity of 2.5 x 10-9 M. This binding can be competitively inhibited with unlabeled TNFα or lymphotoxin (TNFβ).

  18. Influence of geometrical factor on binding energy of Cooper pairs in YBa2Cu3O7-δ compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Saeed O.; Mustafa, Bassam M.

    2016-03-01

    In this research the influence of geometrical factors on binding energy between Cooper pairs are investigated for the high temperature superconducting (YBa2Cu3O7-δ) compound. This is done by using a model considering that the formation of Cooper pairs happens during tunneling mechanism of holes between the two CuO2 layers in the YBCO crystal which are considered as forming adjacent ridged potential wells. According to this model binding energy is: Eb i n=4/√{2 }m3/2 π2ħ3p ×∫U-0(U -0-E) exp [-2/(d -Rc) ħ √{2 m (U -E ) } ] √{E } d E 0 is a work function, ħ is the Plank's constant, m is the electron mass, and U is the height of the potential barrier, E is the energy, Rc is the electron cloud radius in tunneling direction and d is the distance between the two CuO2 planes. In the above model two effects of geometrical factors were ignored, considering that ridges in the two CuO2 layers as having rectangular shape, but in reality the ridges in the potential well are of triangular shape. Also the model considers the distance between layers as constant but really the distant d is variable due to the triangular geometry. In this work we consider both effects that affect the density of state in the potential well and the tunneling probability. Then binding energy between the Cooper pairs, is calculated.

  19. Shiga toxin activates complement and binds factor H: evidence for an active role of complement in hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Dorothea; Khan, Abdul Basit; Naim, Asma; Grif, Katharina; Brockmeyer, Jens; Karch, Helge; Joannidis, Michael; Clark, Simon J; Day, Anthony J; Fidanzi, Sonja; Stoiber, Heribert; Dierich, Manfred P; Zimmerhackl, Lothar B; Würzner, Reinhard

    2009-05-15

    Infections with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) are a major cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Shiga toxins (Stxs), especially Stx2, are believed to represent major virulence factors of EHEC, contributing to HUS pathogenesis. Beside EHEC-associated HUS, there are hereditary atypical forms of HUS, which are mostly caused by mutations of complement regulators. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether or not complement is also involved in the pathogenesis of EHEC-induced typical HUS, by being activated either directly or indirectly by involvement of its inhibitors. Purified Stx2 markedly activated complement via the alternative pathway and was found to bind to factor H (FH), however, only when it was active. No apparent cleavage or destruction of FH was visible, and cofactor activity in fluid phase was unaffected, but clearly delayed for surface-attached FH, where it is essential for host cell protection. Binding studies using FH constructs revealed that Stx2 binds to short consensus repeats (SCRs) 6-8 and SCRs18-20, but not to SCRs16-17, i.e., to regions involved in the surface recognition function of FH. In conclusion, complement, and in particular FH, not only plays an important role in atypical HUS, but most probably also in EHEC-induced HUS.

  20. Conformational Dynamics and the Binding of Specific and Nonspecific DNA by the Autoinhibited Transcription Factor Ets-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Geneviève; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-07-26

    The affinity of the Ets-1 transcription factor for DNA is autoinhibited by an intrinsically disordered serine-rich region (SRR) and a helical inhibitory module (IM) appended to its winged helix-turn-helix ETS domain. Using NMR spectroscopy, we investigated how Ets-1 recognizes specific versus nonspecific DNA, with a focus on the roles of protein dynamics and autoinhibition in these processes. Upon binding either DNA, the two marginally stable N-terminal helices of the IM predominantly unfold, but still sample partially ordered conformations. Also, on the basis of amide chemical shift perturbation mapping, Ets-1 associates with both specific and nonspecific DNA through the same canonical ETS domain interface. These interactions are structurally independent of the SRR, and thus autoinhibition does not impart DNA-binding specificity. However, relative to the pronounced NMR spectroscopic changes in Ets-1 resulting from specific DNA binding, the spectra of the nonspecific DNA complexes showed conformational exchange broadening and lacked several diagnostic amide and indole signals attributable to hydrogen bonding interactions seen in reported X-ray crystallographic structures of this transcription factor with its cognate DNA sequences. Such differences are highlighted by the chemical shift and relaxation properties of several interfacial lysine and arginine side chains. Collectively, these data support a general model in which Ets-1 interacts with nonspecific DNA via dynamic electrostatic interactions, whereas hydrogen bonding drives the formation of well-ordered complexes with specific DNA.

  1. Functional roles and clinical values of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 in different types of cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G(o)k(c)e Güllü; Sevgi Karabulut; Mustafa Akkiprik

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) are critical regulators of the mitogenic activity of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs).IGFBP5,one of these IGFBPs,has special structural features,including a nuclear transport domain,heparin-binding motif,and IGF/extracellular matrix/acid-labile subunit-binding sites.Furthermore,IGFBP5 has several functional effects on carcinogenesis and even normal cell processes,such as cell growth,death,motility,and tissue remodeling.These biological effects are sometimes related with IGF (IGF-dependent effects) and sometimes not (IGF-independent effects).The functional role of IGFBP5 is most likely determined in a cell-type and tissue-type specific manner but also depends on cell context,especially in terms of the diversity of interacting proteins and the potential for nuclear localization.Clinical findings show that IGFBP5 has the potential to be a useful clinical biomarker for predicting response to therapy and clinical outcome of cancer patients.In this review,we summarize the functional diversity and clinical importance of IGFBP5 in different types of cancers.

  2. Study on localization diagnosis with SPECT rCBF image in childhood epilepsy: in comparison with EEG and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of SPECT rCBF imaging in localization of childhood epileptic foci. Methods: rCBF imaging was performed in 74 epileptic patients not in seizure and 10 epileptic patients right in seizure. EEG was performed in 84, MRI in 67 of the subjects mentioned above. All the results of three modalities were compared with each other. Results: The highest positive rate (82.14%) was found in SPECT rCBF imaging, the positive rate in EEG or MRI was 71.43 or 47.76%. The epileptic foci localized by EEG (60 abnormalities) and by MRI (32 abnormalities) were 70.59% or 58.82% in concordance with those by SPECT, respectively. Conclusions: SPECT rCBF imaging is a sensitive and effective method for epileptic foci localization. It may have some advantages over EEG and MRI in detecting and localizing epileptic foci. However, abnormal SPECT areas may cover some abnormalities which do not belong to epileptic category. A combination of these three methods (SPECT, EEG and MRI) will improve the positive rate and accuracy for localizing

  3. Perfusion and diffusion MRI study detecting CBF disturbance and edema formation in the acute phase of cerebral contusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamata, Tatsuro; Aoyama, Naoki; Mori, Tatsuro; Maeda, Takeshi; Katayama, Yoichi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-12-01

    In order to clarify the mechanisms underlying cerebral contusion-induced CBF disturbance and edema formation, echoplanar diffusion and perfusion images were obtained in the patients with cerebral contusion. In the acute phase within 48 hours post-trauma, the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) showed various levels with a tendency to increase in the central area of contusion (ADC ratio=1.06{+-}0.21). In contrast, the ADC was significantly reduced in the peripheral area of contusion (ADC ratio=0.87{+-}0.16). The ADC at 2 weeks post-trauma increased both in the central (ADC ratio=1.16{+-}0.26) and the peripheral area of contusion (ADC ratio=1.10{+-}0.26, p<0.05), as compared to those within 48 hours post-trauma. The perfusion images showed a wide spread CBF depression extending beyond the area of contusion observed on the T1 and T2 weighted images. These results indicate that; in the early phase of contusion-induced edema formation, cytotoxic edema is predominant, especially in the peripheral area of contusion, and vasogenic edema appears thereafter. The CBF depression may contribute such cytotoxic edema formation in the surrounding area of cerebral contusion. It is concluded that echo-planar diffusion and perfusion images are excellent technique to investigate the evolution of CBF disturbance and edema formation following traumatic brain injury. (author)

  4. Determination of relative CMRO2 from CBF and BOLD changes: significant increase of oxygen consumption rate during visual stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, S.G.; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H.B.;

    1999-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect in functional magnetic resonance imaging depends on at least partial uncoupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) changes. By measuring CBF and BOLD simultaneously, the relative change in CMRO2 can be...... estimated during neural activity using a reference condition obtained with known CMRO2 change. In this work, nine subjects were studied at a magnetic field of 1.5 T; each subject underwent inhalation of a 5% carbon dioxide gas mixture as a reference and two visual stimulation studies. Relative CBF and BOLD......(-1), which corresponds to BOLD signal change of 2.4 +/- 0.7% with a gradient echo time of 50 msec. During black/white visual stimulation reversing at 8 Hz, regional CBF increase in the visual cortex was 43.6 +/- 9.4% (n = 18), and deltaR2* was -0.114 +/- 0.086 sec(-1), corresponding to a BOLD signal...

  5. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  6. A major binding protein for leukemia inhibitory factor in normal mouse serum: identification as a soluble form of the cellular receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Layton, M. J.; Cross, B. A.; Metcalf, D; Ward, L. D.; Simpson, R. J.; Nicola, N A

    1992-01-01

    A protein that specifically binds leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) has been isolated from normal mouse serum by using four successive fractionation steps: chromatography on a LIF affinity matrix, anion-exchange chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, and preparative native gel electrophoresis. The purified LIF-binding protein (LBP) is a glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa that specifically binds 125I-labeled murine LIF with an affinity comparable to that of the low-a...

  7. A cDNA encoding a pRB-binding protein with properties of the transcription factor E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Lees, J A; Vidal, M;

    1992-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, apparently by binding to and regulating cellular transcription factors such as E2F. Here we describe the characterization of a cDNA clone that encodes a protein with properties of E2F. This clone, RBP3......, was identified by the ability of its gene product to interact with pRB. RBP3 bound to pRB both in vitro and in vivo, and this binding was competed by viral proteins known to disrupt pRB-E2F association. RBP3 bound to E2F recognition sequences in a sequence-specific manner. Furthermore, transient expression...

  8. Isolation of complexes formed between insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 and transferrin from the human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miljuš Goran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs play an important role in the regulation of cell growth, differentiation and metabolism. The amount of free, biologically active IGFs is regulated by the IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs. IGFBP-3 is the most abundant binding protein and it is known to interact with other circulating proteins, including transferrin (Tf. In order to elucidate the possible role of IGF/IGFBP-3 in the iron metabolism, it is necessary to isolate IGFBP-3/Tf complexes. Several affinity-based techniques were employed. Results have shown that only double immunoprecipitation method with anti-Tf and anti-IGFBP-3 antibodies selectively separated complexes from other molecular forms, such as monomers, oligomers or fragments of IGFBP-3 and Tf. Isolated complexes can now be used to investigate the relationship between IGF/IGFBP-3 and iron, both in structural and metabolic tеrms.

  9. Frontolimbic serotonin 2A receptor binding in healthy subjects is associated with personality risk factors for affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Mortensen, Erik L.; Nielsen, Finn Årup;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Serotonergic dysfunction has been associated with affective disorders. High trait neuroticism, as measured on personality inventories, is a risk factor for major depression. In this study we investigated whether neuroticism is associated with serotonin 2A receptor binding in brain...... regions of relevance for affective disorders. Methods: Eighty-three healthy volunteers completed the standardized personality questionnaire NEO-PI-R (Revised NEO Personality Inventory) and underwent [F-18]altanserin positron emission tomography imaging for assessment of serotonin 2A receptor binding...... analysis of the contributions from the six constituent traits of neuroticism showed that the correlation was primarily driven by two of them: vulnerability and anxiety. Indeed, vulnerability, defined as a person's difficulties in coping with stress, displayed the strongest positive correlation, which...

  10. Dynamic Factors Affecting Gaseous Ligand Binding in an Artificial Oxygen Transport Protein‡

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Andersen, Eskil M.E.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Koder, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the functional analysis of an artificial hexacoordinate oxygen transport protein, HP7, which operates via a mechanism similar to that of human neuroglobin and cytoglobin: the destabilization of one of two heme-ligating histidine residues. In the case of HP7 this is the result of the coupling of histidine side chain ligation with the burial of three charged glutamate residues on the same helix. Here we compare gaseous ligand binding, including rates, affinities and oxyferrous state l...

  11. Membrane-associated insulin-like growth factor (IGF binding structures in placental cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROMANA MASNIKOSA

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The biological activities of IGF-I and –II are mediated mainly by the type 1 IGF receptor (IGF 1R and controlled by their interaction with soluble proteins, the IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs. Although there is a growing body of evidence that some IGFBPs may be cell surface-bound, published data concerning cell association of IGFBP-1 are scarce and none of them concern placental cells. The cell membranes used in this study were isolated from term human placentae. Detergent-solubilized membranes were shown to contain two types of IGF binding structures that were separated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-100 column. Proteins in the first peak were eluted at V0 (Mr > 100 kD and they bound IGF-I with greater specificity and affinity than IGF-II and insulin. Most likely, they represented the IGF 1R. Small proteins (Mr ~ 45 kD were eluted with the membrane proteins in the second maximum. They were able to bind IGF-I and IGF-II, but not insulin. The identity of these proteins was shown to be IGFBP-1 on the basis of their reaction with specific anti-IGFBP-1 antibodies. To the best of our knowledge, the existence of IGFBP-1 associated with human placental cell membranes has not been reported in the literature before. Colocalisation of IGFBP-1 with IGF 1R in cell membranes could provide efficient modulation of IGF 1R receptor-ligand interactions.

