WorldWideScience

Sample records for binding exogenous ligands

  1. Construction of a bisaquo heme enzyme and binding by exogenous ligands.

    OpenAIRE

    McRee, D E; Jensen, G M; Fitzgerald, M M; Siegel, H A; Goodin, D. B.

    1994-01-01

    The crystal structure of the His-175-->Gly (H175G) mutant of cytochrome-c peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.5), missing its only heme ligand, reveals that the histidine is replaced by solvent to give a bisaquo heme protein. This protein retains some residual activity, which can be stimulated or inhibited by addition of exogenous ligands. Structural analysis confirms the binding of imidazole to the heme at the position of the wild-type histidine ligand. This imidazole complex reacts readily with hydrogen ...

  2. Exploration of electrostatic interaction in the hydrophobic pocket of lysozyme: Importance of ligand-induced perturbation of the secondary structure on the mode of binding of exogenous ligand and possible consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous ligand binding can be adequate to alter the secondary structure of biomolecules besides other external stimuli. In such cases, structural alterations can complicate on the nature of interaction with the exogenous molecules. In order to accommodate the exogenous ligand, the biomolecule has to unfold resulting in a considerable change to its properties. If the bound ligand can be unbound, the biomolecule gets the opportunity to refold back and return to its native state. Keeping this in mind, we have purposely investigated the interaction of tartrazine (TZ), a well abundant azo food colorant, with two homologous lysozymes, namely, human lysozyme (HLZ) and chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWLZ) in physiological pH condition. The binding of TZ with lysozymes has been identified to accompany a ligand-induced secondary structure alteration as indicated by the circular dichroism spectra, and the reduction of α-helical content is more with HLZ than CEWLZ. Interestingly, the binding is identified to occur in the electronic ground state of TZ with lysozyme in its hydrophobic cavity, containing excess of positive charge, predominantly via electrostatic interaction. With increase of salinity of the medium the protein tends to refold back due to wakening of electrostatic forces and consequent reduction of strength of ligand interaction and unbinding. The entropy enthalpy compensation (EEC) has been probed to understand the binding features and it is found that CEWLZ-TZ shows better compensation than HLZ-TZ complex. This is presumably due to the fact that with CEWLZ the binding does not accompany substantial change in the protein secondary structure and hence ineffective to scramble the EEC. The present study initiates the importance of ligand-perturbed structural alteration of biomolecule in controlling the thermodynamics of binding. If there is a considerable alteration of the protein secondary structure due to binding, it is indicative that such changes should bring in

  3. Exploration of electrostatic interaction in the hydrophobic pocket of lysozyme: Importance of ligand-induced perturbation of the secondary structure on the mode of binding of exogenous ligand and possible consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Sudipta; Halder, Mintu

    2016-08-01

    Exogenous ligand binding can be adequate to alter the secondary structure of biomolecules besides other external stimuli. In such cases, structural alterations can complicate on the nature of interaction with the exogenous molecules. In order to accommodate the exogenous ligand, the biomolecule has to unfold resulting in a considerable change to its properties. If the bound ligand can be unbound, the biomolecule gets the opportunity to refold back and return to its native state. Keeping this in mind, we have purposely investigated the interaction of tartrazine (TZ), a well abundant azo food colorant, with two homologous lysozymes, namely, human lysozyme (HLZ) and chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWLZ) in physiological pH condition. The binding of TZ with lysozymes has been identified to accompany a ligand-induced secondary structure alteration as indicated by the circular dichroism spectra, and the reduction of α-helical content is more with HLZ than CEWLZ. Interestingly, the binding is identified to occur in the electronic ground state of TZ with lysozyme in its hydrophobic cavity, containing excess of positive charge, predominantly via electrostatic interaction. With increase of salinity of the medium the protein tends to refold back due to wakening of electrostatic forces and consequent reduction of strength of ligand interaction and unbinding. The entropy enthalpy compensation (EEC) has been probed to understand the binding features and it is found that CEWLZ-TZ shows better compensation than HLZ-TZ complex. This is presumably due to the fact that with CEWLZ the binding does not accompany substantial change in the protein secondary structure and hence ineffective to scramble the EEC. The present study initiates the importance of ligand-perturbed structural alteration of biomolecule in controlling the thermodynamics of binding. If there is a considerable alteration of the protein secondary structure due to binding, it is indicative that such changes should bring in

  4. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  5. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them.

  6. Landscape of protein-small ligand binding modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Kota; Kinoshita, Kengo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the mechanisms of specific small-molecule (ligand) recognition by proteins is a long-standing conundrum. While the structures of these molecules, proteins and ligands, have been extensively studied, protein-ligand interactions, or binding modes, have not been comprehensively analyzed. Although methods for assessing similarities of binding site structures have been extensively developed, the methods for the computational treatment of binding modes have not been well established. Here, we developed a computational method for encoding the information about binding modes as graphs, and assessing their similarities. An all-against-all comparison of 20,040 protein-ligand complexes provided the landscape of the protein-ligand binding modes and its relationships with protein- and chemical spaces. While similar proteins in the same SCOP Family tend to bind relatively similar ligands with similar binding modes, the correlation between ligand and binding similarities was not very high (R(2)  = 0.443). We found many pairs with novel relationships, in which two evolutionally distant proteins recognize dissimilar ligands by similar binding modes (757,474 pairs out of 200,790,780 pairs were categorized into this relationship, in our dataset). In addition, there were an abundance of pairs of homologous proteins binding to similar ligands with different binding modes (68,217 pairs). Our results showed that many interesting relationships between protein-ligand complexes are still hidden in the structure database, and our new method for assessing binding mode similarities is effective to find them. PMID:27327045

  7. Rosetta and the Design of Ligand Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Rocco; Bender, Brian J; Allison, Brittany; Meiler, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Proteins that bind small molecules (ligands) can be used as biosensors, signal modulators, and sequestering agents. When naturally occurring proteins for a particular target ligand are not available, artificial proteins can be computationally designed. We present a protocol based on RosettaLigand to redesign an existing protein pocket to bind a target ligand. Starting with a protein structure and the structure of the ligand, Rosetta can optimize both the placement of the ligand in the pocket and the identity and conformation of the surrounding sidechains, yielding proteins that bind the target compound. PMID:27094285

  8. Integrating structural and mutagenesis data to elucidate GPCR ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Christian; Harpsøe, Kasper; Hauser, Alexander S;

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of human membrane proteins, as well as drug targets. A recent boom in GPCR structural biology has provided detailed images of receptor ligand binding sites and interactions on the molecular level. An ever-increasing number of ligands...... elucidate new GPCR ligand binding sites, and ultimately design drugs with tailored pharmacological activity....

  9. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2014-12-03

    Background Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction for protein-ligand binding sites, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. Results In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. We propose a combination technique to reduce the effects of different sliding residue windows in the process of encoding input feature vectors. Moreover, due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we construct several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier is trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers forms a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Conclusions Experimental results on CASP9 and CASP8 data sets demonstrate that our method compares favorably with the state-of-the-art protein-ligand binding site prediction methods.

  10. Architectural repertoire of ligand-binding pockets on protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-03-01

    Knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of ligand binding sites in proteins provides valuable information for computer-assisted drug design. We present a method for the automated extraction and classification of ligand binding site topologies, in which protein surface cavities are represented as branched frameworks. The procedure employs a growing neural gas approach for pocket topology assignment and pocket framework generation. We assessed the structural diversity of 623 known ligand binding site topologies based on framework cluster analysis. At a resolution of 5 A only 23 structurally distinct topology groups were formed; this suggests an overall limited structural diversity of ligand-accommodating protein cavities. Higher resolution allowed for identification of protein-family specific pocket features. Pocket frameworks highlight potentially preferred modes of ligand-receptor interactions and will help facilitate the identification of druggable subpockets suitable for ligand affinity and selectivity optimization. PMID:20069621

  11. Serum albumin ligand binding volumes using high pressure denaturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We use pressure shift assay to study the thermodynamics of decanoate and dodecanoate ligand binding to human serum albumin. ► Pressure shift assay provides information on ligand binding volumes. ► The ligands stabilized human serum albumin against both pressure and temperature denaturation. ► ANS is a strong human serum albumin stabilizer and competes with lipids for the same binding sites. - Abstract: The pressure shift assay (PSA, also termed either PressureFluor or differential pressure fluorimetry) was used to study the thermodynamics of decanoate and dodecanoate lipid binding to human serum albumin (HSA) in the temperature range from 25 °C to 80 °C and the pressure range from 0.1 MPa to 400 MPa. The ligands stabilized HSA against both pressure and temperature denaturation. The P–T phase diagram for HSA bound to saturated fatty acids is shown. Pressure induced HSA denaturation reversibility is demonstrated via either intrinsic tryptophan or extrinsic probe 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate (ANS) fluorescence. The effect of guanidinium in a PSA was studied. PSA provides information on ligand binding volumes. The volume changes from protein–ligand binding are thermodynamically important and could be used in designing compounds with specific volumetric binding properties.

  12. Topological Analyses of Protein-Ligand Binding: a Network Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Proteins can be conveniently represented as networks of interacting residues, thus allowing the study of several network parameters that can shed light onto several of their structural and functional aspects. With respect to the binding of ligands, which are central for the function of many proteins, network analysis may constitute a possible route to assist the identification of binding sites. As the bulk of this review illustrates, this has generally been easier for enzymes than for non-enzyme proteins, perhaps due to the different topological nature of the binding sites of the former over those of the latter. The article also illustrates how network representations of binding sites can be used to search PDB structures in order to identify proteins that bind similar molecules and, lastly, how codifying proteins as networks can assist the analysis of the conformational changes consequent to ligand binding.

  13. Ligand-specific conformational changes in the alpha1 glycine receptor ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2009-01-01

    indicate that channel opening is accompanied by conformational rearrangements in both beta-sheets. In an attempt to resolve ligand-dependent movements in the ligand-binding domain, we employed voltage-clamp fluorometry on alpha1 glycine receptors to compare changes mediated by the agonist, glycine...... in the inner beta-sheet and pre-M1 domain that may be important for activation, desensitization, or both. In contrast, most labeled residues in loops C and F yielded fluorescence changes identical in magnitude for glycine and strychnine. A notable exception was H201C in loop C. This labeled residue responded...... differently to glycine and strychnine, thus underlining the importance of loop C in ligand discrimination. These results provide an important step toward mapping the domains crucial for ligand discrimination in the ligand-binding domain of glycine receptors and possibly other Cys loop receptors....

  14. Natural ligand binding and transfer from liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gerónimo, Eduardo; Hagan, Robert M; Wilton, David C; Córsico, Betina

    2010-09-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among fatty acid-binding proteins because it binds more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands. Also, the transfer of fluorescent fatty acid analogues to model membranes under physiological ionic strength follows a different mechanism compared to most of the members of this family of intracellular lipid binding proteins. Tryptophan insertion mutants sensitive to ligand binding have allowed us to directly measure the binding affinity, ligand partitioning and transfer to model membranes of natural ligands. Binding of fatty acids shows a cooperative mechanism, while acyl-CoAs binding presents a hyperbolic behavior. Saturated fatty acids seem to have a stronger partition to protein vs. membranes, compared to unsaturated fatty acids. Natural ligand transfer rates are more than 200-fold higher compared to fluorescently-labeled analogues. Interestingly, oleoyl-CoA presents a markedly different transfer behavior compared to the rest of the ligands tested, probably indicating the possibility of specific targeting of ligands to different metabolic fates. PMID:20541621

  15. Highly selective ligand binding by Methylophilus methylotrophus cytochrome c''.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintas, Pedro O; Catarino, Teresa; Todorovic, Smilja; Turner, David L

    2011-06-28

    Cytochrome c'' (cyt c'') from Methylophilus methylotrophus is unusual insofar as the heme has two axial histidine ligands in the oxidized form but one is detached when the protein is reduced. Despite cyt c'' having an axial site available for binding small ligands, we show here that only NO binds readily to the ferrous cyt c''. Binding of CO, as well as CN(-), on the other hand requires considerable structural reorganization, or reduction of the disulfide bridge close to the heme. Standard free energies for the binding of NO and CO reveal high selectivity of the ferrous cyt c'' for NO, indicating its putative physiological role. In this work, we characterize in detail the kinetics of NO binding and the structural features of the Fe(2+)-NO adduct by stopped-flow and resonance Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  16. Ligand Binding Thermodynamics in Drug Discovery: Still a Hot Tip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwindner, Stefan; Ulander, Johan; Johansson, Patrik

    2015-08-27

    The use of ligand binding thermodynamics has been proposed as a potential success factor to accelerate drug discovery. However, despite the intuitive appeal of optimizing binding enthalpy, a number of factors complicate routine use of thermodynamic data. On a macroscopic level, a range of experimental parameters including temperature and buffer choice significantly influence the observed thermodynamic signatures. On a microscopic level, solute effects, structural flexibility, and cooperativity lead to nonlinear changes in enthalpy. This multifactorial character hides essential enthalpy contributions of intermolecular contacts, making them experimentally nonobservable. In this perspective, we present three case studies, reflect on some key factors affecting thermodynamic signatures, and investigate their relation to the hydrophobic effect, enthalpy-entropy compensation, lipophilic ligand efficiency, and promiscuity. The studies highlight that enthalpy and entropy cannot be used as direct end points but can together with calculations increase our understanding of ligand binding and identify interesting outliers that do not behave as expected.

  17. The thermodynamic principles of ligand binding in chromatography and biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    In chromatography, macromolecules do not adsorb in the traditional sense of the word but bind to ligands that are covalently bonded to the surface of the porous bead. Therefore, the adsorption must be modelled as a process where protein molecules bind to the immobilised ligands. The paper discusses...... the general thermodynamic principles of ligand binding. Models of the multi-component adsorption in ion-exchange and hydrophobic chromatography, HIC and RPLC, are developed. The parameters in the models have a well-defined physical significance. The models are compared to the Langmuir model...... but it is also observed in chromatography due to protein-protein interactions. Retention measurements on P-lactoglobulin A demonstrate this. A discussion of salt effects on hydrophobic interactions in precipitation and chromatography of proteins concludes the paper. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  18. Structural Basis of Cooperative Ligand Binding by the Glycine Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Butler; J Wang; Y Xiong; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The glycine riboswitch regulates gene expression through the cooperative recognition of its amino acid ligand by a tandem pair of aptamers. A 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of the tandem riboswitch from the glycine permease operon of Fusobacterium nucleatum reveals the glycine binding sites and an extensive network of interactions, largely mediated by asymmetric A-minor contacts, that serve to communicate ligand binding status between the aptamers. These interactions provide a structural basis for how the glycine riboswitch cooperatively regulates gene expression.

  19. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to acyl-coenzyme A binding protein studied by titration calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færgeman, Nils J.; Sigurskjold, B W; Kragelund, B B;

    1996-01-01

    Ligand binding to recombinant bovine acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) was examined using isothermal microcalorimetry. Microcalorimetric measurements confirm that the binding affinity of acyl-CoA esters for ACBP is strongly dependent on the length of the acyl chain with a clear preference for acyl-...

  20. Specific uranyl binding by macrocyclic ligands attached to resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macrocyclic polydentates have attracted enormous attention from chemists because of their unique and significant characteristics of the strong and selective binding of a variety of metal ions. The metal binding is governed mostly by the size of the macroring and the nature of heteroatoms involved. The most important role of the macrocyclic structure is, in general, the so-called macrocyclic effect - to increase (making less negative) a large negative entropy change involved in the polydentate chelation. Basic strategy of uranium binding, is to design a ligand of very strong metal binding to take advantage of this macrocyclic effect, where number of chelating heteroatoms and their spatial arrangement is designed to be most appropriate for uranyl (UO22+) binding, since in natural sea water uranium is dissolved mostly in a form of uranyl carbonate. The following macrocylic ligands, hexamine, hexaketone, hexacarboxylic acid, were prepared and tested. The macrocyclic hexacarboxylic ligand was the most promising. The addition of hexacarboxylic acid to a uranyl tricarbonate solution gave a change of visible absorption due to the competitive formation of the uranyl complex. From this competitive binding, a relative formation constant was estimated to be 10-5, giving a log K/sub f/ value of 16.4 at 250C for the uranyl complex. This value is the largest among the hosts ever reported to bind uranyl ion.The selectivity of the macrocyclic hexacarboxylic ligand was also ascertained by testing with other metal cations. Results indicate that uranyl ions can be extracted efficiently from sea water using the hexacarboxylic acid ligands which are attached to a polymer insoluble in water

  1. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery.

  2. Cloud computing for protein-ligand binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Che-Lun; Hua, Guan-Jie

    2013-01-01

    The proteome-wide analysis of protein-ligand binding sites and their interactions with ligands is important in structure-based drug design and in understanding ligand cross reactivity and toxicity. The well-known and commonly used software, SMAP, has been designed for 3D ligand binding site comparison and similarity searching of a structural proteome. SMAP can also predict drug side effects and reassign existing drugs to new indications. However, the computing scale of SMAP is limited. We have developed a high availability, high performance system that expands the comparison scale of SMAP. This cloud computing service, called Cloud-PLBS, combines the SMAP and Hadoop frameworks and is deployed on a virtual cloud computing platform. To handle the vast amount of experimental data on protein-ligand binding site pairs, Cloud-PLBS exploits the MapReduce paradigm as a management and parallelizing tool. Cloud-PLBS provides a web portal and scalability through which biologists can address a wide range of computer-intensive questions in biology and drug discovery. PMID:23762824

  3. Predicting protein ligand binding motions with the conformation explorer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Samuel C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the structure of proteins bound to known or potential ligands is crucial for biological understanding and drug design. Often the 3D structure of the protein is available in some conformation, but binding the ligand of interest may involve a large scale conformational change which is difficult to predict with existing methods. Results We describe how to generate ligand binding conformations of proteins that move by hinge bending, the largest class of motions. First, we predict the location of the hinge between domains. Second, we apply an Euler rotation to one of the domains about the hinge point. Third, we compute a short-time dynamical trajectory using Molecular Dynamics to equilibrate the protein and ligand and correct unnatural atomic positions. Fourth, we score the generated structures using a novel fitness function which favors closed or holo structures. By iterating the second through fourth steps we systematically minimize the fitness function, thus predicting the conformational change required for small ligand binding for five well studied proteins. Conclusions We demonstrate that the method in most cases successfully predicts the holo conformation given only an apo structure.

  4. The complex interplay between ligand binding and conformational structure of the folate binding protein (folate receptor)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Hansen, Steen I.

    2015-01-01

    , and the binding induces a conformational change with formation of hydrophilic and stable holo-FBP. Holo-FBP exhibits a ligand-mediated concentration-dependent self-association into multimers of great thermal and chemical stability due to strong intermolecular forces. Both ligand and FBP are thus protected against...

  5. Retinoid-binding proteins: similar protein architectures bind similar ligands via completely different ways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ru Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinoids are a class of compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A, which is an essential nutrient that plays a key role in vision, cell growth and differentiation. In vivo, retinoids must bind with specific proteins to perform their necessary functions. Plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and epididymal retinoic acid binding protein (ERABP carry retinoids in bodily fluids, while cellular retinol-binding proteins (CRBPs and cellular retinoic acid-binding proteins (CRABPs carry retinoids within cells. Interestingly, although all of these transport proteins possess similar structures, the modes of binding for the different retinoid ligands with their carrier proteins are different. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, we analyzed the various retinoid transport mechanisms using structure and sequence comparisons, binding site analyses and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that in the same family of proteins and subcellular location, the orientation of a retinoid molecule within a binding protein is same, whereas when different families of proteins are considered, the orientation of the bound retinoid is completely different. In addition, none of the amino acid residues involved in ligand binding is conserved between the transport proteins. However, for each specific binding protein, the amino acids involved in the ligand binding are conserved. The results of this study allow us to propose a possible transport model for retinoids. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the differences in the binding modes between the different retinoid-binding proteins.

  6. GluR2 ligand-binding core complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, C; Lunn, M-L; Liljefors, T;

    2002-01-01

    X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-Des-Me-AMPA and in the presence and absence of zinc ions have been determined. (S)-Des-Me-AMPA, which is devoid of a substituent in the 5-position of the isoxazolol ring, only has limited interactions with the partly hydrophobic...

  7. Improving Binding Affinity and Selectivity of Computationally Designed Ligand-Binding Proteins Using Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinberg, Christine E; Khare, Sagar D

    2016-01-01

    The ability to de novo design proteins that can bind small molecules has wide implications for synthetic biology and medicine. Combining computational protein design with the high-throughput screening of mutagenic libraries of computationally designed proteins is emerging as a general approach for creating binding proteins with programmable binding modes, affinities, and selectivities. The computational step enables the creation of a binding site in a protein that otherwise does not (measurably) bind the intended ligand, and targeted mutagenic screening allows for validation and refinement of the computational model as well as provides orders-of-magnitude increases in the binding affinity. Deep sequencing of mutagenic libraries can provide insights into the mutagenic binding landscape and enable further affinity improvements. Moreover, in such a combined computational-experimental approach where the binding mode is preprogrammed and iteratively refined, selectivity can be achieved (and modulated) by the placement of specified amino acid side chain groups around the ligand in defined orientations. Here, we describe the experimental aspects of a combined computational-experimental approach for designing-using the software suite Rosetta-proteins that bind a small molecule of choice and engineering, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and high-throughput yeast surface display, high affinity and ligand selectivity. We illustrated the utility of this approach by performing the design of a selective digoxigenin (DIG)-binding protein that, after affinity maturation, binds DIG with picomolar affinity and high selectivity over structurally related steroids. PMID:27094290

  8. Ligand Migration and Binding in Myoglobin Mutant L29W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, G. Ulrich; Waschipky, Robert; Nienhaus, Karin; Minkow, Oleksandr; Ostermann, Andreas; Parak, Fritz G.

    2001-09-01

    Myoglobin, a small globular heme protein that binds gaseous ligands such as O2, CO, and NO reversibly at the heme iron, has for many years been a paradigm for studying the effects of structure and dynamics on protein reactions. Time-resolved spectroscopic measurements after photodissociation of the ligand reveal a complex ligand binding reaction with multiple kinetic intermediates, resulting from protein relaxation and movements of the ligand within the protein. To observe structural changes induced by ligand dissociation, we have investigated carbonmonoxy myoglobin (MbCO) mutant L29W using time-resolved infrared spectroscopy in combination with x-ray crystallography. The presence of two distinct infrared stretch bands of the bound CO, AI at 1945 cm-1 and AII at 1955 cm-1, implies that L29W MbCO assumes two different conformations at neutral pH. Low-temperature flash photolysis experiments with monitoring of the absorption changes in the individual CO lines reveal markedly different rebinding properties. While recombination in AII is conceptually simple and well described by a two-state transition involving a distribution of enthalpy barriers, recombination in AI is more complicated: Besides a fast kinetic component, a second, slower kinetic component appears; its population grows with increasing temperature. X-ray crystallography of crystals illuminated below 180 K to photodissociate the CO reveals that the slow component arises from ligands that have migrated from their initial docking site to a remote site within the distal heme pocket. This process occurs in an essentially immobilized, frozen protein. Subsequently, ligands rebind by thermal activation over a barrier that is much higher than the barrier for recombination from the initial docking site. Upon photodissociation above 180 K, ligands escape from the distal pocket, aided by protein fluctuations that transiently open exit channels. The x-ray structure shows a large proportion of ligands in a cavity on

  9. The interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of the folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Schou, Christian; Babol, Linnea N.;

    2011-01-01

    The folate binding protein (FBP) regulates homeostasis and intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of decisive importance in cell division and growth. We analyzed whether interrelationship between ligand binding and self-association of FBP plays a significant role in the physiology...

  10. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negami, Tatsuki; Shimizu, Kentaro; Terada, Tohru

    2014-09-30

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations with the MARTINI force field were performed to reproduce the protein-ligand binding processes. We chose two protein-ligand systems, the levansucrase-sugar (glucose or sucrose), and LinB-1,2-dichloroethane systems, as target systems that differ in terms of the size and shape of the ligand-binding pocket and the physicochemical properties of the pocket and the ligand. Spatial distributions of the Coarse-grained (CG) ligand molecules revealed potential ligand-binding sites on the protein surfaces other than the real ligand-binding sites. The ligands bound most strongly to the real ligand-binding sites. The binding and unbinding rate constants obtained from the CGMD simulation of the levansucrase-sucrose system were approximately 10 times greater than the experimental values; this is mainly due to faster diffusion of the CG ligand in the CG water model. We could obtain dissociation constants close to the experimental values for both systems. Analysis of the ligand fluxes demonstrated that the CG ligand molecules entered the ligand-binding pockets through specific pathways. The ligands tended to move through grooves on the protein surface. Thus, the CGMD simulations produced reasonable results for the two different systems overall and are useful for studying the protein-ligand binding processes.

  11. Computational approaches to modeling receptor flexibility upon ligand binding: Application to interfacially activated enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wade, R.C.; Sobolev, V.; Ortiz, A.R. .;

    1998-01-01

    Receptors generally undergo conformational change upon ligand binding. We describe how fairly simple techniques may be used in docking and design studies to account for some of the changes in the conformations of proteins on ligand binding. Simulations of protein-ligand interactions that give...... a more complete description of the dynamics important for ligand binding are then discussed. These methods are illustrated for phospholipase A(2) and lipase, enzymes that both undergo interfacial activation....

  12. SiteComp: a server for ligand binding site analysis in protein structures

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yingjie; Yoo, Seungyeul; Sanchez, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Computational characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins provides preliminary information for functional annotation, protein design and ligand optimization. SiteComp implements binding site analysis for comparison of binding sites, evaluation of residue contribution to binding sites and identification of sub-sites with distinct molecular interaction properties.

  13. Analysis of the ligand binding properties of recombinant bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolf, B; Oudenampsen-Krüger, E; Börchers, T;

    1995-01-01

    The coding part of the cDNA for bovine liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) has been amplified by RT-PCR, cloned and used for the construction of an Escherichia coli (E. coli) expression system. The recombinant protein made up to 25% of the soluble E. coli proteins and could be isolated...... by a simple two step protocol combining ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Dissociation constants for binding of oleic acid, arachidonic acid, oleoyl-CoA, lysophosphatidic acid and the peroxisomal proliferator bezafibrate to L-FABP have been determined by titration calorimetry. All ligands were...... bound in a 2:1 stoichiometry, the dissociation constants for the first ligand bound were all in the micro molar range. Oleic acid was bound with the highest affinity and a Kd of 0.26 microM. Furthermore, binding of cholesterol to L-FABP was investigated with the Lipidex assay, a liposome binding assay...

  14. Modeling of ligand binding to dopamine D2 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ostopovici-Halip Liliana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopaminic receptors have been for long time the major targets for developing new small molecules with high affinity and selectivity to treat psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration, drug abuse, and other therapeutic areas. In the absence of a 3D structure for the human D2 dopamine (HDD2 receptor, the efforts for discovery and design of new potential drugs rely on comparative models generation, docking and pharmacophore development studies. To get a better understanding of the HDD2 receptor binding site and the ligand-receptor interactions a homology model of HDD2 receptor based on the X-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor has been built and used to dock a set of partial agonists of HDD2 receptor. The main characteristics of the binding mode for the HDD2 partial agonists set are given by the ligand particular folding and a complex network of contacts represented by stacking interactions, salt bridge and hydrogen bond formation. The characterization of the partial agonist binding mode at HDD2 receptor provide the needed information to generate pharmacophore models which represent essential information in the future virtual screening studies in order to identify new potential HDD2 partial agonists.

  15. Engineering periplasmic ligand binding proteins as glucose nanosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance J. Jeffery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes affects over 100 million people worldwide. Better methods for monitoring blood glucose levels are needed for improving disease management. Several labs have previously made glucose nanosensors by modifying members of the periplasmic ligand binding protein superfamily. This minireview summarizes recent developments in constructing new versions of these proteins that are responsive within the physiological range of blood glucose levels, employ new reporter groups, and/or are more robust. These experiments are important steps in the development of novel proteins that have the characteristics needed for an implantable glucose nanosensor for diabetes management: specificity for glucose, rapid response, sensitivity within the physiological range of glucose concentrations, reproducibility, and robustness.

  16. Ligand Binding to Chlorite Dismutase from Magnetospirillum sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schutter, Amy; Correia, Hugo D; Freire, Diana M; Rivas, María G; Rizzi, Alberto; Santos-Silva, Teresa; González, Pablo J; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2015-10-29

    Chlorite dismutase (Cld) catalyzes the reduction of chlorite to chloride and dioxygen. Here, the ligand binding to Cld of Magnetospirillum sp. (MaCld) is investigated with X-ray crystallography and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). EPR reveals a large heterogeneity in the structure of wild-type MaCld, showing a variety of low- and high-spin ferric heme forms. Addition of an axial ligand, such as azide or imidazole, removes this heterogeneity almost entirely. This is in line with the two high resolution crystal structures of MaCld obtained in the presence of azide and thiocyanate that show the coordination of the ligands to the heme iron. The crystal structure of the MaCld-azide complex reveals a single well-defined orientation of the azide molecule in the heme pocket. EPR shows, however, a pH-dependent heme structure, probably due to acid-base transitions of the surrounding amino-acid residues stabilizing azide. For the azide and imidazole complex of MaCld, the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions with the close-by (14)N and (1)H nuclei are determined using pulsed EPR. These values are compared to the corresponding data for the low-spin forms observed in the ferric wild-type MaCld and to existing EPR data on azide and imidazole complexes of other heme proteins. PMID:26287794

  17. The Movable Type Method Applied to Protein-Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zheng; Ucisik, Melek N.; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    Accurately computing the free energy for biological processes like protein folding or protein-ligand association remains a challenging problem. Both describing the complex intermolecular forces involved and sampling the requisite configuration space make understanding these processes innately difficult. Herein, we address the sampling problem using a novel methodology we term “movable type”. Conceptually it can be understood by analogy with the evolution of printing and, hence, the name movable type. For example, a common approach to the study of protein-ligand complexation involves taking a database of intact drug-like molecules and exhaustively docking them into a binding pocket. This is reminiscent of early woodblock printing where each page had to be laboriously created prior to printing a book. However, printing evolved to an approach where a database of symbols (letters, numerals, etc.) was created and then assembled using a movable type system, which allowed for the creation of all possible combinations of symbols on a given page, thereby, revolutionizing the dissemination of knowledge. Our movable type (MT) method involves the identification of all atom pairs seen in protein-ligand complexes and then creating two databases: one with their associated pairwise distant dependent energies and another associated with the probability of how these pairs can combine in terms of bonds, angles, dihedrals and non-bonded interactions. Combining these two databases coupled with the principles of statistical mechanics allows us to accurately estimate binding free energies as well as the pose of a ligand in a receptor. This method, by its mathematical construction, samples all of configuration space of a selected region (the protein active site here) in one shot without resorting to brute force sampling schemes involving Monte Carlo, genetic algorithms or molecular dynamics simulations making the methodology extremely efficient. Importantly, this method explores the

  18. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used

  19. Ligand Binding and Substrate Discrimination by UDP-Galactopyranose Mutase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, Todd D.; Borrok, M. Jack; Westler, William M.; Forest, Katrina T.; Kiessling, Laura L.; (UW)

    2009-07-31

    Galactofuranose (Galf) residues are present in cell wall glycoconjugates of numerous pathogenic microbes. Uridine 5{prime}-diphosphate (UDP) Galf, the biosynthetic precursor of Galf-containing glycoconjugates, is produced from UDP-galactopyranose (UDP-Galp) by the flavoenzyme UDP-galactopyranose mutase (UGM). The gene encoding UGM (glf) is essential for the viability of pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and this finding underscores the need to understand how UGM functions. Considerable effort has been devoted to elucidating the catalytic mechanism of UGM, but progress has been hindered by a lack of structural data for an enzyme-substrate complex. Such data could reveal not only substrate binding interactions but how UGM can act preferentially on two very different substrates, UDP-Galp and UDP-Galf, yet avoid other structurally related UDP sugars present in the cell. Herein, we describe the first structure of a UGM-ligand complex, which provides insight into the catalytic mechanism and molecular basis for substrate selectivity. The structure of UGM from Klebsiella pneumoniae bound to the substrate analog UDP-glucose (UDP-Glc) was solved by X-ray crystallographic methods and refined to 2.5 {angstrom} resolution. The ligand is proximal to the cofactor, a finding that is consistent with a proposed mechanism in which the reduced flavin engages in covalent catalysis. Despite this proximity, the glucose ring of the substrate analog is positioned such that it disfavors covalent catalysis. This orientation is consistent with data indicating that UDP-Glc is not a substrate for UGM. The relative binding orientations of UDP-Galp and UDP-Glc were compared using saturation transfer difference NMR. The results indicate that the uridine moiety occupies a similar location in both ligand complexes, and this relevant binding mode is defined by our structural data. In contrast, the orientations of the glucose and galactose sugar moieties differ. To understand the

  20. Conformational Changes and Ligand Recognition of Escherichia coli d-Xylose Binding Protein Revealed

    OpenAIRE

    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Park, Chankyu; Mowbray, Sherry

    2010-01-01

    ABC transport systems account for most import of necessary nutrients in bacteria. The periplasmic binding component (or an equivalent membrane-anchored protein) is critical to recognizing the cognate ligand and directing it to the appropriate membrane permease. Here we report X-ray structures of D-xylose-binding protein from Escherichia coli in ligand-free open, ligand-bound open and ligand-bound closed forms, at 2.15, 2.2, and 2.2-Å resolution, respectively. The ligand-bound open form is the...

  1. Enthalpy/entropy compensation effects from cavity desolvation underpin broad ligand binding selectivity for rat odorant binding protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, Katherine L; Long, Jed; Carr, Stephen; Briand, Loïc; Winzor, Donald J; Searle, Mark S; Scott, David J

    2014-04-15

    Evolution has produced proteins with exquisite ligand binding specificity, and manipulating this effect has been the basis for much of modern rational drug design. However, there are general classes of proteins with broader ligand selectivity linked to function, the origin of which is poorly understood. The odorant binding proteins (OBPs) sequester volatile molecules for transportation to the olfactory receptors. Rat OBP3, which we characterize by X-ray crystallography and NMR, binds a homologous series of aliphatic γ-lactones within its aromatic-rich hydrophobic pocket with remarkably little variation in affinity but extensive enthalpy/entropy compensation effects. We show that the binding energetics are modulated by two desolvation processes with quite different thermodynamic signatures. Ligand desolvation follows the classical hydrophobic effect; however, cavity desolvation is consistent with the liberation of "high energy" water molecules back into bulk solvent with a strong, but compensated, enthalpic contribution, which together underpin the origins of broad ligand binding selectivity.

  2. Origin and evolution of the ligand-binding ability of nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Gabriel V; Laudet, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    The origin of the ligand-binding ability of nuclear receptors is still a matter of discussion. Current opposing models are the early evolution of an ancestral receptor that would bind a specific ligand with high affinity and the early evolution of an ancestral orphan that was a constitutive transcription factor. Here we review the arguments in favour or against these two hypotheses, and we discuss an alternative possibility that the ancestor was a ligand sensor, which would be able to explain the apparently contradictory data generated in previous models for the evolution of ligand binding in nuclear receptors. PMID:21055443

  3. Computational Exploration of a Protein Receptor Binding Space with Student Proposed Peptide Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew D.; Phillips, Paul; Turner, Matthew W.; Katz, Michael; Lew, Sarah; Bradburn, Sarah; Andersen, Tim; McDougal, Owen M.

    2016-01-01

    Computational molecular docking is a fast and effective "in silico" method for the analysis of binding between a protein receptor model and a ligand. The visualization and manipulation of protein to ligand binding in three-dimensional space represents a powerful tool in the biochemistry curriculum to enhance student learning. The…

  4. Bioluminescent Ligand-Receptor Binding Assays for Protein or Peptide Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Bioluminescence has been widely used in biomedical research due to its high sensitivity, low background, and broad linear range. In recent studies, we applied bioluminescence to ligand-receptor binding assays for some protein or peptide hormones based on a newly developed small monomeric Nanoluciferase (NanoLuc) reporter that has the so far brightest bioluminescence. The conventional ligand-receptor binding assays rely on radioligands that have drawbacks, such as radioactive hazards and short shelf lives. In contrast, the novel bioluminescent binding assays use the NanoLuc-based protein or peptide tracers that are safe, stable, and ultrasensitive. Thus, the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay would be applied to more and more protein or peptide hormones for ligand-receptor interaction studies in future. In the present article, we provided detailed protocols for setting up the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assays using two representative protein hormones as examples. PMID:27424896

  5. A sequence-based dynamic ensemble learning system for protein ligand-binding site prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2015-12-03

    Background: Proteins have the fundamental ability to selectively bind to other molecules and perform specific functions through such interactions, such as protein-ligand binding. Accurate prediction of protein residues that physically bind to ligands is important for drug design and protein docking studies. Most of the successful protein-ligand binding predictions were based on known structures. However, structural information is not largely available in practice due to the huge gap between the number of known protein sequences and that of experimentally solved structures

  6. Ligand binding was acquired during evolution of nuclear receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Escriva, Hector; Safi, Rachid; Hänni, Catherine; Langlois, Marie-Claire; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Stehelin, Dominique; Capron, André; Pierce, Raymond; Laudet, Vincent

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily comprises, in addition to ligand-activated transcription factors, members for which no ligand has been identified to date. We demonstrate that orphan receptors are randomly distributed in the evolutionary tree and that there is no relationship between the position of a given liganded receptor in the tree and the chemical nature of its ligand. NRs are specific to metazoans, as revealed by a screen of NR-related sequences in early- and non-metazoan organism...

  7. Mixed-ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) incorporating a diazo ligand: Synthesis, characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Megha S Deshpande; Avinash S Kumbhar

    2005-03-01

    Mixed-ligand complexes of the type [Ru(N-N)2(dzdf)]Cl2, where N-N is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) and 9-diazo-4,5-diazafluorene (dzdf), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, UV-Vis, IR and NMR spectroscopy. Binding of these complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) has been investigated by absorption spectroscopy, steady-state emission spectroscopy and viscosity measurements. The experimental results indicate that the size and shape of the intercalating ligands have marked effect on the binding affinity of the complexes to CT-DNA. The complex [Ru(phen)2(dzdf)]Cl2 binds with CT-DNA through an intercalative binding mode, while the complex [Ru(bpy)2(dzdf)]Cl2 binds electrostatically.

  8. TIM-4 structures identify a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site where phosphatidylserine binds

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Cesar; Ballesteros, Angela; Martinez-Muñoz, Laura; Mellado, Mario; Kaplan, Gerardo G.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Casasnovas, José M.

    2007-01-01

    The T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM) proteins are important regulators of T cell responses. They have been linked to autoimmunity and cancer. Structures of the murine TIM-4 identified a Metal Ion-dependent Ligand Binding Site (MILIBS) in the immunoglobulin (Ig) domain of the TIM family. The characteristic CC’ loop of the TIM domain and the hydrophobic FG loop shaped a narrow cavity where acidic compounds penetrate and coordinate to a metal ion bound to conserved residues in the TI...

  9. Water networks contribute to enthalpy/entropy compensation in protein-ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breiten, Benjamin; Lockett, Matthew R; Sherman, Woody; Fujita, Shuji; Al-Sayah, Mohammad; Lange, Heiko; Bowers, Carleen M; Heroux, Annie; Krilov, Goran; Whitesides, George M

    2013-10-16

    The mechanism (or mechanisms) of enthalpy-entropy (H/S) compensation in protein-ligand binding remains controversial, and there are still no predictive models (theoretical or experimental) in which hypotheses of ligand binding can be readily tested. Here we describe a particularly well-defined system of protein and ligands--human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) and a series of benzothiazole sulfonamide ligands with different patterns of fluorination--that we use to define enthalpy/entropy (H/S) compensation in this system thermodynamically and structurally. The binding affinities of these ligands (with the exception of one ligand, in which the deviation is understood) to HCA are, despite differences in fluorination pattern, indistinguishable; they nonetheless reflect significant and compensating changes in enthalpy and entropy of binding. Analysis reveals that differences in the structure and thermodynamic properties of the waters surrounding the bound ligands are an important contributor to the observed H/S compensation. These results support the hypothesis that the molecules of water filling the active site of a protein, and surrounding the ligand, are as important as the contact interactions between the protein and the ligand for biomolecular recognition, and in determining the thermodynamics of binding.

  10. Microassay for measurement of binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woof, J M; Burton, D R

    1988-07-22

    An improved technique for measuring the binding of radiolabelled ligands to cell surface molecules has been developed by modification of a procedure using centrifugation through a water-immiscible oil to separate free and cell-bound ligand. It maximises the percentage of ligand bound since cell-bound and free ligand can be separated easily and reproducibly even when very small reaction volumes are used. This permits low levels of ligand radiolabelling and relatively low numbers of cells to be used. PMID:2840465

  11. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Susanne; Netz, Roland R

    2015-01-01

    We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand-receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket.

  12. Identification of ligands that target the HCV-E2 binding site on CD81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaby, Reem Al; Azzazy, Hassan M; Harris, Rodney; Chromy, Brett; Vielmetter, Jost; Balhorn, Rod

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C is a global health problem. While many drug companies have active R&D efforts to develop new drugs for treating Hepatitis C virus (HCV), most target the viral enzymes. The HCV glycoprotein E2 has been shown to play an essential role in hepatocyte invasion by binding to CD81 and other cell surface receptors. This paper describes the use of AutoDock to identify ligand binding sites on the large extracellular loop of the open conformation of CD81 and to perform virtual screening runs to identify sets of small molecule ligands predicted to bind to two of these sites. The best sites selected by AutoLigand were located in regions identified by mutational studies to be the site of E2 binding. Thirty-six ligands predicted by AutoDock to bind to these sites were subsequently tested experimentally to determine if they bound to CD81-LEL. Binding assays conducted using surface Plasmon resonance revealed that 26 out of 36 (72 %) of the ligands bound in vitro to the recombinant CD81-LEL protein. Competition experiments performed using dual polarization interferometry showed that one of the ligands predicted to bind to the large cleft between the C and D helices was also effective in blocking E2 binding to CD81-LEL.

  13. Comparison of ligand migration and binding in heme proteins of the globin family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karin, Nienhaus; Ulrich Nienhaus, G.

    2015-12-01

    The binding of small diatomic ligands such as carbon monoxide or dioxygen to heme proteins is among the simplest biological processes known. Still, it has taken many decades to understand the mechanistic aspects of this process in full detail. Here, we compare ligand binding in three heme proteins of the globin family, myoglobin, a dimeric hemoglobin, and neuroglobin. The combination of structural, spectroscopic, and kinetic experiments over many years by many laboratories has revealed common properties of globins and a clear mechanistic picture of ligand binding at the molecular level. In addition to the ligand binding site at the heme iron, a primary ligand docking site exists that ensures efficient ligand binding to and release from the heme iron. Additional, secondary docking sites can greatly facilitate ligand escape after its dissociation from the heme. Although there is only indirect evidence at present, a preformed histidine gate appears to exist that allows ligand entry to and exit from the active site. The importance of these features can be assessed by studies involving modified proteins (via site-directed mutagenesis) and comparison with heme proteins not belonging to the globin family.

  14. Copper binding ligands: production by marine plankton and characterization by ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orians, K.; Ross, A.; Lawrence, M.; Ikonomou, M.

    2003-04-01

    Organic complexation affects the bioavailability and distribution of copper in the surface ocean. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 was cultured in the lab and subjected to near-toxic Cu concentrations. Strong Cu-binding ligands were produced under these conditions, as found for other species of Synechococcus. The copper-binding ligand produced had a log K'cond. (log conditional stability constant) of 12.2, similar to the natural ligands found in the surface ocean. The amount of ligand produced was proportional to the amount of copper present. Isolation and concentration of these compounds for characterization by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) provides information about the structure of the organic ligands and their metal-ion complexes. Using model ligands, we'll show that ligands can be characterized by ESI-MS and that the location of the copper binding site can be determined in complex molecules. We'll also present results of copper-complexing ligands extracted from the coastal waters of British Columbia. Ligand concentrations are higher at low salinity and in surface waters, indicating that these ligands are produced in surface waters and/or delivered to the region via the Fraser River. Analysis of the extracts with highest UV absorbance identified two Cu2+ ligands of molecular weight 259 and 264. The mass and isotopic distributions are consistent with dipeptides and tripeptides containing two metal-binding amino groups. This result is consistent with the findings of other studies attempting to characterize Cu2+ ligands in seawater. The structure of the identified ligand is similar to that of rhodotorulic acid (a microbial siderophore), glutathione, and phytochelatins, indicating that small peptides and related compounds can act as strong, specific metal chelators in natural waters

  15. Theoretical investigation on the diatomic ligand migration process and ligand binding properties in non-O2-binding H-NOX domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuebin; Liu, Li; Wu, Lei; Li, Shuai; Li, Fei; Li, Zhengqiang

    2013-08-01

    The Nostoc sp (Ns) H-NOX (heme-nitric oxide or OXygen-binding) domain shares 35% sequence identity with soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and exhibits similar ligand binding property with the sGC. Previously, our molecular dynamic (MD) simulation work identified that there exists a Y-shaped tunnel system hosted in the Ns H-NOX interior, which servers for ligand migration. The tunnels were then confirmed by Winter et al. [PNAS 2011;108(43):E 881-889] recently using x-ray crystallography with xenon pressured conditions. In this work, to further investigate how the protein matrix of Ns H-NOX modulates the ligand migration process and how the distal residue composition affects the ligand binding prosperities, the free energy profiles for nitric oxide (NO), carbon monooxide (CO), and O2 migration are explored using the steered MDs simulation and the ligand binding energies are calculated using QM/MM schemes. The potential of mean force profiles suggest that the longer branch of the tunnel would be the most favorable route for NO migration and a second NO trapping site other than the distal heme pocket along this route in the Ns H-NOX was identified. On the contrary, CO and O2 would prefer to diffuse via the shorter branch of the tunnel. The QM/MM (quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics) calculations suggest that the hydrophobic distal pocket of Ns H-NOX would provide an approximately vacuum environment and the ligand discrimination would be determined by the intrinsic binding properties of the diatomic gas ligand to the heme group. PMID:23504767

  16. Computational protocol for predicting the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Tarun; Jayaram, B

    2007-06-01

    Zinc is one of the most important metal ions found in proteins performing specific functions associated with life processes. Coordination geometry of the zinc ion in the active site of the metalloprotein-ligand complexes poses a challenge in determining ligand binding affinities accurately in structure-based drug design. We report here an all atom force field based computational protocol for estimating rapidly the binding affinities of zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes, considering electrostatics, van der Waals, hydrophobicity, and loss in conformational entropy of protein side chains upon ligand binding along with a nonbonded approach to model the interactions of the zinc ion with all the other atoms of the complex. We examined the sensitivity of the binding affinity predictions to the choice of Lennard-Jones parameters, partial atomic charges, and dielectric treatments adopted for system preparation and scoring. The highest correlation obtained was R2 = 0.77 (r = 0.88) for the predicted binding affinity against the experiment on a heterogenous dataset of 90 zinc containing metalloprotein-ligand complexes consisting of five unique protein targets. Model validation and parameter analysis studies underscore the robustness and predictive ability of the scoring function. The high correlation obtained suggests the potential applicability of the methodology in designing novel ligands for zinc-metalloproteins. The scoring function has been web enabled for free access at www.scfbio-iitd.res.in/software/drugdesign/bapplz.jsp as BAPPL-Z server (Binding Affinity Prediction of Protein-Ligand complexes containing Zinc metal ions).

  17. Ligand Binding and Crystal Structures of the Substrate-Binding Domain of the ABC Transporter OpuA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina C.; Berntsson, Ronnie P-A.; Gul, Nadia; Karasawa, Akira; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W. H.; Slotboom, Dirk-Jan; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    The ABC transporter OpuA from Lactococcus lactis transports glycine betaine upon activation by threshold values of ionic strength. In this study, the ligand binding characteristics of purified OpuA in a detergent-solubilized state and of its substrate-binding domain produced as soluble protein (OpuA

  18. Fringe-mediated extension of O-linked fucose in the ligand-binding region of Notch1 increases binding to mammalian Notch ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Paul; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Sheppard, Devon; Chillakuri, Chandramouli; Lea, Susan M; Haltiwanger, Robert S; Handford, Penny A

    2014-05-20

    The Notch signaling pathway is essential for many aspects of development, cell fate determination, and tissue homeostasis. Notch signaling can be modulated by posttranslational modifications to the Notch receptor, which are known to alter both ligand binding and receptor activation. We have modified the ligand-binding region (EGF domains 11-13) of human Notch1 (hN1) with O-fucose and O-glucose glycans and shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance that the Fringe-catalyzed addition of GlcNAc to the O-fucose at T466 in EGF12 substantially increases binding to Jagged1 and Delta-like 1 (DLL1) ligands. We have subsequently determined the crystal structures of EGF domains 11-13 of hN1 modified with either the O-fucose monosaccharide or the GlcNAc-fucose disaccharide at T466 of EGF12 and observed no change in backbone structure for each variant. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for GlcNAc in modulating the ligand-binding site in hN1 EGF12, resulting in an increased affinity of this region for ligands Jagged1 and DLL1. We propose that this finding explains the Fringe-catalyzed enhancement of Notch-Delta signaling observed in flies and humans, but suggest that the inhibitory effect of Fringe on Jagged/Serrate mediated signaling involves other regions of Notch.

  19. A computational study of ligand binding affinities in iron(III) porphine and protoporphyrin IX complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, Marcus C

    2014-07-01

    The search for novel anti-malarial drugs that can disrupt biomineralization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX to haemozoin requires an understanding of the fundamental chemistry of the porphyrin's iron(iii) centre at the water-lipid interface. Towards this end, the binding affinities for a diverse set of 31 small ligands with iron(iii) porphine have been calculated using density functional theory, in the gas phase and also with implicit solvent corrections for both water and n-octanol. In addition, the binding of hydroxide, chloride, acetate, methylamine and water to ferriprotoporphyrin IX has been studied, and very similar trends are observed for the smaller and larger models. Anionic ligands generally give stronger binding than neutral ones; the strongest binding is observed for RO(-) and OH(-) ligands, whilst acetate binds relatively weakly among the anions studied. Electron-rich nitrogen donors tend to bind more strongly than electron-deficient ones, and the weakest binding is found for neutral O and S donors such as oxazole and thiophene. In all cases, ligand binding is stronger in n-octanol than in water, and the differences in binding energies for the two solvents are greater for ionic ligands than for neutrals. Finally, dimerization of ferriprotoporphyrin IX by means of iron(iii)-carboxylate bond formation has been modelled. The results are discussed in terms of haemozoin crystal growth and its disruption by known anti-malarial drugs.

  20. Solvent fluctuations induce non-Markovian kinetics in hydrophobic pocket-ligand binding

    CERN Document Server

    Weiß, R Gregor; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the impact of water fluctuations on the key-lock association kinetics of a hydrophobic ligand (key) binding to a hydrophobic pocket (lock) by means of a minimalistic stochastic model system. It describes the collective hydration behavior of the pocket by bimodal fluctuations of a water-pocket interface that dynamically couples to the diffusive motion of the approaching ligand via the hydrophobic interaction. This leads to a set of overdamped Langevin equations in 2D-coordinate-space, that is Markovian in each dimension. Numerical simulations demonstrate locally increased friction of the ligand, decelerated binding kinetics, and local non-Markovian (memory) effects in the ligand's reaction coordinate as found previously in explicit-water molecular dynamics studies of model hydrophobic pocket-ligand binding [1,2]. Our minimalistic model elucidates the origin of effectively enhanced friction in the process that can be traced back to long-time decays in the force-autocorrelation function induced by...

  1. Common Internal Allosteric Network Links Anesthetic Binding Sites in a Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Thomas T; Mincer, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics bind reversibly to ion channels, modifying their global conformational distributions, but the underlying atomic mechanisms are not completely known. We examine this issue by way of the model protein Gloeobacter violaceous ligand-gated ion channel (GLIC) using computational molecular dynamics, with a coarse-grained model to enhance sampling. We find that in flooding simulations, both propofol and a generic particle localize to the crystallographic transmembrane anesthetic binding region, and that propofol also localizes to an extracellular region shared with the crystallographic ketamine binding site. Subsequent simulations to probe these binding modes in greater detail demonstrate that ligand binding induces structural asymmetry in GLIC. Consequently, we employ residue interaction correlation analysis to describe the internal allosteric network underlying the coupling of ligand and distant effector sites necessary for conformational change. Overall, the results suggest that the same allosteric network may underlie the actions of various anesthetics, regardless of binding site. PMID:27403526

  2. Fe-binding dissolved organic ligands in the oxic and suboxic waters of the Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes J.A. Gerringa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the oxygen-rich layer of the Black Sea, above the permanent halocline, the Fe and nitrate concentrations are low where fluorescence is relatively high , indicating uptake by phytoplankton. In this study we used ligand exchange adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE-aCSV, using 2-(2-Thiazolylazo-p-cresol (TAC as measuring ligand, to investigate the role of Fe-binding dissolved organic ligands in keeping Fe in the dissolved phase and potentially biologically available. The conditional stability constant, logK´, was between 21 and 22 in most samples, which is on average lower than in ocean water. The Fe-binding dissolved organic ligand concentrations varied between 0.35 and 4.81 nEq of M Fe, which was higher than the dissolved concentration of Fe (DFe as found in most samples. At two stations ligands were saturated in the surface. At one station ligands were saturated near the oxycline, where ligand concentrations seemed to increase, indicating that they play a role in keeping Fe in the dissolved phase across the redox gradient. At the fluorescence maximum (between 40 and 50 m, the dissolved organic ligand binding capacity (alphaFeL=K´*[L´] of Fe was at its highest while the concentration DFe was at its lowest. Here, we find a statistically significant, positive relationship between fluorescence and the logarithm of alphaFeL, along with fluorescence and the ratio of the total ligand concentration over DFe. These relationships are best explained by phytoplankton utilizing Fe from Fe-binding organic ligands, resulting in an increase in free Fe-binding ligands.

  3. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  4. Co-variance of dissolved Fe-binding ligands with phytoplankton characteristics in the Canary Basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerringa, L. J. A.; Veldhuis, M. J. W.; Timmermans, K. R.; Sarthou, G.; de Baar, H. J. W.

    2006-01-01

    Dissolved Fe and ligand concentrations and the Fe-binding strength of the organic ligands were measured in samples from the upper water column (150 m) of the oligotrophic waters of the Canary Basin (eastern North Atlantic Ocean). Concentrations of major nutrients, phytoplankton abundance and photosy

  5. Reevaluation of ANS binding to human and bovine serum albumins: key role of equilibrium microdialysis in ligand - receptor binding characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina M Kuznetsova

    Full Text Available In this work we return to the problem of the determination of ligand-receptor binding stoichiometry and binding constants. In many cases the ligand is a fluorescent dye which has low fluorescence quantum yield in free state but forms highly fluorescent complex with target receptor. That is why many researchers use dye fluorescence for determination of its binding parameters with receptor, but they leave out of account that fluorescence intensity is proportional to the part of the light absorbed by the solution rather than to the concentration of bound dye. We showed how ligand-receptor binding parameters can be determined by spectrophotometry of the solutions prepared by equilibrium microdialysis. We determined the binding parameters of ANS - human serum albumin (HSA and ANS - bovine serum albumin (BSA interaction, absorption spectra, concentration and molar extinction coefficient, as well as fluorescence quantum yield of the bound dye. It was found that HSA and BSA have two binding modes with significantly different affinity to ANS. Correct determination of the binding parameters of ligand-receptor interaction is important for fundamental investigations and practical aspects of molecule medicine and pharmaceutics. The data obtained for albumins are important in connection with their role as drugs transporters.

  6. Influence of length and flexibility of spacers on the binding affinity of divalent ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Liese

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a quantitative model for the binding of divalent ligand–receptor systems. We study the influence of length and flexibility of the spacers on the overall binding affinity and derive general rules for the optimal ligand design. To this end, we first compare different polymeric models and determine the probability to simultaneously bind to two neighboring receptor binding pockets. In a second step the binding affinity of divalent ligands in terms of the IC50 value is derived. We find that a divalent ligand has the potential to bind more efficiently than its monovalent counterpart only, if the monovalent dissociation constant is lower than a critical value. This critical monovalent dissociation constant depends on the ligand-spacer length and flexibility as well as on the size of the receptor. Regarding the optimal ligand-spacer length and flexibility, we find that the average spacer length should be equal or slightly smaller than the distance between the receptor binding pockets and that the end-to-end spacer length fluctuations should be in the same range as the size of a receptor binding pocket.

  7. Multifunctionality and mechanism of ligand binding in a mosquito antiinflammatory protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Eric; Mans, Ben J.; Ribeiro, José M.C.; Andersen, John F.; (NIH)

    2009-04-07

    The mosquito D7 salivary proteins are encoded by a multigene family related to the arthropod odorant-binding protein (OBP) superfamily. Forms having either one or two OBP domains are found in mosquito saliva. Four single-domain and one two-domain D7 proteins from Anopheles gambiae and Aedes aegypti (AeD7), respectively, were shown to bind biogenic amines with high affinity and with a stoichiometry of one ligand per protein molecule. Sequence comparisons indicated that only the C-terminal domain of AeD7 is homologous to the single-domain proteins from A. gambiae, suggesting that the N-terminal domain may bind a different class of ligands. Here, we describe the 3D structure of AeD7 and examine the ligand-binding characteristics of the N- and C-terminal domains. Isothermal titration calorimetry and ligand complex crystal structures show that the N-terminal domain binds cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) with high affinities (50-60 nM) whereas the C-terminal domain binds biogenic amines. The lipid chain of the cysLT binds in a hydrophobic pocket of the N-terminal domain, whereas binding of norepinephrine leads to an ordering of the C-terminal portion of the C-terminal domain into an alpha-helix that, along with rotations of Arg-176 and Glu-268 side chains, acts to bury the bound ligand.

  8. The glucocorticoid receptor hormone binding domain mediates transcriptional activation in vitro in the absence of ligand.

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, J.; Stunnenberg, H G

    1993-01-01

    We show that recombinant rat glucocorticoid receptor (vvGR) expressed using vaccinia virus is indistinguishable from authentic GR with respect to DNA and hormone binding. In the absence of hormone, vvGR is mainly found in the cytoplasm in a complex with heat shock protein 90. Upon incubation with ligand, vvGR is released from this complex and translocated to the nucleus. Thus, the ligand binding domain displays the known biochemical properties. However, in vitro, transcription from a syntheti...

  9. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  10. Cloud computing approaches for prediction of ligand binding poses and pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrenz, Morgan; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-01-22

    We describe an innovative protocol for ab initio prediction of ligand crystallographic binding poses and highly effective analysis of large datasets generated for protein-ligand dynamics. We include a procedure for setup and performance of distributed molecular dynamics simulations on cloud computing architectures, a model for efficient analysis of simulation data, and a metric for evaluation of model convergence. We give accurate binding pose predictions for five ligands ranging in affinity from 7 nM to > 200 μM for the immunophilin protein FKBP12, for expedited results in cases where experimental structures are difficult to produce. Our approach goes beyond single, low energy ligand poses to give quantitative kinetic information that can inform protein engineering and ligand design.

  11. Imaging G protein-coupled receptors while quantifying their ligand-binding free-energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsteens, David; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Zhang, Cheng; Spoerri, Patrizia M; Coughlin, Shaun R; Kobilka, Brian K; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    Imaging native membrane receptors and testing how they interact with ligands is of fundamental interest in the life sciences but has proven remarkably difficult to accomplish. Here, we introduce an approach that uses force-distance curve-based atomic force microscopy to simultaneously image single native G protein-coupled receptors in membranes and quantify their dynamic binding strength to native and synthetic ligands. We measured kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for individual protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) molecules in the absence and presence of antagonists, and these measurements enabled us to describe PAR1's ligand-binding free-energy landscape with high accuracy. Our nanoscopic method opens an avenue to directly image and characterize ligand binding of native membrane receptors. PMID:26167642

  12. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li L; Feng, Guo Q; Zhang, Qing G

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  13. Large-scale molecular dynamics simulation: Effect of polarization on thrombin-ligand binding energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li L.; Feng, Guo Q.; Zhang, Qing G.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations lasting 500 ns were performed in explicit water to investigate the effect of polarization on the binding of ligands to human α-thrombin based on the standard nonpolarizable AMBER force field and the quantum-derived polarized protein-specific charge (PPC). The PPC includes the electronic polarization effect of the thrombin-ligand complex, which is absent in the standard force field. A detailed analysis and comparison of the results of the MD simulation with experimental data provided strong evidence that intra-protein, protein-ligand hydrogen bonds and the root-mean-square deviation of backbone atoms were significantly stabilized through electronic polarization. Specifically, two critical hydrogen bonds between thrombin and the ligand were broken at approximately 190 ns when AMBER force field was used and the number of intra-protein backbone hydrogen bonds was higher under PPC than under AMBER. The thrombin-ligand binding energy was computed using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method, and the results were consistent with the experimental value obtained using PPC. Because hydrogen bonds were unstable, it was failed to predict the binding affinity under the AMBER force field. Furthermore, the results of the present study revealed that differences in the binding free energy between AMBER and PPC almost comes from the electrostatic interaction. Thus, this study provides evidence that protein polarization is critical to accurately describe protein-ligand binding. PMID:27507430

  14. Detection of site-specific binding and co-binding of ligands to macromolecules using sup 19 F NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, B.G. (Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Study of ligand-macromolecular interactions by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy affords many opportunities for obtaining molecular biochemical and pharmaceutical information. This is due to the absence of a background fluorine signal, as well as the relatively high sensitivity of {sup 19}F NMR. Use of fluorine-labeled ligands enables one to probe not only binding and co-binding phenomena to macromolecules, but also can provide data on binding constants, stoichiometries, kinetics, and conformational properties of these complexes. Under conditions of slow exchange and macromolecule-induced chemical shifts, multiple {sup 19}F NMR resonances can be observed for free and bound ligands. These shifted resonances are a direct correlate of the concentration of ligand bound in a specific state rather than the global concentrations of bound or free ligand which are usually determined using other techniques such as absorption spectroscopy or equilibrium dialysis. Examples of these interactions are demonstrated both from the literature and from interactions of 5-fluorotryptophan, 5-fluorosalicylic acid, flurbiprofen, and sulindac sulfide with human serum albumin. Other applications of {sup 19}F NMR to study of these interactions in vivo, as well for receptor binding and metabolic tracing of fluorinated drugs and proteins are discussed.

