WorldWideScience

Sample records for binding energy distribution

  1. Binding-energy distribution and dephasing of localized biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Umlauff, M.

    1997-01-01

    We report on the binding energy and dephasing of localized biexciton states in narrow ZnSe multiple quantum wells. The measured binding-energy distribution of the localized biexcitons shows a width of 2.2 meV centered at 8.5 meV, and is fairly independent of the exciton localization energy. In four...

  2. Distribution of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chempath, Shaji [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pratt, Lawrence R [TULANE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    Distributions of binding energies of a water molecule in the water liquid-vapor interface are obtained on the basis of molecular simulation with the SPC/E model of water. These binding energies together with the observed interfacial density profile are used to test a minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical statistical thermodynamic theory. Binding energy distributions for water molecules in that interfacial region clearly exhibit a composite structure. A minimally conditioned Gaussian quasi-chemical model that is accurate for the free energy of bulk liquid water breaks down for water molecules in the liquid-vapor interfacial region. This breakdown is associated with the fact that this minimally conditioned Gaussian model would be inaccurate for the statistical thermodynamics of a dilute gas. Aggressive conditioning greatly improves the performance of that Gaussian quasi-chemical model. The analogy between the Gaussian quasi-chemical model and dielectric models of hydration free energies suggests that naive dielectric models without the conditioning features of quasi-chemical theory will be unreliable for these interfacial problems. Multi-Gaussian models that address the composite nature of the binding energy distributions observed in the interfacial region might provide a mechanism for correcting dielectric models for practical applications.

  3. Electron momentum distributions and binding energies for the valence orbitals of hydrogen bromide and hydrogen iodide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brion, C.E.; McCarthy, I.E.; Suzuki, I.H.; Weigold, E.; Williams, G.R.J.; Bedford, K.L.; Kunz, A.B.; Weidman, R.

    1981-12-01

    The electron binding energy spectra and momentum distributions have been obtained for the valence orbitals of HBr and HI using noncoplanar symmetric electron coincidence spectroscopy at 1200eV. The weakly bonding inner valence ns orbitals, which have not been previously observed, have their spectroscopic (pole) strength severely split among a number of ion states. For HBr the strength of the main inner valence (ns) transition is 0.42 0.03 whereas for HI it is 0.37 0.04, in close agreement with that observed for the valence s orbitals of the corresponding isoelectronic inert gas atoms. The spectroscopic strength for the two outermost orbitals is found to be close to unity, in agreement with many body Green's function calculations. The measured momentum distributions are compared with several spherically averaged MO momentum distributions, as well as (for HBr) with a Green's function calculation of the generalized overlap amplitude (GOA). The GOA momentum distributions are in excellent agreement with the HBr data, both in shape and relative magnitude. Not all of the MO momentum distributions are in reasonable agreement with the data. Comparison is also made with the calculated momentum distributions for Kr, Br, Xe and I

  4. Binding energy and momentum distribution of nuclear matter using Green's function methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, A.; Dickhoff, W.H.; Polls, A.

    1991-01-01

    The influence of hole-hole (h-h) propagation in addition to the conventional particle-particle (p-p) propagation, on the energy per particle and the momentum distribution is investigated for the v 2 central interaction which is derived from Reid's soft-core potential. The results are compared to Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations with a continuous choice for the single-particle (SP) spectrum. Calculation of the energy from a self-consistently determined SP spectrum leads to a lower saturation density. This result is not corroborated by calculating the energy from the hole spectral function, which is, however, not self-consistent. A generalization of previous calculations of the momentum distribution, based on a Goldstone diagram expansion, is introduced that allows the inclusion of h-h contributions to all orders. From this result an alternative calculation of the kinetic energy is obtained. In addition, a direct calculation of the potential energy is presented which is obtained from a solution of the ladder equation containing p-p and h-h propagation to all orders. These results can be considered as the contributions of selected Goldstone diagrams (including p-p and h-h terms on the same footing) to the kinetic and potential energy in which the SP energy is given by the quasiparticle energy. The results for the summation of Goldstone diagrams leads to a different momentum distribution than the one obtained from integrating the hole spectral function which in general gives less depletion of the Fermi sea. Various arguments, based partly on the results that are obtained, are put forward that a self-consistent determination of the spectral functions including the p-p and h-h ladder contributions (using a realistic interaction) will shed light on the question of nuclear saturation at a nonrelativistic level that is consistent with the observed depletion of SP orbitals in finite nuclei

  5. Binding energy and momentum distribution of nuclear matter using Green's function methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, A.; Dickhoff, W.H.; Polls, A.

    1990-07-01

    The influence of hole-hole (hh) propagation in addition to the conventional particle-particle (pp) propagation on the energy per particle and the momentum distribution is investigated for two central interactions (v 2 and v 2 l=0 ) which are derived from Reid's soft core potential. The results are compared to Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations with a continuous choice for the single-particle (sp) spectrum. Calculation of the energy from a self-consistently determined sp spectrum leads to a lower saturation density. This result is not corroborated by calculating the energy from the hole spectral function which is, however, not self-consistent. A generalization of previous calculations of the momentum distribution based on a Goldstone diagram expansion is introduced which allows the inclusion of hh contributions to all orders. From this result an alternative calculation of the kinetic energy is obtained. In addition, a direct calculation of the potential energy is presented which is obtained from a solution of the ladder equation containing pp and hh propagation to all orders. These results can be considered as the contributions of selected Goldstone diagrams (including pp and hh terms on the same footing) to the kinetic and potential energy in which the sp energy is given by the quasi-article energy. The results for the summation of Goldstone diagrams leads to a different momentum distribution than the one obtained from integrating the hole spectral function which in general gives less depletion of the Fermi sea. Various arguments, based partly on the results that are obtained, are put forward that a self-consistent determination of the spectral functions including the pp and hh ladder contributions (using a realistic interaction) will shed light on the question of nuclear saturation at a non-relativistic level which is consistent with the observed depletion of sp orbitals in finite nuclei. (Author) (51 refs., 3 tabs., 15 figs)

  6. Quarkeosynthesis Binding Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Bill

    2009-05-01

    Quarkeosynthesis shows that the binding energy of a nucleus is the difference between the relativistic kinetic energies of its threesome of Jumbo Quarks and that of its building block quarks from neutrons and protons. There is no involvement of a nuclear strong force or gluon material.

  7. Communication: regularizing binding energy distributions and thermodynamics of hydration: theory and application to water modeled with classical and ab initio simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Valéry; Merchant, Safir; Asthagiri, D

    2011-11-14

    The high-energy tail of the distribution of solute-solvent interaction energies is poorly characterized for condensed systems, but this tail region is of principal interest in determining the excess free energy of the solute. We introduce external fields centered on the solute to modulate the short-range repulsive interaction between the solute and solvent. This regularizes the binding energy distribution and makes it easy to calculate the free energy of the solute with the field. Together with the work done to apply the field in the presence and absence of the solute, we calculate the excess chemical potential of the solute. We present the formal development of this idea and apply it to study liquid water. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  8. Binding energy of protonium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assad Abdel-Raouf, Mohamed

    2009-11-01

    The goal of the present work is to calculate the binding energy of the protonium ions bar PPe+ and bar PPe- using Rayleigh- Ritz variational method. It is indicated that an employment of 21 components of the trial wavefunction yields -0.08793 eV as the ground state energy of these ions. Our result agrees quite well with recently obtained results based on elaborate Monte Carlo approximations. It confirms the possible formation of these ions in laboratory.

  9. Distributed Energy Implementation Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chandralata N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-13

    This presentation covers the options for implementing distributed energy projects. It distinguishes between options available for distributed energy that is government owned versus privately owned, with a focus on the privately owned options including Energy Savings Performance Contract Energy Sales Agreements (ESPC ESAs). The presentation covers the new ESPC ESA Toolkit and other Federal Energy Management Program resources.

  10. Distributed Energy Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Distributed Energy Technologies Laboratory (DETL) is an extension of the power electronics testing capabilities of the Photovoltaic System Evaluation Laboratory...

  11. Conformational Transitions and Convergence of Absolute Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The Binding Energy Distribution Analysis Method (BEDAM) is employed to compute the standard binding free energies of a series of ligands to a FK506 binding protein (FKBP12) with implicit solvation. Binding free energy estimates are in reasonably good agreement with experimental affinities. The conformations of the complexes identified by the simulations are in good agreement with crystallographic data, which was not used to restrain ligand orientations. The BEDAM method is based on λ -hopping Hamiltonian parallel Replica Exchange (HREM) molecular dynamics conformational sampling, the OPLS-AA/AGBNP2 effective potential, and multi-state free energy estimators (MBAR). Achieving converged and accurate results depends on all of these elements of the calculation. Convergence of the binding free energy is tied to the level of convergence of binding energy distributions at critical intermediate states where bound and unbound states are at equilibrium, and where the rate of binding/unbinding conformational transitions is maximal. This finding mirrors similar observations in the context of order/disorder transitions as for example in protein folding. Insights concerning the physical mechanism of ligand binding and unbinding are obtained. Convergence for the largest FK506 ligand is achieved only after imposing strict conformational restraints, which however require accurate prior structural knowledge of the structure of the complex. The analytical AGBNP2 model is found to underestimate the magnitude of the hydrophobic driving force towards binding in these systems characterized by loosely packed protein-ligand binding interfaces. Rescoring of the binding energies using a numerical surface area model corrects this deficiency. This study illustrates the complex interplay between energy models, exploration of conformational space, and free energy estimators needed to obtain robust estimates from binding free energy calculations. PMID:22368530

  12. Binding energy of the barbell exciton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, F. M.; Golub, J. E.

    1991-02-01

    The exciton binding energy in asymmetric coupled double quantum wells is calculated. As the system is electrically tuned from type I to type II, the exciton binding energy decreases from that of a two-dimensional exciton to the binding energy of a spatially separated electron-hole pair, i.e., the barbell exciton.$-- We compare our theoretical results with a recent experiment and find good agreement.

  13. DEM - distribution energy management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, A.; Kekkonen, V.; Koreneff, G. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)] [and others

    1998-08-01

    The electricity market was de-regulated in Finland at the end of 1995 and the customers can now freely choose their power suppliers. The national grid and local distribution network operators are now separated from the energy business. The network operators transmit the electric power to the customers on equal terms regardless from whom the power is purchased. The Finnish national grid is owned by one company Finnish Power Grid PLC (Fingrid). The major shareholders of Fingrid are the state of Finland, two major power companies and institutional investors. In addition there are about 100 local distribution utilities operating the local 110 kV, 20 kV and 0.4 kV networks. The distribution utilities are mostly owned by the municipalities and towns. In each network one energy supplier is always responsible for the hourly energy balance in the network (a `host`) and it also has the obligation to provide public energy prices accessible to any customer in the network`s area. The Finnish regulating authorities nominate such a supplier who has a dominant market share in the network`s area as the supplier responsible for the network`s energy balance. A regulating authority, called the Electricity Market Centre, ensures that the market is operating properly. The transmission prices and public energy prices are under the Electricity Market Centre`s control. For domestic and other small customers the cost of hourly metering (ca. 1000 US$) would be prohibitive and therefore the use of conventional energy metering and load models is under consideration by the authorities. Small customer trade with the load models (instead of the hourly energy recording) is scheduled to start in the first half of 1998. In this presentation, the problems of energy management from the standpoint of the energy trading and distributing companies in the new situation are first discussed. The topics covered are: the hourly load data management, the forecasting and estimation of hourly energy demands

  14. Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bairen; Chen, Xi; Cui, Xiaodong

    2015-03-01

    The optical properties of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) feature prominent excitonic natures. Here we report an experimental approach to measuring the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 with linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE). TP-PLE measurements show the exciton binding energy of 0.71 +/- 0.01 eV around K valley in the Brillouin zone.

  15. Binding energy of two-dimensional biexcitons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jai; Birkedal, Dan; Vadim, Lyssenko

    1996-01-01

    Using a model structure for a two-dimensional (2D) biexciton confined in a quantum well, it is shown that the form of the Hamiltonian of the 2D biexciton reduces into that of an exciton. The binding energies and Bohr radii of a 2D biexciton in its various internal energy states are derived...... analytically using the fractional dimension approach. The ratio of the binding energy of a 2D biexciton to that of a 2D exciton is found to be 0.228, which agrees very well with the recent experimental value. The results of our approach are compared with those of earlier theories....

  16. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N. [Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Physics

    1996-05-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of {Lambda} hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the {Lambda} single-particle energy in terms of basic {Lambda}-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body {Lambda}NN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei.

  17. Binding energies of hypernuclei and hypernuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL; Murali, S.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1996-01-01

    In part 1 the effect of nuclear core dynamics on the binding energies of Λ hypernuclei is discussed in the framework of variational correlated wave functions. In particular, the authors discuss a new rearrangement energy contribution and its effect on the core polarization. In part 2 they consider the interpretation of the Λ single-particle energy in terms of basic Λ-nuclear interactions using a local density approximation based on a Fermi hypernetted chain calculation of the A binding to nuclear matter. To account for the data strongly repulsive 3-body ΛNN forces are required. Also in this framework they discuss core polarization for medium and heavier hypernuclei

  18. Li+-ligand binding energies and the effect of ligand fluorination on the binding energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.

    2018-02-01

    The Li+-ligand binding energies are computed for seven ligands and their perfluoro analogs using Density Functional Theory. The bonding is mostly electrostatic in origin. Thus the size of the binding energy tends to correlate with the ligand dipole moment, however, the charge-induced dipole contribution can be sufficiently large to affect the dipole-binding energy correlation. The perfluoro species are significantly less strongly bound than their parents, because the electron withdrawing power of the fluorine reduces the ligand dipole moment.

  19. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NREL's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility (DERTF) is a working laboratory for interconnection and systems integration testing. This state-of-the-art facility...

  20. Binding Energy and Equilibrium of Compact Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the existence of a limit mass for compact astronomic ob- jects requires the solution of the Einstein’s equations of g eneral relativity together with an appropriate equation of state. Analytical solutions exi st in some special cases like the spherically symmetric static object without energy sou rces that is here considered. Solutions, i.e. the spacetime metrics, can have a singular m athematical form (the so called Schwarzschild metric due to Hilbert or a nonsingula r form (original work of Schwarzschild. The former predicts a limit mass and, conse quently, the existence of black holes above this limit. Here it is shown that, the origi nal Schwarzschild met- ric permits compact objects, without mass limit, having rea sonable values for central density and pressure. The lack of a limit mass is also demonst rated analytically just imposing reasonable conditions on the energy-matter densi ty, of positivity and decreas- ing with radius. Finally the ratio between proper mass and to tal mass tends to 2 for high values of mass so that the binding energy reaches the lim it m (total mass seen by a distant observer. As it is known the negative binding energ y reduces the gravitational mass of the object; the limit of m for the binding energy provides a mechanism for stable equilibrium of any amount of mass to contrast the gravitatio nal collapse.

  1. eqpair: Electron energy distribution calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, Paolo S.

    2018-02-01

    eqpair computes the electron energy distribution resulting from a balance between heating and direct acceleration of particles, and cooling processes. Electron-positron pair balance, bremstrahlung, and Compton cooling, including external soft photon input, are among the processes considered, and the final electron distribution can be hybrid, thermal, or non-thermal.

  2. Distributed coordination of energy storage with distributed generators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di; Stoorvogel, Antonie Arij; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    With a growing emphasis on energy efficiency and system flexibility, a great effort has been made recently in developing distributed energy resources (DER), including distributed generators and energy storage systems. This paper first formulates an optimal DER coordination problem considering

  3. Distribution System Pricing with Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hledik, Ryan [The Brattle Group, Cambridge, MA (United States); Lazar, Jim [The Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-08-16

    Technological changes in the electric utility industry bring tremendous opportunities and significant challenges. Customers are installing clean sources of on-site generation such as rooftop solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. At the same time, smart appliances and control systems that can communicate with the grid are entering the retail market. Among the opportunities these changes create are a cleaner and more diverse power system, the ability to improve system reliability and system resilience, and the potential for lower total costs. Challenges include integrating these new resources in a way that maintains system reliability, provides an equitable sharing of system costs, and avoids unbalanced impacts on different groups of customers, including those who install distributed energy resources (DERs) and low-income households who may be the least able to afford the transition.

  4. Interconnection of Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, Emerson [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-04-19

    This is a presentation on interconnection of distributed energy resources, including the relationships between different aspects of interconnection, best practices and lessons learned from different areas of the U.S., and an update on technical advances and standards for interconnection.

  5. An energy conservation approach to adsorbate-induced surface stress and the extraction of binding energy using nanomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A.; Boiadjiev, Vassil I.; Hawk, John E.; Gehl, Anthony C.; Fernando, Gayanath W.; Rohana Wijewardhana, L. C.

    2008-03-01

    Surface stress induced by molecular adsorption in three different binding processes has been studied experimentally using a microcantilever sensor. A comprehensive free-energy analysis based on an energy conservation approach is proposed to explain the experimental observations. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. The released binding energy appears to be almost exclusively channeled to the surface energy, and energy distribution to other channels, including heat, appears to be inactive for this micromechanical system. When this excess surface energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such vapor phase experiments were conducted for three binding processes: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. Binding energies for these three processes were also estimated.

  6. An energy conservation approach to adsorbate-induced surface stress and the extraction of binding energy using nanomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A; Boiadjiev, Vassil I; Hawk, John E; Gehl, Anthony C [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6122 (United States); Fernando, Gayanath W [Physics Department, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Wijewardhana, L C Rohana [Physics Department, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2008-03-12

    Surface stress induced by molecular adsorption in three different binding processes has been studied experimentally using a microcantilever sensor. A comprehensive free-energy analysis based on an energy conservation approach is proposed to explain the experimental observations. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. The released binding energy appears to be almost exclusively channeled to the surface energy, and energy distribution to other channels, including heat, appears to be inactive for this micromechanical system. When this excess surface energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such vapor phase experiments were conducted for three binding processes: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. Binding energies for these three processes were also estimated.