  12. Connective tissue growth factor differentially binds to members of the cystine knot superfamily and potentiates platelet-derived growth factor-B signaling in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liya; Pi; Pei-Yu; Chung; Sriniwas; Sriram; Masmudur; M; Rahman; Wen-Yuan; Song; Edward; W; Scott; Bryon; E; Petersen; Gregory; S; Schultz

    2015-01-01

    AIM:To study the binding of connective tissue growth factor(CTGF) to cystine knot-containing ligands and how this impacts platelet-derived growth factor(PDGF)-B signaling. METHODS:The binding strengths of CTGF to cystine knot-containing growth factors including vascular en-dothelial growth factor(VEGF)-A,PDGF-B,bone morphogenetic protein(BMP)-4,and transforming growth factor(TGF)-β1 were compared using the LexA-based yeast two-hybrid system. EYG48 reporter strain that carried a wild-type LEU2 gene under the control of Lex A operators and a lac Z reporter plasmid(p80plac Z) containing eight high affinity Lex A binding sites were used in the yeast two-hybrid analysis. Interactions between CTGF and the tested growth factors were evaluated based on growth of transformed yeast cells on selective media and colorimetric detection in a liquid β-galactosidase activity assay. Dissociation constants of CTGF to VEGF-A isoform 165 or PDGF-BB homo-dimer were measured in surface plasma resonance(SPR) analysis. CTGF regulation in PDGF-B presentation to the PDGF receptor β(PDGFRβ) was also quantitatively assessed by the SPR analysis. Combinational effects of CTGF protein and PDGF-BB on activation of PDGFRβ and downstream signaling molecules ERK1/2 and AKT were assessed in rabbit corneal fibroblast cells by Western analysis. RESULTS:In the LexA-based yeast two-hybrid system,cystine knot motifs of tested growth factors were fused to the activation domain of the transcriptional factor GAL4 while CTGF was fused to the DNA binding domain of the bacterial repressor protein Lex A. Yeast cotransformants containing corresponding fusion proteins for CTGF and all four tested cystine knot motifs survived on selective medium containing galactose and raffinose but lacking histidine,tryptophan,and uracil. In liquid β-galactosidase assays,CTGF expressing cells that were co-transformed with the cystine knot of VEGF-A had the highest activity,at 29.88 ± 0.91 fold above controls(P < 0

  13. Crystal Structure of the Bovine lactadherin C2 Domain, a Membrane Binding Motif, Shows Similarity of the C2 Domains of Factor V and Factor VIII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin,L.; Huai, Q.; Huang, M.; Furie, B.; Furie, B.

    2007-01-01

    Lactadherin, a glycoprotein secreted by a variety of cell types, contains two EGF domains and two C domains with sequence homology to the C domains of blood coagulation proteins factor V and factor VIII. Like these proteins, lactadherin binds to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes with high affinity. We determined the crystal structure of the bovine lactadherin C2 domain (residues 1 to 158) at 2.4 Angstroms. The lactadherin C2 structure is similar to the C2 domains of factors V and VIII (rmsd of C? atoms of 0.9 Angstroms and 1.2 Angstroms, and sequence identities of 43% and 38%, respectively). The lactadherin C2 domain has a discoidin-like fold containing two ?-sheets of five and three antiparallel ?-strands packed against one another. The N and C termini are linked by a disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys158. One ?-turn and two loops containing solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues extend from the C2 domain ?-sandwich core. In analogy with the C2 domains of factors V and VIII, some or all of these solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues, Trp26, Leu28, Phe31, and Phe81, likely participate in membrane binding. The C2 domain of lactadherin may serve as a marker of cell surface phosphatidylserine exposure and may have potential as a unique anti-thrombotic agent.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Bovine lactadherin C2 Domain, a Membrane Binding Motif, Shows Similarity to the C2 Domains of Factor V and Factor VIII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin,L.

    2007-01-01

    Lactadherin, a glycoprotein secreted by a variety of cell types, contains two EGF domains and two C domains with sequence homology to the C domains of blood coagulation proteins factor V and factor VIII. Like these proteins, lactadherin binds to phosphatidylserine (PS)-containing membranes with high affinity. We determined the crystal structure of the bovine lactadherin C2 domain (residues 1 to 158) at 2.4 {angstrom}. The lactadherin C2 structure is similar to the C2 domains of factors V and VIII (rmsd of C{sub {alpha}} atoms of 0.9 {angstrom} and 1.2 {angstrom}, and sequence identities of 43% and 38%, respectively). The lactadherin C2 domain has a discoidin-like fold containing two {beta}-sheets of five and three antiparallel {beta}-strands packed against one another. The N and C termini are linked by a disulfide bridge between Cys1 and Cys158. One {beta}-turn and two loops containing solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues extend from the C2 domain {beta}-sandwich core. In analogy with the C2 domains of factors V and VIII, some or all of these solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues, Trp26, Leu28, Phe31, and Phe81, likely participate in membrane binding. The C2 domain of lactadherin may serve as a marker of cell surface phosphatidylserine exposure and may have potential as a unique anti-thrombotic agent.

  15. Binding characteristics of brain-derived neurotrophic factor to its receptors on neurons from the chick embryo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Tebar, A.; Barde, Y.A.

    1988-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein known to support the survival of embryonic sensory neurons and retinal ganglion cells, was derivatized with 125I-Bolton-Hunter reagent and obtained in a biologically active, radioactive form (125I-BDNF). Using dorsal root ganglion neurons from chick embryos at 9 d of development, the basic physicochemical parameters of the binding of 125I-BDNF with its receptors were established. Two different classes of receptors were found, with dissociation constants of 1.7 x 10(-11) M (high-affinity receptors) and 1.3 x 10(-9) M (low-affinity receptors). Unlabeled BDNF competed with 125I-BDNF for binding to the high-affinity receptors with an inhibition constant essentially identical to the dissociation constant of the labeled protein: 1.2 x 10(-11) M. The association and dissociation rates from both types of receptors were also determined, and the dissociation constants calculated from these kinetic experiments were found to correspond to the results obtained from steady-state binding. The number of high-affinity receptors (a few hundred per cell soma) was 15 times lower than that of low-affinity receptors. No high-affinity receptors were found on sympathetic neurons, known not to respond to BDNF, although specific binding of 125I-BDNF to these cells was detected at a high concentration of the radioligand. These results are discussed and compared with those obtained with nerve growth factor on the same neuronal populations.

  16. A factor VIII-derived peptide enables von Willebrand factor (VWF)-binding of artificial platelet nanoconstructs without interfering with VWF-adhesion of natural platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haji-Valizadeh, Hassan; Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2014-05-01

    There is substantial clinical interest in synthetic platelet analogs for potential application in transfusion medicine. To this end, our research is focused on self-assembled peptide-lipid nanoconstructs that can undergo injury site-selective adhesion and subsequently promote site-directed active platelet aggregation, thus mimicking platelet's primary hemostatic actions. For injury site-selective adhesion, we have utilized a coagulation factor FVIII-derived VWF-binding peptide (VBP). FVIII binds to VWF's D'-D3 domain while natural platelet GPIbα binds to VWF's A1 domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that the VBP-decorated nanoconstructs will adhere to VWF without mutual competition with natural platelets. We further hypothesized that the adherent VBP-decorated constructs can enhance platelet aggregation when co-decorated with a fibrinogen-mimetic peptide (FMP). To test these hypotheses, we used glycocalicin to selectively block VWF's A1 domain and, using fluorescence microscopy, studied the binding of fluorescently labeled VBP-decorated nanoconstructs versus platelets to ristocetin-treated VWF. Subsequently, we co-decorated the nanoconstructs with VBP and FMP and incubated them with human platelets to study construct-mediated enhancement of platelet aggregation. Decoration with VBP resulted in substantial construct adhesion to ristocetin-treated VWF even if the A1-domain was blocked by glycocalicin. In comparison, such A1-blocking resulted in significant reduction of platelet adhesion. Without A1-blocking, the VBP-decorated constructs and natural platelets could adhere to VWF concomitantly. Furthermore, the constructs co-decorated with VBP and FMP enhanced active platelet aggregation. The results indicate significant promise in utilizing the FVIII-derived VBP in developing synthetic platelet analogs that do not interfere with VWF-binding of natural platelets but allow site-directed enhancement of platelet aggregation when combined with FMP.

  17. Clinical Value of Interphase Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization in Diagnosis of Core-binding Factor Acute Myelocytic Leukemia%间期荧光原位杂交技术对诊断核心结合因子急性髓系白血病的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨慧; 范磊; 仇海荣; 王蓉; 张建富; 吴雨洁; 李建勇; 刘澎

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical value of interpha.se fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) in diagnosis of core-binding factor acute myelocytic leukemia (CBF AML). The cytogenetic characteristics in leukemia cells from 82 cases of AML-M2 and 43 cases of AML-M?/M5 were detected by using I-FISH with AML1-ET0 double color double fusion probe and double color break point isolated gene probe CBFfj-MYH11, and the detected results were compared with results detected by conventional cytogenetic R banding technique (CC). The results indicated that AMU-ETO fusion gene was detected in 30. 5% cases (25/82) by FISH, and t (8;21) ( q22;q22) karyotypic aberrations was found in 28.0% cases(23/82) by CC method . Among 25 FISH positive cases, typical FISH positive signal pattern ( 1R1G2F) was displayed in 22 cases and atypical signal pattern( 1R2G1F and 2R1G2F) was found in the other 3 cases. Among all 43 AML-M4/M5 cases, the CBFp-MYHU fusion gene was detected in 23.3% cases ( 10/43) by FISH, which sensitivity was significant higher than that by CC method (2/43) (p<0.05). It is concluded that some insufficiency of CC technique can be compensated by FISH, and combination of I-FISH with CC technique play a crucial role in diagnosis of CBF AML and in monitoring of minimal residual disease.%本研究主要探讨间期荧光原位杂交技术在核心结合因子急性髓系白血病(CBF AML)诊断中的价值.采用间期荧光原位杂交技术(I-FISH),分别应用AMLl-ETO双色双融合探针和荧光素直接标记的双色断裂点分离基因探针CBF β-MYH1l检测82例AML-M2及43例AML-M4/M5患者白血病细胞的细胞遗传学异常,并与R显带常规细胞遗传学(CC)检测结果进行比较分析.结果表明:82例AML-M2患者中FISH检测AMLI -ETO融合基因阳性患者为25例(30.5%),CC检测存在t(8;21) (q22;q22)染色体异常为23例(28.0%),所有FISH检测AML1ETO阳性患者中典型的阳性信号模式1R1G2F为22例(88.0%);

  18. Trp[superscript 2313]-His[superscript 2315] of Factor VIII C2 Domain Is Involved in Membrane Binding Structure of a Complex Between the C[subscript 2] Domain and an Inhibitor of Membrane Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhuo; Lin, Lin; Yuan, Cai; Nicolaes, Gerry A.F.; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Furie, Bruce; Furie, Barbara; Huang, Mingdong (Harvard-Med); (UAH); (Maastricht); (Chinese Aca. Sci.)

    2010-11-03

    Factor VIII (FVIII) plays a critical role in blood coagulation by forming the tenase complex with factor IXa and calcium ions on a membrane surface containing negatively charged phospholipids. The tenase complex activates factor X during blood coagulation. The carboxyl-terminal C2 domain of FVIII is the main membrane-binding and von Willebrand factor-binding region of the protein. Mutations of FVIII cause hemophilia A, whereas elevation of FVIII activity is a risk factor for thromboembolic diseases. The C2 domain-membrane interaction has been proposed as a target of intervention for regulation of blood coagulation. A number of molecules that interrupt FVIII or factor V (FV) binding to cell membranes have been identified through high throughput screening or structure-based design. We report crystal structures of the FVIII C2 domain under three new crystallization conditions, and a high resolution (1.15 {angstrom}) crystal structure of the FVIII C2 domain bound to a small molecular inhibitor. The latter structure shows that the inhibitor binds to the surface of an exposed {beta}-strand of the C2 domain, Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315}. This result indicates that the Trp{sup 2313}-His{sup 2315} segment is an important constituent of the membrane-binding motif and provides a model to understand the molecular mechanism of the C2 domain membrane interaction.

  19. Structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I with reduced affinity for serum binding proteins and the type 2 insulin-like growth factor receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayne, M.L.; Applebaum, J.; Chicchi, G.G.; Hayes, N.S.; Green, B.G.; Cascieri, M.A.