  15. Doubling the Size of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligand Binding Pocket by Deacylcortivazol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chenghai; Tao, Yong-guang; Tolbert, W. David; Simons, Jr., S. Stoney; Xu, H. Eric (NIH)

    2010-03-08

    A common feature of nuclear receptor ligand binding domains (LBD) is a helical sandwich fold that nests a ligand binding pocket within the bottom half of the domain. Here we report that the ligand pocket of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) can be continuously extended into the top half of the LBD by binding to deacylcortivazol (DAC), an extremely potent glucocorticoid. It has been puzzling for decades why DAC, which contains a phenylpyrazole replacement at the conserved 3-ketone of steroid hormones that are normally required for activation of their cognate receptors, is a potent GR activator. The crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to DAC and the fourth LXXLL motif of steroid receptor coactivator 1 reveals that the GR ligand binding pocket is expanded to a size of 1,070 {angstrom}{sup 3}, effectively doubling the size of the GR dexamethasone-binding pocket of 540 {angstrom}{sup 3} and yet leaving the structure of the coactivator binding site intact. DAC occupies only {approx}50% of the space of the pocket but makes intricate interactions with the receptor around the phenylpyrazole group that accounts for the high-affinity binding of DAC. The dramatic expansion of the DAC-binding pocket thus highlights the conformational adaptability of GR to ligand binding. The new structure also allows docking of various nonsteroidal ligands that cannot be fitted into the previous structures, thus providing a new rational template for drug discovery of steroidal and nonsteroidal glucocorticoids that can be specifically designed to reach the unoccupied space of the expanded pocket.

  16. Essential dynamics of the cellular retinol-binding protein - Evidence for ligand-induced conformational changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalten, D.M.F.; Findlay, J.B.C.; Amadei, A; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The cellular retinol-binding protein (CRBP) is an intracellular retinol carrier protein belonging to a family of hydrophobic ligand-binding proteins, It transports retinol to specific locations in the cell where, for instance, it is esterified for storage, Recently solved crystallographic structures

  17. Ligand binding to G protein-coupled receptors in tethered cell membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Karen L.; Meyer, Bruno H.; Hovius, Ruud;

    2003-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large class of seven transmembrane proteins, which bind selectively agonists or antagonists with important consequences for cellular signaling and function. Comprehension of the molecular details of ligand binding is important for the understanding...

  18. Helical propensity in an intrinsically disordered protein accelerates ligand binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iesmantavicius, Vytautas; Dogan, Jakob; Jemth, Per;

    2014-01-01

    Many intrinsically disordered proteins fold upon binding to other macromolecules. The secondary structure present in the well-ordered complex is often formed transiently in the unbound state. The consequence of such transient structure for the binding process is, however, not clear. The activation...... domain of the activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors (ACTR) is intrinsically disordered and folds upon binding to the nuclear coactivator binding domain (NCBD) of the CREB binding protein. A number of mutants was designed that selectively perturbs the amount of secondary structure...... in unbound ACTR without interfering with the intermolecular interactions between ACTR and NCBD. Using NMR spectroscopy and fluorescence-monitored stopped-flow kinetic measurements we show that the secondary structure content in helix 1 of ACTR indeed influences the binding kinetics. The results thus support...

  19. Parameterization of an effective potential for protein-ligand binding from host-guest affinity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Lauren; Deng, Nanjie; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Nguyen, Crystal; Gilson, Michael K; Kurtzman, Tom; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-01-01

    Force field accuracy is still one of the "stalemates" in biomolecular modeling. Model systems with high quality experimental data are valuable instruments for the validation and improvement of effective potentials. With respect to protein-ligand binding, organic host-guest complexes have long served as models for both experimental and computational studies because of the abundance of binding affinity data available for such systems. Binding affinity data collected for cyclodextrin (CD) inclusion complexes, a popular model for molecular recognition, is potentially a more reliable resource for tuning energy parameters than hydration free energy measurements. Convergence of binding free energy calculations on CD host-guest systems can also be obtained rapidly, thus offering the opportunity to assess the robustness of these parameters. In this work, we demonstrate how implicit solvent parameters can be developed using binding affinity experimental data and the binding energy distribution analysis method (BEDAM) and validated using the Grid Inhomogeneous Solvation Theory analysis. These new solvation parameters were used to study protein-ligand binding in two drug targets against the HIV-1 virus and improved the agreement between the calculated and the experimental binding affinities. This work illustrates how benchmark sets of high quality experimental binding affinity data and physics-based binding free energy models can be used to evaluate and optimize force fields for protein-ligand systems. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26256816

  20. An NMR-Based Structural Rationale for Contrasting Stoichiometry and Ligand Binding Site(s) in Fatty Acid-binding Proteins†

    OpenAIRE

    He, Yan; Estephan, Rima; Yang, Xiaomin; Vela, Adriana; Wang, Hsin; Bernard, Cédric; Stark, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is a 14-kDa cytosolic polypeptide, differing from other family members in number of ligand binding sites, diversity of bound ligands, and transfer of fatty acid(s) to membranes primarily via aqueous diffusion rather than direct collisional interactions. Distinct two-dimensional 1H-15N NMR signals indicative of slowly exchanging LFABP assemblies formed during stepwise ligand titration were exploited, without solving the protein-ligand complex structures...

  1. Ligand-receptor binding kinetics in surface plasmon resonance cells: A Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, Jacob; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Täuber, Uwe C

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chips are widely used to measure association and dissociation rates for the binding kinetics between two species of chemicals, e.g., cell receptors and ligands. It is commonly assumed that ligands are spatially well mixed in the SPR region, and hence a mean-field rate equation description is appropriate. This approximation however ignores the spatial fluctuations as well as temporal correlations induced by multiple local rebinding events, which become prominent for slow diffusion rates and high binding affinities. We report detailed Monte Carlo simulations of ligand binding kinetics in an SPR cell subject to laminar flow. We extract the binding and dissociation rates by means of the techniques frequently employed in experimental analysis that are motivated by the mean-field approximation. We find major discrepancies in a wide parameter regime between the thus extracted rates and the known input simulation values. These results underscore the crucial quantitative importance of s...

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of ligand dissociation from liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Long

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized "portal region" could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques.

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of ligand dissociation from liver fatty acid binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dong; Mu, Yuguang; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of how ligands enter and leave the binding cavity of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) have been a puzzling question over decades. Liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) is a unique family member which accommodates two molecules of fatty acids in its cavity and exhibits the capability of interacting with a variety of ligands with different chemical structures and properties. Investigating the ligand dissociation processes of LFABP is thus a quite interesting topic, which however is rather difficult for both experimental approaches and ordinary simulation strategies. In the current study, random expulsion molecular dynamics simulation, which accelerates ligand motions for rapid dissociation, was used to explore the potential egress routes of ligands from LFABP. The results showed that the previously hypothesized "portal region" could be readily used for the dissociation of ligands at both the low affinity site and the high affinity site. Besides, one alternative portal was shown to be highly favorable for ligand egress from the high affinity site and be related to the unique structural feature of LFABP. This result lends strong support to the hypothesis from the previous NMR exchange studies, which in turn indicates an important role for this alternative portal. Another less favored potential portal located near the N-terminal end was also identified. Identification of the dissociation pathways will allow further mechanistic understanding of fatty acid uptake and release by computational and/or experimental techniques. PMID:19564911

  4. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, James; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Babinchak, Michael;

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP(+)) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP(+)), has ...

  5. Thermodynamics of ligand binding to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase from Bordetella/Alcaligenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Baud, Matthias G J; Fuchter, Matthew J; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-03-01

    Thermodynamic studies on ligand-protein binding have become increasingly important in the process of drug design. In combination with structural data and molecular dynamics simulations, thermodynamic studies provide relevant information about the mode of interaction between compounds and their target proteins and therefore build a sound basis for further drug optimization. Using the example of histone deacetylases (HDACs), particularly the histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase (HDAH) from Bordetella/Alcaligenes, a novel sensitive competitive fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based binding assay was developed and the thermodynamics of interaction of both fluorescent ligands and inhibitors to histone deacetylase like amidohydrolase were investigated. The assay consumes only small amounts of valuable target proteins and is suitable for fast kinetic and mechanistic studies as well as high throughput screening applications. Binding affinity increased with increasing length of aliphatic spacers (n = 4-7) between the hydroxamate moiety and the dansyl head group of ligand probes. Van't Hoff plots revealed an optimum in enthalpy contribution to the free energy of binding for the dansyl-ligand with hexyl spacer. The selectivity in the series of dansyl-ligands against human class I HDAC1 but not class II HDACs 4 and 6 increased with the ratio of ΔH(0)/ΔG(0). The data clearly emphasize the importance of thermodynamic signatures as useful general guidance for the optimization of ligands or rational drug design.

  6. Configurational entropy and cooperativity between ligand binding and dimerization in glycopeptide antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusuf, Sutjano; Loll, Patrick J; Axelsen, Paul H

    2003-04-01

    Oligomerization and ligand binding are thermodynamically cooperative processes in many biochemical systems, and the mechanisms giving rise to cooperative behavior are generally attributed to changes in structure. In glycopeptide antibiotics, however, these cooperative processes are not accompanied by significant structural changes. To investigate the mechanism by which cooperativity arises in these compounds, fully solvated molecular dynamics simulations and quasiharmonic normal-mode analysis were performed on chloroeremomycin, vancomycin, and dechlorovancomycin. Configurational entropies were derived from the vibrational modes recovered from ligand-free and ligand-bound forms of the monomeric and dimeric species. Results indicate that both ligand binding and dimerization incur an entropic cost as vibrational activity in the central core of the antibiotic is shifted to higher frequencies with lower amplitudes. Nevertheless, ligand binding and dimerization are cooperative because the entropic cost of both processes occurring together is less than the cost of these processes occurring separately. These reductions in configurational entropy are more than sufficient in magnitude to account for the experimentally observed cooperativity between dimerization and ligand binding. We conclude that biochemical cooperativity can be mediated through changes in vibrational activity, irrespective of the presence or absence of concomitant structural change. This may represent a general mechanism of allostery underlying cooperative phenomena in diverse macromolecular systems. PMID:12656635

  7. NMR studies of DNA oligomers and their interactions with minor groove binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fagan, P A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-05-01

    The cationic peptide ligands distamycin and netropsin bind noncovalently to the minor groove of DNA. The binding site, orientation, stoichiometry, and qualitative affinity of distamycin binding to several short DNA oligomers were investigated by NMR spectroscopy. The oligomers studied contain A,T-rich or I,C-rich binding sites, where I = 2-desaminodeoxyguanosine. I{center_dot}C base pairs are functional analogs of A{center_dot}T base pairs in the minor groove. The different behaviors exhibited by distamycin and netropsin binding to various DNA sequences suggested that these ligands are sensitive probes of DNA structure. For sites of five or more base pairs, distamycin can form 1:1 or 2:1 ligand:DNA complexes. Cooperativity in distamycin binding is low in sites such as AAAAA which has narrow minor grooves, and is higher in sites with wider minor grooves such as ATATAT. The distamycin binding and base pair opening lifetimes of I,C-containing DNA oligomers suggest that the I,C minor groove is structurally different from the A,T minor groove. Molecules which direct chemistry to a specific DNA sequence could be used as antiviral compounds, diagnostic probes, or molecular biology tools. The author studied two ligands in which reactive groups were tethered to a distamycin to increase the sequence specificity of the reactive agent.

  8. High resolution crystal structures of unliganded and liganded human liver ACBP reveal a new mode of binding for the acyl-CoA ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskinen, Jukka P; van Aalten, Daan M; Knudsen, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is essential for the fatty acid metabolism, membrane structure, membrane fusion, and ceramide synthesis. Here high resolution crystal structures of human cytosolic liver ACBP, unliganded and liganded with a physiological ligand, myristoyl-CoA are described...... are filled by other ligand fragments. This novel binding mode shows that the acyl moiety can flip out of its classical binding pocket and bind elsewhere, suggesting a mechanism for the acyl-CoA transfer between ACBP and the active site of a target enzyme. This mechanism is of possible relevance...

  9. The distribution of ligand-binding pockets around protein-protein interfaces suggests a general mechanism for pocket formation

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Mu; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous in a biological cell. Here, we report a comprehensive study of the distribution of protein-ligand interaction sites, namely ligand-binding pockets, around protein-protein interfaces where protein-protein interactions occur. We inspected a representative set of 1,611 representative protein-protein complexes and identified pockets with a potential for binding small molecule ligands. The majority of these pockets are within a 6 Å dis...

  10. Quantitative Determination of DNA-Ligand Binding Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eamonn F.

    2007-01-01

    The effective use of fluorescence spectroscopy for determining the binding of the intercalcating agent crhidium bromide to DNA is being described. The analysis used simple measurement techniques and hence can be easily adopted by the students for a better understanding.

  11. Metal-coordination-driven mixed ligand binding in supramolecular bisporphyrin tweezers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikbal, Sk Asif; Dhamija, Avinash; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2015-09-25

    Mg(II)bisporphyrin has been used as an efficient host for the selective binding of guest ligands. In the presence of heterogeneous guest pairs, 2-aminopyrimidine/pyrazine and 2-aminopyrimidine/1,4-dioxane, 2-aminopyrimidine is bound selectively inside the bisporphyrin cavity whereas pyrazine/1,4-dioxane is bound outside to produce 1D mixed ligand polymers. UV-vis, (1)H NMR spectra and X-ray structure confirm such a selective and orthogonal binding of the guest ligands. The mixed ligand polymer has been synthesized just by mixing the host and guests in one pot and easily isolated as a solid in nearly quantitative yield due to its high stability. PMID:26256242

  12. Analysis of Peptide Ligand Binding to FGFR1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Simulating annealing algorithm was used in docking computation to predict a selected peptide VYMSPF(P2) binding site on the ectodomain of FGFR1. The peptide is located on the hydrophobic surface of the receptor, which is critical for FGF binding. The synthesized peptide can effectively inhibit the mitogenic activity of aFGF, and has a potential to become a therapeutic agent as an aFGF antagonist.

  13. Evaluation of ligand-binding affinity using polynomial empirical scoring functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azevedo, Walter Filgueira; Dias, Raquel

    2008-10-15

    Assessing protein-ligand interaction is of great importance for virtual screening initiatives in order to discover new drugs. The present work describes a set of empirical scoring functions to assess the binding affinity, involving terms for intermolecular hydrogen bonds and contact surface. The results show that our methodology works better to predict protein-ligand affinity when compared with XSCORE, a popular empirical scoring function.

  14. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R.; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To e...

  15. Biophysical characterization of G-protein coupled receptor-peptide ligand binding

    OpenAIRE

    Langelaan, David N.; Ngweniform, Pascaline; Rainey, Jan K.

    2011-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are ubiquitous membrane proteins allowing intracellular response to extracellular factors that range from photons of light to small molecules to proteins. Despite extensive exploitation of GRCRs as therapeutic targets, biophysical characterization of GPCR-ligand interactions remains challenging. In this minireview, we focus on techniques which have been successfully employed for structural and biophysical characterization of peptide ligands binding to their...

  16. 芳香烃受体内外源性配体研究进展%Research progress on endogenous and exogenous ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段毅涛; 赵辉; 黄鹤

    2013-01-01

    芳香烃受体(aryl hydrocarbon receptor,AhR)是药物及毒物代谢酶的一种重要转录调控因子,主要调控细胞色素P-450酶系家族1(CYP1)和一些Ⅱ相代谢酶的表达,还具有许多内源性功能,包括调控细胞周期、免疫应答和细胞分化.AhR还与化学致癌有关.内源性配体持续激活AhR是细胞发挥正常生理功能的必要条件之一;但外源性配体激活AhR则对机体有害.该文对近年来AhR的内外源性配体研究进展进行综述,主要介绍内外源性配体的类型、结构和功能等以及一些新配体的特征.%Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important transcriptional regulator of drug or toxic metabolizing enzymes that dominantly controls the expression of CYP1 family genes and some phase Ⅱ enzymes.AhR also has many endogenous functions including cell cycle control,immune response,and cell differentiation.In addition,AhR is well-known to be involved in chemically induced carcinogenesis.While exogenous activation of AhR has adverse effects on human organism,sustained activation of AhR by endogenous ligands is indispensable for proper cell functions.In this paper,an overview of the recent studies about endogenous and exogenous ligands of aryl hydrocarbon receptor was presented,which introduced their types,structures,functions and characteristics of some new ligands.

  17. Mixed ligand copper(II) dicarboxylate complexes: the role of co-ligand hydrophobicity in DNA binding, double-strand DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rangasamy; Ramakrishnan, Sethu; Ganeshpandian, Mani; Bhuvanesh, Nattamai S P; Palaniandavar, Mallayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Akbarsha, Mohamad Abdulkadhar

    2015-06-14

    A few water soluble mixed ligand copper(ii) complexes of the type [Cu(bimda)(diimine)] , where bimda is N-benzyliminodiacetic acid and diimine is 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy, ) or 1,10-phenanthroline (phen, ) or 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (5,6-dmp, ) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (3,4,7,8-tmp, ) and dipyrido[3,2-d: 2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq, ), have been successfully isolated and characterized by elemental analysis and other spectral techniques. The coordination geometry around copper(ii) in is described as distorted square based pyramidal while that in is described as square pyramidal. Absorption spectral titrations and competitive DNA binding studies reveal that the intrinsic DNA binding affinity of the complexes depends upon the diimine co-ligand, dpq () > 3,4,7,8-tmp () > 5,6-dmp () > phen () > bpy (). The phen and dpq co-ligands are involved in the π-stacking interaction with DNA base pairs while the 3,4,7,8-tmp/5,6-dmp and bpy co-ligands are involved in respectively hydrophobic and surface mode of binding with DNA. The small enhancement in the relative viscosity of DNA upon binding to supports the DNA binding modes proposed. Interestingly, and are selective in exhibiting a positive induced CD band (ICD) upon binding to DNA suggesting that they induce B to A conformational change. In contrast, and show CD responses which reveal their involvement in strong DNA binding. The complexes are unique in displaying prominent double-strand DNA cleavage while effects only single-strand DNA cleavage, and their ability to cleave DNA in the absence of an activator varies as > > > > . Also, all the complexes exhibit oxidative double-strand DNA cleavage activity in the presence of ascorbic acid, which varies as > > > > . The ability of the complexes to bind and cleave the protein BSA varies in the order > > > > . Interestingly, and cleave the protein non-specifically in the presence of H2O2 as an activator suggesting that they can act also as chemical proteases

  18. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany; Remesh, Soumya G; Kaever, Thomas; Bardet, Wilfried; Jackson, Kenneth; McLeod, Rima; Sette, Alessandro; Nielsen, Morten; Zajonc, Dirk M; Blader, Ira J; Peters, Bjoern; Hildebrand, William

    2016-01-29

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T-cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen-derived peptides maintain a canonical N-terminal binding core yet exhibit a C-terminal extension of 1-30 amino acids. Structural analysis demonstrates that binding of extended peptides opens the HLA class I F' pocket, allowing the C-terminal extension to protrude through one end of the binding groove. In summary, we demonstrate that unrealized structural flexibility makes MHC class I receptive to parasite-derived ligands that exhibit unique C-terminal peptide extensions.

  19. Dissecting electrostatic screening, specific ion binding, and ligand binding in an energetic model for glycine riboswitch folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, Jan; Sim, Adelene Y.L.; Herschlag, Daniel; Doniach, Sebastian (Stanford)

    2010-09-17

    Riboswitches are gene-regulating RNAs that are usually found in the 5{prime}-untranslated regions of messenger RNA. As the sugar-phosphate backbone of RNA is highly negatively charged, the folding and ligand-binding interactions of riboswitches are strongly dependent on the presence of cations. Using small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and hydroxyl radical footprinting, we examined the cation dependence of the different folding stages of the glycine-binding riboswitch from Vibrio cholerae. We found that the partial folding of the tandem aptamer of this riboswitch in the absence of glycine is supported by all tested mono- and divalent ions, suggesting that this transition is mediated by nonspecific electrostatic screening. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations using SAXS-derived low-resolution structural models allowed us to perform an energetic dissection of this process. The results showed that a model with a constant favorable contribution to folding that is opposed by an unfavorable electrostatic term that varies with ion concentration and valency provides a reasonable quantitative description of the observed folding behavior. Glycine binding, on the other hand, requires specific divalent ions binding based on the observation that Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} facilitated glycine binding, whereas other divalent cations did not. The results provide a case study of how ion-dependent electrostatic relaxation, specific ion binding, and ligand binding can be coupled to shape the energetic landscape of a riboswitch and can begin to be quantitatively dissected.

  20. Evaluating the binding efficiency of pheromone binding protein with its natural ligand using molecular docking and fluorescence analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilayaraja, Renganathan; Rajkumar, Ramalingam; Rajesh, Durairaj; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2014-06-01

    Chemosignals play a crucial role in social and sexual communication among inter- and intra-species. Chemical cues are bound with protein that is present in the pheromones irrespective of sex are commonly called as pheromone binding protein (PBP). In rats, the pheromone compounds are bound with low molecular lipocalin protein α2u-globulin (α2u). We reported farnesol is a natural endogenous ligand (compound) present in rat preputial gland as a bound volatile compound. In the present study, an attempt has been made through computational method to evaluating the binding efficiency of α2u with the natural ligand (farnesol) and standard fluorescent molecule (2-naphthol). The docking analysis revealed that the binding energy of farnesol and 2-naphthol was almost equal and likely to share some binding pocket of protein. Further, to extrapolate the results generated through computational approach, the α2u protein was purified and subjected to fluorescence titration and binding assay. The results showed that the farnesol is replaced by 2-naphthol with high hydrophobicity of TYR120 in binding sites of α2u providing an acceptable dissociation constant indicating the binding efficiency of α2u. The obtained results are in corroboration with the data made through computational approach.

  1. Protein and ligand adaptation in a retinoic acid binding protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanayek, R.; Newcomer, M E

    1999-01-01

    A retinoic acid binding protein isolated from the lumen of the rat epididymis (ERABP) is a member of the lipocalin superfamily. ERABP binds both the all-trans and 9-cis isomers of retinoic acid, as well as the synthetic retinoid (E)-4-[2-(5,6,7,8)-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2 napthalenyl-1 propenyl]-benzoic acid (TTNPB), a structural analog of all-trans retinoic acid. The structure of ERABP with a mixture of all-trans and 9-cis retinoic acid has previously been reported. To elucidate any ...

  2. Ligand binding and thermostability of different allosteric states of the insulin zinc-hexamer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huus, Kasper; Havelund, Svend; Olsen, Helle B;

    2006-01-01

    The influence of ligand binding and conformation state on the thermostability of hexameric zinc-insulin was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The insulin hexamer exists in equilibrium between the forms T6, T3R3, and R6. Phenolic ligands induce and stabilize the T3R3- and R6-states...... which are further stabilized by binding of certain anions that do not stabilize the T6-state. It was shown that the thermostability of the resorcinol-stabilized R6-state was significantly higher than that of the T6-state. Further analysis showed that phenol- and m-cresol-stabilized R6-hexamer loses...

  3. Role of Desolvation in Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Ligand Binding to a Kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Mondal, Jagannath; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2014-01-01

    Computer simulations are used to determine the free energy landscape for the binding of the anticancer drug Dasatinib to its src kinase receptor and show that before settling into a free energy basin the ligand must surmount a free energy barrier. An analysis based on using both the ligand-pocket separation and the pocket-water occupancy as reaction coordinates shows that the free energy barrier is a result of the free energy cost for almost complete desolvation of the binding pocket. The sim...

  4. Chelate effects in sulfate binding by amide/urea-based ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Chuandong; Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2015-07-01

    The influence of chelate and mini-chelate effects on sulfate binding was explored for six amide-, amide/amine-, urea-, and urea/amine-based ligands. Two of the urea-based hosts were selective for SO4(2-) in water-mixed DMSO-d6 systems. Results indicated that the mini-chelate effect provided by a single urea group with two NH binding sites appears to provide enhanced binding over two amide groups. Furthermore, additional urea binding sites incorporated into the host framework appeared to overcome to some extent competing hydration effects with increasing water content.

  5. Novel peptide ligand with high binding capacity for antibody purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, L. N.; Gustavsson, P. E.; Michael, R.;

    2012-01-01

    and the interaction is favorable and entropy-driven with an enthalpy penalty. Our results show that the binding of the Fc fragment of IgG is mediated by hydrophobic interactions and that elution at low pH is most likely due to electrostatic repulsion. Furthermore, we have separated aggregated IgG from non...

  6. Ligand-binding sites in human serum amyloid P component

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, N.H.H.; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Roepstorff, P.;

    1996-01-01

    Amyloid P component (AP) is a naturally occurring glycoprotein that is found in serum and basement membranes, AP is also a component of all types of amyloid, including that found in individuals who suffer from Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. Because AP has been found to bind strongly...

  7. Tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Zishun; Feng, Xi-Qiao; Gao, Huajian

    2016-03-01

    Cell adhesion plays a crucial role in many biological processes of cells, e.g., immune responses, tissue morphogenesis, and stem cell differentiation. An essential problem in the molecular mechanism of cell adhesion is to characterize the binding affinity of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands under different physiological conditions. In this paper, a theoretical model is presented to study the binding affinity between a large number of anchored receptors and ligands under both tensile and compressive stresses, and corroborated by demonstrating excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that the binding affinity becomes lower as the magnitude of the applied stress increases, and drops to zero at a critical tensile or compressive stress. Interestingly, the critical compressive stress is found to be substantially smaller than the critical tensile stress for relatively long and flexible receptor-ligand complexes. This counterintuitive finding is explained by using the Euler instability theory of slender columns under compression. The tension-compression asymmetry in the binding affinity of anchored receptors and ligands depends subtly on the competition between the breaking and instability of their complexes. This study helps in understanding the role of mechanical forces in cell adhesion mediated by specific binding molecules.

  8. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II Transcription in Human Cells by Synthetic DNA-Binding Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Liliane A.; Gulizia, Richard J.; Trauger, John W.; Baird, Eldon E.; Mosier, Donald E.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.; Dervan, Peter B.

    1998-10-01

    Sequence-specific DNA-binding small molecules that can permeate human cells potentially could regulate transcription of specific genes. Multiple cellular DNA-binding transcription factors are required by HIV type 1 for RNA synthesis. Two pyrrole--imidazole polyamides were designed to bind DNA sequences immediately adjacent to binding sites for the transcription factors Ets-1, lymphoid-enhancer binding factor 1, and TATA-box binding protein. These synthetic ligands specifically inhibit DNA-binding of each transcription factor and HIV type 1 transcription in cell-free assays. When used in combination, the polyamides inhibit virus replication by >99% in isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes, with no detectable cell toxicity. The ability of small molecules to target predetermined DNA sequences located with RNA polymerase II promoters suggests a general approach for regulation of gene expression, as well as a mechanism for the inhibition of viral replication.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of barley and maize lipid transfer proteins show different ligand binding preferences in agreement with experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lorna J; Roby, Ysobel; Allison, Jane R; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2013-07-30

    Experimental studies of barley and maize lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) show that the two proteins bind the ligand palmitate in opposite orientations in their internal cavities. Moreover, maize LTP is reported to bind the ligand caprate in the internal cavity in a mixture of two orientations with approximately equal occupancy. Six 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of maize and barley LTP with ligands bound in two orientations (modes M and B) have been used to understand the different ligand binding preferences. The simulations show that both maize and barley LTP could bind palmitate in the orientation observed experimentally for maize LTP (mode M), with the predominant interaction being a salt bridge between the ligand carboxylate headgroup and a conserved arginine side chain. However, the simulation of barley LTP with palmitate in the mode B orientation shows the most favorable protein-ligand interaction energy. In contrast, the simulations of maize LTP with palmitate and with caprate in the mode B orientation show no persistent ligand binding, the ligands leaving the cavity during the simulations. Sequence differences between maize and barley LTP in the AB loop region, in residues at the base of the hydrophobic cavity, and in the helix A region are identified as contributing to the different behavior. The simulations reproduce well the experimentally observed binding preferences for palmitate and suggest that the experimental data for maize LTP with caprate reflect ligand mobility in binding mode M rather than the population of binding modes M and B. PMID:23834513

  10. Directed evolution of estrogen receptor proteins with altered ligand-binding specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Kazi Mohammed Didarul; Dilcher, Meik; Thurow, Corinna; Vock, Carsten; Krimmelbein, Ilga Kristine; Tietze, Lutz Friedjan; Gonzalez, Victor; Zhao, Huimin; Gatz, Christiane

    2009-01-01

    Transcriptional activators that respond to ligands with no cellular targets are powerful tools that can confer regulated expression of a transgene in almost all biological systems. In this study, we altered the ligand-binding specificity of the human estrogen receptor alpha (hER alpha) so that it would recognize a non-steroidal synthetic compound with structural similarities to the phytoestrogen resveratrol. For this purpose, we performed iterative rounds of site-specific saturation mutagenesis of a fixed set of ligand-contacting residues and subsequent random mutagenesis of the entire ligand-binding domain. Selection of the receptor mutants and quantification of the interaction were carried out by exploiting a yeast two-hybrid system that reports the ligand-dependent interaction between hER alpha and steroid receptor coactivator-1 (SRC-1). The screen was performed with a synthetic ligand (CV3320) that promoted growth of the reporter yeast strain to half maximal levels at a concentration of 3.7 microM. The optimized receptor mutant (L384F/L387M/Y537S) showed a 67-fold increased activity to the synthetic ligand CV3320 (half maximal yeast growth at 0.055 microM) and a 10-fold decreased activity to 17beta-estradiol (E2; half maximal yeast growth at 4 nM). The novel receptor-ligand pair partially fulfills the requirements for a specific 'gene switch' as it responds to concentrations of the synthetic ligand which do not activate the wildtype receptor. Due to its residual responsiveness to E2 at concentrations (4 nM) that might occur in vivo, further improvements have to be performed to render the system applicable in organisms with endogenous E2 synthesis.

  11. Structure and Ligand-Binding Mechanism of a Cysteinyl Leukotriene-Binding Protein from a Blood-Feeding Disease Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonka, Willy; Pham, Van; Nardone, Glenn; Gittis, Apostolos; Silva-Cardoso, Lívia; Atella, Georgia C; Ribeiro, José M C; Andersen, John F

    2016-07-15

    Blood-feeding disease vectors mitigate the negative effects of hemostasis and inflammation through the binding of small-molecule agonists of these processes by salivary proteins. In this study, a lipocalin protein family member (LTBP1) from the saliva of Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi, is shown to sequester cysteinyl leukotrienes during feeding to inhibit immediate inflammatory responses. Calorimetric binding experiments showed that LTBP1 binds leukotrienes C4 (LTC4), D4 (LTD4), and E4 (LTE4) but not biogenic amines, adenosine diphosphate, or other eicosanoid compounds. Crystal structures of ligand-free LTBP1 and its complexes with LTC4 and LTD4 reveal a conformational change during binding that brings Tyr114 into close contact with the ligand. LTC4 is cleaved in the complex, leaving free glutathione and a C20 fatty acid. Chromatographic analysis of bound ligands showed only intact LTC4, suggesting that cleavage could be radiation-mediated. PMID:27124118

  12. Computational analysis of protein-ligand binding : from single continuous trajectories to multiple parallel simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Thorsteinsdottir, Holmfridur B.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with other proteins or small molecules is essential for biological functions. Understanding the molecular basis of protein-ligand binding is of a vast interest for drug discovery, and computational methods to estimate proteinligand binding are starting to play an increasingly important role. In order to apply atomistic computational methods to the drug discovery process it is necessary to have accurate three-dimensional structures of the target prote...

  13. Rescue of ligand binding of a mutant IGF-I receptor by complementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Arjun Anders; Hinrichsen, Jane; Whittaker, Linda;

    2005-01-01

    from a wild-type receptor monomer and a mutant receptor monomer devoid of binding activity. Receptor hybrids were generated by transient co-transfection of cDNAs encoding wild-type and mutant receptors with unique epitope tags. Hybrid receptors were purified from transfected cells by sequential immuno......-affinity chromatography and their ligand-binding properties were determined. Complementation produced a hybrid with near wild-type affinity. Dissociation studies demonstrated that the hybrid did not exhibit negative cooperativity....

  14. Implicit ligand theory: Rigorous binding free energies and thermodynamic expectations from molecular docking

    OpenAIRE

    Minh, David D. L.

    2012-01-01

    A rigorous formalism for estimating noncovalent binding free energies and thermodynamic expectations from calculations in which receptor configurations are sampled independently from the ligand is derived. Due to this separation, receptor configurations only need to be sampled once, facilitating the use of binding free energy calculations in virtual screening. Demonstrative calculations on a host-guest system yield good agreement with previous free energy calculations and isothermal titration...

  15. Theory and Normal Mode Analysis of Change in Protein Vibrational Dynamics on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortisugu, Kei [RIKEN, Japan; Njunda, Brigitte [Computational Molecular Biophysics, Interdisciplinary Center for Scientific Computing (IWR); Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    The change of protein vibrations on ligand binding is of functional and thermodynamic importance. Here, this process is characterized using a simple analytical 'ball-and-spring' model and all-atom normal-mode analysis (NMA) of the binding of the cancer drug, methotrexate (MTX) to its target, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The analytical model predicts that the coupling between protein vibrations and ligand external motion generates entropy-rich, low-frequency vibrations in the complex. This is consistent with the atomistic NMA which reveals vibrational softening in forming the DHFR-MTX complex, a result also in qualitative agreement with neutron-scattering experiments. Energy minimization of the atomistic bound-state (B) structure while gradually decreasing the ligand interaction to zero allows the generation of a hypothetical 'intermediate' (I) state, without the ligand force field but with a structure similar to that of B. In going from I to B, it is found that the vibrational entropies of both the protein and MTX decrease while the complex structure becomes enthalpically stabilized. However, the relatively weak DHFR:MTX interaction energy results in the net entropy gain arising from coupling between the protein and MTX external motion being larger than the loss of vibrational entropy on complex formation. This, together with the I structure being more flexible than the unbound structure, results in the observed vibrational softening on ligand binding.

  16. Protein Unfolding Coupled to Ligand Binding: Differential Scanning Calorimetry Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soledad Celej, María; Fidelio, Gerardo Daniel; Dassie, Sergio Alberto

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the physicochemical basis underlying the changes in protein thermostability upon ligand binding. The article is addressed to advanced undergraduate and postgraduate chemistry students with an interest in protein biophysics. In addition, this article provides a useful tool for both learning and teaching biophysics because it links fundamental concepts: thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, and protein stability. The influence of protein ligand interactions on thermally-induced protein denaturation was monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The changes in DSC output (thermogram) emerge by linking binding equilibrium with reversible protein unfolding thermodynamics. We derive the formalism for the description of protein unfolding in the presence of ligand that can bind to a single site on either native, unfolded, or both protein states. In addition to a rigorous mathematical description of the involved equilibria, the model provides the general formulation for simulating thermograms and calculating the changes in protein species during heating. First, we describe ligand interaction and emphasize the relationship between protein stability parameters and redistribution of species in equilibrium. After that, we describe the origin of bimodal thermograms, and finally, the effect on thermogram shape of protein concentration at constant ligand/protein mole ratio.

  17. Protein:Ligand binding free energies: A stringent test for computational protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druart, Karen; Palmai, Zoltan; Omarjee, Eyaz; Simonson, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    A computational protein design method is extended to allow Monte Carlo simulations where two ligands are titrated into a protein binding pocket, yielding binding free energy differences. These provide a stringent test of the physical model, including the energy surface and sidechain rotamer definition. As a test, we consider tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase (TyrRS), which has been extensively redesigned experimentally. We consider its specificity for its substrate l-tyrosine (l-Tyr), compared to the analogs d-Tyr, p-acetyl-, and p-azido-phenylalanine (ac-Phe, az-Phe). We simulate l- and d-Tyr binding to TyrRS and six mutants, and compare the structures and binding free energies to a more rigorous "MD/GBSA" procedure: molecular dynamics with explicit solvent for structures and a Generalized Born + Surface Area model for binding free energies. Next, we consider l-Tyr, ac- and az-Phe binding to six other TyrRS variants. The titration results are sensitive to the precise rotamer definition, which involves a short energy minimization for each sidechain pair to help relax bad contacts induced by the discrete rotamer set. However, when designed mutant structures are rescored with a standard GBSA energy model, results agree well with the more rigorous MD/GBSA. As a third test, we redesign three amino acid positions in the substrate coordination sphere, with either l-Tyr or d-Tyr as the ligand. For two, we obtain good agreement with experiment, recovering the wildtype residue when l-Tyr is the ligand and a d-Tyr specific mutant when d-Tyr is the ligand. For the third, we recover His with either ligand, instead of wildtype Gln.

  18. Nucleotide binding database NBDB--a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand-protein interactions found in crystallized ligand-protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  19. Structural insights into human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-delta selective ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda A H Batista

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs δ, α and γ are closely related transcription factors that exert distinct effects on fatty acid and glucose metabolism, cardiac disease, inflammatory response and other processes. Several groups developed PPAR subtype specific modulators to trigger desirable effects of particular PPARs without harmful side effects associated with activation of other subtypes. Presently, however, many compounds that bind to one of the PPARs cross-react with others and rational strategies to obtain highly selective PPAR modulators are far from clear. GW0742 is a synthetic ligand that binds PPARδ more than 300-fold more tightly than PPARα or PPARγ but the structural basis of PPARδ:GW0742 interactions and reasons for strong selectivity are not clear. Here we report the crystal structure of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex. Comparisons of the PPARδ:GW0742 complex with published structures of PPARs in complex with α and γ selective agonists and pan agonists suggests that two residues (Val312 and Ile328 in the buried hormone binding pocket play special roles in PPARδ selective binding and experimental and computational analysis of effects of mutations in these residues confirms this and suggests that bulky substituents that line the PPARα and γ ligand binding pockets as structural barriers for GW0742 binding. This analysis suggests general strategies for selective PPARδ ligand design.

  20. In silico identification of anthropogenic chemicals as ligands of zebrafish sex hormone binding globulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthropogenic compounds with the capacity to interact with the steroid-binding site of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) pose health risks to humans and other vertebrates including fish. Building on studies of human SHBG, we have applied in silico drug discovery methods to identify potential binders for SHBG in zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model aquatic organism. Computational methods, including; homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations, virtual screening, and 3D QSAR analysis, successfully identified 6 non-steroidal substances from the ZINC chemical database that bind to zebrafish SHBG (zfSHBG) with low-micromolar to nanomolar affinities, as determined by a competitive ligand-binding assay. We also screened 80,000 commercial substances listed by the European Chemicals Bureau and Environment Canada, and 6 non-steroidal hits from this in silico screen were tested experimentally for zfSHBG binding. All 6 of these compounds displaced the [3H]5α-dihydrotestosterone used as labeled ligand in the zfSHBG screening assay when tested at a 33 μM concentration, and 3 of them (hexestrol, 4-tert-octylcatechol, and dihydrobenzo(a)pyren-7(8H)-one) bind to zfSHBG in the micromolar range. The study demonstrates the feasibility of large-scale in silico screening of anthropogenic compounds that may disrupt or highjack functionally important protein:ligand interactions. Such studies could increase the awareness of hazards posed by existing commercial chemicals at relatively low cost

  1. 2D Kinetics and Forced Dissociation of Selectin-ligand Bindings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mian Long

    2004-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONS Cell adhesion is crucial to many pathophysiological processes, such as inflammatory reaction and tumor metastasis. It is mediated by specific interactions between receptors and ligands, and provides the physical linkages among cells. For example, interactions between selectins and glycoconjugate ligands mediate leukocyte initially tethering to and subsequently rolling on vascular surfaces in sites of inflammation or injury, which is determined by their fast kinetic rates. To mediate cell adhesion, the interacting receptors and ligands must anchor to apposing surfaces of two cells or a cell and the substratum, i.e. , the so-called two-dimensional (2D) binding, which differs from interactions in the fluid phase, i.e. , the three-dimensional (3D) binding. How structural variations and surface environments of interacting molecules affect their 2D kinetics, and how external forces manipulate their dissociation has little been known quantitatively, and nowadays attracts more and more attentions.

  2. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Frei Eva

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by...

  3. Vibrational Softening of a Protein on Ligand Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balog, Erica [Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary; Perahia, David [Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan, Cachan, France; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Merzel, Franci [National Institute of Chemistry, Solvenia

    2011-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have demonstrated that binding of the cancer drug methotrexate softens the low-frequency vibrations of its target protein, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). Here, this softening is fully reproduced using atomic detail normal-mode analysis. Decomposition of the vibrational density of states demonstrates that the largest contributions arise from structural elements of DHFR critical to stability and function. Mode-projection analysis reveals an increase of the breathing-like character of the affected vibrational modes consistent with the experimentally observed increased adiabatic compressibility of the protein on complexation.

  4. Albumin binding ligands and albumin conjugate uptake by cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frei Eva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The scope of this short review is to summarise the knowledge gleaned from the fate of drugs transported by albumin upon contact with the target cancer cell or cells in inflamed tissues. The authors expertise covers covalently bound drugs and their cellular uptake and release from albumin. This review therefore aims to deduce what will happen to drugs such as insulin detemir which is considered to bind non-covalently to albumin and may have a fate similar to fatty acids transported by albumin.

  5. An Experiment Illustrating the Change in Ligand p"K"[subscript a] upon Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2012-01-01

    The modulation of ligand p"K"[subscript a] due to its surrounding environment is a crucial feature that controls many biological phenomena. For example, the shift in the p"K"[subscript a] of substrates or catalytic residues at enzyme active sites upon substrate binding often triggers and controls enzymatic reactions. In this work, we developed an…

  6. Distinct expression and ligand-binding profiles of two constitutively active GPR17 splice variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2010-01-01

    In humans and non-human primates, the 7TM receptor GPR17 exists in two isoforms differing only by the length of the N-terminus. Of these, only the short isoform has previously been characterized. Hence, we investigated gene expression and ligand-binding profiles of both splice variants and furthe...

  7. PBSA_E: A PBSA-Based Free Energy Estimator for Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-23

    Improving the accuracy of scoring functions for estimating protein-ligand binding affinity is of significant interest as well as practical utility in drug discovery. In this work, PBSA_E, a new free energy estimator based on the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) descriptors, has been developed. This free energy estimator was optimized using high-quality experimental data from a training set consisting of 145 protein-ligand complexes. The method was validated on two separate test sets containing 121 and 130 complexes. Comparison of the binding affinities predicted using the present method with those obtained using three popular scoring functions, i.e., GlideXP, GlideSP, and SYBYL_F, demonstrated that the PBSA_E method is more accurate. This new energy estimator requires a MM/PBSA calculation of the protein-ligand binding energy for a single complex configuration, which is typically obtained by optimizing the crystal structure. The present study shows that PBSA_E has the potential to become a robust tool for more reliable estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity in structure-based drug design. PMID:27088302

  8. STARD6 on steroids: solution structure, multiple timescale backbone dynamics and ligand binding mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Létourneau, Danny; Bédard, Mikaël; Cabana, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Andrée; LeHoux, Jean-Guy; Lavigne, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    START domain proteins are conserved α/β helix-grip fold that play a role in the non-vesicular and intracellular transport of lipids and sterols. The mechanism and conformational changes permitting the entry of the ligand into their buried binding sites is not well understood. Moreover, their functions and the identification of cognate ligands is still an active area of research. Here, we report the solution structure of STARD6 and the characterization of its backbone dynamics on multiple time-scales through 15N spin-relaxation and amide exchange studies. We reveal for the first time the presence of concerted fluctuations in the Ω1 loop and the C-terminal helix on the microsecond-millisecond time-scale that allows for the opening of the binding site and ligand entry. We also report that STARD6 binds specifically testosterone. Our work represents a milestone for the study of ligand binding mechanism by other START domains and the elucidation of the biological function of STARD6. PMID:27340016

  9. Ligand Binding Kinetics of the Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Martin; Hodgkinson, James T.; Gross, Jeremy;

    2013-01-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal (PQS) is a quorum sensing molecule that plays an important role in regulating the virulence of this organism. We have purified the ligand binding domain of the receptor PqsRLBD for PQS and have used Förster resonance energy transfer fluorimetry and...

  10. Characterisation of the zebrafish serotonin transporter functionally links TM10 to the ligand binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kasper; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Wiborg, Ove;

    2008-01-01

    and inhibitors. To identify domains and individual amino acids important for ligand binding, we cloned the serotonin transporter from zebrafish, Danio rerio, (drSERT) and compared its pharmacological profile to that of the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) with respect to inhibition of [(3)H]5-HT uptake...

  11. Identifying and quantifying two ligand-binding sites while imaging native human membrane receptors by AFM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Alsteens, David; Wieneke, Ralph; Zhang, Cheng; Coughlin, Shaun R.; Tampé, Robert; Kobilka, Brian K.; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-11-01

    A current challenge in life sciences is to image cell membrane receptors while characterizing their specific interactions with various ligands. Addressing this issue has been hampered by the lack of suitable nanoscopic methods. Here we address this challenge and introduce multifunctional high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image human protease-activated receptors (PAR1) in the functionally important lipid membrane and to simultaneously localize and quantify their binding to two different ligands. Therefore, we introduce the surface chemistry to bifunctionalize AFM tips with the native receptor-activating peptide and a tris-N-nitrilotriacetic acid (tris-NTA) group binding to a His10-tag engineered to PAR1. We further introduce ways to discern between the binding of both ligands to different receptor sites while imaging native PAR1s. Surface chemistry and nanoscopic method are applicable to a range of biological systems in vitro and in vivo and to concurrently detect and localize multiple ligand-binding sites at single receptor resolution.

  12. The ligand-binding domain of the cell surface receptor for urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ploug, M; Patthy, L;

    1991-01-01

    with the internal repeats of u-PAR constitute the extracellular part of Ly-6 antigens and of the squid glycoprotein Sgp-2. Like u-PAR, these proteins are attached to the membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol anchor. The hydrophilic, ligand-binding u-PAR domain identified in the present study has potential...

  13. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity as an ultra sensitive tool for ligand binding analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim

    2007-01-01

    upon azide complexation. Application of this method allows for rapid analysis of ligand binding in metalloproteins in dilute aqueous solution and could in the future, when combined with theoretical studies, increase the obtainable structural resolution of proteins beyond that of X-ray analysis....

  14. Comparison of the kinetics of different Markov models for ligand binding under varying conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Johannes W. R.; Habeck, Michael

    2015-03-01

    We recently derived a Markov model for macromolecular ligand binding dynamics from few physical assumptions and showed that its stationary distribution is the grand canonical ensemble [J. W. R. Martini, M. Habeck, and M. Schlather, J. Math. Chem. 52, 665 (2014)]. The transition probabilities of the proposed Markov process define a particular Glauber dynamics and have some similarity to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Here, we illustrate that this model is the stochastic analog of (pseudo) rate equations and the corresponding system of differential equations. Moreover, it can be viewed as a limiting case of general stochastic simulations of chemical kinetics. Thus, the model links stochastic and deterministic approaches as well as kinetics and equilibrium described by the grand canonical ensemble. We demonstrate that the family of transition matrices of our model, parameterized by temperature and ligand activity, generates ligand binding kinetics that respond to changes in these parameters in a qualitatively similar way as experimentally observed kinetics. In contrast, neither the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm nor the Glauber heat bath reflects changes in the external conditions correctly. Both converge rapidly to the stationary distribution, which is advantageous when the major interest is in the equilibrium state, but fail to describe the kinetics of ligand binding realistically. To simulate cellular processes that involve the reversible stochastic binding of multiple factors, our pseudo rate equation model should therefore be preferred to the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Glauber heat bath, if the stationary distribution is not of only interest.

  15. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  16. The Effects of Exogenous and Endogenous Ligands of the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor on the Activation of Autoimmune Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Abu-Rizq, Hana'A

    2012-01-01

    The aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important receptor found in immune cells. Itfunctions as a detector of environmental toxins, naturally occurring dietary products, andendogenous tryptophan derivatives for induction of gene transcription responses. Previousreports have implicated stimulation of AhR by various ligands in promoting T cellactivation or regulatory function, with effects on autoimmune disease models. Also, effectsof Ah toxins or natural products on increasing or suppressin...

  17. Role of solution conformation and flexibility of short peptide ligands that bind to the p56(lck) SH2 domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; de Mol, Nico J; Bultinck, Patrick; Kemmink, Johan; Hilbers, Hans W; Liskamp, Rob M J; Dekker, Frank

    2003-01-01

    A general approach in drug design is making ligands more rigid in order to avoid loss in conformational entropy (deltaS(conf)) upon receptor binding. We hypothesized that in the high affinity binding of pYEEI peptide ligands to the p56(lck) SH2 domain this loss in deltaS(conf) might be diminished du

  18. Mass Spectrometry-Based Monitoring of Millisecond Protein-Ligand Binding Dynamics Using an Automated Microfluidic Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yongzheng; Katipamula, Shanta; Trader, Cameron D.; Orton, Daniel J.; Geng, Tao; Baker, Erin Shammel; Kelly, Ryan T.

    2016-03-24

    Characterizing protein-ligand binding dynamics is crucial for understanding protein function and developing new therapeutic agents. We have developed a novel microfluidic platform that features rapid mixing of protein and ligand solutions, variable incubation times, and on-chip electrospray ionization to perform label-free, solution-based monitoring of protein-ligand binding dynamics. This platform offers many advantages including automated processing, rapid mixing, and low sample consumption.

  19. Methods and systems for identifying ligand-protein binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Xin

    2016-05-06

    The invention provides a novel integrated structure and system-based approach for drug target prediction that enables the large-scale discovery of new targets for existing drugs Novel computer-readable storage media and computer systems are also provided. Methods and systems of the invention use novel sequence order-independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity techniques to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures even promiscuous structural features of different binding sites for a drug on known targets. The drug\\'s PPE is combined with an approximation of the drug delivery profile to facilitate large-scale prediction of novel drug- protein interactions with several applications to biological research and drug development.

  20. Misuse of thermodynamics in the interpretation of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand binding to proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethica, Brian A

    2015-03-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has given a mass of data on the binding of small molecules to proteins and other biopolymers, with particular interest in drug binding to proteins chosen as therapeutic indicators. Interpretation of the enthalpy data usually follows an unsound protocol that uses thermodynamic relations in circumstances where they do not apply. Errors of interpretation include incomplete definitions of ligand binding and equilibrium constants and neglect of the non-ideality of the solutions under study, leading to unreliable estimates of standard free energies and entropies of binding. The mass of reported thermodynamic functions for ligand binding to proteins estimated from ITC enthalpies alone is consequently of uncertain thermodynamic significance and utility. ITC and related experiments to test the protocol assumptions are indicated. A thermodynamic procedure avoiding equilibrium constants or other reaction models and not requiring protein activities is given. The discussion draws attention to the fundamental but neglected relation between the thermodynamic activity and bioactivity of drugs and to the generally unknown thermodynamic status of ligand solutions, which for drugs relates directly to effective therapeutic dosimetry.

  1. Ligand binding affinities of arctigenin and its demethylated metabolites to estrogen receptor alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jong-Sik; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Hattori, Masao

    2013-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (-)-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (-)-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL) by Eubacterium (E.) sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (-)-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (-)-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC(50) value of (2R,3R)-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl)-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl)-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10⁻⁴ M. PMID:23325100

  2. Functional interactions between polypyrimidine tract binding protein and PRI peptide ligand containing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Miguel B; Ascher, David B; Gooding, Clare; Lang, Emma; Maude, Hannah; Turner, David; Llorian, Miriam; Pires, Douglas E V; Attig, Jan; Smith, Christopher W J

    2016-08-15

    Polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTBP1) is a heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) that plays roles in most stages of the life-cycle of pre-mRNA and mRNAs in the nucleus and cytoplasm. PTBP1 has four RNA binding domains of the RNA recognition motif (RRM) family, each of which can bind to pyrimidine motifs. In addition, RRM2 can interact via its dorsal surface with proteins containing short peptide ligands known as PTB RRM2 interacting (PRI) motifs, originally found in the protein Raver1. Here we review our recent progress in understanding the interactions of PTB with RNA and with various proteins containing PRI ligands. PMID:27528752

  3. Terahertz underdamped vibrational motion governs protein-ligand binding in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turton, David A; Senn, Hans Martin; Harwood, Thomas; Lapthorn, Adrian J; Ellis, Elizabeth M; Wynne, Klaas

    2014-06-03

    Low-frequency collective vibrational modes in proteins have been proposed as being responsible for efficiently directing biochemical reactions and biological energy transport. However, evidence of the existence of delocalized vibrational modes is scarce and proof of their involvement in biological function absent. Here we apply extremely sensitive femtosecond optical Kerr-effect spectroscopy to study the depolarized Raman spectra of lysozyme and its complex with the inhibitor triacetylchitotriose in solution. Underdamped delocalized vibrational modes in the terahertz frequency domain are identified and shown to blue-shift and strengthen upon inhibitor binding. This demonstrates that the ligand-binding coordinate in proteins is underdamped and not simply solvent-controlled as previously assumed. The presence of such underdamped delocalized modes in proteins may have significant implications for the understanding of the efficiency of ligand binding and protein-molecule interactions, and has wider implications for biochemical reactivity and biological function.

  4. Ligand Binding Affinities of Arctigenin and Its Demethylated Metabolites to Estrogen Receptor Alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao Hattori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoestrogens are defined as plant-derived compounds with estrogen-like activities according to their chemical structures and activities. Plant lignans are generally categorized as phytoestrogens. It was reported that (−-arctigenin, the aglycone of arctiin, was demethylated to (−-dihydroxyenterolactone (DHENL by Eubacterium (E. sp. ARC-2. Through stepwise demethylation, E. sp. ARC-2 produced six intermediates, three mono-desmethylarctigenins and three di-desmethylarctigenins. In the present study, ligand binding affinities of (−-arctigenin and its seven metabolites, including DHENL, were investigated for an estrogen receptor alpha, and found that demethylated metabolites had stronger binding affinities than (−-arctigenin using a ligand binding screen assay method. The IC50 value of (2R,3R-2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzyl-3-(3,4-dihydroxybenzyl-butyrolactone was 7.9 × 10−4 M.

  5. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  6. Nonlinear scoring functions for similarity-based ligand docking and binding affinity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal

    2013-11-25

    A common strategy for virtual screening considers a systematic docking of a large library of organic compounds into the target sites in protein receptors with promising leads selected based on favorable intermolecular interactions. Despite a continuous progress in the modeling of protein-ligand interactions for pharmaceutical design, important challenges still remain, thus the development of novel techniques is required. In this communication, we describe eSimDock, a new approach to ligand docking and binding affinity prediction. eSimDock employs nonlinear machine learning-based scoring functions to improve the accuracy of ligand ranking and similarity-based binding pose prediction, and to increase the tolerance to structural imperfections in the target structures. In large-scale benchmarking using the Astex/CCDC data set, we show that 53.9% (67.9%) of the predicted ligand poses have RMSD of <2 Å (<3 Å). Moreover, using binding sites predicted by recently developed eFindSite, eSimDock models ligand binding poses with an RMSD of 4 Å for 50.0-39.7% of the complexes at the protein homology level limited to 80-40%. Simulations against non-native receptor structures, whose mean backbone rearrangements vary from 0.5 to 5.0 Å Cα-RMSD, show that the ratio of docking accuracy and the estimated upper bound is at a constant level of ∼0.65. Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental and predicted by eSimDock Ki values for a large data set of the crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes from BindingDB is 0.58, which decreases only to 0.46 when target structures distorted to 3.0 Å Cα-RMSD are used. Finally, two case studies demonstrate that eSimDock can be customized to specific applications as well. These encouraging results show that the performance of eSimDock is largely unaffected by the deformations of ligand binding regions, thus it represents a practical strategy for across-proteome virtual screening using protein models. eSimDock is freely

  7. Copper, iron and the organic ligands that bind them - updates from San Francisco Bay and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, K. N.; Bundy, R.; Biller, D.; Bruland, K. W.; Barbeau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Building on more than 30 years of measurements in San Francisco Bay by Russ Flegal and others, the concentrations of dissolved manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, cadmium and lead were determined from a suite of water quality monitoring program stations in North, Central and South Bay using inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry following preconcentration on a Nobias-chelate PA1 resin. Given the importance of organic ligands in governing iron solubility and copper bioavailability in natural waters, the organic complexation of dissolved iron and copper in these samples was determined from multiple analytical windows applied to competitive ligand exchange- adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. This study constitutes the first dataset of iron speciation in San Francisco Bay and expands upon prior work evaluating the potential for copper toxicity in this urbanized estuary. Recent advances in voltammetric techniques emerging from a Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR) working group on metal-binding ligands in the marine environment, and insights gained from high-resolution ligand measurements from the U.S. GEOTRACES program, highlight how metal-binding ligands in San Francisco Bay compare with those of the coastal and open ocean.

  8. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  9. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan. PMID:10633107

  10. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes ( = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields.

  11. Active regions' setting of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human interleukin-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The reliable three dimensional (3-D) structure of the extracellular ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hIL-6R) has been constructed by means of computer-guided homology modeling techniques using the crystal structure of the extracellular ligand-binding region (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. The space location of some key residues which influence the combination ability between the receptor and the ligand has been observed and the effects of point mutagenesis of the four conservative cysteine residues on the space conformation are analyzed. The results show that the space conformation of the side-chain carboxyl of E305 plays a key role in the ligand-binding ability. Furthermore, the space conformation of the side-chain carboxyl of E305 is very important for the electrostatic potential complementarity between hIL-6R and hIL-6 according to the docking method.

  12. A mollusk retinoic acid receptor (RAR) ortholog sheds light on the evolution of ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Lima, Daniela; Pierzchalski, Keely; Jones, Jace W; Kane, Maureen; Nishikawa, Jun-Ichi; Hiromori, Youhei; Nakanishi, Tsuyoshi; Santos, Miguel M; Castro, L Filipe C; Bourguet, William; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2014-11-01

    Nuclear receptors are transcription factors that regulate networks of target genes in response to small molecules. There is a strong bias in our knowledge of these receptors because they were mainly characterized in classical model organisms, mostly vertebrates. Therefore, the evolutionary origins of specific ligand-receptor couples still remain elusive. Here we present the identification and characterization of a retinoic acid receptor (RAR) from the mollusk Nucella lapillus (NlRAR). We show that this receptor specifically binds to DNA response elements organized in direct repeats as a heterodimer with retinoid X receptor. Surprisingly, we also find that NlRAR does not bind all-trans retinoic acid or any other retinoid we tested. Furthermore, NlRAR is unable to activate the transcription of reporter genes in response to stimulation by retinoids and to recruit coactivators in the presence of these compounds. Three-dimensional modeling of the ligand-binding domain of NlRAR reveals an overall structure that is similar to vertebrate RARs. However, in the ligand-binding pocket (LBP) of the mollusk receptor, the alteration of several residues interacting with the ligand has apparently led to an overall decrease in the strength of the interaction with the ligand. Accordingly, mutations of NlRAR at key positions within the LBP generate receptors that are responsive to retinoids. Altogether our data suggest that, in mollusks, RAR has lost its affinity for all-trans retinoic acid, highlighting the evolutionary plasticity of its LBP. When put in an evolutionary context, our results reveal new structural and functional features of nuclear receptors validated by millions of years of evolution that were impossible to reveal in model organisms. PMID:25116705

  13. Evolutionary diversification of retinoic acid receptor ligand-binding pocket structure by molecular tinkering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Mazariegos, Juliana; Nadendla, Eswar Kumar; Studer, Romain A; Alvarez, Susana; de Lera, Angel R; Kuraku, Shigehiro; Bourguet, William; Schubert, Michael; Laudet, Vincent

    2016-03-01

    Whole genome duplications (WGDs) have been classically associated with the origin of evolutionary novelties and the so-called duplication-degeneration-complementation model describes the possible fates of genes after duplication. However, how sequence divergence effectively allows functional changes between gene duplicates is still unclear. In the vertebrate lineage, two rounds of WGDs took place, giving rise to paralogous gene copies observed for many gene families. For the retinoic acid receptors (RARs), for example, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily, a unique ancestral gene has been duplicated resulting in three vertebrate paralogues: RARα, RARβ and RARγ. It has previously been shown that this single ancestral RAR was neofunctionalized to give rise to a larger substrate specificity range in the RARs of extant jawed vertebrates (also called gnathostomes). To understand RAR diversification, the members of the cyclostomes (lamprey and hagfish), jawless vertebrates representing the extant sister group of gnathostomes, provide an intermediate situation and thus allow the characterization of the evolutionary steps that shaped RAR ligand-binding properties following the WGDs. In this study, we assessed the ligand-binding specificity of cyclostome RARs and found that their ligand-binding pockets resemble those of gnathostome RARα and RARβ. In contrast, none of the cyclostome receptors studied showed any RARγ-like specificity. Together, our results suggest that cyclostome RARs cover only a portion of the specificity repertoire of the ancestral gnathostome RARs and indicate that the establishment of ligand-binding specificity was a stepwise event. This iterative process thus provides a rare example for the diversification of receptor-ligand interactions of NRs following WGDs. PMID:27069642

  14. The different ligand-binding modes of relaxin family peptide receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel J; Rosengren, K Johan; Bathgate, Ross A D

    2012-11-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing modules. Although relaxin can bind and activate both RXFP1 and RXFP2, INSL3 can only bind and activate RXFP2. To investigate whether this difference is related to the nature of the high-affinity ECD binding site or to differences in secondary binding sites involving the receptor transmembrane (TM) domain, we created a suite of constructs with RXFP1/2 chimeric ECD attached to single TM helices. We show that by changing as little as one LRR, representing four amino acid substitutions, we were able to engineer a high-affinity INSL3-binding site into the ECD of RXFP1. Molecular modeling of the INSL3-RXFP2 interaction based on extensive experimental data highlights the differences in the binding mechanisms of relaxin and INSL3 to the ECD of their cognate receptors. Interestingly, when the engineered RXFP1/2 ECD were introduced into full-length RXFP1 constructs, INSL3 exhibited only low affinity and efficacy on these receptors. These results highlight critical differences both in the ECD binding and in the coordination of the ECD-binding site with the TM domain, and provide new mechanistic insights into the binding and activation events of RXFP1 and RXFP2 by their native hormone ligands. PMID:22973049

  15. Ligand-induced conformational changes: Improved predictions of ligand binding conformations and affinities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimurer, T.M.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Iversen, L.F.;

    2003-01-01

    A computational docking strategy using multiple conformations of the target protein is discussed and evaluated. A series of low molecular weight, competitive, nonpeptide protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors are considered for which the x-ray crystallographic structures in complex with protein...... tyrosine phosphatase 1 B (PTP1B) are known. To obtain a quantitative measure of the impact of conformational changes induced by the inhibitors, these were docked to the active site region of various structures of PTP1B using the docking program FlexX. Firstly, the inhibitors were docked to a PTP1B crystal...... with low estimated binding energies corresponded to relatively large RMS differences when aligned with the corresponding crystal structure. Secondly, the inhibitors were docked to their parent protein structures in which they were cocrystallized. In this case, there was a good correlation between low...