  7. Energy efficient distributed computing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Young-Choon

    2012-01-01

    The energy consumption issue in distributed computing systems raises various monetary, environmental and system performance concerns. Electricity consumption in the US doubled from 2000 to 2005.  From a financial and environmental standpoint, reducing the consumption of electricity is important, yet these reforms must not lead to performance degradation of the computing systems.  These contradicting constraints create a suite of complex problems that need to be resolved in order to lead to 'greener' distributed computing systems.  This book brings together a group of outsta

  8. Sampling and energy evaluation challenges in ligand binding protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jiayi; Doyle, Lindsey; Jr Greisen, Per; Schena, Alberto; Park, Hahnbeom; Johnsson, Kai; Stoddard, Barry L; Baker, David

    2017-12-01

    The steroid hormone 17α-hydroxylprogesterone (17-OHP) is a biomarker for congenital adrenal hyperplasia and hence there is considerable interest in development of sensors for this compound. We used computational protein design to generate protein models with binding sites for 17-OHP containing an extended, nonpolar, shape-complementary binding pocket for the four-ring core of the compound, and hydrogen bonding residues at the base of the pocket to interact with carbonyl and hydroxyl groups at the more polar end of the ligand. Eight of 16 designed proteins experimentally tested bind 17-OHP with micromolar affinity. A co-crystal structure of one of the designs revealed that 17-OHP is rotated 180° around a pseudo-two-fold axis in the compound and displays multiple binding modes within the pocket, while still interacting with all of the designed residues in the engineered site. Subsequent rounds of mutagenesis and binding selection improved the ligand affinity to nanomolar range, while appearing to constrain the ligand to a single bound conformation that maintains the same "flipped" orientation relative to the original design. We trace the discrepancy in the design calculations to two sources: first, a failure to model subtle backbone changes which alter the distribution of sidechain rotameric states and second, an underestimation of the energetic cost of desolvating the carbonyl and hydroxyl groups of the ligand. The difference between design model and crystal structure thus arises from both sampling limitations and energy function inaccuracies that are exacerbated by the near two-fold symmetry of the molecule. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  9. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atcitty, Stanley [Albuquerque, NM; Clark, Nancy H [Corrales, NM; Boyes, John D [Albuquerque, NM; Ranade, Satishkumar J [Las Cruces, NM

    2007-07-03

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  10. Perturbation method for calculating impurity binding energy in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Perturbation method is used to calculate the binding energy within the framework of effective mass approximation and taking into account the effect of dielectric mismatch between the dot and the barrier material. The ground-state binding energy of the donor is computed as a function of dot size for finite confinement.

  11. Extrapolations of nuclear binding energies from new linear mass relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, D.; Jensen, A. S.; Riisager, K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to extrapolate nuclear binding energies from known values for neighboring nuclei. We select four specific mass relations constructed to eliminate smooth variation of the binding energy as function nucleon numbers. The fast odd-even variations are avoided by comparing nuclei...

  12. Perturbation method for calculating impurity binding energy in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilanjan Sil

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... Abstract. In the present paper, we have studied the binding energy of the shallow donor hydrogenic impurity, which is confined in an inhomogeneous cylindrical quantum dot (CQD) of GaAs-AlxGa1−xAs. Perturbation method is used to calculate the binding energy within the framework of effective mass ...

  13. Energy conservation in electric distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chong-Jin.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the potential for energy and power savings that exist in electric power delivery systems. These savings translate into significant financial and environmental benefits for electricity producers and consumers as well as for society in general. AlliedSignal's knowledge and perspectives on this topic are the result of discussions with hundreds of utility executives, government officials and other industry experts over the past decade in conjunction with marketing our Amorphous Metal technology for electric distribution transformers. Amorphous metal is a technology developed by AlliedSignal that significantly reduces the energy lost in electric distribution transformers at an incremental cost of just a few cents per kilo-Watt-hour. The purpose of this paper is to discuss: Amorphous Metal Alloy Technology; Energy Savings Opportunity; The Industrial Barriers and Remedies; Worldwide Demand; and A Low Risk Strategy. I wish this presentation will help KEPCO achieve their stated aims of ensuring sound development of the national economy and enhancement of public life through the economic and stable supply of electric power. AlliedSignal Korea Ltd. in conjunction with AlliedSignal Amorphous Metals in the U.S. are here to work with KEPCO, transformer manufacturers, industry, and government agencies to achieve greater efficiency in power distribution

  14. Eel calcitonin binding site distribution and antinociceptive activity in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidobono, F.; Netti, C.; Sibilia, V.; Villa, I.; Zamboni, A.; Pecile, A.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of binding site for [ 125 I]-eel-calcitonin (ECT) to rat central nervous system, studied by an autoradiographic technique, showed concentrations of binding in the diencephalon, the brain stem and the spinal cord. Large accumulations of grains were seen in the hypothalamus, the amygdala, in the fasciculus medialis prosencephali, in the fasciculus longitudinalis medialis, in the ventrolateral part of the periventricular gray matter, in the lemniscus medialis and in the raphe nuclei. The density of grains in the reticular formation and in the nucleus tractus spinalis nervi trigemini was more moderate. In the spinal cord, grains were scattered throughout the dorsal horns. Binding of the ligand was displaced equally by cold ECT and by salmon CT(sCT), indicating that both peptides bind to the same receptors. Human CT was much weaker than sCT in displacing [ 125 I]-ECT binding. The administration of ECT into the brain ventricles of rats dose-dependently induced a significant and long-lasting enhancement of hot-plate latencies comparable with that obtained with sCT. The antinociceptive activity induced by ECT is compatible with the topographical distribution of binding sites for the peptide and is a further indication that fish CTs are active in the mammalian brain

  15. Computation of pH-Dependent Binding Free Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. Olivia; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding accompanies changes in the surrounding electrostatic environments of the two binding partners and may lead to changes in protonation upon binding. In cases where the complex formation results in a net transfer of protons, the binding process is pH-dependent. However, conventional free energy computations or molecular docking protocols typically employ fixed protonation states for the titratable groups in both binding partners set a priori, which are identical for the free and bound states. In this review, we draw attention to these important yet largely ignored binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand association by outlining physical origins and prevalence of the protonation changes upon binding. Following a summary of various theoretical methods for pKa prediction, we discuss the theoretical framework to examine the pH dependence of protein-ligand binding processes. PMID:26202905

  16. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Y-90 (Yttrium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume A `Nuclei with Z = 1 - 54' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms'. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Y-90 (Yttrium, atomic number Z = 39, mass number A = 90).

  17. Multiple binding modes of ibuprofen in human serum albumin identified by absolute binding free energy calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Evoli, Stefania

    2016-11-10

    Human serum albumin possesses multiple binding sites and transports a wide range of ligands that include the anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen. A complete map of the binding sites of ibuprofen in albumin is difficult to obtain in traditional experiments, because of the structural adaptability of this protein in accommodating small ligands. In this work, we provide a set of predictions covering the geometry, affinity of binding and protonation state for the pharmaceutically most active form (S-isomer) of ibuprofen to albumin, by using absolute binding free energy calculations in combination with classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular docking. The most favorable binding modes correctly reproduce several experimentally identified binding locations, which include the two Sudlow\\'s drug sites (DS2 and DS1) and the fatty acid binding sites 6 and 2 (FA6 and FA2). Previously unknown details of the binding conformations were revealed for some of them, and formerly undetected binding modes were found in other protein sites. The calculated binding affinities exhibit trends which seem to agree with the available experimental data, and drastically degrade when the ligand is modeled in a protonated (neutral) state, indicating that ibuprofen associates with albumin preferentially in its charged form. These findings provide a detailed description of the binding of ibuprofen, help to explain a wide range of results reported in the literature in the last decades, and demonstrate the possibility of using simulation methods to predict ligand binding to albumin.

  18. Structure-function relationships of Na+, K+, ATP, or Mg2+ binding and energy transduction in Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Peter L.; Pedersen, Per Amstrup

    2000-01-01

    Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction......Na,K-ATPase; Mutagenesis; Na+ binding; K+ binding; Tl+ binding; Mg2+ binding; ATP binding; Cation binding site; Energy transduction...

  19. Using the fast fourier transform in binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Hai; Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Minh, David D L

    2018-04-30

    According to implicit ligand theory, the standard binding free energy is an exponential average of the binding potential of mean force (BPMF), an exponential average of the interaction energy between the unbound ligand ensemble and a rigid receptor. Here, we use the fast Fourier transform (FFT) to efficiently evaluate BPMFs by calculating interaction energies when rigid ligand configurations from the unbound ensemble are discretely translated across rigid receptor conformations. Results for standard binding free energies between T4 lysozyme and 141 small organic molecules are in good agreement with previous alchemical calculations based on (1) a flexible complex ( R≈0.9 for 24 systems) and (2) flexible ligand with multiple rigid receptor configurations ( R≈0.8 for 141 systems). While the FFT is routinely used for molecular docking, to our knowledge this is the first time that the algorithm has been used for rigorous binding free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Integration of Energy Storage in Distribution Grids

    OpenAIRE

    Geth, Frederik; Tant, Jeroen; Haesen, Edwin; Driesen, Johan; Belmans, Ronnie

    2010-01-01

    Electrical energy storage services can bring benefit to multiple stakeholders in the distribution grid. Energy storage owners maximize their profit on an external energy market. This can cause a conflict with the distribution system operator because a grid is designed in terms of peak power, not energy. The subject of this paper is a optimization method for the siting and sizing of energy storage in distribution grids. The optimization is implemented multi-objective as to visualize the trade-...

  1. Energy Distribution and Economic Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Carl-Johan Lars; Strulik, Holger

    2011-01-01

    /2 and 3/4, depending on the efficiency of the network. Together with an energy conservation equation, capturing instantaneous aggregate demand for electricity, we are able to provide a metabolic-energetic founded law of motion for capital per capita that is mathematically isomorphic to the one emanating...... of electricity distribution. The model leads to a supply relation according to which feasible electricity consumption per capita rises with the size of the economy, as measured by capital per capita. Specifically, the relation is a simple power law with an exponent assigned to capital that is bounded between 1...... from the Solow growth model. Using data for the 50 US states 1960–2000, we examine the determination of growth in electricity consumption per capita and test the model structurally. The model fits the data well. The exponent in the power law connecting capital and electricity is 2/3....

  2. Energy Efficiency in Grocery Distribution in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)......Evaluation of the development of the energy efficiency of grocery distribution from 1960 to the present in Denmark, covering both the distribution to the shops and the shopping transport (distribution from shops to individual homes)...

  3. Evaluation of two typical distributed energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Miaomiao; Tan, Xiu

    2018-03-01

    According to the two-natural gas distributed energy system driven by gas engine driven and gas turbine, in this paper, the first and second laws of thermodynamics are used to measure the distributed energy system from the two parties of “quantity” and “quality”. The calculation results show that the internal combustion engine driven distributed energy station has a higher energy efficiency, but the energy efficiency is low; the gas turbine driven distributed energy station energy efficiency is high, but the primary energy utilization rate is relatively low. When configuring the system, we should determine the applicable natural gas distributed energy system technology plan and unit configuration plan according to the actual load factors of the project and the actual factors such as the location, background and environmental requirements of the project. “quality” measure, the utilization of waste heat energy efficiency index is proposed.

  4. Enzyme activation through the utilization of intrinsic dianion binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyes, T L; Malabanan, M M; Zhai, X; Reyes, A C; Richard, J P

    2017-03-01

    We consider 'the proposition that the intrinsic binding energy that results from the noncovalent interaction of a specific substrate with the active site of the enzyme is considerably larger than is generally believed. An important part of this binding energy may be utilized to provide the driving force for catalysis, so that the observed binding energy represents only what is left over after this utilization' [Jencks,W.P. (1975) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas. Mol. Biol. , , 219-410]. The large ~12 kcal/mol intrinsic substrate phosphodianion binding energy for reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is divided into 4-6 kcal/mol binding energy that is expressed on the formation of the Michaelis complex in anchoring substrates to the respective enzyme, and 6-8 kcal/mol binding energy that is specifically expressed at the transition state in activating the respective enzymes for catalysis. A structure-based mechanism is described where the dianion binding energy drives a conformational change that activates these enzymes for catalysis. Phosphite dianion plays the active role of holding TIM in a high-energy closed active form, but acts as passive spectator in showing no effect on transition-state structure. The result of studies on mutant enzymes is presented, which support the proposal that the dianion-driven enzyme conformational change plays a role in enhancing the basicity of side chain of E167, the catalytic base, by clamping the base between a pair of hydrophobic side chains. The insight these results provide into the architecture of enzyme active sites and the development of strategies for the de novo design of protein catalysts is discussed.

  5. The perspectives of fusion energy: The roadmap towards energy production and fusion energy in a distributed energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2014-01-01

    at very high temperature where all matter is in the plasma state as the involved energies are orders of magnitude higher than typical chemical binding energies. It is one of the great science and engineering challenges to construct a viable power plant based on fusion energy. Fusion research is a world...... The presentation will discuss the present status of the fusion energy research and review the EU Roadmap towards a fusion power plant. Further the cost of fusion energy is assessed as well as how it can be integrated in the distributed energy system......Controlled thermonuclear fusion has the potential of providing an environmentally friendly and inexhaustible energy source for mankind. Fusion energy, which powers our sun and the stars, is released when light elements, such as the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, fuse together. This occurs...

  6. Funnel metadynamics as accurate binding free-energy method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Vittorio; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Parrinello, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A detailed description of the events ruling ligand/protein interaction and an accurate estimation of the drug affinity to its target is of great help in speeding drug discovery strategies. We have developed a metadynamics-based approach, named funnel metadynamics, that allows the ligand to enhance the sampling of the target binding sites and its solvated states. This method leads to an efficient characterization of the binding free-energy surface and an accurate calculation of the absolute protein–ligand binding free energy. We illustrate our protocol in two systems, benzamidine/trypsin and SC-558/cyclooxygenase 2. In both cases, the X-ray conformation has been found as the lowest free-energy pose, and the computed protein–ligand binding free energy in good agreement with experiments. Furthermore, funnel metadynamics unveils important information about the binding process, such as the presence of alternative binding modes and the role of waters. The results achieved at an affordable computational cost make funnel metadynamics a valuable method for drug discovery and for dealing with a variety of problems in chemistry, physics, and material science. PMID:23553839

  7. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cf-252 (Californium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cf-252 (Californium, atomic number Z = 98, mass number A = 252).

  8. The Pattern of microRNA Binding Site Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangyuan Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Micro-RNA (miRNA or miR regulates at least 60% of the genes in the human genome through their target sites at mRNA 3’-untranslated regions (UTR, and defects in miRNA expression regulation and target sites are frequently observed in cancers. We report here a systematic analysis of the distribution of miRNA target sites. Using the evolutionarily conserved miRNA binding sites in the TargetScan database (release 7.1, we constructed a miRNA co-regulation network by connecting genes sharing common miRNA target sites. The network possesses characteristics of the ubiquitous small-world network. Non-hub genes in the network—those sharing miRNA target sites with small numbers of genes—tend to form small cliques with their neighboring genes, while hub genes exhibit high levels of promiscuousness in their neighboring genes. Additionally, miRNA target site distribution is extremely uneven. Among the miRNAs, the distribution concentrates on a small number of miRNAs, in that their target sites occur in an extraordinarily large number of genes, that is, they have large numbers of target genes. The distribution across the genes follows a similar pattern; the mRNAs of a small proportion of the genes contain extraordinarily large numbers of miRNA binding sites. Quantitatively, the patterns fit into the P(K ∝ K−α relationship (P(K: the number of miRNAs with K target genes or genes with K miRNA sites; α: a positive constant, the mathematical description of connection distribution among the nodes and a defining characteristic of the so-called scale-free networks—a subset of small-world networks. Notably, well-known tumor-suppressive miRNAs (Let-7, miR-15/16, 26, 29, 31, 34, 145, 200, 203–205, 223, and 375 collectively have more than expected target genes, and well-known cancer genes contain more than expected miRNA binding sites. In summary, miRNA target site distribution exhibits characteristics of the small-world network. The potential to use this

  9. Distributed Energy Resource (DER) Cybersecurity Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, Danish [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Johnson, Jay [Sandia National Laboratories

    2017-11-08

    This presentation covers the work that Sandia National Laboratories and National Renewable Energy Laboratory are doing for distributed energy resource cybersecurity standards, prepared for NREL's Annual Cybersecurity & Resilience Workshop on October 9-10, 2017.

  10. Energy Management of Smart Distribution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Bananeh

    Electric power distribution systems interface the end-users of electricity with the power grid. Traditional distribution systems are operated in a centralized fashion with the distribution system owner or operator being the only decision maker. The management and control architecture of distribution systems needs to gradually transform to accommodate the emerging smart grid technologies, distributed energy resources, and active electricity end-users or prosumers. The content of this document concerns with developing multi-task multi-objective energy management schemes for: 1) commercial/large residential prosumers, and 2) distribution system operator of a smart distribution system. The first part of this document describes a method of distributed energy management of multiple commercial/ large residential prosumers. These prosumers not only consume electricity, but also generate electricity using their roof-top solar photovoltaics systems. When photovoltaics generation is larger than local consumption, excess electricity will be fed into the distribution system, creating a voltage rise along the feeder. Distribution system operator cannot tolerate a significant voltage rise. ES can help the prosumers manage their electricity exchanges with the distribution system such that minimal voltage fluctuation occurs. The proposed distributed energy management scheme sizes and schedules each prosumer's ES to reduce the electricity bill and mitigate voltage rise along the feeder. The second part of this document focuses on emergency energy management and resilience assessment of a distribution system. The developed emergency energy management system uses available resources and redundancy to restore the distribution system's functionality fully or partially. The success of the restoration maneuver depends on how resilient the distribution system is. Engineering resilience terminology is used to evaluate the resilience of distribution system. The proposed emergency energy

  11. Analysis of experimental positron-molecule binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, J R; Surko, C M; Young, J A

    2010-01-01

    Experiments show that positron annihilation on molecules frequently occurs via capture into vibrational Feshbach resonances. In these cases, the downshifts in the annihilation spectra from the vibrational mode spectra provide measures of the positron-molecule binding energies. An analysis of these binding energy data is presented in terms of the molecular dipole polarizability, the permanent dipole moment, and the number of π bonds in aromatic molecules. The results of this analysis are in reasonably good agreement with other information about positron-molecule bound states. Predictions for other targets and promising candidate molecules for further investigation are discussed.