    1988-05-05

    Four structural analogs of human insulin-like growth factor I (hIGF-I) have been prepared by site-directed mutagenesis of a synthetic IGF-I gene and subsequent expression and purification of the mutant protein from the conditioned media of transformed yeast. (Phe/sup -1/, Val/sup 1/, Asn/sup 2/, Gln/sup 3/, His/sup 4/, Ser/sup 8/, His/sup 9/, Glu/sup 12/, Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I (B-chain mutant), in which the first 16 amino acids of hIGF-I were replaced with the first 17 amino acids of the B-chain of insulin, has >1000-, 100-, and 2-fold reduced potency for human serum binding proteins, the rat liver type 2 IGF receptor, and the human placental type 1 IGF receptor, respectively. The B-chain mutant also has 4-fold increased affinity for the human placental insulin receptor. (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/) IGF-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins, but is equipotent to hIGF-I at the types 1 and 2 IGF and insulin receptors. (Tyr/sup 15/, Leu/sup 16/) IGH-I has 4-fold reduced affinity for human serum binding proteins and 10-fold increased affinity for the insulin receptor. The peptide in which these four-point mutations are combined, (Gln/sup 3/, Ala/sup 4/, Tyr/sup 15/,Leu/sup 16/)IGF-I, has 600-fold reduced affinity for the serum binding proteins. All four of these mutants stimulate DNA synthesis in the rat vascular smooth muscle cell line A10 with potencies reflecting their potency at the type 1 IGF receptor. These studies identify some of the domains of hIGF-I which are responsible for maintaining high affinity binding with the serum binding protein and the type 2 IGF receptor. In addition, These peptides will be useful in defining the role of the type 2 IGF receptor and serum binding proteins in the physiological actions of hIGF-I.

  20. Transcription of the human beta enolase gene (ENO-3) is regulated by an intronic muscle-specific enhancer that binds myocyte-specific enhancer factor 2 proteins and ubiquitous G-rich-box binding factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feo, S; Antona, V; Barbieri, G; Passantino, R; Calì, L; Giallongo, A

    1995-01-01

    To provide evidence for the cis-regulatory DNA sequences and trans-acting factors involved in the complex pattern of tissue- and stage-specific expression of the beta enolase gene, constructs containing fragments of the gene fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene were used in transient-transfection assays of C2C12 myogenic cells. Deletion analysis revealed the presence of four major regions: two negative regions in the 5'-flanking sequence, a basal promoter region which directs expression at low levels in proliferating and differentiated muscle cells, and a positive region within the first intron that confers cell-type-specific and differentiation-induced expression. This positive regulatory element is located in the 3'-proximal portion of the first intron (nucleotides +504 to +637) and acts as an enhancer irrespective of orientation and position from the homologous beta enolase promoter or the heterologous thymidine kinase promoter, conferring in both cases muscle-specific expression to the linked reporter gene. Deletion of a putative myocyte-specific enhancer factor 1 (MEF-1) binding site, containing a canonical E-box motif, had no effects on muscle-specific transcription, indicating that this site is not required for the activity of the enhancer. Gel mobility shift assays, competition analysis, DNase I footprinting, and mutagenesis studies indicated that this element interacts through an A/T-rich box with a MEF-2 protein(s) and through a G-rich box with a novel ubiquitous factor(s). Mutation of either the G-rich box or the A/T-rich box resulted in a significantly reduced activity of the enhancer in transient-transfection assays. These data indicate that MEF-2 and G-rich-box binding factors are each necessary for tissue-specific expression of the beta enolase gene in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:7565752

  1. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein SdrE binds complement regulator factor H as an immune evasion tactic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available Similar to other highly successful invasive bacterial pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus recruits the complement regulatory protein factor H (fH to its surface to inhibit the alternative pathway of complement. Here, we report the identification of the surface-associated protein SdrE as a fH-binding protein using purified fH overlay of S. aureus fractionated cell wall proteins and fH cross-linking to S. aureus followed by mass spectrometry. Studies using recombinant SdrE revealed that rSdrE bound significant fH whether from serum or as a purified form, in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, rSdrE-bound fH exhibited cofactor functionality for factor I (fI-mediated cleavage of C3b to iC3b which correlated positively with increasing amounts of fH. Expression of SdrE on the surface of the surrogate bacterium Lactococcus lactis enhanced recruitment of fH which resulted in increased iC3b generation. Moreover, surface expression of SdrE led to a reduction in C3-fragment deposition, less C5a generation, and reduced killing by polymorphonuclear cells. Thus, we report the first identification of a S. aureus protein associated with the staphylococcal surface that binds factor H as an immune evasion mechanism.

  2. Second Intron of Mouse Nestin Gene Directs its Expression in Pluripotent Embryonic Carcinoma Cells through POU Factor Binding Site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang JIN; Li LIU; Hua ZHONG; Ke-Jing ZHANG; Yong-Feng CHEN; Wei BIAN; Le-Ping CHENG; Nai-He JING

    2006-01-01

    Nestin, an intermediate filament protein, is expressed in the neural stem cells of the developing central nervous system. This tissue-specific expression is driven by the neural stem cell-specific enhancer in the second intron of the nestin gene. In this study, we showed that the mouse nestin gene was expressed in pluripotent embryonic carcinoma (EC) P19 and F9 cells, not in the differentiated cell types. This cell typespecific expression was conferred by the enhancer in the second intron. Mutation of the conserved POU factor-binding site in the enhancer abolished the reporter gene expression in EC cells. Oct4, a Class V POU factor, was found to be coexpressed with nestin in EC cells. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and supershift assays showed that a unique protein-DNA complex was formed specifically with nuclear extracts of EC cells, and Oct4 protein was included. Together, these results suggest the functional relevance between the conserved POU factor-binding site and the expression of the nestin gene in pluripotent EC cells.

  3. Probabilistic Inference on Multiple Normalized Signal Profiles from Next Generation Sequencing: Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Ka-Chun

    2015-04-20

    With the prevalence of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with sequencing (ChIP-Seq) technology, massive ChIP-Seq data has been accumulated. The ChIP-Seq technology measures the genome-wide occupancy of DNA-binding proteins in vivo. It is well-known that different DNA-binding protein occupancies may result in a gene being regulated in different conditions (e.g. different cell types). To fully understand a gene\\'s function, it is essential to develop probabilistic models on multiple ChIP-Seq profiles for deciphering the gene transcription causalities. In this work, we propose and describe two probabilistic models. Assuming the conditional independence of different DNA-binding proteins\\' occupancies, the first method (SignalRanker) is developed as an intuitive method for ChIP-Seq genome-wide signal profile inference. Unfortunately, such an assumption may not always hold in some gene regulation cases. Thus, we propose and describe another method (FullSignalRanker) which does not make the conditional independence assumption. The proposed methods are compared with other existing methods on ENCODE ChIP-Seq datasets, demonstrating its regression and classification ability. The results suggest that FullSignalRanker is the best-performing method for recovering the signal ranks on the promoter and enhancer regions. In addition, FullSignalRanker is also the best-performing method for peak sequence classification. We envision that SignalRanker and FullSignalRanker will become important in the era of next generation sequencing. FullSignalRanker program is available on the following website: http://www.cs.toronto.edu/∼wkc/FullSignalRanker/ © 2015 IEEE.

  4. Berberine inhibits cyclin D1 expression via suppressed binding of AP-1 transcription factors to CCND1 AP-1 motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye LUO; Yu HAO; Tai-ping SHI; Wei-wei DENG; Na LI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To verify the suppressive effect of berberine on the proliferation of the human pulmonary giant cell carcinoma cell line PG and to demonstrate the mecha-nisms behind the antitumoral effects of berberine. Methods: The proliferative effects of PG cells were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetry. The cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. The expression level of cyclin D1 was detected by RT-PCR. The activities of the activating protein-1 (AP-1) and NF-κB signaling pathways related to cyclin D1 were examined by luciferase assay. The cytoplasmic level of c-Jun was detected by Western blot analysis. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to examiae the binding of transcription factors to the cyclin D1 gene (CCNDl) AP-1 motif. Results: The results showed that the proliferation of PG cells treated with different concentrations (10, 20, and 40 μg/mL) of berberine for 24 and 48 h was suppressed significantly compared to the control group. After treatment with berberine, the proportion of PG cells at the G0/G1 phase increased, while cells at the S and G2/M phases decreased. Berberine could inhibit the expression of cyclin D1 in PG cells. Berberine inhibited the activity of the AP-1 signaling pathway, but had no significant effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Berberine suppressed the expression of c-Jun and decreased the binding of tran-scription factors to the CCND1 AP-1 motif. Conclusion: Berberine suppresses the activity of the AP-1 signaling pathway and decreases the binding of transcrip-tion factors to the CCND1 AP-1 motif. This is one of the important mechanisms behind the antitumoral effects of berberine as a regulator of cyclin D1.

  5. Evidence that IGF-binding protein-5 functions as a growth factor

    OpenAIRE

    Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Richman, Charmaine; Kasukawa, Yuji; Linkhart, Thomas A.; David J. Baylink; Mohan, Subburaman

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies support the concept that IGF-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) stimulates bone formation, at least in part, via IGF-independent mechanisms. To evaluate this hypothesis further, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo effects of IGFBP-5 on bone formation parameters using the IGF-I knockout (KO) mouse. Treatment of serum-free cultures of osteoblast clones derived from IGF-I KO mice with recombinant human IGFBP-5 increased both proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in a dose-d...

  6. Purification and characterization of porcine growth hormone-dependent insulin-like growth factor binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis were (1) to evaluate molecular weight (M{sub r}) profiles of IGF-I and {sup 125}I-IGF-I; binding activity in pig serum; (2) to determine whether exogenous IGF-I partitions to IGFBPs in the circulation in pigs; (3) to purify and characterize the GH-dependent IGFBP from pig serum; (4) to assess the effects of the IGFBP on IGF-I action in vitro; (5) to establish a radioimmunoassay for the IGFBP; and (6) to measure IGFBP concentrations in serum from GH- and IGF-I-treated pigs.

  7. Characterization of a Wnt-binding site of the WIF-domain of Wnt inhibitory factor-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányai, László; Kerekes, Krisztina; Patthy, László

    2012-09-21

    A Wnt-binding site of the WIF-domain of Wnt inhibitory factor-1 was localized by structure-guided arginine-scanning mutagenesis in combination with surface plasmon resonance assays. Our observation that substitution of some residues of WIF resulted in an increased affinity for Wnt5a, but decreased affinity for Wnt3a, suggests that these residues may define the specificity spectrum of WIF for Wnts. These results hold promise for a more specific targeting of Wnt family members with WIF variants in various forms of cancer. PMID:22986341

  8. Epigenetic analyses of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 gene in type 1 diabetes and diabetic nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Tianwei; Falhammar, Henrik; Gu, Harvest F.; Brismar, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical observations have demonstrated that high levels of circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) are associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D), whereas low serum IGFBP-1 levels are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, we reported that increased DNA methylation levels in the IGFBP1 gene were associated with T2D. In the present study, we evaluated the epigenetic changes of IGFBP1 in T1D and diabetic nephropathy (DN). Results In total,...

  9. Salmon serum 22 kDa insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) is IGFBP-1

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, M; Dickey, J T; Fukada, H; Dickhoff, W W

    2005-01-01

    Western ligand blotting of salmon serum typically reveals three insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) at 22, 28 and 41 kDa. Physiological regulation of the 22-kDa IGFBP is similar to that of mammalian IGFBP-1; it is increased under catabolic states such as fasting and stress. On the other hand, its molecular weight on Western ligand blotting is closest to mammalian IGFBP-4. The conflict between physiology and molecular weight makes it difficult to conclude the identity of the 2...

  10. High-affinity insulin binding to an atypical insulin-like growth factor-I receptor in human breast cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Milazzo, G.; Yip, C. C.; Maddux, B A; Vigneri, R; Goldfine, I D

    1992-01-01

    We studied the nature of insulin receptor binding in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. In both intact cells and solubilized receptor preparations, high-affinity insulin binding was seen. However, unlabeled insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) was five-fold more potent in inhibiting 125I-insulin binding than insulin itself. With monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor, 30% of 125I-insulin binding was inhibited. In contrast when alpha-IR3, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes typical IGF-I rece...

  11. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  12. Staphylococcus aureus protein A binding to osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor 1 results in activation of nuclear factor kappa B and release of interleukin-6 in bone infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro, Tânia; Widaa, Amro; McDonnell, Cormac; Foster, Timothy J; O'Brien, Fergal J; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the major pathogen among the staphylococci and the most common cause of bone infections. These infections are mainly characterized by bone destruction and inflammation, and are often debilitating and very difficult to treat. Previously we demonstrated that S. aureus protein A (SpA) can bind to osteoblasts, which results in inhibition of osteoblast proliferation and mineralization, apoptosis, and activation of osteoclasts. In this study we used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to demonstrate that osteoblast tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR-1) is responsible for the recognition of and binding to SpA. TNFR-1 binding to SpA results in the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). In turn, NFκB translocates to the nucleus of the osteoblast, which leads to release of interleukin 6 (IL-6). Silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts or disruption of the spa gene in S. aureus prevented both NFκB activation and IL-6 release. As well as playing a key role in proinflammatory reactions, IL-6 is also an important osteotropic factor. Release of IL-6 from osteoblasts results in the activation of the bone-resorbing cells, the osteoclasts. Consistent with our results described above, both silencing TNFR-1 in osteoblasts and disruption of spa in S. aureus prevented osteoclast activation. These studies are the first to demonstrate the importance of the TNFR-1-SpA interaction in bone infection, and may help explain the mechanism through which osteoclasts become overactivated, leading to bone destruction. Anti-inflammatory drug therapy could be used either alone or in conjunction with antibiotics to treat osteomyelitis or for prophylaxis in high-risk patients.

  13. Effects of an endurance cycling competition on resting serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and its binding proteins IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3

    OpenAIRE

    Chicharro, J; Lopez-Calderon, A; Hoyos, J; Martin-Velasco, A; Villa, G; Villanua, M; Lucia, A

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To determine whether consecutive bouts of intense endurance exercise over a three week period alters serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and/or its binding proteins.