  16. Computational design of an endo-1,4-[beta]-xylanase ligand binding site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morin, Andrew; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Fortenberry, Carie; Harp, Joel M.; Mizoue, Laura S.; Meiler, Jens (Vanderbilt)

    2012-09-05

    The field of computational protein design has experienced important recent success. However, the de novo computational design of high-affinity protein-ligand interfaces is still largely an open challenge. Using the Rosetta program, we attempted the in silico design of a high-affinity protein interface to a small peptide ligand. We chose the thermophilic endo-1,4-{beta}-xylanase from Nonomuraea flexuosa as the protein scaffold on which to perform our designs. Over the course of the study, 12 proteins derived from this scaffold were produced and assayed for binding to the target ligand. Unfortunately, none of the designed proteins displayed evidence of high-affinity binding. Structural characterization of four designed proteins revealed that although the predicted structure of the protein model was highly accurate, this structural accuracy did not translate into accurate prediction of binding affinity. Crystallographic analyses indicate that the lack of binding affinity is possibly due to unaccounted for protein dynamics in the 'thumb' region of our design scaffold intrinsic to the family 11 {beta}-xylanase fold. Further computational analysis revealed two specific, single amino acid substitutions responsible for an observed change in backbone conformation, and decreased dynamic stability of the catalytic cleft. These findings offer new insight into the dynamic and structural determinants of the {beta}-xylanase proteins.

  17. New mixed ligand complexes of ruthenium(II) that incorporate a modified phenanthroline ligand: Synthesis, spectral characterization and DNA binding

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Murali; C V Sastri; Bhaskar G Maiya

    2002-08-01

    The hexafluorophosphate and chloride salts of two ruthenium(II) complexes, viz. [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ and [Ru(ptzo)3]2+, where ptzo = 1,10-phenanthrolino[5,6-]1,2,4-triazine-3-one (ptzo) - a new modified phenanthroline (phen) ligand, have been synthesised. These complexes have been characterised by infrared, UV-Vis, steady-state emission and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods. Results of absorption and fluorescence titration as well as thermal denaturation studies reveal that both the bis- and tris-complexes of ptzo show moderately strong affinity for binding with calf thymus (CT) DNA with the binding constants being close to 105M-1 in each case. An intercalative mode of DNA binding has been suggested for both the complexes. Emission studies carried out in non-aqueous solvents and in aqueous media without DNA reveal that both [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ and [Ru(ptzo)3]2+ are weakly luminescent under these solution conditions. Successive addition of CT DNA to buffered aqueous solutions containing [Ru(phen)(ptzo)2]2+ results in an enhancement of the emission. These results have been discussed in the light of the dependence of the structure-specific deactivation processes of the MLCT state of the metallointercalator with the characteristic features of its DNA interaction. In doing so, attempts have been made to compare and contrast its properties with those of the analogous phenanthroline-based complexes including the ones reported by us previously.

  18. Monitoring Solution Structures of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor β/δ upon Ligand Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Rico; Tänzler, Dirk; Ihling, Christian H; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) have been intensively studied as drug targets to treat type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This study is part of our ongoing efforts to map conformational changes in PPARs in solution by a combination of chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry (MS). To our best knowledge, we performed the first studies addressing solution structures of full-length PPAR-β/δ. We monitored the conformations of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ upon binding of two agonists. (Photo-) cross-linking relied on (i) a variety of externally introduced amine- and carboxyl-reactive linkers and (ii) the incorporation of the photo-reactive amino acid p-benzoylphenylalanine (Bpa) into PPAR-β/δ by genetic engineering. The distances derived from cross-linking experiments allowed us to monitor conformational changes in PPAR-β/δ upon ligand binding. The cross-linking/MS approach proved highly advantageous to study nuclear receptors, such as PPARs, and revealed the interplay between DBD (DNA-binding domain) and LDB in PPAR-β/δ. Our results indicate the stabilization of a specific conformation through ligand binding in PPAR-β/δ LBD as well as full-length PPAR-β/δ. Moreover, our results suggest a close distance between the N- and C-terminal regions of full-length PPAR-β/δ in the presence of GW1516. Chemical cross-linking/MS allowed us gaining detailed insights into conformational changes that are induced in PPARs when activating ligands are present. Thus, cross-linking/MS should be added to the arsenal of structural methods available for studying nuclear receptors. PMID:26992147

  19. A Prediction Method of Binding Free Energy of Protein and Ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kun; Wang, Xicheng

    2010-05-01

    Predicting the binding free energy is an important problem in bimolecular simulation. Such prediction would be great benefit in understanding protein functions, and may be useful for computational prediction of ligand binding strengths, e.g., in discovering pharmaceutical drugs. Free energy perturbation (FEP)/thermodynamics integration (TI) is a classical method to explicitly predict free energy. However, this method need plenty of time to collect datum, and that attempts to deal with some simple systems and small changes of molecular structures. Another one for estimating ligand binding affinities is linear interaction energy (LIE) method. This method employs averages of interaction potential energy terms from molecular dynamics simulations or other thermal conformational sampling techniques. Incorporation of systematic deviations from electrostatic linear response, derived from free energy perturbation studies, into the absolute binding free energy expression significantly enhances the accuracy of the approach. However, it also is time-consuming work. In this paper, a new prediction method based on steered molecular dynamics (SMD) with direction optimization is developed to compute binding free energy. Jarzynski's equality is used to derive the PMF or free-energy. The results for two numerical examples are presented, showing that the method has good accuracy and efficiency. The novel method can also simulate whole binding proceeding and give some important structural information about development of new drugs.

  20. β-lactoglobulin's conformational requirements for ligand binding at the calyx and the dimer interphase: a flexible docking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenin Domínguez-Ramírez

    Full Text Available β-lactoglobulin (BLG is an abundant milk protein relevant for industry and biotechnology, due significantly to its ability to bind a wide range of polar and apolar ligands. While hydrophobic ligand sites are known, sites for hydrophilic ligands such as the prevalent milk sugar, lactose, remain undetermined. Through the use of molecular docking we first, analyzed the known fatty acid binding sites in order to dissect their atomistic determinants and second, predicted the interaction sites for lactose with monomeric and dimeric BLG. We validated our approach against BLG structures co-crystallized with ligands and report a computational setup with a reduced number of flexible residues that is able to reproduce experimental results with high precision. Blind dockings with and without flexible side chains on BLG showed that: i 13 experimentally-determined ligands fit the calyx requiring minimal movement of up to 7 residues out of the 23 that constitute this binding site. ii Lactose does not bind the calyx despite conformational flexibility, but binds the dimer interface and an alternate Site C. iii Results point to a probable lactolation site in the BLG dimer interface, at K141, consistent with previous biochemical findings. In contrast, no accessible lysines are found near Site C. iv lactose forms hydrogen bonds with residues from both monomers stabilizing the dimer through a claw-like structure. Overall, these results improve our understanding of BLG's binding sites, importantly narrowing down the calyx residues that control ligand binding. Moreover, our results emphasize the importance of the dimer interface as an insufficiently explored, biologically relevant binding site of particular importance for hydrophilic ligands. Furthermore our analyses suggest that BLG is a robust scaffold for multiple ligand-binding, suitable for protein design, and advance our molecular understanding of its ligand sites to a point that allows manipulation to control

  1. Calculation of binding constants and concentration of binding sites in a reaction of a ligand with a heterogeneous system of binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the calculation of association constants and the concentration of binding sites in a reaction of a ligand with a heterogeneous system of binding sites. The Scatchard plot for such a system is curvelinear and the method employs previously established relationships between the parameters of the limiting slopes to such a curve and the above mentioned association constants and concentrations of binding sites. The special case of a system with two different and non-interacting groups of binding sites was solved. The expressions thus obtained were used to characterize the reaction of a polypeptide neurotoxin with its specific binding sites in a membranal preparation from insect central nervous system. Moreover it is evident from these expressions that the widely accepted method to analyze such system, by an intuitive generalization of the method applicable to homogeneous systems, is erroneous and should be avoided. (author)

  2. Mac-2 binding protein is a novel E-selectin ligand expressed by breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirure, Venktesh S; Reynolds, Nathan M; Burdick, Monica M

    2012-01-01

    Hematogenous metastasis involves the adhesion of circulating tumor cells to vascular endothelium of the secondary site. We hypothesized that breast cancer cell adhesion is mediated by interaction of endothelial E-selectin with its glycoprotein counter-receptor(s) expressed on breast cancer cells. At a hematogenous wall shear rate, ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells specifically adhered to E-selectin expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells when tested in parallel plate flow chamber adhesion assays. Consistent with their E-selectin ligand activity, ZR-75-1 cells expressed flow cytometrically detectable epitopes of HECA-452 mAb, which recognizes high efficiency E-selectin ligands typified by sialofucosylated moieties. Multiple E-selectin reactive proteins expressed by ZR-75-1 cells were revealed by immunoprecipitation with E-selectin chimera (E-Ig chimera) followed by Western blotting. Mass spectrometry analysis of the 72 kDa protein, which exhibited the most prominent E-selectin ligand activity, corresponded to Mac-2 binding protein (Mac-2BP), a heretofore unidentified E-selectin ligand. Immunoprecipitated Mac-2BP expressed sialofucosylated epitopes and possessed E-selectin ligand activity when tested by Western blot analysis using HECA-452 mAb and E-Ig chimera, respectively, demonstrating that Mac-2BP is a novel high efficiency E-selectin ligand. Furthermore, silencing the expression of Mac-2BP from ZR-75-1 cells by shRNA markedly reduced their adhesion to E-selectin expressing cells under physiological flow conditions, confirming the functional E-selectin ligand activity of Mac-2BP on intact cells. In addition to ZR-75-1 cells, several other E-selectin ligand positive breast cancer cell lines expressed Mac-2BP as detected by Western blot and flow cytometry, suggesting that Mac-2BP may be an E-selectin ligand in a variety of breast cancer types. Further, invasive breast carcinoma tissue showed co-localized expression of Mac-2BP and HECA-452 antigens by

  3. Structural basis for the ligand-binding specificity of fatty acid-binding proteins (pFABP4 and pFABP5) in gentoo penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang Woo; Kim, Jung Eun; Do, Hackwon; Kim, Ryeo-Ok; Lee, Sung Gu; Park, Hyun Ho; Chang, Jeong Ho; Yim, Joung Han; Park, Hyun; Kim, Il-Chan; Lee, Jun Hyuck

    2015-09-11

    Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs) are involved in transporting hydrophobic fatty acids between various aqueous compartments of the cell by directly binding ligands inside their β-barrel cavities. Here, we report the crystal structures of ligand-unbound pFABP4, linoleate-bound pFABP4, and palmitate-bound pFABP5, obtained from gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua), at a resolution of 2.1 Å, 2.2 Å, and 2.3 Å, respectively. The pFABP4 and pFABP5 proteins have a canonical β-barrel structure with two short α-helices that form a cap region and fatty acid ligand binding sites in the hydrophobic cavity within the β-barrel structure. Linoleate-bound pFABP4 and palmitate-bound pFABP5 possess different ligand-binding modes and a unique ligand-binding pocket due to several sequence dissimilarities (A76/L78, T30/M32, underlining indicates pFABP4 residues) between the two proteins. Structural comparison revealed significantly different conformational changes in the β3-β4 loop region (residues 57-62) as well as the flipped Phe60 residue of pFABP5 than that in pFABP4 (the corresponding residue is Phe58). A ligand-binding study using fluorophore displacement assays shows that pFABP4 has a relatively strong affinity for linoleate as compared to pFABP5. In contrast, pFABP5 exhibits higher affinity for palmitate than that for pFABP4. In conclusion, our high-resolution structures and ligand-binding studies provide useful insights into the ligand-binding preferences of pFABPs based on key protein-ligand interactions.

  4. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy P; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A; Mayerl, Steven J; Lee, Brian H; Weissman, Jonathan S; Conklin, Bruce R; Wells, James A

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  5. Ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors facilitate tight control of split CRISPR activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy P.; Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Gilbert, Luke A.; Mayerl, Steven J.; Lee, Brian H.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Conklin, Bruce R.; Wells, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Cas9-based RNA-guided nuclease (RGN) has emerged to be a versatile method for genome editing due to the ease of construction of RGN reagents to target specific genomic sequences. The ability to control the activity of Cas9 with a high temporal resolution will facilitate tight regulation of genome editing processes for studying the dynamics of transcriptional regulation or epigenetic modifications in complex biological systems. Here we show that fusing ligand-binding domains of nuclear receptors to split Cas9 protein fragments can provide chemical control over split Cas9 activity. The method has allowed us to control Cas9 activity in a tunable manner with no significant background, which has been challenging for other inducible Cas9 constructs. We anticipate that our design will provide opportunities through the use of different ligand-binding domains to enable multiplexed genome regulation of endogenous genes in distinct loci through simultaneous chemical regulation of orthogonal Cas9 variants. PMID:27363581

  6. Analysis of RNA folding and ligand binding by conventional and high-throughput calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloski, Joshua E; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Noncoding RNAs serve myriad functions in the cell, but their biophysical properties are not well understood. Calorimetry offers direct and label-free means for characterizing the ligand-binding and thermostability properties of these RNA. We apply two main types of calorimetry--isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)--to the characterization of these functional RNA molecules. ITC can describe ligand binding in terms of stoichiometry, affinity, and heat (enthalpy), while DSC can provide RNA stability in terms of heat capacity, melting temperature, and folding enthalpy. Here, we offer detailed experimental protocols for studying such RNA systems with commercially available conventional and high-throughput ITC and DSC instruments.

  7. Importance of Many-Body Effects in the Kernel of Hemoglobin for Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Cédric; O'Regan, David D.; Hine, Nicholas D. M.; Littlewood, Peter B.; Kotliar, Gabriel; Payne, Mike C.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a mechanism for binding of diatomic ligands to heme based on a dynamical orbital selection process. This scenario may be described as bonding determined by local valence fluctuations. We support this model using linear-scaling first-principles calculations, in combination with dynamical mean-field theory, applied to heme, the kernel of the hemoglobin metalloprotein central to human respiration. We find that variations in Hund’s exchange coupling induce a reduction of the iron 3d density, with a concomitant increase of valence fluctuations. We discuss the comparison between our computed optical absorption spectra and experimental data, our picture accounting for the observation of optical transitions in the infrared regime, and how the Hund’s coupling reduces, by a factor of 5, the strong imbalance in the binding energies of heme with CO and O2 ligands.

  8. Exhaustive comparison and classification of ligand-binding surfaces in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Yoichi; Kinoshita, Kengo; Kinjo, Akira R; Nakamura, Haruki

    2013-01-01

    Many proteins function by interacting with other small molecules (ligands). Identification of ligand-binding sites (LBS) in proteins can therefore help to infer their molecular functions. A comprehensive comparison among local structures of LBSs was previously performed, in order to understand their relationships and to classify their structural motifs. However, similar exhaustive comparison among local surfaces of LBSs (patches) has never been performed, due to computational complexity. To enhance our understanding of LBSs, it is worth performing such comparisons among patches and classifying them based on similarities of their surface configurations and electrostatic potentials. In this study, we first developed a rapid method to compare two patches. We then clustered patches corresponding to the same PDB chemical component identifier for a ligand, and selected a representative patch from each cluster. We subsequently exhaustively as compared the representative patches and clustered them using similarity score, PatSim. Finally, the resultant PatSim scores were compared with similarities of atomic structures of the LBSs and those of the ligand-binding protein sequences and functions. Consequently, we classified the patches into ∼2000 well-characterized clusters. We found that about 63% of these clusters are used in identical protein folds, although about 25% of the clusters are conserved in distantly related proteins and even in proteins with cross-fold similarity. Furthermore, we showed that patches with higher PatSim score have potential to be involved in similar biological processes. PMID:23934772

  9. Nucleotide binding database NBDB – a collection of sequence motifs with specific protein-ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zejun; Goncearenco, Alexander; Berezovsky, Igor N.

    2016-01-01

    NBDB database describes protein motifs, elementary functional loops (EFLs) that are involved in binding of nucleotide-containing ligands and other biologically relevant cofactors/coenzymes, including ATP, AMP, ATP, GMP, GDP, GTP, CTP, PAP, PPS, FMN, FAD(H), NAD(H), NADP, cAMP, cGMP, c-di-AMP and c-di-GMP, ThPP, THD, F-420, ACO, CoA, PLP and SAM. The database is freely available online at http://nbdb.bii.a-star.edu.sg. In total, NBDB contains data on 249 motifs that work in interactions with 24 ligands. Sequence profiles of EFL motifs were derived de novo from nonredundant Uniprot proteome sequences. Conserved amino acid residues in the profiles interact specifically with distinct chemical parts of nucleotide-containing ligands, such as nitrogenous bases, phosphate groups, ribose, nicotinamide, and flavin moieties. Each EFL profile in the database is characterized by a pattern of corresponding ligand–protein interactions found in crystallized ligand–protein complexes. NBDB database helps to explore the determinants of nucleotide and cofactor binding in different protein folds and families. NBDB can also detect fragments that match to profiles of particular EFLs in the protein sequence provided by user. Comprehensive information on sequence, structures, and interactions of EFLs with ligands provides a foundation for experimental and computational efforts on design of required protein functions. PMID:26507856

  10. Exogenous bridging and nonbridging in Cu(II) complexes of Mannich base ligands: Synthesis and physical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Sujatha; T M Rajendiran; R Kannappan; R Venkatesan; P Sambasiva Rao

    2000-12-01

    Preparation of pentadentate ligands L1, L2, L3 and L4, where L1=4-chloro-3-methyl-2[(prolin-1-yl)methyl]-6-[N-phenyl piperazin-1-yl)methyl]phenol, L2= 4-ethyl-2-[(prolin-1-yl)methyl]-6-[(N-phenyl piperazin-1-yl)methyl]phenol, L3 =4-chloro-3-methyl-2-[(prolin-1-yl)methyl]-6-[N-methyl piperazin-1-yl]methyl phenol, L4 = 4-methoxy-2-[(prolin-1-yl)methyl]-6-[(N-phenyl piperazin-1-yl)methyl]phenol is described together with that of the corresponding Cu(II) complexes with various bridging motifs like OH, OAc and NO2. The complexes are characterized by elemental analysis, electrochemical and electron paramagnetic spectral studies. Redox properties of the complexes in acetonitrile are highly quasireversible due to the chemical or/and stereochemical changes subsequent to electron transfer. The complexes show resolved copper hyperfine EPR at room temperature, indicating the presence of weak antiferromagnetic coupling between the copper atoms. Strengths of the antiferromagnetic interactions are in the order NO2 > OAc > OH.

  11. Ligand-induced Coupling versus Receptor Pre-association: Cellular automaton simulations of FGF-2 binding

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Forsten-Williams, Kimberly; Tauber, Uwe C.

    2003-01-01

    The binding of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) to its cell surface receptor (CSR) and subsequent signal transduction is known to be enhanced by Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans (HSPGs). HSPGs bind FGF-2 with low affinity and likely impact CSR-mediated signaling via stabilization of FGF-2-CSR complexes via association with both the ligand and the receptor. What is unknown is whether HSPG associates with CSR in the absence of FGF-2. In this paper, we determine conditions by which pre-associ...

  12. The Different Ligand-Binding Modes of Relaxin Family Peptide Receptors RXFP1 and RXFP2

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Daniel J.; Rosengren, K. Johan; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2012-01-01

    Relaxin and insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) are peptide hormones with a number of important physiological roles in reproduction, regulation of extracellular matrix turnover, and cardiovascular function. Relaxin and INSL3 mediate their actions through the closely related G-protein coupled receptors, relaxin family peptide receptors 1 and 2 (RXFP1 and RXFP2), respectively. These receptors have large extracellular domains (ECD) that contain high-affinity ligand-binding sites within their 10 leuci...

  13. Crystal structures of Bbp from Staphylococcus aureus reveal the ligand binding mechanism with Fibrinogen α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wu, Meng; Zhuo, Wei; Gu, Jinke; Zhang, Sensen; Ge, Jingpeng; Yang, Maojun

    2015-10-01

    Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp), a MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), mediates adherence to fibrinogen α (Fg α), a component in the extracellular matrix of the host cell and is important for infection and pathogenesis. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-Bbp(273-598) and Bbp(273-598)-Fg α(561-575) complex at a resolution of 2.03 Å and 1.45 Å, respectively. Apo-Bbp(273-598) contained the ligand binding region N2 and N3 domains, both of which followed a DE variant IgG fold characterized by an additional D1 strand in N2 domain and D1' and D2' strands in N3 domain. The peptide mapped to the Fg α(561-575) bond to Bbp(273-598) on the open groove between the N2 and N3 domains. Strikingly, the disordered C-terminus in the apo-form reorganized into a highly-ordered loop and a β-strand G'' covering the ligand upon ligand binding. Bbp(Ala298-Gly301) in the N2 domain of the Bbp(273-598)-Fg α(561-575) complex, which is a loop in the apo-form, formed a short α-helix to interact tightly with the peptide. In addition, Bbp(Ser547-Gln561) in the N3 domain moved toward the binding groove to make contact directly with the peptide, while Bbp(Asp338-Gly355) and Bbp(Thr365-Tyr387) in N2 domain shifted their configurations to stabilize the reorganized C-terminus mainly through strong hydrogen bonds. Altogether, our results revealed the molecular basis for Bbp-ligand interaction and advanced our understanding of S. aureus infection process. PMID:26349459

  14. Protein interactions and ligand binding: From protein subfamilies to functional specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Rausell, A.; de Juan, D.; Pazos, F; Valencia, A.

    2010-01-01

    The divergence accumulated during the evolution of protein families translates into their internal organization as subfamilies, and it is directly reflected in the characteristic patterns of differentially conserved residues. These specifically conserved positions in protein subfamilies are known as “specificity determining positions” (SDPs). Previous studies have limited their analysis to the study of the relationship between these positions and ligand-binding specificity, demonstrating sign...

  15. Microbially produced extracellular poly-saccharidic Pu(IV)- binding ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: The investigation of the Pu-binding properties of ligands for diverse extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) is of relevance for the quantitative understanding of colloidal barriers to radionuclide migration. The EPS isolated for this study were from four different bacteria species: a) two aerobic soil bacteria: Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 and Pseudomonas fluorescens Biovar II; and b) one anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. BC1. EPS from these bacteria were isolated through repeated ethanol precipitations. The neutral monosaccharides in the EPS from Pseudomonas florescens Biovar II that were determined by GC-MS consisted of rhamnose, fucose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose and glucose. The potentially Pu(IV) binding EPS ligands were mainly composed of carboxylic acids and other minor poly-anionic groups, e.g., sulphates and phosphates. Up to 70 % of total carbohydrates were hydrophilic uronic acids, and total carbohydrates made up 23-31% of organic carbon for P. florescens Biovar II and 9-17% of organic carbon for S. putrefaciens CN32. Besides the neutral and acidic sugars in the EPS, there were also 2-13 % of more hydrophobic proteins among these bacterial EPS. Pu binding to these exo-polymers showed log Kd values of about 5 - 6, with results strongly dependent on procedural details (e.g., removal of colloids in Pu(IV) tracer and reagent solutions). We hypothesize that the relative hydrophobicity of the EPS ligands affects the outcome in ternary sorption studies with colloidal silica. Experiments with varying relative hydrophobicities of EPS will elucidate the different sorption strengths and/or attachment potentials of the Pu-binding ligands to inorganic surfaces. (authors)

  16. FcRn expression, ligands binding properties and its regulation in human immune cells and hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT Expression and diverse functions of MHC class I related neonatal Fc receptor in different tissues is continually reported. To contribute to the understanding of how the receptor functions according to cell type, we investigated the expression and ligands binding properties of FcRn in human immune cells and hepatocytes. Here, we report that heterodimeric FcRn is expressed in these cells as evidenced by RT-PCR, Western immunoblottting and flow cytometry. The receptor expression i...

  17. Dynamic Factors Affecting Gaseous Ligand Binding in an Artificial Oxygen Transport Protein‡

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Andersen, Eskil M.E.; Khajo, Abdelahad; Magliozzo, Richard S.; Koder, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We report the functional analysis of an artificial hexacoordinate oxygen transport protein, HP7, which operates via a mechanism similar to that of human neuroglobin and cytoglobin: the destabilization of one of two heme-ligating histidine residues. In the case of HP7 this is the result of the coupling of histidine side chain ligation with the burial of three charged glutamate residues on the same helix. Here we compare gaseous ligand binding, including rates, affinities and oxyferrous state l...

  18. Microbially produced extracellular poly-saccharidic Pu(IV)- binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, C.C.; Roberts, K.A.; Schwehr, K.A.; Santschi, P.H. [Texas A and M University at Galveston, 5007 Ave U, Galveston, TX 77551 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The investigation of the Pu-binding properties of ligands for diverse extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) is of relevance for the quantitative understanding of colloidal barriers to radionuclide migration. The EPS isolated for this study were from four different bacteria species: a) two aerobic soil bacteria: Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 and Pseudomonas fluorescens Biovar II; and b) one anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium sp. BC1. EPS from these bacteria were isolated through repeated ethanol precipitations. The neutral monosaccharides in the EPS from Pseudomonas florescens Biovar II that were determined by GC-MS consisted of rhamnose, fucose, ribose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, galactose and glucose. The potentially Pu(IV) binding EPS ligands were mainly composed of carboxylic acids and other minor poly-anionic groups, e.g., sulphates and phosphates. Up to 70 % of total carbohydrates were hydrophilic uronic acids, and total carbohydrates made up 23-31% of organic carbon for P. florescens Biovar II and 9-17% of organic carbon for S. putrefaciens CN32. Besides the neutral and acidic sugars in the EPS, there were also 2-13 % of more hydrophobic proteins among these bacterial EPS. Pu binding to these exo-polymers showed log Kd values of about 5 - 6, with results strongly dependent on procedural details (e.g., removal of colloids in Pu(IV) tracer and reagent solutions). We hypothesize that the relative hydrophobicity of the EPS ligands affects the outcome in ternary sorption studies with colloidal silica. Experiments with varying relative hydrophobicities of EPS will elucidate the different sorption strengths and/or attachment potentials of the Pu-binding ligands to inorganic surfaces. (authors)

  19. Competitive interactions of ligands and macromolecular crowders with maltose binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew C Miklos

    Full Text Available Cellular signaling involves a cascade of recognition events occurring in a complex environment with high concentrations of proteins, polysaccharides, and other macromolecules. The influence of macromolecular crowders on protein binding affinity through hard-core repulsion is well studied, and possible contributions of protein-crowder soft attraction have been implicated recently. Here we present direct evidence for weak association of maltose binding protein (MBP with a polysaccharide crowder Ficoll, and that this association effectively competes with the binding of the natural ligand, maltose. Titration data over wide ranges of maltose and Ficoll concentrations fit well with a three-state competitive binding model. Broadening of MBP (1H-(15N TROSY spectra by the addition of Ficoll indicates weak protein-crowder association, and subsequent recovery of sharp NMR peaks upon addition of maltose indicates that the interactions of the crowder and the ligand with MBP are competitive. We hypothesize that, in the Escherichia coli periplasm, the competitive interactions of polysaccharides and maltose with MBP could allow MBP to shuttle between the peptidoglycan attached to the outer membrane and the ATP-binding cassette transporter in the inner membrane.

  20. Competition between transferrin and the serum ligands citrate and phosphate for the binding of aluminum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Wesley R; Wang, Zhepeng; Hamada, Yahia Z

    2003-05-19

    A key issue regarding the speciation of Al(3+) in serum is how well the ligands citric acid and phosphate can compete with the iron transport protein serum transferrin for the aluminum. Previous studies have attempted to measure binding constants for each ligand separately, but experimental problems make it very difficult to obtain stability constants with the accuracy required to make a meaningful comparison between these ligands. In this study, effective binding constants for Al-citrate and Al-phosphate at pH 7.4 have been determined using difference UV spectroscopy to monitor the direct competition between these ligands and transferrin. The analysis of this competition equilibrium also includes the binding of citrate and phosphate as anions to apotransferrin. The effective binding constants are 10(11.59) for the 1:1 Al-citrate complexes and 10(14.90) for the 1:2 Al-citrate complexes. The effective binding constant for the 1:2 Al-phosphate complex is 10(12.02). No 1:1 Al-phosphate complex was detected. Speciation calculations based on these effective binding constants indicate that, at serum concentrations of citrate and phosphate, citrate will be the primary low-molecular-mass ligand for aluminum. Formal stability constants for the Al-citrate system have also been determined by potentiometric methods. This equilibrium system is quite complex, and information from both electrospray mass spectrometry and difference UV experiments has been used to select the best model for fitting the potentiometric data. The mass spectra contain peaks that have been assigned to complexes having aluminum:citrate stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 2:2, 2:3, and 3:3. The difference UV results were used to determine the stability constant for Al(H(-1)cta)-, which was then used in the least-squares fitting of the potentiometric data to determine stability constants for Al(Hcta)+, Al(cta), Al(cta)2(3-), Al(H(-1)cta)(cta)(4-), Al2(H(-1)cta)2(2-), and Al3(H(-1)cta)3(OH)(4-).

  1. Ligand binding-dependent functions of the lipocalin NLaz: an in vivo study in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Mario; Ganfornina, Maria D; Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K; Sanchez, Diego

    2014-04-01

    Lipocalins are small extracellular proteins mostly described as lipid carriers. The Drosophila lipocalin NLaz (neural Lazarillo) modulates the IIS pathway and regulates longevity, stress resistance, and behavior. Here, we test whether a native hydrophobic pocket structure is required for NLaz to perform its functions. We use a point mutation altering the binding pocket (NLaz(L130R)) and control mutations outside NLaz binding pocket. Tryptophan fluorescence titration reveals that NLaz(L130R) loses its ability to bind ergosterol and the pheromone 7(z)-tricosene but retains retinoic acid binding. Using site-directed transgenesis in Drosophila, we test the functionality of the ligand binding-altered lipocalin at the organism level. NLaz-dependent life span reduction, oxidative stress and starvation sensitivity, aging markers accumulation, and deficient courtship are rescued by overexpression of NLaz(WT), but not of NLaz(L130R). Transcriptional responses to aging and oxidative stress show a large set of age-responsive genes dependent on the integrity of NLaz binding pocket. Inhibition of IIS activity and modulation of oxidative stress and infection-responsive genes are binding pocket-dependent processes. Control of energy metabolites on starvation appears to be, however, insensitive to the modification of the NLaz binding pocket.

  2. Temperature dependence of estrogen binding: importance of a subzone in the ligand binding domain of a novel piscine estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, N S; Frecer, V; Lam, T J; Ding, J L

    1999-11-11

    The full length estrogen receptor from Oreochromis aureus (OaER) was cloned and expressed in vitro and in vivo as a functional transcription factor. Amino acid residues involved in the thermal stability of the receptor are located at/near subzones beta1 and beta3, which are highly conserved in other non-piscine species but not in OaER. Hormone binding studies, however, indicate that OaER is thermally stable but exhibited a approximately 3-fold reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperatures. Transfection of OaER into various cell lines cultured at different temperatures displayed a significant estrogen dose-response shift compared with that of chicken ER (cER). At 37 degrees C, OaER requires approximately 80-fold more estrogen to achieve half-maximal stimulation of CAT. Lowering of the incubation temperature from 37 degrees C to 25 degrees C or 20 degrees C resulted in a 4-fold increase in its affinity for estrogen. The thermally deficient transactivation of OaER at temperatures above 25 degrees C was fully prevented by high levels of estrogen. Thus, compared to cER, the OaER exhibits reduced affinity for estrogen at elevated temperature as reflected in its deficient transactivation capability. Amino acid replacements of OaER beta3 subzones with corresponding amino acids from cER could partially rescue this temperature sensitivity. The three-dimensional structure of the OaER ligand binding domain (LBD) was modelled based on conformational similarity and sequence homology with human RXRalpha apo, RARgamma holo and ERalpha LBDs. Unliganded and 17beta-estradiol-liganded OaER LBD retained the overall folding pattern of the nuclear receptor LBDs. The residues at/near the subzone beta3 of the LBD constitute the central core of OaER structure. Thus, amino acid alteration at this region potentially alters the structure and consequently its temperature-dependent ligand binding properties. PMID:10559464

  3. An ELISA Based Binding and Competition Method to Rapidly Determine Ligand-receptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syedbasha, Mohameedyaseen; Linnik, Janina; Santer, Deanna; O'Shea, Daire; Barakat, Khaled; Joyce, Michael; Khanna, Nina; Tyrrell, D Lorne; Houghton, Michael; Egli, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of signaling pathways requires detailed knowledge regarding ligand-receptor interaction. This article describes two fast and reliable point-by-point protocols of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for the investigation of ligand-receptor interactions: the direct ligand-receptor interaction assay (LRA) and the competition LRA. As a case study, the ELISA based analysis of the interaction between different lambda interferons (IFNLs) and the alpha subunit of their receptor (IL28RA) is presented: the direct LRA is used for the determination of dissociation constants (KD values) between receptor and IFN ligands, and the competition LRA for the determination of the inhibitory capacity of an oligopeptide, which was designed to compete with the IFNLs at their receptor binding site. Analytical steps to estimate KD and half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values are described. Finally, the discussion highlights advantages and disadvantages of the presented method and how the results enable a better molecular understanding of ligand-receptor interactions.

  4. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein-Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brackenridge, Danielle Allison; McGuffin, Liam James

    2015-12-15

    Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein-ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein-ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein-ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP) and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO) projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  5. Proteins and Their Interacting Partners: An Introduction to Protein–Ligand Binding Site Prediction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Barry Roche

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Elucidating the biological and biochemical roles of proteins, and subsequently determining their interacting partners, can be difficult and time consuming using in vitro and/or in vivo methods, and consequently the majority of newly sequenced proteins will have unknown structures and functions. However, in silico methods for predicting protein–ligand binding sites and protein biochemical functions offer an alternative practical solution. The characterisation of protein–ligand binding sites is essential for investigating new functional roles, which can impact the major biological research spheres of health, food, and energy security. In this review we discuss the role in silico methods play in 3D modelling of protein–ligand binding sites, along with their role in predicting biochemical functionality. In addition, we describe in detail some of the key alternative in silico prediction approaches that are available, as well as discussing the Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction (CASP and the Continuous Automated Model EvaluatiOn (CAMEO projects, and their impact on developments in the field. Furthermore, we discuss the importance of protein function prediction methods for tackling 21st century problems.

  6. Relationships of ligand binding, redox properties, and protonation in Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Rosati, Antonella; De Sanctis, Giampiero; Sinibaldi, Federica; Marini, Stefano; Santucci, Roberto; Ascenzi, Paolo; Welinder, Karen G; Coletta, Massimo

    2003-05-23

    The pH dependence of the redox potentials and kinetics for CO association and dissociation was determined between pH 3.0 and 13.0 at 25 degrees C for the wild-type Coprinus cinereus fungal peroxidase and for a site-directed mutant in which Asp245, which is H-bonded to N delta of the imidazole of the proximal His183, was substituted with Asn. The determination of these functional properties allowed this information to be merged in a self-consistent fashion and to formulate for the first time a complete scheme employing the minimum number of groups required to describe the whole proton-linked behavior of both redox and ligand binding properties. The overall pH dependence can be accounted for by four redox- and ligand-linked groups. The proximal H-bond, which is strictly conserved in all peroxidases, will still be present in the site-specific mutant, but will no longer have an ionic character, and this event will bring about an alteration of redox equilibria and CO binding kinetics, envisaging a relevant role played by this H-bond also in modulating redox properties and ligand binding equilibria.

  7. Competitive ligand - binding assay for thyroxine binding globulin. Comparison with TBG radioimmunoassay and T3 uptake test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and reproducible competitive ligand binding assay has been utilized to measure serum TBG concentration. In euthyroid subjects TBG concentration (mean +- SD, mg/l) was 33.7 +- 4; hyperthyroid 24 -+ 6; T3-thyrotoxicosis 20 +- 7; hypothyroid 37 -+ 7; pregnant 67 -+ 18; post-partum period 59.8 -+ 17; oral contraceptives 45 -+ 7. The correlation of CLBA with RIA measurement of TBG was significant (p3 uptake test (p4: TBG ratio according to serum T4 and TBG concentration provided a reliable index in the assessment of thyroid function

  8. Computational Analysis of the Ligand Binding Site of the Extracellular ATP Receptor, DORN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Cuong The; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Cao, Yangrong; Cho, Sung-Hwan; Xu, Dong; Stacey, Gary

    2016-01-01

    DORN1 (also known as P2K1) is a plant receptor for extracellular ATP, which belongs to a large gene family of legume-type (L-type) lectin receptor kinases. Extracellular ATP binds to DORN1 with strong affinity through its lectin domain, and the binding triggers a variety of intracellular activities in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, information on the tertiary structure of the ligand binding site of DORN1is lacking, which hampers efforts to fully elucidate the mechanism of receptor action. Available data of the crystal structures from more than 50 L-type lectins enable us to perform an in silico study of molecular interaction between DORN1 and ATP. In this study, we employed a computational approach to develop a tertiary structure model of the DORN1 lectin domain. A blind docking analysis demonstrated that ATP binds to a cavity made by four loops (defined as loops A B, C and D) of the DORN1 lectin domain with high affinity. In silico target docking of ATP to the DORN1 binding site predicted interaction with 12 residues, located on the four loops, via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions. The ATP binding pocket is structurally similar in location to the carbohydrate binding pocket of the canonical L-type lectins. However, four of the residues predicted to interact with ATP are not conserved between DORN1 and the other carbohydrate-binding lectins, suggesting that diversifying selection acting on these key residues may have led to the ATP binding activity of DORN1. The in silico model was validated by in vitro ATP binding assays using the purified extracellular lectin domain of wild-type DORN1, as well as mutated DORN1 lacking key ATP binding residues. PMID:27583834

  9. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  10. Understanding the Selectivity Mechanism of the Human Asialoglycoprotein Receptor (ASGP-R toward Gal- and Man- type Ligands for Predicting Interactions with Exogenous Sugars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emo Chiellini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A practical approach for addressing the computer simulation of protein-carbohydrate interactions is described here. An articulated computational protocol was setup and validated by checking its ability to predict experimental data, available in theliterature, and concerning the selectivity shown by the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain(CRD of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R toward Gal-type ligands. Somerequired features responsible for the interactions were identified. Subsequently the sameprotocol was applied to monomer sugar molecules that constitute the building blocks foralginates and ulvans. Such sugar polymers may supply a low-cost source of rare sugars witha potential impact on several industrial applications, from pharmaceutical to fine chemicalindustry. An example of their applicative exploitation could be given by their use indeveloping biomaterial with adhesion properties toward hepatocytes, through interactionwith the ASGP-R. Such a receptor has been already proposed as a target for exogenousmolecules, specifically in the case of hepatocytes, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.The DOCK5.2 program was used to search optimal locations of the above ligands of interestinto CRD binding site and to roughly estimate interaction energies. Finally, the binding ∆G oftheoretical protein-ligand complexes was estimated by using the DelPhi program in which thesolvation free energy is accounted for with a continuum solvent model, by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The structure analysis of the obtained complexes and their ∆G values suggest that one of the sugar monomers of interest shows the desired characteristics.

  11. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J.; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics. PMID:27241473

  12. Rational design of a protein that binds integrin αvβ3 outside the ligand binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Yin, Lu; Yang, Jenny J; Lee, Hsiauwei; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Yan, Chunli; Yang, Hua; Grossniklaus, Hans E; Wang, Siming; Ma, Cheng; Sun, Li; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2016-05-31

    Integrin αvβ3 expression is altered in various diseases and has been proposed as a drug target. Here we use a rational design approach to develop a therapeutic protein, which we call ProAgio, that binds to integrin αvβ3 outside the classical ligand-binding site. We show ProAgio induces apoptosis of integrin αvβ3-expressing cells by recruiting and activating caspase 8 to the cytoplasmic domain of integrin αvβ3. ProAgio also has anti-angiogenic activity and strongly inhibits growth of tumour xenografts, but does not affect the established vasculature. Toxicity analyses demonstrate that ProAgio is not toxic to mice. Our study reports a new integrin-targeting agent with a unique mechanism of action, and provides a template for the development of integrin-targeting therapeutics.

  13. Improved ligand binding energies derived from molecular dynamics: replicate sampling enhances the search of conformational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Marc; Beroza, Paul

    2013-08-26

    Does a single molecular trajectory provide an adequate sample conformational space? Our calculations indicate that for Molecular Mechanics--Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area (MM-PBSA) measurement of protein ligand binding, a single molecular dynamics trajectory does not provide a representative sampling of phase space. For a single trajectory, the binding energy obtained by averaging over a number of molecular dynamics frames in an equilibrated system will converge after an adequate simulation time. A separate trajectory with nearly identical starting coordinates (1% randomly perturbed by 0.001 Å), however, can lead to a significantly different calculated binding energy. Thus, even though the calculated energy converges for a single molecular dynamics run, the variation across separate runs implies that a single run inadequately samples the system. The divergence in the trajectories is reflected in the individual energy components, such as the van der Waals and the electrostatics terms. These results indicate that the trajectories sample different conformations that are not in rapid exchange. Extending the length of the dynamics simulation does not resolve the energy differences observed between different trajectories. By averaging over multiple simulations, each with a nearly equivalent starting structure, we find the standard deviation in the calculated binding energy to be ∼1.3 kcal/mol. The work presented here indicates that combining MM-PBSA with multiple samples of the initial starting coordinates will produce more precise and accurate estimates of protein/ligand affinity. PMID:23845109

  14. Metal-ligand binding affinity vs reactivity: qualitative studies in Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring-opening reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Gavin Chit; Dougan, Patrick; Lautens, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Rh(I)-catalyzed asymmetric ring opening (ARO) of oxabenzonorbornadiene is used as a model system to qualitatively study reactions involving multiple metal-ligand interactions. The key feature of this approach is the use of product ee as an indicator to quickly gain important information such as the relative ligand binding affinity and relative reactivity of catalysts.

  15. 金黄色葡萄球菌FnBP配体结合区基因的克隆及其原核表达%Cloning and Prokaryotic Expression of FnBP Ligand Binding Gene of Staphylococcus aureus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹荣兰; 杨正涛; 张艳晶; 刘辉; 刘珊; 杨琦; 曹永国; 张乃生

    2008-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to clone the FnBP ligand binding gene of Staphylococcus aureus and run prokaryotic expression by constructing a prokaryotic expression vector. [Method] The gene encoding FnBP ligand binding gene was amplified from S.aureus chromosomal DNA by PCR technique. After T-A cloning, plasmid pMD18- FnBP was constructed. pMD18- FnBP and pET28a(+)were digested by BamH Ⅰ and EcoR Ⅰ double enzymes, then the purified FnBP ligand binding gene was subcloned into the expression vector pET28a(+), and the prokaryotic expression vector pET28a-FnBP was thus constructed. The constructed plasmid pET28a-FnBP was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) competent cells. The bacterium was induced by IPTG and the expressed products were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. [Result] The gene fragment with the length of 370 bp was amplified by PCR approach. One approximately 30 kD exogenous protein was observed in SDS-PAGE analysis. Western blot analysis indicates the protein has antigenicity of S.aureus. [Conclusion] The FnBP ligand binding gene of S.aureus was successfully cloned and expressed in prokaryotic cells.

  16. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand 11C-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined changes in binding of the sigma-1 agonist 11C-SA4503 in C6 glioma cells and in living rats after modification of endogenous steroid levels. 11C-SA4503 binding was assessed in C6 monolayers by gamma counting and in anaesthetized rats by microPET scanning. C6 cells were either repeatedly washed and incubated in steroid-free medium or exposed to five kinds of exogenous steroids (1 h or 5 min before tracer addition, respectively). Tumour-bearing male rats were repeatedly treated with pentobarbital (a condition known to result in reduction of endogenous steroid levels) or injected with progesterone. Binding of 11C-SA4503 to C6 cells was increased (∝50%) upon removal and decreased (∝60%) upon addition of steroid hormones (rank order of potency: progesterone > allopregnanolone = testosterone = androstanolone > dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulphate, IC50 progesterone 33 nM). Intraperitoneally administered progesterone reduced tumour uptake and tumour-to-muscle contrast (36%). Repeated treatment of animals with pentobarbital increased the PET standardized uptake value of 11C-SA4503 in tumour (16%) and brain (27%), whereas the kinetics of blood pool radioactivity was unaffected. The binding of 11C-SA4503 is sensitive to steroid competition. Since not only increases but also decreases of steroid levels affect ligand binding, a considerable fraction of the sigma-1 receptor population in cultured tumour cells or tumour-bearing animals is normally occupied by endogenous steroids. (orig.)

  17. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand {sup 11}C-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Jong, Johan R. de; Vries, Erik F. de; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Waarde, Aren van [University of Groningen, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen Medical Center, Groningen (Netherlands); Ishiwata, Kiichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology, Positron Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined changes in binding of the sigma-1 agonist {sup 11}C-SA4503 in C6 glioma cells and in living rats after modification of endogenous steroid levels. {sup 11}C-SA4503 binding was assessed in C6 monolayers by gamma counting and in anaesthetized rats by microPET scanning. C6 cells were either repeatedly washed and incubated in steroid-free medium or exposed to five kinds of exogenous steroids (1 h or 5 min before tracer addition, respectively). Tumour-bearing male rats were repeatedly treated with pentobarbital (a condition known to result in reduction of endogenous steroid levels) or injected with progesterone. Binding of {sup 11}C-SA4503 to C6 cells was increased ({proportional_to}50%) upon removal and decreased ({proportional_to}60%) upon addition of steroid hormones (rank order of potency: progesterone > allopregnanolone = testosterone = androstanolone > dehydroepiandrosterone-3-sulphate, IC{sub 50} progesterone 33 nM). Intraperitoneally administered progesterone reduced tumour uptake and tumour-to-muscle contrast (36%). Repeated treatment of animals with pentobarbital increased the PET standardized uptake value of {sup 11}C-SA4503 in tumour (16%) and brain (27%), whereas the kinetics of blood pool radioactivity was unaffected. The binding of {sup 11}C-SA4503 is sensitive to steroid competition. Since not only increases but also decreases of steroid levels affect ligand binding, a considerable fraction of the sigma-1 receptor population in cultured tumour cells or tumour-bearing animals is normally occupied by endogenous steroids. (orig.)

  18. Investigation of the Copper Binding Site And the Role of Histidine As a Ligand in Riboflavin Binding Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.R.; Bencze, K.Z.; Russ, K.A.; Wasiukanis, K.; Benore-Parsons, M.; Stemmler, T.L.

    2009-05-26

    Riboflavin Binding Protein (RBP) binds copper in a 1:1 molar ratio, forming a distinct well-ordered type II site. The nature of this site has been examined using X-ray absorption and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies, revealing a four coordinate oxygen/nitrogen rich environment. On the basis of analysis of the Cambridge Structural Database, the average protein bound copper-ligand bond length of 1.96 {angstrom}, obtained by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), is consistent with four coordinate Cu(I) and Cu(II) models that utilize mixed oxygen and nitrogen ligand distributions. These data suggest a Cu-O{sub 3}N coordination state for copper bound to RBP. While pulsed EPR studies including hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance show clear spectroscopic evidence for a histidine bound to the copper, inclusion of a histidine in the EXAFS simulation did not lead to any significant improvement in the fit.

  19. Millisecond Timescale Dynamics of Human Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein: Testing of Its Relevance to the Ligand Entry Process

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Dong; Yang, Daiwen

    2010-01-01

    For over a decade, scientists have been attempting to know more about the conformational dynamics of fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs), to answer the puzzling question of how ligands could access the internalized binding site(s). Conformational exchange of FABPs on the microsecond to millisecond timescales has been found in many FABPs and offers an important hypothesis for the ligand entry mechanism. Despite the potential significance, the validity of this hypothesis has not been verified y...

  20. Ligand binding mode to duplex and triplex DNA assessed by combining electrospray tandem mass spectrometry and molecular modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Rosu, Frédéric; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; De Pauw, Edwin; Gabelica, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we report the analysis of seven benzopyridoindole and benzopyridoquinoxaline drugs binding to different duplex DNA and triple helical DNA, using an approach combining electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and molecular modeling. The ligands were ranked according to the collision energy (CE(50)) necessary to dissociate 50% of the complex with the duplex or the triplex in tandem MS. To determine the probable ligand binding site and ...

  1. Magnetic levitation as a platform for competitive protein-ligand binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Soh, Siowling; Mirica, Katherine A; Whitesides, George M

    2012-07-17

    This paper describes a method based on magnetic levitation (MagLev) that is capable of indirectly measuring the binding of unlabeled ligands to unlabeled protein. We demonstrate this method by measuring the affinity of unlabeled bovine carbonic anhydrase (BCA) for a variety of ligands (most of which are benzene sulfonamide derivatives). This method utilizes porous gel beads that are functionalized with a common aryl sulfonamide ligand. The beads are incubated with BCA and allowed to reach an equilibrium state in which the majority of the immobilized ligands are bound to BCA. Since the beads are less dense than the protein, protein binding to the bead increases the overall density of the bead. This change in density can be monitored using MagLev. Transferring the beads to a solution containing no protein creates a situation where net protein efflux from the bead is thermodynamically favorable. The rate at which protein leaves the bead for the solution can be calculated from the rate at which the levitation height of the bead changes. If another small molecule ligand of BCA is dissolved in the solution, the rate of protein efflux is accelerated significantly. This paper develops a reaction-diffusion (RD) model to explain both this observation, and the physical-organic chemistry that underlies it. Using this model, we calculate the dissociation constants of several unlabeled ligands from BCA, using plots of levitation height versus time. Notably, although this method requires no electricity, and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it can measure accurately the binding of unlabeled proteins to small molecules over a wide range of dissociation constants (K(d) values within the range from ~10 nM to 100 μM are measured easily). Assays performed using this method generally can be completed within a relatively short time period (20 min-2 h). A deficiency of this system is that it is not, in its present form, applicable to proteins with molecular weight greater

  2. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  3. Selectivity of odorant-binding proteins from the southern house mosquito tested against physiologically relevant ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao eYin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available As opposed to humans, insects rely heavily on an acute olfactory system for survival and reproduction. Two major types of olfactory proteins, namely, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs and odorant receptors (ORs, may contribute to the selectivity and sensitivity of the insects’ olfactory system. Here, we aimed at addressing the question whether OBPs highly enriched in the antennae of the southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, contribute at least in part to the selective reception of physiologically relevant compounds. Using a fluorescence reporter and a panel of 34 compounds, including oviposition attractants, human-derived attractants, and repellents, we measured binding affinities of CquiOBP1, CquiOBP2, and CquiOBP5. Based on dissociation constants, we surmised that CquiOBP2 is a carrier for the oviposition attractant skatole, whereas CquiOBP1 and CquiOBP5 might transport the oviposition pheromone MOP, a human-derived attractant nonanal, and the insect repellent picardin. Binding of these three ligands to CquiOBP1 was further analyzed by examining the influence of pH on apparent affinity as well as by docking these three ligands into CquiOBP1. Our findings suggest that CquiOBP1 might discriminate MOP from nonanal/picaridin on the basis of the midpoint transition of a pH-dependence conformational change, and that MOP is better accommodated in the binding cavity than the other two ligands. These findings, along with previous experimental evidence suggesting that CquiOBP1 does not detect nonanal in vivo, suggest that OBP selectivity may not be clearly manifested in their dissociation constants.

  4. Protein Structural Memory Influences Ligand Binding Mode(s) and Unbinding Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Caflisch, Amedeo; Hamm, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The binding of small molecules (e.g., natural ligands, metabolites, and drugs) to proteins governs most biochemical pathways and physiological processes. Here, we use molecular dynamics to investigate the unbinding of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) from two distinct states of a small rotamase enzyme, the FK506-binding protein (FKBP). These states correspond to the FKBP protein relaxed with and without DMSO in the active site. Since the time scale of ligand unbinding (2-20 ns) is faster than protein relaxation (100 ns), a novel methodology is introduced to relax the protein without having to introduce an artificial constraint. The simulation results show that the unbinding time is an order of magnitude longer for dissociation from the DMSO-bound state (holo-relaxed). That is, the actual rate of unbinding depends on the state of the protein, with the protein having a long-lived memory. The rate thus depends on the concentration of the ligand as the apo and holo states reflect low and high concentrations of DMSO, respectively. Moreover, there are multiple binding modes in the apo-relaxed state, while a single binding mode dominates the holo-relaxed state in which DMSO acts as hydrogen bond acceptor from the backbone NH of Ile56, as in the crystal structure of the DMSO/FKBP complex. The solvent relaxes very fast (∼1 ns) close to the NH of Ile56 and with the same time scale of the protein far away from the active site. These results have implications for high-throughput docking, which makes use of a rigid structure of the protein target.

  5. Mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes: the role of the co-ligand in DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Wen-Jing; Wang, Xin-Tian; Xie, Cheng-Zhi; Tian, He; Song, Xue-Qing; Pan, He-Ting; Qiao, Xin; Xu, Jing-Yuan

    2016-05-31

    Four novel mononuclear Schiff base copper(ii) complexes, namely, [Cu(L)(OAc)]·H2O (), [Cu(HL)(C2O4)(EtOH)]·EtOH (), [Cu(L)(Bza)] () and [Cu(L)(Sal)] () (HL = 1-(((2-((2-hydroxypropyl)amino)ethyl)imino)methyl)naphthalene-2-ol), Bza = benzoic acid, Sal = salicylic acid), were synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography, elemental analysis and infrared spectroscopy. Single-crystal diffraction analysis revealed that all the complexes were mononuclear molecules, in which the Schiff base ligand exhibited different coordination modes and conformations. The N-HO and O-HO inter- and intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions linked these molecules into multidimensional networks. Their interactions with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) were investigated by UV-visible and fluorescence spectrometry, as well as by viscosity measurements. The magnitude of the Kapp values of the four complexes was 10(5), indicating a moderate intercalative binding mode between the complexes and DNA. Electrophoresis results showed that all these complexes induced double strand breaks of pUC19 plasmid DNA in the presence of H2O2 through an oxidative pathway. In addition, the fluorescence spectrum of human serum albumin (HSA) with the complexes suggested that the quenching mechanism of HSA by the complexes was a static process. Moreover, the antiproliferative activity of the four complexes against HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) and HepG-2 (human liver hepatocellular carcinoma) cells evaluated by colorimetric cell proliferation assay and clonogenic assay revealed that all four complexes had improved cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Inspiringly, complex , with salicylic acid as the auxiliary ligand, displayed a stronger anticancer activity, suggesting that a synergistic effect of the Schiff base complex and the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug may be involved in the cell killing process. The biological features of mixed-ligand copper(ii) Schiff base complexes and how acetic auxiliary

  6. Nucleotide-binding Oligomerization Domain-1 Ligand Induces Inflammation and Attenuates Glucose Uptake in Human Adipocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-jun Zhou; Ai Li; Yu-ling Song; Yan Li; Hui Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of stimulant for nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) on secretion of proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines and insulin-dependent glucose uptake in human differentiated adipocytes.Methods Adipose tissues were obtained from patients undergoing liposuction.Stromal vascular cells were extracted and differentiated into adipocytes.A specific ligand for NOD1,was administered to human adipocytes in culture.Nuclear factor-κB transcriptional activity and proinflammatory chemokine/cytokines production were determined by reporter plasmid assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay,respectively.Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was measured by 2-deoxy-D-[3H]glucose uptake assay.Furthermore,chemokine/cytokine secretion and glucose uptake in adipocytes transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NOD1 upon stimulation of NOD1 ligand were analyzed.Results Nuclear factor-κB transcriptional activity and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1),interleukin (IL)-6,and IL-8 secretion in human adipocytes were markedly increased stimulated with NOD1 ligand (all P<0.01).Insulin-induced glucose uptake was decreased upon the activation of NOD1 (P<0.05).NOD1 gene silencing by siRNA reduced NOD1 ligand-induced MCP-1,IL-6,and IL-8 release and increased insulin-induced glucose uptake (all P<0.05).Conclusion NOD1 activation in adipocytes might be implicated in the onset of insulin resistance.

  7. Consensus of sample-balanced classifiers for identifying ligand-binding residue by co-evolutionary physicochemical characteristics of amino acids

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is an important mechanism for some proteins to perform their functions, and those binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. So far, the state-of-the-art methods search for similar, known structures of the query and predict the binding sites based on the solved structures. However, such structural information is not commonly available. In this paper, we propose a sequence-based approach to identify protein-ligand binding residues. Due to the highly imbalanced samples between the ligand-binding sites and non ligand-binding sites, we constructed several balanced data sets, for each of which a random forest (RF)-based classifier was trained. The ensemble of these RF classifiers formed a sequence-based protein-ligand binding site predictor. Experimental results on CASP9 targets demonstrated that our method compared favorably with the state-of-the-art. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013.

  8. Measuring Binding Affinity of Protein-Ligand Interaction Using Spectrophotometry: Binding of Neutral Red to Riboflavin-Binding Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenprakhon, Pirom; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2010-01-01

    The dissociation constant, K[subscript d], of the binding of riboflavin-binding protein (RP) with neutral red (NR) can be determined by titrating RP to a fixed concentration of NR. Upon adding RP to the NR solution, the maximum absorption peak of NR shifts to 545 nm from 450 nm for the free NR. The change of the absorption can be used to determine…

  9. Characterisation of Conformational and Ligand Binding Properties of Membrane Proteins Using Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rohanah; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to crystallise for use in X-ray crystallographic structural determination, or too complex for NMR structural studies. Circular dichroism (CD) is a fast and relatively easy spectroscopic technique to study protein conformational behaviour in solution. The advantage of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) measured with synchrotron beamlines compared to the CD from benchtop instruments is the extended spectral far-UV region that increases the accuracy of secondary structure estimations, in particular under high ionic strength conditions. Membrane proteins are often available in small quantities, and for this SRCD measured at the Diamond B23 beamline has successfully facilitated molecular recognition studies. This was done by probing the local tertiary structure of aromatic amino acid residues upon addition of chiral or non-chiral ligands using long pathlength cells (1-5 cm) of small volume capacity (70 μl-350 μl). In this chapter we describe the use of SRCD to qualitatively and quantitatively screen ligand binding interactions (exemplified by Sbma, Ace1 and FsrC proteins); to distinguish between functionally similar drugs that exhibit different mechanisms of action towards membrane proteins (exemplified by FsrC); and to identify suitable detergent conditions to observe membrane protein-ligand interactions using stabilised proteins (exemplified by inositol transporters) as well as the stability of membrane proteins (exemplified by GalP, Ace1). The importance of the in solution characterisation of the conformational behaviour and ligand binding properties of proteins in both far- andnear-UV regions and the use of high-throughput CD (HT-CD) using 96- and 384-well multiplates to study the folding effects in various protein crystallisation buffers are also discussed. PMID:27553234

  10. Characterization of a ligand binding site in the human transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klement, Göran; Eisele, Lina; Malinowsky, David; Nolting, Andreas; Svensson, Mats; Terp, Gitte; Weigelt, Dirk; Dabrowski, Michael

    2013-02-19

    The pharmacology and regulation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) ion channel activity is intricate due to the physiological function as an integrator of multiple chemical, mechanical, and temperature stimuli as well as differences in species pharmacology. In this study, we describe and compare the current inhibition efficacy of human TRPA1 on three different TRPA1 antagonists. We used a homology model of TRPA1 based on Kv1.2 to select pore vestibule residues available for interaction with ligands entering the vestibule. Site-directed mutation constructs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and their functionality and pharmacology assessed to support and improve our homology model. Based on the functional pharmacology results we propose an antagonist-binding site in the vestibule of the TRPA1 ion channel. We use the results to describe the proposed intravestibular ligand-binding site in TRPA1 in detail. Based on the single site substitutions, we designed a human TRPA1 receptor by substituting several residues in the vestibule and adjacent regions from the rat receptor to address and explain observed species pharmacology differences. In parallel, the lack of effect on HC-030031 inhibition by the vestibule substitutions suggests that this molecule interacts with TRPA1 via a binding site not situated in the vestibule.