  12. Distributed optimal coordination for distributed energy resources in power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Di; Yang, Tao; Stoorvogel, A.

    2017-01-01

    Driven by smart grid technologies, distributed energy resources (DERs) have been rapidly developing in recent years for improving reliability and efficiency of distribution systems. Emerging DERs require effective and efficient coordination in order to reap their potential benefits. In this paper......, we consider an optimal DER coordination problem over multiple time periods subject to constraints at both system and device levels. Fully distributed algorithms are proposed to dynamically and automatically coordinate distributed generators with multiple/single storages. With the proposed algorithms...

  13. Protection of Distribution Systems with Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Browne, Matthew; Calone, Roberto

    The usage of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) in utilities around the world is expected to increase significantly. The existing distribution systems have been generally designed for unidirectional power flow, and feeders are opened and locked out for any fault within. However, in the future...... this practice may lead to a loss of significant generation where each feeder may have significant DER penetration. Also, utilities have started to investigate islanding operation of distribution systems with DER as a way to improve the reliability of the power supply to customers. This report is the result...... of 17 months of work of the Joint Working Group B5/C6.26/CIRED “Protection of Distribution Systems with Distributed Energy Resources”. The working group used the CIGRE report TB421 “The impact of Renewable Energy Sources and Distributed Generation on Substation Protection and Automation”, published...

  14. Modelling distributed energy resources in energy service networks

    CERN Document Server

    Acha, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    Focuses on modelling two key infrastructures (natural gas and electrical) in urban energy systems with embedded technologies (cogeneration and electric vehicles) to optimise the operation of natural gas and electrical infrastructures under the presence of distributed energy resources

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Grain Surface Chemistry to Binding Energies of Ice Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, E. M.; Walsh, C.; Cuppen, H. M.

    2017-07-01

    Advanced telescopes, such as ALMA and the James Webb Space Telescope, are likely to show that the chemical universe may be even more complex than currently observed, requiring astrochemical modelers to improve their models to account for the impact of new data. However, essential input information for gas-grain models, such as binding energies of molecules to the surface, have been derived experimentally only for a handful of species, leaving hundreds of species with highly uncertain estimates. We present in this paper a systematic study of the effect of uncertainties in the binding energies on an astrochemical two-phase model of a dark molecular cloud, using the rate equations approach. A list of recommended binding energy values based on a literature search of published data is presented. Thousands of simulations of dark cloud models were run, and in each simulation a value for the binding energy of hundreds of species was randomly chosen from a normal distribution. Our results show that the binding energy of H2 is critical for the surface chemistry. For high binding energies, H2 freezes out on the grain forming an H2 ice. This is not physically realistic, and we suggest a change in the rate equations. The abundance ranges found are in reasonable agreement with astronomical ice observations. Pearson correlation coefficients revealed that the binding energy of HCO, HNO, CH2, and C correlate most strongly with the abundance of dominant ice species. Finally, the formation route of complex organic molecules was found to be sensitive to the branching ratios of H2CO hydrogenation.

  16. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE BATTERY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LANDI, J.T.; PLIVELICH, R.F.

    2006-04-30

    Electro Energy, Inc. conducted a research project to develop an energy efficient and environmentally friendly bipolar Ni-MH battery for distributed energy storage applications. Rechargeable batteries with long life and low cost potentially play a significant role by reducing electricity cost and pollution. A rechargeable battery functions as a reservoir for storage for electrical energy, carries energy for portable applications, or can provide peaking energy when a demand for electrical power exceeds primary generating capabilities.

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Avidity Distribution and Estimating General Binding Properties of Transcription Factors from Genome-Wide Binding Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir A

    2017-01-01

    The shape of the experimental frequency distributions (EFD) of diverse molecular interaction events quantifying genome-wide binding is often skewed to the rare but abundant quantities. Such distributions are systematically deviated from standard power-law functions proposed by scale-free network models suggesting that more explanatory and predictive probabilistic model(s) are needed. Identification of the mechanism-based data-driven statistical distributions that provide an estimation and prediction of binding properties of transcription factors from genome-wide binding profiles is the goal of this analytical survey. Here, we review and develop an analytical framework for modeling, analysis, and prediction of transcription factor (TF) DNA binding properties detected at the genome scale. We introduce a mixture probabilistic model of binding avidity function that includes nonspecific and specific binding events. A method for decomposition of specific and nonspecific TF-DNA binding events is proposed. We show that the Kolmogorov-Waring (KW) probability function (PF), modeling the steady state TF binding-dissociation stochastic process, fits well with the EFD for diverse TF-DNA binding datasets. Furthermore, this distribution predicts total number of TF-DNA binding sites (BSs), estimating specificity and sensitivity as well as other basic statistical features of DNA-TF binding when the experimental datasets are noise-rich and essentially incomplete. The KW distribution fits equally well to TF-DNA binding activity for different TFs including ERE, CREB, STAT1, Nanog, and Oct4. Our analysis reveals that the KW distribution and its generalized form provides the family of power-law-like distributions given in terms of hypergeometric series functions, including standard and generalized Pareto and Waring distributions, providing flexible and common skewed forms of the transcription factor binding site (TFBS) avidity distribution function. We suggest that the skewed binding

  18. Binding energy and formation heat of UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, M.R. de; Veado, J.T.; Siqueira, M.L. de

    The Born-Haber cycle is utilized for the calculation of the heat of formation of UO 2 , on the assumption that the binding energy is predominantly ionic in character. The ionization potentials of U and the repulsion energy are two critical values that influence calculations. Calculations of the ionization potentials with non-relativistic Hartree-Fock-Gaspar-Kohn-Sham approximation are presented [pt

  19. Predicting accurate absolute binding energies in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2015-01-01

    Recent predictions of absolute binding free energies of host-guest complexes in aqueous solution using electronic structure theory have been encouraging for some systems, while other systems remain problematic. In this paper I summarize some of the many factors that could easily contribute 1-3 kcal...

  20. Nuclear Cartography: Patterns in Binding Energies and Subatomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, E. C.; Shelley, M.

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear masses and binding energies are some of the first nuclear properties met in high school physics, and can be used to introduce radioactive decays, fusion, and fission. With relatively little extension, they can also illustrate fundamental concepts in nuclear physics, such as shell structure and pairing, and to discuss how the elements…

  1. Protection of Distribution Systems with Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Browne, Matthew; Calone, Roberto

    of 17 months of work of the Joint Working Group B5/C6.26/CIRED “Protection of Distribution Systems with Distributed Energy Resources”. The working group used the CIGRE report TB421 “The impact of Renewable Energy Sources and Distributed Generation on Substation Protection and Automation”, published......The usage of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) in utilities around the world is expected to increase significantly. The existing distribution systems have been generally designed for unidirectional power flow, and feeders are opened and locked out for any fault within. However, in the future...... by WG B5.34 as the entry document for the work on this report. In doing so, the group aligned the content and the scope of this report, the network structures considered, possible islanding, standardized communication and adaptive protection, interface protection, connection schemes and protection...

  2. Capacity of Distribution Feeders for Hosting Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papathanassiou, S.; Hatziargyriou, N.; Anagnostopoulos, P.

    The last two decades have seen an unprecedented development of distributed energy resources (DER) all over the world. Several countries have adopted a variety of support schemes (feed-in tariffs, green certificates, direct subsidies, tax exemptions etc.) so as to promote distributed generation (DG...

  3. Computational scheme for pH-dependent binding free energy calculation with explicit solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juyong; Miller, Benjamin T; Brooks, Bernard R

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational scheme to compute the pH-dependence of binding free energy with explicit solvent. Despite the importance of pH, the effect of pH has been generally neglected in binding free energy calculations because of a lack of accurate methods to model it. To address this limitation, we use a constant-pH methodology to obtain a true ensemble of multiple protonation states of a titratable system at a given pH and analyze the ensemble using the Bennett acceptance ratio (BAR) method. The constant pH method is based on the combination of enveloping distribution sampling (EDS) with the Hamiltonian replica exchange method (HREM), which yields an accurate semi-grand canonical ensemble of a titratable system. By considering the free energy change of constraining multiple protonation states to a single state or releasing a single protonation state to multiple states, the pH dependent binding free energy profile can be obtained. We perform benchmark simulations of a host-guest system: cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) and benzimidazole (BZ). BZ experiences a large pKa shift upon complex formation. The pH-dependent binding free energy profiles of the benchmark system are obtained with three different long-range interaction calculation schemes: a cutoff, the particle mesh Ewald (PME), and the isotropic periodic sum (IPS) method. Our scheme captures the pH-dependent behavior of binding free energy successfully. Absolute binding free energy values obtained with the PME and IPS methods are consistent, while cutoff method results are off by 2 kcal mol(-1) . We also discuss the characteristics of three long-range interaction calculation methods for constant-pH simulations. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  4. Magnetic properties and core electron binding energies of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galamba, N.; Cabral, Benedito J. C.

    2018-01-01

    The magnetic properties and the core and inner valence electron binding energies of liquid water are investigated. The adopted methodology relies on the combination of molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the Becke and Lee-Yang-Parr functionals for exchange and correlation, respectively, and includes an empirical correction (BLYP-D3) functional and classical molecular dynamics with the TIP4P/2005-F model were carried out. The Keal-Tozer functional was applied for predicting magnetic shielding and spin-spin coupling constants. Core and inner valence electron binding energies in liquid water were calculated with symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction. The relationship between the magnetic shielding constant σ(17O), the role played by the oxygen atom as a proton acceptor and donor, and the tetrahedral organisation of liquid water are investigated. The results indicate that the deshielding of the oxygen atom in water is very dependent on the order parameter (q) describing the tetrahedral organisation of the hydrogen bond network. The strong sensitivity of magnetic properties on changes of the electronic density in the nuclei environment is illustrated by a correlation between σ(17O) and the energy gap between the 1a1[O1s] (core) and the 2a1 (inner valence) orbitals of water. Although several studies discussed the eventual connection between magnetic properties and core electron binding energies, such a correlation could not be clearly established. Here, we demonstrate that for liquid water this correlation exists although involving the gap between electron binding energies of core and inner valence orbitals.

  5. Application of Henry's Law for Binding Energies of Adsorbed Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Andrew; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Sweany, Mark; Pfeifer, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The method of isosteres is the simplest method used to calculate the differential enthalpy of adsorption. However, it is incredibly sensitive to the choice of model and respective fitting parameters. For a set of isotherms measured on a specific sample, most models converge upon a similar value at high coverage, but are inconsistent in the low pressure regime. In this talk, we investigate the application of various models for localized and mobile adsorption at low pressures in order to obtain binding energy of hydrogen to the adsorbent surface. Henry's Law analysis of the Langmuir Model of adsorption yield binding energies in excellent agreement with those obtained from the Clausius Clapeyron relation. Work supported by DOE-EERE, Award No. DE-FG36-08GO18142.

  6. Experimental electron binding energies for thulium in different matrices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Zbořil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 202, JUL (2015), s. 46-55 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004; GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Tm-169 * (169)yb * atomic environment * electron binding energy * chemical shift * natural atomic level width Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2015

  7. Effect of valence nucleons on nuclear binding energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angeli, I. (Kossuth Lajos Tudomanyegyetem, Debrecen (HU))

    1991-10-01

    The nucleonic promiscuity factor P = N{sub p}N{sub n}/(N{sub p} + N{sub n}), where N{sub p}(N{sub n}) is the number of valence protons (neutrons) or holes, is shown to be a useful parameter in the description of the mass number dependence of nuclear binding energies. This means that most of the deviation from a smooth mass number dependence is caused by the isoscalar interaction between valence protons and neutrons.

  8. Impurity binding energy for δ-doped quantum well structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The binding energy of an impurity delta layer situated either in the centre or at the edge of a quantum well (QW) is theoretically considered for the example of n-type Si0∙8Ge0∙2/Si/Si0∙8Ge0∙2 QW doped with phosphorus. Calculations are made for the case of not so big impurity concentrations, when impurity.

  9. Cooperative Optimal Coordination for Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tao; Wu, Di; Ren, Wei; Wang, Hong; Hong, Yiguang; Johansson, Karl

    2017-12-12

    In this paper, we consider the optimal coordination problem for distributed energy resources (DERs) including distributed generators and energy storage devices. We propose an algorithm based on the push-sum and gradient method to optimally coordinate storage devices and distributed generators in a distributed manner. In the proposed algorithm, each DER only maintains a set of variables and updates them through information exchange with a few neighbors over a time-varying directed communication network. We show that the proposed distributed algorithm solves the optimal DER coordination problem if the time-varying directed communication network is uniformly jointly strongly connected, which is a mild condition on the connectivity of communication topologies. The proposed distributed algorithm is illustrated and validated by numerical simulations.

  10. Electricity End Uses, Energy Efficiency, and Distributed Energy Resources Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Morrow, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Deason, Jeff [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schiller, Steven R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leventis, Greg [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Leow, Woei Ling [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Levin, Todd [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Plotkin, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Zhou, Yan [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This report was developed by a team of analysts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, with Argonne National Laboratory contributing the transportation section, and is a DOE EPSA product and part of a series of “baseline” reports intended to inform the second installment of the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER 1.2). QER 1.2 provides a comprehensive review of the nation’s electricity system and cover the current state and key trends related to the electricity system, including generation, transmission, distribution, grid operations and planning, and end use. The baseline reports provide an overview of elements of the electricity system. This report focuses on end uses, electricity consumption, electric energy efficiency, distributed energy resources (DERs) (such as demand response, distributed generation, and distributed storage), and evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methods for energy efficiency and DERs.

  11. Spatial distribution of thermal energy in equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2015-06-01

    The equipartition theorem states that in equilibrium, thermal energy is equally distributed among uncoupled degrees of freedom that appear quadratically in the system's Hamiltonian. However, for spatially coupled degrees of freedom, such as interacting particles, one may speculate that the spatial distribution of thermal energy may differ from the value predicted by equipartition, possibly quite substantially in strongly inhomogeneous or disordered systems. Here we show that for systems undergoing simple Gaussian fluctuations around an equilibrium state, the spatial distribution is universally bounded from above by 1/2k(B)T. We further show that in one-dimensional systems with short-range interactions, the thermal energy is equally partitioned even for coupled degrees of freedom in the thermodynamic limit and that in higher dimensions nontrivial spatial distributions emerge. Some implications are discussed.

  12. Making the most of distributed energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkamaeki, M.

    2004-01-01

    Distributed energy production is on the threshold of a new area, and offers a growing number of options for meeting energy needs that cannot be met effectively by larger, base load-type infrastructure. Distributed energy generation can offer a more cost- effective approach, depending on things such as location, load requirements, and fuel availability. It can also make it possible to generate energy at times when grid power is not available or is likely to be overloaded, and in locations not covered by an existing grid net-work. Perhaps most interesting from a technological point of view is the fact that distributed power opens up the opportunity to use fuels that have not been utilised up until now, for a variety of reasons

  13. Tailored ion energy distributions on plasma electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economou, Demetre J.

    2013-01-01

    As microelectronic device features continue to shrink approaching atomic dimensions, control of the ion energy distribution on the substrate during plasma etching and deposition becomes increasingly critical. The ion energy should be high enough to drive ion-assisted etching, but not too high to cause substrate damage or loss of selectivity. In many cases, a nearly monoenergetic ion energy distribution (IED) is desired to achieve highly selective etching. In this work, the author briefly reviews: (1) the fundamentals of development of the ion energy distribution in the sheath and (2) methods to control the IED on plasma electrodes. Such methods include the application of “tailored” voltage waveforms on an electrode in continuous wave plasmas, or the application of synchronous bias on a “boundary electrode” during a specified time window in the afterglow of pulsed plasmas

  14. Hawai‘i Distributed Energy Resource Technologies for Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-09-30

    HNEI has conducted research to address a number of issues important to move Hawai‘i to greater use of intermittent renewable and distributed energy resource (DER) technologies in order to facilitate greater use of Hawai‘i's indigenous renewable energy resources. Efforts have been concentrated on the Islands of Hawai‘i, Maui, and O‘ahu, focusing in three areas of endeavor: 1) Energy Modeling and Scenario Analysis (previously called Energy Road mapping); 2) Research, Development, and Validation of Renewable DER and Microgrid Technologies; and 3) Analysis and Policy. These efforts focused on analysis of the island energy systems and development of specific candidate technologies for future insertion into an integrated energy system, which would lead to a more robust transmission and distribution system in the state of Hawai‘i and eventually elsewhere in the nation.

  15. Hybrid Hydrogen and Mechanical Distributed Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ubertini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective energy storage technologies represent one of the key elements to solving the growing challenges of electrical energy supply of the 21st century. Several energy storage systems are available, from ones that are technologically mature to others still at a research stage. Each technology has its inherent limitations that make its use economically or practically feasible only for specific applications. The present paper aims at integrating hydrogen generation into compressed air energy storage systems to avoid natural gas combustion or thermal energy storage. A proper design of such a hybrid storage system could provide high roundtrip efficiencies together with enhanced flexibility thanks to the possibility of providing additional energy outputs (heat, cooling, and hydrogen as a fuel, in a distributed energy storage framework. Such a system could be directly connected to the power grid at the distribution level to reduce power and energy intermittence problems related to renewable energy generation. Similarly, it could be located close to the user (e.g., office buildings, commercial centers, industrial plants, hospitals, etc.. Finally, it could be integrated in decentralized energy generation systems to reduce the peak electricity demand charges and energy costs, to increase power generation efficiency, to enhance the security of electrical energy supply, and to facilitate the market penetration of small renewable energy systems. Different configurations have been investigated (simple hybrid storage system, regenerate system, multistage system demonstrating the compressed air and hydrogen storage systems effectiveness in improving energy source flexibility and efficiency, and possibly in reducing the costs of energy supply. Round-trip efficiency up to 65% can be easily reached. The analysis is conducted through a mixed theoretical-numerical approach, which allows the definition of the most relevant physical parameters affecting the system

  16. Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

    2008-03-31

    This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

  17. Binding energy and single–particle Energies in the 16 0 region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... single-particle energies in the oxygen region by folding together a Hamiltonian in the rest-frame of the nucleus with two-body correlation functions based on the Njimegen potential. We have found that the binding energies are very sensitive to the core radius rc and that the effects of tensor correlations are non-negligible.