  14. Studying the evolution of transcription factor binding events using multi-species ChIP-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Zhao, Hongyu

    2013-03-01

    Recent technology advances make it possible to collect whole-genome transcription factor binding (TFB) profiles from multiple species through the ChIP-Seq data. This provides rich information to understand TFB evolution. However, few rigorous statistical models are available to infer TFB evolution from these data. We have developed a phylogenetic tree based method to model the on/off rates of TFB events. There are two unique features of our method compared to existing models. First, we mask nucleotide substitutions and focus on INDEL disruption of TFB events, which are rarer evolution events and more appropriate for divergent species and non-coding regulatory regions. Second, we correct for ascertainment bias in ChIP-Seq data by maximizing likelihood conditional on the observed (incomplete) data. Simulations show that our method works well in model selection and parameter estimation when there are sufficient aligned TFB events. When this method is applied to a ChIP-Seq data set with five vertebrates, we find that the instantaneous transition rates to INDELs are higher in TFB regions than in homologous non-binding regions. This is driven by an excess of alignment columns showing binding in one species but gaps in all other species. When we compare the inferred transition rates between the conserved and non-conserved regions, as expected, the conserved regions are estimated to have lower transition rates. The R package TFBphylo that implements the described model can be downloaded from http://bioinformatics.med.yale.edu/. PMID:23446869

  15. A common site within factor H SCR 7 responsible for binding heparin, C-reactive protein and streptococcal M protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Eleni; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Male, Dean A; Ranganathan, Shoba; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Fischetti, Vince A; Mold, Carolyn; Gordon, David L

    2003-04-01

    The complement inhibitor factor H (fH) interacts via its seventh short consensus repeat (SCR) domain with multiple ligands including heparin, streptococcal M protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to localize the residues in SCR 7 required for these interactions. We initially built a homology model of fH SCR 6-7 using the averaged NMR structures of fH SCR 15-16 and vaccinia control protein SCR 3-4 as templates. Electrostatic potentials of the model's surface demonstrated a co-localization of three clusters of positively charged residues on SCR 7, labeled site A (R369 and K370), site B (R386 and K387) and site C (K392). These residues, localized to the linker region preceding SCR 7 and to the end of a "hypervariable loop" in SCR 7, were systematically replaced with uncharged alanine residues in an fH construct containing SCR 1-7. The resulting proteins were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. By ELISA analysis we demonstrated: first, that substituting site A inhibited heparin and CRP binding; secondly, that substituting site B inhibited binding to heparin, CRP and M protein; and thirdly, that substituting site C clearly inhibited only heparin binding.

  16. The chitin-binding Cladosporium fulvum effector protein Avr4 is a virulence factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Esse, H Peter; Bolton, Melvin D; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2007-09-01

    The biotrophic fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva) is the causal agent of tomato leaf mold. The Avr4 protein belongs to a set of effectors that is secreted by C. fulvum during infection and is thought to play a role in pathogen virulence. Previous studies have shown that Avr4 binds to chitin present in fungal cell walls and that, through this binding, Avr4 can protect these cell walls against hydrolysis by plant chitinases. In this study, we demonstrate that Avr4 expression in Arabidopsis results in increased virulence of several fungal pathogens with exposed chitin in their cell walls, whereas the virulence of a bacterium and an oomycete remained unaltered. Heterologous expression of Avr4 in tomato increased the virulence of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Through tomato GeneChip analyses, we demonstrate that Avr4 expression in tomato results in the induced expression of only a few genes. Finally, we demonstrate that silencing of the Avr4 gene in C. fulvum decreases its virulence on tomato. This is the first report on the intrinsic function of a fungal avirulence protein that has a counter-defensive activity required for full virulence of the pathogen.

  17. Transforming growth factor beta stimulation of biglycan gene expression is potentially mediated by sp1 binding factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Xie, Zhongjian; Young, Marian Frances;

    2004-01-01

    Biglycan is a small leucine-rich proteoglycan which is localized in the extracellular matrix of bone and other specialized connective tissues. Both biglycan mRNA and protein are up-regulated by transforming growth factor-beta(1) (TGF-beta(1)) and biglycan appears to influence TGF-beta(1) activity...

  18. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M;

    2001-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate, markers of disease activity in acromegaly in relation to perceived disease activity. Thirty-seven consecutively treated, acromegalic patients, classified by clinical symptoms as inactive (n=16), slightly active (n=10) and active (n=11), entered the study. When evaluating......-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease activity...

  19. Interruption of intrachromosomal looping by CCCTC binding factor decoy proteins abrogates genomic imprinting of human insulin-like growth factor II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Niu, Beibei; Ge, Shengfang; Wang, Haibo; Li, Tao; Ling, Jianqun; Steelman, Brandon N.; Qian, Guanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of IGF2 is regulated by CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) binding to the imprinting control region (ICR) on the maternal allele, with subsequent formation of an intrachromosomal loop to the promoter region. The N-terminal domain of CTCF interacts with SUZ12, part of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2), to silence the maternal allele. We synthesized decoy CTCF proteins, fusing the CTCF deoxyribonucleic acid–binding zinc finger domain to CpG methyltransferase Sss1 or to enhanced green fluorescent protein. In normal human fibroblasts and breast cancer MCF7 cell lines, the CTCF decoy proteins bound to the unmethylated ICR and to the IGF2 promoter region but did not interact with SUZ12. EZH2, another part of PRC2, was unable to methylate histone H3-K27 in the IGF2 promoter region, resulting in reactivation of the imprinted allele. The intrachromosomal loop between the maternal ICR and the IGF2 promoters was not observed when IGF2 imprinting was lost. CTCF epigenetically governs allelic gene expression of IGF2 by orchestrating chromatin loop structures involving PRC2. PMID:21536749

  20. The Binding Affinity and Molecular Basis of the Structure-Binding Relationship between Urinary Tamm-Horsfall Glycoprotein and Tumor Necrosis Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Li Yu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study we noted significant THP binding to TNF-α, but did not explore the molecular basis of the structure-binding relationship. In this study, we used lectin-binding ELISA to assess the carbohydrate compositions of THP, BSA, IgG, TNF-α, and IFN-g. We identified β(1,4-N-acetylglucosamine oligomers (GlcNAc and GlcNAc/branched mannose in BSA, IgG, TNF-α, and THP, but not in IFN-g. These carbohydrate moieties mediated binding with THP. Small amounts of Siaα(2,3Gal/ GalNAc, Sia(2,6Gal/GalNAc, and mannose residues were also present in THP and TNF-α. Binding affinity (Kd between THP and TNF-α by Scatchard plot analysis was 1.4–1.7 × 10−6 M, lower than antigen-antibody or ligand-receptor binding affinities. To elucidate the structure-binding relationship of THP-TNF-α, THP was digested with neuraminidase, β-galactosidase, O-sialoglycoprotein endopeptidase, carboxypeptidase Y, or proteinase K. β-galactosidase increased binding capacity of THP for TNF-α. Monosaccharide inhibition suggested that α-methyl-D-mannoside, GlcNAc, and GalNAc, but not sialic acid, suppress THP-TNF-α binding as detected by ELISA. We conclude that sugar-lectin and sugar-protein interactions between cognate sites in THP and TNF-α mediate their binding.

  1. Coagulation factor Va binds to human umbilical vein endothelial cells and accelerates protein C activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, I.; Salem, H H; Majerus, P W

    1984-01-01

    In vitro the rate of protein C activation by thrombin is significantly accelerated by two distinct cofactors (a) the endothelial cell surface protein, thrombomodulin, and (b) human coagulation Factor Va. We have recently reported that the activity of Factor Va is contained in the 78,000-D light chain. In this study we have investigated the effects of Factor Va and its light chain on the activation of protein C in the presence of cultured endothelial cells. Thrombin-catalyzed protein C activat...

  2. Reconfiguring the connectivity of a multiprotein complex: Fusions of yeast TATA-binding protein with Brf1, and the function of transcription factor IIIB

    OpenAIRE

    Kassavetis, George A.; Soragni, Elisabetta; Driscoll, Robert; Geiduschek, E.Peter

    2005-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) IIIB, the central transcription initiation factor of RNA polymerase III (pol III), is composed of three subunits, Bdp1, Brf1 and TATA-binding protein (TBP), all essential for normal function in vivo and in vitro. Brf1 is a modular protein: Its N-proximal half is related to TFIIB and binds similarly to the C-terminal stirrup of TBP; its C-proximal one-third provides most of the affinity for TBP by binding along the entire length of the convex surface and N-terminal la...

  3. Release of IgD-binding factor by T cells under the influence of interleukin 2, interleukin 4, or cross-linked IgD.

    OpenAIRE

    Amin, A R; Coico, R F; Finkelman, F; Siskind, G W; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1988-01-01

    Helper T cells with receptors specific for IgD have immunoaugmenting properties. We have now detected soluble IgD-binding factor in cell supernatants immobilized on nitrocellulose paper by their ability to bind 125I-labeled IgD. IgD-binding factor is released by normal splenic T cells stimulated with recombinant interleukin 2, recombinant interleukin 4, or crosslinked IgD in amounts paralleling the induction of IgD receptors on the cells. IgD receptors are constitutively produced by antigen-s...

  4. Isolation of transcription factors binding auxin response elements using a yeast one-hybrid system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI; Mei(齐眉); HUANG; Meijuan(黄美娟); CHEN; Fan(陈凡)

    2002-01-01

    Plant hormones play an important role during higher plant embryogenesis. Auxin is central to the development of vascular tissues, formation of lateral and adventitious roots, control of apical dominance, and tropic responses. Auxin response element (AuxRE), present in the promoters of many auxin-induced genes, can confer auxin responsiveness. Using carrot somatic embryo under specific developmental phase, a cDNA expression library was constructed. Several plasmids were recombined containing the tetramer of AuxRE as a bait. After screening by a yeast one-hy- brid system, one positive clone was confirmed and characterized. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that AxRF1 protein expressed in yeast cell could bind AuxRE in vitro. It suggests that AxRF1 participates in regulation of the expression of auxin responsive gene during carrot somatic embryogenesis.

  5. An epigenetic regulator emerges as microtubule minus-end binding and stabilizing factor in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Sylvain; Shvedunova, Maria; Van Nguyen, Nhuong; Avila, Leonor; Vernos, Isabelle; Akhtar, Asifa

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary conserved NSL complex is a prominent epigenetic regulator controlling expression of thousands of genes. Here we uncover a novel function of the NSL complex members in mitosis. As the cell enters mitosis, KANSL1 and KANSL3 undergo a marked relocalisation from the chromatin to the mitotic spindle. By stabilizing microtubule minus ends in a RanGTP-dependent manner, they are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. Moreover, we identify KANSL3 as a microtubule minus-end-binding protein, revealing a new class of mitosis-specific microtubule minus-end regulators. By adopting distinct functions in interphase and mitosis, KANSL proteins provide a link to coordinate the tasks of faithful expression and inheritance of the genome during different phases of the cell cycle.

  6. Hypersensitivity to thromboxane receptor mediated cerebral vasomotion and CBF oscillations during acute NO-deficiency in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Horváth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low frequency (4-12 cpm spontaneous fluctuations of the cerebrovascular tone (vasomotion and oscillations of the cerebral blood flow (CBF have been reported in diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. Since endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO suppresses constitutively the release and vascular effects of thromboxane A(2 (TXA(2, NO-deficiency is often associated with activation of thromboxane receptors (TP. In the present study we hypothesized that in the absence of NO, overactivation of the TP-receptor mediated cerebrovascular signaling pathway contributes to the development of vasomotion and CBF oscillations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Effects of pharmacological modulation of TP-receptor activation and its downstream signaling pathway have been investigated on CBF oscillations (measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry in anesthetized rats and vasomotion (measured by isometric tension recording in isolated rat middle cerebral arteries, MCAs both under physiological conditions and after acute inhibition of NO synthesis. Administration of the TP-receptor agonist U-46619 (1 µg/kg i.v. to control animals failed to induce any changes of the systemic or cerebral circulatory parameters. Inhibition of the NO synthesis by nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 mg/kg i.v. resulted in increased mean arterial blood pressure and a decreased CBF accompanied by appearance of CBF-oscillations with a dominant frequency of 148±2 mHz. U-46619 significantly augmented the CBF-oscillations induced by L-NAME while inhibition of endogenous TXA(2 synthesis by ozagrel (10 mg/kg i.v. attenuated it. In isolated MCAs U-46619 in a concentration of 100 nM, which induced weak and stable contraction under physiological conditions, evoked sustained vasomotion in the absence of NO, which effect could be completely reversed by inhibition of Rho-kinase by 10 µM Y-27632. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that hypersensitivity of the TP

  7. Serum free and total insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 levels in healthy elderly individuals - Relation to self-reported duality of health and disability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, JAMJL; Stolk, RP; Pols, HAP; Grobbee, DE; Lamberts, SWJ

    1998-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of the free insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGF-I/IGFBP) system on the quality of health and on disability in the elderly population. Design: In a cross-sectional population based study of 218 healthy elderly su

  8. Structural basis for S-adenosylmethionine binding and methyltransferase activity by mitochondrial transcription factor B1

    OpenAIRE

    Guja, Kip E.; Venkataraman, Krithika; Yakubovskaya, Elena; Hui SHI; Mejia, Edison; Hambardjieva, Elena; Karzai, A. Wali; Garcia-Diaz, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factor B (TFB) proteins are homologous to KsgA/Dim1 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) methyltransferases. The mammalian TFB1, mitochondrial (TFB1M) factor is an essential protein necessary for mitochondrial gene expression. TFB1M mediates an rRNA modification in the small ribosomal subunit and thus plays a role analogous to KsgA/Dim1 proteins. This modification has been linked to mitochondrial dysfunctions leading to maternally inherited deafness, aminoglycoside sensitivity and di...