  11. The impact of a ligand binding on strand migration in the SAM-I riboswitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Huang

    Full Text Available Riboswitches sense cellular concentrations of small molecules and use this information to adjust synthesis rates of related metabolites. Riboswitches include an aptamer domain to detect the ligand and an expression platform to control gene expression. Previous structural studies of riboswitches largely focused on aptamers, truncating the expression domain to suppress conformational switching. To link ligand/aptamer binding to conformational switching, we constructed models of an S-adenosyl methionine (SAM-I riboswitch RNA segment incorporating elements of the expression platform, allowing formation of an antiterminator (AT helix. Using Anton, a computer specially developed for long timescale Molecular Dynamics (MD, we simulated an extended (three microseconds MD trajectory with SAM bound to a modeled riboswitch RNA segment. Remarkably, we observed a strand migration, converting three base pairs from an antiterminator (AT helix, characteristic of the transcription ON state, to a P1 helix, characteristic of the OFF state. This conformational switching towards the OFF state is observed only in the presence of SAM. Among seven extended trajectories with three starting structures, the presence of SAM enhances the trend towards the OFF state for two out of three starting structures tested. Our simulation provides a visual demonstration of how a small molecule (<500 MW binding to a limited surface can trigger a large scale conformational rearrangement in a 40 kDa RNA by perturbing the Free Energy Landscape. Such a mechanism can explain minimal requirements for SAM binding and transcription termination for SAM-I riboswitches previously reported experimentally.

  12. Preliminary Molecular Dynamic Simulations of the Estrogen Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain from Antagonist to Apo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian E. Roitberg

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptors (ER are known as nuclear receptors. They exist in the cytoplasm of human cells and serves as a DNA binding transcription factor that regulates gene expression. However the estrogen receptor also has additional functions independent of DNA binding. The human estrogen receptor comes in two forms, alpha and beta. This work focuses on the alpha form of the estrogen receptor. The ERα is found in breast cancer cells, ovarian stroma cells, endometrium, and the hypothalamus. It has been suggested that exposure to DDE, a metabolite of DDT, and other pesticides causes conformational changes in the estrogen receptor. Before examining these factors, this work examines the protein unfolding from the antagonist form found in the 3ERT PDB crystal structure. The 3ERT PDB crystal structure has the estrogen receptor bound to the cancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen. The 4-hydroxytamoxifen ligand was extracted before the simulation, resulting in new conformational freedom due to absence of van der Waals contacts between the ligand and the receptor. The conformational changes that result expose the binding clef of the co peptide beside Helix 12 of the receptor forming an apo conformation. Two key conformations in the loops at either end of the H12 are produced resulting in the antagonist to apo conformation transformation. The results were produced over a 42ns Molecular Dynamics simulation using the AMBER FF99SB force field.

  13. Estrogen receptor determination in endometrial carcinoma: ligand binding assay versus enzyme immunoassay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Nielsen, Anette Lynge; Lyndrup, J;

    1995-01-01

    We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA, and cyto......We compared concentrations of cytosolic estrogen receptors (ERc) measured in 35 postmenopausal endometrial carcinomas by ligand binding method (LBA) (dextran-coated charcoal assay) and enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Correlations between ERc, nuclear estrogen receptors (ERn) determined by EIA......, and cytosolic progesterone receptors (PR) measured by LBA were also studied. While ERc concentrations determined by LBA and EIA were highly correlated (r: 0.94), ERc values detected by LBA were approximately twice those found by EIA (median values of ERc: 155 vs. 64 fmol/mg cytosol protein, DCC vs. EIA......). The percentages of ERc positive tumors were 89% by LBA and 77% by EIA. The median fraction of total ER present as ERn was 63%. PR levels correlated positively with ERn concentrations (r: 0.73). We explore possible reasons why greater concentrations of ERc are determined by estradiol binding than by the ER-EIA kit...

  14. Ligand binding reduces SUMOylation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ activation function 1 (AF1 domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Diezko

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor regulating adipogenesis, glucose homeostasis and inflammatory responses. The activity of PPARγ is controlled by post-translational modifications including SUMOylation and phosphorylation that affects its biological and molecular functions. Several important aspects of PPARγ SUMOylation including SUMO isoform-specificity and the impact of ligand binding on SUMOylation remain unresolved or contradictory. Here, we present a comprehensive study of PPARγ1 SUMOylation. We show that PPARγ1 can be modified by SUMO1 and SUMO2. Mutational analyses revealed that SUMOylation occurs exclusively within the N-terminal activation function 1 (AF1 domain predominantly at lysines 33 and 77. Ligand binding to the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (LBD of PPARγ1 reduces SUMOylation of lysine 33 but not of lysine 77. SUMOylation of lysine 33 and lysine 77 represses basal and ligand-induced activation by PPARγ1. We further show that lysine 365 within the LBD is not a target for SUMOylation as suggested in a previous report, but it is essential for full LBD activity. Our results suggest that PPARγ ligands negatively affect SUMOylation by interdomain communication between the C-terminal LBD and the N-terminal AF1 domain. The ability of the LBD to regulate the AF1 domain may have important implications for the evaluation and mechanism of action of therapeutic ligands that bind PPARγ.

  15. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  16. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  17. Effect of iodination site on binding of radiolabeled ligand by insulin antibodies and insulin autoantibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four human insulins and four porcine insulins, each monoiodinated to the same specific activity at one of the four tyrosine residues (A14, A19, B16, B26) and purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography, were tested in a radiobinding assay against a panel of insulin-antibody (IA)-positive sera from 10 insulin-treated diabetics and insulin-autoantibody-positive (IAA) sera from 10 nondiabetics. Of the 10 IAA-positive sera, five were fully cross reactive with both insulin species, and five were specific for human insulin. The rank order of binding of sera with the four ligands from each species was random for IA (mean rank values of 1.9 for A14, 2.0 for A19, 2.5 for B16, and 3.6 for B26 from a possible ranking range of 1 to 4), but more consistent for non-human-insulin-specific IAA (mean rank values 1.3 for A14, 3.8 for A19, 1.7 for B16, and 3.2 for B26 for labeled human insulins; 1.2 for A14, 4.0 for A19, 1.8 for B16, and 3.0 for B26 for labeled porcine insulins). The rank order of binding was virtually uniform for human-insulin-specific IAA (mean values 1.2 for A14, 3.0 for A19, 1.8 for B16, and 4.0 for B26). The influence of iodination site on the binding of labeled insulin appears to be dependent on the proximity of the labeled tyrosine to the antibody binding site and the clonal diversity, or restriction, of insulin-binding antibodies in the test serum. When IA and IAA are measured, the implications of this study regarding the choice of assay ligand may be important

  18. The MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to estimate ligand-binding affinities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genheden, Samuel; Ryde, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The molecular mechanics energies combined with the Poisson–Boltzmann or generalized Born and surface area continuum solvation (MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA) methods are popular approaches to estimate the free energy of the binding of small ligands to biological macromolecules. They are typically based on molecular dynamics simulations of the receptor–ligand complex and are therefore intermediate in both accuracy and computational effort between empirical scoring and strict alchemical perturbation methods. They have been applied to a large number of systems with varying success. Areas covered: The authors review the use of MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA methods to calculate ligand-binding affinities, with an emphasis on calibration, testing and validation, as well as attempts to improve the methods, rather than on specific applications. Expert opinion: MM/PBSA and MM/GBSA are attractive approaches owing to their modular nature and that they do not require calculations on a training set. They have been used successfully to reproduce and rationalize experimental findings and to improve the results of virtual screening and docking. However, they contain several crude and questionable approximations, for example, the lack of conformational entropy and information about the number and free energy of water molecules in the binding site. Moreover, there are many variants of the method and their performance varies strongly with the tested system. Likewise, most attempts to ameliorate the methods with more accurate approaches, for example, quantum-mechanical calculations, polarizable force fields or improved solvation have deteriorated the results. PMID:25835573

  19. Measuring binding of protein to gel-bound ligands using magnetic levitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Nathan D; Mirica, Katherine A; Soh, Siowling; Phillips, Scott T; Taran, Olga; Mace, Charles R; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S; Whitesides, George M

    2012-03-28

    This paper describes the use of magnetic levitation (MagLev) to measure the association of proteins and ligands. The method starts with diamagnetic gel beads that are functionalized covalently with small molecules (putative ligands). Binding of protein to the ligands within the bead causes a change in the density of the bead. When these beads are suspended in a paramagnetic aqueous buffer and placed between the poles of two NbFeB magnets with like poles facing, the changes in the density of the bead on binding of protein result in changes in the levitation height of the bead that can be used to quantify the amount of protein bound. This paper uses a reaction-diffusion model to examine the physical principles that determine the values of rate and equilibrium constants measured by this system, using the well-defined model system of carbonic anhydrase and aryl sulfonamides. By tuning the experimental protocol, the method is capable of quantifying either the concentration of protein in a solution, or the binding affinities of a protein to several resin-bound small molecules simultaneously. Since this method requires no electricity and only a single piece of inexpensive equipment, it may find use in situations where portability and low cost are important, such as in bioanalysis in resource-limited settings, point-of-care diagnosis, veterinary medicine, and plant pathology. It still has several practical disadvantages. Most notably, the method requires relatively long assay times and cannot be applied to large proteins (>70 kDa), including antibodies. The design and synthesis of beads with improved characteristics (e.g., larger pore size) has the potential to resolve these problems. PMID:22364170

  20. ProBiS-CHARMMing: Web Interface for Prediction and Optimization of Ligands in Protein Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konc, Janez; Miller, Benjamin T; Štular, Tanja; Lešnik, Samo; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Janežič, Dušanka

    2015-11-23

    Proteins often exist only as apo structures (unligated) in the Protein Data Bank, with their corresponding holo structures (with ligands) unavailable. However, apoproteins may not represent the amino-acid residue arrangement upon ligand binding well, which is especially problematic for molecular docking. We developed the ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface by connecting the ProBiS ( http://probis.cmm.ki.si ) and CHARMMing ( http://www.charmming.org ) web servers into one functional unit that enables prediction of protein-ligand complexes and allows for their geometry optimization and interaction energy calculation. The ProBiS web server predicts ligands (small compounds, proteins, nucleic acids, and single-atom ligands) that may bind to a query protein. This is achieved by comparing its surface structure against a nonredundant database of protein structures and finding those that have binding sites similar to that of the query protein. Existing ligands found in the similar binding sites are then transposed to the query according to predictions from ProBiS. The CHARMMing web server enables, among other things, minimization and potential energy calculation for a wide variety of biomolecular systems, and it is used here to optimize the geometry of the predicted protein-ligand complex structures using the CHARMM force field and to calculate their interaction energies with the corresponding query proteins. We show how ProBiS-CHARMMing can be used to predict ligands and their poses for a particular binding site, and minimize the predicted protein-ligand complexes to obtain representations of holoproteins. The ProBiS-CHARMMing web interface is freely available for academic users at http://probis.nih.gov.

  1. Rat neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing a7 subunit: pharmacological properties of ligand binding and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingxian XIAO; Galya R ABDRAKHMANOVA; Maryna BAYDYUK; Susan HERNANDEZ; Kenneth J KELLAR

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To compare pharmacological properties of heterologously expressed homomeric a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (a.7 nAChRs) with those of native nAChRs containing a.7 subunit (a.7* nAChRs) in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Methods: We established a stably transfected HEK-293 cell line that expresses homomeric rat a7 nAChRs. We studies ligand binding profiles and functional properties of nAChRs expressed in this cell line and native rat a.7* nAChRs in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. We used [125IJ-a-bungarotoxin to compare ligand binding profiles in these cells with those in rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. The functional properties of the a.7 nAChRs expressed in this cell line were studied using whole-cell current recording.Results: The newly established cell line, KXa7Rl, expresses homomeric a7 nAChRs that bind [125I]-a-bungarotoxin with a Kd value of 0.38±0.06 nmol/L, similar to Kj values of native rat a.7* nAChRs from hippocampus (Kd=0.28±0.03 nmol/L) and cerebral cortex (Kd=0.33±0.05 nmol/L). Using whole-cell current recording, the homomeric a7 nAChRs expressed in the cells were activated by acetylcholine and (-)-nicotine with EC50 values of 280±19 nmol/L and 180±40 nmol/L, respectively. The acetylcholine activated currents were potently blocked by two selective antagonists of a.7 nAChRs, a-bungarotoxin (IC5o=19±2 nmol/L) and methyllycaconitine (IC50=100±10 pmol/L). A comparative study of ligand binding profiles, using 13 nicotinic ligands, showed many similarities between the homomeric a.7 nAChRs and native a.7* receptors in rat brain, but it also revealed several notable differences.Conclusion: This newly established stable cell line should be very useful for studying the properties of homomeric a7 nAChRs and comparing these properties to native a.7* nAChRs.

  2. Rational design and asymmetric synthesis of potent and neurotrophic ligands for FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomplun, Sebastian; Wang, Yansong; Kirschner, Alexander; Kozany, Christian; Bracher, Andreas; Hausch, Felix

    2015-01-01

    To create highly efficient inhibitors for FK506-binding proteins, a new asymmetric synthesis for pro-(S)-C(5) -branched [4.3.1] aza-amide bicycles was developed. The key step of the synthesis is an HF-driven N-acyliminium cyclization. Functionalization of the C(5)  moiety resulted in novel protein contacts with the psychiatric risk factor FKBP51, which led to a more than 280-fold enhancement in affinity. The most potent ligands facilitated the differentiation of N2a neuroblastoma cells with low nanomolar potency.

  3. Structural Analysis of the Ligand-Binding Domain of the Aspartate Receptor Tar from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mise, Takeshi

    2016-07-01

    The Escherichia coli cell-surface aspartate receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni(2+). These signals are transmitted from the extracellular region of Tar to the cytoplasmic region via the transmembrane domain. The mechanism by which extracellular signals are transmitted into the cell through conformational changes in Tar is predicted to involve a piston displacement of one of the α4 helices of the homodimer. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by an attractant, the three-dimensional structures of the E. coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate, Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively, were determined. Of the two ligand-binding sites, only one site was occupied, and it clearly showed the electron density of an aspartate. The slight changes in conformation and the electrostatic surface potential around the aspartate-binding site were observed. In addition, the presence of an aspartate stabilized residues Phe-150' and Arg-73. A pistonlike displacement of helix α4b' was also induced by aspartate binding as predicted by the piston model. Taken together, these small changes might be related to the induction of Tar activity and might disturb binding of the second aspartate to the second binding site in E. coli. PMID:27292793

  4. Ligand binding to anti-cancer target CD44 investigated by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tin Trung; Tran, Duy Phuoc; Pham Dinh Quoc Huy; Hoang, Zung; Carloni, Paolo; Van Pham, Phuc; Nguyen, Chuong; Li, Mai Suan

    2016-07-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and receptor for hyaluronan, one of the major components of the tumor extracellular matrix. There is evidence that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan promotes breast cancer metastasis. Recently, the molecule F-19848A was shown to inhibit hyaluronan binding to receptor CD44 in a cell-based assay. In this study, we investigated the mechanism and energetics of F-19848A binding to CD44 using molecular simulation. Using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we obtained the binding free energy and inhibition constant of the complex. The van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the extended portion of F-19848A play key roles in the binding affinity. We screened natural products from a traditional Chinese medicine database to search for CD44 inhibitors. From combining pharmaceutical requirements with docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found ten compounds that are potentially better or equal to the F-19848A ligand at binding to CD44 receptor. Therefore, we have identified new candidates of CD44 inhibitors, based on molecular simulation, which may be effective small molecules for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27342250

  5. Domain interplay in the urokinase receptor. Requirement for the third domain in high affinity ligand binding and demonstration of ligand contact sites in distinct receptor domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Ronne, E; Dano, K

    1996-01-01

    . This result shows that in addition to D1, which has an established function in ligand binding (Behrendt, N., Ploug, M., Patthy, L., Houen, G., Blasi, F., and Dano, K. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 7842-7847), D3 has an important role in governing a high affinity in the intact receptor. Real-time biomolecular...

  6. Conformational changes and ligand recognition of Escherichia coli D-xylose binding protein revealed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sooriyaarachchi, Sanjeewani; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Park, Chankyu;

    2010-01-01

    ATP binding cassette transport systems account for most import of necessary nutrients in bacteria. The periplasmic binding component (or an equivalent membrane-anchored protein) is critical to recognizing cognate ligand and directing it to the appropriate membrane permease. Here we report the X-r...

  7. A nuclear magnetic resonance-based structural rationale for contrasting stoichiometry and ligand binding site(s) in fatty acid-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Estephan, Rima; Yang, Xiaomin; Vela, Adriana; Wang, Hsin; Bernard, Cédric; Stark, Ruth E

    2011-03-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is a 14 kDa cytosolic polypeptide, differing from other family members in the number of ligand binding sites, the diversity of bound ligands, and the transfer of fatty acid(s) to membranes primarily via aqueous diffusion rather than direct collisional interactions. Distinct two-dimensional (1)H-(15)N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals indicative of slowly exchanging LFABP assemblies formed during stepwise ligand titration were exploited, without determining the protein-ligand complex structures, to yield the stoichiometries for the bound ligands, their locations within the protein binding cavity, the sequence of ligand occupation, and the corresponding protein structural accommodations. Chemical shifts were monitored for wild-type LFABP and an R122L/S124A mutant in which electrostatic interactions viewed as being essential to fatty acid binding were removed. For wild-type LFABP, the results compared favorably with the data for previous tertiary structures of oleate-bound wild-type LFABP in crystals and in solution: there are two oleates, one U-shaped ligand that positions the long hydrophobic chain deep within the cavity and another extended structure with the hydrophobic chain facing the cavity and the carboxylate group lying close to the protein surface. The NMR titration validated a prior hypothesis that the first oleate to enter the cavity occupies the internal protein site. In contrast, (1)H and (15)N chemical shift changes supported only one liganded oleate for R122L/S124A LFABP, at an intermediate location within the protein cavity. A rationale based on protein sequence and electrostatics was developed to explain the stoichiometry and binding site trends for LFABPs and to put these findings into context within the larger protein family. PMID:21226535

  8. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  9. Crystal structures of the ligand-binding region of uPARAP: effect of calcium ion binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Cai; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Engelholm, Lars H; Li, Rui; Liu, Min; Jiang, Longguang; Luo, Zhipu; Behrendt, Niels; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    The proteins of the mannose receptor (MR) family share a common domain organization and have a broad range of biological functions. Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP) (or Endo180) is a member of this family and plays an important role in extracellular matrix remodelling through interaction with its ligands, including collagens and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). We report the crystal structures of the first four domains of uPARAP (also named the ligand-binding region, LBR) at pH 7.4 in Ca(2+)-bound and Ca(2+)-free forms. The first domain (cysteine-rich or CysR domain) folds into a new and unique conformation different from the β-trefoil fold of typical CysR domains. The so-called long loop regions (LLRs) of the C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD) 1 and 2 (the third and fourth domain) mediate the direct contacts between these domains. These LLRs undergo a Ca(2+)-dependent conformational change, and this is likely to be the key structural determinant affecting the overall conformation of uPARAP. Our results provide a molecular mechanism to support the structural flexibility of uPARAP, and shed light on the structural flexibility of other members of the MR family. PMID:27247422

  10. Synthetic Peptide Ligands of the Antigen Binding Receptor Induce Programmed Cell Death in a Human B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renschler, Markus F.; Bhatt, Ramesh R.; Dower, William J.; Levy, Ronald

    1994-04-01

    Peptide ligands for the antigen binding site of the surface immunoglobulin receptor of a human B-cell lymphoma cell line were identified with the use of filamentous phage libraries displaying random 8- and 12-amino acid peptides. Corresponding synthetic peptides bound specifically to the antigen binding site of this immunoglobulin receptor and blocked the binding of an anti-idiotype antibody. The ligands, when conjugated to form dimers or tetramers, induced cell death by apoptosis in vitro with an IC50 between 40 and 200 nM. This effect was associated with specific stimulation of intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation.

  11. Evolution of off-lattice model proteins under ligand binding constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik D.; Grishin, Nick V.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate protein evolution using an off-lattice polymer model evolved to imitate the behavior of small enzymes. Model proteins evolve through mutations to nucleotide sequences (including insertions and deletions) and are selected to fold and maintain a specific binding site compatible with a model ligand. We show that this requirement is, in itself, sufficient to maintain an ordered folding domain, and we compare it to the requirement of folding an ordered (but otherwise unrestricted) domain. We measure rates of amino acid change as a function of local environment properties such as solvent exposure, packing density, and distance from the active site, as well as overall rates of sequence and structure change, both along and among model lineages in star phylogenies. The model recapitulates essentially all of the behavior found in protein phylogenetic analyses, and predicts that amino acid substitution rates vary linearly with distance from the binding site.

  12. pMD-Membrane: A Method for Ligand Binding Site Identification in Membrane-Bound Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Prakash

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Probe-based or mixed solvent molecular dynamics simulation is a useful approach for the identification and characterization of druggable sites in drug targets. However, thus far the method has been applied only to soluble proteins. A major reason for this is the potential effect of the probe molecules on membrane structure. We have developed a technique to overcome this limitation that entails modification of force field parameters to reduce a few pairwise non-bonded interactions between selected atoms of the probe molecules and bilayer lipids. We used the resulting technique, termed pMD-membrane, to identify allosteric ligand binding sites on the G12D and G13D oncogenic mutants of the K-Ras protein bound to a negatively charged lipid bilayer. In addition, we show that differences in probe occupancy can be used to quantify changes in the accessibility of druggable sites due to conformational changes induced by membrane binding or mutation.

  13. An integrated methodology for data processing in dynamic force spectroscopy of ligand-receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odorico, M.; Teulon, J.-M.; Berthoumieu, O. [CEA-Valrho, DSV-DIEP-SBTN, BP 17171, Bagnols sur Ceze 30207 (France); Chen, S.-W. [13 avenue de la Mayre, Bagnols sur Ceze 30200 (France); Parot, P.; Pellequer, J.-L. [CEA-Valrho, DSV-DIEP-SBTN, BP 17171, Bagnols sur Ceze 30207 (France)

    2007-10-15

    Dynamic force spectroscopy (DFS), using atomic force microscopy (AFM), is a powerful tool to study ligand-receptor binding. The interaction mode of two binding partners is investigated by exploring stochastic behaviors of bond rupture events. However, to define a rupture event from force-distance measurements is not conclusive or unique in literature. To reveal the influence of event identification methods, we have developed an efficient protocol to manage tremendous amount of data by implementing different choices of peak selection from the force-distance curve. This data processing software simplifies routinely experimental procedures such as cantilever spring constant and force-distance curve calibrations, statistical treatments of data, and analysis distributions of rupture events. In the present work, we took available experimental data from a complex between a chelate metal compound and a monoclonal antibody as a study system.

  14. Roles of cell and microvillus deformation and receptor-ligand binding kinetics in cell rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Parag; Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles D; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment to sites of inflammation is initiated by selectin-mediated PMN tethering and rolling on activated endothelium under flow. Cell rolling is modulated by bulk cell deformation (mesoscale), microvillus deformability (microscale), and receptor-ligand binding kinetics (nanoscale). Selectin-ligand bonds exhibit a catch-slip bond behavior, and their dissociation is governed not only by the force but also by the force history. Whereas previous theoretical models have studied the significance of these three "length scales" in isolation, how their interplay affects cell rolling has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a three-dimensional computational model that integrates the aforementioned length scales to delineate their relative contributions to PMN rolling. Our simulations predict that the catch-slip bond behavior and to a lesser extent bulk cell deformation are responsible for the shear threshold phenomenon. Cells bearing deformable rather than rigid microvilli roll slower only at high P-selectin site densities and elevated levels of shear (>or=400 s(-1)). The more compliant cells (membrane stiffness=1.2 dyn/cm) rolled slower than cells with a membrane stiffness of 3.0 dyn/cm at shear rates >50 s(-1). In summary, our model demonstrates that cell rolling over a ligand-coated surface is a highly coordinated process characterized by a complex interplay between forces acting on three distinct length scales.

  15. Searching the protein structure database for ligand-binding site similarities using CPASS v.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caprez Adam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent analysis of protein sequences deposited in the NCBI RefSeq database indicates that ~8.5 million protein sequences are encoded in prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, where ~30% are explicitly annotated as "hypothetical" or "uncharacterized" protein. Our Comparison of Protein Active-Site Structures (CPASS v.2 database and software compares the sequence and structural characteristics of experimentally determined ligand binding sites to infer a functional relationship in the absence of global sequence or structure similarity. CPASS is an important component of our Functional Annotation Screening Technology by NMR (FAST-NMR protocol and has been successfully applied to aid the annotation of a number of proteins of unknown function. Findings We report a major upgrade to our CPASS software and database that significantly improves its broad utility. CPASS v.2 is designed with a layered architecture to increase flexibility and portability that also enables job distribution over the Open Science Grid (OSG to increase speed. Similarly, the CPASS interface was enhanced to provide more user flexibility in submitting a CPASS query. CPASS v.2 now allows for both automatic and manual definition of ligand-binding sites and permits pair-wise, one versus all, one versus list, or list versus list comparisons. Solvent accessible surface area, ligand root-mean square difference, and Cβ distances have been incorporated into the CPASS similarity function to improve the quality of the results. The CPASS database has also been updated. Conclusions CPASS v.2 is more than an order of magnitude faster than the original implementation, and allows for multiple simultaneous job submissions. Similarly, the CPASS database of ligand-defined binding sites has increased in size by ~ 38%, dramatically increasing the likelihood of a positive search result. The modification to the CPASS similarity function is effective in reducing CPASS similarity scores

  16. Computational study of ligand binding in lipid transfer proteins: Structures, interfaces, and free energies of protein-lipid complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez Pacios, Luis; Gomez Casado, Cristina; Tordesillas Villuendas, Leticia; Palacín Gómez, Aranzazu; Sanchez-Monge Laguna De Rins, Maria Rosa; Díaz Perales, Araceli

    2012-01-01

    Plant nonspecific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs) bind a wide variety of lipids, which allows them to perform disparate functions. Recent reports on their multifunctionality in plant growth processes have posed new questions on the versatile binding abilities of these proteins. The lack of binding specificity has been customarily explained in qualitative terms on the basis of a supposed structural flexibility and nonspecificity of hydrophobic protein-ligand interactions. We present here a co...

  17. LIGSITEcsc: predicting ligand binding sites using the Connolly surface and degree of conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schroeder Michael

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying pockets on protein surfaces is of great importance for many structure-based drug design applications and protein-ligand docking algorithms. Over the last ten years, many geometric methods for the prediction of ligand-binding sites have been developed. Results We present LIGSITEcsc, an extension and implementation of the LIGSITE algorithm. LIGSITEcsc is based on the notion of surface-solvent-surface events and the degree of conservation of the involved surface residues. We compare our algorithm to four other approaches, LIGSITE, CAST, PASS, and SURFNET, and evaluate all on a dataset of 48 unbound/bound structures and 210 bound-structures. LIGSITEcsc performs slightly better than the other tools and achieves a success rate of 71% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion The use of the Connolly surface leads to slight improvements, the prediction re-ranking by conservation to significant improvements of the binding site predictions. A web server for LIGSITEcsc and its source code is available at scoppi.biotec.tu-dresden.de/pocket.

  18. Assaying the binding strength of G-quadruplex ligands using single-molecule TPM experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Wei; Chu, Jen-Fei; Tsai, Cheng-Ting; Fang, Hung-Chih; Chang, Ta-Chau; Li, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-15

    G-quadruplexes are stable secondary structures formed by Hoogsteen base pairing of guanine-rich single-stranded DNA sequences in the presence of monovalent cations (Na(+) or K(+)). Folded G-quadruplex (G4) structures in human telomeres have been proposed as a potential target for cancer therapy. In this study, we used single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments to assay the binding strength of possible G4 ligands. We found that individual single-stranded DNA molecules containing the human telomeric sequence d[AGGG(TTAGGG)3] fluctuated between the folded and the unfolded states in a 10 mM Na(+) solution at 37 °C. The durations of folded and unfolded states were single-exponentially distributed, and in return the folding and unfolding rate constants were 1.68 ± 0.01 and 1.63 ± 0.03 (s(-1)), respectively. In the presence of G4 ligands, such as TMPyP4, DODCI, BMVC, and BMVPA, the unfolding rate constant decreased appreciably. In addition, combining the Cu(2+)-induced G4 unfolding and TPM assay, we showed that BMVC and TMPyP4 are better G4 stabilizers than DODCI. The capability of monitoring the fluctuation between the folded and the unfolded state of G4 DNA in real time allows the determination of both kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in a single measurement and offers a simple way to assay binding strength under various conditions.

  19. Application of Hydration Thermodynamics to the Evaluation of Protein Structures and Protein-Ligand Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Harano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Discovering the mechanism that controls the three-dimensional structures of proteins, which are closely related to their biological functions, remains a challenge in modern biological science, even for small proteins. From a thermodynamic viewpoint, the native structure of a protein can be understood as the global minimum of the free energy landscape of the protein-water system. However, it is still difficult to describe the energetics of protein stability in an effective manner. Recently, our group developed a free energy function with an all-atomic description for a protein that focuses on hydration thermodynamics. The validity of the function was examined using structural decoy sets that provide numerous misfolded “non-native” structures. For all targeted sets, the function was able to identify the experimentally determined native structure as the best structure. The energy function can also be used to calculate the binding free energy of a protein with ligands. I review the physicochemical theories employed in the development of the free energy function and recent studies evaluating protein structure stability and protein-ligand binding affinities that use this function.

  20. Improving the scoring of protein-ligand binding affinity by including the effects of structural water and electronic polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2013-06-24

    Docking programs that use scoring functions to estimate binding affinities of small molecules to biological targets are widely applied in drug design and drug screening with partial success. But accurate and efficient scoring functions for protein-ligand binding affinity still present a grand challenge to computational chemists. In this study, the polarized protein-specific charge model (PPC) is incorporated into the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) method to rescore the binding poses of some protein-ligand complexes, for which docking programs, such as Autodock, could not predict their binding modes correctly. Different sampling techniques (single minimized conformation and multiple molecular dynamics (MD) snapshots) are used to test the performance of MM/PBSA combined with the PPC model. Our results show the availability and effectiveness of this approach in correctly ranking the binding poses. More importantly, the bridging water molecules are found to play an important role in correctly determining the protein-ligand binding modes. Explicitly including these bridging water molecules in MM/PBSA calculations improves the prediction accuracy significantly. Our study sheds light on the importance of both bridging water molecules and the electronic polarization in the development of more reliable scoring functions for predicting molecular docking and protein-ligand binding affinity. PMID:23651068

  1. DNA cleavage at the AP site via β-elimination mediated by the AP site-binding ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Yukiko S; Sasaki, Shigeki

    2016-02-15

    DNA is continuously damaged by endogenous and exogenous factors such as oxidation and alkylation. In the base excision repair pathway, the damaged nucleobases are removed by DNA N-glycosylase to form the abasic sites (AP sites). The alkylating antitumor agent exhibits cytotoxicity through the formation of the AP site. Therefore blockage or modulation of the AP site repair pathway may enhance the antitumor efficacy of DNA alkylating agents. In this study, we have examined the effects of the nucleobase-polyamine conjugated ligands (G-, A-, C- and T-ligands) on the cleavage of the AP site. The G- and A-ligands cleaved DNA at the AP site by promoting β-elimination in a non-selective manner by the G-ligand, and in a selective manner for the opposing dT by the A-ligand. These results suggest that the nucleobase-polyamine conjugate ligands may have the potential for enhancement of the cytotoxicities of the AP site.

  2. Crystal structures and ligand binding of PurM proteins from Thermus thermophilus and Geobacillus kaustophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Mayumi; Baba, Seiki; Watanabe, Yuzo; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Sampei, Gen-Ichi; Kawai, Gota

    2016-03-01

    Crystal structures of 5-aminoimidazole ribonucleotide (AIR) synthetase, also known as PurM, from Thermus thermophilus (Tt) and Geobacillus kaustophilus (Gk) were determined. For TtPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with four dimers in an asymmetric unit. For GkPurM, the maximum resolution was 2.2 Å and the space group was P21212 with one monomer in asymmetric unit. The biological unit is dimer for both TtPurM and GkPurM and the dimer structures were similar to previously determined structures of PurM in general. For TtPurM, ∼50 residues at the amino terminal were disordered in the crystal structure whereas, for GkPurM, the corresponding region covered the ATP-binding site forming an α helix in part, suggesting that the N-terminal region of PurM changes its conformation upon binding of ligands. FGAM binding site was predicted by the docking simulation followed by the MD simulation based on the SO4 (2-) binding site found in the crystal structure of TtPurM.

  3. Ligands for pheromone-sensing neurons are not conformationally activated odorant binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Gomez-Diaz

    Full Text Available Pheromones form an essential chemical language of intraspecific communication in many animals. How olfactory systems recognize pheromonal signals with both sensitivity and specificity is not well understood. An important in vivo paradigm for this process is the detection mechanism of the sex pheromone (Z-11-octadecenyl acetate (cis-vaccenyl acetate [cVA] in Drosophila melanogaster. cVA-evoked neuronal activation requires a secreted odorant binding protein, LUSH, the CD36-related transmembrane protein SNMP, and the odorant receptor OR67d. Crystallographic analysis has revealed that cVA-bound LUSH is conformationally distinct from apo (unliganded LUSH. Recombinantly expressed mutant versions of LUSH predicted to enhance or diminish these structural changes produce corresponding alterations in spontaneous and/or cVA-evoked activity when infused into olfactory sensilla, leading to a model in which the ligand for pheromone receptors is not free cVA, but LUSH that is "conformationally activated" upon cVA binding. Here we present evidence that contradicts this model. First, we demonstrate that the same LUSH mutants expressed transgenically affect neither basal nor pheromone-evoked activity. Second, we compare the structures of apo LUSH, cVA/LUSH, and complexes of LUSH with non-pheromonal ligands and find no conformational property of cVA/LUSH that can explain its proposed unique activated state. Finally, we show that high concentrations of cVA can induce neuronal activity in the absence of LUSH, but not SNMP or OR67d. Our findings are not consistent with the model that the cVA/LUSH complex acts as the pheromone ligand, and suggest that pheromone molecules alone directly activate neuronal receptors.

  4. SPOT-Ligand: Fast and effective structure-based virtual screening by binding homology search according to ligand and receptor similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhan, Jian; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2016-07-01

    Structure-based virtual screening usually involves docking of a library of chemical compounds onto the functional pocket of the target receptor so as to discover novel classes of ligands. However, the overall success rate remains low and screening a large library is computationally intensive. An alternative to this "ab initio" approach is virtual screening by binding homology search. In this approach, potential ligands are predicted based on similar interaction pairs (similarity in receptors and ligands). SPOT-Ligand is an approach that integrates ligand similarity by Tanimoto coefficient and receptor similarity by protein structure alignment program SPalign. The method was found to yield a consistent performance in DUD and DUD-E docking benchmarks even if model structures were employed. It improves over docking methods (DOCK6 and AUTODOCK Vina) and has a performance comparable to or better than other binding-homology methods (FINDsite and PoLi) with higher computational efficiency. The server is available at http://sparks-lab.org. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27074979

  5. Mixed ligand ruthenium(III) complexes of benzaldehyde 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazones with triphenylphosphine/triphenylarsine co-ligands: Synthesis, DNA binding, DNA cleavage, antioxidative and cytotoxic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, K.; Sathiyaraj, S.; Raja, G.; Jayabalakrishnan, C.

    2013-08-01

    The new ruthenium(III) complexes with 4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone ligands, (E)-2-(2-chlorobenzylidene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL1) and (E)-2-(2-nitrobenzylidene)-N-methylhydrazinecarbothioamide (HL2), were prepared and characterized by various physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The title compounds act as bidentate, monobasic chelating ligands with S and N as the donor sites and are preferably found in the thiol form in all the complexes studied. The molecular structure of HL1 and HL2 were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction method. DNA binding of the ligands and complexes were investigated by absorption spectroscopy and IR spectroscopy. It reveals that the compounds bind to nitrogenous bases of DNA via intercalation. The oxidative cleavage of the complexes with CT-DNA inferred that the effects of cleavage are dose dependent. Antioxidant study of the ligands and complexes showed the significant antioxidant activity against DPPH radical. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the ligands and complexes against MCF-7 cell line was assayed which showed higher cytotoxic activity with the lower IC50 values indicating their efficiency in killing the cancer cells even at low concentrations.

  6. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqing; Chang, Bianca W. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Mans, Ben J. [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Agricultural Research Council, Onderstepoort 0110 (South Africa); Ribeiro, Jose M. C.; Andersen, John F., E-mail: jandersen@niaid.nih.gov [NIH/NIAID, 12735 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity.

  7. Structure and ligand-binding properties of the biogenic amine-binding protein from the saliva of a blood-feeding insect vector of Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic amine-binding proteins mediate the anti-inflammatory and antihemostatic activities of blood-feeding insect saliva. The structure of the amine-binding protein from R. prolixus reveals the interaction of biogenic amine ligands with the protein. Proteins that bind small-molecule mediators of inflammation and hemostasis are essential for blood-feeding by arthropod vectors of infectious disease. In ticks and triatomine insects, the lipocalin protein family is greatly expanded and members have been shown to bind biogenic amines, eicosanoids and ADP. These compounds are potent mediators of platelet activation, inflammation and vascular tone. In this paper, the structure of the amine-binding protein (ABP) from Rhodnius prolixus, a vector of the trypanosome that causes Chagas disease, is described. ABP binds the biogenic amines serotonin and norepinephrine with high affinity. A complex with tryptamine shows the presence of a binding site for a single ligand molecule in the central cavity of the β-barrel structure. The cavity contains significant additional volume, suggesting that this protein may have evolved from the related nitrophorin proteins, which bind a much larger heme ligand in the central cavity

  8. Synthesis and binding characteristics of [(3)H]neuromedin N, a NTS2 receptor ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Fanni; Mallareddy, Jayapal Reddy; Tourwé, Dirk; Lipkowski, Andrzej W; Bujalska-Zadrozny, Magdalena; Benyhe, Sándor; Ballet, Steven; Tóth, Géza; Kleczkowska, Patrycja

    2016-06-01

    Neurotensin (NT) and its analog neuromedin N (NN) are formed by the processing of a common precursor in mammalian brain tissue and intestines. The biological effects mediated by NT and NN (e.g. analgesia, hypothermia) result from the interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. The goal of this study consisted of the synthesis and radiolabeling of NN, as well as the determination of the binding characteristics of [(3)H]NN and G protein activation by the cold ligand. In homologous displacement studies a weak affinity was determined for NN, with IC50 values of 454nM in rat brain and 425nM in rat spinal cord membranes. In saturation binding experiments the Kd value proved to be 264.8±30.18nM, while the Bmax value corresponded to 3.8±0.2pmol/mg protein in rat brain membranes. The specific binding of [(3)H]NN was saturable, interacting with a single set of homogenous binding sites. In sodium sensitivity experiments, a very weak inhibitory effect of Na(+) ions was observed on the binding of [(3)H]NN, resulting in an IC50 of 150.6mM. In [(35)S]GTPγS binding experiments the Emax value was 112.3±1.4% in rat brain and 112.9±2.4% in rat spinal cord membranes and EC50 values of 0.7nM and 0.79nM were determined, respectively. NN showed moderate agonist activities in stimulating G proteins. The stimulatory effect of NN could be maximally inhibited via use of the NTS2 receptor antagonist levocabastine, but not by the opioid receptor specific antagonist naloxone, nor by the NTS1 antagonist SR48692. These observations allow us to conclude that [(3)H]NN labels NTS2 receptors in rat brain membranes. PMID:26707235

  9. Protein-Ligand Binding Potential of Mean Force Calculations with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange on Alchemical Interaction Grids

    CERN Document Server

    Minh, David D L

    2015-01-01

    A binding potential of mean force (BPMF) is a free energy of noncovalent association in which one binding partner is flexible and the other is rigid. I have developed a method to calculate BPMFs for protein-ligand systems. The method is based on replica exchange sampling from multiple thermodynamic states at different temperatures and protein-ligand interaction strengths. Protein-ligand interactions are represented by interpolating precomputed electrostatic and van der Waals grids. Using a simple estimator for thermodynamic length, thermodynamic states are initialized at approximately equal intervals. The method is demonstrated on the Astex diverse set, a database of 85 protein-ligand complexes relevant to pharmacy or agriculture. Fifteen independent simulations of each complex were started using poses from crystallography, docking, or the lowest-energy pose observed in the other simulations. Benchmark simulations completed within three days on a single processor. Overall, protocols initialized using the ther...

  10. Computational fragment-based binding site identification by ligand competitive saturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgun Guvench

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Fragment-based drug discovery using NMR and x-ray crystallographic methods has proven utility but also non-trivial time, materials, and labor costs. Current computational fragment-based approaches circumvent these issues but suffer from limited representations of protein flexibility and solvation effects, leading to difficulties with rigorous ranking of fragment affinities. To overcome these limitations we describe an explicit solvent all-atom molecular dynamics methodology (SILCS: Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation that uses small aliphatic and aromatic molecules plus water molecules to map the affinity pattern of a protein for hydrophobic groups, aromatic groups, hydrogen bond donors, and hydrogen bond acceptors. By simultaneously incorporating ligands representative of all these functionalities, the method is an in silico free energy-based competition assay that generates three-dimensional probability maps of fragment binding (FragMaps indicating favorable fragment:protein interactions. Applied to the two-fold symmetric oncoprotein BCL-6, the SILCS method yields two-fold symmetric FragMaps that recapitulate the crystallographic binding modes of the SMRT and BCOR peptides. These FragMaps account both for important sequence and structure differences in the C-terminal halves of the two peptides and also the high mobility of the BCL-6 His116 sidechain in the peptide-binding groove. Such SILCS FragMaps can be used to qualitatively inform the design of small-molecule inhibitors or as scoring grids for high-throughput in silico docking that incorporate both an atomic-level description of solvation and protein flexibility.

  11. Probing organic ligands and their binding schemes on nanocrystals by mass spectrometric and FT-IR spectroscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jin Gyeong; Choi, Eunjin; Piao, Yuanzhe; Han, Sang Woo; Lee, Tae Geol

    2016-02-01

    We report an analysis method to identify conjugated ligands and their binding states on semiconductor nanocrystals based on their molecular information. Surface science techniques, such as time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and FT-IR spectroscopy, are adopted based on the micro-aggregated sampling method. Typical trioctylphosphine oxide-based synthesis methods of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been criticized because of the peculiar effects of impurities on the synthesis processes. Because the ToF-SIMS technique provides molecular composition evidence on the existence of certain ligands, we were able to clearly identify n-octylphosphonic acid (OPA) as a surface ligand on CdSe/ZnS QDs. Furthermore, the complementary use of the ToF-SIMS technique with the FT-IR technique could reveal the OPA ligands' binding state as bidentate complexes.We report an analysis method to identify conjugated ligands and their binding states on semiconductor nanocrystals based on their molecular information. Surface science techniques, such as time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and FT-IR spectroscopy, are adopted based on the micro-aggregated sampling method. Typical trioctylphosphine oxide-based synthesis methods of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) have been criticized because of the peculiar effects of impurities on the synthesis processes. Because the ToF-SIMS technique provides molecular composition evidence on the existence of certain ligands, we were able to clearly identify n-octylphosphonic acid (OPA) as a surface ligand on CdSe/ZnS QDs. Furthermore, the complementary use of the ToF-SIMS technique with the FT-IR technique could reveal the OPA ligands' binding state as bidentate complexes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional data (Fig. S1-S5). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07592k

  12. Application of the novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay to relaxin-RXFP1 system for interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Jia-Hui; Gao, Yu; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Liu, Ya-Li; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-04-01

    Relaxin is a prototype of the relaxin family peptide hormones and plays important biological functions by binding and activating the G protein-coupled receptor RXFP1. To study their interactions, in the present work, we applied the newly developed bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay to the relaxin-RXFP1 system. First, a fully active easily labeled relaxin, in which three Lys residues of human relaxin-2 were replaced by Arg, was prepared through overexpression of a single-chain precursor in Pichia pastoris and in vitro enzymatic maturation. Thereafter, the B-chain N-terminus of the easily labeled relaxin was chemically cross-linked with a C-terminal cysteine residue of an engineered NanoLuc through a disulfide linkage. Receptor-binding assays demonstrated that the NanoLuc-conjugated relaxin retained high binding affinity with the receptor RXFP1 (K d = 1.11 ± 0.08 nM, n = 3) and was able to sensitively monitor binding of a variety of ligands with RXFP1. Using the novel bioluminescent binding assay, we demonstrated that three highly conserved B-chain Arg residues of relaxin-3 had distinct contributions to binding of the receptor RXFP1. In summary, our present work provides a novel bioluminescent ligand-receptor binding assay for the relaxin-RXFP1 system to facilitate their interaction studies, such as characterization of relaxin analogues or screening novel agonists or antagonists of RXFP1. PMID:26767372

  13. Determining PPARγ-ligand binding affinity using fluorescent assay with cis-parinaric acid as a probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Zhenting; LUO Haibin; CHEN Lili; SHEN Jianhua; CHEN Kaixian; JIANG Hualiang; SHEN Xu

    2005-01-01

    Upon the study of small-molecules binding to proteins, the traditional methods for calculating dissociation constants (Kd and Ki) have shortcomings in dealing with the single binding site models. In this paper, two equations have been derived to solve this problem. These two equations are independent of the total concentration or initial degree of saturation of receptor and the activity of the competitive molecule. Through nonlinear fitting against these two equations, Kd value of a probe can be obtained by binding assay, and Ki value of a ligand can be obtained by competitive assay. Moreover, only the total concentrations of receptor([R]t), ligand([L]t) and probe([P]t) are required for the data fitting. In this work, Ki values of some typical ligands of PPARγ were successfully determined by use of our equations, among which the Ki value of PPARγ-LY171883 was reported for the first time.

  14. Cross-talk between the ligand- and DNA-binding domains of estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Greene, Geoffrey L; Ravikumar, Krishnakumar M; Yang, Sichun

    2013-11-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a hormone-responsive transcription factor that contains several discrete functional domains, including a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a DNA-binding domain (DBD). Despite a wealth of knowledge about the behaviors of individual domains, the molecular mechanisms of cross-talk between LBD and DBD during signal transduction from hormone to DNA-binding of ERα remain elusive. Here, we apply a multiscale approach combining coarse-grained (CG) and atomistically detailed simulations to characterize this cross-talk mechanism via an investigation of the ERα conformational landscape. First, a CG model of ERα is built based on crystal structures of individual LBDs and DBDs, with more emphasis on their interdomain interactions. Second, molecular dynamics simulations are implemented and enhanced sampling is achieved via the "push-pull-release" strategy in the search for different LBD-DBD orientations. Third, multiple energetically stable ERα conformations are identified on the landscape. A key finding is that estradiol-bound LBDs utilize the well-described activation helix H12 to pack and stabilize LBD-DBD interactions. Our results suggest that the estradiol-bound LBDs can serve as a scaffold to position and stabilize the DBD-DNA complex, consistent with experimental observations of enhanced DNA binding with the LBD. Final assessment using atomic-level simulations shows that these CG-predicted models are significantly stable within a 15-ns simulation window and that specific pairs of lysine residues in close proximity at the domain interfaces could serve as candidate sites for chemical cross-linking studies. Together, these simulation results provide a molecular view of the role of ERα domain interactions in response to hormone binding.

  15. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian, E-mail: sfalberti@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Peña 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Roitberg, Adrian E. [Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data.

  16. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data

  17. Studies on Immunogenicity and Antigenicity of Baculovirus-Expressed Binding Region of Plasmodium falciparum EBA-140 Merozoite Ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerka, Agata; Rydzak, Joanna; Lass, Anna; Szostakowska, Beata; Nahorski, Wacław; Wroczyńska, Agnieszka; Myjak, Przemyslaw; Krotkiewski, Hubert; Jaskiewicz, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    The erythrocyte binding ligand 140 (EBA-140) is a member of the Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigens (EBA) family, which are considered as prospective candidates for malaria vaccine development. EBA proteins were identified as important targets for naturally acquired inhibitory antibodies. Natural antibody response against EBA-140 ligand was found in individuals living in malaria-endemic areas. The EBA-140 ligand is a paralogue of the well-characterized P. falciparum EBA-175 protein. They both share homology of domain structure, including the binding region (Region II), which consists of two homologous F1 and F2 domains and is responsible for ligand-erythrocyte receptor interaction during merozoite invasion. It was shown that the erythrocyte receptor for EBA-140 ligand is glycophorin C-a minor human erythrocyte sialoglycoprotein. In studies on the immunogenicity of P. falciparum EBA ligands, the recombinant proteins are of great importance. In this report, we have demonstrated that the recombinant baculovirus-obtained EBA-140 Region II is immunogenic and antigenic. It can raise specific antibodies in rabbits, and it is recognized by natural antibodies present in sera of patients with malaria, and thus, it may be considered for inclusion in multicomponent blood-stage vaccines. PMID:26439848

  18. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Maria, E-mail: mariami@mail.nih.gov [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E. [Protein Purification Core, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States); Wlodawer, Alexander [Protein Structure Section, Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland 21702-1201 (United States)

    2009-12-01

    The crystal structure of the Taz2 zinc-finger domain of the human p300 transcriptional coactivator was determined using the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. Crystal contacts suggested a possible novel mode of Taz2–peptide ligand interactions. CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723–1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813–1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  19. Free energy calculations to estimate ligand-binding affinities in structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M Rami; Reddy, C Ravikumar; Rathore, R S; Erion, Mark D; Aparoy, P; Reddy, R Nageswara; Reddanna, P

    2014-01-01

    Post-genomic era has led to the discovery of several new targets posing challenges for structure-based drug design efforts to identify lead compounds. Multiple computational methodologies exist to predict the high ranking hit/lead compounds. Among them, free energy methods provide the most accurate estimate of predicted binding affinity. Pathway-based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP), Thermodynamic Integration (TI) and Slow Growth (SG) as well as less rigorous end-point methods such as Linear interaction energy (LIE), Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann./Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) and λ-dynamics have been applied to a variety of biologically relevant problems. The recent advances in free energy methods and their applications including the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity for some of the important drug targets have been elaborated. Results using a recently developed Quantum Mechanics (QM)/Molecular Mechanics (MM) based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method, which has the potential to provide a very accurate estimation of binding affinities to date has been discussed. A case study for the optimization of inhibitors for the fructose 1,6- bisphosphatase inhibitors has been described. PMID:23947646

  20. Chronic brief restraint decreases in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptor ligand to mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosaddeghi, M; Burke, T F; Moerschbaecher, J M

    1993-01-01

    This study examines the effects of chronic brief restraint on in vivo benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor binding in mouse brain. Three groups of mice were used. Mice in group 1 were neither restrained nor injected (ACUTE control). Mice in group 2 were restrained for 5-6 s by grabbing the back skin and holding the subject upside-down at a 45 degrees angle as if to be injected (CHRONIC SHAM control) for 7 d. Mice in group 3 (CHRONIC SALINE) received daily single intraperitoneal (ip) injections of saline (5 mL/kg) for 7 d. On d 8 BZD receptors were labeled in vivo by administration of 3 microCi [3H]flumazenil (ip). The levels of ligand bound in vivo to cerebral cortex (CX), cerebellum (CB), brain stem (BS), striatum (ST), hippocampus (HP), and hypothalamus (HY) were determined. Results indicated that the level of binding was significantly (p stress produces a decrease in BZD receptor binding sites. PMID:8385464

  1. Structural Basis of Ligand Binding by a C-di-GMP Riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Lipchock, S; Ames, T; Wang, J; Breaker, R; Strobel, S

    2009-01-01

    The second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3{prime}-5{prime})-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) regulates many processes in bacteria, including motility, pathogenesis and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches are important downstream targets in this signaling pathway. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution, of a c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer from Vibrio cholerae bound to c-di-GMP, showing that the ligand binds within a three-helix junction that involves base-pairing and extensive base-stacking. The symmetric c-di-GMP is recognized asymmetrically with respect to both the bases and the backbone. A mutant aptamer was engineered that preferentially binds the candidate signaling molecule c-di-AMP over c-di-GMP. Kinetic and structural data suggest that genetic regulation by the c-di-GMP riboswitch is kinetically controlled and that gene expression is modulated through the stabilization of a previously unidentified P1 helix, illustrating a direct mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling.

  2. Structural basis of ligand binding by a c-di-GMP riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kathryn D; Lipchock, Sarah V; Ames, Tyler D; Wang, Jimin; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2009-12-01

    The second messenger signaling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) regulates many processes in bacteria, including motility, pathogenesis and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches are important downstream targets in this signaling pathway. Here we report the crystal structure, at 2.7 A resolution, of a c-di-GMP riboswitch aptamer from Vibrio cholerae bound to c-di-GMP, showing that the ligand binds within a three-helix junction that involves base-pairing and extensive base-stacking. The symmetric c-di-GMP is recognized asymmetrically with respect to both the bases and the backbone. A mutant aptamer was engineered that preferentially binds the candidate signaling molecule c-di-AMP over c-di-GMP. Kinetic and structural data suggest that genetic regulation by the c-di-GMP riboswitch is kinetically controlled and that gene expression is modulated through the stabilization of a previously unidentified P1 helix, illustrating a direct mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling. PMID:19898477

  3. β-Subunit Binding Is Sufficient for Ligands to Open the Integrin αIIbβ3 Headpiece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fu-Yang; Zhu, Jianghai; Eng, Edward T; Hudson, Nathan E; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-02-26

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a KQAGDV motif at the fibrinogen γ-chain C terminus and to RGD motifs present in loops in many extracellular matrix proteins. These ligands bind in a groove between the integrin α and β-subunits; the basic Lys or Arg side chain hydrogen bonds to the αIIb-subunit, and the acidic Asp side chain coordinates to a metal ion held by the β3-subunit. Ligand binding induces headpiece opening, with conformational change in the β-subunit. During this opening, RGD slides in the ligand-binding pocket toward αIIb, with movement of the βI-domain β1-α1 loop toward αIIb, enabling formation of direct, charged hydrogen bonds between the Arg side chain and αIIb. Here we test whether ligand interactions with β3 suffice for stable ligand binding and headpiece opening. We find that the AGDV tetrapeptide from KQAGDV binds to the αIIbβ3 headpiece with affinity comparable with the RGDSP peptide from fibronectin. AGDV induced complete headpiece opening in solution as shown by increase in hydrodynamic radius. Soaking of AGDV into closed αIIbβ3 headpiece crystals induced intermediate states similarly to RGDSP. AGDV has very little contact with the α-subunit. Furthermore, as measured by epitope exposure, AGDV, like the fibrinogen γ C-terminal peptide and RGD, caused integrin extension on the cell surface. Thus, pushing by the β3-subunit on Asp is sufficient for headpiece opening and ligand sliding, and no pulling by the αIIb subunit on Arg is required.

  4. eMatchSite: sequence order-independent structure alignments of ligand binding pockets in protein models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Brylinski

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Detecting similarities between ligand binding sites in the absence of global homology between target proteins has been recognized as one of the critical components of modern drug discovery. Local binding site alignments can be constructed using sequence order-independent techniques, however, to achieve a high accuracy, many current algorithms for binding site comparison require high-quality experimental protein structures, preferably in the bound conformational state. This, in turn, complicates proteome scale applications, where only various quality structure models are available for the majority of gene products. To improve the state-of-the-art, we developed eMatchSite, a new method for constructing sequence order-independent alignments of ligand binding sites in protein models. Large-scale benchmarking calculations using adenine-binding pockets in crystal structures demonstrate that eMatchSite generates accurate alignments for almost three times more protein pairs than SOIPPA. More importantly, eMatchSite offers a high tolerance to structural distortions in ligand binding regions in protein models. For example, the percentage of correctly aligned pairs of adenine-binding sites in weakly homologous protein models is only 4-9% lower than those aligned using crystal structures. This represents a significant improvement over other algorithms, e.g. the performance of eMatchSite in recognizing similar binding sites is 6% and 13% higher than that of SiteEngine using high- and moderate-quality protein models, respectively. Constructing biologically correct alignments using predicted ligand binding sites in protein models opens up the possibility to investigate drug-protein interaction networks for complete proteomes with prospective systems-level applications in polypharmacology and rational drug repositioning. eMatchSite is freely available to the academic community as a web-server and a stand-alone software distribution at http://www.brylinski.org/ematchsite.

  5. Multiple ligand simultaneous docking (MLSD): A novel approach to study the effect of inhibitors on substrate binding to PPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, S; Aditya Rao, S J; Kumar, Vadlapudi; Ramesh, C K

    2015-12-01

    Multiple ligand simultaneous docking, a computational approach is used to study the concurrent interactions between substrate and the macromolecule binding together in the presence of an inhibitor. The present investigation deals with the study of the effect of different inhibitors on binding of substrate to the protein Polyphenoloxidase (PPO). The protein was isolated from Mucuna pruriens and confirmed as tyrosinases involved in L-DOPA production. The activity was measured using different inhibitors at different concentrations taking catechol as substrate. A high-throughput binding study was conducted to compare the binding orientations of individual ligands and multiple ligands employing Autodock 4.2. The results of single substrate docking showed a better binding of urea with the binding energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) and inter molecular energy of -3.48 kJ mol(-1) while the results of MLSD revealed that ascorbic acid combined with the substrate showed better inhibition with a decreased binding energy of -2.37 kJ mol(-1). PMID:26414950

  6. Renormalization of myoglobin-ligand binding energetics by quantum many-body effects

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Cedric; O'Regan, David D; Payne, Mike C

    2014-01-01

    We carry out a first-principles atomistic study of the electronic mechanisms of ligand binding and discrimination in the myoglobin protein. Electronic correlation effects are taken into account using one of the most advanced methods currently available, namely a linear-scaling density functional theory (DFT) approach wherein the treatment of localized iron 3d electrons is further refined using dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). This combination of methods explicitly accounts for dynamical and multi-reference quantum physics, such as valence and spin fluctuations, of the 3d electrons, whilst treating a significant proportion of the protein (more than 1000 atoms) with density functional theory. The computed electronic structure of the myoglobin complexes and the nature of the Fe-O2 bonding are validated against experimental spectroscopic observables. We elucidate and solve a long standing problem related to the quantum-mechanical description of the respiration process, namely that DFT calculations predict a st...

  7. Relationships between ligand binding sites, protein architecture and correlated paths of energy and conformational fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The statistical thermodynamics basis of energy and residue position fluctuations is explained for native proteins. The protein and its surroundings are treated as a canonical system with emphasis on the effects of energy exchange between the two. Fluctuations of the energy are related to fluctuations of residue positions, which in turn are related to the connectivity matrix of the protein, thus establishing a connection between energy fluctuation pathways and protein architecture. The model gives the locations of hotspots for ligand binding and identifies the pathways of energy conduction within the protein. Results are discussed in terms of two sets of models, the BPTI and 12 proteins that contain the PDZ domain. A possible use of the model for determining functionally similar domains in a diverse set of proteins is pointed out

  8. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N Antonenko

    Full Text Available Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin. Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL and (ii by an increased lifetime τ(PLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL nor τ(P changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors.

  9. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai; (CH-Boston); (DFCI)

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  10. Globin-like proteins in Caenorhabditis elegans: in vivo localization, ligand binding and structural properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Doorslaer Sabine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains more than 30 putative globin genes that all are transcribed. Although their translated amino acid sequences fit the globin fold, a variety of amino-acid substitutions and extensions generate a wide structural diversity among the putative globins. No information is available on the physicochemical properties and the in vivo expression. Results We expressed the globins in a bacterial system, characterized the purified proteins by optical and resonance Raman spectroscopy, measured the kinetics and equilibria of O2 binding and determined the crystal structure of GLB-1* (CysGH2 → Ser mutant. Furthermore, we studied the expression patterns of glb-1 (ZK637.13 and glb-26 (T22C1.2 in the worms using green fluorescent protein technology and measured alterations of their transcript abundances under hypoxic conditions.GLB-1* displays the classical three-over-three α-helical sandwich of vertebrate globins, assembled in a homodimer associated through facing E- and F-helices. Within the heme pocket the dioxygen molecule is stabilized by a hydrogen bonded network including TyrB10 and GlnE7.GLB-1 exhibits high ligand affinity, which is, however, lower than in other globins with the same distal TyrB10-GlnE7 amino-acid pair. In the absence of external ligands, the heme ferrous iron of GLB-26 is strongly hexacoordinated with HisE7, which could explain its extremely low affinity for CO. This globin oxidizes instantly to the ferric form in the presence of oxygen and is therefore incapable of reversible oxygen binding. Conclusion The presented data indicate that GLB-1 and GLB-26 belong to two functionally-different globin classes.