  18. Measurement of Exciton Binding Energy of Monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhu, Bairen; Cui, Xiaodong

    Excitonic effects are prominent in monolayer crystal of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) because of spatial confinement and reduced Coulomb screening. Here we use linear differential transmission spectroscopy and two-photon photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy (TP-PLE) to measure the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2. Peaks for excitonic absorptions of the direct gap located at K valley of the Brillouin zone and transitions from multiple points near Γ point of the Brillouin zone, as well as trion side band are shown in the linear absorption spectra of WS2. But there is no gap between distinct excitons and the continuum of the interband transitions. Strong electron-phonon scattering, overlap of excitons around Γ point and the transfer of the oscillator strength from interband continuum to exciton states make it difficult to resolve the electronic interband transition edge even down to 10K. The gap between excited states of the band-edge exciton and the single-particle band is probed by TP-PLE measurements. And the energy difference between 1s exciton and the single-particle gap gives the exciton binding energy of monolayer WS2 to be about 0.71eV. The work is supported by Area of excellency (AoE/P-04/08), CRF of Hong Kong Research Grant Council (HKU9/CRF/13G) and SRT on New Materials of The University of Hong Kong.

  19. How To Deal with Multiple Binding Poses in Alchemical Relative Protein–Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  20. How to deal with multiple binding poses in alchemical relative protein-ligand binding free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Joseph W; Harder, Edward; Lin, Teng; Abel, Robert; McCammon, J Andrew; Wang, Lingle

    2015-06-09

    Recent advances in improved force fields and sampling methods have made it possible for the accurate calculation of protein–ligand binding free energies. Alchemical free energy perturbation (FEP) using an explicit solvent model is one of the most rigorous methods to calculate relative binding free energies. However, for cases where there are high energy barriers separating the relevant conformations that are important for ligand binding, the calculated free energy may depend on the initial conformation used in the simulation due to the lack of complete sampling of all the important regions in phase space. This is particularly true for ligands with multiple possible binding modes separated by high energy barriers, making it difficult to sample all relevant binding modes even with modern enhanced sampling methods. In this paper, we apply a previously developed method that provides a corrected binding free energy for ligands with multiple binding modes by combining the free energy results from multiple alchemical FEP calculations starting from all enumerated poses, and the results are compared with Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations. From these calculations, the dominant ligand binding mode can also be predicted. We apply this method to a series of ligands that bind to c-Jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK1) and obtain improved free energy results. The dominant ligand binding modes predicted by this method agree with the available crystallography, while both Glide docking and MM-GBSA calculations incorrectly predict the binding modes for some ligands. The method also helps separate the force field error from the ligand sampling error, such that deviations in the predicted binding free energy from the experimental values likely indicate possible inaccuracies in the force field. An error in the force field for a subset of the ligands studied was identified using this method, and improved free energy results were obtained by correcting the partial charges assigned to the

  1. Small Distributed Renewable Energy Generation for Low Voltage Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chindris M.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Driven by the existing energy policies, the use of renewable energy has increased considerably all over the world in order to respond to the increasing energy consumption and to reduce the environmental impact of the electricity generation. Although most policy makers and companies are focusing on large applications, the use of cheap small generation units, based on local renewable resources, has become increasingly attractive for the general public, small farms and remote communities. The paper presents several results of a research project aiming to identify the power quality issues and the impact of RES based distributed generation (DG or other non-linear loads on low voltage (LV distribution networks in Romania; the final goal is to develop a Universal Power Quality Conditioner (UPQC able to diminish the existing disturbances. Basically, the work analyses the existing DG technologies and identifies possible solutions for their integration in Romania; taking into account the existent state of the art, the attention was paid on small systems, using wind and solar energy, and on possibility to integrate them into suburban and rural LV distribution networks. The presence of DG units at distribution voltage level means the transition from traditional passive to active distribution networks. In general, the relatively low penetration levels of DG does not produce problems; however, the nowadays massive increase of local power generation have led to new integration challenges in order to ensure the reliability and quality of the power supply. Power quality issues are identified and their assessment is the key element in the design of measures aiming to diminish all existing disturbances.

  2. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A.; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  3. A Fossilized Energy Distribution of Lightning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasek, Matthew A; Hurst, Marc

    2016-07-28

    When lightning strikes soil, it may generate a cylindrical tube of glass known as a fulgurite. The morphology of a fulgurite is ultimately a consequence of the energy of the lightning strike that formed it, and hence fulgurites may be useful in elucidating the energy distribution frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning. Fulgurites from sand mines in Polk County, Florida, USA were collected and analyzed to determine morphologic properties. Here we show that the energy per unit length of lightning strikes within quartz sand has a geometric mean of ~1.0 MJ/m, and that the distribution is lognormal with respect to energy per length and frequency. Energy per length is determined from fulgurites as a function of diameter, and frequency is determined both by cumulative number and by cumulative length. This distribution parallels those determined for a number of lightning parameters measured in actual atmospheric discharge events, such as charge transferred, voltage, and action integral. This methodology suggests a potential useful pathway for elucidating lightning energy and damage potential of strikes.

  4. An Accurate Redetermination of the $^{118}Sn$ Binding Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Borzakov, S B; Faikow-Stanczyk, H; Grigoriev, Yu V; Panteleev, T; Pospísil, S; Smotritsky, L M; Telezhnikov, S A

    2001-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong {gamma}-line from {{^198}Au}, the "gold standard", has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, {B_n}, from complicated {(n , gamma)}-spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum is taking into account by a Monte Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining of {B_n} for {{^118}Sn} and {{^64}Cu}. The {gamma}-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by {{^117}Sn} has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. {gamma}-rays were detected by a 72 cm^3 HPGe-detector. {B_n} for {{^64}Cu} was obtained from two {gamma}-...

  5. Electron energy-distribution functions in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchford, L.C.

    1981-01-01

    Numerical calculation of the electron energy distribution functions in the regime of drift tube experiments is discussed. The discussion is limited to constant applied fields and values of E/N (ratio of electric field strength to neutral density) low enough that electron growth due to ionization can be neglected

  6. Exciton binding energy in a pyramidal quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, A.; Arulmozhi, M.

    2018-05-01

    The effects of spatially dependent effective mass, non-parabolicity of the conduction band and dielectric screening function on exciton binding energy in a pyramid-shaped quantum dot of GaAs have been investigated by variational method as a function of base width of the pyramid. We have assumed that the pyramid has a square base with area a× a and height of the pyramid H=a/2. The trial wave function of the exciton has been chosen according to the even mirror boundary condition, i.e. the wave function of the exciton at the boundary could be non-zero. The results show that (i) the non-parabolicity of the conduction band affects the light hole (lh) and heavy hole (hh) excitons to be more bound than that with parabolicity of the conduction band, (ii) the dielectric screening function (DSF) affects the lh and hh excitons to be more bound than that without the DSF and (iii) the spatially dependent effective mass (SDEM) affects the lh and hh excitons to be less bound than that without the SDEM. The combined effects of DSF and SDEM on exciton binding energy have also been calculated. The results are compared with those available in the literature.

  7. Spectral unfolding of fast neutron energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Michelle; Jackman, Kevin; Engle, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the energy distribution of a neutron flux is difficult in experiments with constrained geometry where techniques such as time of flight cannot be used to resolve the distribution. The measurement of neutron fluxes in reactors, which often present similar challenges, has been accomplished using radioactivation foils as an indirect probe. Spectral unfolding codes use statistical methods to adjust MCNP predictions of neutron energy distributions using quantified radioactive residuals produced in these foils. We have applied a modification of this established neutron flux characterization technique to experimentally characterize the neutron flux in the critical assemblies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the spallation neutron flux at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results of the unfolding procedure are presented and compared with a priori MCNP predictions, and the implications for measurements using the neutron fluxes at these facilities are discussed.

  8. Methods for Distributed Optimal Energy Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm, Robert

    micro-grids by prevention of meteorologic power flows into high voltage grids. A method, based on mathematical optimisation and a consensus algorithm is introduced and evaluated to coordinate charge/discharge scheduling for batteries between a number of buildings in order to improve self......The presented research deals with the fundamental underlying methods and concepts of how the growing number of distributed generation units based on renewable energy resources and distributed storage devices can be most efficiently integrated into the existing utility grid. In contrast......-consumption of renewable energy resources in low voltage grids. It can be shown that this method prevents mutual discharging of batteries and prevents peak loads, a supervisory control instance can dictate the level of autarchy from the utility grid. Further it is shown that the problem of optimal energy flow management...

  9. Energy Policy Case Study - California: Renewables and Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homer, Juliet S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bender, Sadie R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    The purpose of this document is to present a case study of energy policies in California related to power system transformation and renewable and distributed energy resources (DERs). Distributed energy resources represent a broad range of technologies that can significantly impact how much, and when, electricity is demanded from the grid. Key policies and proceedings related to power system transformation and DERs are grouped into the following categories: 1.Policies that support achieving environmental and climate goals 2.Policies that promote deployment of DERs 3.Policies that support reliability and integration of DERs 4.Policies that promote market animation and support customer choice. Major challenges going forward are forecasting and modeling DERs, regulatory and utility business model issues, reliability, valuation and pricing, and data management and sharing.

  10. Binding energy of a hydrogenic impurity in a coaxial quantum wire with an insulator layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kes, H.; Bilekkaya, A.; Aktas, S.; Okan, S. E.

    2017-11-01

    The electronic properties of a coaxial cylindrical quantum well-barrier system constituted about an central insulating wire were determined under an external electric field. The model wire, inside to outside, was considered to be layered as AlAs / GaAs / Alx1 Ga1 -x1 As / GaAs / Alx2 Ga1 -x2 As. Within the framework of the effective mass-approximation, the binding energy of a hydrogenic impurity is calculated by using the combination of the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method and variational approaches. The binding energy exhibits sharp changes depending on the impurity position and the geometrical parameters of the structure such as the well widths of the GaAs wires and the height and thickness of the barrier constituted by Alx1 Ga1 -x1 As . The binding energy of the electron was found to be independent from the impurity position for the specific widths of the well wires. Also, the barrier properties appeared as very effective parameters in controlling the probability distribution of the electron.

  11. Double binding energy differences: Mean-field or pairing effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chong

    2012-10-01

    In this Letter we present a systematic analysis on the average interaction between the last protons and neutrons in atomic nuclei, which can be extracted from the double differences of nuclear binding energies. The empirical average proton-neutron interaction Vpn thus derived from experimental data can be described in a very simple form as the interplay of the nuclear mean field and the pairing interaction. It is found that the smooth behavior as well as the local fluctuations of the Vpn in even-even nuclei with N ≠ Z are dominated by the contribution from the proton-neutron monopole interactions. A strong additional contribution from the isoscalar monopole interaction and isovector proton-neutron pairing interaction is seen in the Vpn for even-even N = Z nuclei and for the adjacent odd-A nuclei with one neutron or proton being subtracted.

  12. Energy distribution in dissociations of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koernig, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis studies are reported of fragmentation processes in polyatomic molecules. In order to find out which dessocaciation reactions take place, how they are brought about by the internal energy of the reactant, and to investigate the structure of the dissociating 'transition state', the fragment mass and the corresponding kinetic energy release (KER) are determined by differential translational spectroscopy using a position and time sensitive two-particle coincidence detector. The results are interpreted using the statistical theory of unimolecular dissociation. It turns out that the standard assumptions of the theory, especially in calculating KER-distributions, are not realistic in all molecules considered. Dissociation is induced by the neutralization with alkali metal vapour. In ch. 2 the experimental method and the analysis of the data (dissociation pathways, branching ratios and ε-d-distributions) are introduced and exemplified by measurements of cyclohexane, which represents the upper limit in precursor and fragment mass accessible in the apparatus. In ch. 3 a study is reported of the molecules methylchloride (CH 3 Cl) and the acetylradical (CH 3 CO). In spite of their similar geometric structures, completely different dissociation mechanisms have been found. Methylchloride dissociates via a repulsive state; acetyl radicals show energy scrambling. The energy distribution from dissociating acetyl exemplifies dynamical effects in the dissociation. In ch. 4 an investigation of a number of prototype hydrocarbons is presented. The dissociation pathways of several small linear alkanes indicate that neutralization takes place to unknown repulsive potentials, of which the position and steepness are determined from the kinetic energy release. (author). 118 refs.; 40 figs.; 5 tabs

  13. Experimental energy-dependent nuclear spin distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egidy, T. von; Bucurescu, D.

    2009-01-01

    A new method is proposed to determine the energy-dependent spin distribution in experimental nuclear-level schemes. This method compares various experimental and calculated moments in the energy-spin plane to obtain the spin-cutoff parameter σ as a function of mass A and excitation energy using a total of 7202 levels with spin assignment in 227 nuclei between F and Cf. A simple formula, σ 2 =0.391 A 0.675 (E-0.5Pa ' ) 0.312 , is proposed up to about 10 MeV that is in very good agreement with experimental σ values and is applied to improve the systematics of level-density parameters.

  14. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Gao, Minrui; Zheng, Jie; Chen, Jingguang G; Yan, Yushan

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  15. Energy management in a microgrid with distributed energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Linfeng; Gari, Nicolae; Hmurcik, Lawrence V.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A performance metric is proposed with the consideration of price, environment effect, and service quality. • Models of a microgrid and a microgrid network are designed with distribute energy resources and storage. • Different cases in MG operation are discussed. - Abstract: A smart grid power system with renewable energy resources and distributed energy storage shows significant improvement in the power system’s emission reduction, reliability, efficiency, and security. A microgrid is a smart grid in a small scale which can be stand-alone or grid-tied. Multi microgrids form a network with energy management and operational planning through two-way power flow and communication. To comprehensively evaluate the performance of a microgrid, a performance metric is proposed with consideration of the electricity price, emission, and service quality, each of them is given a weighting factor. Thus, the performance metric is flexible according to the consumers’ preference. With the weighting factors set in this paper, this performance metric is further applied on microgrids operated as stand-alone, grid-tied, and networked. Each microgrid consists of a solar panel, a hydrogen fuel cell stack, an electrolyzer, a hydrogen storage tank, and a load. For a stand-alone system, the load prediction lowers down the daily electricity consumption about 5.7%, the quantity of H 2 stored fluctuates in a wide range, and overall performance indexes increase with the solar panel size. In a grid-tied MG, the load prediction has a significant effect on the daily consumed electricity which drops 25% in 4 days, some day-time loads are shifted to the night time, and the capacity of hydrogen tank is lower than that in a stand-alone MG. In a network with multiple MGs, the control of the power distribution strongly affects the MG’s performance. However, the overall performance index instead of any specific index increases with the MG’s power generated from renewable energy

  16. Advanced Distribution Network Modelling with Distributed Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Alison

    The addition of new distributed energy resources, such as electric vehicles, photovoltaics, and storage, to low voltage distribution networks means that these networks will undergo major changes in the future. Traditionally, distribution systems would have been a passive part of the wider power system, delivering electricity to the customer and not needing much control or management. However, the introduction of these new technologies may cause unforeseen issues for distribution networks, due to the fact that they were not considered when the networks were originally designed. This thesis examines different types of technologies that may begin to emerge on distribution systems, as well as the resulting challenges that they may impose. Three-phase models of distribution networks are developed and subsequently utilised as test cases. Various management strategies are devised for the purposes of controlling distributed resources from a distribution network perspective. The aim of the management strategies is to mitigate those issues that distributed resources may cause, while also keeping customers' preferences in mind. A rolling optimisation formulation is proposed as an operational tool which can manage distributed resources, while also accounting for the uncertainties that these resources may present. Network sensitivities for a particular feeder are extracted from a three-phase load flow methodology and incorporated into an optimisation. Electric vehicles are the focus of the work, although the method could be applied to other types of resources. The aim is to minimise the cost of electric vehicle charging over a 24-hour time horizon by controlling the charge rates and timings of the vehicles. The results demonstrate the advantage that controlled EV charging can have over an uncontrolled case, as well as the benefits provided by the rolling formulation and updated inputs in terms of cost and energy delivered to customers. Building upon the rolling optimisation, a

  17. Autonomy-oriented mechanisms for efficient energy distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiming; Shi, Benyun

    2010-09-15

    Due to the uneven geographical availability of energy resources, it is essential for the energy suppliers and consumers in different countries/regions to most efficiently, economically, as well as reliably distribute energy resources. In this paper, starting from a specific energy distribution problem, we present a decentralized behavior-based paradigm that draws on the methodology of autonomy-oriented computing. The goal is twofold: (i) to characterize the underlying mechanism of the energy distribution systems, (ii) to provide scalable solutions for efficient energy distribution. We conjecture that efficient energy trading markets can emerge from appropriate behavior-based mechanisms, which can autonomously improve energy distribution efficiency.