  9. Dynamic Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of an Arabidopsis SR Splicing Factor: Role of the RNA-Binding Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Rausin, Glwadys; Tillemans, Vinciane; Stankovic, Nancy; Hanikenne, Marc; Motte, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are essential nuclear-localized splicing factors. We have investigated the dynamic subcellular distribution of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) RSZp22 protein, a homolog of the human 9G8 SR factor. Little is known about the determinants underlying the control of plant SR protein dynamics, and so far most studies relied on ectopic transient overexpression. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the RSZp22 expression profile and describe its nucleocytop...

  10. Allele-specific transcription factor binding to common and rare variants associated with disease and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallerman, Ola; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Berggren, Olof; Elvers, Ingegerd; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Rönnblom, Lars; Lindblad Toh, Kerstin; Wadelius, Claes

    2016-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of disease-associated SNPs, but in few cases the functional variant and the gene it controls have been identified. To systematically identify candidate regulatory variants, we sequenced ENCODE cell lines and used public ChIP-seq data to look for transcription factors binding preferentially to one allele. We found 9962 candidate regulatory SNPs, of which 16 % were rare and showed evidence of larger functional effect than common ones. Functionally rare variants may explain divergent GWAS results between populations and are candidates for a partial explanation of the missing heritability. The majority of allele-specific variants (96 %) were specific to a cell type. Furthermore, by examining GWAS loci we found >400 allele-specific candidate SNPs, 141 of which were highly relevant in our cell types. Functionally validated SNPs support identification of an SNP in SYNGR1 which may expose to the risk of rheumatoid arthritis and primary biliary cirrhosis, as well as an SNP in the last intron of COG6 exposing to the risk of psoriasis. We propose that by repeating the ChIP-seq experiments of 20 selected transcription factors in three to ten people, the most common polymorphisms can be interrogated for allele-specific binding. Our strategy may help to remove the current bottleneck in functional annotation of the genome. PMID:26993500

  11. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ángel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs.

  12. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Giannone

    Full Text Available Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography--tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS. After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  13. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B [ORNL; Shen, Rong-Fong [National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health; Wang, Yisong [ORNL; Liu, Yie [National Institute on Aging, Baltimore

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in the bovine mammary gland: Receptors, endogenous secretion, and appearance in milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    This is the first study to characterize both insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) in bovine milk, to characterize the IGF-I receptor in the dry and lactating mammary gland, and to report de novo synthesis and secretion of IGF-I and IGFBP from normal mammary tissue. Immunoreactive IGF-I was principally associated with 45 kDa IGFBP in milk. Multiparous cows had a higher IGF-I concentration of 307 ng/ml than primiparous cows at 147 ng/ml. IGF-I concentration on day 56 of lactation was 34 ng/ml for combined parity groups. At parturition, IGF-I mass in blood and milk pools was 1.4 and 1.2 mg, respectively. Binding of {sup 125}I-IGF-I was specific for IGF-I with anIC{sub 50} of 2.2 ng which was a 10- and 1273-fold greater affinity than IGF-II and insulin, respectively. Association constants, as determined by Scatchard analysis, were similar for both pregnant and lactating cows at 3.5 and 4.0 L/nM, respectively. In addition, estimated mean receptor concentration was 0.25 and 0.23 pM/mg protein for pregnant and lactating cows, respectively. In a survey of mammary microscomes prepared from 48 cows, {sup 125}I-IGF-I binding declined with progressing lactation and a similar trend was observed during pregnancy.

  15. Targeting insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 signaling pathways. A novel therapeutic approach for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun; Kim, So Ri; Oh, Youngman; Cho, Seong Ho; Schleimer, Robert P; Lee, Yong Chul

    2014-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has been recognized to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of asthma, whereas IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 blocks crucial physiologic manifestations of asthma. IGF-I enhances subepithelial fibrosis, airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness, and airway smooth muscle hyperplasia by interacting with various inflammatory mediators and complex signaling pathways, such as intercellular adhesion molecule-1, and the hypoxia-inducible factor/vascular endothelial growth factor axis. On the other hand, IGFBP-3 decreases airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness through IGFBP-3 receptor-mediated activation of caspases, which subsequently inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. It also inhibits the IGF-I/hypoxia-inducible factor/vascular endothelial growth factor axis via IGF-I-dependent and/or IGF-I-independent mechanisms. This Translational Review summarizes the role of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in the context of allergic airway disease, and discusses the therapeutic potential of various strategies targeting the IGF-I and IGFBP-3 signaling pathways for the management of asthma. PMID:24219511

  16. HB-EGF与坏死性小肠结肠炎的研究进展%Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor and necrotizing enterocolitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张炎

    2013-01-01

    坏死性小肠结肠炎(necrotizing enterocolitis,NEC)是一种常见且严重的胃肠道疾病,主要发生在早产儿.尽管采取了诸多措施,NEC的病死率仍然很高.近年来,诸多研究显示肝素结合表皮生长因子样生长因子(heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor,HB-EGF)可以保护肠道上皮细胞免受多种伤害.并且,在成年大鼠肠道缺血再灌注损伤模型和新生NEC模型鼠进行的实验显示,HB-EGF可以保护肠道免受损伤.这些研究为NEC的治疗和预防提供了一个新的研究方向.%Necrotizing enterocolitis(NEC) is a common and devastating gastrointestinal disease that occurs predominantly in premature infants.Despite various advances in management,the mortality of this disease remains high.During the last decade,studies have shown that heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF),can protect intestinal epithelial cells from various forms of injury in vitro.Furthermore,studies using both an intestinal ischemia-reperfusion injury model in adult rats and neonatal rat model of NEC,have shown that HB-EGF can protect the intestines from injury.Present studies provide a new research direction in the prevention and treatment.

  17. Volumes of chronic traumatic frontal brain lesions measured by MR imaging and CBF tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeder, P.; Wirsen, A.; Bajc, M.; Schalen, W.; Sjoeholm, H.; Skeidsvoll, H.; Cronqvist, S.; Ingvar, D.H. (University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Neuroradiology University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology University Hospital, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1991-07-01

    The volumes (ml) of chronic traumatic frontal brain lesions were compared measured 'morphologically' with MR imaging (T1 and T2 weighted images) and 'functionally' with a tomographic rCBF technique (SPECT with {sup 133}Xe i.v.). The T1 volumes varied between 11 and 220 ml. The correlation between T1 and T2 volumes was 0.95, the T2 volumes being 33% larger than T1 volumes (p<0.001). The functional SPECT volumes were considerably larger (range 16-324 ml) than the MR volumes. The mean volume difference was 81% between T1 and SPECT images (p<0.001), and 35% between T2 and SPECT images (p<0.001). Correlations between the MR and SPECT volumes were also higher for T2 than T1 volumes. The volume difference is most likely explained by a functional decrease in regions around the lesion in which no morphologic change visible on MR images had taken place. MR and SPECT volume measurements were positively related to persistent lack of energy and personality changes, but only moderately related to duration of impaired consciousness and neuropsychologie outcome. (orig.).

  18. Study on the preparation of the compound bioflocculant CBF-1 and its flocculation properties%复合生物絮凝剂CBF-1的制备及其絮凝特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷志斌; 胡勇有; 于琪

    2012-01-01

    Compound bioflocculant ( CBF-1 ) was prepared by mechanical mixing of microbial fiocculant (MBF8) and biopolymeric floceulant (CG-A). The functional group, electrical and the framework characteristics of CBF-1 were determined by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) , Zeta electric potential method and transmission electron microscope ( TEM), respectively. Moreover, the flocculating properties of CBF-1 on treating kaolin suspension were also examined. The results showed that the optimum weight ratio of CG- A : MBF8 was 4 : 6. CBF- 1 was pale yellow solution with 0. 013% of undissolved substance. The pH value, relative viscosity ( effective constituent O. 5% , 30 ℃ ) and isoionic point ( effective constituent O. 1% ) of such solution were 6. 1, 1.72 and pH = 1.5, respectively. The main specific functional groups were hydroxyl group, carboxyl group, amino group, amide group and phosphate group. With the PAC dosage of 3 mg" L - 1 and the CBF-1 dosage range from 1.0 to 8.0 mg" L - 1, the optimum pH value was 6.0 ~ 10.0 and the optimum ionic strength was 0.5 ~ 5.0 mmol. L - I for the Jar tests. For the kaolin suspension with turbidity of 100 NTU, the removal rate of turbidity could achieve 92% and the residual aluminum was less than 75 μg·L-l under a reaction pH of 8.0 and ionic strength of 3.0 mmol·L-l For the kaolin suspension with turbidity of 6 to 300 NTU, the removal efficiency of turbidity ranged from 61% to 98%.%采用机械混合的方法,将微生物絮凝剂MBF8与植物胶粉羧甲基改性絮凝剂CG-A复合制备了新型高效复合生物絮凝剂CBF-1.采用FT-IR、zeta(ξ)电位、透射电镜分析,确定了CBF-1的特征官能团、电荷性及分子胶束形态等物化性质;采用烧杯絮凝实验,探究了CBF-1的絮凝特性.结果表明,制备CBF-1的最佳CG-A∶MBF8质量复合比为4∶6;CBF-1为含少量沉淀物的淡黄色液体(不溶物0.013%),有效成分为0.5%,pH6.1,相对粘度1.72;有效成分0.1%时等电点约pH1.5;主

  19. Developmental roles of 21 Drosophila transcription factors are determined by quantitative differences in binding to an overlapping set of thousands of genomic regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacArthur, Stewart; Li, Xiao-Yong; Li, Jingyi; Brown, James B.; Chu, Hou Cheng; Zeng, Lucy; Grondona, Brandi P.; Hechmer, Aaron; Simirenko, Lisa; Keranen, Soile V.E.; Knowles, David W.; Stapleton, Mark; Bickel, Peter; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2009-05-15

    BACKGROUND: We previously established that six sequence-specific transcription factors that initiate anterior/posterior patterning in Drosophila bind to overlapping sets of thousands of genomic regions in blastoderm embryos. While regions bound at high levels include known and probable functional targets, more poorly bound regions are preferentially associated with housekeeping genes and/or genes not transcribed in the blastoderm, and are frequently found in protein coding sequences or in less conserved non-coding DNA, suggesting that many are likely non-functional. RESULTS: Here we show that an additional 15 transcription factors that regulate other aspects of embryo patterning show a similar quantitative continuum of function and binding to thousands of genomic regions in vivo. Collectively, the 21 regulators show a surprisingly high overlap in the regions they bind given that they belong to 11 DNA binding domain families, specify distinct developmental fates, and can act via different cis-regulatory modules. We demonstrate, however, that quantitative differences in relative levels of binding to shared targets correlate with the known biological and transcriptional regulatory specificities of these factors. CONCLUSIONS: It is likely that the overlap in binding of biochemically and functionally unrelated transcription factors arises from the high concentrations of these proteins in nuclei, which, coupled with their broad DNA binding specificities, directs them to regions of open chromatin. We suggest that most animal transcription factors will be found to show a similar broad overlapping pattern of binding in vivo, with specificity achieved by modulating the amount, rather than the identity, of bound factor.

  20. Nectin-1 binds and signals through the fibroblast growth factor receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Kirsten Borup; Clausen, Ole; Rohde, Kristian;

    2012-01-01

    protein and induced neurite outgrowth in primary cultures of hippocampal and cerebellar granule neurons, an effect abolished by treatment with the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor SU5402, or by transfection with a dominant-negative FGFR1 construct. We showed by surface plasmon resonance...

  1. The six insulin-like growth factor binding proteins : developmental expression and structural aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.P. Schuller (Alwin)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractInsulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) are single chain polypeptides mediating many of the growth promoting effects of growth hormone, as stated in the "somatomedin hypothesis" (Daughaday et al., 1972). IGF-I is a basic protein and consists of 70 AA with a predicted molecular wei

  2. Fission Yeast CSL Transcription Factors: Mapping Their Target Genes and Biological Roles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Převorovský

    Full Text Available Cbf11 and Cbf12, the fission yeast CSL transcription factors, have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, but no specific roles have been described and their target genes have been only partially mapped.Using a combination of transcriptome profiling under various conditions and genome-wide analysis of CSL-DNA interactions, we identify genes regulated directly and indirectly by CSL proteins in fission yeast. We show that the expression of stress-response genes and genes that are expressed periodically during the cell cycle is deregulated upon genetic manipulation of cbf11 and/or cbf12. Accordingly, the coordination of mitosis and cytokinesis is perturbed in cells with genetically manipulated CSL protein levels, together with other specific defects in cell-cycle progression. Cbf11 activity is nutrient-dependent and Δcbf11-associated defects are mitigated by inactivation of the protein kinase A (Pka1 and stress-activated MAP kinase (Sty1p38 pathways. Furthermore, Cbf11 directly regulates a set of lipid metabolism genes and Δcbf11 cells feature a stark decrease in the number of storage lipid droplets.Our results provide a framework for a more detailed understanding of the role of CSL proteins in the regulation of cell-cycle progression in fission yeast.