  11. Solution structure of human intestinal fatty acid binding protein: Implications for ligand entry and exit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fengli [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States); Luecke, Christian [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitaet (Germany); Baier, Leslie J. [NIDDK, NIH, Phoenix Epidemiology and Clinical Research Branch (United States); Sacchettini, James C. [Texas A and M University, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics (United States); Hamilton, James A. [Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Biophysics (United States)

    1997-04-15

    The human intestinal fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP) is a small (131 amino acids) protein which binds dietary long-chain fatty acids in the cytosol of enterocytes. Recently, an alanine to threonine substitution at position 54 in I-FABP has been identified which affects fatty acid binding and transport, and is associated with the development of insulin resistance in several populations including Mexican-Americans and Pima Indians. To investigate the molecular basis of the binding properties of I-FABP, the 3D solution structure of the more common form of human I-FABP (Ala54) was studied by multidimensional NMR spectroscopy.Recombinant I-FABP was expressed from E. coli in the presence and absence of 15N-enriched media. The sequential assignments for non-delipidated I-FABP were completed by using 2D homonuclear spectra (COSY, TOCSY and NOESY) and 3D heteronuclear spectra(NOESY-HMQC and TOCSY-HMQC). The tertiary structure of human I-FABP was calculated by using the distance geometry program DIANA based on 2519 distance constraints obtained from the NMR data. Subsequent energy minimization was carried out by using the program SYBYL in the presence of distance constraints. The conformation of human I-FABP consists of 10 antiparallel {beta}-strands which form two nearly orthogonal {beta}-sheets of five strands each, and two short {alpha}-helices that connect the {beta}-strands A and B. The interior of the protein consists of a water-filled cavity between the two {beta}-sheets. The NMR solution structure of human I-FABP is similar to the crystal structure of rat I-FABP.The NMR results show significant conformational variability of certain backbone segments around the postulated portal region for the entry and exit of fatty acid ligand.

  12. Estimation of statistical binding properties of ligand population during in vitro selection based on population dynamics theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aita, Takuyo; Nishigaki, Koichi; Husimi, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    During in vitro selection process, it is very valuable to monitor the binding properties of the ligand population in real time, particularly the population average of the association constant in the population. If this monitoring can be realized, the selection process can be controlled in a rational way. In this paper, we present a simple method to estimate the binding properties of the ligand population during in vitro selection. The framework of the method is as follows. First, the number of all the collected ligand molecules, which are eluted after incubation and washing, is measured. Ideally, this number corresponds to the number of all the ligand molecules bound with the target-receptor or other materials in a test tube. This measurement is performed through several successive rounds of selection. Second, the measured numbers of molecules are subjected to a theoretical analysis, based on the mathematical theory of population dynamics in the selection process. Then, we can estimate the probability density of the binding free energy in the ligand population. The validity of our method was confirmed by several computer simulations based on a physicochemical model. PMID:24239675

  13. Comparative thermodynamic studies on substrate and product binding of O-Acetylserine Sulfhydrylase reveals two different ligand recognition modes†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Sangaralingam

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of understanding the detailed mechanism of cysteine biosynthesis in bacteria is underscored by the fact that cysteine is the only sulfur donor for all cellular components containing reduced sulfur. O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS catalyzes this crucial last step in the cysteine biosynthesis and has been recognized as an important gene for the survival and virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Structural and kinetic studies have contributed to the understanding of mechanistic aspects of OASS, but details of ligand recognition features of OASS are not available. In the absence of any detailed study on the energetics of ligand binding, we have studied the thermodynamics of OASS from Salmonella typhimurium (StOASS, Haemophilus influenzae (HiOASS, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtOASS binding to their substrate O-acetylserine (OAS, substrate analogue (methionine, and product (cysteine. Results Ligand binding properties of three OASS enzymes are studied under defined solution conditions. Both substrate and product binding is an exothermic reaction, but their thermodynamic signatures are very different. Cysteine binding to OASS shows that both enthalpy and entropy contribute significantly to the binding free energy at all temperatures (10-30°C examined. The analyses of interaction between OASS with OAS (substrate or methionine (substrate analogue revealed a completely different mode of binding. Binding of both OAS and methionine to OASS is dominated by a favorable entropy change, with minor contribution from enthalpy change (ΔHSt-Met = -1.5 ± 0.1 kJ/mol; TΔSSt-Met = 8.2 kJ/mol at 20°C. Our salt dependent ligand binding studies indicate that methionine binding affinity is more sensitive to [NaCl] as compared to cysteine affinity. Conclusions We show that OASS from three different pathogenic bacteria bind substrate and product through two different mechanisms. Results indicate that predominantly entropy driven

  14. Structural analyses of the Slm1-PH domain demonstrate ligand binding in the non-canonical site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan Anand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pleckstrin homology (PH domains are common membrane-targeting modules and their best characterized ligands are a set of important signaling lipids that include phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PtdInsPs. PH domains recognize PtdInsPs through two distinct mechanisms that use different binding pockets on opposite sides of the β-strands 1 and 2: i a canonical binding site delimited by the β1-β2 and β3-β4loops and ii a non-canonical binding site bordered by the β1-β2 and β5-β6loops. The PH domain-containing protein Slm1 from budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for actin cytoskeleton polarization and cell growth. We recently reported that this PH domain binds PtdInsPs and phosphorylated sphingolipids in a cooperative manner. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To study the structural basis for the Slm1-PH domain (Slm1-PH specificity, we co-crystallized this domain with different soluble compounds that have structures analogous to anionic lipid head groups of reported Slm1 ligands: inositol 4-phosphate, which mimics phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns(4P, and phosphoserine as a surrogate for dihydrosphingosine 1-phosphate (DHS1-P. We found electron densities for the ligands within the so-called non-canonical binding site. An additional positively charged surface that contacts a phosphate group was identified next to the canonical binding site. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that Slm1-PH utilizes a non-canonical binding site to bind PtdInsPs, similar to that described for the PH domains of β-spectrin, Tiam1 and ArhGAP9. Additionally, Slm1-PH may have retained an active canonical site. We propose that the presence of both a canonical and a non-canonical binding pocket in Slm1-PH may account for the cooperative binding to PtdInsPs and DHS-1P.

  15. Brownian nanoimaging of interface dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at cell surfaces in 3-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Igor R; Evans, Evan A

    2013-04-01

    We describe a method for nanoimaging interfacial dynamics and ligand-receptor binding at surfaces of live cells in 3-D. The imaging probe is a 1-μm diameter glass bead confined by a soft laser trap to create a "cloud" of fluctuating states. Using a facile on-line method of video image analysis, the probe displacements are reported at ~10 ms intervals with bare precisions (±SD) of 4-6 nm along the optical axis (elevation) and 2 nm in the transverse directions. We demonstrate how the Brownian distributions are analyzed to characterize the free energy potential of each small probe in 3-D taking into account the blur effect of its motions during CCD image capture. Then, using the approach to image interactions of a labeled probe with lamellae of leukocytic cells spreading on cover-glass substrates, we show that deformations of the soft distribution in probe elevations provide both a sensitive long-range sensor for defining the steric topography of a cell lamella and a fast telemetry for reporting rare events of probe binding with its surface receptors. Invoking established principles of Brownian physics and statistical thermodynamics, we describe an off-line method of super resolution that improves precision of probe separations from a non-reactive steric boundary to ~1 nm.

  16. The Bet v 1 fold: an ancient, versatile scaffold for binding of large, hydrophobic ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breiteneder Heimo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major birch pollen allergen, Bet v 1, is a member of the ubiquitous PR-10 family of plant pathogenesis-related proteins. In recent years, a number of diverse plant proteins with low sequence similarity to Bet v 1 was identified. In addition, determination of the Bet v 1 structure revealed the existence of a large superfamily of structurally related proteins. In this study, we aimed to identify and classify all Bet v 1-related structures from the Protein Data Bank and all Bet v 1-related sequences from the Uniprot database. Results Structural comparisons of representative members of already known protein families structurally related to Bet v 1 with all entries of the Protein Data Bank yielded 47 structures with non-identical sequences. They were classified into eleven families, five of which were newly identified and not included in the Structural Classification of Proteins database release 1.71. The taxonomic distribution of these families extracted from the Pfam protein family database showed that members of the polyketide cyclase family and the activator of Hsp90 ATPase homologue 1 family were distributed among all three superkingdoms, while members of some bacterial families were confined to a small number of species. Comparison of ligand binding activities of Bet v 1-like superfamily members revealed that their functions were related to binding and metabolism of large, hydrophobic compounds such as lipids, hormones, and antibiotics. Phylogenetic relationships within the Bet v 1 family, defined as the group of proteins with significant sequence similarity to Bet v 1, were determined by aligning 264 Bet v 1-related sequences. A distance-based phylogenetic tree yielded a classification into 11 subfamilies, nine exclusively containing plant sequences and two subfamilies of bacterial proteins. Plant sequences included the pathogenesis-related proteins 10, the major latex proteins/ripening-related proteins subfamily, and

  17. Complementary Spectroscopic Assays for Investigating Protein-Ligand Binding Activity: A Project for the Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascotti, David P.; Waner, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    A protein-ligand binding, guided-inquiry laboratory project with potential application across the advanced undergraduate curriculum is described. At the heart of the project are fluorescence and spectrophotometric assays utilizing biotin-4-fluorescein and streptavidin. The use of the same stock solutions for an assay that may be examined by two…

  18. Different domains of Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins can bind to insect midgut membrane proteins on ligand blots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maagd, de R.A.; Klei, van der H.; Bakker, P.L.; Stiekema, W.J.; Bosch, D.

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the role of the constituent domains of the CryIA(b) and CryIA(c) δ-endotoxins in binding to midgut epithelial cell membrane proteins of Spodoptera exigua and Manduca sexta on ligand blots. A collection of wild- type and CryIC-CryIA hybrid toxins was used for this purpose. As demonstr

  19. Host-guest complexation. 18. Effects on cation binding of convergent ligand sites appended to macrocyclic polyethers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syntheses are reported for 16 new macrocyclic polyether ligand systems which contain potentially convergent side chains containing additional binding sites. The free energies of association of these systems in CDCl3 at 250C with Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+, NH4+, CH3NH3+, and t-BuNH3+ picrates were determined

  20. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  1. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties. PMID:27444879

  2. Effects of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of protein GB1 studied by steered molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ji-Guo; Zhao, Shu-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Feng; Li, Chun-Hua; Li, Jing-Yuan

    2016-08-01

    Regulation of the mechanical properties of proteins plays an important role in many biological processes, and sheds light on the design of biomaterials comprised of protein. At present, strategies to regulate protein mechanical stability focus mainly on direct modulation of the force-bearing region of the protein. Interestingly, the mechanical stability of GB1 can be significantly enhanced by the binding of Fc fragments of human IgG antibody, where the binding site is distant from the force-bearing region of the protein. The mechanism of this long-range allosteric control of protein mechanics is still elusive. In this work, the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical stability of GB1 was investigated using steered molecular dynamics simulation, and a mechanism underlying the enhanced protein mechanical stability is proposed. We found that the external force causes deformation of both force-bearing region and ligand binding site. In other words, there is a long-range coupling between these two regions. The binding of ligand restricts the distortion of the binding site and reduces the deformation of the force-bearing region through a long-range allosteric communication, which thus improves the overall mechanical stability of the protein. The simulation results are very consistent with previous experimental observations. Our studies thus provide atomic-level insights into the mechanical unfolding process of GB1, and explain the impact of ligand binding on the mechanical properties of the protein through long-range allosteric regulation, which should facilitate effective modulation of protein mechanical properties.

  3. Linking aptamer-ligand binding and expression platform folding in riboswitches: prospects for mechanistic modeling and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-ela, Fareed; Huang, Wei; Abd Elrahman, Maaly; Boyapati, Vamsi; Li, Pan

    2015-01-01

    The power of riboswitches in regulation of bacterial metabolism derives from coupling of two characteristics: recognition and folding. Riboswitches contain aptamers, which function as biosensors. Upon detection of the signaling molecule, the riboswitch transduces the signal into a genetic decision. The genetic decision is coupled to refolding of the expression platform, which is distinct from, although overlapping with, the aptamer. Early biophysical studies of riboswitches focused on recognition of the ligand by the aptamer-an important consideration for drug design. A mechanistic understanding of ligand-induced riboswitch RNA folding can further enhance riboswitch ligand design, and inform efforts to tune and engineer riboswitches with novel properties. X-ray structures of aptamer/ligand complexes point to mechanisms through which the ligand brings together distal strand segments to form a P1 helix. Transcriptional riboswitches must detect the ligand and form this P1 helix within the timescale of transcription. Depending on the cell's metabolic state and cellular environmental conditions, the folding and genetic outcome may therefore be affected by kinetics of ligand binding, RNA folding, and transcriptional pausing, among other factors. Although some studies of isolated riboswitch aptamers found homogeneous, prefolded conformations, experimental, and theoretical studies point to functional and structural heterogeneity for nascent transcripts. Recently it has been shown that some riboswitch segments, containing the aptamer and partial expression platforms, can form binding-competent conformers that incorporate an incomplete aptamer secondary structure. Consideration of the free energy landscape for riboswitch RNA folding suggests models for how these conformers may act as transition states-facilitating rapid, ligand-mediated aptamer folding. PMID:26361734

  4. Evaluation of DNA binding, DNA cleavage, protein binding, radical scavenging and in vitro cytotoxic activities of ruthenium(II) complexes containing 2,4-dihydroxy benzylidene ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanraj, Maruthachalam; Ayyannan, Ganesan; Raja, Gunasekaran; Jayabalakrishnan, Chinnasamy

    2016-12-01

    The new ruthenium(II) complexes with hydrazone ligands, 4-Methyl-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(1)), 4-Methoxy-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(2)), 4-Bromo-benzoic acid (2,4-dihydroxy-benzylidene)-hydrazide (HL(3)), were synthesized and characterized by various spectro analytical techniques. The molecular structures of the ligands were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction technique. The DNA binding studies of the ligands and complexes were examined by absorption, fluorescence, viscosity and cyclic voltammetry methods. The results indicated that the ligands and complexes could interact with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) through intercalation. The DNA cleavage activity of the complexes was evaluated by gel electrophoresis assay, which revealed that the complexes are good DNA cleaving agents. The binding interaction of the ligands and complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopic method. Antioxidant studies showed that the complexes have a strong radical scavenging properties. Further, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes examined on cancerous cell lines showed that the complexes exhibit significant anticancer activity. PMID:27612830

  5. Ligand Migration in the Gaseous Insulin-CB7 Complex—A Cautionary Tale About the Use of ECD-MS for Ligand Binding Site Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Brittany L.; Jockusch, Rebecca A.

    2012-11-01

    Knowledge of the structure of protein-ligand complexes can aid in understanding their roles within complex biological processes. Here we use electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer to investigate the noncovalent binding of the macrocycle cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) to bovine insulin. Recent condensed-phase experiments (Chinai et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133:8810-8813, 2011) indicate that CB7 binds selectively to the N-terminal phenylalanine of the insulin B-chain. Competition experiments employing ESI mass spectrometry to assess complex formation between CB7 and wild type insulin B-chain vs. a mutant B-chain, confirm that the N-terminal phenylalanine plays in important role in solution-phase binding. However, analysis of fragment ions produced by electron capture dissociation (ECD) of CB7 complexed to intact insulin and to the insulin B-chain suggests a different picture. The apparent gas-phase binding site, as identified by the ECD, lies further along the insulin B-chain. Together, these studies thus indicate that the CB7 ligand migrates in the ESI mass spectrometry analysis. Migration is likely aided by the presence of additional interactions between CB7 and the insulin B-chain, which are not observed in the crystal structure. While this conformational difference may result simply from the removal of solvent and addition of excess protons by the ESI, we propose that the migration may be enhanced by charge reduction during the ECD process itself because ion-dipole interactions are key to CB7 binding. The results of this study caution against using ECD-MS as a stand-alone structural probe for the determination of solution-phase binding sites.

  6. New Synthesis and Tritium Labeling of a Selective Ligand for Studying High-Affinity γ-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine B.; Marek, Ales; Bay, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    3-Hydroxycyclopent-1-enecarboxylic acid (HOCPCA, 1) is a potent ligand for the high-affinity GHB binding sites in the CNS. An improved synthesis of 1 together with a very efficient synthesis of [3H]-1 is described. The radiosynthesis employs in situ generated lithium trimethoxyborotritide....... Screening of 1 against different CNS targets establishes a high selectivity, and we demonstrate in vivo brain penetration. In vitro characterization of [3H]-1 binding shows high specificity to the high-affinity GHB binding sites....

  7. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Burusco, M Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R; Roe, Andrew J; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O

    2015-11-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein-ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male.

  8. Diversity in the structures and ligand-binding sites of nematode fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins revealed by Na-FAR-1 from Necator americanus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Burusco, M. Florencia; Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Gabrielsen, Mads; Franchini, Gisela R.; Roe, Andrew J.; Griffiths, Kate; Zhan, Bin; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid and retinol-binding proteins (FARs) comprise a family of unusual α-helix rich lipid-binding proteins found exclusively in nematodes. They are secreted into host tissues by parasites of plants, animals and humans. The structure of a FAR protein from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is available, but this protein [C. elegans FAR-7 (Ce-FAR-7)] is from a subfamily of FARs that does not appear to be important at the host/parasite interface. We have therefore examined [Necator americanus FAR-1 (Na-FAR-1)] from the blood-feeding intestinal parasite of humans, N. americanus. The 3D structure of Na-FAR-1 in its ligand-free and ligand-bound forms, determined by NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography respectively, reveals an α-helical fold similar to Ce-FAR-7, but Na-FAR-1 possesses a larger and more complex internal ligand-binding cavity and an additional C-terminal α-helix. Titration of apo-Na-FAR-1 with oleic acid, analysed by NMR chemical shift perturbation, reveals that at least four distinct protein–ligand complexes can be formed. Na-FAR-1 and possibly other FARs may have a wider repertoire for hydrophobic ligand binding, as confirmed in the present study by our finding that a range of neutral and polar lipids co-purify with the bacterially expressed recombinant protein. Finally, we show by immunohistochemistry that Na-FAR-1 is present in adult worms with a tissue distribution indicative of possible roles in nutrient acquisition by the parasite and in reproduction in the male. PMID:26318523

  9. Correlating RANK ligand/RANK binding kinetics with osteoclast formation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Julia T; Zou, Wei; Decker, Corinne E; Rohatgi, Nidhi; Nelson, Christopher A; Fremont, Daved H; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The interaction between Receptor Activator of NF-κB Ligand (RANKL) and its receptor RANK is essential for the differentiation and bone resorbing capacity of the osteoclast. Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a soluble homodimer, acts as a decoy receptor for RANKL and thus inhibits osteoclastogenesis. An imbalance in the RANKL/RANK/OPG axis, with decreased OPG and/or increased RANKL, is associated with diseases that favor bone loss, including osteoporosis. Recently, we established a yeast surface display system and screened libraries of randomly mutated RANKL proteins to identify mutations that abolish binding to OPG while preserving recognition of RANK. These efforts yielded several RANKL variants possessing substantially higher affinity for RANK compared to their wild-type (WT) counterpart. Using recombinant RANKL mutant proteins, we find those with increased affinity for RANK produce more robust signaling in osteoclast lineage cells and have greater osteoclastogenic potential. Our results are the first to document gain of function RANKL mutations. They indicate that the physiological RANKL/RANK interaction is not optimized for maximal signaling and function, perhaps reflecting the need to maintain receptor specificity within the tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF). Instead, we find, a biphasic relationship exists between RANKL/RANK affinity and osteoclastogenic capacity. In our panel of RANKL variants, this relationship is driven entirely by manipulation of the kinetic off-rate. Our structure-based and yeast surface display-derived insights into manipulating this critical signaling axis may aid in the design of novel anti-resorptive therapies as well as provide a paradigm for design of other receptor-specific TNF superfamily ligand variants. PMID:25864714

  10. Enhancement of binding activity of soluble human CD40 to CD40 ligand through incorporation of an isoleucine zipper motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-hui HE; Li-hui XU; Yi LIU

    2006-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of incorporation of all isoleucine zipper(IZ)motif into CD40 on binding activity of CD40 for the CD40 ligand (CD40L).Methods:Prokaryotic expression vectors for 2 soluble CD40 derivatives,shCD40His and shCD40IZ containing an IZ dowain,were constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli.The recombinant proteins were purified to homogeneity after refolding from inclusion bodies.Their molecular weights in solution of shCD40His and shCD40IZ were compared by size-exclusion chromatography,and their binding activity for CD40L on Jurkat T cells was determined by flow cytometry.Results:shCD40His and shCD40IZ were generated.Both of them possessed significant binding activity for the cognate ligand CD40L expressed on the cell surface.shCD40IZ had much higher binding activity to its ligand(CD40L)than did shCD40His.Furthermore,size-exclusion chromatography demonstrated that shCD40IZ existed in high molecular mass forms that were most likely to be trimers in solution.Conclusion:Incorporation of an IZ motif into CD40 enhances its binding activity for CD40L through trimerization of the CD40 derivative.

  11. Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and DNA-Binding Studies of a Nickel(II Complex with the Bis(2-benzimidazolymethylamine Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huilu Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A V-shaped ligand Bis(2-benzimidazolymethylamine (bba and its nickel(II picrate (pic complex, with composition [Ni(bba2](pic2⋅3MeOH, have been synthesized and characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, molar conductivities, IR spectra, and UV/vis measurements. In the complex, the Ni(II ion is six-coordinated with a N2O4 ligand set, resulting in a distorted octahedron coordination geometry. In addition, the DNA-binding properties of the Ni(II complex have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence, and viscosity measurements. The experimental results suggest that the nickel(II complex binds to DNA by partial intercalation binding mode.

  12. Homogeneous time-resolved G protein-coupled receptor-ligand binding assay based on fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thomas; Ott, David; Ebell, Katharina; Hansen, Kerrin; Henry, Luc; Becker, Frank; Hannus, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate many important physiological functions and are considered as one of the most successful therapeutic target classes for a wide spectrum of diseases. Drug discovery projects generally benefit from a broad range of experimental approaches for screening compound libraries and for the characterization of binding modes of drug candidates. Owing to the difficulties in solubilizing and purifying GPCRs, assay formats have been so far mainly limited to cell-based functional assays and radioligand binding assays. In this study, we used fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS) to analyze the interaction of detergent-solubilized receptors to various types of GPCR ligands: endogenous peptides, small molecules, and a large surrogate antagonist represented by a blocking monoclonal antibody. Our work demonstrates the suitability of the homogeneous and time-resolved FCCS assay format for a robust, high-throughput determination of receptor-ligand binding affinities and kinetic rate constants for various therapeutically relevant GPCRs. PMID:26954998

  13. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  14. Protein-specific force field derived from the fragment molecular orbital method can improve protein-ligand binding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Le; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-30

    Accurate computational estimate of the protein-ligand binding affinity is of central importance in rational drug design. To improve accuracy of the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) for protein-ligand simulations, we use a protein-specific FF derived by the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method and by the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. Applying this FMO-RESP method to two proteins, dodecin, and lysozyme, we found that protein-specific partial charges tend to differ more significantly from the standard AMBER charges for isolated charged atoms. We did not see the dependence of partial charges on the secondary structure. Computing the binding affinities of dodecin with five ligands by MM PBSA protocol with the FMO-RESP charge set as well as with the standard AMBER charges, we found that the former gives better correlation with experimental affinities than the latter. While, for lysozyme with five ligands, both charge sets gave similar and relatively accurate estimates of binding affinities. PMID:23420697

  15. Oxytocin receptor ligand binding in embryonic tissue and postnatal brain development of the C57BL/6J mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth eHammock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT has drawn increasing attention as a developmentally relevant neuropeptide given its role in the brain regulation of social behavior. It has been suggested that OXT plays an important role in the infant brain during caregiver attachment in nurturing familial contexts, but there is incomplete experimental evidence. Mouse models of OXT system genes have been particularly informative for the role of the OXT system in social behavior, however, the developing brain areas that could respond to ligand activation of the OXT receptor (OXTR have yet to be identified in this species. Here we report new data revealing dynamic ligand-binding distribution of OXTR in the developing mouse brain. Using male and female C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P 0, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 60 we quantified OXTR ligand binding in several brain areas which changed across development. Further, we describe OXTR ligand binding in select tissues of the near-term whole embryo at E18.5. Together, these data aid in the interpretation of findings in mouse models of the OXT system and generate new testable hypotheses for developmental roles for OXT in mammalian systems. We discuss our findings in the context of developmental disorders (including autism, attachment biology, and infant physiological regulation.

  16. Characterization of the ligand binding site of the bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Woof, Jenny M; Brandtzaeg, Per

    2004-12-24

    Recently, we identified a bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R), which shows high homology to the human myeloid Fc alpha R, CD89. IgA binding has previously been shown to depend on several specific residues located in the B-C and F-G loops of the membrane-distal extracellular domain 1 of CD89. To compare the ligand binding properties of these two Fc alpha Rs, we have mapped the IgA binding site of bFc alpha R. We show that, in common with CD89, Tyr-35 in the B-C loop is essential for IgA binding. However, in contrast to earlier observations on CD89, mutation of residues in the F-G loop did not significantly inhibit IgA binding.

  17. Characterization of the ligand binding site of the bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Woof, Jenny M; Brandtzaeg, Per

    2004-12-24

    Recently, we identified a bovine IgA Fc receptor (bFc alpha R), which shows high homology to the human myeloid Fc alpha R, CD89. IgA binding has previously been shown to depend on several specific residues located in the B-C and F-G loops of the membrane-distal extracellular domain 1 of CD89. To compare the ligand binding properties of these two Fc alpha Rs, we have mapped the IgA binding site of bFc alpha R. We show that, in common with CD89, Tyr-35 in the B-C loop is essential for IgA binding. However, in contrast to earlier observations on CD89, mutation of residues in the F-G loop did not significantly inhibit IgA binding. PMID:15485844

  18. Solution-state molecular structure of apo and oleate-liganded liver fatty acid-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Yang, Xiaomin; Wang, Hsin; Estephan, Rima; Francis, Fouad; Kodukula, Sarala; Storch, Judith; Stark, Ruth E

    2007-11-01

    Rat liver fatty acid-binding protein (LFABP) is distinctive among intracellular lipid-binding proteins (iLBPs): more than one molecule of long-chain fatty acid and a variety of diverse ligands can be bound within its large cavity, and in vitro lipid transfer to model membranes follows a mechanism that is diffusion-controlled rather than mediated by protein-membrane collisions. Because the apoprotein has proven resistant to crystallization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy offers a unique route to functionally informative comparisons of molecular structure and dynamics for LFABP in free (apo) and liganded (holo) forms. We report herein the solution-state structures determined for apo-LFABP at pH 6.0 and for holoprotein liganded to two oleates at pH 7.0, as well as the structure of the complex including locations of the ligands. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments revealed very similar types and locations of secondary structural elements for apo- and holo-LFABP as judged from chemical shift indices. The solution-state tertiary structures of the proteins were derived with the CNS/ARIA computational protocol, using distance and angular restraints based on 1H-1H nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs), hydrogen-bonding networks, 3J(HNHA) coupling constants, intermolecular NOEs, and residual dipolar (NH) couplings. The holo-LFABP solution-state conformation is in substantial agreement with a previously reported X-ray structure [Thompson, J., Winter, N., Terwey, D., Bratt, J., and Banaszak, L. (1997) The crystal structure of the liver fatty acid-binding protein. A complex with two bound oleates, J. Biol. Chem. 272, 7140-7150], including the typical beta-barrel capped by a helix-turn-helix portal. In the solution state, the internally bound oleate has the expected U-shaped conformation and is tethered electrostatically, but the extended portal ligand can adopt a range of conformations based on the computationally refined structures, in contrast to the single

  19. The utility of geometrical and chemical restraint information extracted from predicted ligand-binding sites in protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal; Lee, Seung Yup; Zhou, Hongyi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2011-03-01

    Exhaustive exploration of molecular interactions at the level of complete proteomes requires efficient and reliable computational approaches to protein function inference. Ligand docking and ranking techniques show considerable promise in their ability to quantify the interactions between proteins and small molecules. Despite the advances in the development of docking approaches and scoring functions, the genome-wide application of many ligand docking/screening algorithms is limited by the quality of the binding sites in theoretical receptor models constructed by protein structure prediction. In this study, we describe a new template-based method for the local refinement of ligand-binding regions in protein models using remotely related templates identified by threading. We designed a Support Vector Regression (SVR) model that selects correct binding site geometries in a large ensemble of multiple receptor conformations. The SVR model employs several scoring functions that impose geometrical restraints on the Cα positions, account for the specific chemical environment within a binding site and optimize the interactions with putative ligands. The SVR score is well correlated with the RMSD from the native structure; in 47% (70%) of the cases, the Pearson's correlation coefficient is >0.5 (>0.3). When applied to weakly homologous models, the average heavy atom, local RMSD from the native structure of the top-ranked (best of top five) binding site geometries is 3.1Å (2.9Å) for roughly half of the targets; this represents a 0.1 (0.3)Å average improvement over the original predicted structure. Focusing on the subset of strongly conserved residues, the average heavy atom RMSD is 2.6Å (2.3Å). Furthermore, we estimate the upper bound of template-based binding site refinement using only weakly related proteins to be ∼2.6Å RMSD. This value also corresponds to the plasticity of the ligand-binding regions in distant homologues. The Binding Site Refinement (BSR

  20. Molecular simulations of aromatase reveal new insights into the mechanism of ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jiho; Czapla, Luke; Amaro, Rommie E

    2013-08-26

    CYP19A1, also known as aromatase or estrogen synthetase, is the rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of estrogens from their corresponding androgens. Several clinically used breast cancer therapies target aromatase. In this work, explicitly solvated all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of aromatase with a model of the lipid bilayer and the transmembrane helix are performed. The dynamics of aromatase and the role of titration of an important amino acid residue involved in aromatization of androgens are investigated via two 250-ns long simulations. One simulation treats the protonated form of the catalytic aspartate 309, which appears more consistent with crystallographic data for the active site, while the simulation of the deprotonated form shows some notable conformational shifts. Ensemble-based computational solvent mapping experiments indicate possible novel druggable binding sites that could be utilized by next-generation inhibitors. In addition, the effects of protonation on the ligand positioning and channel dynamics are investigated using geometrical models that estimate the opening width of critical channels. Significant differences in channel dynamics between the protonated and deprotonated trajectories are exhibited, suggesting that the mechanism for substrate and product entry and the aromatization process may be coupled to a "locking" mechanism and channel opening. Our results may be particularly relevant in the design of novel drugs, which may be useful therapeutic treatments of cancers such as those of the breast and prostate. PMID:23927370

  1. Calreticulin Binds to Fas Ligand and Inhibits Neuronal Cell Apoptosis Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beilei Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calreticulin (CRT can bind to Fas ligand (FasL and inhibit Fas/FasL-mediated apoptosis of Jurkat T cells. However, its effect on neuronal cell apoptosis has not been investigated. Purpose. We aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CRT following ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI. Methods. Mice underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and SH-SY5Y cells subjected to oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD were used as models for IRI. The CRT protein level was detected by Western blotting, and mRNA expression of CRT, caspase-3, and caspase-8 was measured by real-time PCR. Immunofluorescence was used to assess the localization of CRT and FasL. The interaction of CRT with FasL was verified by coimmunoprecipitation. SH-SY5Y cell viability was determined by MTT assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. The measurement of caspase-8 and caspase-3 activity was carried out using caspase activity assay kits. Results. After IRI, CRT was upregulated on the neuron surface and bound to FasL, leading to increased viability of OGD-exposed SH-SY5Y cells and decreased activity of caspase-8 and caspase-3. Conclusions. This study for the first time revealed that increased CRT inhibited Fas/FasL-mediated neuronal cell apoptosis during the early stage of ischemic stroke, suggesting it to be a potential protector activated soon after IRI.

  2. Dengue virus utilizes calcium modulating cyclophilin-binding ligand to subvert apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianling; Huang, Rongjie; Liao, Weiyong; Chen, Zhaoni; Zhang, Shijun; Huang, Renbin

    2012-02-24

    Dengue virus (DENV) capsid (C) proteins are the major structural component of virus particles. This study aimed to identify the host interacting partners of DENV C protein that could contribute to viral pathogenesis. DENV C protein was screened against human liver cDNA yeast two-hybrid library. We identified calcium modulating cyclophilin-binding ligand (CAML) as a novel interacting partner of DENV C protein. We report for the first time that CAML influenced DENV production. DENV production was significantly attenuated in CAML knock-down cells at 36h post-infection. CAML did not influence DENV entry, genome uncoating, viral transcription, viral translation and virus secretion. Our study pinpointed that CAML influenced the process of apoptosis by altering mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation from 36h post-infection. Over-expression of CAML protected Huh7 cells from apoptosis and knock down of CAML favoured apoptosis following infection with DENV. We also showed that CAML expression was up-regulated during DENV infection. Increased CAML levels protected DENV-infected cells from undergoing apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial damage and caspase-3 activation which in turn favoured DENV production from 36h post-infection. Overall, this study demonstrated that DENV manipulated the levels of CAML to subvert the apoptotic process which in turn favoured efficient virus production. PMID:22281498

  3. Toxoplasma gondii peptide ligands open the gate of the HLA class I binding groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMurtrey, Curtis; Trolle, Thomas; Sansom, Tiffany;

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I presentation of pathogen-derived peptide ligands is essential for CD8+ T cell recognition of Toxoplasma gondii infected cells. Currently, little data exist pertaining to peptides that are presented after T. gondii infection. Herein we purify HLA-A*02:01 complexes from T. gondii infected...... cells and characterize the peptide ligands using LCMS. We identify 195 T. gondii encoded ligands originating from both secreted and cytoplasmic proteins. Surprisingly, T. gondii ligands are significantly longer than uninfected host ligands, and these longer pathogen derived peptides maintain a canonical...

  4. Lamellipodial tension, not integrin/ligand binding, is the crucial factor to realise integrin activation and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Carsten; Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Oldani, Amanda; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Lenardi, Cristina; Milani, Paolo; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    The molecular clutch (MC) model proposes that actomyosin-driven force transmission permits integrin-dependent cell migration. To investigate the MC, we introduced diverse talin (TLN) and integrin variants into Flp-In™ T-Rex™ HEK293 cells stably expressing uPAR. Vitronectin variants served as substrate providing uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and optionally integrin binding. This particular system allowed us to selectively analyse key MC proteins and interactions, effectively from the extracellular matrix substrate to intracellular f-actin, and to therewith study mechanobiological aspects of MC engagement also uncoupled from integrin/ligand binding. With this experimental approach, we found that for the initial PIP2-dependent membrane/TLN/f-actin linkage and persistent lamellipodia formation the C-terminal TLN actin binding site (ABS) is dispensable. The establishment of an adequate MC-mediated lamellipodial tension instead depends predominantly on the coupling of this C-terminal TLN ABS to the actomyosin-driven retrograde actin flow force. This lamellipodial tension is crucial for full integrin activation eventually determining integrin-dependent cell migration. In the integrin/ligand-independent condition the frictional membrane resistance participates to these processes. Integrin/ligand binding can also contribute but is not necessarily required. PMID:26616200

  5. A scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries using a MapReduce approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, T; Zhang, B; Cicotti, P; Armen, R S; Taufer, M

    2012-07-01

    We present a scalable and accurate method for classifying protein-ligand binding geometries in molecular docking. Our method is a three-step process: the first step encodes the geometry of a three-dimensional (3D) ligand conformation into a single 3D point in the space; the second step builds an octree by assigning an octant identifier to every single point in the space under consideration; and the third step performs an octree-based clustering on the reduced conformation space and identifies the most dense octant. We adapt our method for MapReduce and implement it in Hadoop. The load-balancing, fault-tolerance, and scalability in MapReduce allow screening of very large conformation spaces not approachable with traditional clustering methods. We analyze results for docking trials for 23 protein-ligand complexes for HIV protease, 21 protein-ligand complexes for Trypsin, and 12 protein-ligand complexes for P38alpha kinase. We also analyze cross docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking into 24 protein conformations of the HIV protease, and receptor ensemble docking trials for 24 ligands, each docking in a pool of HIV protease receptors. Our method demonstrates significant improvement over energy-only scoring for the accurate identification of native ligand geometries in all these docking assessments. The advantages of our clustering approach make it attractive for complex applications in real-world drug design efforts. We demonstrate that our method is particularly useful for clustering docking results using a minimal ensemble of representative protein conformational states (receptor ensemble docking), which is now a common strategy to address protein flexibility in molecular docking. PMID:22658682

  6. A Folded Excited State of Ligand-Free Nuclear Coactivator Binding Domain (NCBD) Underlies Plasticity in Ligand Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Andersen, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Lau Dalby;

    2013-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are renowned for their structural plasticity when they undergo coupled folding and binding to partner proteins. The nuclear coactivator binding domain of CBP is a remarkable example of this adaptability as it folds into two different conformations depending...... experience conformational exchange. The dispersion data can be described by a global two-state exchange process between a ground state and an excited state populated to 8%. The three helices are still folded in the excited state but have a different packing from the ground state; the contact between helices...

  7. Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis by detecting exogenous fluorescent signal of ligand bound to beta amyloid in the lens of human eye: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eKerbage

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We report results of a clinical exploratory human trial involving 10 participants using a combination of a fluorescent ligand and a laser scanning device, SAPPHIRE System, as an aid in the diagnosis of Probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that such a technique has been used in vivo of a human lens. The primary goal of the clinical trial, in addition to safety assessment, was to evaluate efficacy of the system. By detecting specific fluorescent signature of ligand bound beta amyloid in the supranucleus region of the human lens, a two-fold differentiation factor between AD patients and Control groups is achieved. Data from our studies indicates that deeper regions of the supranucleus provide the highest measures of ligand bound fluorescence signal from both controls and AD patients. Further studies are underway involving a larger population for statistical evaluation of the method.

  8. SMAP-WS: a parallel web service for structural proteome-wide ligand-binding site comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jingyuan; Xie, Lei; Li, Wilfred W; Bourne, Philip E

    2010-07-01

    The proteome-wide characterization and analysis of protein ligand-binding sites and their interactions with ligands can provide pivotal information in understanding the structure, function and evolution of proteins and for designing safe and efficient therapeutics. The SMAP web service (SMAP-WS) meets this need through parallel computations designed for 3D ligand-binding site comparison and similarity searching on a structural proteome scale. SMAP-WS implements a shape descriptor (the Geometric Potential) that characterizes both local and global topological properties of the protein structure and which can be used to predict the likely ligand-binding pocket [Xie,L. and Bourne,P.E. (2007) A robust and efficient algorithm for the shape description of protein structures and its application in predicting ligand-binding sites. BMC bioinformatics, 8 (Suppl. 4.), S9.]. Subsequently a sequence order independent profile-profile alignment (SOIPPA) algorithm is used to detect and align similar pockets thereby finding protein functional and evolutionary relationships across fold space [Xie, L. and Bourne, P.E. (2008) Detecting evolutionary relationships across existing fold space, using sequence order-independent profile-profile alignments. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 105, 5441-5446]. An extreme value distribution model estimates the statistical significance of the match [Xie, L., Xie, L. and Bourne, P.E. (2009) A unified statistical model to support local sequence order independent similarity searching for ligand-binding sites and its application to genome-based drug discovery. Bioinformatics, 25, i305-i312.]. These algorithms have been extensively benchmarked and shown to outperform most existing algorithms. Moreover, several predictions resulting from SMAP-WS have been validated experimentally. Thus far SMAP-WS has been applied to predict drug side effects, and to repurpose existing drugs for new indications. SMAP-WS provides both a user-friendly web interface and

  9. Ligand- and subunit-specific conformational changes in the ligand-binding domain and the TM2-TM3 linker of {alpha}1 {beta}2 {gamma}2 GABAA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qian; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Lynch, Joseph W

    2010-01-01

    Cys-loop receptor ligand binding sites are located at subunit interfaces where they are lined by loops A-C from one subunit and loops D-F from the adjacent subunit. Agonist binding induces large conformational changes in loops C and F. However, it is controversial as to whether these conformational...... directly with attached fluorophores at the same site. Here we show that ligands binding to the β2-α1 interface GABA binding site produce conformational changes at the adjacent subunit interface. This is most likely due to agonist-induced loop C closure directly altering loop F conformation at the adjacent...

  10. ESR1 gene status correlates with estrogen receptor protein levels measured by ligand binding assay and immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Knoop, Ann; Ejlertsen, Bent Laursen;

    2012-01-01

    level determined by two different methods and ESR1 gene copy number. From 289 primary high-risk breast cancer patients, randomized in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG) 77C trial, results from cytosolic ER levels were available from ligand binding assays. Archival tumor tissue...... (ratio ESR1/CEN-6 from 1.30 to 1.99) in 19% of the patients. A positive correlation of ESR1 FISH with both ER-cytosol and ER IHC was found (p gene are associated with higher ER protein content measured by ligand binding assay and a more intense nuclear......The Estrogen Receptor (ER) is an established predictive marker for the selection of adjuvant endocrine treatment in early breast cancer. During the 1990s Immunohistochemistry (IHC) replaced cytosol based assays for determination of ER status. This study examined the association between ER protein...

  11. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents

  12. Computational prediction of binding affinity for CYP1A2-ligand complexes using empirical free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen;

    2010-01-01

    , and methods based on statistical mechanics. In the present investigation, we started from an LIE model to predict the binding free energy of structurally diverse compounds of cytochrome P450 1A2 ligands, one of the important human metabolizing isoforms of the cytochrome P450 family. The data set includes both...... substrates and inhibitors. It appears that the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy becomes negligible in this particular protein and a simple empirical model was derived, based on a training set of eight compounds. The root mean square error for the training set was 3.7 kJ/mol. Subsequent...

  13. Atomic force microscopy measurements reveal multiple bonds between Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen binding adhesin and Lewis b ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, P; Shi, Q; Magalhaes, A; Reis, C A; Bugaytsova, J; Borén, T; Leckband, D; Martins, M C L

    2014-12-01

    The strength of binding between the Helicobacter pylori blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA) and its cognate glycan receptor, the Lewis b blood group antigen (Le(b)), was measured by means of atomic force microscopy. High-resolution measurements of rupture forces between single receptor-ligand pairs were performed between the purified BabA and immobilized Le(b) structures on self-assembled monolayers. Dynamic force spectroscopy revealed two similar but statistically different bond populations. These findings suggest that the BabA may form different adhesive attachments to the gastric mucosa in ways that enhance the efficiency and stability of bacterial adhesion.

  14. Fatty Acid-binding Proteins Interact with Comparative Gene Identification-58 Linking Lipolysis with Lipid Ligand Shuttling*

    OpenAIRE

    Hofer, Peter; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Jaeger, Doris; Feiler, Ursula; Arthanari, Haribabu; Mayer, Nicole; Zehender, Fabian; Rechberger, Gerald; Oberer, Monika; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Haemmerle, Guenter; Breinbauer, Rolf; Zechner, Rudolf; Preiss-Landl, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background: A multiprotein complex designated as lipolysome degrades intracellular triglycerides and contains proteins such as adipose triglyceride lipase (Atgl) and its co-activator Cgi-58. Results: Cgi-58 interacts with fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps), which impact Atgl-mediated lipolysis and lipid signaling. Conclusion: Fabps modulate Atgl-mediated TG hydrolysis and link lipolysis with intracellular lipid ligand shuttling. Significance: Novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of...

  15. Probing the structure and function of the estrogen receptor ligand binding domain by analysis of mutants with altered transactivation characteristics.

    OpenAIRE

    Eng, F C; Lee, H.S.; Ferrara, J; Willson, T M; White, J H

    1997-01-01

    We have developed a genetic screen for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to isolate estrogen receptor (ER) mutants with altered transactivation characteristics. Use of a "reverse" ER, in which the mutagenized ligand binding domain was placed at the N terminus of the receptor, eliminated the isolation of truncated constitutively active mutants. A library was screened with a low-affinity estrogen, 2-methoxyestrone (2ME), at concentrations 50-fold lower than those required for activation of the...

  16. Ligand binding studies in the mouse olfactory bulb: identification and characterisation of a L-[3H]carnosine binding site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binding sites for the dipeptide L-carnosine (β-alanyl-t-histidine) have been detected in membranes prepared from mouse olfactory bulbs. The binding of L-[3H]- carnosine was saturable, reversible and stereospecific and had a Ksub(d) of about 770 nM. The stereospecific binding of L-carnosine represented about 30% of the totoal binding at pH 6.8, and decreased markedly with increasing pH. Binding was stimulated by calcium, unaffected by zinc, magnesium or manganese and inhibted by sodium and potassium. Carnosine binding was sensitive to trypsin and phospholipases A and C, but not to neuraminidase. Nystatin and filipin, which interact with membrane lipids, also interfered with binding. Some peptide analogues of carnosine were potent inhibitors of binding, but a variety of drugs serving as potent inhibitors in other binding systems had no effect on carnosine binding. Carnosine binding to mouse olfactory bulb membranes was 15-fold higher than that seen in membranes prepared from cerebral hemispheres, 5-fold higher than in cerebellum membranes and 3-fold higher than in membranes from spinal medulla and the olfactory tubercle-lateral olfactory tract area. (Auth.)

  17. The clathrin-binding motif and the J-domain of Drosophila Auxilin are essential for facilitating Notch ligand endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Henry C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ligand endocytosis plays a critical role in regulating the activity of the Notch pathway. The Drosophila homolog of auxilin (dAux, a J-domain-containing protein best known for its role in the disassembly of clathrin coats from clathrin-coated vesicles, has recently been implicated in Notch signaling, although its exact mechanism remains poorly understood. Results To understand the role of auxilin in Notch ligand endocytosis, we have analyzed several point mutations affecting specific domains of dAux. In agreement with previous work, analysis using these stronger dAux alleles shows that dAux is required for several Notch-dependent processes, and its function during Notch signaling is required in the signaling cells. In support of the genetic evidences, the level of Delta appears elevated in dAux deficient cells, suggesting that the endocytosis of Notch ligand is disrupted. Deletion analysis shows that the clathrin-binding motif and the J-domain, when over-expressed, are sufficient for rescuing dAux phenotypes, implying that the recruitment of Hsc70 to clathrin is a critical role for dAux. However, surface labeling experiment shows that, in dAux mutant cells, Delta accumulates at the cell surface. In dAux mutant cells, clathrin appears to form large aggregates, although Delta is not enriched in these aberrant clathrin-positive structures. Conclusion Our data suggest that dAux mutations inhibit Notch ligand internalization at an early step during clathrin-mediated endocytosis, before the disassembly of clathrin-coated vesicles. Further, the inhibition of ligand endocytosis in dAux mutant cells possibly occurs due to depletion of cytosolic pools of clathrin via the formation of clathrin aggregates. Together, our observations argue that ligand endocytosis is critical for Notch signaling and auxilin participates in Notch signaling by facilitating ligand internalization.

  18. Evidence for clustered mannose as a new ligand for hyaluronan-binding protein (HABP1) from human fibroblasts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajeev Kumar; Nirupam Roy Choudhury; Dinakar M Salunke; K Datta

    2001-09-01

    We have earlier reported that overexpression of the gene encoding human hyaluronan-binding protein (HABP1) is functionally active, as it binds specifically with hyaluronan (HA). In this communication, we confirm the collapse of the filamentous and branched structure of HA by interaction with increasing concentrations of recombinant-HABP1 (rHABP1). HA is the reported ligand of rHABP1. Here, we show the affinity of rHABP1 towards D-mannosylated albumin (DMA) by overlay assay and purification using a DMA affinity column. Our data suggests that DMA is another ligand for HABP1. Furthermore, we have observed that DMA inhibits the binding of HA in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting its multiligand affinity amongst carbohydrates. rHABP1 shows differential affinity towards HA and DMA which depends on pH and ionic strength. These data suggest that affinity of rHABP1 towards different ligands is regulated by the microenvironment.

  19. A combination of docking, QM/MM methods, and MD simulation for binding affinity estimation of metalloprotein ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Akash; Lukacova, Viera; Comez, Dogan; Kroll, Daniel M; Raha, Soumyendu; Balaz, Stefan

    2005-08-25

    To alleviate the problems in the receptor-based design of metalloprotein ligands due to inadequacies in the force-field description of coordination bonds, a four-tier approach was devised. Representative ligand-metalloprotein interaction energies are obtained by subsequent application of (1) docking with metal-binding-guided selection of modes, (2) optimization of the ligand-metalloprotein complex geometry by combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, (3) conformational sampling of the complex with constrained metal bonds by force-field-based molecular dynamics (MD), and (4) a single point QM/MM energy calculation for the time-averaged structures. The QM/MM interaction energies are, in a linear combination with the desolvation-characterizing changes in the solvent-accessible surface areas, correlated with experimental data. The approach was applied to structural correlation of published binding free energies of a diverse set of 28 hydroxamate inhibitors to zinc-dependent matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). Inclusion of steps 3 and 4 significantly improved both correlation and prediction. The two descriptors explained 90% of variance in inhibition constants of all 28 inhibitors, ranging from 0.08 to 349 nM, with the average unassigned error of 0.318 log units. The structural and energetic information obtained from the time-averaged MD simulation results helped understand the differences in binding modes of related compounds.

  20. Non-synonymous polymorphisms in the FCN1 gene determine ligand-binding ability and serum levels of M-ficolin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Gytz Ammitzbøll

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system encompasses various recognition molecules able to sense both exogenous and endogenous danger signals arising from pathogens or damaged host cells. One such pattern-recognition molecule is M-ficolin, which is capable of activating the complement system through the lectin pathway. The lectin pathway is multifaceted with activities spanning from complement activation to coagulation, autoimmunity, ischemia-reperfusion injury and embryogenesis. Our aim was to explore associations between SNPs in FCN1, encoding M-ficolin and corresponding protein concentrations, and the impact of non-synonymous SNPs on protein function. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped 26 polymorphisms in the FCN1 gene and found 8 of these to be associated with M-ficolin levels in a cohort of 346 blood donors. Four of those polymorphisms were located in the promoter region and exon 1 and were in high linkage disequilibrium (r(2≥0.91. The most significant of those were the AA genotype of -144C>A (rs10117466, which was associated with an increase in M-ficolin concentration of 26% compared to the CC genotype. We created recombinant proteins corresponding to the five non-synonymous mutations encountered and found that the Ser268Pro (rs150625869 mutation lead to loss of M-ficolin production. This was backed up by clinical observations, indicating that an individual homozygote of Ser268Pro would be completely M-ficolin deficient. Furthermore, the Ala218Thr (rs148649884 and Asn289Ser (rs138055828 were both associated with low M-ficolin levels, and the mutations crippled the ligand-binding capability of the recombinant M-ficolin, as indicated by the low binding to Group B Streptococcus. SIGNIFICANCE: Overall, our study interlinks the genotype and phenotype relationship concerning polymorphisms in FCN1 and corresponding concentrations and biological functions of M-ficolin. The elucidations of these associations provide information for future genetic

  1. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins. PMID:18840687

  2. Efficient cell-free production of olfactory receptors: detergent optimization, structure, and ligand binding analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Liselotte; Graveland-Bikker, Johanna; Steuerwald, Dirk; Vanberghem, Mélanie; Herlihy, Kara; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-10-14

    High-level production of membrane proteins, particularly of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in heterologous cell systems encounters a number of difficulties from their inherent hydrophobicity in their transmembrane domains, which frequently cause protein aggregation and cytotoxicity and thus reduce the protein yield. Recent advances in cell-free protein synthesis circumvent those problems to produce membrane proteins with a yield sometimes exceeding the cell-based approach. Here, we report cell-free production of a human olfactory receptor 17-4 (hOR17-4) using the wheat germ extract. Using the simple method, we also successful produced two additional olfactory receptors. To obtain soluble olfactory receptors and to increase yield, we directly added different detergents in varying concentrations to the cell-free reaction. To identify a purification buffer system that maintained the receptor in a nonaggregated form, we developed a method that uses small-volume size-exclusion column chromatography combined with rapid and sensitive dot-blot detection. Different buffer components including salt concentration, various detergents and detergent concentration, and reducing agent and its concentrations were evaluated for their ability to maintain the cell-free produced protein stable and nonaggregated. The purified olfactory receptor displays a typical a alpha-helical CD spectrum. Surface plasmon resonance measurements were used to show binding of a known ligand undecanal to hOR17-4. Our approach to produce a high yield of purified olfactory receptor is a milestone toward obtaining a large quantity of olfactory receptors for designing bionic sensors. Furthermore, this simple approach may be broadly useful not only for other classes of GPCRs but also for other membrane proteins.

  3. Molecular modeling, structural analysis and identification of ligand binding sites of trypanothione reductase from Leishmania mexicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozal Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Trypanothione reductase (TR is a member of FAD-dependent NADPH oxidoreductase protein family and it is a key enzyme which connects the NADPH and the thiol-based redox system. Inhibition studies indicate that TR is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. Therefore, it is an attractive target enzyme for novel drug candidates. There is no structural model for TR of Leishmania mexicana (LmTR in the protein databases. In this work, 3D structure of TR from L. mexicana was identified by template-based in silico homology modeling method, resultant model was validated, structurally analyzed and possible ligand binding pockets were identified. Methods: For computational molecular modeling study, firstly, template was identified by BLAST search against PDB database. Multiple alignments were achieved by ClustalW2. Molecular modeling of LmTR was done and possible drug targeting sites were identified. Refinement of the model was done by performing local energy minimization for backbone, hydrogen and side chains. Model was validated by web-based servers. Results: A reliable 3D model for TR from L. mexicana was modeled by using L. infantum trypanothione reductase (LiTR as a template. RMSD results according to C-alpha, visible atoms and backbone were 0.809 Å, 0.732 Å and 0.728 Å respectively. Ramachandran plot indicates that model shows an acceptable stereochemistry. Conclusion: Modeled structure of LmTR shows high similarity with LiTR based on overall structural features like domains and folding patterns. Predicted structure will provide a source for the further docking studies of various peptide-based inhibitors.

  4. The structure of the ankyrin-binding site of [beta]-spectrin reveals how tandem spectrin-repeats generate unique ligand-binding properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabach, Paul R.; Simonovic, Ivana; Ranieri, Miranda A.; Aboodi, Michael S.; Steitz, Thomas A.; Simonovic, Miljan; Morrow, Jon S.; (Yale); (HHMI)

    2009-09-02

    Spectrin and ankyrin participate in membrane organization, stability, signal transduction, and protein targeting; their interaction is critical for erythrocyte stability. Repeats 14 and 15 of {beta}I-spectrin are crucial for ankyrin recognition, yet the way spectrin binds ankyrin while preserving its repeat structure is unknown. We have solved the crystal structure of the {beta}I-spectrin 14,15 di-repeat unit to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution and found 14 residues critical for ankyrin binding that map to the end of the helix C of repeat 14, the linker region, and the B-C loop of repeat 15. The tilt (64{sup o}) across the 14,15 linker is greater than in any published di-repeat structure, suggesting that the relative positioning of the two repeats is important for ankyrin binding. We propose that a lack of structural constraints on linker and inter-helix loops allows proteins containing spectrin-like di-repeats to evolve diverse but specific ligand-recognition sites without compromising the structure of the repeat unit. The linker regions between repeats are thus critical determinants of both spectrin's flexibility and polyfunctionality. The putative coupling of flexibility and ligand binding suggests a mechanism by which spectrin might participate in mechanosensory regulation.

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain with a coactivator-like peptide and selective androgen receptor modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain has been crystallized as a ternary complex with a coactivator-like undecapeptide and two different synthetic ligands. The ligand-binding domain of the human androgen receptor has been cloned, overproduced and crystallized in the presence of a coactivator-like 11-mer peptide and two different nonsteroidal ligands. The crystals of the two ternary complexes were isomorphous and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.7 and 1.95 Å resolution, respectively. Structure determination of these two complexes will help in understanding the mode of binding of selective nonsteroidal androgens versus endogenous steroidal ligands and possibly the origin of their tissue selectivity

  6. Structural analysis of prolyl oligopeptidases using molecular docking and dynamics: insights into conformational changes and ligand binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Kaushik

    Full Text Available Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP is considered as an important pharmaceutical target for the treatment of numerous diseases. Despite enormous studies on various aspects of POPs structure and function still some of the questions are intriguing like conformational dynamics of the protein and interplay between ligand entry/egress. Here, we have used molecular modeling and docking based approaches to unravel questions like differences in ligand binding affinities in three POP species (porcine, human and A. thaliana. Despite high sequence and structural similarity, they possess different affinities for the ligands. Interestingly, human POP was found to be more specific, selective and incapable of binding to a few planar ligands which showed extrapolation of porcine POP in human context is more complicated. Possible routes for substrate entry and product egress were also investigated by detailed analyses of molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the three proteins. Trajectory analysis of bound and unbound forms of three species showed differences in conformational dynamics, especially variations in β-propeller pore size, which was found to be hidden by five lysine residues present on blades one and seven. During simulation, β-propeller pore size was increased by ∼2 Å in porcine ligand-bound form which might act as a passage for smaller product movement as free energy barrier was reduced, while there were no significant changes in human and A. thaliana POPs. We also suggest that these differences in pore size could lead to fundamental differences in mode of product egress among three species. This analysis also showed some functionally important residues which can be used further for in vitro mutagenesis and inhibitor design. This study can help us in better understanding of the etiology of POPs in several neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Exploring the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-4-AHCP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina B; Pickering, Darryl S; Greenwood, Jeremy R;

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the ionotropic GluR2 ligand-binding core (GluR2-S1S2J) in complex with the bicyclical AMPA analogue (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-7,8-dihydro-6H-cyclohepta[d]-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid [(S)-4-AHCP] has been determined, as well as the binding pharmacology of this construct...... and of the full-length GluR2 receptor. (S)-4-AHCP binds with a glutamate-like binding mode and the ligand adopts two different conformations. The K(i) of (S)-4-AHCP at GluR2-S1S2J was determined to be 185 +/- 29 nM and at full-length GluR2(R)o it was 175 +/- 8 nM. (S)-4-AHCP appears to elicit partial agonism...... at GluR2 by inducing an intermediate degree of domain closure (17 degrees). Also, functionally (S)-4-AHCP has an efficacy of 0.38 at GluR2(Q)i, relative to (S)-glutamate. The proximity of bound (S)-4-AHCP to domain D2 prevents full D1-D2 domain closure, which is limited by steric repulsion, especially...

  8. Binding capability of the enediyne-associated apoprotein to human tumors and constitution of a ligand oligopeptide-integrated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Lin; Chen, Hongxia; Miao, Qingfang; Wu, Shuying; Shang, Yue; Zhen, Yongsu

    2009-10-26

    The molecule of lidamycin that belongs to the chromoprotein family of antitumor antibiotics is composed of an apoprotein (LDP) and an enediyne chromophore. The enediyne moiety of the molecule is responsible for the potent cytotoxicity; however, the biological function of the apoprotein moiety, particularly its interaction with cancer cells, remains unclear. In present study, the binding capability of LDP to human tumors was detected for the first time by tissue microarray. LDP bound to various human tumors with significant difference from the corresponding normal tissues. Positive correlation between binding activity and the overexpression of VEGF and EGFR was confirmed by lung carcinoma tissue microarray. A fusion protein LG-LDP that consists of LDP and a ligand oligopeptide to EGFR was constructed by DNA recombination. LG-LDP showed augmented binding to EGFR-overexpressing cancer cells. Furthermore, an energized fusion protein LG-LDP-AE was prepared by integrating the active enediyne (AE) into LG-LDP molecule. By MTT assay, LG-LDP-AE displayed extremely potent cytotoxicity to cancer cells with IC50 approximate to 0.01nM. The results indicate that LDP binds to various human tumors and it might serve as a delivery carrier by integration of ligand oligopeptide to manufacture motif-based, targeted fusion proteins for cancer. PMID:19737585

  9. Binding mode of inhibitors and Cryptosporidium parvum IMP dehydrogenase: A combined ligand- and receptor-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R-J; Wang, Y-L; Wang, Q-H; Huang, W-X; Wang, J; Cheng, M-S

    2015-01-01

    A combined ligand- and target-based approach was used to analyse the interaction models of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (CpIMPDH) with selective inhibitors. First, a ligand-based pharmacophore model was generated from 20 NAD(+) competitive CpIMPDH inhibitors with the HipHop module. The characteristic of the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH was then described, and the binding modes of the representative inhibitors were studied by molecular docking. The combination of the pharmacophore model and the docking results allowed us to evaluate the pharmacophore features and structural information of the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH. This research supports the proposal of an interaction model inside the NAD(+) binding site of CpIMPDH, consisting of four key interaction points: two hydrophobic-aromatic groups, a hydrophobic-aliphatic group and a hydrogen bond donor. This study also provides guidance for the design of more potent CpIMPDH inhibitors for the treatment of Cryptosporidium infections. PMID:25978645

  10. Fibrinogen is a ligand for the Staphylococcus aureus Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules (MSCRAMM) Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp)

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) are bacterial surface proteins mediating adherence of the microbes to components of the extracellular matrix of the host. On Staphylococci the MSCRAMMs often have multiple ligands. Consequently we hypothesized that the S. aureus MSCRAMM Bbp (bone sialoprotein-binding protein) might recognize host molecules other than the identified bone protein. A ligand screen revealed that Bbp binds human fibrinogen (...