  18. An exploration of possible design options for a binding energy savings target in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, Robert; Eichhammer, Wolfgang; Wesselink, Bart

    2014-01-01

    As Europe is not on track in meeting its 2020 energy savings target, there has been quite some debate to make the energy savings target binding instead of indicative. Although the final draft text of the Energy Efficiency Directive left the option of a binding target explicitly open for the period

  19. Proceedings. Future Energy - Resources, Distribution and Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    the environment, energy and the use of resources will be an important foundation for bringing about changes in the future. The environmental effects caused by the Energy System are local as well as global. Regarding the global challenges, it is important to find solutions and incentives that are financially, politically and administratively sound, that will work across borders and give a fair distribution of burdens between rich and poor countries, at the same time giving poor countries good opportunities for development. The Proceedings from the seminar should be a useful contribution to the debate on the Energy System for both specialists and the general public. It will also be a useful background document for setting priorities for energy policies and energy research in the future. Furthermore, it should provide a useful summary of the current scientific debate for both the laymen and specialized experts in the field of energy research. This will also provide guidance for the task of setting national research priorities in the future. The seminar describes status and future prospects within different resource-, technology- and application areas globally as well as from a Norwegian perspective. International trends in the energy markets are described, and an ambitious Swiss plan to halve the consumption of fossil fuels in the future will be presented.

  20. Smart Operations in Distributed Energy Resources System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Jie, Shu; Zhang-XianYong; Qing, Zhou

    Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help solve the challenges concerning system operations due to that the trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in case of that threats of disruption have risen. This paper mainly explores models for distributed energy resources system (DG, storage, and load),and also reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be solved as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  1. Binding affinity of a small molecule to an amorphous polymer in a solvent. Part 1: free energy of binding to a binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunsrivirot, Surasak; Diao, Ying; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2011-10-18

    Crystallization is commonly used in a separation and purification process in the production of a wide range of materials in various industries. In industry, crystallization usually starts with heterogeneous nucleation on a foreign surface. The complicated mechanism of heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood; however, we hypothesize that there might be a possible correlation between binding affinity to a surface and enhancement of nucleation. Recent studies show that amorphous polymers can be used to control crystallization, selectively produce pharmaceutical polymorphs, and discover novel pharmaceutical polymorphs. To investigate the possible correlation between the binding affinity of one molecule to key binding sites (local binding) and heterogeneous nucleation activity as well as the possibility of using this binding affinity to help guide the selection of polymers that promote heterogeneous nucleation, we computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to four nonporous cross-linked polymers in an ethanol-water 38 v% mixture. These cross-linked polymers are poly(4-acryloylmorpholine) (PAM), poly(2-carboxyethyl acrylate) (PCEA), poly(4-hydroxylbutyl acrylate) (PHBA), and polystyrene (PS); all of them were cross-linked with divinylbenzene (DVB). These systems were used because their heterogeneous nucleation activities are available in literature, and the ranking is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. We generated three independent surfaces for each polymer and computed the free energy of binding of aspirin to the best binding site that we found on each surface. The average free energies of binding to the best sites of PAM, PCEA, PHBA, and PS are -20.4 ± 1.0, -16.7 ± 1.0, -14.4 ± 1.1, and -13.6 ± 1.1 kcal/mol, respectively. We found that the trend of the magnitudes of the average free energies of binding to the best sites is PAM > PCEA > PHBA ≈ PS. This trend is very similar to that of heterogeneous nucleation activity. Our results suggest the importance of the

  2. Influence of host matrices on krypton electron binding energies and KLL Auger transition energies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Inoyatov, A. K.; Perevoshchikov, L. L.; Kovalík, Alojz; Filosofov, D. V.; Yushkevich, Yu. V.; Ryšavý, Miloš; Lee, B. Q.; Kibédi, T.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Zhdanov, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 197, DEC (2014), s. 64-71 ISSN 0368-2048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP203/12/1896; GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Kr-83 * Rb-83 * Sr-83 * electron binding energy * KLL transitions * natural atomic level width * multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.436, year: 2014

  3. Trading strategies for distribution company with stochastic distributed energy resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jianhui; Korpås, Magnus; Pinson, Pierre; Østergaard, Jacob; Khodayar, Mohammad E.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A market framework is presented for a proactive DISCO (PDISCO). • Two-stage wholesale markets and stochastic distributed energy resources are involved. • A one-leader multi-follower bilevel model is proposed. • Continuous strategic offers and bids are achieved. - Abstract: This paper proposes a methodology to address the trading strategies of a proactive distribution company (PDISCO) engaged in the transmission-level (TL) markets. A one-leader multi-follower bilevel model is presented to formulate the gaming framework between the PDISCO and markets. The lower-level (LL) problems include the TL day-ahead market and scenario-based real-time markets, respectively with the objectives of maximizing social welfare and minimizing operation cost. The upper-level (UL) problem is to maximize the PDISCO’s profit across these markets. The PDISCO’s strategic offers/bids interactively influence the outcomes of each market. Since the LL problems are linear and convex, while the UL problem is non-linear and non-convex, an equivalent primal–dual approach is used to reformulate this bilevel model to a solvable mathematical program with equilibrium constraints (MPEC). The effectiveness of the proposed model is verified by case studies.

  4. Coordinated Collaboration between Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahin Abdollahy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A power distribution feeder, where a heterogeneous set of distributed energy resources is deployed, is examined by simulation. The energy resources include PV, battery storage, natural gas GenSet, fuel cells, and active thermal storage for commercial buildings. The resource scenario considered is one that may exist in a not too distant future. Two cases of interaction between different resources are examined. One interaction involves a GenSet used to partially offset the duty cycle of a smoothing battery connected to a large PV system. The other example involves the coordination of twenty thermal storage devices, each associated with a commercial building. Storage devices are intended to provide maximum benefit to the building, but it is shown that this can have a deleterious effect on the overall system, unless the action of the individual storage devices is coordinated. A network based approach is also introduced to calculate some type of effectiveness metric to all available resources which take part in coordinated operation. The main finding is that it is possible to achieve synergy between DERs on a system; however this required a unified strategy to coordinate the action of all devices in a decentralized way.

  5. Quantitative autoradiographic distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in rat central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenamyre, J.T.; Young, A.B.; Penney, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to determine the distribution of L-[3H]glutamate-binding sites in the rat central nervous system. Autoradiography was carried out in the presence of Cl- and Ca2+ ions. Scatchard plots and Hill coefficients of glutamate binding suggested that glutamate was interacting with a single population of sites having a K-D of about 300 nM and a capacity of 14.5 pmol/mg of protein. In displacement studies, ibotenate also appeared to bind to a single class of non-interacting sites with a KI of 28 microM. However, quisqualate displacement of [3H]glutamate binding revealed two well-resolved sites with KIS of 12 nM and 114 microM in striatum. These sites were unevenly distributed, representing different proportions of specific glutamate binding in different brain regions. The distribution of glutamate-binding sites correlated very well with the projection areas of putative glutamatergic pathways. This technique provides an extremely sensitive assay which can be used to gather detailed pharmacological and anatomical information about L-[3H]glutamate binding in the central nervous system

  6. An Energy Conservation Approach to Adsorbate-Induced Surface Stress and the Extraction of Binding Energy Using Nanomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A [ORNL; Boiadjiev, Vassil I [ORNL; Fernando, G. W. [University of Connecticut, Storrs; Hawk, J. E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wijewardhana, L.C. R. [University of Cincinnati; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Microcantilevers are ideally-suited for the study of surface phenomena due to their large surface-to-volume ratios, which amplify surface effects. We show that when guest molecules bind to atoms/molecules on a microcantilever surface, the released binding energy is retained in the host surface, leading to a metastable state where the excess energy on the surface is manifested as an increase in surface stress leading to the bending of the microcantilever. When the excess energy is released, the microcantilever relaxes back to the original state, and the relaxation time depends on the particular binding process involved. Such experiments were conducted for three binding processes in vapor phase experiments: physisorption, hydrogen bonding, and chemisorption. To our knowledge, such an energy conservation approach has not been taken into account in adsorbate-induced surface effect investigations. Furthermore, these experiments illustrate that detailed molecular-level information on binding energies can be extracted from this simple micromechanical sensor.

  7. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23

    In this report, we present an analytical evaluation of the potential of occupant-regulated distributed environmental control systems (DECS) to enhance individual occupant thermal comfort in an office building with no increase, and possibly even a decrease in annual energy consumption. To this end we developed and applied several analytical models that allowed us to optimize comfort and energy consumption in partitioned office buildings equipped with either conventional central HVAC systems or occupant-regulated DECS. Our approach involved the following interrelated components: 1. Development of a simplified lumped-parameter thermal circuit model to compute the annual energy consumption. This was necessitated by the need to perform tens of thousands of optimization calculations involving different US climatic regions, and different occupant thermal preferences of a population of ~50 office occupants. Yearly transient simulations using TRNSYS, a time-dependent building energy modeling program, were run to determine the robustness of the simplified approach against time-dependent simulations. The simplified model predicts yearly energy consumption within approximately 0.6% of an equivalent transient simulation. Simulations of building energy usage were run for a wide variety of climatic regions and control scenarios, including traditional “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected “have-it-your-way” (HIYW) control with a thermostat at each workstation. The thermal model shows that, un-optimized, DECS would lead to an increase in building energy consumption between 3-16% compared to the conventional approach depending on the climate regional and personal preferences of building occupants. Variations in building shape had little impact in the relative energy usage. 2. Development of a gradient-based optimization method to minimize energy consumption of DECS while keeping each occupant

  8. Advanced Energy Storage Management in Distribution Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Xiao, Bailu [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ollis, T Ben [ORNL; King, Daniel J [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2016-01-01

    With increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in the distribution networks (DN), the secure and optimal operation of DN has become an important concern. In this paper, an iterative mixed integer quadratic constrained quadratic programming model to optimize the operation of a three phase unbalanced distribution system with high penetration of Photovoltaic (PV) panels, DG and energy storage (ES) is developed. The proposed model minimizes not only the operating cost, including fuel cost and purchasing cost, but also voltage deviations and power loss. The optimization model is based on the linearized sensitivity coefficients between state variables (e.g., node voltages) and control variables (e.g., real and reactive power injections of DG and ES). To avoid slow convergence when close to the optimum, a golden search method is introduced to control the step size and accelerate the convergence. The proposed algorithm is demonstrated on modified IEEE 13 nodes test feeders with multiple PV panels, DG and ES. Numerical simulation results validate the proposed algorithm. Various scenarios of system configuration are studied and some critical findings are concluded.

  9. Spin assignments of nuclear levels above the neutron binding energy in $^{88}$Sr

    CERN Multimedia

    Neutron resonances reveal nuclear levels in the highly excited region of the nucleus around the neutron binding energy. Nuclear level density models are therefore usually calibrated to the number of observed levels in neutron-induced reactions. The gamma-ray cascade from the decay of the highly excited compound nucleus state to the ground state show dierences dependent on the initial spin. This results in a dierence in the multiplicity distribution which can be exploited. We propose to use the 4${\\pi}$ total absorption calorimeter (TAC) at the n TOF facility to determine the spins of resonances formed by neutrons incident on a metallic $^{87}$Sr sample by measuring the gamma multiplicity distributions for the resolved resonances. In addition we would like to use the available enriched $^{87}$Sr target for cross section measurements with the C$\\scriptscriptstyle{6}$D$\\scriptscriptstyle{6}$ detector setup.

  10. Leveraging Renewable Energies in Distributed Private Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pape Christian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The vast and unstoppable rise of virtualization technologies and the related hardware abstraction in the last years established the foundation for new cloud-based infrastructures and new scalable and elastic services. This new paradigm has already found its way in modern data centers and their infrastructures. A positive side effect of these technologies is the transparency of the execution of workloads in a location-independent and hardware-independent manner. For instance, due to higher utilization of underlying hardware thanks to the consolidation of virtual resources or by moving virtual resources to sites with lower energy prices or more available renewable energy resources, data centers can counteract their economic and ecological downsides resulting from their steadily increasing energy demand. This paper introduces a vector-based algorithm for the placement of virtual machines in distributed private cloud environments. After outlining the basic operation of our approach, we provide a formal definition as well as an outlook for further research.

  11. Biexciton binding energy in ZnSe quantum wells and quantum wires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Hans-Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2002-01-01

    The biexciton binding energy E-XX is investigated in ZnSe/ZnMgSe quantum wells and quantum wires as a function of the lateral confinement by transient four-wave mixing. In the quantum wells one observes for decreasing well width a significant increase in the relative binding energy, saturating fo...

  12. Calculation of Relative Binding Free Energy in the Water-Filled Active Site of Oligopeptide-Binding Protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Maurer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The periplasmic oligopeptide binding protein A (OppA represents a well-known example of water-mediated protein-ligand interactions. Here, we perform free-energy calculations for three different ligands binding to OppA, using a thermodynamic integration approach. The tripeptide ligands share a high structural similarity (all have the sequence KXK, but their experimentally-determined binding free energies differ remarkably. Thermodynamic cycles were constructed for the ligands, and simulations conducted in the bound and (freely solvated unbound states. In the unbound state, it was observed that the difference in conformational freedom between alanine and glycine leads to a surprisingly slow convergence, despite their chemical similarity. This could be overcome by increasing the softness parameter during alchemical transformations. Discrepancies remained in the bound state however, when comparing independent simulations of the three ligands. These difficulties could be traced to a slow relaxation of the water network within the active site. Fluctuations in the number of water molecules residing in the binding cavity occur mostly on a timescale larger than the simulation time along the alchemical path. After extensive simulations, relative binding free energies that were converged to within thermal noise could be obtained, which agree well with available experimental data.

  13. Advanced Energy Efficiency and Distributed Renewables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovins, Amory

    2007-04-01

    The US now wrings twice the GDP from each unit of energy that it did in 1975. Reduced energy intensity since then now provides more than twice as much service as burning oil does. Yet still more efficient end-use of energy -- explained more fully in a companion workshop offered at 1245 -- is the largest, fastest, cheapest, most benign, least understood, and least harnessed energy resource available. For example, existing technologies could save half of 2000 US oil and gas and three-fourths of US electricity, at lower cost than producing and delivering that energy from existing facilities. Saving half the oil through efficiency and replacing the other half with saved natural gas and advanced biofuels would cost an average of only 15/barrel and could eliminate US oil use by the 2040s, led by business for profit. Efficiency techniques and ways to combine and apply them continue to improve faster than they're applied, so the ``efficiency resource'' is becoming ever larger and cheaper. As for electricity, ``micropower'' (distributed renewables plus low-carbon cogeneration) is growing so quickly that by 2005 it provided a sixth of the world's electricity and a third of its new electricity, and was adding annually 4x the capacity and 11x the capacity added by nuclear power, which it surpassed in capacity in 2002 and in output in 2006. Together, micropower and ``negawatts'' (saved electricity) now provide upwards half the world's new electrical services, due to their far lower cost and lower financial risk than the central thermal power stations that still dominate policy discussions. For oil and electricity, each of which adds about two-fifths of the world's energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, efficiency plus competitive alternative supplies can stabilize the earth's climate at a profit, as well as solving the oil and (largely) the nuclear proliferation problems. Conversely, costlier and slower options, notably nuclear power, would displace less carbon emission per

  14. System Integration of Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyeng, Preben

    units, including the ICT solutions that can facilitate the integration. Specifically, the international standard "IEC 61850-7-420 Communications systems for Distributed Energy Resources" is considered as a possible brick in the solution. This standard has undergone continuous development....... It is therefore investigated in this project how ancillary services can be provided by alternatives to central power stations, and to what extent these can be integrated in the system by means of market-based methods. Particular emphasis is put on automatic solutions, which is particularly relevant for small......, and this project has actively contributed to its further development and improvements. Different types of integration methods are investigated in the project. Some are based on local measurement and control, e.g. by measuring the grid frequency, whereas others are based on direct remote control or market...

  15. Regional distribution of high affinity binding of 3H-adenosine in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traversa, U.; Puppini, P.; de Angelis, L.; Vertua, R.

    1984-06-01

    The high and low affinity adenosine binding sites with Kd values ranging respectively from 0.8 to 1.65 microM and from 3.1 to 13.86 microM were demonstrated in the following rat brain areas: cortex, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, diencephalon, and pons-medulla. Adenosine receptors involved in the high affinity binding seem to be mainly Ra-type. The analysis of the regional distribution of 3H-Adenosine showed the highest levels of specific binding in striatum and hippocampus; somewhat smaller values in cortex, cerebellum, and diencephalon, and even lower in pons-medulla.

  16. Distribution of calcium-binding proteins in the chick visual system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.P. Pfeiffer

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR, and parvalbumin (PV have been extensively studied over the last decade since they appear to be important as buffers of intracellular calcium. In the present study we investigated the distribution of these proteins in the chick visual system by means of conventional immunocytochemistry. The results indicated that CB, CR, and PV are widely distributed in retinorecipient areas of the chick brain. In some regions, all three calcium-binding proteins were present at different intensities and often in different neurons such as in the dorsolateral thalamic complex. In other areas, such as the nucleus geniculatus lateralis ventralis, only CB and CR were detected, whereas PV was absent. These results show that these three calcium-binding proteins are differentially distributed in the visual system of the chick, with varying degrees of co-localization

  17. Electromagnetic projectile acceleration utilizing distributed energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.V.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit equations are derived for an electromagnetic projectile accelerator (railgun) powered by a large number of capacitive discharge circuits distributed along its length. The circuit equations are put into dimensionless form and the parameters governing the solutions derived. After specializing the equations to constant spacing between circuits, the case of lossless rails and negligible drag is analyzed to show that the electrical to kinetic energy transfer efficiency is equal to sigma/2, where sigma = 2mS/Lq 2 0 and m is the projectile mass, S the distance between discharge circuit, Lthe rail inductance per unit length, and q 0 the charge on the first stage capacitor. For sigma = 2 complete transfer of electrical to kinetic energy is predicted while for sigma>2 the projective-discharge circuit system is unstable. Numerical solutions are presented for both lossless rails and for finite rail resistance. When rail resistance is included, >70% transfer is calculated for accelerators of arbitrary length. The problem of projectile startup is considered and a simple modification of the first two stages is described which provides proper startup. Finally, the results of the numerical solutions are applied to a practical railgun design. A research railgun designed for repeated operation at 50 km/sec is described. It would have an overall length of 77 m, an electrical efficiency of 81%, a stored energy per stage of 105 kJ, and a charge transfer of <50 C per stage. A railgun of this design appears to be practicable with current pulsed power technology

  18. Research on the Orientation and Application of Distributed Energy Storage in Energy Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Zhou, Pengcheng; Li, Ran; Zhou, Jingjing; Chen, Tao; Li, Zhe

    2018-01-01

    Energy storage is indispensable resources to achieve a high proportion of new energy power consumption in electric power system. As an important support to energy Internet, energy storage system can achieve a variety of energy integration operation to ensure maximum energy efficiency. In this paper, firstly, the SWOT analysis method is used to express the internal and external advantages and disadvantages of distributed energy storage participating in the energy Internet. Secondly, the function orientation of distributed energy storage in energy Internet is studied, based on which the application modes of distributed energy storage in virtual power plant, community energy storage and auxiliary services are deeply studied. Finally, this paper puts forward the development strategy of distributed energy storage which is suitable for the development of China’s energy Internet, and summarizes and prospects the application of distributed energy storage system.