  3. Binding of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) to pregnancy zone protein (PZP). Comparison to the TGF-beta-alpha 2-macroglobulin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, A; Bostedt, L; Stigbrand, T; O'Connor-McCourt, M D

    1994-04-15

    Pregnancy zone protein (PZP) is quantitatively the most important pregnancy-associated plasma protein and it has strong similarity to alpha 2-macroglobulin. Since alpha 2-macroglobulin is a binding protein for transforming growth factors-beta (TGF-beta), it was of interest to test whether the related protein, PZP, also binds to these growth-regulatory proteins. Using affinity-labelling methods, we demonstrate that PZP binds both TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 and that the binding characteristics are similar to those of the TGF-beta-alpha 2-macroglobulin interaction. TGF-beta 2 and TGF-beta 1 bind to PZP in a predominantly noncovalent manner in vitro. TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 bind to both the dimeric and tetrameric forms of PZP. Our studies also indicate that PZP binds TGF-beta 2 with higher affinity than TGF-beta 1. Finally, we demonstrate that PZP inhibits the binding of TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2 to their cell surface receptors. The increased level of PZP during pregnancy may affect the action of TGF-beta by regulating the distribution, clearance and/or general availability of TGF-beta. The preferential binding of TGF-beta 2 over TGF-beta 1 by PZP implies that PZP may differentially regulate the action of TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta 2.

  4. Computational identification of conserved transcription factor binding sites upstream of genes induced in rat brain by transient focal ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliam, John V K; Xu, Zhenfeng; Ford, Gregory D; Liu, Cuimei; Li, Yonggang; Stovall, Kyndra C; Cannon, Virginetta S; Tewolde, Teclemichael; Moreno, Carlos S; Ford, Byron D

    2013-02-01

    Microarray analysis has been used to understand how gene regulation plays a critical role in neuronal injury, survival and repair following ischemic stroke. To identify the transcriptional regulatory elements responsible for ischemia-induced gene expression, we examined gene expression profiles of rat brains following focal ischemia and performed computational analysis of consensus transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in the genes of the dataset. In this study, rats were sacrificed 24 h after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke and gene transcription in brain tissues following ischemia/reperfusion was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip technology. The CONserved transcription FACtor binding site (CONFAC) software package was used to identify over-represented TFBS in the upstream promoter regions of ischemia-induced genes compared to control datasets. CONFAC identified 12 TFBS that were statistically over-represented from our dataset of ischemia-induced genes, including three members of the Ets-1 family of transcription factors (TFs). Microarray results showed that mRNA for Ets-1 was increased following tMCAO but not pMCAO. Immunohistochemical analysis of Ets-1 protein in rat brains following MCAO showed that Ets-1 was highly expressed in neurons in the brain of sham control animals. Ets-1 protein expression was virtually abolished in injured neurons of the ischemic brain but was unchanged in peri-infarct brain areas. These data indicate that TFs, including Ets-1, may influence neuronal injury following ischemia. These findings could provide important insights into the mechanisms that lead to brain injury and could provide avenues for the development of novel therapies. PMID:23246490

  5. FOXA1 promotes tumor progression in prostate cancer via the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Imamura

    Full Text Available Fork-head box protein A1 (FOXA1 is a "pioneer factor" that is known to bind to the androgen receptor (AR and regulate the transcription of AR-specific genes. However, the precise role of FOXA1 in prostate cancer (PC remains unknown. In this study, we report that FOXA1 plays a critical role in PC cell proliferation. The expression of FOXA1 was higher in PC than in normal prostate tissues (P = 0.0002, and, using immunohistochemical analysis, we found that FOXA1 was localized in the nucleus. FOXA1 expression levels were significantly correlated with both PSA and Gleason scores (P = 0.016 and P = 0.031, respectively. Moreover, FOXA1 up-regulation was a significant factor in PSA failure (P = 0.011. Depletion of FOXA1 in a prostate cancer cell line (LNCaP using small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly inhibited AR activity, led to cell-growth suppression, and induced G0/G1 arrest. The anti-proliferative effect of FOXA1 siRNA was mediated through insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3. An increase in IGFBP-3, mediated by depletion of FOXA1, inhibited phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt, and increased expression of the cell cycle regulators p21 and p27. We also found that the anti-proliferative effect of FOXA1 depletion was significantly reversed by simultaneous siRNA depletion of IGFBP-3. These findings provide direct physiological and molecular evidence for a role of FOXA1 in controlling cell proliferation through the regulation of IGFBP-3 expression in PC.

  6. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in follicular fluid from morphologically distinct healthy and atretic bovine antral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving-Rodgers, H F; Catanzariti, K D; Master, M; Grant, P A; Owens, P C; Rodgers, R J

    2003-01-01

    In bovine follicles 2-5 mm in diameter, two morphologically distinct types of healthy follicles and two types of atretic follicles have been described recently. Healthy follicles either have columnar basal granulosa cells with follicular basal lamina composed of many layers or 'loops' or they have rounded basal cells with a conventional single-layered, aligned follicular basal lamina. In atretic follicles, cell death either commences at the basal layer and progresses to the antrum (basal atresia) with macrophage penetration of the membrana granulosa or death progresses from the antrum in a basal direction (antral atresia). Little is known about how these different phenotypes develop. To determine whether insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) levels in follicular fluid differ between these different types of follicles, we measured IGFBP levels in fluids from these follicles. A total of 61 follicles were assessed by light microscopy and characterized by morphological analysis as either healthy, with columnar or rounded basal granulosa cells, or as undergoing antral or basal atresia. The IGFBP concentration in the follicular fluid of individual follicles from the four groups (n = 12-20 per group) was identified by Western ligand blots using (125)I-insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II as a probe. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 2, 3 (44 and 40 kDa), 4 (glycosylated and non-glycosylated) and 5 were observed. The levels (per volume of fluid) of IGFBPs 2, 4 and 5 were greater in atretic follicles than in healthy follicles. However, there were no statistical differences in levels of each IGFBP between either the two types of healthy follicle or between the two types of atretic follicles. Thus, IGFBP levels are not related to the different types of healthy or atretic follicles. PMID:12921699

  7. Increased Drought Tolerance through the Suppression of ESKMO1 Gene and Overexpression of CBF-Related Genes in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Fuhui Xu; Zhixue Liu; Hongyan Xie; Jian Zhu; Juren Zhang; Josef Kraus; Tasja Blaschnig; Reinhard Nehls; Hong Wang

    2014-01-01

    Improved drought tolerance is always a highly desired trait for agricultural plants. Significantly increased drought tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia-0) has been achieved in our work through the suppression of ESKMO1 (ESK1) gene expression with small-interfering RNA (siRNA) and overexpression of CBF genes with constitutive gene expression. ESK1 has been identified as a gene linked to normal development of the plant vascular system, which is assumed directly related to plant drought...

  8. Factor H binds to the hypervariable region of many Streptococcus pyogenes M proteins but does not promote phagocytosis resistance or acute virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias C U Gustafsson

    Full Text Available Many pathogens express a surface protein that binds the human complement regulator factor H (FH, as first described for Streptococcus pyogenes and the antiphagocytic M6 protein. It is commonly assumed that FH recruited to an M protein enhances virulence by protecting the bacteria against complement deposition and phagocytosis, but the role of FH-binding in S. pyogenes pathogenesis has remained unclear and controversial. Here, we studied seven purified M proteins for ability to bind FH and found that FH binds to the M5, M6 and M18 proteins but not the M1, M3, M4 and M22 proteins. Extensive immunochemical analysis indicated that FH binds solely to the hypervariable region (HVR of an M protein, suggesting that selection has favored the ability of certain HVRs to bind FH. These FH-binding HVRs could be studied as isolated polypeptides that retain ability to bind FH, implying that an FH-binding HVR represents a distinct ligand-binding domain. The isolated HVRs specifically interacted with FH among all human serum proteins, interacted with the same region in FH and showed species specificity, but exhibited little or no antigenic cross-reactivity. Although these findings suggested that FH recruited to an M protein promotes virulence, studies in transgenic mice did not demonstrate a role for bound FH during acute infection. Moreover, phagocytosis tests indicated that ability to bind FH is neither sufficient nor necessary for S. pyogenes to resist killing in whole human blood. While these data shed new light on the HVR of M proteins, they suggest that FH-binding may affect S. pyogenes virulence by mechanisms not assessed in currently used model systems.

  9. Time dependent impact of perinatal hypoxia on growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Ömer; Aydınöz, Seçil; Kartal, Ayşe Tuğba; Kelestemur, Taha; Caglayan, Ahmet Burak; Beker, Mustafa Caglar; Karademir, Ferhan; Süleymanoğlu, Selami; Kul, Mustafa; Yulug, Burak; Kilic, Ertugrul

    2016-08-01

    Hypoxic-ischemia (HI) is a widely used animal model to mimic the preterm or perinatal sublethal hypoxia, including hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It causes diffuse neurodegeneration in the brain and results in mental retardation, hyperactivity, cerebral palsy, epilepsy and neuroendocrine disturbances. Herein, we examined acute and subacute correlations between neuronal degeneration and serum growth factor changes, including growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) after hypoxic-ischemia (HI) in neonatal rats. In the acute phase of hypoxia, brain volume was increased significantly as compared with control animals, which was associated with reduced GH and IGF-1 secretions. Reduced neuronal survival and increased DNA fragmentation were also noticed in these animals. However, in the subacute phase of hypoxia, neuronal survival and brain volume were significantly decreased, accompanied by increased apoptotic cell death in the hippocampus and cortex. Serum GH, IGF-1, and IGFBP-3 levels were significantly reduced in the subacute phase of HI. Significant retardation in the brain and body development were noted in the subacute phase of hypoxia. Here, we provide evidence that serum levels of growth-hormone and factors were decreased in the acute and subacute phase of hypoxia, which was associated with increased DNA fragmentation and decreased neuronal survival. PMID:26943480

  10. Cloning and characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana AtNAP57--a homologue of yeast pseudouridine synthase Cbf5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceluch, J; Kmieciak, M; Szweykowska-Kulińska, Z; Jarmołowski, A

    2001-01-01

    Rat Nap57 and its yeast homologue Cbf5p are pseudouridine synthases involved in rRNA biogenesis, localized in the nucleolus. These proteins, together with H/ACA class of snoRNAs compose snoRNP particles, in which snoRNA guides the synthase to direct site-specific pseudouridylation of rRNA. In this paper we present an Arabidopsis thaliana protein that is highly homologous to Cbf5p (72% identity and 85% homology) and NAP57 (67% identity and 81% homology). Moreover, the plant protein has conserved structural motifs that are characteristic features of pseudouridine synthases of the TruB class. We have named the cloned and characterized protein AtNAP57 (Arabidopsis thaliana homologue of NAP57). AtNAP57 is a 565 amino-acid protein and its calculated molecular mass is 63 kDa. The protein is encoded by a single copy gene located on chromosome 3 of the A. thaliana genome. Interestingly, the AtNAP57 gene does not contain any introns. Mutations in the human DKC1 gene encoding dyskerin (human homologue of yeast Cbf5p and rat NAP57) cause dyskeratosis congenita a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and mucosal leukoplakia.

  11. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  12. Interactions between the R2R3-MYB transcription factor, AtMYB61, and target DNA binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Prouse

    Full Text Available Despite the prominent roles played by R2R3-MYB transcription factors in the regulation of plant gene expression, little is known about the details of how these proteins interact with their DNA targets. For example, while Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB protein AtMYB61 is known to alter transcript abundance of a specific set of target genes, little is known about the specific DNA sequences to which AtMYB61 binds. To address this gap in knowledge, DNA sequences bound by AtMYB61 were identified using cyclic amplification and selection of targets (CASTing. The DNA targets identified using this approach corresponded to AC elements, sequences enriched in adenosine and cytosine nucleotides. The preferred target sequence that bound with the greatest affinity to AtMYB61 recombinant protein was ACCTAC, the AC-I element. Mutational analyses based on the AC-I element showed that ACC nucleotides in the AC-I element served as the core recognition motif, critical for AtMYB61 binding. Molecular modelling predicted interactions between AtMYB61 amino acid residues and corresponding nucleotides in the DNA targets. The affinity between AtMYB61 and specific target DNA sequences did not correlate with AtMYB61-driven transcriptional activation with each of the target sequences. CASTing-selected motifs were found in the regulatory regions of genes previously shown to be regulated by AtMYB61. Taken together, these findings are consistent with the hypothesis that AtMYB61 regulates transcription from specific cis-acting AC elements in vivo. The results shed light on the specifics of DNA binding by an important family of plant-specific transcriptional regulators.