  11. Fibrinogen Is a Ligand for the Staphylococcus aureus Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules (MSCRAMM) Bone Sialoprotein-binding Protein (Bbp)

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Vanessa; Liang, Xiaowen; Horndahl, Jenny K.; Ganesh, Vannakambadi K.; Smeds, Emanuel; Foster, Timothy J.; Hook, Magnus

    2011-01-01

    Microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules (MSCRAMMs) are bacterial surface proteins mediating adherence of the microbes to components of the extracellular matrix of the host. On Staphylococci, the MSCRAMMs often have multiple ligands. Consequently, we hypothesized that the Staphylococcus aureus MSCRAMM bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp) might recognize host molecules other than the identified bone protein. A ligand screen revealed that Bbp binds human fibrinogen ...

  12. Structural and functional insights into the ligand-binding domain of a nonduplicated retinoid X nuclear receptor from the invertebrate chordate amphioxus

    OpenAIRE

    Tocchini-Valentini, Guiseppe D.; Rochel, Natacha; Escriva, Hector; Germain, Pierre; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Paris, Mathilde; Sanglier-Cianferani, Sarah; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Moras, Dino; Laudet, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Retinoid X nuclear receptors (RXRs), as well as their insect orthologue, ultraspiracle protein (USP), play an important role in the transcription regulation mediated by the nuclear receptors as the common partner of many other nuclear receptors. Phylogenetic and structural studies have shown that the several evolutionary shifts have modified the ligand binding ability of RXRs. To understand the vertebrate-specific character of RXRs, we have studied the RXR ligand-binding domain of the cephalo...

  13. Substitution of glutamine for lysine at the pyridoxal phosphate binding site of bacterial D-amino acid transaminase. Effects of exogenous amines on the slow formation of intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futaki, S; Ueno, H; Martinez del Pozo, A; Pospischil, M A; Manning, J M; Ringe, D; Stoddard, B; Tanizawa, K; Yoshimura, T; Soda, K

    1990-12-25

    In bacterial D-amino acid transaminase, Lys-145, which binds the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate in Schiff base linkage, was changed to Gln-145 by site-directed mutagenesis (K145Q). The mutant enzyme had 0.015% the activity of the wild-type enzyme and was capable of forming a Schiff base with D-alanine; this external aldimine was formed over a period of minutes depending upon the D-alanine concentration. The transformation of the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate form of the enzyme to the pyridoxamine-5'-phosphate form (i.e. the half-reaction of transamination) occurred over a period of hours with this mutant enzyme. Thus, information on these two steps in the reaction and on the factors that influence them can readily be obtained with this mutant enzyme. In contrast, these reactions with the wild-type enzyme occur at much faster rates and are not easily studied separately. The mutant enzyme shows distinct preference for D- over L-alanine as substrates but it does so about 50-fold less effectively than the wild-type enzyme. Thus, Lys-145 probably acts in concert with the coenzyme and other functional side chain(s) to lead to efficient and stereochemically precise transamination in the wild-type enzyme. The addition of exogenous amines, ethanolamine or methyl amine, increased the rate of external aldimine formation with D-alanine and the mutant enzyme but the subsequent transformation to the pyridoxamine-5'-phosphate form of the enzyme was unaffected by exogenous amines. The wild-type enzyme displayed a large negative trough in the circular dichroic spectrum at 420 nm, which was practically absent in the mutant enzyme. However, addition of D-alanine to the mutant enzyme generated this negative Cotton effect (due to formation of the external aldimine with D-alanine). This circular dichroism band gradually collapsed in parallel with the transformation to the pyridoxamine-5'-phosphate enzyme. Further studies on this mutant enzyme, which displays the characteristics of the wild

  14. Toward Quantitatively Accurate Calculation of the Redox-Associated Acid-Base and Ligand Binding Equilibria of Aquacobalamin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ryne C; Zhou, Jing; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2016-08-01

    Redox processes in complex transition metal-containing species are often intimately associated with changes in ligand protonation states and metal coordination number. A major challenge is therefore to develop consistent computational approaches for computing pH-dependent redox and ligand dissociation properties of organometallic species. Reduction of the Co center in the vitamin B12 derivative aquacobalamin can be accompanied by ligand dissociation, protonation, or both, making these properties difficult to compute accurately. We examine this challenge here by using density functional theory and continuum solvation to compute Co-ligand binding equilibrium constants (Kon/off), pKas, and reduction potentials for models of aquacobalamin in aqueous solution. We consider two models for cobalamin ligand coordination: the first follows the hexa, penta, tetra coordination scheme for Co(III), Co(II), and Co(I) species, respectively, and the second model features saturation of each vacant axial coordination site on Co(II) and Co(I) species with a single, explicit water molecule to maintain six directly interacting ligands or water molecules in each oxidation state. Comparing these two coordination schemes in combination with five dispersion-corrected density functionals, we find that the accuracy of the computed properties is largely independent of the scheme used, but including only a continuum representation of the solvent yields marginally better results than saturating the first solvation shell around Co throughout. PBE performs best, displaying balanced accuracy and superior performance overall, with RMS errors of 80 mV for seven reduction potentials, 2.0 log units for five pKas and 2.3 log units for two log Kon/off values for the aquacobalamin system. Furthermore, we find that the BP86 functional commonly used in corrinoid studies suffers from erratic behavior and inaccurate descriptions of Co-axial ligand binding, leading to substantial errors in predicted pKas and

  15. Functional glass slides for in vitro evaluation of interactions between osteosarcoma TE85 cells and mineral-binding ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jie; Chen, Julia; Klapperich, Catherine M.; Eng, Vincent; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2004-07-20

    Primary amine-functionalized glass slides obtained through a multi-step plasma treatment were conjugated with anionic amino acids that are frequently found as mineral binding elements in acidic extracellular matrix components of natural bone. The modified glass surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements. Human osteosarcoma TE85 cells were cultured on these functionalized slides and analyses on both protein and gene expression levels were performed to probe the ''biocompatibility'' of the surface ligands. Cell attachment and proliferation on anionic surfaces were either better than or comparable to those of cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). The modified glass surfaces promoted the expression of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase activity and ECM proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin under differentiation culture conditions. Transcript analysis using gene chip microarrays confirmed that culturing TE85 cells on anionic surfaces did not activate apoptotic pathways. Collectively, these results suggest that the potential mineral-binding anionic ligands examined here do not exert significant adverse effects on the expression of important osteogenic markers of TE85 cells. This work paves the way for the incorporation of these ligands into 3-dimensional artificial bone-like scaffolds.

  16. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27117350

  17. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypot...

  18. Size-dependent stability toward dissociation and ligand binding energies of phosphine-ligated gold cluster ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The stability of sub-nanometer size gold clusters ligated with organic molecules is of paramount importance to the scalable synthesis of monodisperse size-selected metal clusters with highly tunable chemical and physical properties. For the first time, a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR-MS) equipped with surface induced dissociation (SID) has been employed to investigate the time and collision energy resolved fragmentation behavior of cationic doubly charged gold clusters containing 7-9 gold atoms and 6-7 triphenylphosphine (TPP) ligands prepared by reduction synthesis in solution. The TPP ligated gold clusters are demonstrated to fragment through three primary dissociation pathways: (1) Loss of a neutral TPP ligand from the precursor gold cluster, (2) asymmetric fission and (3) symmetric fission and charge separation of the gold core resulting in formation of complementary pairs of singly charged fragment ions. Threshold energies and activation entropies of these fragmentation pathways have been determined employing Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling of the experimental SID data. It is demonstrated that the doubly charged cluster ion containing eight gold atoms and six TPP ligands, (8,6)2+, exhibits exceptional stability compared to the other cationic gold clusters examined in this study due to its large ligand binding energy of 1.76 eV. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic effect of the size and extent of ligation on the gas-phase stability and preferred fragmentation pathways of small TPP-ligated gold clusters.

  19. Structural basis for PPAR partial or full activation revealed by a novel ligand binding mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Davide; Cerchia, Carmen; Montanari, Roberta; Loiodice, Fulvio; Tortorella, Paolo; Laghezza, Antonio; Cervoni, Laura; Pochetti, Giorgio; Lavecchia, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of the metabolic homeostasis and therefore represent valuable therapeutic targets for the treatment of metabolic diseases. The development of more balanced drugs interacting with PPARs, devoid of the side-effects showed by the currently marketed PPARγ full agonists, is considered the major challenge for the pharmaceutical companies. Here we present a structure-based virtual screening approach that let us identify a novel PPAR pan-agonist with a very attractive activity profile and its crystal structure in the complex with PPARα and PPARγ, respectively. In PPARα this ligand occupies a new pocket whose filling is allowed by the ligand-induced switching of the F273 side chain from a closed to an open conformation. The comparison between this pocket and the corresponding cavity in PPARγ provides a rationale for the different activation of the ligand towards PPARα and PPARγ, suggesting a novel basis for ligand design.

  20. Variation in one residue associated with the metal ion-dependent adhesion site regulates αIIbβ3 integrin ligand binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Raborn

    Full Text Available The Asp of the RGD motif of the ligand coordinates with the β I domain metal ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS divalent cation, emphasizing the importance of the MIDAS in ligand binding. There appears to be two distinct groups of integrins that differ in their ligand binding affinity and adhesion ability. These differences may be due to a specific residue associated with the MIDAS, particularly the β3 residue Ala(252 and corresponding Ala in the β1 integrin compared to the analogous Asp residue in the β2 and β7 integrins. Interestingly, mutations in the adjacent to MIDAS (ADMIDAS of integrins α4β7 and αLβ2 increased the binding and adhesion abilities compared to the wild-type, while the same mutations in the α2β1, α5β1, αVβ3, and αIIbβ3 integrins demonstrated decreased ligand binding and adhesion. We introduced a mutation in the αIIbβ3 to convert this MIDAS associated Ala(252 to Asp. By combination of this mutant with mutations of one or two ADMIDAS residues, we studied the effects of this residue on ligand binding and adhesion. Then, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the wild-type and mutant αIIbβ3 integrin β I domains, and investigated the dynamics of metal ion binding sites in different integrin-RGD complexes. We found that the tendency of calculated binding free energies was in excellent agreement with the experimental results, suggesting that the variation in this MIDAS associated residue accounts for the differences in ligand binding and adhesion among different integrins, and it accounts for the conflicting results of ADMIDAS mutations within different integrins. This study sheds more light on the role of the MIDAS associated residue pertaining to ligand binding and adhesion and suggests that this residue may play a pivotal role in integrin-mediated cell rolling and firm adhesion.

  1. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R2 = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R2 = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of both

  2. Prediction of binding affinity and efficacy of thyroid hormone receptor ligands using QSAR and structure-based modeling methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politi, Regina [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Laboratory for Molecular Modeling, Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The thyroid hormone receptor (THR) is an important member of the nuclear receptor family that can be activated by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC). Quantitative Structure–Activity Relationship (QSAR) models have been developed to facilitate the prioritization of THR-mediated EDC for the experimental validation. The largest database of binding affinities available at the time of the study for ligand binding domain (LBD) of THRβ was assembled to generate both continuous and classification QSAR models with an external accuracy of R{sup 2} = 0.55 and CCR = 0.76, respectively. In addition, for the first time a QSAR model was developed to predict binding affinities of antagonists inhibiting the interaction of coactivators with the AF-2 domain of THRβ (R{sup 2} = 0.70). Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed for a set of THRβ ligands (57 agonists and 15 antagonists of LBD, 210 antagonists of the AF-2 domain, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using several THRβ structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. We found that two agonist-bound THRβ conformations could effectively discriminate their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Moreover, one of the agonist conformations could discriminate agonists from antagonists. Finally, we have conducted virtual screening of a chemical library compiled by the EPA as part of the Tox21 program to identify potential THRβ-mediated EDCs using both QSAR models and docking. We concluded that the library is unlikely to have any EDC that would bind to the THRβ. Models developed in this study can be employed either to identify environmental chemicals interacting with the THR or, conversely, to eliminate the THR-mediated mechanism of action for chemicals of concern. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset for ligand binding domain (LBD) of the THRβ. • We report the first QSAR model for antagonists of AF-2 domain of THRβ. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables

  3. A chemometric analysis of ligand-induced changes in intrinsic fluorescence of folate binding protein indicates a link between altered conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne W; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann;

    2009-01-01

    Ligand binding alters the conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics of bovine folate binding protein (FBP). For the purpose of achieving further information we analyzed ligand (folate and methotrexate)-induced changes in the fluorescence landscape of FBP. Fluorescence excitation...... of folate accords fairly well with the disappearance of strongly hydrophobic tryptophan residues from the solvent-exposed surface of FBP. The PARAFAC has thus proven useful to establish a hitherto unexplained link between parallel changes in conformational structure and physico-chemical characteristics...... of FBP induced by folate binding. Parameters for ligand binding derived from PARAFAC analysis of the fluorescence data were qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those obtained from binding of radiofolate to FBP. Herein, methotrexate exhibited a higher affinity for FBP than in competition...

  4. Synthesis and Evaluation of Quinazolone Derivatives as a New Class of c-KIT G-Quadruplex Binding Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhou, Chen-Xi; Yan, Jin-Wu; Hou, Jin-Qiang; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Ou, Tian-Miao; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Tan, Jia-Heng

    2013-10-10

    The c-KIT G-quadruplex structures are a novel class of attractive targets for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Herein, a series of new quinazolone derivatives with the expansion of unfused aromatic ring system were designed and synthesized. Subsequent biophysical studies demonstrated that the derivatives with adaptive scaffold could effectively bind to and stabilize c-KIT G-quadruplexes with good selectivity against duplex DNA. More importantly, these ligands further inhibited the transcription and expression of c-KIT gene and exhibited significant cytotoxicity on the GIST cell line HGC-27. Overall, these quinazolone derivatives represent a new class of promising c-KIT G-quadruplex ligands. The experimental results have also reinforced the idea of inhibition of c-KIT expression through targeting c-KIT G-quadruplex DNA. PMID:24900584

  5. Protein-ligand binding affinities from large-scale quantum mechanical simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The accurate prediction of protein-drug binding affinities is a major aim of computational drug optimisation and development. A quantitative measure of binding affinity is provided by the free energy of binding, and such calculations typically require extensive configurational sampling of entities such as proteins with thousands of atoms. Current binding free energy methods use force fields to perform the configurational sampling and to compute interaction energies. Due to the empirical natur...

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of kanamycin-binding β-lactamase in complex with its ligand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recombinant BlaKr has been cocrystallized with kanamycin. A complete data set has been collected to 1.67 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. TEM-1 β-lactamase is a highly efficient enzyme that is involved in bacterial resistance against β-lactam antibiotics such as penicillin. It is also a robust scaffold protein which can be engineered by molecular-evolution techniques to bind a variety of targets. One such β-lactamase variant (BlaKr) has been constructed to bind kanamycin (kan) and other aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are neither substrates nor ligands of native β-lactamases. In addition to recognizing kan, BlaKr activity is up-regulated by its binding via an activation mechanism which is not yet understood at the molecular level. In order to fill this gap, determination of the structure of the BlaKr–kan complex was embarked upon. A crystallization condition for BlaKr–kan was identified using high-throughput screening, and crystal growth was further optimized using streak-seeding and hanging-drop methods. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.01, b = 72.33, c = 74.62 Å, and diffracted to 1.67 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The X-ray structure of BlaKr with its ligand kanamycin should provide the molecular-level details necessary for understanding the activation mechanism of the engineered enzyme

  7. Improving the performance of the PLB index for ligand-binding site prediction using dihedral angles and the solvent-accessible surface area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chen; Xu, Shutan

    2016-01-01

    Protein ligand-binding site prediction is highly important for protein function determination and structure-based drug design. Over the past twenty years, dozens of computational methods have been developed to address this problem. Soga et al. identified ligand cavities based on the preferences of amino acids for the ligand-binding site (RA) and proposed the propensity for ligand binding (PLB) index to rank the cavities on the protein surface. However, we found that residues exhibit different RAs in response to changes in solvent exposure. Furthermore, previous studies have suggested that some dihedral angles of amino acids in specific regions of the Ramachandran plot are preferred at the functional sites of proteins. Based on these discoveries, the amino acid solvent-accessible surface area and dihedral angles were combined with the RA and PLB to obtain two new indexes, multi-factor RA (MF-RA) and multi-factor PLB (MF-PLB). MF-PLB, PLB and other methods were tested using two benchmark databases and two particular ligand-binding sites. The results show that MF-PLB can improve the success rate of PLB for both ligand-bound and ligand-unbound structures, particularly for top choice prediction. PMID:27619067

  8. An in Vitro and in Vivo Investigation of Bivalent Ligands That Display Preferential Binding and Functional Activity for Different Melanocortin Receptor Homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensing, Cody J; Freeman, Katie T; Schnell, Sathya M; Adank, Danielle N; Speth, Robert C; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2016-04-14

    Pharmacological probes for the melanocortin receptors have been utilized for studying various disease states including cancer, sexual function disorders, Alzheimer's disease, social disorders, cachexia, and obesity. This study focused on the design and synthesis of bivalent ligands to target melanocortin receptor homodimers. Lead ligands increased binding affinity by 14- to 25-fold and increased cAMP signaling potency by 3- to 5-fold compared to their monovalent counterparts. Unexpectedly, different bivalent ligands showed preferences for particular melanocortin receptor subtypes depending on the linker that connected the binding scaffolds, suggesting structural differences between the various dimer subtypes. Homobivalent compound 12 possessed a functional profile that was unique from its monovalent counterpart providing evidence of the discrete effects of bivalent ligands. Lead compound 7 significantly decreased feeding in mice after intracerebroventricular administration. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a melanocortin bivalent ligand's in vivo physiological effects. PMID:26959173

  9. Modification of the loops in the ligand-binding site turns avidin into a steroid-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulomaa Markku S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Engineered proteins, with non-immunoglobulin scaffolds, have become an important alternative to antibodies in many biotechnical and therapeutic applications. When compared to antibodies, tailored proteins may provide advantageous properties such as a smaller size or a more stable structure. Results Avidin is a widely used protein in biomedicine and biotechnology. To tailor the binding properties of avidin, we have designed a sequence-randomized avidin library with mutagenesis focused at the loop area of the binding site. Selection from the generated library led to the isolation of a steroid-binding avidin mutant (sbAvd-1 showing micromolar affinity towards testosterone (Kd ~ 9 μM. Furthermore, a gene library based on the sbAvd-1 gene was created by randomizing the loop area between β-strands 3 and 4. Phage display selection from this library led to the isolation of a steroid-binding protein with significantly decreased biotin binding affinity compared to sbAvd-1. Importantly, differential scanning calorimetry and analytical gel-filtration revealed that the high stability and the tetrameric structure were preserved in these engineered avidins. Conclusions The high stability and structural properties of avidin make it an attractive molecule for the engineering of novel receptors. This methodology may allow the use of avidin as a universal scaffold in the development of novel receptors for small molecules.

  10. Functional Analysis of the Citrate Activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis Implicates a Divalent Metal in Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blancato, Víctor S.; Pagliai, Fernando A.; Magni, Christian; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2016-01-01

    The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD = 1.2 ± 0.2 μM), while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation. PMID:26903980

  11. Functional analysis of the citrate activator CitO from Enterococcus faecalis implicates a divalent metal in ligand binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor S. Blancato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The regulator of citrate metabolism, CitO, from Enterococcus faecalis belongs to the FCD family within the GntR superfamily. In the presence of citrate, CitO binds to cis-acting sequences located upstream of the cit promoters inducing the expression of genes involved in citrate utilization. The quantification of the molecular binding affinities, performed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, indicated that CitO has a high affinity for citrate (KD= 1.2±0.2 µM, while it did not recognize other metabolic intermediates. Based on a structural model of CitO where a putative small molecule and a metal binding site were identified, it was hypothesized that the metal ion is required for citrate binding. In agreement with this model, citrate binding to CitO sharply decreased when the protein was incubated with EDTA. This effect was reverted by the addition of Ni2+, and Zn2+ to a lesser extent. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis was conducted and it was found that changes to alanine in residues Arg97 and His191 resulted in decreased binding affinities for citrate, as determined by EMSA and ITC. Further assays using lacZ fusions confirmed that these residues in CitO are involved in sensing citrate in vivo. These results indicate that the molecular modifications induced by a ligand and a metal binding in the C-terminal domain of CitO are required for optimal DNA binding activity, and consequently, transcriptional activation.

  12. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the environmental effect of the atom under consideration. We have developed a novel knowledge-based statistical energy function for protein-ligand complexes which takes atomic environment in to account hence functional group as a singular entity. The proposed knowledge based scoring function is fast, simple to construct, easy to use and moreover it tackle the existing problem of handling molecular orientation in active site pocket. We have designed and used Functional group based Ligand retrieval (FBLR) system which can identify and detect the orientation of functional groups in ligand. This decoy searching was used to build the above KBSF to quantify the activity and affinity of high resolution protein-ligand complexes. We have proposed the probable use of these decoys in molecular build-up as a de-novo drug designing approach. We have also discussed the possible use of the said KSBF in pharmacophore fragment detection and pseudo center based fragment alignment procedure. PMID:19255647

  13. Murine interleukin 1 receptor. Direct identification by ligand blotting and purification to homogeneity of an interleukin 1-binding glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional receptors (IL1-R) for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL1) were solubilized from plasma membranes of the NOB-1 subclone of murine EL4 6.1 thymoma cells using the zwitterionic detergent 3[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Membrane extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and ligand blotted with 125I-labeled recombinant human IL1 alpha in order to reveal proteins capable of specifically binding IL1. A single polydisperse polypeptide of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 was identified in this way, which bound IL1 alpha and IL1 beta with the same affinity as the IL1-R on intact NOB-1 cells (approximately equal to 10(-10) M). The IL1-binding polypeptide was only seen in membranes from IL1-R-bearing cells and did not react with interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interferon. IL1-R was purified to apparent homogeneity from solubilized NOB-1 membranes by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose and IL1 alpha-Sepharose. Gel electrophoresis and silver staining of purified preparations revealed a single protein of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 which reacted positively in the ligand-blotting procedure and which we identify as the ligand-binding moiety of the murine IL1-R. Purified IL1-R exhibited the same affinity and specificity as the receptor on intact cells. The relationship of this protein to proteins identified by covalent cross-linking studies is discussed

  14. Crystal Structure of the Ligand Binding Suppressor Domain of Type 1 Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Ivan; Yamazaki, Haruka; Matsu-ura, Toru; Michikawa, Takayuki; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (U. of Texas-SMED)

    2010-11-10

    Binding of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) to the amino-terminal region of IP{sub 3} receptor promotes Ca{sup 2+} release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Within the amino terminus, the first 220 residues directly preceding the IP{sub 3} binding core domain play a key role in IP{sub 3} binding suppression and regulatory protein interaction. Here we present a crystal structure of the suppressor domain of the mouse type 1 IP{sub 3} receptor at 1.8 {angstrom}. Displaying a shape akin to a hammer, the suppressor region contains a Head subdomain forming the {beta}-trefoil fold and an Arm subdomain possessing a helix-turn-helix structure. The conserved region on the Head subdomain appeared to interact with the IP{sub 3} binding core domain and is in close proximity to the previously proposed binding sites of Homer, RACK1, calmodulin, and CaBP1. The present study sheds light onto the mechanism underlying the receptor's sensitivity to the ligand and its communication with cellular signaling proteins.

  15. The unique ligand binding features of subfamily-II iLBPs with respect to bile salts and related drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favretto, Filippo; Ceccon, Alberto; Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Ragona, Laura; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs) are a family of evolutionarily related small cytoplasmic proteins implicated in the transcellular transport of lipophilic ligands. Subfamily-II iLBPs include the liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), and the ileal and the liver and ileal bile acid binding proteins (L-BABP and I-BABP). Atomic-level investigations during the past 15-20 years have delivered relevant information on bile acid binding by this protein group, revealing unique features including binding cooperativity, promiscuity, and site selectivity. Using NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical techniques, our laboratories have contributed to an understanding of the molecular determinants of some of these properties and their generality among proteins from different animal species. We focused especially on formation of heterotypic complexes, considering the mixed compositions of physiological bile acid pools. Experiments performed with synthetic bile acid derivatives showed that iLBPs could act as targets for cell-specific contrast agents and, more generally, as effective carriers of amphiphilic drugs. This review collects the major findings related to bile salt interactions with iLBPs aiming to provide keys for a deeper understanding of protein-mediated intracellular bile salt trafficking. PMID:25468388

  16. Ligand selectivity of 105 kDa and 130 kDa lipoprotein-binding proteins in vascular-smooth-muscle-cell membranes is unique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, V N; Tkachuk, V A; Philippova, M P; Stambolsky, D V; Bühler, F R; Resink, T J

    1996-07-01

    Using ligand blotting techniques, with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) as ligand, we have previously described the existence of atypical lipoprotein-binding proteins (105 kDa and 130 kDa) in membranes from human aortic medical tissue. The present study demonstrates that these proteins are also present in membranes from cultured human (aortic and mesenteric) and rat (aortic) vascular smooth-muscle cells (VSMCs). To assess the relationship of 105 and 130 kDa lipoprotein-binding proteins to known lipoprotein receptors, ligand binding specificity was studied. We tested effects of substances known to antagonize ligand binding to either the LDL [apolipoprotein B,E (apo B,E)] receptor (dextran sulphate, heparin, pentosan polysulphate, protamine, spermine, histone), the scavenger receptor (dextran sulphate, fucoidin), the very-low-density-lipoprotein (VLDL) receptor [receptor-associated protein (RAP)], or LDL receptor-related protein (RAP, alpha 2-macroglobulin, lipoprotein lipase, exotoxin-A). None of these substances, with the exception of dextran sulphate, influenced binding of LDL to either 105 or 130 kDa proteins. Sodium oleate or oleic acid, known stimuli for the lipoprotein binding activity of the lipolysis-stimulated receptor, were also without effect. LDL binding to 105 and 130 kDa proteins was inhibited by anti-LDL (apo B) antibodies. LDL and VLDL bound to 105 and 130 kDa proteins with similar affinities (approximately 50 micrograms/ml). The unique ligand selectivity of 105 and 130 kDa proteins supports the existence of a novel lipoprotein-binding protein that is distinct from all other currently identified LDL receptor family members. The similar ligand selectivity of 105 and 130 kDa proteins suggests that they may represent variant forms of an atypical lipoprotein-binding protein. PMID:8694779

  17. Effect of Common Buffers and Heterocyclic Ligands on the Binding of Cu(II at the Multimetal Binding Site in Human Serum Albumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Sokołowska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Visible-range circular dichroism titrations were used to study Cu(II binding properties of Multimetal Binding Site (MBS of Human Serum Albumin (HSA. The formation of ternary MBS-Cu(II-Buffer complexes at pH 7.4 was positively verified for sodium phosphate, Tris, and Hepes, the three most common biochemical buffers. The phosphate > Hepes > Tris order of affinities, together with strong spectral changes induced specifically by Tris, indicates the presence of both Buffer-Cu(II and Buffer-HSA interactions. All complexes are strong enough to yield a nearly 100% ternary complex formation in 0.5 mM HSA dissolved in 100 mM solutions of respective buffers. The effects of warfarin and ibuprofen, specific ligands of hydrophobic pockets I and II in HSA on the Cu(II binding to MBS were also investigated. The effects of ibuprofen were negligible, but warfarin diminished the MBS affinity for Cu(II by a factor of 20, as a result of indirect conformational effects. These results indicate that metal binding properties of MBS can be modulated directly and indirectly by small molecules.

  18. Rhenium complexes of chromophore-appended dipicolylamine ligands: syntheses, spectroscopic properties, DNA binding and X-ray crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullice, L.A.; Buurma, N.J.; Pope, S.J.A. [Cardiff Univ., School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Laye, R.H. [Sheffield Univ., Dept. of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Harding, L.P. [Huddersfield Univ., School of Biological and Chemical Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    The syntheses of two chromophore-appended dipicolylamine-derived ligands and their reactivity with penta-carbonyl-chloro-rhenium have been studied. The resultant complexes each possess the fac-Re(CO){sub 3} core. The ligands L{sup 1} 1-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-pyrene and L{sup 2} 2-[bis(pyridine-2-yl-methyl)amino]methyl-quinoxaline were isolated via a one-pot reductive amination in moderate yield. The corresponding rhenium complexes were isolated in good yields and characterised by {sup 1}H NMR, MS, IR and UV-Vis studies. X-Ray crystallographic data were obtained for fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}), C{sub 34}H{sub 26}BF{sub 4}N{sub 4}O{sub 3}Re: monoclinic, P2(1)/c, a 18.327(2) Angstroms, {alpha} = 90.00 degrees, b 14.1537(14) Angstroms, {beta}96.263(6) degrees, c = 23.511(3) Angstroms, {gamma} 90.00 Angstroms, 6062.4(11) (Angstroms){sup 3}, Z=8. The luminescence properties of the ligands and complexes were also investigated, with the emission attributed to the appended chromophore in each case. Isothermal titration calorimetry suggests that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) self-aggregates cooperatively in aqueous solution, probably forming micelle-like aggregates with a cmc of 0.18 mM. Investigations into the DNA-binding properties of fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) were undertaken and revealed that fac-{l_brace}Re(CO){sub 3}(L{sup 1}){r_brace}(BF{sub 4}) binding to fish sperm DNA (binding constant 1.5 {+-} 0.2 * 10{sup 5} M{sup -1}, binding site size 3.2 {+-} 0.3 base pairs) is accompanied by changes in the UV-Vis spectrum as typically observed for pyrene-based intercalators while the calorimetrically determined binding enthalpy (-14 {+-} 2 kcal mol{sup -1}) also agrees favourably with values as typically found for intercalators. (authors)

  19. The crystal structure of the non-liganded 14-3-3σ protein: insights into determinants of isoform specific ligand binding and dimerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anne BENZINGER; Grzegorz M. POPOWICZ; Joma K. JOY; Sudipta MAJUMDAR; Tad A. HOLAK; Heiko HERMEKING

    2005-01-01

    Seven different, but highly conserved 14-3-3 proteins are involved in diverse signaling pathways in human cells. It is unclear how the 14-3-3σ isoform, a transcriptional target of p53, exerts its inhibitory effect on the cell cycle in the presence of other 14-3-3 isoforms, which are constitutively expressed at high levels. In order to identify structural differences between the 14-3-3 isoforms, we solved the crystal structure of the human 14-3-3σ protein at a resolution of 2.8 A and compared it to the known structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ. The global architecture of the 14-3-3σ fold is similar to the previously determined structures of 14-3-3ζ and 14-3-3τ: two 14-3-3σ molecules form a cup-shaped dimer. Significant differences between these 14-3-3 isoforms were detected adjacent to the amphipathic groove, which mediates the binding to phosphorylated consensus motifs in 14-3-3-1igands. Another specificity determining region is localized between amino-acids 203 to 215. These differences presumably select for the interaction with specific ligands,which may explain the different biological functions of the respective 14-3-3 isoforms. Furthermore, the two 14-3-3σ molecules forming a dimer differ by the spatial position of the ninth helix, which is shifted to the inside of the ligand interaction surface, thus indicating adaptability of this part of the molecule. In addition, 5 non-conserved residues are located at the interface between two 14-3-3σ proteins forming a dimer and represent candidate determinants of homoand hetero-dimerization specificity. The structural differences among the 14-3-3 isoforms described here presumably contribute to isoform-specific interactions and functions.

  20. Down-regulation of protein kinase Ceta potentiates the cytotoxic effects of exogenous tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand in PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnemann, Jürgen; Gekeler, Volker; Sagrauske, Antje; Müller, Cornelia; Hofmann, Hans-Peter; Beck, James F

    2004-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a highly promising candidate for the treatment of cancer because it elicits cell death in the majority of tumor cells while sparing most normal cells. Some cancers, however, display resistance to TRAIL, suggesting that treatment with TRAIL alone may be insufficient for cancer therapy. In the present study, we explored whether the apoptotic responsiveness of PC-3 prostate cancer cells to TRAIL could be enhanced by targeting the novel protein kinase C (PKC) isoform eta. Transfection of PC-3 cells with second-generation chimeric antisense oligonucleotides against PKCeta caused a time- and dose-dependent knockdown of PKCeta, as revealed by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Knockdown of PKCeta resulted in a marked amplification of TRAIL's cytotoxic activity. Cell killing could be substantially prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. In addition, PKCeta knockdown and administration of TRAIL significantly synergized in activation of caspase-3 and internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. Knockdown of PKCeta augmented TRAIL-induced dissipation of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into the cytosol, indicating that PKCeta acts upstream of mitochondria. We conclude that PKCeta represents a considerable resistance factor with respect to TRAIL and a promising target to exploit the therapeutic potential of TRAIL. PMID:15252138

  1. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E;

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or...

  2. Antioxidation and DNA-binding properties of binuclear lanthanide(III) complexes with a Schiff base ligand derived from 8-hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxaldehyde and benzoylhydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongchun; Zhang, Kejun; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Junying; Liu, Jianning

    2012-08-01

    8-Hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxaldehyde (8-HQ-7-CA), Schiff-base ligand 8-hydroxyquinoline-7-carboxaldehyde benzoylhydrazone, and binuclear complexes [LnL(NO(3))(H(2)O)(2)](2) were prepared from the ligand and equivalent molar amounts of Ln(NO(3))·6H(2)O (Ln=La(3+), Nd(3+), Sm(3+), Eu(3+), Gd(3+), Dy(3+), Ho(3+), Er(3+), Yb(3+), resp.). Ligand acts as dibasic tetradentates, binding to Ln(III) through the phenolate O-atom, N-atom of quinolinato unit, and C=N and -O-C=N- groups of the benzoylhydrazine side chain. Dimerization of this monomeric unit occurs through the phenolate O-atoms leading to a central four-membered (LnO)(2) ring. Ligand and all of the Ln(III) complexes can strongly bind to CT-DNA through intercalation with the binding constants at 10(5)-10(6) M(-1). Moreover, ligand and all of the Ln(III) complexes have strong abilities of scavenging effects for hydroxyl (HO·) radicals. Both the antioxidation and DNA-binding properties of Ln(III) complexes are much better than that of ligand.

  3. Structure of the HCMV UL16-MICB complex elucidates select binding of a viral immunoevasin to diverse NKG2D ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Müller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D promotes elimination of infected or malignant cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes through engagement of stress-induced MHC class I-related ligands. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV-encoded immunoevasin UL16 subverts NKG2D-mediated immune responses by retaining a select group of diverse NKG2D ligands inside the cell. We report here the crystal structure of UL16 in complex with the NKG2D ligand MICB at 1.8 A resolution, revealing the molecular basis for the promiscuous, but highly selective, binding of UL16 to unrelated NKG2D ligands. The immunoglobulin-like UL16 protein utilizes a three-stranded beta-sheet to engage the alpha-helical surface of the MHC class I-like MICB platform domain. Intriguingly, residues at the center of this beta-sheet mimic a central binding motif employed by the structurally unrelated C-type lectin-like NKG2D to facilitate engagement of diverse NKG2D ligands. Using surface plasmon resonance, we find that UL16 binds MICB, ULBP1, and ULBP2 with similar affinities that lie in the nanomolar range (12-66 nM. The ability of UL16 to bind its ligands depends critically on the presence of a glutamine (MICB or closely related glutamate (ULBP1 and ULBP2 at position 169. An arginine residue at this position however, as found for example in MICA or ULBP3, would cause steric clashes with UL16 residues. The inability of UL16 to bind MICA and ULBP3 can therefore be attributed to single substitutions at key NKG2D ligand locations. This indicates that selective pressure exerted by viral immunoevasins such as UL16 contributed to the diversification of NKG2D ligands.

  4. Structure of the HCMV UL16-MICB complex elucidates select binding of a viral immunoevasin to diverse NKG2D ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Steffen; Zocher, Georg; Steinle, Alexander; Stehle, Thilo

    2010-01-01

    The activating immunoreceptor NKG2D promotes elimination of infected or malignant cells by cytotoxic lymphocytes through engagement of stress-induced MHC class I-related ligands. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded immunoevasin UL16 subverts NKG2D-mediated immune responses by retaining a select group of diverse NKG2D ligands inside the cell. We report here the crystal structure of UL16 in complex with the NKG2D ligand MICB at 1.8 A resolution, revealing the molecular basis for the promiscuous, but highly selective, binding of UL16 to unrelated NKG2D ligands. The immunoglobulin-like UL16 protein utilizes a three-stranded beta-sheet to engage the alpha-helical surface of the MHC class I-like MICB platform domain. Intriguingly, residues at the center of this beta-sheet mimic a central binding motif employed by the structurally unrelated C-type lectin-like NKG2D to facilitate engagement of diverse NKG2D ligands. Using surface plasmon resonance, we find that UL16 binds MICB, ULBP1, and ULBP2 with similar affinities that lie in the nanomolar range (12-66 nM). The ability of UL16 to bind its ligands depends critically on the presence of a glutamine (MICB) or closely related glutamate (ULBP1 and ULBP2) at position 169. An arginine residue at this position however, as found for example in MICA or ULBP3, would cause steric clashes with UL16 residues. The inability of UL16 to bind MICA and ULBP3 can therefore be attributed to single substitutions at key NKG2D ligand locations. This indicates that selective pressure exerted by viral immunoevasins such as UL16 contributed to the diversification of NKG2D ligands. PMID:20090832

  5. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C for (dT)5 to a maximum of 9 °C with oligomers ≥10 nucleotides, with an apparent Kd of <1 µM for (dT)20. Specifically, the results indicate that ICP8 is capable of interacting with oligomers as short as 5 nucleotides. Moreover, the observed increases in melting temperature of up to 9 °C, indicates that single-strand DNA binding significantly stabilizes the structure of ICP8. This assay may be applied to investigate the ligand binding proteins of other single-strand DNA binding proteins and used as a high-throughput screen to identify compounds with therapeutic potential that inhibit single-strand DNA binding. As proof of concept, the single-strand DNA binding agent ciprofloxacin reduces the ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of ICP8 in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:25449284

  6. Trapping conformational states along ligand-binding dynamics of peptide deformylase: the impact of induced fit on enzyme catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Fieulaine

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, molecular recognition has been considered one of the most fundamental processes in biochemistry. For enzymes, substrate binding is often coupled to conformational changes that alter the local environment of the active site to align the reactive groups for efficient catalysis and to reach the transition state. Adaptive substrate recognition is a well-known concept; however, it has been poorly characterized at a structural level because of its dynamic nature. Here, we provide a detailed mechanism for an induced-fit process at atomic resolution. We take advantage of a slow, tight binding inhibitor-enzyme system, actinonin-peptide deformylase. Crystal structures of the initial open state and final closed state were solved, as well as those of several intermediate mimics captured during the process. Ligand-induced reshaping of a hydrophobic pocket drives closure of the active site, which is finally "zipped up" by additional binding interactions. Together with biochemical analyses, these data allow a coherent reconstruction of the sequence of events leading from the encounter complex to the key-lock binding state of the enzyme. A "movie" that reconstructs this entire process can be further extrapolated to catalysis.

  7. The Structure of a High-Affinity Kainate Receptor: GluK4 Ligand-Binding Domain Crystallized with Kainate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Ole; Kristensen, Lise Baadsgaard; Møllerud, Stine; Frydenvang, Karla; Pickering, Darryl S; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm

    2016-09-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors play a key role in fast neurotransmission in the CNS and have been linked to several neurological diseases and disorders. One subfamily is the kainate receptors, which are grouped into low-affinity (GluK1-3) and high-affinity (GluK4-5) receptors based on their affinity for kainate. Although structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of all low-affinity kainate receptors have been reported, no structures of the high-affinity receptor subunits are available. Here, we present the X-ray structure of GluK4-LBD with kainate at 2.05 Å resolution, together with thermofluor and radiolabel binding affinity data. Whereas binding-site residues in GluK4 are most similar to the AMPA receptor subfamily, the domain closure and D1-D2 interlobe contacts induced by kainate are similar to the low-affinity kainate receptor GluK1. These observations provide a likely explanation for the high binding affinity of kainate at GluK4-LBD.

  8. BDflex: A method for efficient treatment of molecular flexibility in calculating protein-ligand binding rate constants from Brownian dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greives, Nicholas; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2012-10-01

    A method developed by Northrup et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 80, 1517 (1984)], 10.1063/1.446900 for calculating protein-ligand binding rate constants (ka) from Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations has been widely used for rigid molecules. Application to flexible molecules is limited by the formidable computational cost to treat conformational fluctuations during the long BD simulations necessary for ka calculation. Here, we propose a new method called BDflex for ka calculation that circumvents this problem. The basic idea is to separate the whole space into an outer region and an inner region, and formulate ka as the product of kE and bar η _d, which are obtained by separately solving exterior and interior problems. kE is the diffusion-controlled rate constant for the ligand in the outer region to reach the dividing surface between the outer and inner regions; in this exterior problem conformational fluctuations can be neglected. bar η _d is the probability that the ligand, starting from the dividing surface, will react at the binding site rather than escape to infinity. The crucial step in reducing the determination of bar η _d to a problem confined to the inner region is a radiation boundary condition imposed on the dividing surface; the reactivity on this boundary is proportional to kE. By confining the ligand to the inner region and imposing the radiation boundary condition, we avoid multiple-crossing of the dividing surface before reaction at the binding site and hence dramatically cut down the total simulation time, making the treatment of conformational fluctuations affordable. BDflex is expected to have wide applications in problems where conformational fluctuations of the molecules are crucial for productive ligand binding, such as in cases where transient widening of a bottleneck allows the ligand to access the binding pocket, or the binding site is properly formed only after ligand entrance induces the closure of a lid.

  9. EPSP synthase: binding studies using isothermal titration microcalorimetry and equilibrium dialysis and their implications for ligand recognition and kinetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, J E; Yuen, H K; Frazier, R B; Sikorski, J A

    1992-06-23

    Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements are reported which give important new binding constant (Kd) information for various substrate and inhibitor complexes of Escherichia coli EPSP synthase (EPSPS). The validity of this technique was first verified by determining Kd's for the known binary complex with the substrate, shikimate 3-phosphate (S3P), as well as the herbicidal ternary complex with S3P and glyphosate (EPSPS.S3P.glyphosate). The observed Kd's agreed very well with those from previous independently determined kinetic and fluorescence binding measurements. Further applications unequivocally demonstrate for the first time a fairly tight interaction between phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and free enzyme (Kd = 390 microM) as well as a correspondingly weak affinity for glyphosate (Kd = 12 mM) alone with enzyme. The formation of the EPSPS.PEP binary complex was independently corroborated using equilibrium dialysis. These results strongly suggest that S3P synergizes glyphosate binding much more effectively than it does PEP binding. These observations add important new evidence to support the hypothesis that glyphosate acts as a transition-state analogue of PEP. However, the formation of a catalytically productive PEP binary complex is inconsistent with the previously reported compulsory binding order process required for catalysis and has led to new studies which completely revise the overall EPSPS kinetic mechanism. A previously postulated ternary complex between S3P and inorganic phosphate (EPSPS.S3P.Pi, Kd = 4 mM) was also detected for the first time. Quantitative binding enthalpies and entropies were also determined for each ligand complex from the microcalorimetry data. These values demonstrate a clear difference in thermodynamic parameters for recognition at the S3P site versus those observed for the PEP, Pi, and glyphosate sites.

  10. Structural and functional insights into the ligand-binding domain of a nonduplicated retinoid X nuclear receptor from the invertebrate chordate amphioxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchini-Valentini, Giuseppe D; Rochel, Natacha; Escriva, Hector; Germain, Pierre; Peluso-Iltis, Carole; Paris, Mathilde; Sanglier-Cianferani, Sarah; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Moras, Dino; Laudet, Vincent

    2009-01-16

    Retinoid X nuclear receptors (RXRs), as well as their insect orthologue, ultraspiracle protein (USP), play an important role in the transcription regulation mediated by the nuclear receptors as the common partner of many other nuclear receptors. Phylogenetic and structural studies have shown that the several evolutionary shifts have modified the ligand binding ability of RXRs. To understand the vertebrate-specific character of RXRs, we have studied the RXR ligand-binding domain of the cephalochordate amphioxus (Branchiostoma floridae), an invertebrate chordate that predates the genome duplication that produced the three vertebrates RXRs (alpha, beta, and gamma). Here we report the crystal structure of a novel apotetramer conformation of the AmphiRXR ligand-binding domain, which shows some similarity with the structures of the arthropods RXR/USPs. AmphiRXR adopts an apo antagonist conformation with a peculiar conformation of helix H11 filling the binding pocket. In contrast to the arthropods RXR/USPs, which cannot be activated by any RXR ligands, our functional data show that AmphiRXR, like the vertebrates/mollusk RXRs, is able to bind and be activated by RXR ligands but less efficiently than vertebrate RXRs. Our data suggest that amphioxus RXR is, functionally, an intermediate between arthropods RXR/USPs and vertebrate RXRs. PMID:18986992

  11. Human insulin polymorphism upon ligand binding and pH variation: the case of 4-ethylresorcinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fili

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the effects of the organic ligand 4-ethylresorcinol on the crystal structure of human insulin using powder X-ray crystallography. For this purpose, systematic crystallization experiments have been conducted in the presence of the organic ligand and zinc ions within the pH range 4.50–8.20, while observing crystallization behaviour around the isoelectric point of insulin. High-throughput crystal screening was performed using a laboratory X-ray diffraction system. The most representative samples were selected for synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, which took place at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF and the Swiss Light Source (SLS. Four different crystalline polymorphs have been identified. Among these, two new phases with monoclinic symmetry have been found, which are targets for the future development of microcrystalline insulin drugs.

  12. Human insulin polymorphism upon ligand binding and pH variation: the case of 4-ethylresorcinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fili, S; Valmas, A; Norrman, M; Schluckebier, G; Beckers, D; Degen, T; Wright, J; Fitch, A; Gozzo, F; Giannopoulou, A E; Karavassili, F; Margiolaki, I

    2015-09-01

    This study focuses on the effects of the organic ligand 4-ethylresorcinol on the crystal structure of human insulin using powder X-ray crystallography. For this purpose, systematic crystallization experiments have been conducted in the presence of the organic ligand and zinc ions within the pH range 4.50-8.20, while observing crystallization behaviour around the isoelectric point of insulin. High-throughput crystal screening was performed using a laboratory X-ray diffraction system. The most representative samples were selected for synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements, which took place at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) and the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Four different crystalline polymorphs have been identified. Among these, two new phases with monoclinic symmetry have been found, which are targets for the future development of microcrystalline insulin drugs. PMID:26306195

  13. Novel thermo-responsive fucose binding ligands for glycoprotein purification by affinity precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Lindsay; Chen, Rachel

    2014-02-01

    Novel thermo-responsive affinity sugar binders were developed by fusing a bacterial fucose lectin with a thermo-responsive polypeptide. These designer affinity ligand fusions were produced using an Escherichia coli system capable of extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins and were isolated with a high recovery yield (95%) directly from growth medium by Inverse Temperature Cycling (ITC). With horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as a model protein, we demonstrate here that the designer thermo-responsive ligands are capable of interacting with glycans on a glycoprotein, a property that was used to develop a novel affinity precipitation method for glycoprotein purification. The method, requiring only simple process steps, affords full recovery of a target glycoprotein, and is effective at a target glycoprotein concentration as low as 1.4 pM in the presence of large amounts of contaminants. By developing other sugar binders in the similar fashion, the method should be highly useful for glycoprotein purification and detection.

  14. Principles of a competitive binding assay for the study of the interactions of poorly water-soluble ligands with their soluble binding partners. Application to bilirubin with the use of Sephadex G-10 as a competitive adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwissen, J A; Kinnaert, M; Michiels, G; Heirwegh, K P

    1988-01-01

    1. A generally applicable method is described for obtaining experimental data on the interactions between a poorly water-soluble ligand and soluble binding factors, with the use of chemically inert solid adsorbent. The equilibrium distribution of the ligand between the liquid phase containing the soluble binders and the adsorbent must be measured and knowledge of the binding isotherm of the adsorbent is required. Procedures are given for the calculation of the binding parameters. 2. The method has been applied to quantify the interactions of bilirubin with serum and liver cytosol from the rat, Sephadex G-10 serving as the competing adsorbent. Reversible adsorption keeps the concentration of the free ligand low, thereby preventing formation of colloidal bilirubin. The sensitivity of the procedure accommodates the rather high binding affinities by which bilirubin generally interacts with its specific binding proteins. 3. The binding activities of serum and liver cytosol are of comparable magnitude. Binding of bilirubin by rat serum can be described by two independent binding sites, the affinities of which differ by two orders of magnitude. Only the site with the higher affinity appears to be of physiological importance. The major bilirubin-binding sites of rat liver cytosol seem to contribute equally to the overall binding activity of this preparation, provided that GSH is present. PMID:2449176

  15. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    OpenAIRE

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the env...

  16. Examination of the ligand-binding and enzymatic properties of a bilin-binding protein from the poisonous caterpillar Lonomia obliqua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana B G Veiga

    Full Text Available The bilin-binding proteins (BBP from lepidopteran insects are members of the lipocalin family of proteins and play a special role in pigmentation through the binding of biliverdin IXγ. Lopap, a BBP-like protein from the venom of the toxic caterpillar Lonomia obliqua has been reported to act as a serine protease that activates the coagulation proenzyme prothrombin. Here we show that BBPLo, a variant of lopap from the same organism binds biliverdin IXγ, forming a complex that is spectrally identical with previously described BBP proteins. Although BBPLo is nearly identical in sequence to lopap, no prothrombinase activity was detected in our recombinant preparations using reconstituted systems containing coagulation factors Xa and Va, as well as anionic phospholipids. In addition to biliverdin, BBPLo was found to form a 1:1 complex with heme prompting us to examine whether the unusual biliverdin IXγ ligand of BBPs forms as a result of oxidation of bound heme in situ rather than by a conventional heme oxygenase. Using ascorbate or a NADPH(+-ferredoxin reductase-ferredoxin system as a source of reducing equivalents, spectral changes are seen that suggest an initial reduction of heme to the Fe(II state and formation of an oxyferrous complex. The complex then disappears and a product identified as a 5-coordinate carbonyl complex of verdoheme, an intermediate in the biosynthesis of biliverdin, is formed. However, further reaction to form biliverdin was not observed, making it unlikely that biliverdin IXγ is formed by this pathway.

  17. Acyl-CoA esters antagonize the effects of ligands on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha conformation, DNA binding, and interaction with Co-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Dam, I; Jorgensen, C;

    2001-01-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and a key regulator of lipid homeostasis. Numerous fatty acids and eicosanoids serve as ligands and activators for PPARalpha. Here we demonstrate that S-hexadecyl-CoA, a nonhydrolyzable...... palmitoyl-CoA analog, antagonizes the effects of agonists on PPARalpha conformation and function in vitro. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, S-hexadecyl-CoA prevented agonist-induced binding of the PPARalpha-retinoid X receptor alpha heterodimer to the acyl-CoA oxidase peroxisome proliferator...... a functional PPARalpha ligand-binding pocket. S-Hexadecyl-CoA prevented ligand-induced interaction between the co-activator SRC-1 and PPARalpha but increased recruitment of the nuclear receptor co-repressor NCoR. In cells, the concentration of free acyl-CoA esters is kept in the low nanomolar range due...

  18. DETERMINANTS OF LIGAND BINDING AFFINITY AND COOPERATIVITY AT THE GLUT1 ENDOFACIAL SITE

    OpenAIRE

    Robichaud, Trista; Appleyard, Antony N.; Herbert, Richard B.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Cytochalasin B (CB) and forskolin (FSK) inhibit GLUT1-mediated sugar transport in red cells by binding at or close to the GLUT1 endofacial sugar binding site. Paradoxically, very low concentrations of each of these inhibitors produce a modest stimulation of sugar transport (Cloherty, E. K., Levine, K. B., & Carruthers, A. (2001). The red blood cell glucose transporter presents multiple, nucleotide-sensitive sugar exit sites. Biochemistry, 40(51), 15549–15561). This result is consistent with t...

  19. Computational Biology Tools for Identifying Specific Ligand Binding Residues for Novel Agrochemical and Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neshich, Izabella Agostinho Pena; Nishimura, Leticia; de Moraes, Fabio Rogerio; Salim, Jose Augusto; Villalta-Romero, Fabian; Borro, Luiz; Yano, Inacio Henrique; Mazoni, Ivan; Tasic, Ljubica; Jardine, Jose Gilberto; Neshich, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The term "agrochemicals" is used in its generic form to represent a spectrum of pesticides, such as insecticides, fungicides or bactericides. They contain active components designed for optimized pest management and control, therefore allowing for economically sound and labor efficient agricultural production. A "drug" on the other side is a term that is used for compounds designed for controlling human diseases. Although drugs are subjected to much more severe testing and regulation procedures before reaching the market, they might contain exactly the same active ingredient as certain agrochemicals, what is the case described in present work, showing how a small chemical compound might be used to control pathogenicity of Gram negative bacteria Xylella fastidiosa which devastates citrus plantations, as well as for control of, for example, meningitis in humans. It is also clear that so far the production of new agrochemicals is not benefiting as much from the in silico new chemical compound identification/discovery as pharmaceutical production. Rational drug design crucially depends on detailed knowledge of structural information about the receptor (target protein) and the ligand (drug/agrochemical). The interaction between the two molecules is the subject of analysis that aims to understand relationship between structure and function, mainly deciphering some fundamental elements of the nanoenvironment where the interaction occurs. In this work we will emphasize the role of understanding nanoenvironmental factors that guide recognition and interaction of target protein and its function modifier, an agrochemical or a drug. The repertoire of nanoenvironment descriptors is used for two selected and specific cases we have approached in order to offer a technological solution for some very important problems that needs special attention in agriculture: elimination of pathogenicity of a bacterium which is attacking citrus plants and formulation of a new fungicide. Finally

  20. Ligand Binding Reduces Conformational Flexibility in the Active Site of Tyrosine Phosphatase Related to Biofilm Formation A (TpbA) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Koveal, Dorothy; Clarkson, Michael W.; Wood, Thomas K.; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    TpbA is a periplasmic dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) that controls biofilm formation in the pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. While DUSPs are known to regulate important cellular functions in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, very few structures of bacterial DUSPs are available. Here, we present the solution structure of TpbA in the ligand-free open conformation, along with an analysis of the structural and dynamic changes that accompany ligand/phosphate binding. While TpbA ad...

  1. Tyr702 is an important determinant of agonist binding and domain closure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne; Pickering, Darryl S.; Vestergaard, Bente;

    2005-01-01

    display selectivity among (S)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl) propionic acid (AMPA)-receptor subtypes. The present study provides X-ray structures of the glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2)-selective partial agonist (S)-2-amino-3-(1,3,5,6,7-pentahydro-2,4-dioxocyclopenta[e] pyrimidin-1-yl) propanoic...... acid [(S)-CPW399] in complex with the ligand-binding core of GluR2 (GluR2-S1S2J) and with a (Y702F)GluR2-S1S2J mutant. In addition, the structure of the nonselective partial agonist kainate in complex with (Y702F)GluR2-S1S2J was determined. The results show that the selectivity of (S)-CPW399 toward...

  2. The high affinity ligand binding conformation of the nuclear 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor is functionally linked to the transactivation domain 2 (AF-2).

    OpenAIRE

    Nayeri, S; Kahlen, J P; Carlberg, C

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear receptor for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD), VDR, is a transcription factor that mediates all genomic actions of the hormone. The activation of VDR by ligand induces a conformational change within its ligand binding domain (LBD). Due to the lack of a crystal structure analysis, biochemical methods have to be applied in order to investigate the details of this receptor-ligand interaction. The limited protease digestion assay can be used as a tool for the determination of a functiona...

  3. Screening for PreS specific binding ligands with a phage displayed peptides library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Deng; Ming Zhuang; Yu-Ying Kong; You-Hua Xie; Yuan Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct a random peptide phage display library and search for peptides that specifically bind to the PreS region of hepatitis B virus (HBV).METHODS: A phage display vector, pFuse8, based on the gene 8 product (pⅧ) of M13 phage was made and used to construct a random peptide library. E. coli derived thioredoxin-PreS was purified with Thio-bond beads, and exploited as the bait protein for library screening. Five rounds of bio-panning were performed. The PreS-binding specificities of enriched phages were characterized with phage ELISA assay.RESULTS: A phage display vector was successfully constructed as demonstrated to present a pⅧ fused HBV PreS1 epitope on the phage surface with a high efficiency.A cysteine confined random peptide library was constructed containing independent clones exceeding 5±108 clone forming unit (CFU). A pool of phages showing a PreS-binding specificity was obtained after the screening against thioPres with an enrichment of approximately 400 times. Five phages with high PreS-binding specificities were selected and characterized. Sequences of the peptides displayed on these phages were determined.CONCLUSION: A phage library has been constructed,with random peptides displaying as pⅧ-fusion proteins.Specific PreS-binding peptides have been obtained, which may be useful for developing antivirals against HBV infection.

  4. Induced-fit upon ligand binding revealed by crystal structures of the hot-dog fold thioesterase in dynemicin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Chong Wai; Sharff, Andrew; Kotaka, Masayo; Kong, Rong; Sun, Huihua; Qureshi, Insaf; Bricogne, Gérard; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Lescar, Julien

    2010-11-26

    Dynemicins are structurally related 10-membered enediyne natural products isolated from Micromonospora chernisa with potent antitumor and antibiotic activity. The early biosynthetic steps of the enediyne moiety of dynemicins are catalyzed by an iterative polyketide synthase (DynE8) and a thioesterase (DynE7). Recent studies indicate that the function of DynE7 is to off-load the linear biosynthetic intermediate assembled on DynE8. Here, we report crystal structures of DynE7 in its free form at 2.7 Å resolution and of DynE7 in complex with the DynE8-produced all-trans pentadecen-2-one at 2.1 Å resolution. These crystal structures reveal that upon ligand binding, significant conformational changes throughout the substrate-binding tunnel result in an expanded tunnel that traverses an entire monomer of the tetrameric DynE7 protein. The enlarged inner segment of the channel binds the carbonyl-conjugated polyene mainly through hydrophobic interactions, whereas the putative catalytic residues are located in the outer segment of the channel. The crystallographic information reinforces an unusual catalytic mechanism that involves a strictly conserved arginine residue for this subfamily of hot-dog fold thioesterases, distinct from the typical mechanism for hot-dog fold thioesterases that utilizes an acidic residue for catalysis. PMID:20888341

  5. Expression cloning of a cDNA encoding the murine interleukin 4 receptor based on ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harada, N.; Castle, B.E.; Gorman, D.M.; Itoh, A.; Schreurs, J.; Barrett, R.L.; Howard, M.; Miyajima, A. (DNAX Research Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1990-02-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a potent mediator of growth and differentiation for various lymphoid and myeloid cells. To isolate a cDNA encoding the murine IL-4 receptor, the authors have developed an expression cloning method that uses biotinylated ligand as a probe and that may be generally applicable to cloning of receptor genes. COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the cloned full-length cDNA bind murine IL-4 specifically with a K{sub d} = 165 pM. Crosslinking of {sup 125}I-labeled IL-4 to COS-7 cells transfected with the cDNA reveals binding to proteins of 120-140 kDa. IL-4-responsive cells also express IL-4-binding proteins of 120-140 kDa but show additional bands at 60-70 kDa; the relationship of the smaller proteins to the larger ones is unclear. The nucleotide sequence indicates that the full-length cDNA encodes 810 amino acids including the signal sequence. While no consensus sequence for protein kinases is present in the cytoplasmic domain, a sequence comparison with the erythropoietin receptor, the IL-6 receptor, and the {beta} chain of the IL-2 receptor reveals a significant homology in the extracellular domain, indicating that the IL-4 receptor is a member of a cytokine receptor family.

  6. A Self-Adaptive Steered Molecular Dynamics Method Based on Minimization of Stretching Force Reveals the Binding Affinity of Protein–Ligand Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junfeng Gu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Binding affinity prediction of protein–ligand complexes has attracted widespread interest. In this study, a self-adaptive steered molecular dynamics (SMD method is proposed to reveal the binding affinity of protein–ligand complexes. The SMD method is executed through adjusting pulling direction to find an optimum trajectory of ligand dissociation, which is realized by minimizing the stretching force automatically. The SMD method is then used to simulate the dissociations of 19 common protein–ligand complexes which are derived from two homology families, and the binding free energy values are gained through experimental techniques. Results show that the proposed SMD method follows a different dissociation pathway with lower a rupture force and energy barrier when compared with the conventional SMD method, and further analysis indicates the rupture forces of the complexes in the same protein family correlate well with their binding free energy, which reveals the possibility of using the proposed SMD method to identify the active ligand.

  7. Polyfluorinated bis-styrylbenzenes as amyloid-β plaque binding ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Kapoerchan, Varsha V; Metaxas, Athanasios; de Jongh, Sanne; de Backer, Maaike; Welling, Mick M; Jiskoot, Wim; Windhorst, Albert D; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van Buchem, Mark A; Overhand, Mark; van der Weerd, Louise

    2014-04-15

    Detection of cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) by targeted contrast agents remains of great interest to aid the in vivo diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Bis-styrylbenzenes have been previously reported as potential Aβ imaging agents. To further explore their potency as (19)F MRI contrast agents we synthetized several novel fluorinated bis-styrylbenzenes and studied their fluorescent properties and amyloid-β binding characteristics. The compounds showed a high affinity for Aβ plaques on murine and human brain sections. Interestingly, competitive binding experiments demonstrated that they bound to a different binding site than chrysamine G. Despite their high logP values, many bis-styrylbenzenes were able to enter the brain and label murine amyloid in vivo. Unfortunately initial post-mortem (19)F NMR studies showed that these compounds as yet do not warrant further MRI studies due to the reduction of the (19)F signal in the environment of the brain. PMID:24657049

  8. Synthesis and receptor binding affinity of new selective GluR5 ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, L; Johansen, T H; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans;

    2001-01-01

    Two hybrid analogues of the kainic acid receptor agonists, 2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ATPA) and (2S,4R)-4-methylglutamic acid ((2S,4R)-4-Me-Glu), were designed, synthesized, and characterized in radioligand binding assays using cloned ionotropic and metabotropi.......0 and 2.0 microM. respectively. Their affinities in the [3H]AMPA binding assay on native cortical receptors were shown to correlate with their GluR2 affinity rather than their GluR5 affinity. No affinity for GluR6 was detected (IC50 > 100 microM)....