  19. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor binding sites: autoradiographic distribution in the rat and guinea pig brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazos, A.; Cortes, R.; Palacios, J.M.

    1985-11-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) binding sites were labeled in vitro in mounted brain tissue sections from rat and guinea pig brains with (TH)methyl TRH and localized autoradiographically using TH-sensitive film. Regional densities of TRH binding sites were measured by computer-assisted microdensitometry. The distribution of sites in both species was highly heterogeneous. In both guinea pig and rat brains, the highest densities of binding sites were seen in the amygdaloid nuclei and the perirhinal cortex. In contrast, in other brain areas, a clear difference between the distribution of sites in rat and guinea pig was found. The temporal cortex, pontine nuclei, and interpeduncular nucleus, which contained high densities of binding in the guinea pig, were scarcely labeled in the rat. The accessory olfactory bulb and the septohippocampal area presented in the rat higher concentrations of binding sites than in the guinea pig. The anterior pituitary also presented low to intermediate concentrations of receptors. The distribution of TRH sites here described does not completely correlate with that of endogenous TRH, but is in good agreement with previous biochemical data. The results are discussed in correlation to the physiological effects that appear to be mediated by TRH.

  20. Binding, distribution, and plant uptake of mercury in a soil from Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fengxiang X; Su, Yi; Monts, David L; Waggoner, Charles A; Plodinec, M John

    2006-09-15

    A large amount of mercury has been discharged on the U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Site (Tennessee) as a part of the U.S. nuclear weapon program during the 1950s through the early 1960s. Increases in mercury concentration in fish and in lower East Fork Poplar Creek of Oak Ridge have been recently reported. This is an experimental study mimicking the initial stage of transformation and redistribution of mercury in soils, which are comparable to those of the Oak Ridge site. The objectives of this study were to investigate potential transformation, distribution, and plant uptake of mercury compounds in soils. Results show that the H(2)O(2)-oxidizable mercury fraction (organically bound mercury) was the major solid-phase fraction in soils freshly contaminated with soluble mercury compounds, while cinnabar fraction was the major solid phase fraction in soils contaminated with HgS. Langmuir relationships were found between mercury concentrations in plant shoots and in soil solid-phase components. Mercury in HgS-contaminated soils was to some extent phytoavailable to plants. Mercury transformation occurred from more labile fractions into more stable fractions, resulting in strong binding of mercury and decreasing its phytoavailability in soils. In addition, high mercury losses from soils contaminated with soluble mercury compounds were observed during a growing season through volatilization, accounting for 20-62% of the total initial mercury in soils.

  1. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of Herschel sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near-infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected restframe ten colors space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multivariate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median SEDs of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the magphys code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-infrared luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z ~ 1 Ly-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eightother popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather than by the choice of

  2. Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, L.; Hedman, B.; Knowles, D.; Freedman, S. I.; Woods, R.; Schweizer, T.

    2003-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is directing substantial programs in the development and encouragement of new energy technologies. Among them are renewable energy and distributed energy resource technologies. As part of its ongoing effort to document the status and potential of these technologies, DOE EERE directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to lead an effort to develop and publish Distributed Energy Technology Characterizations (TCs) that would provide both the department and energy community with a consistent and objective set of cost and performance data in prospective electric-power generation applications in the United States. Toward that goal, DOE/EERE - joined by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) - published the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations in December 1997.As a follow-up, DOE EERE - joined by the Gas Research Institute - is now publishing this document, Gas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Technology Characterizations.

  3. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mertens, Jeffrey A., E-mail: Jeffrey.Mertens@ars.usda.gov [Bioenergy Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, IL 61604 (United States); Hector, Ronald E.; Bowman, Michael J. [Bioenergy Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1815 North University Street, Peoria, IL 61604 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamics of (GalpA){sub n} oligomers binding to an exo-polygalacturonase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energetics of binding (GalpA){sub n} were determined by ITC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermodynamic parameters attributable to individual subsites were determined. - Abstract: Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic process that is enthalpically driven and results in extremely tight binding of the substrate to RPG16. Binding energies in combination with prior biochemical data suggests that RPG16 has the potential for five subsites, -1 to +4, with the greatest contribution to binding energies arising from subsite -1/+1. While the enthalpic contribution to binding decreases substantially for subsites +2 to +4, beneficial entropic effects occur in subsites +3 and +4 leading to increased total free energy as the length of oligomer increases. This information will be useful for additional studies in determining the binding contributions of specific amino acids with mutant enzymes.

  4. Determination analysis of energy conservation standards for distribution transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W.; McConnell, B.W.; Das, S.

    1996-07-01

    This report contains information for US DOE to use in making a determination on proposing energy conservation standards for distribution transformers as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Potential for saving energy with more efficient liquid-immersed and dry-type distribution transformers could be significant because these transformers account for an estimated 140 billion kWh of the annual energy lost in the delivery of electricity. Objective was to determine whether energy conservation standards for distribution transformers would have the potential for significant energy savings, be technically feasible, and be economically justified from a national perspective. It was found that energy conservation for distribution transformers would be technically and economically feasible. Based on the energy conservation options analyzed, 3.6-13.7 quads of energy could be saved from 2000 to 2030.

  5. Distributed Energy Generation for Climate Resilience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, Sherry; Hotchkiss, Eliza

    2017-05-24

    Distributed generation can play a critical role in supporting climate adaptation goals. This infographic style poster will showcase the role of distributed generation in achieving a wide range of technical and policy goals and social services associated with climate adaptation.

  6. How to shape a binding energy savings target for Europe that allows for effective evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harmsen, R.; Wesselink, B.; Eichhammer, W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers which design of a binding energy savings target for the EU is the most feasible to both make it work and to ensure it can be evaluated in an efficient and transparent manner. We look at four possible design options. We conclude that a binding target at Member State level

  7. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-14

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  8. Binding free energy analysis of protein-protein docking model structures by evERdock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Kazuhiro; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Kitao, Akio

    2018-03-01

    To aid the evaluation of protein-protein complex model structures generated by protein docking prediction (decoys), we previously developed a method to calculate the binding free energies for complexes. The method combines a short (2 ns) all-atom molecular dynamics simulation with explicit solvent and solution theory in the energy representation (ER). We showed that this method successfully selected structures similar to the native complex structure (near-native decoys) as the lowest binding free energy structures. In our current work, we applied this method (evERdock) to 100 or 300 model structures of four protein-protein complexes. The crystal structures and the near-native decoys showed the lowest binding free energy of all the examined structures, indicating that evERdock can successfully evaluate decoys. Several decoys that show low interface root-mean-square distance but relatively high binding free energy were also identified. Analysis of the fraction of native contacts, hydrogen bonds, and salt bridges at the protein-protein interface indicated that these decoys were insufficiently optimized at the interface. After optimizing the interactions around the interface by including interfacial water molecules, the binding free energies of these decoys were improved. We also investigated the effect of solute entropy on binding free energy and found that consideration of the entropy term does not necessarily improve the evaluations of decoys using the normal model analysis for entropy calculation.

  9. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spher- ical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic ...

  10. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of external magnetic field on the excited state energies in a spherical quantum dot was studied. The impurity energy and binding energy were calculated using the variational method within the effective mass approximation and finite barrier potential. The results showed that by increasing the magnetic field, the ...

  11. Distributed Renewable Energy Generation and Landscape Architecture: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Osmer DeVon

    2010-01-01

    Governments and utility organizations around the world have mandated and provided incentives for new distributed renewable energy generation (DREG) capacity, and market projections indicate strong growth in distributed renewable energy generation installations in the coming years. New distributed renewable energy generation utilities, by definition, will be primarily located in built environments near consumers; these utilities are often planned and designed by landscape architects, yet no ev...

  12. Energy Systems Integration: Demonstrating Distributed Resource Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    Overview fact sheet about the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Schneider Electric Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) project at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. INTEGRATE is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grid Modernization Initiative.

  13. Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution: Transportation Means Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kaj

    1996-01-01

    The report serves as a background report for the project "Energy and Environmental Effects of Grocery Distribution". It contains a systematic overview of physical characteristics of the typical technologies, including energy and environmental effects....

  14. Toward developing a Distributed Autonomous Energy Management System (DAEMS)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abu-Mahfouz, Adnan M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available of optimal distributed energy resources (DER) is a promising approach for creating more renewable energy. In order to successfully implement DER, one must first consider several technical performance issues that would benefit from applied research...

  15. Power distribution in the face of the new energy paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desama, Claude

    2012-01-01

    After the challenge of the liberalization of the domestic market of the energy which put an end to the vertically integrated structures, the managers of the distribution networks must now face the energy transition i.e. to substitution from a supply from electricity centralized by intermittent productions related to renewable energies. The article approaches the possible solutions to face this new energy paradigm

  16. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Regular Octahedral Structure of Li6 Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Ping; Li, Ping; Gou, Qing-Quan; Liu, Wei-Na

    2008-12-01

    The formation mechanism for the regular octahedral structure of Li6cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between any two neighboring nuclei has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of -44.736 89 a.u. at R = 5.07a0. When R approaches infinity, the total energy of six lithium atoms has the value of -44.568 17 a.u. So the binding energy of Li6 with respect to six lithium atoms is 0.1687 a.u. Therefore, the binding energy per atom for Li6 is 0.028 12 a.u., or 0.7637 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2 and the binding energy per atom of 0.494 eV for Li3 calculated in our previous work. This means that the Li6 cluster may be formed in a regular octahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  17. SAAMBE: Webserver to Predict the Charge of Binding Free Energy Caused by Amino Acids Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukh, Marharyta; Dai, Luogeng; Alexov, Emil

    2016-04-12

    Predicting the effect of amino acid substitutions on protein-protein affinity (typically evaluated via the change of protein binding free energy) is important for both understanding the disease-causing mechanism of missense mutations and guiding protein engineering. In addition, researchers are also interested in understanding which energy components are mostly affected by the mutation and how the mutation affects the overall structure of the corresponding protein. Here we report a webserver, the Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) webserver, which addresses the demand for tools for predicting the change of protein binding free energy. SAAMBE is an easy to use webserver, which only requires that a coordinate file be inputted and the user is provided with various, but easy to navigate, options. The user specifies the mutation position, wild type residue and type of mutation to be made. The server predicts the binding free energy change, the changes of the corresponding energy components and provides the energy minimized 3D structure of the wild type and mutant proteins for download. The SAAMBE protocol performance was tested by benchmarking the predictions against over 1300 experimentally determined changes of binding free energy and a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.62 was obtained. How the predictions can be used for discriminating disease-causing from harmless mutations is discussed. The webserver can be accessed via http://compbio.clemson.edu/saambe_webserver/.

  18. An energy internet-based distribution system morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, W.; Wang, P.; Hu, X. W.; Wang, X. N.; Shi, F.

    2017-06-01

    The future power distribution system will play an important role in the future energy system - energy Internet. With an eye to the diversification of energy and power fusion to the distribution system form, the prospect of the future integrated power distribution system for energy Internet is proposed, from the three aspects of structure, equipment form and industrial form: a multi-level AC-DC ring network as a framework, including the P2P interconnection and DC information satisfied power grid integrated network structure, is given; the concept of energy exchanger, the concept of energy server is put forward, and on this basis, the future distribution system of the equipment is prospected; the future distribution of the three types of industrial forms is analysed.

  19. Distributed renewable energy: the answer to Nigeria's energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -electrified population of 75 million people. Likewise, the cost of the energy access deficit is huge, and is borne by households, businesses and the government. This article emphasizes the need for cheaper, modern sources of energy to ...

  20. Perturbation method for calculating impurity binding energy in an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nilanjan Sil

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... the physical properties in them. As a result, the energy of the electrons in the confined directions become quan- tized and forms a discrete energy spectrum. For such size-quantized electrons, the scattering probability is drastically suppressed [15]. The donor impurity in semiconductor nanoheterostru-.

  1. Measurements of energy losses, distributions of energy loss and additivity of energy losses for 50 to 150 keV protons in hydrogen and nine hydrocarbon gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1976-05-01

    Measurements of energy-loss distributions were made for 51, 102, and 153 keV protons traversing hydrogen, methane, ethyne (acetylene), ethene (ethylene), ethane, propyne (methyl acetylene), propadiene (allene), propene (propylene), cyclopropane and propane. The objectives were to test the theories of energy-loss distribution in this energy range and to see if the type of carbon bonding in a hydrocarbon molecule affects the shape of the distribution. Stopping powers and stopping cross sections were also measured at these energies and at 76.5 and 127.5 keV to determine effects of chemical binding. All of the measurements were made at the gas density required to give a 4 percent energy loss. The mean energy, second central moment (a measure of the width of the distribution), and the third central moment (a measure of the skew) were calculated from the measured energy-loss distributions. Stopping power values, calculated using the mean energy, compared reasonably well with those calculated from the Bethe stopping power theory. For the second and third central moments, the best agreement between measurement and theory was when the classical scattering probability was used for the calculations, but even these did not agree well. In all cases, variations were found in the data that could be correlated to the type of carbon binding in the molecule. The differences were statistically significant at a 99 percent confidence interval for the stopping powers and second central moments measured with 51 keV protons. Similar trends were noted at other energies and for the third central moment, but the differences were not statistically significant at the 99 percent confidence interval

  2. Integration of new distributed energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleym, Anngjerd; Bakken, Bjoern H.; Hetland, Jens

    2001-01-01

    In years with average runoff, Norway will be a net importer of electric power. The use of electric energy is not declining and so the gap between supply and demand is increasing. A large-scale increase of the production of new hydroelectric power is unlikely for political reasons. Gas power by today's technology is controversial and basing the national energy supply on import is undesirable. It is possible to concentrate on decentralized electricity production in small units. On the supply side, increased taxation can be used to reduce consumption; but this may hit unfairly. Direct regulation to limit consumption is undesirable in a free market. One solution on the consumer side may be a more flexible energy use by way of new technology, incorporating thermal energy. Research and development in a united energy sector is needed to realize the potential of small combined heating and power units connected to the existing system. Some efforts have already been made

  3. Subcellular distribution of calcium-binding proteins and a calcium-ATPase in canine pancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, S.K.; Towers, T.

    1990-01-01

    Using a 45Ca blot-overlay assay, we monitored the subcellular fractionation pattern of several Ca binding proteins of apparent molecular masses 94, 61, and 59 kD. These proteins also appeared to stain blue with Stains-All. Additionally, using a monoclonal antiserum raised against canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase, we examined the subcellular distribution of a canine pancreatic 110-kD protein recognized by this antiserum. This protein had the same electrophoretic mobility as the cardiac protein against which the antiserum was raised. The three Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase cofractionated into the rough microsomal fraction (RM), previously shown to consist of highly purified RER, in a pattern highly similar to that of the RER marker, ribophorin I. To provide further evidence for an RER localization, native RM were subjected to isopycnic flotation in sucrose gradients. The Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase were found in dense fractions, along with ribophorin I. When RM were stripped of ribosomes with puromycin/high salt, the Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase exhibited a shift to less dense fractions, as did ribophorin I. We conclude that, in pancreas, the Ca binding proteins and Ca-ATPase we detect are localized to the RER (conceivably a subcompartment of the RER) or, possibly, a structure intimately associated with the RER

  4. Selective binding of pyrene in subdomain IB of human serum albumin: Combining energy transfer spectroscopy and molecular modelling to understand protein binding flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Irene; Taha, Mohamed; Al-Sharji, Nada A.; Abou-Zied, Osama K.

    2018-04-01

    The ability of human serum albumin (HSA) to bind medium-sized hydrophobic molecules is important for the distribution, metabolism, and efficacy of many drugs. Herein, the interaction between pyrene, a hydrophobic fluorescent probe, and HSA was thoroughly investigated using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. A slight quenching of the fluorescence signal from Trp214 (the sole tryptophan residue in the protein) in the presence of pyrene was used to determine the ligand binding site in the protein, using Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory. The estimated FRET apparent distance between pyrene and Trp214 was 27 Å, which was closely reproduced by the docking analysis (29 Å) and MD simulation (32 Å). The highest affinity site for pyrene was found to be in subdomain IB from the docking results. The calculated equilibrium structure of the complex using MD simulation shows that the ligand is largely stabilized by hydrophobic interaction with Phe165, Phe127, and the nonpolar moieties of Tyr138 and Tyr161. The fluorescence vibronic peak ratio I1/I3 of bound pyrene inside HSA indicates the presence of polar effect in the local environment of pyrene which is less than that of free pyrene in buffer. This was clarified by the MD simulation results in which an average of 5.7 water molecules were found within 0.5 nm of pyrene in the binding site. Comparing the fluorescence signals and lifetimes of pyrene inside HSA to that free in buffer, the high tendency of pyrene to form dimer was almost completely suppressed inside HSA, indicating a high selectivity of the binding pocket toward pyrene monomer. The current results emphasize the ability of HSA, as a major carrier of several drugs and ligands in blood, to bind hydrophobic molecules in cavities other than subdomain IIA which is known to bind most hydrophobic drugs. This ability stems from the nature of the amino acids forming the binding

  5. LOGISTICS IN THE EFFICIENCY OF DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Szkutnik; Krystyna Baum

    2009-01-01

    The report presents the solution, which is very useful for evaluation of the functioning of the networks of distribution companies taking into account the efficiency of energy distribution. The efficiency is determined by the level of energy losses in particular elements of the network in each voltage types. The software enables the detailed diagnosis of situation and through simulations shows the most appropriate actions aimed at increasing efficiency of networks of a distribution company. I...