  13. TGF-β Signaling Cooperates with AT Motif-Binding Factor-1 for Repression of the α-Fetoprotein Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuo Sakata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Fetoprotein (AFP is known to be highly produced in fetal liver despite its barely detectable level in normal adult liver. On the other hand, hepatocellular carcinoma often shows high expression of AFP. Thus, AFP seems to be an oncogenic marker. In our present study, we investigated how TGF-β signaling cooperates with AT motif-binding factor-1 (ATBF1 to inhibit AFP transcription. Indeed, the expression of AFP mRNA in HuH-7 cells was negatively regulated by TGF-β signaling. To further understand how TGF-β suppresses the transcription of the AFP gene, we analyzed the activity of the AFP promoter in the presence of TGF-β. We found that the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 suppressed AFP transcription through two ATBF1 binding elements (AT-motifs. Using a heterologous reporter system, both AT-motifs were required for transcriptional repression upon TGF-β stimulation. Furthermore, Smads were found to interact with ATBF1 at both its N-terminal and C-terminal regions. Since the N-terminal (ATBF1N and C-terminal regions of ATBF1 (ATBF1C lack the ability of DNA binding, both truncated mutants rescued the cooperative inhibitory action by the TGF-β signaling and ATBF1 in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that TGF-β signaling can act in concert with ATBF1 to suppress the activity of the AFP promoter through direct interaction of ATBF1 with Smads.

  14. C4b-binding protein protects coagulation factor Va from inactivation by activated protein C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poel, RHL; Meijers, JCM; Rosing, J; Tans, G; Bouma, Bonno N.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the effect of C4BP on APC-mediated inactivation of factor Va (FVa) in the absence and presence of protein S. FVa inactivation was biphasic (k(506) = 4.4 x 10(8) M-1 s(-1), k(306) = 2.7 x 10(7) M-1 s(-1)), and protein S accelerated Arg(306) cleavage approximately 10-fold. Preincubatio

  15. A Fluorescence Polarization Assay for Binding to Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Crystal Structures for Complexes of Two Potent Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is both a keto–enol tautomerase and a cytokine associated with numerous inflammatory diseases and cancer. Consistent with observed correlations between inhibition of the enzymatic and biological activities, discovery of MIF inhibitors has focused on monitoring the tautomerase activity using l-dopachrome methyl ester or 4-hydroxyphenyl pyruvic acid as substrates. The accuracy of these assays is compromised by several issues including substrate instability, spectral interference, and short linear periods for product formation. In this work, we report the syntheses of fluorescently labeled MIF inhibitors and their use in the first fluorescence polarization-based assay to measure the direct binding of inhibitors to the active site. The assay allows the accurate and efficient identification of competitive, noncompetitive, and covalent inhibitors of MIF in a manner that can be scaled for high-throughput screening. The results for 22 compounds show that the most potent MIF inhibitors bind with Kd values of ca. 50 nM; two are from our laboratory, and the other is a compound from the patent literature. X-ray crystal structures for two of the most potent compounds bound to MIF are also reported here. Striking combinations of protein–ligand hydrogen bonding, aryl–aryl, and cation−π interactions are responsible for the high affinities. A new chemical series was then designed using this knowledge to yield two more strong MIF inhibitors/binders. PMID:27299179

  16. Automated discovery of tissue-targeting enhancers and transcription factors from binding motif and gene function data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetu Tuteja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying enhancers regulating gene expression remains an important and challenging task. While recent sequencing-based methods provide epigenomic characteristics that correlate well with enhancer activity, it remains onerous to comprehensively identify all enhancers across development. Here we introduce a computational framework to identify tissue-specific enhancers evolving under purifying selection. First, we incorporate high-confidence binding site predictions with target gene functional enrichment analysis to identify transcription factors (TFs likely functioning in a particular context. We then search the genome for clusters of binding sites for these TFs, overcoming previous constraints associated with biased manual curation of TFs or enhancers. Applying our method to the placenta, we find 33 known and implicate 17 novel TFs in placental function, and discover 2,216 putative placenta enhancers. Using luciferase reporter assays, 31/36 (86% tested candidates drive activity in placental cells. Our predictions agree well with recent epigenomic data in human and mouse, yet over half our loci, including 7/8 (87% tested regions, are novel. Finally, we establish that our method is generalizable by applying it to 5 additional tissues: heart, pancreas, blood vessel, bone marrow, and liver.

  17. High-yield bacterial expression and structural characterization of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Monalisa; Slomiany, Mark G.; Rosenzweig, Steven A.; Atreya, Hanudatta S.

    2010-01-01

    The diverse biological activities of the insulin-like growth factors (IGF-1 and IGF-2) are mediated by the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-IR). These actions are modulated by a family of six IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP-1–6; 22–31 kDa) that via high affinity binding to the IGFs (KD ~ 300–700 pM) both protect the IGFs in the circulation and attenuate IGF action by blocking their receptor access. In recent years, IGFBPs have been implicated in a variety of cancers. However, the structural basis of their interaction with IGFs and/or other proteins is not completely understood. A critical challenge in the structural characterization of full-length IGFBPs has been the difficulty in expressing these proteins at levels suitable for NMR/X-ray crystallography analysis. Here we describe the high-yield expression of full-length recombinant human IGFBP-2 (rhIGFBP-2) in E. coli. Using a single step purification protocol, rhIGFBP-2 was obtained with >95% purity and structurally characterized using NMR spectroscopy. The protein was found to exist as a monomer at the high concentrations required for structural studies and to exist in a single conformation exhibiting a unique intra-molecular disulfide-bonding pattern. The protein retained full biologic activity. This study represents the first high-yield expression of wild-type recombinant human IGFBP-2 in E. coli and first structural characterization of a full-length IGFBP. PMID:20541521

  18. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of p63 binding sites identifies AP-2 factors as co-regulators of epidermal differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, Simon S.; Henry, Alexandra E.; Pivato, Geraldine P.; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Constantinos; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Orr, Nicholas; Lord, Christopher J.; Patel, Daksha; Ashworth, Alan; McCance, Dennis J.

    2012-01-01

    The p63 transcription factor (TP63) is critical in development, growth and differentiation of stratifying epithelia. This is highlighted by the severity of congenital abnormalities caused by TP63 mutations in humans, the dramatic phenotypes in knockout mice and de-regulation of TP63 expression in neoplasia altering the tumour suppressive roles of the TP53 family. In order to define the normal role played by TP63 and provide the basis for better understanding how this network is perturbed in disease, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with massively parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) to identify >7500 high-confidence TP63-binding regions across the entire genome, in primary human neonatal foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Using integrative strategies, we demonstrate that only a subset of these sites are bound by TP53 in response to DNA damage. We identify a role for TP63 in transcriptional regulation of multiple genes genetically linked to cleft palate and identify AP-2alpha (TFAP2A) as a co-regulator of a subset of these genes. We further demonstrate that AP-2gamma (TFAP2C) can bind a subset of these regions and that acute depletion of either TFAP2A or TFAP2C alone is sufficient to reduce terminal differentiation of organotypic epidermal skin equivalents, indicating overlapping physiological functions with TP63. PMID:22573176

  20. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of 125I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB-125I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein

  1. Affinity purification of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha-chain. Demonstration of binding by photoaffinity labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, S.; Shibuya, K.; Miyazono, K.; Tojo, A.; Oka, Y.; Miyagawa, K.; Takaku, F. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-11-15

    The human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha-chain, a low affinity component of the receptor, was solubilized and affinity-purified from human placenta using biotinylated GM-CSF. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-GM-CSF binding to the placental membrane extract disclosed that the GM-CSF receptor had a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.5-0.8 nM, corresponding to the Kd value of the GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain on the intact placental membrane. Affinity labeling of the solubilized protein using a photoreactive cross-linking agent, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate (HSAB), demonstrated a single specific band of 70-95 kDa representing a ligand-receptor complex. Approximately 2 g of the placental membrane extract was subjected to a biotinylated GM-CSF-fixed streptavidin-agarose column, resulting in a single major band at 70 kDa on a silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate gel. The radioiodination for the purified material disclosed that the purified protein had an approximate molecular mass of 70 kDa and a pI of 6.6. Binding activity of the purified material was demonstrated by photoaffinity labeling using HSAB-{sup 125}I-GM-CSF, producing a similar specific band at 70-95 kDa as was demonstrated for the crude protein.

  2. Octamer-binding factor 6 (Oct-6/Pou3f1) is induced by interferon and contributes to dsRNA-mediated transcriptional responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Hofmann (Elisabeth); U. Reichart (Ursula); C. Gausterer (Christian); C. Guelly (Christian); D.N. Meijer (Dies); M. Müller (Martina); B. Strobl (Birgit)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Octamer-binding factor 6 (Oct-6, Pou3f1, SCIP, Tst-1) is a transcription factor of the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family. POU proteins regulate key developmental processes and have been identified from a diverse range of species. Oct-6 expression is described to be confined to the dev

  3. Depletion of elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins by CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing enhances antiviral response in porcine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Type I interferons (IFN) are key mediators of the innate antiviral response in mammalian cells. Elongation initiation factor 4E binding proteins (4E-BPs) are translational controllers of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), the master regulator of IFN transcription. The role of 4EBPs in the negat...

  4. Global analysis of ion dependence unveils hidden steps in DNA binding and bending by integration host factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Paula; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Rice, Phoebe A.; Ansari, Anjum

    2013-09-01

    Proteins that recognize and bind to specific sites on DNA often distort the DNA at these sites. The rates at which these DNA distortions occur are considered to be important in the ability of these proteins to discriminate between specific and nonspecific sites. These rates have proven difficult to measure for most protein-DNA complexes in part because of the difficulty in separating the kinetics of unimolecular conformational rearrangements (DNA bending and kinking) from the kinetics of bimolecular complex association and dissociation. A notable exception is the Integration Host Factor (IHF), a eubacterial architectural protein involved in chromosomal compaction and DNA recombination, which binds with subnanomolar affinity to specific DNA sites and bends them into sharp U-turns. The unimolecular DNA bending kinetics has been resolved using both stopped-flow and laser temperature-jump perturbation. Here we expand our investigation by presenting a global analysis of the ionic strength dependence of specific binding affinity and relaxation kinetics of an IHF-DNA complex. This analysis enables us to obtain each of the underlying elementary rates (DNA bending/unbending and protein-DNA association/dissociation), and their ionic strength dependence, even under conditions where the two processes are coupled. Our analysis indicates interesting differences in the ionic strength dependence of the bi- versus unimolecular steps. At moderate [KCl] (100-500 mM), nearly all the ionic strength dependence to the overall equilibrium binding affinity appears in the bimolecular association/dissociation of an initial, presumably weakly bent, encounter complex, with a slope SKbi ≈ 8 describing the loglog-dependence of the equilibrium constant to form this complex on [KCl]. In contrast, the unimolecular equilibrium constant to form the fully wrapped specific complex from the initial complex is nearly independent of [KCl], with SKuni water molecules, which is osmotically favored by

  5. A single, specific thymine mutation in the ComK-Binding site severely decreases binding and transcription activation by the competence transcription factor ComK of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanna, Kim A.; Mironczuk, Aleksandra M.; Smits, Wiep Klaas; Hamoen, Leendert W.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2007-01-01

    The competence transcription factor ComK plays a central role in competence development in Bacillus subtilis by activating the transcription of the K regulon. ComK-activated genes are characterized by the presence of a specific sequence to which ComK binds, a K-box, in their upstream DNA region. Eac

  6. Physical capacity influences the response of insulin-like growth factor and its binding proteins to training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendal, Lars; Langberg, Henning; Flyvbjerg, Allan;

    2002-01-01

    The influence of initial training status on the response of circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and its binding proteins (IGFBP) to prolonged physical training was studied in young men. It was hypothesized that highly standardized training would result in more extensive changes...... in the circulating IGF system in untrained subjects because of lower fitness level. Seven untrained (UT) and 12 well-trained (WT) individuals performed 11 wk of intense physical training (2-4 h daily). Fasting serum samples were analyzed for total and free IGF-I and -II, for IGFBP-1 to -4, as well as for IGFBP-3...... proteolysis. Eleven weeks of physical training resulted in decreased levels of total IGF-I, free IGF-I, and IGFBP-4 in both the UT and WT groups. In the UT group, IGFBP-2 increased, IGFBP-3 decreased [from 4,255 +/- 410 (baseline) to 3,896 +/- 465 (SD) microg/l (week 4); P

  7. Genetic diversity and levels of expression of factor H binding protein among carriage isolates of Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemée, Ludovic; Hong, Eva; Etienne, Manuel; Deghmane, Ala-Eddine; Delbos, Valérie; Terrade, Aude; Berthelot, Gilles; Caron, Francois; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2014-01-01

    The prevention of meningococcal disease may be improved by recombinant vaccines such as 4CMenB and rLP2086 that target the factor H binding protein (fHbp), an immunogenic surface component of Neisseria meningitidis present as one of three variants. Whether such vaccines decrease carriage of invasive isolates and thus induce herd immunity is unknown. We analyzed the genetic diversity and levels of expression of fHbp among 268 carriage strains and compare them to those of 467 invasive strains. fhbp gene sequencing showed higher proportions of variants 2 and 3 among carriage isolates (pCarriage isolates expressed lower levels of fHbp (pmeningococcal vaccines might reduce, at least in part, the acquisition of some hyperinvasive isolates. PMID:25247300

  8. The PDZ domain of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor PDZGEF directs binding to phosphatidic acid during brush border formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V Consonni

    Full Text Available PDZGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small G protein Rap. It was recently found that PDZGEF contributes to establishment of intestinal epithelial polarity downstream of the kinase Lkb1. By binding to phosphatidic acid enriched at the apical membrane, PDZGEF locally activates Rap2a resulting in induction of brush border formation via a pathway that includes the polarity players TNIK, Mst4 and Ezrin. Here we show that the PDZ domain of PDZGEF is essential and sufficient for targeting PDZGEF to the apical membrane of polarized intestinal epithelial cells. Inhibition of PLD and consequently production of phosphatidic acid inhibitis targeting of PDZGEF to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, localization requires specific positively charged residues within the PDZ domain. We conclude that local accumulation of PDZGEF at the apical membrane during establishment of epithelial polarity is mediated by electrostatic interactions between positively charged side chains in the PDZ domain and negatively charged phosphatidic acid.