  9. Three-dimensional structure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2 in complex with the agonist (S)-ATPA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunn, Marie-Louise; Hogner, Anders; Stensbøl, Tine B;

    2003-01-01

    Two X-ray structures of the GluR2 ligand-binding core in complex with (S)-2-amino-3-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxy-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid ((S)-ATPA) have been determined with and without Zn(2+) ions. (S)-ATPA induces a domain closure of ca. 21 degrees compared to the apo form. The tert-butyl moiety...... of (S)-ATPA is buried in a partially hydrophobic pocket and forces the ligand into the glutamate-like binding mode. The structures provide new insight into the molecular basis of agonist selectivity between AMPA and kainate receptors....

  10. Ligand induced stabilization of the melting temperature of the HSV-1 single-strand DNA binding protein using the thermal shift assay

    OpenAIRE

    Rupesh, Kanchi Ravi; Smith, Aaron; Boehmer, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    We have adapted the thermal shift assay to measure the ligand binding properties of the herpes simplex virus-1 single-strand DNA binding protein, ICP8. By measuring SYPRO Orange fluorescence in microtiter plates using a fluorescence-enabled thermal cycler, we have quantified the effects of oligonucleotide ligands on the melting temperature of ICP8. We found that single-stranded oligomers raise the melting temperature of ICP8 in a length- and concentration-dependent manner, ranging from 1 °C f...

  11. Display of aggregation-prone ligand binding domain of human PPAR gamma on surface of bacteriophage lambda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo KONG; Wei-jun MA

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To display the aggregation-prone ligand binding domain (LBD) of the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) on the surface of bacteriophages to establish an easy screening assay for the identification of PPARγ ligands. Methods: Plasmids were constructed for the expression of the PPARγ LBD as a fusion to the N-terminus of the g3p protein of filamentous phage or the C-terminus of the capsid protein D (pD) of phage lambda. The fusion proteins were expressed in E coli and solubility characteristics were compared. Polyclonal antibodies against the LBD as well as the pD protein were prepared for Western blot analysis and phage capture assay. Results: The pD-LBD fusion protein was partially soluble, whereas the LBD-g3p fusion protein was detected only in the insoluble fraction. The pD-LBD fusion protein was efficiently incorporated in phage particles. Furthermore, the LBD was shown to be displayed on the surface of bacteriophage lambda. On average, the pD-LBD fusion protein accounted for 28% of the total pD protein in the lambda head capsid. Conclusion: The hydrophobic PPARγLBD was expressed as a soluble form of fusionprotein in E coli and displayed on the surface of bacteriophage lambda when it was fused to the lambda pD protein. The lambda pD fusion system could be used for improving the solubility of proteins that tend to form inclusion bodies when expressed in E coli. The lambda phage particles displaying the LBD of PPARγ may be of great value for the identification of novel PPARγ ligands.

  12. KIR polymorphisms modulate peptide-dependent binding to an MHC class I ligand with a Bw6 motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud D Colantonio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs and their MHC class I ligands play a central role in the regulation of natural killer (NK cell responses to viral pathogens and tumors. Here we identify Mamu-A1*00201 (Mamu-A*02, a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque with a canonical Bw6 motif, as a ligand for Mamu-KIR3DL05. Mamu-A1*00201 tetramers folded with certain SIV peptides, but not others, directly stained primary NK cells and Jurkat cells expressing multiple allotypes of Mamu-KIR3DL05. Differences in binding avidity were associated with polymorphisms in the D0 and D1 domains of Mamu-KIR3DL05, whereas differences in peptide-selectivity mapped to the D1 domain. The reciprocal exchange of the third predicted MHC class I-contact loop of the D1 domain switched the specificity of two Mamu-KIR3DL05 allotypes for different Mamu-A1*00201-peptide complexes. Consistent with the function of an inhibitory KIR, incubation of lymphocytes from Mamu-KIR3DL05(+ macaques with target cells expressing Mamu-A1*00201 suppressed the degranulation of tetramer-positive NK cells. These observations reveal a previously unappreciated role for D1 polymorphisms in determining the selectivity of KIRs for MHC class I-bound peptides, and identify the first functional KIR-MHC class I interaction in the rhesus macaque. The modulation of KIR-MHC class I interactions by viral peptides has important implications to pathogenesis, since it suggests that the immunodeficiency viruses, and potentially other types of viruses and tumors, may acquire changes in epitopes that increase the affinity of certain MHC class I ligands for inhibitory KIRs to prevent the activation of specific NK cell subsets.

  13. Equilibrium binding studies of mono, di and triisocyanide ligands on Au powder surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ontko, A.

    1997-10-08

    The author`s group has previously shown that isocyanides are readily adsorbed from solutions to Au powder and bind to the Au surface in an end-on fashion through the terminal carbon. Later work demonstrated that the equilibrium constants for the reversible adsorption of electronically inequivalent isocyanides could be obtained using the Langmuir isotherm technique. This dissertation describes two projects completed which complement the initial findings of this group. Initially, several alkylisocyanides were synthesized to examine the effect of tail length on Au powder adsorption. It was observed that the length of the alkyl chain affected not only the Au surface binding affinity, but also the rate of surface saturation and saturation coverage values. Direct competition studies were also studied using a {sup 13}C-labeled isocyanide. These studies demonstrated the stabilization afforded by substrate-substrate packing forces in SAM`s formed by the longer chain isocyanides. In a second study, di and triisocyanides were synthesized to determine the effect that the length of the connecting link and the number of isocyanide groups (as points of attachment) have on Au adsorption stability. The work in this area describes the binding modes, relative binding affinities and surface coverage values for a series of flexible alkyl and xylyldiisocyanides on Au powder surfaces. This report contains only the introductory material, and general summary. Two chapters have been processed separately. 56 refs.

  14. Transmissible gastroenteritis virus; identification of M protein-binding peptide ligands with antiviral and diagnostic potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    The membrane (M) protein is one of the major structural proteins of coronavirus particles. In this study, the M protein of transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) was used to biopan a 12-mer phage display random peptide library. Three phages expressing TGEV-M-binding peptides were identified and ...

  15. Identification of glycosaminoglycan binding regions in the Plasmodium falciparum encoded placental sequestration ligand, VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Resende, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten A.; Dahlbaeck, Madeleine;

    2008-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy malaria is caused by Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes binding the placental receptor chondroitin sulfate A (CSA). This results in accumulation of parasites in the placenta with severe clinical consequences for the mother and her unborn child. Women become resistan...

  16. Heptapeptide ligands against receptor-binding sites of influenza hemagglutinin toward anti-influenza therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Teruhiko; Onishi, Ai; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Sato, Toshinori

    2016-03-01

    The initial attachment of influenza virus to cells is the binding of hemagglutinin (HA) to the sialyloligosaccharide receptor; therefore, the small molecules that inhibit the sugar-protein interaction are promising as HA inhibitors to prevent the infection. We herein demonstrate that sialic acid-mimic heptapeptides are identified through a selection from a primary library against influenza virus HA. In order to obtain lead peptides, an affinity selection from a phage-displayed random heptapeptide library was performed with the HAs of the H1 and H3 strains, and two kinds of the HA-binding peptides were identified. The binding of the peptides to HAs was inhibited in the presence of sialic acid, and plaque assays indicated that the corresponding N-stearoyl peptide strongly inhibited infections by the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2) strain of the virus. Alanine scanning of the peptides indicated that arginine and proline were responsible for binding. The affinities of several mutant peptides with single-amino-acid substitutions against H3 HA were determined, and corresponding docking studies were performed. A Spearman analysis revealed a correlation between the affinity of the peptides and the docking study. These results provide a practicable method to design of peptide-based HA inhibitors that are promising as anti-influenza drugs. PMID:26833245

  17. 'Venus trapped, Mars transits': Cu and Fe redox chemistry, cellular topography and in situ ligand binding in terrestrial isopod hepatopancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kille, P; Morgan, A J; Powell, K; Mosselmans, J F W; Hart, D; Gunning, P; Hayes, A; Scarborough, D; McDonald, I; Charnock, J M

    2016-03-01

    Woodlice efficiently sequester copper (Cu) in 'cuprosomes' within hepatopancreatic 'S' cells. Binuclear 'B' cells in the hepatopancreas form iron (Fe) deposits; these cells apparently undergo an apocrine secretory diurnal cycle linked to nocturnal feeding. Synchrotron-based µ-focus X-ray spectroscopy undertaken on thin sections was used to characterize the ligands binding Cu and Fe in S and B cells of Oniscus asellus (Isopoda). Main findings were: (i) morphometry confirmed a diurnal B-cell apocrine cycle; (ii) X-ray fluorescence (XRF) mapping indicated that Cu was co-distributed with sulfur (mainly in S cells), and Fe was co-distributed with phosphate (mainly in B cells); (iii) XRF mapping revealed an intimate morphological relationship between the basal regions of adjacent S and B cells; (iv) molecular modelling and Fourier transform analyses indicated that Cu in the reduced Cu(+) state is mainly coordinated to thiol-rich ligands (Cu-S bond length 2.3 Å) in both cell types, while Fe in the oxidized Fe(3+) state is predominantly oxygen coordinated (estimated Fe-O bond length of approx. 2 Å), with an outer shell of Fe scatterers at approximately 3.05 Å; and (v) no significant differences occur in Cu or Fe speciation at key nodes in the apocrine cycle. Findings imply that S and B cells form integrated unit-pairs; a functional role for secretions from these cellular units in the digestion of recalcitrant dietary components is hypothesized. PMID:26935951

  18. Recombinant norovirus-specific scFv inhibit virus-like particle binding to cellular ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Michele E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses cause epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness in all age-groups. The rapid onset and ease of person-to-person transmission suggest that inhibitors of the initial steps of virus binding to susceptible cells have value in limiting spread and outbreak persistence. We previously generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb 54.6 that blocks binding of recombinant norovirus-like particles (VLP to Caco-2 intestinal cells and inhibits VLP-mediated hemagglutination. In this study, we engineered the antigen binding domains of mAb 54.6 into a single chain variable fragment (scFv and tested whether these scFv could function as cell binding inhibitors, similar to the parent mAb. Results The scFv54.6 construct was engineered to encode the light (VL and heavy (VH variable domains of mAb 54.6 separated by a flexible peptide linker, and this recombinant protein was expressed in Pichia pastoris. Purified scFv54.6 recognized native VLPs by immunoblot, inhibited VLP-mediated hemagglutination, and blocked VLP binding to H carbohydrate antigen expressed on the surface of a CHO cell line stably transfected to express α 1,2-fucosyltransferase. Conclusion scFv54.6 retained the functional properties of the parent mAb with respect to inhibiting norovirus particle interactions with cells. With further engineering into a form deliverable to the gut mucosa, norovirus neutralizing antibodies represent a prophylactic strategy that would be valuable in outbreak settings.

  19. Response of SCP-2L domain of human MFE-2 to ligand removal: binding site closure and burial of peroxisomal targeting signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensink, M F; Haapalainen, A M; Hiltunen, J K; Glumoff, T; Juffer, A H

    2002-10-11

    In the study of the structure and function relationship of human MFE-2, we have investigated the dynamics of human MFE-2SCP-2L (hSCP-2L) and its response to ligand removal. A comparison was made with homologous rabbit SCP-2. Breathing and a closing motion are found, identifiable with an adjustment in size and a closing off of the binding pocket. Crucial residues for structural integrity have been identified. Particularly mobile areas of the protein are loop 1 that is connecting helices A and C in space, and helix D, next to the entrance of the pocket. In hSCP-2L, the binding pocket gets occupied by Phe93, which is making a tight hydrophobic contact with Trp36. In addition, it is found that the C-terminal peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) that is solvent exposed in the complexed structure becomes buried when no ligand is present. Moreover, an anti-correlation exists between burial of PTS1 and the size of the binding pocket. The results are in accordance with plant nsLTPs, where a similar accommodation of binding pocket size was found after ligand binding/removal. Furthermore, the calculations support the suggestion of a ligand-assisted targeting mechanism.

  20. Crystallographic evidence of a large ligand-induced hinge-twist motion between the two domains of the maltodextrin binding protein involved in active transport and chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharff, A J; Rodseth, L E; Spurlino, J C; Quiocho, F A

    1992-11-10

    The periplasmic maltodextrin binding protein of Escherichia coli serves as an initial receptor for the active transport of and chemotaxis toward maltooligosaccharides. The three-dimensional structure of the binding protein complexed with maltose has been previously reported [Spurlino, J. C., Lu, G.-Y., & Quiocho, F. A. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 5202-5219]. Here we report the structure of the unliganded form of the binding protein refined to 1.8-A resolution. This structure, combined with that for the liganded form, provides the first crystallographic evidence that a major ligand-induced conformational change occurs in a periplasmic binding protein. The unliganded structure shows a rigid-body "hinge-bending" between the two globular domains by approximately 35 degrees, relative to the maltose-bound structure, opening the sugar binding site groove located between the two domains. In addition, there is an 8 degrees twist of one domain relative to the other domain. The conformational changes observed between this structure and the maltose-bound structure are consistent with current models of maltose/maltodextrin transport and maltose chemotaxis and solidify a mechanism for receptor differentiation between the ligand-free and ligand-bound forms in signal transduction.

  1. Change in structure and ligand binding properties of hyperstable cytochrome c555 from Aquifex aeolicus by domain swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Masaru; Nagao, Satoshi; Komori, Hirofumi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2015-03-01

    Cytochrome c555 from hyperthermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus (AA cyt c555 ) is a hyperstable protein belonging to the cyt c protein family, which possesses a unique long 310 -α-310 helix containing the heme-ligating Met61. Herein, we show that AA cyt c555 forms dimers by swapping the region containing the extra 310 -α-310 helix and C-terminal α-helix. The asymmetric unit of the crystal of dimeric AA cyt c555 contained two dimer structures, where the structure of the hinge region (Val53-Lys57) was different among all four protomers. Dimeric AA cyt c555 dissociated to monomers at 92 ± 1°C according to DSC measurements, showing that the dimer was thermostable. According to CD measurements, the secondary structures of dimeric AA cyt c555 were maintained at pH 2.2-11.0. CN(-) and CO bound to dimeric AA cyt c555 in the ferric and ferrous states, respectively, owing to the flexibility of the hinge region close to Met61 in the dimer, whereas these ligands did not bind to the monomer under the same conditions. In addition, CN(-) and CO bound to the oxidized and reduced dimer at neutral pH and a wide range of pH (pH 2.2-11.0), respectively, in a wide range of temperature (25-85°C), owing to the thermostability and pH tolerance of the dimer. These results show that the ligand binding character of hyperstable AA cyt c555 changes upon dimerization by domain swapping. PMID:25586341

  2. A secreted WNT-ligand-binding domain of FZD5 generated by a frameshift mutation causes autosomal dominant coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunqiao; Widen, Sonya A; Williamson, Kathleen A; Ratnapriya, Rinki; Gerth-Kahlert, Christina; Rainger, Joe; Alur, Ramakrishna P; Strachan, Erin; Manjunath, Souparnika H; Balakrishnan, Archana; Floyd, James A; Li, Tiansen; Waskiewicz, Andrew; Brooks, Brian P; Lehmann, Ordan J; FitzPatrick, David R; Swaroop, Anand

    2016-04-01

    Ocular coloboma is a common eye malformation resulting from incomplete fusion of the optic fissure during development. Coloboma is often associated with microphthalmia and/or contralateral anophthalmia. Coloboma shows extensive locus heterogeneity associated with causative mutations identified in genes encoding developmental transcription factors or components of signaling pathways. We report an ultra-rare, heterozygous frameshift mutation in FZD5 (p.Ala219Glufs*49) that was identified independently in two branches of a large family with autosomal dominant non-syndromic coloboma. FZD5 has a single-coding exon and consequently a transcript with this frameshift variant is not a canonical substrate for nonsense-mediated decay. FZD5 encodes a transmembrane receptor with a conserved extracellular cysteine rich domain for ligand binding. The frameshift mutation results in the production of a truncated protein, which retains the Wingless-type MMTV integration site family member-ligand-binding domain, but lacks the transmembrane domain. The truncated protein was secreted from cells, and behaved as a dominant-negative FZD5 receptor, antagonizing both canonical and non-canonical WNT signaling. Expression of the resultant mutant protein caused coloboma and microphthalmia in zebrafish, and disruption of the apical junction of the retinal neural epithelium in mouse, mimicking the phenotype of Fz5/Fz8 compound conditional knockout mutants. Our studies have revealed a conserved role of Wnt-Frizzled (FZD) signaling in ocular development and directly implicate WNT-FZD signaling both in normal closure of the human optic fissure and pathogenesis of coloboma.

  3. Ligand binding alters dimerization and sequestering of urokinase receptors in raft-mimicking lipid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yifan; Siegel, Amanda P; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A

    2014-11-01

    Lipid heterogeneities, such as lipid rafts, are widely considered to be important for the sequestering of membrane proteins in plasma membranes, thereby influencing membrane protein functionality. However, the underlying mechanisms of such sequestration processes remain elusive, in part, due to the small size and often transient nature of these functional membrane heterogeneities in cellular membranes. To overcome these challenges, here we report the sequestration behavior of urokinase receptor (uPAR), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, in a planar model membrane platform with raft-mimicking lipid mixtures of well-defined compositions using a powerful optical imaging platform consisting of confocal spectroscopy XY-scans, photon counting histogram, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analyses. This methodology provides parallel information about receptor sequestration, oligomerization state, and lateral mobility with single molecule sensitivity. Most notably, our experiments demonstrate that moderate changes in uPAR sequestration are not only associated with modifications in uPAR dimerization levels, but may also be linked to ligand-mediated allosteric changes of these membrane receptors. Our data show that these modifications in uPAR sequestration can be induced by exposure to specific ligands (urokinase plasminogen activator, vitronectin), but not via adjustment of the cholesterol level in the planar model membrane system. Good agreement of our key findings with published results on cell membranes confirms the validity of our model membrane approach. We hypothesize that the observed mechanism of receptor translocation in the presence of raft-mimicking lipid mixtures is also applicable to other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

  4. Bile acid binding protein: a versatile host of small hydrophobic ligands for applications in the fields of MRI contrast agents and bio-nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiuscia Pagano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade a growing amount of evidence has been obtained, supporting the role of the beta-clamshell family of intracellular lipid binding proteins (iLBPs not only in the translocation of lipophilic molecules but also in lipid mediated signalling and metabolism. Given the central role of lipids in physiological processes, it is essential to have detailed knowledge on their interactions with cognate binding proteins. Structural and dynamical aspects of the binding mechanisms have been widely investigated by means of NMR spectroscopy, docking and molecular dynamics simulation approaches. iLBPs share a stable beta-barrel fold, delimiting an internal cavity capable of promiscuous ligand binding and display significant flexibility at the putative ligand portal. These features make this class of proteins good scaffolds to build host-guest systems for applications in nanomedicine and nanomaterials.

  5. Methotrexate concentrations in biological fluids: Comparison of results obtained by radioimmunoassay and direct ligand binding radioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive (sensitivity 2.2 x 10-9 mol/l) and specific (practically no cross-reaction with circulating folates) radioimmunoassay for the determination of methotrexate concentrations in biological fluids is described and compared with a commercial competitive protein binding assay. Antiserum with high titer was produced in rabbits immunized with MTX-human serum albumin conjugate. Fitness for use in pharmacokinetic drug level determinations was shown in three patients, who received both low doses and high dose therapy combined with citrovorum factor rescue. An excellent correlation was found between plasma and urine MTX concentrations obtained by RIA and competitive protein binding assay. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was found adequately describing the serum decay curves, but there was a great interindividual variability in the calculated pharmacokinetic parameters. (author)

  6. Protein contacts and ligand binding in the inward-facing model of human P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajeva, Ilza K; Hanl, Markus; Wiese, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The primary aim of this work was to analyze the contacts between residues in the nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) and at the interface between the transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the NBDs in the inward-open homology model of human P-glycoprotein (P-gp). The analysis revealed communication nets through hydrogen bonding in the NBD and at the NBD-TMD interface of each half involving residues from the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) motifs and the coupling helices of the intracellular loops. Similar networks have been identified in P-gp conformations generated by molecular dynamics simulation. Differences have been recorded in the networking between both halves of P-gp. Many of the residue contacts have also been observed in the X-ray crystal structures of other ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters, which confirms their validity. Next, possible binding pockets involving residues of importance for the TMD-NBD communication were identified. By studying these pockets, binding sites were suggested for rhodamine 123 (R-site) and prazosin (regulatory site) at the NBD-TMD interface that agreed with the experimental data on their location. Additionally, one more R-site in the protein cavity was proposed, in accordance with the available biochemical data. Together with the previously suggested Hoechst 33342 site (H-site), all sites were interpreted with respect to their effects on the protein ATPase activity, in correspondence with the experimental observations. Several residues involved in key contacts in the P-gp NBDs were proposed for further targeted mutagenesis experiments. PMID:23564544

  7. The unusual estrogen-binding protein (UEBP) of male rat liver: structural determinants of ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, M L; Smirnova, O V; Smirnov, A N; Rozen, V B

    1983-04-01

    The unusual estrogen-binding protein (UEBP) found in a male rat liver is a sex dependent protein which differs from other known receptor and transport proteins by the high lability of its complexes with estradiol (E2) and also the unique specificity of affinity for hormones. In this work values of relative binding affinity (RBA) of the UEBP for 57 steroids and their analogs were determined. The affinity of steroids was characterised by the amount of the unlabeled compound needed for 50% inhibition of [3H]-E2 binding with the UEBP. A number of derivatives of estrane and androstane possess an ability to interact with this protein, in contrast to the derivatives of pregnane, stilbene and triphenylethane. Characterized by RBA values, natural steroids are found to have the following order: estriol larger than or equal to E2 greater than 16 alpha-hydroxyestrone = 2 alpha-hydroxytestosterone greater than 16-epiestriol greater than or equal to estetrol greater than or equal to 17-epiestriol greater than or equal to 2-methoxyestradiol greater than or equal to 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol greater than or equal to estrone greater than testosterone greater than or equal to 2 beta-hydroxytestosterone greater than 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Affinity of estrogens and androgens for the UEBP diminishes abruptly after removal of 3- and 17-hydroxy groups, masking of these by ether bonds or changing of 17 beta-hydroxyl to 17 alpha. All the investigated 17 oxo-C19-steroids, 5 beta-derivatives of testosterone, its 6 beta- and 16 alpha-hydroxy metabolites as well as 5 alpha-androstane-3 beta,17 beta-diol and 19-nortestosterone exhibit no essential affinity for the protein. On the basis of the results obtained it is suggested that the binding sites for estrogens and androgens in the UEBP molecule overlap but do not completely coincide. PMID:6834826

  8. GPR17: Molecular modeling and dynamics studies of the 3-D structure and purinergic ligand binding features in comparison with P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranghino Graziella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a G-protein-coupled receptor located at intermediate phylogenetic position between two distinct receptor families: the P2Y and CysLT receptors for extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-LTs, respectively. We previously showed that GPR17 can indeed respond to both classes of endogenous ligands and to synthetic compounds active at the above receptor families, thus representing the first fully characterized non-peptide "hybrid" GPCR. In a rat brain focal ischemia model, the selective in vivo knock down of GPR17 by anti-sense technology or P2Y/CysLT antagonists reduced progression of ischemic damage, thus highlighting GPR17 as a novel therapeutic target for stroke. Elucidation of the structure of GPR17 and of ligand binding mechanisms are the necessary steps to obtain selective and potent drugs for this new potential target. On this basis, a 3-D molecular model of GPR17 embedded in a solvated phospholipid bilayer and refined by molecular dynamics simulations has been the first aim of this study. To explore the binding mode of the "purinergic" component of the receptor, the endogenous agonist UDP and two P2Y receptor antagonists demonstrated to be active on GPR17 (MRS2179 and cangrelor were then modeled on the receptor. Results Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is similar to that described for the other P2Y receptors, although only one of the three basic residues that have been typically involved in ligand recognition is conserved (Arg255. The binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and covered at the top by EL2. Driving interactions are H-bonds and salt bridges between the 6.55 and 6.52 residues and the phosphate moieties of the ligands. An "accessory" binding site in a region formed by the EL2, EL3 and the Nt was also found. Conclusion Nucleotide binding to GPR17 occurs on the same receptor regions identified for already known P2Y receptors. Agonist

  9. Structure of the Taz2 domain of p300: insights into ligand binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Maria; Dauter, Zbigniew; Cherry, Scott; Tropea, Joseph E.; Wlodawer, Alexander; (NCI)

    2010-01-12

    CBP and its paralog p300 are histone acetyl transferases that regulate gene expression by interacting with multiple transcription factors via specialized domains. The structure of a segment of human p300 protein (residues 1723-1836) corresponding to the extended zinc-binding Taz2 domain has been investigated. The crystal structure was solved by the SAD approach utilizing the anomalous diffraction signal of the bound Zn ions. The structure comprises an atypical helical bundle stabilized by three Zn ions and closely resembles the solution structures determined previously for shorter peptides. Residues 1813-1834 from the current construct form a helical extension of the C-terminal helix and make extensive crystal-contact interactions with the peptide-binding site of Taz2, providing additional insights into the mechanism of the recognition of diverse transactivation domains (TADs) by Taz2. On the basis of these results and molecular modeling, a hypothetical model of the binding of phosphorylated p53 TAD1 to Taz2 has been proposed.

  10. Liver fatty acid binding protein: species variation and the accommodation of different ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J; Reese-Wagoner, A; Banaszak, L

    1999-11-23

    The crystal structure of rat liver fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) and an alignment of amino acid sequences of all known species have been used to demonstrate two groups or sub-classes. Based on estimates at neutral pH and the electrostatic field calculated using the crystal coordinates, some evidence of changes that occur in going from holo- to apo-forms has been obtained. LFABP belongs to a large family frequently referred to as the intracellular lipid binding proteins or iLBPs. LFABP, unlike other family members, has two fatty acid binding sites. The two cavity sites have been reviewed and arguments for interactions between the sites are presented. Based on the crystal structure of rat LFABP, differences between the A and B groups have been postulated. Last of all, hypothetical models have been built of complexes of LFABP and heme, and LFABP and oleoyl CoA. In both cases, the stoichiometry is one to one and the models show why this is likely. PMID:10570240

  11. Allostery mediates ligand binding to Grb2 adaptor in a mutually exclusive manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Caleb B; El Hokayem, Jimmy; Zafar, Nawal; Balke, Jordan E; Bhat, Vikas; Mikles, David C; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-02-01

    Allostery plays a key role in dictating the stoichiometry and thermodynamics of multi-protein complexes driving a plethora of cellular processes central to health and disease. Herein, using various biophysical tools, we demonstrate that although Sos1 nucleotide exchange factor and Gab1 docking protein recognize two non-overlapping sites within the Grb2 adaptor, allostery promotes the formation of two distinct pools of Grb2-Sos1 and Grb2-Gab1 binary signaling complexes in concert in lieu of a composite Sos1-Grb2-Gab1 ternary complex. Of particular interest is the observation that the binding of Sos1 to the nSH3 domain within Grb2 sterically blocks the binding of Gab1 to the cSH3 domain and vice versa in a mutually exclusive manner. Importantly, the formation of both the Grb2-Sos1 and Grb2-Gab1 binary complexes is governed by a stoichiometry of 2:1, whereby the respective SH3 domains within Grb2 homodimer bind to Sos1 and Gab1 via multivalent interactions. Collectively, our study sheds new light on the role of allostery in mediating cellular signaling machinery. PMID:23334917

  12. X-ray Crystal Structure of the Novel Enhanced-Affinity Glucocorticoid Agonist Fluticasone Furoate in the Glucocorticoid Receptor−Ligand Binding Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biggadike, Keith; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Hassell, Anne M.; Kirk, Barrie E.; McLay, Iain M.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Stewart, Eugene L. (GSKNC); (GSK)

    2008-07-08

    An X-ray crystal structure is reported for the novel enhanced-affinity glucocorticoid agonist fluticasone furoate (FF) in the ligand binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor. Comparison of this structure with those of dexamethasone and fluticasone propionate shows the 17{alpha} furoate ester to occupy more fully the lipophilic 17{alpha} pocket on the receptor, which may account for the enhanced glucocorticoid receptor binding of FF.

  13. Radiometric ligand binding assay for C-reactive protein. Complexed C-reactive protein is not detectable in acute phase serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beer, F C; Shine, B; Pepys, M B

    1982-10-01

    A radiometric ligand binding assay for human C-reactive protein (CRP) was established using pneumococcal C polysaccharide (CPS) coupled to magnetizable cellulose particles as the solid phase ligand. Competition for binding to the solid phase between 125I-CRP and unlabelled CRP permitted detection of 30 micrograms/l of CRP and the precise assay of concentrations up to 3000 micrograms/l. Identical results were obtained when the assay was used to quantitate isolated pure CRP and pure CRP added to normal human serum. However in vitro addition of known ligands for CRP to acute phase serum resulted in lowering of the apparent CRP concentration in this assay and addition of as little as 1 microgram/l of free CPS or 1 mg/l of lecithin was demonstrable in this way. A combination of the ligand binding assay and the standard electroimmunoassay for CRP was therefore used to test acute phase sera for the presence of CRP complexed in vitro. No evidence of complexed CRP was detected among sera containing between 1-319 mg/l of CRP from patients with Hodgkin's disease (10), rheumatoid arthritis (10), Crohn's disease (19) and various microbial infections (11), including six with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Since it is likely that CRP does form complexes with its ligands in the plasma these results suggest that complexed CRP is rapidly cleared from the circulation.

  14. Full domain closure of the ligand-binding core of the ionotropic glutamate receptor iGluR5 induced by the high affinity agonist dysiherbaine and the functional antagonist 8,9-dideoxyneodysiherbaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Lash, L Leanne; Naur, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing structural model for ligand activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors posits that agonist efficacy arises from the stability and magnitude of induced domain closure in the ligand-binding core structure. Here we describe an exception to the correlation between ligand efficacy and...

  15. Numerical calculation of protein-ligand binding rates through solution of the Smoluchowski equation using smooth particle hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Daily, Michael D.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of a Lagrangian particle-based method, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), to study diffusion in biomolecular systems by numerically solving the time-dependent Smoluchowski equation for continuum diffusion. The numerical method is first verified in simple systems and then applied to the calculation of ligand binding to an acetylcholinesterase monomer. Unlike previous studies, a reactive Robin boundary condition (BC), rather than the absolute absorbing (Dirichlet) boundary condition, is considered on the reactive boundaries. This new boundary condition treatment allows for the analysis of enzymes with "imperfect" reaction rates. Rates for inhibitor binding to mAChE are calculated at various ionic strengths and compared with experiment and other numerical methods. We find that imposition of the Robin BC improves agreement between calculated and experimental reaction rates. Although this initial application focuses on a single monomer system, our new method provides a framework to explore broader applications of SPH in larger-scale biomolecular complexes by taking advantage of its Lagrangian particle-based nature.

  16. Afi-Chip: An Equipment-Free, Low-Cost, and Universal Binding Ligand Affinity Evaluation Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yanling; Shi, Yuanzhi; Li, Xingrui; Ma, Yanli; Gao, Mingxuan; Liu, Dan; Mao, Yu; Zhu, Zhi; Lin, Hui; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-16

    Binding affinity characterization is of great importance for aptamer screening because the dissociation constant (Kd) value is a key parameter for evaluating molecular interaction. However, conventional methods often require sophisticated equipment and time-consuming processing. Here, we present a portable device, Afi-Chip, as an equipment-free, rapid, low-cost, and universal platform for evaluation of the aptamer affinity. The Afi-Chip displays a distance readout based on the reaction of an enzyme catalyzing the decomposition of H2O2 for gas generation to push the movement of ink bar. Taking advantage of translating the recognition signal to distance signal and realizing the regents mixing and quantitative readout on the chip, we successfully monitored the aptamer evolution process and characterized binding affinity of aptamers against multiple types of targets, including small molecule glucose, cancer biomarker protein EpCAM, and tumor cell SW620. We also applied the Afi-Chip for rapid characterization of the affinity between anti-HCG and HCG to demonstrate the generality for the molecular interaction study. All of the Kd values obtained are comparable to those reported in the literature or obtained by sophisticated instruments such as a flow cytometer. The Afi-Chip offers a new approach for equipment-free investigation of molecular interactions, such as aptamer identification, ligand selection monitoring, and drug screening.

  17. Crystal structures of Bbp from Staphylococcus aureus reveal the ligand binding mechanism with Fibrinogen α

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xinyue; Wu, Meng; Zhuo, Wei; Gu, Jinke; Zhang, Sensen; Ge, Jingpeng; Yang, Maojun

    2015-01-01

    Bone sialoprotein-binding protein (Bbp), a MSCRAMMs (Microbial Surface Components Recognizing Adhesive Matrix Molecules) family protein expressed on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), mediates adherence to fibrinogen α (Fg α), a component in the extracellular matrix of the host cell and is important for infection and pathogenesis. In this study, we solved the crystal structures of apo-Bbp273−598 and Bbp273−598-Fg α561−575 complex at a resolution of 2.03 Å and 1.45 Å, respective...

  18. Ligand binding and micro-switches in 7TM receptor structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte;

    2009-01-01

    ' in which extracellular loop 2b, in particular, functions as a gating element. Small-molecule antagonists and inverse agonists bind in very different modes: some very deeply and others more superficially, even reaching out above the transmembranes. Several highly conserved residues seem to function as micro......-switches of which ArgIII:26 (Arg3.50) in its active conformation interacts directly with the G protein. These micro-switches together with a hydrogen-bond network between conserved polar residues and structural water molecules are proposed to constitute an extended allosteric interface between the domains (i...

  19. Structural insights into a novel interkingdom signaling circuit by cartography of the ligand-binding sites of the homologous quorum sensing LuxR-family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covaceuszach, Sonia; Degrassi, Giuliano; Venturi, Vittorio; Lamba, Doriano

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have identified a novel interkingdom signaling circuit, via plant signaling molecules, and a bacterial sub-family of LuxR proteins, bridging eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Indeed pivotal plant-bacteria interactions are regulated by the so called Plant Associated Bacteria (PAB) LuxR solo regulators that, although closely related to the quorum sensing (QS) LuxR family, do not bind or respond to canonical quorum sensing N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), but only to specific host plant signal molecules. The large body of structural data available for several members of the QS LuxR family complexed with different classes of ligands (AHLs and other compounds), has been exploited to dissect the cartography of their regulatory domains through structure-based multiple sequence alignments, structural superimposition and a comparative analysis of the contact residues involved in ligand binding. In the absence of experimentally determined structures of members of the PAB LuxR solos subfamily, an homology model of its prototype OryR is presented, aiming to elucidate the architecture of its ligand-binding site. The obtained model, in combination with the cartography of the regulatory domains of the homologous QS LuxRs, provides novel insights into the 3D structure of its ligand-binding site and unveils the probable molecular determinants responsible for differences in selectivity towards specific host plant signal molecules, rather than to canonical QS compounds.

  20. Three-dimensional structure and function study on the active region in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human IL-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任蕴芳; 冯健男; 曲红; 李松; 沈倍奋

    2000-01-01

    In this study the three-dimensional (3-D) model of the ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hlL-6 R) was constructed by computer-guided ho-mology modeling technique using the crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. Furthermore, the active binding region of the 3-D model of hlL-6R with the ligand (hlL-6) was predicted. In light of the structural characteristics of the active region, a hydrophobic pocket shielded by two hydrophilic residues (E115 and E505) of the region was identified by a combination of molecular modelling and the site-directed or double-site mutation of the twelve crucial residues in the ligand-binding domain of hIL-6R (V106-P322). We observed and analyzed the effects of these mutants on the spatial conformation of the pocket-like region of hlL-6 R. The results indicated that any site-directed mutation of the five Cys residues (four conservative Cys residues: Cyst 21, Cys132, Cys165, Cys1

  1. A parallel panning scheme used for selection of a GluA4-specific Fab targeting the ligand-binding domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Rasmus Prætorius; Mohr, Andreas; Riise, Erik;

    2016-01-01

    A method for development of murine Fab fragments towards extracellular domains of a surface receptor is presented. The GluA4 ionotropic glutamate receptor is used as a model system. Recombinant GluA4 ectodomain comprising both the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in one...

  2. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby;

    2004-01-01

    CD163 is the macrophage receptor for endocytosis of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes. The extracellular region consisting of nine scavenger receptor cysteine rich (SRCR) domains also circulates in plasma as a soluble protein. By ligand binding analysis of a broad spectrum of soluble CD163...

  3. Oxygen equilibria and ligand binding kinetics of erythrocruorins from two burrowing polychaetes of different modes of life, Marphysa sanguinea and Diopatra cuprea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.; Bonaventura, J.; Sullivan, B.;

    1978-01-01

    Oxygen equilibria, ligand-binding kinetics and some other physicochemical properties are reported for erythrocruorins of two intertidal polychaetes:Marphysa sanguinea, which inhabits simple, relatively stagnant burrows, andDiopatra cuprea, which inhabits impermeable, parchment-like tubes that are...

  4. DNA binding, anti-inflammatory and analgesic evaluation of metal complexes of N/S/O donor ligands; Synthesis, spectral characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar Naik, K. H.; Ashok, B.; Naik, Nagaraja; Mulla, Jameel Ahmed S.; Prakasha, Avinash

    2015-04-01

    Transition metal complexes containing tri-dentate NSN donor ligands i.e., 5-((1(aminomethyl)cyclohexyl)methyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-amine (AMTA) (2) and 5-(2-aminophenyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-amine (ATA) (4i-ii) have been synthesized. The newly synthesized ligands and their respective complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductance measurement and various spectral studies [infrared (IR), electronic, and NMR (for ligands only)]. Metal complexes are like [M(AMTA)2], [M(ATA)2] type, where M = Mn(II), Co(II) and Cu(II). The proposed geometries of the complexes are octahedral in nature. The synthesized ligands and their complexes were exhibits effective anti-inflammatory, analgesic and DNA binding activities. All the tested compounds exhibited significant analgesic activity, whereas the compound 4i, 4(ia) and 4(iib) is equipotent with Diclofenac sodium.

  5. Structure-affinity properties of a high-affinity ligand of FKBP12 studied by molecular simulations of a binding intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Olivieri

    Full Text Available With a view to explaining the structure-affinity properties of the ligands of the protein FKBP12, we characterized a binding intermediate state between this protein and a high-affinity ligand. Indeed, the nature and extent of the intermolecular contacts developed in such a species may play a role on its stability and, hence, on the overall association rate. To find the binding intermediate, a molecular simulation protocol was used to unbind the ligand by gradually decreasing the biasing forces introduced. The intermediate was subsequently refined with 17 independent stochastic boundary molecular dynamics simulations that provide a consistent picture of the intermediate state. In this state, the core region of the ligand remains stable, notably because of the two anchoring oxygen atoms that correspond to recurrent motifs found in all FKBP12 ligand core structures. Besides, the non-core regions participate in numerous transient intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The dynamic aspect of most of the contacts seems important both for the ligand to retain at least a part of its configurational entropy and for avoiding a trapped state along the binding pathway. Since the transient and anchoring contacts contribute to increasing the stability of the intermediate, as a corollary, the dissociation rate constant [Formula: see text] of this intermediate should be decreased, resulting in an increase of the affinity constant [Formula: see text]. The present results support our previous conclusions and provide a coherent rationale for explaining the prevalence in high-affinity ligands of (i the two oxygen atoms found in carbonyl or sulfonyl groups of dissimilar core structures and of (ii symmetric or pseudo-symmetric mobile groups of atoms found as non-core moieties. Another interesting aspect of the intermediate is the distortion of the flexible 80 s loop of the protein, mainly in its tip region, that promotes the accessibility to the bound state.

  6. Bifunctional Ligands for Inhibition of Tight-Binding Protein-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivan, Taavi; Enkvist, Erki; Viira, Birgit; Manoharan, Ganesh Babu; Raidaru, Gerda; Pflug, Alexander; Alam, Kazi Asraful; Zaccolo, Manuela; Engh, Richard Alan; Uri, Asko

    2016-08-17

    The acknowledged potential of small-molecule therapeutics targeting disease-related protein-protein interactions (PPIs) has promoted active research in this field. The strategy of using small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) to fight strong (tight-binding) PPIs tends to fall short due to the flat and wide interfaces of PPIs. Here we propose a biligand approach for disruption of strong PPIs. The potential of this approach was realized for disruption of the tight-binding (KD = 100 pM) tetrameric holoenzyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Supported by X-ray analysis of cocrystals, bifunctional inhibitors (ARC-inhibitors) were constructed that simultaneously associated with both the ATP-pocket and the PPI interface area of the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc). Bifunctional inhibitor ARC-1411, possessing a KD value of 3 pM toward PKAc, induced the dissociation of the PKA holoenzyme with a low-nanomolar IC50, whereas the ATP-competitive inhibitor H89 bound to the PKA holoenzyme without disruption of the protein tetramer. PMID:27389935

  7. Cloning, expression, and ligand-binding characterization of two neuropeptide Y receptor subtypes in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Chen, Weimin; Lin, Haoran; Li, Wensheng

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most important multifunctional peptides, neuropeptide Y (NPY) performs its physiological functions through different subtype receptors. In this study, full-length cDNAs of two NPY receptors (YRs) in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) were cloned and named npy8br (y8b) and npy2r (y2). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Y8b receptor is an ortholog of the teleostean Y8b receptor, which belongs to the Y1 subfamily, and the Y2 receptor is an ortholog of the teleostean Y2 receptor, which belongs to the Y2 subfamily. Both of the YRs have G protein-coupled receptor family profiles. Multiple alignments demonstrate that the extracellular loop regions of YRs have distinctive residues of each species. Expression profile analysis revealed that the grouper Y8b receptor mRNA is primarily expressed in the brain, stomach and intestine, while the grouper Y2 receptor mRNA is primarily expressed in the brain, ovary, liver and heart. Double immunofluorescence analysis determined that the grouper YRs interact with the grouper NPY around the human embryonic kidney 293T cell surface. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis in a phage display system revealed that Asp(6.59) might be a common NPY-binding site, while Asp(2.68) of the Y8b receptor and Glu(5.24) of the Y2 receptor could be likely involved in subtype-specific binding. Combining the expression profile and ligand-binding feature, the grouper Y8b receptor could be involved in regulating food intake via the brain-gut axis and the grouper Y2 receptor might play a role in balancing the regulatory activity of the Y8b receptor and participate in metabolism in the liver and ovary.

  8. Characterization of hydrophobic-ligand-binding proteins of Taenia solium that are expressed specifically in the adult stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M; Lee, E-G; Kim, S-H; Bae, Y-A; Wang, H; Yang, Y; Kong, Y

    2012-09-01

    Taenia solium, a causative agent of taeniasis and cysticercosis, has evolved a repertoire of lipid uptake mechanisms. Proteome analysis of T. solium excretory-secretory products (TsESP) identified 10 kDa proteins displaying significant sequence identity with cestode hydrophobic-ligand-binding-proteins (HLBPs). Two distinct 362- and 352-bp-long cDNAs encoding 264- and 258-bp-long open reading frames (87 and 85 amino acid polypeptides) were isolated by mining the T. solium expressed sequence tags and a cDNA library screening (TsHLBP1 and TsHLBP2; 94% sequence identity). They clustered into the same clade with those found in Moniezia expansa and Hymenolepis diminuta. Genomic structure analysis revealed that these genes might have originated from a common ancestor. Both the crude TsESP and bacterially expressed recombinant proteins exhibited binding activity toward 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS), which was competitively inhibited by oleic acid. The proteins also bound to cis-parinaric acid (cPnA) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy) palmitic acid (16-AP), but showed no binding activity against 11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino] undecanoic acid (DAUDA) and dansyl-DL-α-aminocaprylic acid (DACA). Unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) showed greater affinity than saturated FAs. The proteins were specifically expressed in adult worms throughout the strobila. The TsHLBPs might be involved in uptake and/or sequestration of hydrophobic molecules provided by their hosts, thus contributing to host-parasite interface interrelationships.

  9. Rapid characterization of the binding property of HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain by validation screening of PDZ ligand library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; ELi

    2007-01-01

    HtrA2/Omi is a mammalian mitochondrial serine protease, and was found to have dual roles in mam- malian cells, not only acting as an apoptosis-inducing protein but also maintaining mitochondrial ho- meostasis. PDZ domain is one of the most important protein-protein interaction modules and is in- volved in a variety of important cellular functions, such as signal transduction, degradation of proteins, and formation of cytoskeleton. Recently, it was reported that the PDZ domain of HtrA2/Omi might regulate proteolytic activity through its interactions with ligand proteins. In this study, we rapidly characterized the binding properties of HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain by validation screening of the PDZ ligand library with yeast two-hybrid approach. Then, we predicted its novel ligand proteins in human proteome and reconfirmed them in the yeast two-hybrid system. Finally, we analyzed the smallest networks bordered by the shortest path length between the protein pairs of novel interactions to evaluate the confidence of the identified interactions. The results revealed some novel binding proper- ties of HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain. Besides the reported Class II PDZ motif, it also binds to Class I and Class III motifs, and exhibits restricted variability at P?3, which means that the P?3 residue is selected according to the composition of the last three residues. Seven novel ligand proteins of HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain were discovered, providing significant clues for further clarifying the roles of HtrA2/Omi. Moreover, this study proves the high efficiency and practicability of the newly developed validation screening of candidate ligand library method for binding property characterization of peptide-binding domains.

  10. The 3D structure of the defense-related rice protein Pir7b predicted by homology modeling and ligand binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Quan; Han, Wei-Wei; Zhou, Yi-Han; Yao, Yuan; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2008-07-01

    To better understand the ligand-binding mechanism of protein Pir7b, important part in detoxification of a pathogen-derived compound against Pyricularia oryzae, a 3D structure model of protein Pir7b was constructed based on the structure of the template SABP2. Three substrates were docking to this protein, two of them were proved to be active, and some critical residues are identified, which had not been confirmed by the experiments. His87 and Leu17 considered as 'oxyanion hole' contribute to initiating the Ser86 nucleophilic attack. Gln187 and Asp139 can form hydrogen bonds with the anilid group to maintain the active binding orientation with the substrates. The docking model can well interpret the specificity of protein Pir7b towards the anilid moiety of the substrates and provide valuable structure information about the ligand binding to protein Pir7b. PMID:18449577

  11. Critical role of the H6-H7 loop in the conformational adaptation of all-trans retinoic acid and synthetic retinoids within the ligand-binding site of RARalpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailfait, S; Thoreau, E; Belaiche, D; Formstecher And B Sablonniè, P

    2000-06-01

    The pleiotropic effects of the natural and synthetic retinoids are mediated by the activation of the two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoic X receptors (RXRs). At the molecular level, these events begin with the specific ligand recognition by a nuclear receptor subtype. The adaptation of ligands to the receptor binding site leads to an optimal number of interactions for binding and selectivity which justifies elucidation of the structural requirements of the ligand binding pocket. To explore the contribution of H6-H7 loop folding in the ligand-induced conformational changes explained by the mouse-trap model, four RARalpha mutants were constructed. Ligand binding and transactivation studies revealed that three residues from the H6-H7 loop (Gly(301), Phe(302) and Gly(303)) are critical for the conformational adaptation of both synthetic agonists and antagonists. Model building and analysis of both RARalpha-ATRA and RARalpha-CD367 complexes demonstrate that accommodation of CD367 results in a less tight contact of the saturated ring of this ligand with the amino acid side chains of the receptor ligand-binding pocket compared with that of ATRA. According to the flexibility of the agonists tested (ATRA>TTNPB=Am580> CD367), we observed a decrease in binding that was dependent on ligand structure rigidity. In contrast, the binding and transactivating activities of the L266A mutant confirmed the structural constraints imposed by synthetic ligands on binding affinity for the receptor and revealed that subtle local rearrangements induced by specific conformational adaptation changes result in different binding affinities. Our results illustrate the dynamic nature of the interaction between RARalpha and its ligands and demonstrate the critical role of the H6-H7 loop in the binding of both synthetic retinoid agonists and antagonists.

  12. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  13. Quantification of receptor-ligand binding with [{sup 18}F]fluciclatide in metastatic breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, Giampaolo [Hammersmith Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Center, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Kenny, Laura; Aboagye, Eric O. [Hammersmith Hospital, Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Center, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, MRC Clinical Sciences Center, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Mauri, Francesco [Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Turkheimer, Federico [Hammersmith Hospital, MRC Clinical Sciences Center, Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hammersmith Hospital, Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to estimate the receptor-ligand binding of an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide in somatic tumours. To this aim, we employed dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) data obtained from breast cancer patients with metastases, studied with the {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3/5} integrin receptor radioligand [{sup 18}F]fluciclatide. First, compartmental modelling and spectral analysis with arterial input function were performed at the region of interest (ROI) level in healthy lung and liver, and in lung and liver metastases; compartmental modelling was also carried out at the pixel level. The selection of the most appropriate indexes for tumour/healthy tissue differentiation and for estimation of specific binding was then assessed. The two-tissue reversible model emerged as the best according to the Akaike Information Criterion. Spectral analysis confirmed the reversibility of tracer kinetics. Values of kinetic parameters, estimated as mean from parametric maps, correlated well with those computed from ROI analysis. The volume of distribution V{sub T} was on average higher in lung metastases than in the healthy lung, but lower in liver metastases than in the healthy liver. In agreement with the expected higher {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3/5} expression in pathology, k{sub 3} and k{sub 3}/k{sub 4} were both remarkably higher in metastases, which makes them more suitable than V{sub T} for tumour/healthy tissue differentiation. The ratio k{sub 3}/k{sub 4}, in particular, appeared a reasonable measure of specific binding. Besides establishing the best quantitative approaches for the analysis of [{sup 18}F]fluciclatide data, this study indicated that the k{sub 3}/k{sub 4} ratio is a reasonable measure of specific binding, suggesting that this index can be used to estimate {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3/5} receptor expression in oncology, although further studies are necessary to validate this hypothesis. (orig.)

  14. An Extended Surface Loop on Toxoplasma gondii Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1 Governs Ligand Binding Selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Parker

    Full Text Available Apicomplexan parasites are the causative agents of globally prevalent diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. These obligate intracellular pathogens have evolved a sophisticated host cell invasion strategy that relies on a parasite-host cell junction anchored by interactions between apical membrane antigens (AMAs on the parasite surface and rhoptry neck 2 (RON2 proteins discharged from the parasite and embedded in the host cell membrane. Key to formation of the AMA1-RON2 complex is displacement of an extended surface loop on AMA1 called the DII loop. While conformational flexibility of the DII loop is required to expose the mature RON2 binding groove, a definitive role of this substructure has not been elucidated. To establish a role of the DII loop in Toxoplasma gondii AMA1, we engineered a form of the protein where the mobile portion of the loop was replaced with a short Gly-Ser linker (TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurements with a panel of RON2 peptides revealed an influential role for the DII loop in governing selectivity. Most notably, an Eimeria tenella RON2 (EtRON2 peptide that showed only weak binding to TgAMA1 bound with high affinity to TgAMA1ΔDIIloop. To define the molecular basis for the differential binding, we determined the crystal structure of TgAMA1ΔDIIloop in complex with the EtRON2 peptide. When analyzed in the context of existing AMA1-RON2 structures, spatially distinct anchor points in the AMA1 groove were identified that, when engaged, appear to provide the necessary traction to outcompete the DII loop. Collectively, these data support a model where the AMA1 DII loop serves as a structural gatekeeper to selectively filter out ligands otherwise capable of binding with high affinity in the AMA1 apical groove. These data also highlight the importance of considering the functional implications of the DII loop in the ongoing development of therapeutic intervention strategies targeting the AMA1-RON

  15. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  16. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Engineered Fluorescein-Binding Lipocalin FluA Reveals Rigidification of β-Barrel and Variable Loops upon Enthalpy-Driven Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jeffrey L.; Liu, Gaohua; Skerra, Arne; Szyperski, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The NMR structure of the 21 kDa lipocalin FluA, which was previously obtained by combinatorial design, elucidates a reshaped binding site specific for the dye fluorescein resulting from 21 side chain replacements with respect to the parental lipocalin, the naturally occurring bilin-binding protein (BBP). As expected, FluA exhibits the lipocalin fold of BBP, comprising eight antiparallel β-strands forming a β-barrel with an α-helix attached to its side. Comparison of the NMR structure of the free FluA with the X-ray structures of BBP•biliverdin IXγ and FluA•fluorescein complexes revealed significant conformational changes in the binding pocket, which is formed by four loops at the open end of the β-barrel as well as adjoining β-strand segments. An ‘induced fit’ became apparent for the side-chain conformations of Arg 88 and Phe 99, which contact the bound fluorescein in the complex and undergo concerted rearrangement upon ligand binding. Moreover, slower internal motional modes of the polypeptide backbone were identified by measuring transverse 15N backbone spin relaxation times in the rotating frame for the free FluA and also the FluA•fluorescein complex. A reduction of such motions was detected upon complex formation, indicating rigidification of the protein structure and loss of conformational entropy. This hypothesis was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry, showing that ligand binding is enthalpy driven, thus overcompensating negative entropy associated with both ligand binding per se and rigidification of the protein. Our investigation of the solution structure and dynamics as well as thermodynamics of lipocalin-ligand interaction does not only provide insight into the general mechanism of small molecule accommodation in the deep and narrow cavity of this abundant class of proteins but will also support the future design of corresponding binding proteins with novel specificities, so-called “anticalins”. PMID:19603796

  17. High Throughput Screening of High-Affinity Ligands for Proteins with Anion-Binding Sites using Desorption Electrospray Ionization (DESI) Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xin; Ning, Baoming; He, Dacheng; Huang, Lingyun; Yue, Xiangjun; Zhang, Qiming; Huang, Haiwei; Liu, Yang; He, Lan; Ouyang, Jin

    2014-03-01

    A high throughput screening system involving a linear ion trap (LTQ) analyzer, a house-made platform and a desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) source was established to screen ligands with a high affinity for proteins with anion-binding sites. The complexes were analyzed after incubation, ultrafiltration, washing, and displacement. A new anionic region inhibited dissociation (ARID) mechanism that was suitable for a protein with anion-binding site was proposed. We utilized the differences in detectable dissociation of protein-ligand complexes, combined with displacement experiments, to distinguish free ligands displaced from anion-binding sites from liberated ligands dissociated from nonspecific interactions. The method was validated by α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and (R), (S)-amlodipine. Site-specific enantioselectivity shown in our experiments was consistent with earlier studies. Obtaining all of the qualitative information of 15*3 samples in 2.3 min indicates that the analysis process is no longer the time-limiting step in the initial stage of drug discovery. Quantitative information verified that our method was at least a semiquantitative method.

  18. Saturation-Transfer Difference (STD) NMR: A Simple and Fast Method for Ligand Screening and Characterization of Protein Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, Aldino; Manso, Joao; Nobrega, Franklin L.; Cabrita, Eurico J.

    2011-01-01

    Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR has emerged as one of the most popular ligand-based NMR techniques for the study of protein-ligand interactions. The success of this technique is a consequence of its robustness and the fact that it is focused on the signals of the ligand, without any need of processing NMR information about the receptor…

  19. Lessons from more than 80 structures of the GluA2 ligand-binding domain in complex with agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhlsgaard, Jacob; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Madsen, Ulf;

    2011-01-01

    in learning and memory. However, iGluRs are also implicated in or have causal roles for several brain disorders, e.g. epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Their involvement in neurological diseases has stimulated widespread interest in their structure and function. Since...... the first publication in 1998 of the structure of a recombinant soluble protein comprising the ligand-binding domain of GluA2 extensive studies have afforded numerous crystal structures of wildtype and mutant proteins including different ligands. The structural information obtained combined with functional...

  20. The ligand binding domain of GCNF is not required for repression of pluripotency genes in mouse fetal ovarian germ cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M Okumura

    Full Text Available In mice, successful development and reproduction require that all cells, including germ cells, transition from a pluripotent to a differentiated state. This transition is associated with silencing of the pluripotency genes Oct4 and Nanog. Interestingly, these genes are repressed at different developmental timepoints in germ and somatic cells. Ovarian germ cells maintain their expression until about embryonic day (E 14.5, whereas somatic cells silence them much earlier, at about E8.0. In both somatic cells and embryonic stem cells, silencing of Oct4 and Nanog requires the nuclear receptor GCNF. However, expression of the Gcnf gene has not been investigated in fetal ovarian germ cells, and whether it is required for silencing Oct4 and Nanog in that context is not known. Here we demonstrate that Gcnf is expressed in fetal ovarian germ cells, peaking at E14.5, when Oct4 and Nanog are silenced. However, conditional ablation of the ligand-binding domain of Gcnf using a ubiquitous, tamoxifen-inducible Cre indicates that Gcnf is not required for the down-regulation of pluripotency genes in fetal ovarian germ cells, nor is it required for initiation of meiosis and oogenesis. These results suggest that the silencing of Oct4 and Nanog in germ cells occurs via a different mechanism from that operating in somatic cells during gastrulation.

  1. The Dipole Potential Modifies the Clustering and Ligand Binding Affinity of ErbB Proteins and Their Signaling Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Tamás; Batta, Gyula; Hajdu, Tímea; Szabó, Ágnes; Váradi, Tímea; Zákány, Florina; Csomós, István; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Although activation of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (ErbB1-4) is driven by oligomerization mediated by intermolecular interactions between the extracellular, the kinase and the transmembrane domains, the transmembrane domain has been largely neglected in this regard. The largest contributor to the intramembrane electric field, the dipole potential, alters the conformation of transmembrane peptides, but its effect on ErbB proteins is unknown. Here, we show by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and number and brightness (N&B) experiments that the epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced increase in the homoassociation of ErbB1 and ErbB2 and their heteroassociation are augmented by increasing the dipole potential. These effects were even more pronounced for ErbB2 harboring an activating Val → Glu mutation in the transmembrane domain (NeuT). The signaling capacity of ErbB1 and ErbB2 was also correlated with the dipole potential. Since the dipole potential decreased the affinity of EGF to ErbB1, the augmented growth factor-induced effects at an elevated dipole potential were actually induced at lower receptor occupancy. We conclude that the dipole potential plays a permissive role in the clustering of ErbB receptors and that the effects of lipid rafts on ligand binding and receptor signaling can be partially attributed to the dipole potential. PMID:27775011

  2. Quantitative dissection of the binding contributions of ligand lysines of the receptor-associated protein (RAP) to the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmer, Klavs; Campos, Andres; Gettins, Peter G W

    2013-08-16

    Although lysines are known to be critical for ligand binding to LDL receptor family receptors, relatively small reductions in affinity have been found when such lysines have been mutated. To resolve this paradox, we have examined the specific binding contributions of four lysines, Lys-253, Lys-256, Lys-270, and Lys-289, in the third domain (D3) of receptor-associated protein (RAP), by eliminating all other lysine residues. Using D3 variants containing lysine subsets, we examined binding to the high affinity fragment CR56 from LRP1. With this simplification, we found that elimination of the lysine pairs Lys-253/Lys-256 and Lys-270/Lys-289 resulted in increases in Kd of 1240- and 100,000-fold, respectively. Each pair contributed additively to overall affinity, with 61% from Lys-270/Lys-289 and 39% from Lys-253/Lys-256. Furthermore, the Lys-270/Lys-289 pair alone could bind different single CR domains with similar affinity. Within the pairs, binding contributions of Lys-270 ≫ Lys-256 > Lys-253 ∼ Lys-289 were deduced. Importantly, however, Lys-289 could significantly compensate for the loss of Lys-270, thus explaining how previous studies have underestimated the importance of Lys-270. Calorimetry showed that favorable enthalpy, from Lys-256 and Lys-270, overwhelmingly drives binding, offset by unfavorable entropy. Our findings support a mode of ligand binding in which a proximal pair of lysines engages the negatively charged pocket of a CR domain, with two such pairs of interactions (requiring two CR domains), appropriately separated, being alone sufficient to provide the low nanomolar affinity found for most protein ligands of LDL receptor family members.