  6. Trading strategies for distribution company with stochastic distributed energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Chunyu; Wang, Qi; Wang, Jianhui; Korpås, Magnus; Pinson, Pierre; Østergaard, Jacob; Khodayar, Mohammad E.

    2016-09-01

    This paper proposes a methodology to address the trading strategies of a proactive distribution company (PDISCO) engaged in the transmission-level (TL) markets. A one-leader multi-follower bilevel model is presented to formulate the gaming framework between the PDISCO and markets. The lower-level (LL) problems include the TL day-ahead market and scenario-based real-time markets, respectively with the objectives of maximizing social welfare and minimizing operation cost. The upper-level (UL) problem is to maximize the PDISCO’s profit across these markets. The PDISCO’s strategic offers/bids interactively influence the outcomes of each market. Since the LL problems are linear and convex, while the UL problem is non-linear and non-convex, an equivalent primal–dual approach is used to reformulate this bilevel model to a solvable mathematical program with equilibrium constraints (MPEC). The effectiveness of the proposed model is verified by case studies.

  7. Smart Control of Energy Distribution Grids over Heterogeneous Communication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein; Iov, Florin; Hägerling, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The expected growth in distributed generation will significantly affect the operation and control of todays distribution grids. Being confronted with short time power variations of distributed generations, the assurance of a reliable service (grid stability, avoidance of energy losses) and the qu...

  8. Metrics for Energy Efficiency in Logistics of Freight Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Stet

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a study on the energy efficiency indicators that can be used for the activities in logistics of freight distribution, at the company level, as well as at macroeconomic level. There are highlighted also some solutions for increasing energy efficiency in distribution channels, starting from technical and logistics management actions, at the company level. There are revealed also the impacts of energy efficiency measures.

  9. Effect of magnetic field on the impurity binding energy of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Impurity energy; turning point; binding energy. PACS Nos 73.20.Dx; 73.20.Hb; 71.55.-i; 71.55.Eq. 1. Introduction. Because of the recent advances in nanofabrication technology, it is possible to pro- duce quantum dots whose characteristic dimensions are comparable with the elec- tronic de Broglie wavelengths.

  10. Analysis of binding energy activity of TIBO and HIV-RT based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEN

    2007-02-05

    Feb 5, 2007 ... the structure of TIBO-HIV-RT complex (Ren et al., 1995,. 1999). In this theoretical research, the energy change corresponding to the conformational change within TIBO was investigated. It was observed that change in the beta dihedral angle conformation critically affects the binding energy. Decreased ...

  11. Energy Distributions in Small Populations: Pascal versus Boltzmann

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Roger W.; Weiner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    The theoretical distributions of a limited amount of energy among small numbers of particles with discrete, evenly-spaced quantum levels are examined systematically. The average populations of energy states reveal the pattern of Pascal's triangle. An exact formula for the probability that a particle will be in any given energy state is derived.…

  12. Distributed energy systems with wind power and energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpaas, Magnus

    2004-07-01

    The topic of this thesis is the study of energy storage systems operating with wind power plants. The motivation for applying energy storage in this context is that wind power generation is intermittent and generally difficult to predict, and that good wind energy resources are often found in areas with limited grid capacity. Moreover, energy storage in the form of hydrogen makes it possible to provide clean fuel for transportation. The aim of this work has been to evaluate how local energy storage systems should be designed and operated in order to increase the penetration and value of wind power in the power system. Optimization models and sequential and probabilistic simulation models have been developed for this purpose. Chapter 3 presents a sequential simulation model of a general wind hydrogen energy system. Electrolytic hydrogen is used either as a fuel for transportation or for power generation in a stationary fuel cell. The model is useful for evaluating how hydrogen storage can increase the penetration of wind power in areas with limited or no transmission capacity to the main grid. The simulation model is combined with a cost model in order to study how component sizing and choice of operation strategy influence the performance and economics of the wind-hydrogen system. If the stored hydrogen is not used as a separate product, but merely as electrical energy storage, it should be evaluated against other and more energy efficient storage options such as pumped hydro and redox flow cells. A probabilistic model of a grid-connected wind power plant with a general energy storage unit is presented in chapter 4. The energy storage unit is applied for smoothing wind power fluctuations by providing a firm power output to the grid over a specific period. The method described in the chapter is based on the statistical properties of the wind speed and a general representation of the wind energy conversion system and the energy storage unit. This method allows us to

  13. Lanthanide 4f-electron binding energies and the nephelauxetic effect in wide band gap compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorenbos, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    Employing data from luminescence spectroscopy, the inter 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy U(6, A) in Eu 2+/3+ impurities together with the 5d-centroid energy shift ϵ c (1,3+,A) in Ce 3+ impurities in 40 different fluoride, chloride, bromide, iodide, oxide, sulfide, and nitride compounds has been determined. This work demonstrates that the chemical environment A affects the two energies in a similar fashion; a fashion that follows the anion nephelauxetic sequence F, O, Cl, Br, N, I, S, Se. One may then calculate U(6, A) from well established and accurate ϵ c (1,3+,A) values which are then used as input to the chemical shift model proposed in Dorenbos (2012) [19]. As output it provides the chemical shift of 4f-electron binding energy and therewith the 4f-electron binding energy relative to the vacuum energy. In addition this method provides a tool to routinely establish the binding energy of electrons at the top of the valence band (work function) and the bottom of the conduction band (electron affinity) throughout the entire family of inorganic compounds. How the electronic structure of the compound and lanthanide impurities therein change with type of compound and type of lanthanide is demonstrated. -- Highlights: ► A relationship between 5d centroid shift and 4f-electron Coulomb repulsion energy is established. ► Information on the absolute 4f-electron binding energy of lanthanides in 40 compounds is provided. ► A new tool to determine absolute binding energies of electrons in valence and conduction bands is demonstrated

  14. Hypernuclear interactions and the binding energies of and hypernuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1988-01-01

    By use of variational calculations a reasonable hadronic description is obtained of the s-shell hypernuclei, of /sub /ZBe, and of the well depth, with N forces which are consistent with p scattering and which are quite strongly spin-dependent, with reasonable TPE NN forces with strongly repulsive dispersive-type NN forces. For the latter we also consider a spin-dependent version which is somewhat favored by our analysis. /sub /ZBe is treated as a 2ed + system and is significantly overbound, approx. =1 MeV, if only ed ed and ed potentials are used. An ed ed potential obtained from the NN forces nicely accounts for this overbinding. The hypernuclei /sub /WHe and /sub / Be are treated as ed + 2 and 2ed + 2 systems. Use of the /sub / Be event gives approx. =1.5 MeV too little binding for /sub /WHe. The S0 potential obtained from /sub / Be is quite strongly attractive, comparable to the N and also to the NN potential without OPE. 18 refs.

  15. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Weina; Li Ping; Gou Qingquan; Zhao Yanping

    2008-01-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li 13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li 13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of -96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a 0 . When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of -96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li 13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li 13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li 2 , 0.494 eV for Li 3 , 0.7878 eV for Li 4 , 0.632 eV for Li 5 , and 0.674 eV for Li 7 calculated by us previously. This means that the Li 13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy

  16. Formation Mechanism and Binding Energy for Body-Centred Regular Icosahedral Structure of Li13 Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Na; Li, Ping; Gou, Qing-Quan; Zhao, Yan-Ping

    2008-11-01

    The formation mechanism for the body-centred regular icosahedral structure of Li13 cluster is proposed. The curve of the total energy versus the separation R between the nucleus at the centre and nuclei at the apexes for this structure of Li13 has been calculated by using the method of Gou's modified arrangement channel quantum mechanics (MACQM). The result shows that the curve has a minimal energy of 96.951 39 a.u. at R = 5.46a0. When R approaches to infinity, the total energy of thirteen lithium atoms has the value of 96.564 38 a.u. So the binding energy of Li13 with respect to thirteen lithium atoms is 0.387 01 a.u. Therefore the binding energy per atom for Li13 is 0.029 77 a.u. or 0.810 eV, which is greater than the binding energy per atom of 0.453 eV for Li2, 0.494 eV for Li3, 0.7878 eV for Li4, 0.632 eV for Li5, and 0.674 eV for Li7 calculated by us previously. This means that the Li13 cluster may be formed stably in a body-centred regular icosahedral structure with a greater binding energy.

  17. The distribution and tapping tidal energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Kowalik

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tidal power along tidal shores has been used for centuries to run small tidal mills. Generating electricity by tapping tidal power proved to be very successful only in the last century through the tidal power plant constructed in 1967 in La Rance, France. This used a large barrier to generate the sea level head necessary for driving turbines. Construction of such plants evolved very slowly because of prohibitive costs and concerns about the environmental impact. Developments in the construction of small, efficient and inexpensive underwater turbines admit the possibility of small scale operations that will use local tidal currents to bring electricity to remote locations. Since the generation of such electricity is concerned with the tidal energy in local water bodies, it is important to understand the site-specific energy balance, i.e., the energy flowing in through open boundaries, and the energy generated and dissipated within the local domain. The question is how to tap the tidal energy while keeping possible changes in the present tidal regimes to a minimum. The older approach of constructing barrages may still be quite useful in some locations. The basics of such tidal power plants constructed in a small bay are analyzed in order to understand the principal parameter for tidal plant evaluation, i.e., the power produced.     The new approach is to place turbines - devices similar to windmills - in the pathway of tidal currents. Theoretically, the amount of power available by such turbines for electricity generation is proportional to the water density and velocity cubed of the tidal flow. The naturally dissipated tidal power due to bottom friction forces is also proportional to the cube of the velocity. Because of this similarity, the exploitation of tidal energy can be directed to reinvesting the naturally dissipated power into tidal power for the generation of electricity. This approach to tidal power exploitation is better tuned

  18. 77 FR 10997 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers; Correction AGENCY: Office of... standards for distribution transformers. It was recently discovered that values in certain tables of the...,'' including distribution transformers. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT 1992), Public Law 102-486, amended...

  19. Laminar and regional distribution of galanin binding sites in cat and monkey visual cortex determined by in vitro receptor autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosier, A.M.; Vandesande, F.; Orban, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The distribution of galanin (GAL) binding sites in the visual cortex of cat and monkey was determined by autoradiographic visualization of [ 125 I]-GAL binding to tissue sections. Binding conditions were optimized and, as a result, the binding was saturable and specific. In cat visual cortex, GAL binding sites were concentrated in layers I, IVc, V, and VI. Areas 17, 18, and 19 exhibited a similar distribution pattern. In monkey primary visual cortex, the highest density of GAL binding sites was observed in layers II/III, lower IVc, and upper V. Layers IVA and VI contained moderate numbers of GAL binding sites, while layer I and the remaining parts of layer IV displayed the lowest density. In monkey secondary visual cortex, GAL binding sites were mainly concentrated in layers V-VI. Layer IV exhibited a moderate density, while the supragranular layers contained the lowest proportion of GAL binding sites. In both cat and monkey, we found little difference between regions subserving central and those subserving peripheral vision. Similarities in the distribution of GAL and acetylcholine binding sites are discussed

  20. Energy barrier distributions of maghemite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanus, E; Koettig, T; Gloeckl, G; Prass, S; Schmidl, F; Heinrich, J; Gopinadhan, M; Berkov, D V; Helm, C A; Weitschies, W; Weber, P; Seidel, P

    2007-01-01

    A recently introduced method for the characterization of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) based on the analysis of the temperature-dependent Neel relaxation signal (TMRX) has been applied to characterize maghemite particles with different particle size distributions. The samples were made using an improved magnetic fractionation method for a ferrofluid with a broad particle size distribution. The temperature range of the measurement set-up has been extended from 315 K down to 4 K to detect even the smallest particles in the fractions. A mean magnetically relevant particle size has been derived from TMRX and low temperature coercivity measurements and has been compared to the physical size determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) investigations

  1. Energy optimization of water distribution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    In order to analyze pump operating scenarios for the system with the computer model, information on existing pumping equipment and the distribution system was collected. The information includes the following: component description and design criteria for line booster stations, booster stations with reservoirs, and high lift pumps at the water treatment plants; daily operations data for 1988; annual reports from fiscal year 1987/1988 to fiscal year 1991/1992; and a 1985 calibrated KYPIPE computer model of DWSD`s water distribution system which included input data for the maximum hour and average day demands on the system for that year. This information has been used to produce the inventory database of the system and will be used to develop the computer program to analyze the system.

  2. Subtleties in obtaining the electrostatic energy of continuous distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezerra, M; Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e; Kort-Kamp, W J M; Farina, C

    2014-01-01

    The mathematical steps that generalize the expression for the electrostatic energy of a set of point charges to the corresponding expression for a continuous charge distribution involve a few subtleties that are not usually discussed in standard introductory or advanced electromagnetic textbooks. In this paper, we point out such subtleties and discuss how to deal with them in cases of volume and surface charge distributions. We also show explicitly that it is not possible to define electrostatic energy for a linear charge distribution, since this energy would be divergent. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to recover our results in a simpler and more elegant form. (paper)

  3. Subtleties in obtaining the electrostatic energy of continuous distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, M.; Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e.; Kort-Kamp, W. J. M.; Farina, C.

    2014-11-01

    The mathematical steps that generalize the expression for the electrostatic energy of a set of point charges to the corresponding expression for a continuous charge distribution involve a few subtleties that are not usually discussed in standard introductory or advanced electromagnetic textbooks. In this paper, we point out such subtleties and discuss how to deal with them in cases of volume and surface charge distributions. We also show explicitly that it is not possible to define electrostatic energy for a linear charge distribution, since this energy would be divergent. Finally, we use dimensional analysis to recover our results in a simpler and more elegant form.

  4. Distributed continuous energy scheduling for dynamic virtual power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niesse, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents DynaSCOPE as distributed control method for continuous energy scheduling for dynamic virtual power plants (DVPP). DVPPs aggregate the flexibility of distributed energy units to address current energy markets. As an extension of the Virtual Power Plant concept they show high dynamics in aggregation and operation of energy units. Whereas operation schedules are set up for all energy units in a day-ahead planning procedure, incidents may render these schedules infeasible during execution, like deviation from prognoses or outages. Thus, a continuous scheduling process is needed to ensure product fulfillment. With DynaSCOPE, software agents representing single energy units solve this problem in a completely distributed heuristic approach. Using a stepped concept, several damping mechanisms are applied to allow minimum disturbance while continuously trying to fulfill the product as contracted at the market.

  5. Binding energies: New values and impact on the efficiency of chemical desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakelam, V.; Loison, J.-C.; Mereau, R.; Ruaud, M.

    2017-03-01

    Recent laboratory measurements have confirmed that chemical desorption (desorption of products due to exothermic surface reactions) can be an efficient process. The impact of including this process into gas-grain chemical models entirely depends on the formalism used and the associated parameters. Among these parameters, binding energies are probably the most uncertain ones for the moment. We propose a new model to compute binding energy of species to water ice surfaces. We have also compared the model results using either the new chemical desorption model proposed by Minissale et al. (2016) or the one of Garrod et al. (2007). The new binding energies have a strong impact on the formation of complex organic molecules. In addition, the new chemical desorption model from Minissale produces a much smaller desorption of these species and also of methanol. Combining the two effects, the abundances of CH3OH and COMs observed in cold cores cannot be reproduced by astrochemical models anymore.

  6. A general scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on binary transition metal surface alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    A simple scheme for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on transition metal surface alloys is presented. It is shown that a d-band center model of the alloy surfaces is a convenient and appropriate basis for this scheme; variations in chemical composition, strain effects, and ligand effects...... are all incorporated into the binding energy analysis through this parameter. With few exceptions, the agreement of the results from the simple model with full DFT calculations on hundreds of binary surface alloys is remarkable. The scheme should therefore provide a fast and effective method...... for the estimation of oxygen binding energies on a wide variety of transition metal alloys. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  7. Fuzzification of the Distributed Activation Energy Model Using the Fuzzy Weibull Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Dhaundiyal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the influence of some of the relevant parameters of biomass pyrolysis on a fuzzified solution of the Distributed Activation Energy Model (DAEM due to randomness and inaccuracy of data. The study investigates the fuzzified Distributed Activation Energy Model using the fuzzy Weibull distribution. The activation energy, frequency factor, and distribution variables of the 3-parameter Weibull analysis are converted into a non-crisp set. The expression for the fuzzy sets, and their α-cut are discussed with an initial distribution for the activation energies following the Weibull distribution function. The thermo-analytical data for pine needles is used to illustrate the methodology to exhibit the fuzziness of some of the parameters relevant to biomass pyrolysis.

  8. A comparison of binding energy and metastable zone width for adipic acid with various additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Allan S.; Jang, Shyh M.

    1995-12-01

    The binding energy of nine alkanoic acids to the major crystal faces of adipic acid were calculated employing molecular modelling techniques. The results indicate that the alkanoic acids bind strongly to the surface when compared to solvents and to adipic acid itself indicating that the alkanoic acids could be potential growth and nucleation inhibitors. The binding energies were found to increase with increasing carbon number to C 14 to decrease from C 14 to C 16 and then to increase again. The effect of the alkanoic acids on the metastable zone width of adipic acid in ethanol solution were measured employing a differential scanning calorimeter. The results showed that each of the nine alkanoic acids increased the metastable zone width. The metastable zone widths were found to increase with increasing carbon number to C 14 to decrease from C 14 to C 16 and to then increase again thus correlating well with the results obtained from binding energies. These results indicate that binding energy calculations appear to provide a valid method to screen impurities as potential nucleation inhibitors.

  9. Synthesis of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine: comparative binding and distribution studies with natural enantiomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincek, W.C.; Martin, B.R.; Aceto, M.D.; Tripathi, H.L.; May, E.L.; Harris, L.S.