  9. CBF and CMRo/sub 2/ during craniotomy for small supratentorial cerebral tumours in enflurane anaesthesia. A dose-response study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, J.B.; Cold, G.E.; Eriksen, H.O.; Eskesen, V.; Blatt-Lyon, B.

    1986-01-01

    In 14 patients with supratentorial cerebral tumors with midline shift less than or equal to 10 mm, cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRo/sub 2/) were measured twice on the contralateral side of the craniotomy, using a modification of the Kety and Schmidt method. For induction of anaesthesia, thiopental, fentanyl and pancuronium were used. The anaesthesia was maintained with enflurane 1% in nitrous oxide 67%. Moderate hypocapnia to a level averaging 4.3 kPa was achieved. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n=7), 1% enflurane was used throughout the anaesthesia, and CBF and CMRo/sub 2/ measured about 70 min after induction averaged 30.1 ml 100 g/sup -1/ min/sub -1/ and 1.98 ml O/sub 2/ 100 g/sup -1/ min/sup -1/, respectively. During the second CBF study 1 h later, CBF and CMRo/sub 2/ were unchanged (P>0.05). In group 2 (n=7), the inspiratory enflurane concentration was increased from 1 to 2% after the first CBF measurement. In this group a significant decrease in CMRo/sub 2/ was observed, while CBF was unchanged. In six patients EEG was recorded simultaneously with the CBF measurements. In patients subjected to increasing enflurane concentration (Group 2), a suppression in the EEG activity was observed without spike waves. It is concluded that enflurane induces a dose-related decrease in CMRo/sub 2/ and suppression in the EEG activity, whereas CBF was unchanged.

  10. Latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein 4 is downregulated in esophageal cancer via promoter methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insa Bultmann

    Full Text Available Latent transforming growth factor β-binding protein 4 (LTBP4 is an extracellular matrix molecule that is a member of important connective tissue networks and is needed for the correct folding and the secretion of TGF-β1. LTBP4 is downregulated in carcinomas of various tissues. Here we show that LTBP4 is also downregulated in adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of LTBP4 in esophageal cancer cell lines reduced cell migration ability, whereas cell viability and cell proliferation remained unchanged. Hypermethylation of the promoter regions of the two main human LTBP4 transcriptional forms, LTBP4L and LTBP4S, was found to be involved in LTBP4 silencing. Detailed investigations of the methylation patterns of the promoter regions of LTBP4L and LTBP4S identified GATA1, SP1, E2F4 and SMAD3 as potential transcription factors involved in LTBP4 expression. In in vitro transcription factor activity studies we discovered E2F4 as novel powerful regulator for LTBP4S expression.

  11. The CUGBP2 splicing factor regulates an ensemble of branchpoints from perimeter binding sites with implications for autoregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Dembowski

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-mRNA splicing adjusts the transcriptional output of the genome by generating related mRNAs from a single primary transcript, thereby expanding protein diversity. A fundamental unanswered question is how splicing factors achieve specificity in the selection of target substrates despite the recognition of information-poor sequence motifs. The CUGBP2 splicing regulator plays a key role in the brain region-specific silencing of the NI exon of the NMDA R1 receptor. However, the sequence motifs utilized by this factor for specific target exon selection and its role in splicing silencing are not understood. Here, we use chemical modification footprinting to map the contact sites of CUGBP2 to GU-rich motifs closely positioned at the boundaries of the branch sites of the NI exon, and we demonstrate a mechanistic role for this specific arrangement of motifs for the regulation of branchpoint formation. General support for a branch site-perimeter-binding model is indicated by the identification of a group of novel target exons with a similar configuration of motifs that are silenced by CUGBP2. These results reveal an autoregulatory role for CUGBP2 as indicated by its direct interaction with functionally significant RNA motifs surrounding the branch sites upstream of exon 6 of the CUGBP2 transcript itself. The perimeter-binding model explains how CUGBP2 can effectively embrace the branch site region to achieve the specificity needed for the selection of exon targets and the fine-tuning of alternative splicing patterns.

  12. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies on...... this NCAM-180-induced EGFR down-regulation involves increased EGFR ubiquitination and lysosomal EGFR degradation. Furthermore, NCAM-180-mediated EGFR down-regulation requires NCAM homophilic binding and interactions of the cytoplasmic domain of NCAM-180 with intracellular interaction partners, but does...

  13. Total and free insulin-like growth factor I, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 and acid-labile subunit reflect clinical activity in acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sneppen, S B; Lange, Merete Wolder; Pedersen, L M;

    2001-01-01

    insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) with PV(pos) of 0.69 and 0.71 and PV(neg) of 0.91 and 0.92 respectively. We conclude that free IGF-I is more closely related than total IGF-I to perceived disease activity and is as such useful when evaluating previously treated acromegaly for disease...... activity. Total IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and ALS possess a higher PV(neg) for the clinical disease activity. None of the parameters can at present be claimed to be superior to the others and thus all the measured parameters are recommended to be part of the evaluation of acromegalic patients....

  14. Neuroendocrine differentiation factor, IA-1, is a transcriptional repressor and contains a specific DNA-binding domain: identification of consensus IA-1 binding sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Breslin, Mary B; Zhu, Min; Notkins, Abner L.; Lan, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    A novel cDNA, insulinoma-associated antigen-1 (IA-1), containing five zinc-finger DNA-binding motifs, was isolated from a human insulinoma subtraction library. IA-1 expression is restricted to fetal but not adult pancreatic and brain tissues as well as tumors of neuroendocrine origin. Using various GAL4 DNA binding domain (DBD)/IA-1 fusion protein constructs, we demonstrated that IA-1 functions as a transcriptional repressor and that the region between amino acids 168 and 263 contains the maj...

  15. Structures of the Ets Protein DNA-binding Domains of Transcription Factors Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev: DETERMINANTS OF DNA BINDING AND REDOX REGULATION BY DISULFIDE BOND FORMATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Christopher D O; Newman, Joseph A; Aitkenhead, Hazel; Allerston, Charles K; Gileadi, Opher

    2015-05-29

    Ets transcription factors, which share the conserved Ets DNA-binding domain, number nearly 30 members in humans and are particularly involved in developmental processes. Their deregulation following changes in expression, transcriptional activity, or by chromosomal translocation plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Ets DNA binding, selectivity, and regulation have been extensively studied; however, questions still arise regarding binding specificity outside the core GGA recognition sequence and the mode of action of Ets post-translational modifications. Here, we report the crystal structures of Etv1, Etv4, Etv5, and Fev, alone and in complex with DNA. We identify previously unrecognized features of the protein-DNA interface. Interactions with the DNA backbone account for most of the binding affinity. We describe a highly coordinated network of water molecules acting in base selection upstream of the GGAA core and the structural features that may account for discrimination against methylated cytidine residues. Unexpectedly, all proteins crystallized as disulfide-linked dimers, exhibiting a novel interface (distant to the DNA recognition helix). Homodimers of Etv1, Etv4, and Etv5 could be reduced to monomers, leading to a 40-200-fold increase in DNA binding affinity. Hence, we present the first indication of a redox-dependent regulatory mechanism that may control the activity of this subset of oncogenic Ets transcription factors.

  16. NKX3.1 activates expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 to mediate insulin-like growth factor-I signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlbradt, Erin; Asatiani, Ekaterina; Ortner, Elizabeth; Wang, Antai; Gelmann, Edward P

    2009-03-15

    NKX3.1 is a homeobox gene that codes for a haploinsufficient prostate cancer tumor suppressor. NKX3.1 protein levels are down-regulated in the majority of primary prostate cancer tissues. NKX3.1 expression in PC-3 cells increased insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) mRNA expression 10-fold as determined by expression microarray analysis. In both stably and transiently transfected PC-3 cells and in LNCaP cells, NKX3.1 expression increased IGFBP-3 mRNA and protein expression. In prostates of Nkx3.1 gene-targeted mice Igfbp-3 mRNA levels correlated with Nkx3.1 copy number. NKX3.1 expression in PC-3 cells attenuated the ability of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) to induce phosphorylation of type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR), insulin receptor substrate 1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and AKT. The effect of NKX3.1 on IGF-I signaling was not seen when cells were exposed to long-R3-IGF-I, an IGF-I variant peptide that does not bind to IGFBP-3. Additionally, small interfering RNA-induced knockdown of IGFBP-3 expression partially reversed the attenuation of IGF-IR signaling by NKX3.1 and abrogated NKX3.1 suppression of PC-3 cell proliferation. Thus, there is a close relationship in vitro and in vivo between NKX3.1 and IGFBP-3. The growth-suppressive effects of NKX3.1 in prostate cells are mediated, in part, by activation of IGFBP-3 expression. PMID:19258508

  17. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 mediates the inhibition of DNA synthesis by transforming growth factor-beta in mink lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Feng; Wu, Hai-Bin; Hong, Jiang; Rechler, Matthew M

    2002-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) has been proposed to mediate the growth inhibitory effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta in breast and prostate cancer cells. Both TGF-beta and exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibit DNA synthesis in Mv1 mink lung epithelial cells (CCL64). The present study asks whether IGFBPs synthesized by CCL64 cells mediate growth inhibition by TGF-beta. CCL64 cells synthesize and secrete a single 34-kDa IGFBP that was identified as IGFBP-2 by immunoprecipitation and immunodepletion. Recombinant bovine IGFBP-2 inhibited CCL64 DNA synthesis in serum-free media in an IGF-independent manner. Coincubation with Leu(60)-IGF-I, an IGF-I analog that binds to IGFBPs with higher affinity than to IGF-I receptors, decreased the inhibition by bIGFBP-2. Leu(60)-IGF-I also decreased the inhibition of CCL64 DNA synthesis by TGF-beta by up to 70%, whereas Long-R3-IGF-I, an IGF-I analog with higher affinity for IGF-I receptors than for IGFBPs, did not decrease inhibition, suggesting that the effect of Leu(60)-IGF-I resulted from its forming complexes with endogenous IGFBPs. Leu(60)-IGF-I did not decrease TGF-beta stimulation of a Smad3-dependent reporter gene. Following incubation of intact CCL64 cells with bIGFBP-2 at 0 degrees C, bIGFBP-2 was recovered in membrane fractions; membrane association was abolished by coincubation with Leu(60)-IGF-I. If exogenous and secreted IGFBP-2 must bind to CCL64 cells to inhibit DNA synthesis, Leu(60)-IGF-I might reduce the inhibition of DNA synthesis by bIGFBP-2 or TGF-beta by inhibiting the association of IGFBP-2 in the media with CCL64 cells. Since TGF-beta does not increase IGFBP-2 abundance, we propose that TGF-beta sensitizes CCL64 cells to the latent growth inhibitory activity of endogenous IGFBP-2 by potentiating an intracellular IGFBP-2 signaling pathway or by promoting the association of secreted IGFBP-2 with the plasma membrane. PMID:11807812

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in invasive breast cancers and ductal carcinoma in situ: implications for clinicopathology and patient outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Vestey, Sarah B; Perks, Claire M.; Sen, Chandan; Calder, Caroline J; Holly, Jeff MP; Winters, Zoe E

    2004-01-01

    Introduction Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) differentially modulates breast epithelial cell growth through insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-dependent and IGF-independent pathways and is a direct (IGF-independent) growth inhibitor as well as a mitogen that potentiates EGF (epidermal growth factor) and interacts with HER-2. Previously, high IGFBP-3 levels in breast cancers have been determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoradiometric assay methods. In v...

  19. Neuroendocrine Cancer-Specific Up-Regulating Mechanism of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-2 in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yazawa, Takuya; Sato, Hanako; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Woo, Tetsukan; Tajiri, Michihiko; Ogura, Takashi; Ogawa, Nobuo; Suzuki, Takehisa; Mitsui, Hideaki; Ishii, Jun; Miyata, Chie; Sakaeda, Masashi; Goto, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Korehito

    2009-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) exhibits insulin-like growth factor-dependent growth. SCLC is the most aggressive among known in vivo lung cancers, whereas in vitro growth of SCLC is paradoxically slow as compared with that of non-SCLC (NSCLC). In this study, we demonstrate that SCLC cells overexpress insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 via NeuroD, a neuroendocrine cell-specific transcription factor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, electrophoretic mobility shift, and IGFBP-2 pro...

  20. Mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaltransduction pathway in depressive disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyan Wang; Yingquan Zhang; Mingqi Qiao

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor signal transduction pathway plays an important role in the mechanism of action of antidepressant drugs and has dominated recent studies on the pathogenesis of depression. In the present review we summarize the known roles of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element-binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the pathogenesis of depression and in the mechanism of action of antidepressant medicines. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase/cAMP response element-binding protein/brain-derived neurotrophic factor pathway has potential to be used as a biological index to help diagnose depression, and as such it is considered as an important new target in the treatment of depression.