  3. Sensing Conformational Changes in DNA upon Ligand Binding Using QCM-D. Polyamine Condensation and Rad51 Extension of DNA Layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Lu

    2014-10-16

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. Biosensors, in which binding of ligands is detected through changes in the optical or electrochemical properties of a DNA layer confined to the sensor surface, are important tools for investigating DNA interactions. Here, we investigate if conformational changes induced in surface-attached DNA molecules upon ligand binding can be monitored by the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. DNA duplexes containing 59-184 base pairs were formed on QCM-D crystals by stepwise assembly of synthetic oligonucleotides of designed base sequences. The DNA films were exposed to the cationic polyamines spermidine and spermine, known to condense DNA molecules in bulk experiments, or to the recombination protein Rad51, known to extend the DNA helix. The binding and dissociation of the ligands to the DNA films were monitored in real time by measurements of the shifts in resonance frequency (Δf) and in dissipation (ΔD). The QCM-D data were analyzed using a Voigt-based model for the viscoelastic properties of polymer films in order to evaluate how the ligands affect thickness and shear viscosity of the DNA layer. Binding of spermine shrinks all DNA layers and increases their viscosity in a reversible fashion, and so does spermidine, but to a smaller extent, in agreement with its lower positive charge. SPR was used to measure the amount of bound polyamines, and when combined with QCM-D, the data indicate that the layer condensation leads to a small release of water from the highly hydrated DNA films. The binding of Rad51 increases the effective layer thickness of a 59bp film, more than expected from the know 50% DNA helix extension. The combined results provide guidelines for a QCM-D biosensor based on ligand-induced structural changes in DNA films. The QCM-D approach provides high discrimination between ligands affecting the thickness and the structural properties of the DNA layer differently. The reversibility of the film

  4. The conformational dynamics of H2-H3n and S2-H6 in gating ligand entry into the buried binding cavity of vitamin D receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Wei-Ven; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin

    2016-01-01

    Crystal structures of holo vitamin D receptor (VDR) revealed a canonical conformation in which the ligand is entrapped in a hydrophobic cavity buried in the ligand-binding domain (LBD). The mousetrap model postulates that helix 12 is positioned away from the domain to expose the interior cavity. However, the extended form of helix 12 is likely due to artifacts during crystallization. In this study, we set out to investigate conformational dynamics of apo VDR using molecular dynamics simulation on microsecond timescale. Here we show the neighboring backbones of helix 2-helix 3n and beta strand 2-helix 6 of LBD, instead of the helix 12, undergo large-scale motion, possibly gating the entrance of ligand to the ligand binding domain. Docking analysis to the simulated open structure of VDR with the estimated free energy of −37.0 kJ/mol, would emphasise the role of H2-H3n and S2-H6 in facilitating the entrance of calcitriol to the LBD of VDR. PMID:27786277

  5. Crystallization and crystallographic analysis of the ligand-binding domain of the Pseudomonas putida chemoreceptor McpS in complex with malate and succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallization of the ligand-binding domain of the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. Methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) are transmembrane proteins that sense changes in environmental signals, generating a chemotactic response and regulating other cellular processes. MCPs are composed of two main domains: a ligand-binding domain (LBD) and a cytosolic signalling domain (CSD). Here, the crystallization of the LBD of the chemoreceptor McpS (McpS-LBD) is reported. McpS-LBD is responsible for sensing most of the TCA-cycle intermediates in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440. McpS-LBD was expressed, purified and crystallized in complex with two of its natural ligands (malate and succinate). Crystals were obtained by both the counter-diffusion and the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion techniques after pre-incubation of McpS-LBD with the ligands. The crystals were isomorphous and belonged to space group C2, with two molecules per asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected at the ESRF synchrotron X-ray source to resolutions of 1.8 and 1.9 Å for the malate and succinate complexes, respectively

  6. Syntheses, DNA binding and anticancer profiles of L-glutamic acid ligand and its copper(II) and ruthenium(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Wani, Waseem A; Saleem, Kishwar; Wesselinova, Diana

    2013-02-01

    A new multidentate ligand (L) has been synthesized by the controlled condensation of L-glutamic acid with formaldehyde and ethylenediamine. Cu(II) and Ru(III) metal ion complexes of the synthesized ligand have also been prepared. The ligand and the metal complexes were purified by chromatography and characterized by spectroscopy and other techniques. Molar conductance measurements suggested ionic nature of the complexes. The ligand and the complexes are soluble in water with quite good stabilities; essential requirements for effective anticancer drugs. DNA binding constants (Kbs) for copper and ruthenium complexes were 1.8 x 103 and 2.6 x 103 M-1 while their Ksv values were 7.9 x 103, and 7.3 x 103; revealing strong binding of these complexes with DNA. Hemolytic assays of the reported compounds indicated their significantly less toxicity to RBCs than the standard anticancer drug letrazole. Anticancer profiles of all the compounds were determined on HepG2, HT-29, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa human cancer cell lines. All the compounds have quite good activities on HeLa cell lines but the best results were of CuL on HepG2, HT-29 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. PMID:22741786

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic, antimicrobial, DNA binding and cleavage studies of some metal complexes involving symmetrical bidentate N, N donor Schiff base ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arish, D.; Nair, M. Sivasankaran

    2011-11-01

    The Schiff base ligand, N, N'-bis-(4-isopropylbenzaldimine)-1,2-diaminoethane (L), obtained by the condensation of 4-isopropylbenzaldehyde and 1,2-diaminoethane, has been used to synthesize the complexes of the type [ML 2X 2] [M = Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II); X = Cl and OAc]. The newly synthesized ligand (L) and its complexes have been characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, mass, 1H and 13C-NMR, molar conductance, IR, UV-vis, magnetic moment, CV and thermal analyses, powder XRD and SEM. IR spectral data show that the ligand is coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner. The geometrical structures of these complexes are found to be octahedral. Interestingly, reaction with Cu(II) ion with this ligand undergoes hydrolytic cleavage to form ethylenediamine copper(II) complex and the corresponding aldehyde. The antimicrobial results indicate that the chloro complexes exhibit more activity than the acetato complexes. The complexes bind to CT-DNA by intercalation modes. Novel chloroform soluble ZnL 2Cl 2 complex exhibits tremendous antimicrobial, DNA binding and cleaving properties.

  8. The Binding Mode Prediction and Similar Ligand Potency in the Active Site of Vitamin D Receptor with QM/MM Interaction, MESP, and MD Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraman, Nagamani; Selvam, Saravana Kumar; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2016-08-01

    Non-secosteroidal ligands are well-known vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. In this study, we described a combined QM/MM to define the protein-ligand interaction energy a strong positive correlation in both QM-MM interaction energy and binding free energy against the biological activity. The molecular dynamics simulation study was performed, and specific interactions were extensively studied. The molecular docking results and surface analysis shed light on steric and electrostatic complementarities of these non-secosteroidal ligands to VDR. Finally, the drug likeness properties were also calculated and found within the acceptable range. The results show that bulky group substitutions in side chain decrease the VDR activity, whereas a small substitution increased it. Functional analyses of H393A and H301A mutations substantiate their roles in the VDR agonistic and antagonistic activities. Apart from the His393 and His301, two other amino acids in the hinge region viz. Ser233 and Arg270 acted as an electron donor/acceptor specific to the agonist in the distinct ligand potency. The results from this study disclose the binding mechanism of VDR agonists and structural modifications required to improve the selectivity.

  9. The Binding Mode Prediction and Similar Ligand Potency in the Active Site of Vitamin D Receptor with QM/MM Interaction, MESP, and MD Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraman, Nagamani; Selvam, Saravana Kumar; Muthusamy, Karthikeyan

    2016-08-01

    Non-secosteroidal ligands are well-known vitamin D receptor (VDR) agonists. In this study, we described a combined QM/MM to define the protein-ligand interaction energy a strong positive correlation in both QM-MM interaction energy and binding free energy against the biological activity. The molecular dynamics simulation study was performed, and specific interactions were extensively studied. The molecular docking results and surface analysis shed light on steric and electrostatic complementarities of these non-secosteroidal ligands to VDR. Finally, the drug likeness properties were also calculated and found within the acceptable range. The results show that bulky group substitutions in side chain decrease the VDR activity, whereas a small substitution increased it. Functional analyses of H393A and H301A mutations substantiate their roles in the VDR agonistic and antagonistic activities. Apart from the His393 and His301, two other amino acids in the hinge region viz. Ser233 and Arg270 acted as an electron donor/acceptor specific to the agonist in the distinct ligand potency. The results from this study disclose the binding mechanism of VDR agonists and structural modifications required to improve the selectivity. PMID:26945790

  10. Apo and InsP[subscript 3]-bound crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain of an InsP[subscript 3] receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chun-Chi; Baek, Kyuwon; Lu, Zhe (UPENN)

    2012-05-08

    We report the crystal structures of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of a rat inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP{sub 3}R) in its apo and InsP{sub 3}-bound conformations. Comparison of these two conformations reveals that LBD's first {beta}-trefoil fold ({beta}-TF1) and armadillo repeat fold (ARF) move together as a unit relative to its second {beta}-trefoil fold ({beta}-TF2). Whereas apo LBD may spontaneously transition between gating conformations, InsP{sub 3} binding shifts this equilibrium toward the active state.

  11. The structure of a mixed GluR2 ligand-binding core dimer in complex with (S)-glutamate and the antagonist (S)-NS1209

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Christina; Pickering, Darryl S; Mirza, Osman;

    2006-01-01

    of this novel class of antagonists. We present here the first X-ray structure of a mixed GluR2 ligand-binding core dimer, with the high-affinity antagonist (S)-8-methyl-5-(4-(N,N-dimethylsulfamoyl)phenyl)-6,7,8,9,-tetrahydro-1H-pyrrolo[3,2-h]-isoquinoline-2,3-dione-3-O-(4-hydroxybutyrate-2-yl)oxime [(S)-NS1209...

  12. Deciphering ligand specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum family 35 carbohydrate binding module (CtCBM35 for gluco- and galacto- substituted mannans and its calcium induced stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabinda Ghosh

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35 in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+ vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC. Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displaying significant association with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 14.3×10(4 M(-1, carob galactomannan (Ka = 12.4×10(4 M(-1 and negligible association (Ka = 12 µM(-1 with insoluble mannan. Binding of CtCBM35 with polysaccharides which was calcium dependent exhibited two fold higher association in presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ion with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 41×10(4 M(-1 and carob galactomannan (Ka = 30×10(4 M(-1. The polysaccharide binding was further investigated by fluorescence spectrophotometric studies. On binding with carob galactomannan and konjac glucomannan the conformation of CtCBM35 changed significantly with regular 21 nm peak shifts towards lower quantum yield. The degree of association (K a with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan, 14.3×10(4 M(-1 and 11.4×10(4 M(-1, respectively, corroborated the findings from affinity electrophoresis. The association of CtCBM35with konjac glucomannan led to higher free energy of binding (ΔG -25 kJ mole(-1 as compared to carob galactomannan (ΔG -22 kJ mole(-1. On binding CtCBM35 with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan the hydrodynamic radius (RH as analysed by dynamic light scattering (DLS study, increased to 8 nm and 6 nm, respectively, from 4.25 nm in absence of ligand. The presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ions imparted stiffer orientation of CtCBM35 particles with increased RH of 4.52 nm. Due to such stiffer orientation CtCBM35 became more thermostable and its melting temperature was

  13. Discovery of a novel selective PPARγ ligand with partial agonist binding properties by integrated in silico / in vitro work flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Petersen, Rasmus K.; Fratev, Filip Filipov;

    2013-01-01

    that control glucose and lipid metabolism and is an important target for drugs against type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. In an effort to identify novel PPARγ ligands with an improved pharmacological profile, emphasis has shifted to selective ligands with partial...... American Chemical Society....

  14. Three-dimensional structure and function study on the active region in the extracellular ligand-binding domain of human IL-6 receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this study the three-dimensional (3-D) model of the ligand-binding domain (V106-P322) of human interleukin-6 receptor (hIL-6 R) was constructed by computer-guided homology modeling technique using the crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain (K52-L251) of human growth hormone receptor (hGHR) as templet. Furthermore, the active binding region of the 3-D model of hIL-6R with the ligand (hIL-6) was predicted. In light of the structural characteristics of the active region, a hydrophobic pocket shielded by two hydrophilic residues (E115 and E505) of the region was identified by a combination of molecular modelling and the site-directed or double-site mutation of the twelve crucial residues in the ligand-binding domain of hIL-6R (V106-P322). We observed and analyzed the effects of these mutants on the spatial conformation of the pocket-like region of hIL-6 R. The results indicated that any site-directed mutation of the five Cys residues (four conservative Cys residues: Cys121, Cys132, Cys165, Cys176; near membrane Cys residue: Cys193) or each double-site mutation of the five residues in WSEWS motif of hIL-6R (V106-P322) makes the corresponding spatial conformation of the pocket region block the linkage between hIL-6 R and hIL-6. However, the influence of the site-directed mutation of Cys211 and Cys277 individually on the conformation of the pocket region benefits the interaction between hIL-6R and hIL-6. Our study suggests that the predicted hydrophobic pocket in the 3-D model of hIL-6R (V106-P322) is the critical molecular basis for the binding of hIL-6R with its ligand, and the active pocket may be used as a target for designing small hIL-6R-inhibiting molecules in our further study.

  15. Binding of adrenergic ligands to liver plasma membrane preparations from the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum; the toad, Xenopus laevis; and the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, P A; Grigg, J A

    1988-09-01

    The beta-adrenergic ligand iodocyanopindolol (ICP) bound specifically to hepatic plasma membrane preparations from the axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum (Bmax, 40 fmol/mg protein (P) at free concentration above 140 pM; KD, 42 pM); the toad, Xenopus laevis (Bmax, 200 fmol/mg P at 1 nM; KD, 300 pM); and the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Bmax, 100 fmol/mg P at 5 nM). For the lungfish, the Scatchard plot was curved showing two classes of binding site with KD's of 20 and 500 pM. Neither the alpha 1-adrenergic ligand prazosin nor the alpha 2-adrenergic ligand yohimbine bound specifically to hepatic membrane preparations from any of the three species. Several adrenergic ligands displaced ICP from hepatic membrane preparations of all three species with KD's of Axolotl--propranolol, 50 nM; isoprenaline, 600 nM; adrenaline, 10 microM; phenylephrine, 20 microM; noradrenaline, 40 microM; and phentolamine, greater than 100 microM; X. laevis--propranolol, 30 nM; isoprenaline, 100 microM; adrenaline, 200 microM; noradrenaline, 300 microM; phenylephrine, 1 mM; and phentolamine, greater than 1 mM; N. forsteri,--propranolol, 25 nM; isoprenaline, 1 microM; adrenaline, 20 microM; phenylephrine, 35 microM; noradrenaline, 600 microM; and phentolamine, 400 microM. These findings suggest that alpha-adrenergic receptors are not present in hepatic plasma membrane preparations from these three species and that the hepatic actions of catecholamines are mediated via beta-adrenergic receptors. The order of binding of the beta-adrenergic ligands suggests that the receptors are of the beta 2 type.

  16. Binding modes of aromatic ligands to mammalian heme peroxidases with associated functional implications: crystal structures of lactoperoxidase complexes with acetylsalicylic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, and benzylhydroxamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amit K; Singh, Nagendra; Sinha, Mau; Bhushan, Asha; Kaur, Punit; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P

    2009-07-24

    The binding and structural studies of bovine lactoperoxidase with three aromatic ligands, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), salicylhydoxamic acid (SHA), and benzylhydroxamic acid (BHA) show that all the three compounds bind to lactoperoxidase at the substrate binding site on the distal heme side. The binding of ASA occurs without perturbing the position of conserved heme water molecule W-1, whereas both SHA and BHA displace it by the hydroxyl group of their hydroxamic acid moieties. The acetyl group carbonyl oxygen atom of ASA forms a hydrogen bond with W-1, which in turn makes three other hydrogen-bonds, one each with heme iron, His-109 N(epsilon2), and Gln-105 N(epsilon2). In contrast, in the complexes of SHA and BHA, the OH group of hydroxamic acid moiety in both complexes interacts with heme iron directly with Fe-OH distances of 3.0 and 3.2A respectively. The OH is also hydrogen bonded to His-109 N(epsilon2) and Gln-105N(epsilon2). The plane of benzene ring of ASA is inclined at 70.7 degrees from the plane of heme moiety, whereas the aromatic planes of SHA and BHA are nearly parallel to the heme plane with inclinations of 15.7 and 6.2 degrees , respectively. The mode of ASA binding provides the information about the mechanism of action of aromatic substrates, whereas the binding characteristics of SHA and BHA indicate the mode of inhibitor binding.

  17. Effect of intercalating and groove-binding ligands on formation of covalent complexes between nitracrine (Ledakrin, C-283) or 8-methoxypsoralen and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmańska, D; Małagocka, E; Szmigiero, L; Gniazdowski, M

    1984-07-18

    The effect of ethidium bromide, actinomycin D, distamycin A and netropsin on covalent binding of nitracrine (1-nitro-9-(3,3-N,N-dimethylaminopropylamino)acridine, Ledakrin, C-283) and 8-methoxypsoralen to DNA was examined. The competition was assayed either directly with [3H]- and [14C]nitracrine or indirectly by estimation of transcriptional template activity of nitracrine-DNA and 8-methoxypsoralen-DNA complexes formed in the presence of the ligands. A higher protective effect of ethidium bromide and distamycin on the photo-binding of 8-methoxypsoralen than on the dithiothreitol-dependent attachement of nitracrine to DNA assayed at 0.15 M KCl or NaCl was observed. The non-intercalating antibiotics showed lower competitive effect on 8-methoxypsoralen binding than ethidium bromide. Actinomycin D showed relatively low competition for both drugs with DNA. In contrast to the reaction of 8-methoxypsoralen, the decrease of nitracrine binding in the presence of competing ligands considerably depends on ionic strength. Particularly high inhibition of the adduct formation in the presence of ethidium at 1 M KCl was shown, while the amount of nitracrine bound in the presence of distamycin increases at elevated ionic strength. The results may indicate steric demands of the reaction between nitracrine and DNA. PMID:6733111

  18. Crystal structure of the functional region of Uro-adherence factor A from Staphylococcus saprophyticus reveals participation of the B domain in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Eriko; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Makoto; Shouji, Yuko; Ohta, Toshiko; Tanaka, Isao; Yao, Min

    2011-02-01

    Staphylococci use cell wall-anchored proteins as adhesins to attach to host tissues. Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a uropathogenic species, has a unique cell wall-anchored protein, uro-adherence factor A (UafA), which shows erythrocyte binding activity. To investigate the mechanism of adhesion by UafA, we determined the crystal structure of the functional region of UafA at 1.5 Å resolution. The structure was composed of three domains, designated as the N2, N3, and B domains, arranged in a triangular relative configuration. Hemagglutination inhibition assay with domain-truncated mutants indicated that both N and B domains were necessary for erythrocyte binding. Based on these results, a novel manner of ligand binding in which the B domain acts as a functional domain was proposed as the adhesion mechanism of S. saprophyticus.

  19. A multi-resolution model to capture both global fluctuations of an enzyme and molecular recognition in the ligand-binding site

    CERN Document Server

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    In multi-resolution simulations, different system components are simultaneously modelled at different levels of resolution, these being smoothly coupled together. In the case of enzyme systems, computationally expensive atomistic detail is needed in the active site to capture the chemistry of substrate binding. Global properties of the rest of the protein also play an essential role, determining the structure and fluctuations of the binding site; however, these can be modelled on a coarser level. Similarly, in the most computationally efficient scheme only the solvent hydrating the active site requires atomistic detail. We present a methodology to couple atomistic and coarse-grained protein models, while solvating the atomistic part of the protein in atomistic water. This allows a free choice of which protein and solvent degrees of freedom to include atomistically, without loss of accuracy in the atomistic description. This multi-resolution methodology can successfully model stable ligand binding, and we furt...

  20. Homology-modeled ligand-binding domains of medaka estrogen receptors and androgen receptors: A model system for the study of reproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrogen and androgen and their receptors play critical roles in physiological processes such as sexual differentiation and development. Using the available structural models for the human estrogen receptors alpha and beta and androgen receptor as templates, we designed in silico agonist and antagonist models of medaka estrogen receptor (meER) alpha, beta-1, and beta-2, and androgen receptor (meAR) alpha and beta. Using these models, we studied (1) the structural relationship between the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of ERs and ARs of human and medaka, and (2) whether medaka ER and AR can be potential models for studying the ligand-binding activities of various agonists and antagonists of these receptors by docking analysis. A high level of conservation was observed between the sequences of the ligand-binding domains of meERα and huERα, meERβ1 and huERβ, meERβ2, and huERβ with 62.8%, 66.4%, and 65.1% identity, respectively. The sequence conservation between meARα and huAR, meARβ, and huAR was found with 70.1% and 61.0% of identity, respectively. Thirty-three selected endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), including both agonists and antagonists, were docked into the LBD of ER and AR, and the corresponding docking score for medaka models and human templates were calculated. In order to confirm the conservation of the overall geometry and the binding pocket, the backbone root mean square deviation (RMSD) for Cα atoms was derived from the structure superposition of all 10 medaka homology models to the six human templates. Our results suggested conformational conservation between the ERs and ARs of medaka and human, Thus, medaka could be highly useful as a model system for studies involving estrogen and androgen interaction with their receptors.

  1. Identification of the benzothiazepine-binding polypeptide of skeletal muscle calcium channels with (+)-cis-azidodiltiazem and anti-ligand antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purified dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel from skeletal muscle transverse tubules consists of several subunits, termed alpha 1, alpha 2, beta, gamma and delta. From its associated drug receptors, those for 1,4-dihydropyridines and phenylalkylamines have been shown previously by photoaffinity labeling to reside on the alpha 1 subunit. In the present study the arylazide photo-affinity ligand, (+)-cis-azidodiltiazem ((+)-cis-(2S,3S)-5-[2-(4- azidobenzoyl)aminoethyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-hydroxy-2-(4-methoxyphenyl )-4- oxo-1,5-benzothiazepine), and the respective tritiated derivative, (+)-cis-[3H]azidodiltiazem (45 Ci/mmol), were developed to identify directly the benzothiazepine binding subunit. (+)-cis-Azidodiltiazem binds competitively to the benzothiazepine receptor in rabbit skeletal muscle transverse tubule membranes. Upon ultraviolet irradiation of the (+)-cis-[3H]azidodiltiazem-purified calcium channel complex, the ligand photoincorporates exclusively into the alpha 1 subunit. Photoincorporation is protected by 100 microM (-)-desmethoxyverapamil and 100 microM (+)-cis-diltiazem. A polyclonal antiserum directed against (+)-cis-azidodiltiazem was employed to detect (+)-cis-azidodiltiazem immunoreactivity photoincorporated into the purified calcium channel complex, confirming the exclusive labeling of the alpha 1 subunit. Our data provide direct evidence that, together with the drug receptors for 1,4-dihydropyridines and phenylalkylamines, the benzothiazepine binding domain of skeletal muscle calcium channels is located on the alpha 1 subunit. We conclude that our anti-ligand antibodies could be used successfully to affinity purify the photolabeled proteolytic fragments of the alpha 1 subunit which are expected to form part of the benzothiazepine binding domain

  2. Structural and mechanistic investigations on Salmonella typhimurium acetate kinase (AckA: identification of a putative ligand binding pocket at the dimeric interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chittori Sagar

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium can utilize acetate as the sole source of carbon and energy. Acetate kinase (AckA and phosphotransacetylase (Pta, key enzymes of acetate utilization pathway, regulate flux of metabolites in glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, TCA cycle, glyoxylate bypass and fatty acid metabolism. Results Here we report kinetic characterization of S. typhimurium AckA (StAckA and structures of its unliganded (Form-I, 2.70 Å resolution and citrate-bound (Form-II, 1.90 Å resolution forms. The enzyme showed broad substrate specificity with kcat/Km in the order of acetate > propionate > formate. Further, the Km for acetyl-phosphate was significantly lower than for acetate and the enzyme could catalyze the reverse reaction (i.e. ATP synthesis more efficiently. ATP and Mg2+ could be substituted by other nucleoside 5′-triphosphates (GTP, UTP and CTP and divalent cations (Mn2+ and Co2+, respectively. Form-I StAckA represents the first structural report of an unliganded AckA. StAckA protomer consists of two domains with characteristic βββαβαβα topology of ASKHA superfamily of proteins. These domains adopt an intermediate conformation compared to that of open and closed forms of ligand-bound Methanosarcina thermophila AckA (MtAckA. Spectroscopic and structural analyses of StAckA further suggested occurrence of inter-domain motion upon ligand-binding. Unexpectedly, Form-II StAckA structure showed a drastic change in the conformation of residues 230–300 compared to that of Form-I. Further investigation revealed electron density corresponding to a citrate molecule in a pocket located at the dimeric interface of Form-II StAckA. Interestingly, a similar dimeric interface pocket lined with largely conserved residues could be identified in Form-I StAckA as well as in other enzymes homologous to AckA suggesting that ligand binding at this pocket may influence the function of these

  3. Competitive binding-based optical DNA mapping for fast identification of bacteria--multi-ligand transfer matrix theory and experimental applications on Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Adam N; Emilsson, Gustav; Nyberg, Lena K; Noble, Charleston; Stadler, Liselott Svensson; Fritzsche, Joachim; Moore, Edward R B; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O; Ambjörnsson, Tobias; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate a single DNA molecule optical mapping assay able to resolve a specific Escherichia coli strain from other strains. The assay is based on competitive binding of the fluorescent dye YOYO-1 and the AT-specific antibiotic netropsin. The optical map is visualized by stretching the DNA molecules in nanofluidic channels. We optimize the experimental conditions to obtain reproducible barcodes containing as much information as possible. We implement a multi-ligand transfer matrix method for calculating theoretical barcodes from known DNA sequences. Our method extends previous theoretical approaches for competitive binding of two types of ligands to many types of ligands and introduces a recursive approach that allows long barcodes to be calculated with standard computer floating point formats. The identification of a specific E. coli strain (CCUG 10979) is based on mapping of 50-160 kilobasepair experimental DNA fragments onto the theoretical genome using the developed theory. Our identification protocol introduces two theoretical constructs: a P-value for a best experiment-theory match and an information score threshold. The developed methods provide a novel optical mapping toolbox for identification of bacterial species and strains. The protocol does not require cultivation of bacteria or DNA amplification, which allows for ultra-fast identification of bacterial pathogens.

  4. Synthesis and Characterisation of Copper(II Complexes with Tridentate NNO Functionalized Ligand: Density Function Theory Study, DNA Binding Mechanism, Optical Properties, and Biological Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Hazra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The photo physical properties of two mononuclear pentacoordinated copper(II complexes formulated as [Cu(L(Cl(H2O] (1 and [Cu(L(Br(H2O] (2 HL = (1-[(3-methyl-pyridine-2-ylimino-methyl]-naphthalen-2-ol were synthesized and characterized by elemental, physicochemical, and spectroscopic methods. The density function theory calculations are used to investigate the electronic structures and the electronic properties of ligand and complex. The interactions of copper(II complexes towards calf thymus DNA were examined with the help of absorption, viscosity, and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques at pH 7.40. All spectroscopy's result indicates that complexes show good binding activity to calf thymus DNA through groove binding. The optical absorption and fluorescence emission properties of microwires were characterized by fluorescence microscope. From a spectroscopic viewpoint, all compounds strongly emit green light in the solid state. The microscopy investigation suggested that microwires exhibited optical waveguide behaviour which are applicable as fluorescent nanomaterials and can be used as building blocks for miniaturized photonic devices. Antibacterial study reveals that complexes are better antimicrobial agents than free Schiff base due to bacterial cell penetration by chelation. Moreover, the antioxidant study of the ligand and complexes is evaluated by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH free-radical assays, which demonstrate that the complexes are of higher antioxidant activity than free ligand.

  5. Steroid hormones affect binding of the sigma ligand C-11-SA4503 in tumour cells and tumour-bearing rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybczynska, Anna A.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; de Jong, Johan R.; de Vries, Erik F.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; van Waarde, Aren

    2009-01-01

    Sigma receptors are implicated in memory and cognitive functions, drug addiction, depression and schizophrenia. In addition, sigma receptors are strongly overexpressed in many tumours. Although the natural ligands are still unknown, steroid hormones are potential candidates. Here, we examined change

  6. Langerin-heparin interaction: two binding sites for small and large ligands as revealed by a combination of NMR spectroscopy and cross-linking mapping experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-García, Juan C; Chabrol, Eric; Vivès, Romain R; Thomas, Aline; de Paz, José L; Rojo, Javier; Imberty, Anne; Fieschi, Franck; Nieto, Pedro M; Angulo, Jesús

    2015-04-01

    Langerin is a C-type lectin present on Langerhans cells that mediates capture of pathogens in a carbohydrate-dependent manner, leading to subsequent internalization and elimination in the cellular organelles called Birbeck granules. This mechanism mediated by langerin was shown to constitute a natural barrier for HIV-1 particle transmission. Besides interacting specifically with high mannose and fucosylated neutral carbohydrate structures, langerin has the ability to bind sulfated carbohydrate ligands as 6-sulfated galactosides in the Ca(2+)-dependent binding site. Very recently langerin was demonstrated to interact with sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), in a Ca(2+)-independent way, resulting in the proposal of a new binding site for GAGs. On the basis of those results, we have conducted a structural study of the interactions of small heparin (HEP)-like oligosaccharides with langerin in solution. Heparin bead cross-linking experiments, an approach specifically designed to identify HEP/heparan sulfate binding sites in proteins were first carried out and experimentally validated the previously proposed model for the interaction of langerin extracellular domain with 6 kDa HEP. High-resolution NMR studies of a set of eight synthetic HEP-like trisaccharides harboring different sulfation patterns demonstrated that all of them bound to langerin in a Ca(2+)-dependent way. The binding epitopes were determined by saturation transfer difference NMR and the bound conformations by transferred NOESY experiments. These experimental data were combined with docking and molecular dynamics and resulted in the proposal of a binding mode characterized by the coordination of calcium by the two equatorial hydroxyl groups, OH3 and OH4, at the non-reducing end. The binding also includes the carboxylate group at the adjacent iduronate residue. This epitope is shared by all eight ligands, explaining the absence of any impact on binding from differences in their substitution patterns

  7. Controlling the binding of dihydrogen using ruthenium complexes containing N-mono-functionalised 1,4,7-triazacyclononane ligand systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Andrew L; McGowan, Patrick C; Podesta, Thomas J

    2008-07-28

    Pendant arm macrocycles derived from 1,4,7-triazacyclononane were reacted with RuHCl(CO)(PPh(3))(3) and RuHCl(PPh(3))(3) to yield air-stable cationic ruthenium hydrides that were characterised by a variety of techniques, including X-ray crystallography. Protonation of the metal hydride complexes with a proton source yielded eta(2)-dihydrogen complexes. The lifetime of the dihydrogen ligand was effected by a judicious choice of ancillary ligands.

  8. Controlling the binding of dihydrogen using ruthenium complexes containing N-mono-functionalised 1,4,7-triazacyclononane ligand systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, Andrew L; McGowan, Patrick C; Podesta, Thomas J

    2008-07-28

    Pendant arm macrocycles derived from 1,4,7-triazacyclononane were reacted with RuHCl(CO)(PPh(3))(3) and RuHCl(PPh(3))(3) to yield air-stable cationic ruthenium hydrides that were characterised by a variety of techniques, including X-ray crystallography. Protonation of the metal hydride complexes with a proton source yielded eta(2)-dihydrogen complexes. The lifetime of the dihydrogen ligand was effected by a judicious choice of ancillary ligands. PMID:18615220

  9. Panning of a phage display library against a synthetic capsule for peptide ligands that bind to the native capsule of Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beer

    Full Text Available Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax with the ability to not only produce a tripartite toxin, but also an enveloping capsule comprised primarily of γ-D-glutamic acid residues. The purpose of this study was to isolate peptide ligands capable of binding to the native capsule of B. anthracis from a commercial phage display peptide library using a synthetic form of the capsule consisting of 12 γ-D-glutamic acid residues. Following four rounds of selection, 80 clones were selected randomly and analysed by DNA sequencing. Four clones, each containing a unique consensus sequence, were identified by sequence alignment analysis. Phage particles were prepared and their derived 12-mer peptides were also chemically synthesized and conjugated to BSA. Both the phage particles and free peptide-BSA conjugates were evaluated by ELISA for binding to encapsulated cells of B. anthracis as well as a B. anthracis capsule extract. All the phage particles tested except one were able to bind to both the encapsulated cells and the capsule extract. However, the peptide-BSA conjugates could only bind to the encapsulated cells. One of the peptide-BSA conjugates, with the sequence DSSRIPMQWHPQ (termed G1, was fluorescently labelled and its binding to the encapsulated cells was further confirmed by confocal microscopy. The results demonstrated that the synthetic capsule was effective in isolating phage-displayed peptides with binding affinity for the native capsule of B. anthracis.

  10. Crystallographic Studies of the Binding of Ligands to theDicarboxylate Site of Complex II, and the Identity of the Ligand in the'Oxaloacetate-Inhibited' State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Li-Shar; Shen, John T.; Wang, Andy C.; Berry, Edward A.

    2006-07-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II (succinate:ubiquinoneoxidoreductase) is purified in a partially innactivated state, which canbe activated by removal of tightly bound oxaloacetate (Kearney, E.B. etal. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 49, 1115-1121). We crystallized Complex IIin the presence of oxaloacetate or with the endogenous inhibitor bound.The structure showed a ligand essentially identical to the "malate-likeintermediate" found in Shewanella Flavocytochrome c crystallized withfumarate (Taylor, P., et al. Nat Struct Biol 6, 1108-1112.)Crystallization of Complex II in the presence of excess fumarate alsogave the malate-like intermediate or a mixture of that and fumarate atthe active site. In order to more conveniently monitor the occupationstate of the dicarboxylate site, we are developing a library of UV/Visspectral effects induced by binding different ligands to the site.Treatment with fumarate results in rapid development of the fumaratedifference spectrum and then a very slow conversion into a speciesspectrally similar to the OAA liganded complex. Complex II is known to becapable of oxidizing malate to the enol form of oxaloacetate (Belikova,Y.O., et al. Biochim Biophys Acta 936, 1-9). The observations abovesuggest it may also be capable of interconverting fumarate and malate. Itmay be useful for understanding the mechanism and regulation of theenzyme to identify the malate-like intermediate and its pathway offormation from oxaloacetate or fumarate.

  11. Unusual mode of protein binding by a cytotoxic π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound containing an O,S-chelating ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Jana; Görls, Helmar; Häfner, Norman; Ferraro, Giarita; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Weigand, Wolfgang; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-08-01

    A new pseudo-octahedral π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound, containing an O,S-bidentate ligand (compound 1) and showing significant cytotoxic activity in vitro, was synthesized and characterized. In solution stability and interaction with the model protein bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Its crystal structure and that of the adduct formed upon reaction with RNase A were obtained by X-ray crystallography. The comparison between the structure of purified compound 1 and that of the fragment bound to RNase A reveals an unusual mode of protein binding that includes ligand exchange and alteration of coordination sphere geometry. PMID:27427335

  12. Unusual mode of protein binding by a cytotoxic π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound containing an O,S-chelating ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Jana; Görls, Helmar; Häfner, Norman; Ferraro, Giarita; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Weigand, Wolfgang; Merlino, Antonello

    2016-08-01

    A new pseudo-octahedral π-arene ruthenium(ii) piano-stool compound, containing an O,S-bidentate ligand (compound 1) and showing significant cytotoxic activity in vitro, was synthesized and characterized. In solution stability and interaction with the model protein bovine pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase A) were investigated by using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Its crystal structure and that of the adduct formed upon reaction with RNase A were obtained by X-ray crystallography. The comparison between the structure of purified compound 1 and that of the fragment bound to RNase A reveals an unusual mode of protein binding that includes ligand exchange and alteration of coordination sphere geometry.

  13. Novel chiral N4S2- and N6S3-donor macrocyclic ligands: synthesis, protonation constants, metal-ion binding and asymmetric catalysis in the Henry reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Martell, A E

    2003-08-01

    New hydrophobic chiral macrocyclic ligands L1-L3 with chiral diamino and thiophene moieties have been synthesized by the Schiff base condensation approach. Protonation constants of L1 and L2 were determined by potentiometry titration. Metal-ion binding experiments exhibited that L1 and L3 are pronounced in selective recognition, Ag+, Cu2+ and Ca2+ ions among the surveyed metal ions (Cu2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+, Ag+, Li+, Na+, K+, and Ca2+). L1 was found to spectroscopically detect the presence of Cu2+ and Ca2+ to function as a multiple readout sensor. The detection limit for Ca2+ ions was found to be 9.8 x 10(-5) M in CH2Cl2-MeOH solution. The trimeric chiral ligand L3 has been shown to be an efficient auxiliary in a Zn(II)-mediated enantioselective Henry reaction. PMID:12948208

  14. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and HSA binding of two new N,O,O-donor Schiff-base ligands derived from dihydroxybenzaldehyde and tert-butylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Iman; Hosseini, Farnaz; Khorshidifard, Mahsa; Sahihi, Mehdi; Rudbari, Hadi Amiri

    2016-09-01

    Two new o-hydroxy Schiff-bases compounds, L1 and L2, were derived from the 1:1 M condensation of 2,3-dihydroxybenzaldehyde and 2,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde with tert-butylamine and were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies. The crystal structure of L2 was also determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. The crystal structure of L2 showed that the compound exists as a zwitterionic form in the solid state, with the H atom of the phenol group being transferred to the imine N atom. It adopts an E configuration about the central Cdbnd N double bond. Furthermore, binding of these Schiff base ligands to Human Serum Albumin (HSA) was investigated by fluorescence quenching, absorption spectroscopy, molecular docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation methods. The fluorescence emission of HSA was quenched by ligands. Also, suitable models were used to analyze the UV-vis absorption spectroscopy data for titration of HSA solution by various amounts of Schiff bases. The spectroscopic studies revealed that these Schiff bases formed 1:1 complex with HSA. Energy transfer mechanism of quenching was discussed and the values of 3.35 and 1.57 nm as the mean distances between the bound ligands and the HSA were calculated for L1 and L2, respectively. Molecular docking results indicated that the main active binding site for these Schiff bases ligands is in subdomain IB. Moreover, MD simulation results suggested that this Schiff base complex can interact with HSA, with a slight modification of its tertiary structure.

  15. Novel mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the androgen receptor gene (1790p) associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florina Raicu; Rossella Giuliani; Valentina Gatta; Chiara Palka; Paolo Guanciali Franchi; Pierluigi Lelli-Chiesa; Stefano Tumini; Liborio Stuppia

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked androgen receptor (AR) gene cause androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS), resulting in an impaired embryonic sex differentiation in 46,XY genetic men. Complete androgen insensitivity (CAIS) produces a female external phenotype, whereas cases with partial androgen insensitivity (PAIS) have various ambiguities of the genitalia. Mild androgen insensitivity (MAIS) is characterized by undermasculinization and gynecomastia. Here we describe a 2-month-old 46,XY female patient, with all of the characteristics of CAIS. Defects in testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) synthesis were excluded. Sequencing of the AR gene showed the presence in exon 6 of a T to C transition in the second base of codon 790, nucleotide position 2369, causing a novel missense Leu790Pro mutation in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. The identification of a novel AR mutation in a girl with CAIS provides significant information due to the importance of missense mutations in the ligand-binding domain of the AR, which are able to induce functional abnormalities in the androgen binding capability, stabilization of active conformation, or interaction with coactivators. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 687-691)

  16. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP) transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias-Bexiga, Manuel; Castillo, Francisco; Cobos, Eva S; Oka, Tsutomu; Sudol, Marius; Luque, Irene

    2015-01-01

    YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling. PMID:25607641

  17. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Iglesias-Bexiga

    Full Text Available YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling.

  18. Development of Plate Reader and On-Line Microfluidic Screening to Identify Ligands of the 5-Hydroxytryptamine Binding Protein in Venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reka A. Otvos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The 5-HT3 receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel, which is expressed in the nervous system. Its antagonists are used clinically for treatment of postoperative- and radiotherapy-induced emesis and irritable bowel syndrome. In order to better understand the structure and function of the 5-HT3 receptor, and to allow for compound screening at this receptor, recently a serotonin binding protein (5HTBP was engineered with the Acetylcholine Binding Protein as template. In this study, a fluorescence enhancement assay for 5HTBP ligands was developed in plate-reader format and subsequently used in an on-line microfluidic format. Both assay types were validated using an existing radioligand binding assay. The on-line microfluidic assay was coupled to HPLC via a post-column split which allowed parallel coupling to a mass spectrometer to collect MS data. This high-resolution screening (HRS system is well suitable for compound mixture analysis. As a proof of principle, the venoms of Dendroapsis polylepis, Pseudonaja affinis and Pseudonaja inframacula snakes were screened and the accurate masses of the found bioactives were established. To demonstrate the subsequent workflow towards structural identification of bioactive proteins and peptides, the partial amino acid sequence of one of the bioactives from the Pseudonaja affinis venom was determined using a bottom-up proteomics approach.

  19. Bispyrimidines as potent histamine H(4) receptor ligands: delineation of structure-activity relationships and detailed H(4) receptor binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Harald; Schultes, Sabine; de Graaf, Chris; Nijmeijer, Saskia; Vischer, Henry F; Zuiderveld, Obbe P; Dobler, Julia; Stachurski, Katharina; Mayer, Moriz; Arnhof, Heribert; Scharn, Dirk; Haaksma, Eric E J; de Esch, Iwan J P; Leurs, Rob

    2013-06-13

    The basic methylpiperazine moiety is considered a necessary substructure for high histamine H4 receptor (H4R) affinity. This moiety is however also the metabolic hot spot for various classes of H4R ligands (e.g., indolcarboxamides and pyrimidines). We set out to investigate whether mildly basic 2-aminopyrimidines in combination with the appropriate linker can serve as a replacement for the methylpiperazine moiety. In the series of 2-aminopyrimidines, the introduction of an additional 2-aminopyrimidine moiety in combination with the appropriate linker lead to bispyrimidines displaying pKi values for binding the human H4R up to 8.2. Furthermore, the methylpiperazine replacement results in compounds with improved metabolic properties. The attempt to transfer the knowledge generated in the class of bispyrimidines to the indolecarboxamides failed. Combining the derived structure-activity relationships with homology modeling leads to new detailed insights in the molecular aspects of ligand-H4R binding in general and the binding mode of the described bispyrimidines in specific. PMID:23668417

  20. Search for β2 adrenergic receptor ligands by virtual screening via grid computing and investigation of binding modes by docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Bai

    Full Text Available We designed a program called MolGridCal that can be used to screen small molecule database in grid computing on basis of JPPF grid environment. Based on MolGridCal program, we proposed an integrated strategy for virtual screening and binding mode investigation by combining molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and free energy calculations. To test the effectiveness of MolGridCal, we screened potential ligands for β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR from a database containing 50,000 small molecules. MolGridCal can not only send tasks to the grid server automatically, but also can distribute tasks using the screensaver function. As for the results of virtual screening, the known agonist BI-167107 of β2AR is ranked among the top 2% of the screened candidates, indicating MolGridCal program can give reasonable results. To further study the binding mode and refine the results of MolGridCal, more accurate docking and scoring methods are used to estimate the binding affinity for the top three molecules (agonist BI-167107, neutral antagonist alprenolol and inverse agonist ICI 118,551. The results indicate agonist BI-167107 has the best binding affinity. MD simulation and free energy calculation are employed to investigate the dynamic interaction mechanism between the ligands and β2AR. The results show that the agonist BI-167107 also has the lowest binding free energy. This study can provide a new way to perform virtual screening effectively through integrating molecular docking based on grid computing, MD simulations and free energy calculations. The source codes of MolGridCal are freely available at http://molgridcal.codeplex.com.

  1. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wanli; Huang, Yu-Ming M; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-En A

    2016-08-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design.

  2. Characterization of Promiscuous Binding of Phosphor Ligands to Breast-Cancer-Gene 1 (BRCA1) C-Terminal (BRCT): Molecular Dynamics, Free Energy, Entropy and Inhibitor Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-ming M.; Kizhake, Smitha; Natarajan, Amarnath; Chang, Chia-en A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) mediated by breast-cancer-gene 1 C-terminal (BRCT) is an attractive strategy to sensitize breast and ovarian cancers to chemotherapeutic agents that induce DNA damage. Such inhibitors could also be used for studies to understand the role of this PPI in DNA damage response. However, design of BRCT inhibitors is challenging because of the inherent flexibility associated with this domain. Several studies identified short phosphopeptides as tight BRCT binders. Here we investigated the thermodynamic properties of 18 phosphopeptides or peptide with phosphate mimic and three compounds with phosphate groups binding to BRCT to understand promiscuous molecular recognition and guide inhibitor design. We performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the interactions between inhibitors and BRCT and their dynamic behavior in the free and bound states. MD simulations revealed the key role of loops in altering the shape and size of the binding site to fit various ligands. The mining minima (M2) method was used for calculating binding free energy to explore the driving forces and the fine balance between configuration entropy loss and enthalpy gain. We designed a rigidified ligand, which showed unfavorable experimental binding affinity due to weakened enthalpy. This was because it lacked the ability to rearrange itself upon binding. Investigation of another phosphate group containing compound, C1, suggested that the entropy loss can be reduced by preventing significant narrowing of the energy well and introducing multiple new compound conformations in the bound states. From our computations, we designed an analog of C1 that introduced new intermolecular interactions to strengthen attractions while maintaining small entropic penalty. This study shows that flexible compounds do not always encounter larger entropy penalty, compared with other more rigid binders, and highlights a new strategy for inhibitor design. PMID

  3. Modulation of ligand-heme reactivity by binding pocket residues demonstrated in cytochrome c' over the femtosecond-second temporal range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Henry J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Hough, Michael A; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-12-01

    The ability of hemoproteins to discriminate between diatomic molecules, and the subsequent affinity for their chosen ligand, is fundamental to the existence of life. These processes are often controlled by precise structural arrangements in proteins, with heme pocket residues driving reactivity and specificity. One such protein is cytochrome c', which has the ability to bind nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) on opposite faces of the heme, a property that is shared with soluble guanylate cycle. Like soluble guanylate cyclase, cytochrome c' also excludes O2 completely from the binding pocket. Previous studies have shown that the NO binding mechanism is regulated by a proximal arginine residue (R124) and a distal leucine residue (L16). Here, we have investigated the roles of these residues in maintaining the affinity for NO in the heme binding environment by using various time-resolved spectroscopy techniques that span the entire femtosecond-second temporal range in the UV-vis spectrum, and the femtosecond-nanosecond range by IR spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that the tightly regulated NO rebinding events following excitation in wild-type cytochrome c' are affected in the R124A variant. In the R124A variant, vibrational and electronic changes extend continuously across all time scales (from fs-s), in contrast to wild-type cytochrome c' and the L16A variant. Based on these findings, we propose a NO (re)binding mechanism for the R124A variant of cytochrome c' that is distinct from that in wild-type cytochrome c'. In the wider context, these findings emphasize the importance of heme pocket architecture in maintaining the reactivity of hemoproteins towards their chosen ligand, and demonstrate the power of spectroscopic probes spanning a wide temporal range.

  4. Kinetics of binding of dihydropyridine calcium channel ligands to skeletal muscle membranes: Evidence for low-affinity sites and for the involvement of G proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed kinetic studies of the binding of the calcium channel antagonist (+)-[3H]PN200-110 to membrane preparations form rabbit skeletal muscle have demonstrated that, in addition to the high-affinity sites that are readily measured in equilibrium and kinetic experiments, there are also dihydropyridine binding sites with much lower affinities. These sites were detected by the ability of micromolar concentrations of several dihydropyridines to accelerate the rate of dissociation of (+)-[3H]PN200-110 from its high-affinity sites. The observed increase in rate was dependent on the concentration of competing ligand, and half-maximal effects occurred at approximately 10 μM for the agonist (±)-Bay K8644 and for the antagonists nifedipine, (±)-nitrendipine, and (+)-PN200-110. The low-affinity sites appear to be stereospecific since (-)-PN200-110 (1-200 μM) did not affect the dissociation rate. The possible involvement of guanine nucleotide binding proteins in dihydropyridine binding has been investigated by studying the effects of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS) and guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDPβS) on binding parameters. GTPγS did increase the ability of (±)-[3H]PN200-110. These results suggest that skeletal muscle dihydropyridine receptors have low-affinity binding sites that may be involved in the regulation of calcium channel function and that activation of a guanine nucleotide binding protein may modulate the binding of agonists but not of antagonists to these sites

  5. An improved expression system for the VC1 ligand binding domain of the receptor for advanced glycation end products in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Genny; Colzani, Mara; Tettamanzi, Alberto; Sorrentino, Luca; Aliverti, Alessandro; Fritz, Guenter; Aldini, Giancarlo; Popolo, Laura

    2015-10-01

    The receptor for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily and binds a variety of unrelated ligands sharing a negative charge. Most ligands bind to the extracellular V or VC1 domains of the receptor. In this work, V and VC1 of human RAGE were produced in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris and directed to the secretory pathway. Fusions to a removable C-terminal His-tag evidenced proteolytic processing of the tag by extracellular proteases and also intracellular degradation of the N-terminal portion of V-His. Expression of untagged forms was attempted. While the V domain was retained intracellularly, VC1 was secreted into the medium and was functionally active in binding AGEs. The glycosylation state of VC1 was analyzed by mass spectrometry and peptide-N-glycosidase F digestion. Like RAGE isolated from mammalian sources, the degree of occupancy of the N-glycosylation sites was full at Asn25 and partial at Asn81 which was also subjected to non-enzymatic deamidation. A simple procedure for the purification to homogeneity of VC1 from the medium was developed. The folded state of the purified protein was assessed by thermal shift assays. Recombinant VC1 from P. pastoris showed a remarkably high thermal stability as compared to the protein expressed in bacteria. Our in vivo approach indicates that the V and C1 domains constitute a single folding unit. The stability and solubility of the yeast-secreted VC1 may be beneficial for future in vitro studies aimed to identify new ligands or inhibitors of RAGE. PMID:26118699

  6. Synthesis, characterization and DNA-binding studies of ruthenium(II) mixed-ligand complexes containing dipyrido[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-b]quinoxaline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bin; Chen, Xiang; Du, Ke-Jie; Yu, Bo-Le; Chao, Hui; Ji, Liang-Nian

    2009-11-01

    A novel ligand dipyrido[1,2,5]oxadiazolo[3,4-b]quinoxaline (dpoq) and its complexes [Ru(bpy) 2(dpoq)] 2+ and [Ru(phen) 2(dpoq)] 2+ (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, electrospray mass spectra and 1H NMR. The interaction of Ru(II) complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated by absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, thermal denaturation and viscosity measurements. Results suggest that two Ru(II) complexes bind to DNA via an intercalative mode.

  7. Dissecting the influence of Mg2+ on 3D architecture and ligand-binding of the guanine-sensing riboswitch aptamer domain

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Janina; Noeske, Jonas; Wöhnert, Jens; Schwalbe, Harald

    2010-01-01

    Long-range tertiary interactions determine the three-dimensional structure of a number of metabolite-binding riboswitch RNA elements and were found to be important for their regulatory function. For the guanine-sensing riboswitch of the Bacillus subtilis xpt-pbuX operon, our previous NMR-spectroscopic studies indicated pre-formation of long-range tertiary contacts in the ligand-free state of its aptamer domain. Loss of the structural pre-organization in a mutant of this RNA (G37A/C61U) result...

  8. Functions of key residues in the ligand-binding pocket of vitamin D receptor: Fragment molecular orbital interfragment interaction energy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Keiko; Yamada, Sachiko; Tokiwa, Hiroaki

    2006-03-01

    Fragment molecular orbital-interfragment interaction energy calculations of the vitamin D receptor (VDR)/1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 complex were utilized to assign functions of key residues of the VDR. Only one residue forms a significant interaction with the corresponding hydroxy group of the ligand, although two residues are located around each hydroxy group. The degradation of binding affinity for derivatives upon removal of a hydroxy group is closely related to the trend in the strength of the hydrogen bonds. Type II hereditary rickets due to an Arg274 point mutation is caused by the lack of the strongest hydrogen bond.

  9. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and antimicrobial activity of binuclear metal complexes of a new asymmetrical Schiff base ligand: DNA binding affinity of copper(II) complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebl, Magdy

    2014-01-01

    The 1:1 condensation of o-acetoacetylphenol and 1,2-diaminopropane under condition of high dilution gives the mono-condensed Schiff base, (E)-3-(1-aminopropan-2-ylimino)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)butan-1-one. The mono-condensed Schiff base has been used for further condensation with isatin to obtain the new asymmetrical dicompartmental Schiff base ligand, (E)-3-(2-((E)-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-oxobutan-2-ylideneamino) propylimino)indolin-2-one (H3L) with a N2O3 donor set. Reactions of the ligand with metal salts give a series of new binuclear complexes. The ligand and its metal complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, 1H and 13C NMR, electronic, ESR and mass spectra, conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements as well as thermal analyses. The analytical and spectroscopic tools showed that the complexes can be formulated as: [(HL)(VO)2(SO4)(H2O)]·4H2O, [(HL)Fe2Cl4(H2O)3]·EtOH, [(HL)Fe2(ox)Cl2(H2O)3]·2H2O, [(L)M2(OAc)(H2O)m]·nH2O; M = Co, Ni or Cu, m = 4, 0 and n = 2, 3, [(HL)Cu2Cl]Cl·6H2O and [(L)(UO2)2(OAc)(H2O)3]·6H2O. The metal complexes exhibited octahedral geometrical arrangements except copper complexes that exhibited tetrahedral geometries and uranyl complex in which the metal ion is octa-coordinated. The Schiff base and its metal complexes were evaluated for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus), Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and fungi (Candida albicans and Aspergillus flavus). The ligand and some of its complexes were found to be biologically active. The DNA-binding properties of the copper complexes (6 and 7) have been investigated by electronic absorption, fluorescence and viscosity measurements. The results obtained indicate that these complexes bind to DNA via an intercalation binding mode with an intrinsic binding constant, Kb of 1.34 × 104 and 2.5 × 104 M-1, respectively.

  10. Primary study of a novel reporter gene/probe system human ER ligand binding domain/radiolabeled estradiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of a new reporter gene/probe system, namely human ER ligand binding domain (hERL)/radionuclide labeled estradiol, and to provide basis for its monitoring gene and cell therapy from in vitro cellular uptake study and in vivo imaging experiment. Methods: Recombinant plasmid pDC316-hERL -internal ribosome entry site-VEGF165 (pDC316-hERL-IRES-VEGF165, or EIV) and recombinant Ad-EIV were constructed, which carried a reporter gene (hERL) and a therapeutic gene (VEGF165) through IRES. Adenovirus was used as a vector. MSCs were obtained from tibias and femurs of rat, and cultured normally. Ad-EIV and EIV coated with lipofectamine 2000 (Lipo-EIV) were transfected into MSCs. RT-PCR and Western blot were performed to detect the expression of hERL and VEGF165 from mRNA and protein level.The cellular uptake values of 125I labeled estradiol (125I-E2) were measured in Ad-EIV, Lipo-EIV and non-transfected MSCs at different incubation time (1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 h). Ad-EIV transfected MSCs were injected into the left upper limb of rats, and non-transfected MSCs into the right upper limb as self-control. Micro PET/CT images were obtained after 1 d of transfection. T-test and Pearson linear correlation analysis were used to analyze the data. Results: After transfected with Ad-EIV, mRNA and protein expressions of hERL and VEGF165 in MSCs were increased with adenovirus multiplicity of infection (MOI), and positive correlation could be seen (r2=0.953 and 0.966, both P<0.05). The expressions of mRNA and protein in Ad-EIV group were higher than those of Lipo-EIV transfected MSCs. Time-dependent accumulation of 125I-E2 was observed in the Ad-EIV group and Lipo-EIV group, and the highest uptake rates occurred at 24 h, with peak values of (10.94 ± 0.30) % and (8.93 ± 0.18)%, respectively. Higher cellular uptakes could be seen at all time points in the Ad-EIV group than those of the Lipo-EIV group (t=4.132-16.168, all P<0.05). Moreover, the cellular

  11. MDMA-evoked changes in the binding of dopamine D(2) receptor ligands in striatum of rats with unilateral serotonin depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Søren Dinesen; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Gramsbergen, Jan Bert;

    2010-01-01

    We earlier reported an anomalous 50% decrease in [(11)C]N-methylspiperone ([(11)C]NMSP) binding to dopamine D(2)-like receptors in living pig striatum after challenge with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "Ecstasy"), suggesting either (1) a species peculiarity in the vulnerability...... lesions, later verified by [(125)I]RTI-55 autoradiography. Baseline [(11)C]NMSP microPET recordings were followed by either saline or MDMA-HCl (4 mg/kg) injections (i.v.), and a second [(11)C]NMSP recording, culminating with injection of [(3)H]raclopride for autoradiography ex vivo. Neither MDMA......-challenge nor serotonin lesion had any detectable effect on [(11)C]NMSP binding. In contrast, MDMA challenge increased receptor occupancy by [(3)H]raclopride ex vivo (relative to the B(max) in vitro) from 8% to 12%, and doubled the free ligand concentration in cerebral cortex, apparently by blocking hepatic CYP...

  12. An Introductory Classroom Exercise on Protein Molecular Model Visualization and Detailed Analysis of Protein-Ligand Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeylaut-Palena, Andres, A.; de los Angeles Laborde, Maria

    2013-01-01

    A learning module for molecular level analysis of protein structure and ligand/drug interaction through the visualization of X-ray diffraction is presented. Using DeepView as molecular model visualization software, students learn about the general concepts of protein structure. This Biochemistry classroom exercise is designed to be carried out by…

  13. Sorting of ligand-activated epidermal growth factor receptor to lysosomes requires its actin-binding domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, W; Kerstens, S; Fritzsche, I; den Hartigh, JC; Oud, R; van der Heyden, MAG; Henegouwen, PMPVE

    2004-01-01

    Ligand-induced down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) comprises activation of two sequential transport steps. The first involves endocytic uptake by clathrin-coated vesicles, the second transfer of endocytosed EGFR from endosomes to lysosomes. Here we demonstrate that the sec

  14. Quinoxaline based bio-active mixed ligand transition metal complexes: Synthesis, characterization, electrochemical, antimicrobial, DNA binding, cleavage, antioxidant and molecular docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanaraj, C Justin; Johnson, Jijo

    2015-10-01

    Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) mixed ligand complexes have been synthesized from N(2), N(3)-bis(4-nitrophenyl)quinoxaline-2,3-diamine and 1,10-phenanthroline. The compounds were characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance, magnetic susceptibility, IR, UV-Vis., (1)H NMR, mass and ESR spectra. Octahedral geometry has been assigned for Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes and distorted octahedral geometry for Cu(II) complex. Electrochemical behavior of the synthesized complexes was studied using cyclic voltammetry. Grain size and surface morphologies of the complexes were determined by powder XRD and SEM analyses. The mixed ligand metal complexes were screened for antimicrobial activity against bacterial species Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus; fungal species Aspergillus niger, and Candida albicans by disc diffusion method. The DNA binding and DNA cleavage activities of the compounds were determined using electronic absorption titration and agarose gel electrophoresis respectively. The superoxide radical scavenging and free radical scavenging activities of the Cu(II) complex was also evaluated. Molecular docking studies of the synthesized mixed ligand metal complexes were carried out against B-DNA dodecamer and the protein Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (pf DHFR).

  15. The X-Ray Structure of the Ligand-Free Antibiotic Ristocetin-A Reveals the Role of the Monomer/Dimer Equilibrium in Its Binding Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Prangé

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ristocetin-A belongs to the group of the glycoheptapeptide antibiotics. The sulfate salt of ristocetin-A was crystallized in the P21 monoclinic space group with a homodimer in the asymmetric unit. The two subunits are linked back-to-back like the other members of the family via four peptide bonds forming a twisted β-sheet and exposing the binding pockets to the exterior. The two tetrasaccharide parts of this ligand-free antibiotic are in the anti/anti orientations contrary to what was found in the mono- and diliganded ristocetin-A/-(D-Ala-D-Ala complexes in which the two tetrasaccharides of the dimer are syn/anti. The ligand-free dimer shows however some conformational differences between the two subunits, particularly in the terminal arabinose leading to one extended and one bent conformation of the tetrasaccharide moiety. Comparison between this structure and the two available mono- and diliganded structures confirms that the anti/anti to syn/anti flipping of the tetrasaccharide is a key step in the binding to the D-Ala-D-Ala-containing target sequence and cannot proceed without displacement of the monomer/dimer equilibrium.

  16. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J. [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); McDonald, Neil Q., E-mail: neil.mcdonald@cancer.org.uk [Cancer Research UK, 44 Lincoln’s Inn Fields, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Birkbeck College, University of London, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HX (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  17. Novel high-affinity and selective biaromatic 4-substituted gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) analogues as GHB ligands: design, synthesis, and binding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høg, Signe; Wellendorph, Petrine; Nielsen, Birgitte; Frydenvang, Karla; Dahl, Ivar F; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Brehm, Lotte; Frølund, Bente; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2008-12-25

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a metabolite of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and has been proposed to function as a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. GHB is used in the treatment of narcolepsy and is a drug of abuse. GHB binds to both GABA(B) receptors and specific high-affinity GHB sites in brain, of which the latter have not been linked unequivocally to function, but are speculated to be GHB receptors. In this study, a series of biaromatic 4-substituted GHB analogues, including 4'-phenethylphenyl, 4'-styrylphenyl, and 4'-benzyloxyphenyl GHB analogues, were synthesized and characterized pharmacologically in a [3H](E,RS)-(6,7,8,9-tetrahydro-5-hydroxy-5H-benzocyclohept-6-ylidene)acetic acid ([3H]NCS-382) binding assay and in GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor binding assays. The compounds were selective for the high-affinity GHB binding sites and several displayed Ki values below 100 nM. The affinity of the 4-[4'-(2-iodobenzyloxy)phenyl] GHB analogue 17b was shown to reside predominantly with the R-enantiomer (Ki = 22 nM), which has higher affinity than previously reported GHB ligands.

  18. Mitochondrial Hsp90 is a ligand-activated molecular chaperone coupling ATP binding to dimer closure through a coiled-coil intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Nuri; Lee, Jungsoon; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chang, Changsoo; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Lee, Sukyeong; Tsai, Francis T. F.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-shock protein of 90 kDa (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone that adopts different 3D structures associated with distinct nucleotide states: a wide-open, V-shaped dimer in the apo state and a twisted, N-terminally closed