    1981-11-01

    The preparation of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine (Vb) (specific activity 10.3 Ci/mmole)from (+)-nicotine (Ib) via (-) 4,4-dibromocotinine (IIIb) is described. Although Ib is 10-30 times less potent than (-)-nicotine (Ia) in the CNS, its binding affinity for the crude mitochondrial or nuclear fraction of whole rat brain is only three times less than that of Ia. However, distribution studies showed that the maximum brain levels of (-)-(3H) nicotine are nearly twice those of (+)-(3H)-nicotine following administration of a 2-micrograms/kg dose. Binding affinity and disposition of the stereoisomers account for a portion of the pharmacological stereospecificity of nicotine.

  10. Synthesis of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine: comparative binding and distribution studies with natural enantiomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vincek, W.C.; Martin, B.R.; Aceto, M.D.; Tripathi, H.L.; May, E.L.; Harris, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    The preparation of 4,4-ditritio-(+)-nicotine (Vb) (specific activity 10.3 Ci/mmole)from (+)-nicotine (Ib) via (-) 4,4-dibromocotinine (IIIb) is described. Although Ib is 10-30 times less potent than (-)-nicotine (Ia) in the CNS, its binding affinity for the crude mitochondrial or nuclear fraction of whole rat brain is only three times less than that of Ia. However, distribution studies showed that the maximum brain levels of (-)-[3H] nicotine are nearly twice those of (+)-[3H]-nicotine following administration of a 2-micrograms/kg dose. Binding affinity and disposition of the stereoisomers account for a portion of the pharmacological stereospecificity of nicotine

  11. Distribution in rat tissues of modulator-binding protein of particulate nature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobue, K.; Muramoto, Y.; Kakiuchi, S.; Yamazaki, R.

    1979-01-01

    Studies on Ca 2+ -activatable cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase led to the discovery of a protein modulator that is required for the activation of this enzyme by Ca 2+ . Later, this protein has been shown to cause the Ca 2+ -dependent activation of several enzymes that include phosphodiesterase, adenylate cyclase, a protein kinase from muscles, phosphorylase b kinase, actomyosin ATPase, membranous ATPase from erythrocytes and nerve synapses. Thus, modulator protein appears to be an intracellular mediator of actions of Ca 2+ . The present work shows the distribution of this particulate modulator-binding component in rat tissues. This paper also describes the labeling of modulator protein with tritium without deteriorating its biological activities and application of this 3 H-modulator protein to the determination of the Ca ++ dependent binding of modulator protein with membranous protein. This technique proves to be useful in studying enzymes or proteins whose functions are regulated by Ca ++ /modulator protein system. (Auth.)

  12. Selected aspects of cogeneration technology in distributed energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchora, Konrad

    2017-08-01

    The paper presents an opinion on the use of distributed cogeneration technologies in the power industry. It offers worked out experiences and views on the idea of using renewable energy sources in the conventional power industry. The effects of the work done are analysed arguments concerning the use of cogeneration and renewable energy sources in the micropower industry, and developed ways of the functioning of the distributed energy generation system. The publication presents conclusions and simulation results of the criterial work of a micropower system containing in its structure renewable energy sources and a cogeneration unit.

  13. Binding energies of hypernuclei and Λ-nuclear interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1985-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the s-shell hypernuclei and also of 9 Be hypernuclei with a 2α + Λ model. The well depth is calculated variationally with the Fermi hypernetted chain method. A satisfactory description of all the relevant experimental Λ separation energies and also of the Λp scattering can be obtained with reasonable TPE ΛN and ΛNN forces and strongly repulsive dispersive ΛNN forces which are preferred to be spin dependent. We discuss variational calculations for 6 He and 10 Be hypernuclei with α + 2Λ and 2α + 2Λ models, and the results obtained for the ΛΛ interaction and for 6 He hypernuclei from analysis of 10 Be hypernuclei Coulomb effects and charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed. 24 refs., 5 figs

  14. Binding energies of hypernuclei and. lambda. -nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1985-01-01

    Variational Monte Carlo calculations have been made for the s-shell hypernuclei and also of /sup 9/Be hypernuclei with a 2..cap alpha.. + ..lambda.. model. The well depth is calculated variationally with the Fermi hypernetted chain method. A satisfactory description of all the relevant experimental ..lambda.. separation energies and also of the ..lambda..p scattering can be obtained with reasonable TPE ..lambda..N and ..lambda..NN forces and strongly repulsive dispersive ..lambda..NN forces which are preferred to be spin dependent. We discuss variational calculations for /sup 6/He and /sup 10/Be hypernuclei with ..cap alpha.. + 2..lambda.. and 2..cap alpha.. + 2..lambda.. models, and the results obtained for the ..lambda lambda.. interaction and for /sup 6/He hypernuclei from analysis of /sup 10/Be hypernuclei Coulomb effects and charge symmetry breaking in the A = 4 hypernuclei are discussed. 24 refs., 5 figs.

  15. The influence of gravitational binding energy on cosmic expansion dynamics: new perspectives for cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, Hans-Jörg; Sokaliwska, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Confronted with microwave background observations by WMAP and with consternating supernova locations in the magnitude-redshift diagram modern cosmology feels enforced to call for cosmic vacuum energy as a necessary cosmological ingredient. Most often this vacuum energy is associated with Einstein's cosmological constant Λ or with so-called "dark energy". A positive value of Λ describes an inflationary action on cosmic dynamics which in view of recent cosmological data appears as an absolute need. In this article, however, we question the hypothesis of a constant vacuum energy density since not justifiable on physical grounds. Instead we show that gravitational binding energy of cosmic matter, connected with ongoing structure formation during cosmic expansion, acts similar to vacuum energy, since it reduces the effective gravitating proper mass density. Thus one may be encouraged to believe that actions of cosmic vacuum energy and gravitational binding energy concerning their cosmological effects are closely related to each other, perhaps in some respects even have identical phenomenologies. Based on results presented in this article we propose that the generally wanted action of vacuum energy on cosmic spacetime dynamics inevitably leads to a decay of vacuum energy density. Connected with this decay is a decrease of cosmic binding energy and the generation of new effective gravitating mass in the universe. If this all is adequately taken into account by the energy-momentum tensor of the GR field equations, one is then led to non-standard cosmologies which for the first time can guarantee the conservation of the total energy both in static and expanding universes. We describe the structuring of cosmic matter by a change in time of the 2-point correlation-function. We do show here that cosmic structure formation drives accelerated cosmic expansion and feigns the action of vacuum energy density.

  16. Binding energy of impurity states in an inverse parabolic quantum well under magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Soekmen, I.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the magnetic field which is directed perpendicular to the well on the binding energy of the hydrogenic impurities in an inverse parabolic quantum well (IPQW) with different widths as well as different Al concentrations at the well center. The Al concentration at the barriers was always x max =0.3. The calculations were performed within the effective mass approximation, using a variational method. We observe that IPQW structure turns into parabolic quantum well with the inversion effect of the magnetic field and donor impurity binding energy in IPQW strongly depends on the magnetic field, Al concentration at the well center and well dimensions

  17. Calculation of the Relative Change in Binding Free Energy of a Protein-Inhibitor Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bash, Paul A.; Singh, U. Chandra; Brown, Frank K.; Langridge, Robert; Kollman, Peter A.

    1987-01-01

    By means of a thermodynamic perturbation method implemented with molecular dynamics, the relative free energy of binding was calculated for the enzyme thermolysin complexed with a pair of phosphonamidate and phosphonate ester inhibitors. The calculated difference in free energy of binding was 4.21 ± 0.54 kilocalories per mole. This compares well with the experimental value of 4.1 kilocalories per mole. The method is general and can be used to determine a change or ``mutation'' in any system that can be suitably represented. It is likely to prove useful for protein and drug design.

  18. Pressure-dependent shallow donor binding energy in InGaN/GaN square QWWs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazi, Haddou El; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Using a variational approach, we perform a theoretical study of hydrostatic pressure effect on the ground-state of axial hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN square quantum well wire (SQWWs) as a function of the side length within the effective-mass scheme and finite potential barrier. The pressure dependence of wire length, effective mass, dielectric constant and potential barrier are taken into account. Numerical results show that: (i) the binding energy is strongly affected by the wire length and the external applied pressure and (ii) its maximum moves to the narrow wire in particular for height pressure.

  19. Experimental Support for Desolvation Energy Term in Governing Equations for Binding Equilibria

    OpenAIRE

    Castellano, Brian M.; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new thermodynamic framework for aqueous reaction equilibria that treats water as a co-reactant in the development of a general binding equation. The approach features an explicit consideration for the change in hydration that occurs when two solvated surfaces come into contact. As an outcome of this framework, the standard state free energy of binding is defined by the summation of two terms, the traditional term (−RTlnKi) plus a desolvation free energy term that is we...

  20. The Design of Distributed Micro Grid Energy Storage System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ya-feng; Wang, Yan-ping

    2018-03-01

    Distributed micro-grid runs in island mode, the energy storage system is the core to maintain the micro-grid stable operation. For the problems that it is poor to adjust at work and easy to cause the volatility of micro-grid caused by the existing energy storage structure of fixed connection. In this paper, an array type energy storage structure is proposed, and the array type energy storage system structure and working principle are analyzed. Finally, the array type energy storage structure model is established based on MATLAB, the simulation results show that the array type energy storage system has great flexibility, which can maximize the utilization of energy storage system, guarantee the reliable operation of distributed micro-grid and achieve the function of peak clipping and valley filling.

  1. Microgrid Enabled Distributed Energy Solutions (MEDES) - Fort Bliss Military Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Daylight Time ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS (continued) vi MEDES Microgrid Enabled Distributed Energy Solutions MPPT maximum power point tracking...tracking ( MPPT ) grid-tied inverters will require replacement or modification to allow for substantial use in islanded microgrid configurations

  2. Information Modeling for Direct Control of Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin; Andersen, Palle; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    We present an architecture for an unbundled liberalized electricity market system where a virtual power plant (VPP) is able to control a number of distributed energy resources (DERs) directly through a two-way communication link. The aggregator who operates the VPP utilizes the accumulated...... for a whole range of different DERs. The devised information model can serve as input to the international standardization efforts on distributed energy resources....

  3. Simulation and energy analysis of distributed electric heating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Han, Shenchao; Yang, Yanchun; Liu, Mingyuan

    2018-02-01

    Distributed electric heating system assistssolar heating systemby using air-source heat pump. Air-source heat pump as auxiliary heat sourcecan make up the defects of the conventional solar thermal system can provide a 24 - hour high - efficiency work. It has certain practical value and practical significance to reduce emissions and promote building energy efficiency. Using Polysun software the system is simulated and compared with ordinary electric boiler heating system. The simulation results show that upon energy request, 5844.5kW energy is saved and 3135kg carbon - dioxide emissions are reduced and5844.5 kWhfuel and energy consumption is decreased with distributed electric heating system. Theeffect of conserving energy and reducing emissions using distributed electric heating systemis very obvious.

  4. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2013-07-31

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control decisions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the associating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as advanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and locally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination routines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shifting the focus

  5. Distributed energy resources scheduling considering real-time resources forecast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, M.; Sousa, T.; Ramos, S.

    2014-01-01

    grids and considering day-ahead, hour-ahead and realtime time horizons. This method considers that energy resources are managed by a VPP which establishes contracts with their owners. The full AC power flow calculation included in the model takes into account network constraints. In this paper......, distribution function errors are used to simulate variations between time horizons, and to measure the performance of the proposed methodology. A 33-bus distribution network with large number of distributed resources is used....

  6. Cost allocation model for distribution networks considering high penetration of distributed energy resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soares, Tiago; Pereira, Fábio; Morais, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    The high penetration of distributed energy resources (DER) in distribution networks and the competitive environment of electricity markets impose the use of new approaches in several domains. The network cost allocation, traditionally used in transmission networks, should be adapted and used...... in the distribution networks considering the specifications of the connected resources. The main goal is to develop a fairer methodology trying to distribute the distribution network use costs to all players which are using the network in each period. In this paper, a model considering different type of costs (fixed......, losses, and congestion costs) is proposed comprising the use of a large set of DER, namely distributed generation (DG), demand response (DR) of direct load control type, energy storage systems (ESS), and electric vehicles with capability of discharging energy to the network, which is known as vehicle...

  7. Determination of the absolute binding free energies of HIV-1 protease inhibitors using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tung; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2017-05-01

    The absolute binding free energy of an inhibitor to HIV-1 Protease (PR) was determined throughout evaluation of the non-bonded interaction energy difference between the two bound and unbound states of the inhibitor and surrounding molecules by the fast pulling of ligand (FPL) process using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations. The calculated free energy difference terms help clarifying the nature of the binding. Theoretical binding affinities are in good correlation with experimental data, with R = 0.89. The paradigm used is able to rank two inhibitors having the maximum difference of ∼1.5 kcal/mol in absolute binding free energies.

  8. Economic energy distribution and consumption in a microgrid Part 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahersima, Fatemeh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    level energy manager is designed to distribute available power resources among the houses or sell the remainder to the electricity grid. Simulation results show the economically optimal energy consumption in the buildings and economically ecient power trading between the houses. Microgrid control...

  9. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between EB = 50 eV and 5000. eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle θ are ...

  10. Energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The energy and angular distributions of backscattered electrons produced under the impact of 5 keV electrons with thick Al, Ti, Ag, W and Pt targets are measured. The energy range of backscattered electrons is considered between B = 50 eV and 5000 eV. The angle of incidence α and take-off angle are chosen to have ...

  11. Distribution of epidermal growth factor binding sites in the adult rat anterior pituitary gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabot, J.G.; Walker, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of epidermal growth (EGF) binding sites was studied in the pituitary gland using light and electron microscope autoradiography which was performed at different time intervals (2 to 60 min) after intravenous (IV) injection of (/sup 125/I)EGF into adult rats. At the light microscopic level, the labeling was found over cells of the anterior pituitary gland. The time-course study performed by light microscope autoradiography showed that the maximal values were reached at the 2 min time interval. At this time interval, most silver grains were found at the periphery of the target cells. After, the number of silver grains decreased progressively and the localization of silver grains in the cytoplasm indicated the internalization of (/sup 125/I)EGF. Electron microscope autoradiography showed that labeling was mostly restricted to mammotrophs and somatotrophs. Control experiments indicated that the autoradiographic labeling was due specific interaction of (/sup 125/I)EGF with its binding site. These results indicate that EGF binding sites are present in at least two anterior pituitary cell types and suggest that EGF can exert a physiological role in the pituitary gland.

  12. Distributed sensor coordination for advanced energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumer, Kagan [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). School of Mechanical, Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

    2015-03-12

    Motivation: The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reliable operation of advanced power systems. Recent advances in sensor technology have enabled some level of decision making directly at the sensor level. However, coordinating large numbers of sensors, particularly heterogeneous sensors, to achieve system level objectives such as predicting plant efficiency, reducing downtime or predicting outages requires sophisticated coordination algorithms. Indeed, a critical issue in such systems is how to ensure the interaction of a large number of heterogenous system components do not interfere with one another and lead to undesirable behavior. Objectives and Contributions: The long-term objective of this work is to provide sensor deployment, coordination and networking algorithms for large numbers of sensors to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. Our two specific objectives are to: 1. Derive sensor performance metrics for heterogeneous sensor networks. 2. Demonstrate effectiveness, scalability and reconfigurability of heterogeneous sensor network in advanced power systems. The key technical contribution of this work is to push the coordination step to the design of the objective functions of the sensors, allowing networks of heterogeneous sensors to be controlled. By ensuring that the control and coordination is not specific to particular sensor hardware, this approach enables the design and operation of large heterogeneous sensor networks. In addition to the coordination coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Impact: The impact of this work extends to a large class of problems relevant to the National Energy Technology Laboratory including sensor placement, heterogeneous sensor

  13. Incremental binding free energies of aluminum (III) vs. magnesium (II) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercero, Jose M.; Mujika, Jon I.; Matxain, Jon M.; Lopez, Xabier; Ugalde, Jesus M.

    2003-01-01

    A sequential ligand addition to the aluminum (III) cation has been studied using the B3LYP functional and a combined all-electron/pseudopotentials basis set. The aluminum complexes are compared with analogous magnesium (II) complexes. Different thermodynamical data, such as incremental binding energies, enthalpies, entropies and free energies, are presented for these addition reactions. While the magnesium (II) cation can only accommodate three negatively charged ligands, aluminum (III) accommodates four even after including bulk solvent effects. The main differences between both cations complexing with the neutral ligands, is that aluminum (III) is not able to form complexes with methanol until the number of methanol ligands is equal to 3. Magnesium (II) prefers to bind methanol and formamide when the number of ligands is small, while aluminum prefers formamide. For the largest complexes both cations prefer to bind water

  14. Optimal Operation of Energy Storage in Power Transmission and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan Hejazi, Seyed Hossein

    In this thesis, we investigate optimal operation of energy storage units in power transmission and distribution grids. At transmission level, we investigate the problem where an investor-owned independently-operated energy storage system seeks to offer energy and ancillary services in the day-ahead and real-time markets. We specifically consider the case where a significant portion of the power generated in the grid is from renewable energy resources and there exists significant uncertainty in system operation. In this regard, we formulate a stochastic programming framework to choose optimal energy and reserve bids for the storage units that takes into account the fluctuating nature of the market prices due to the randomness in the renewable power generation availability. At distribution level, we develop a comprehensive data set to model various stochastic factors on power distribution networks, with focus on networks that have high penetration of electric vehicle charging load and distributed renewable generation. Furthermore, we develop a data-driven stochastic model for energy storage operation at distribution level, where the distribution of nodal voltage and line power flow are modelled as stochastic functions of the energy storage unit's charge and discharge schedules. In particular, we develop new closed-form stochastic models for such key operational parameters in the system. Our approach is analytical and allows formulating tractable optimization problems. Yet, it does not involve any restricting assumption on the distribution of random parameters, hence, it results in accurate modeling of uncertainties. By considering the specific characteristics of random variables, such as their statistical dependencies and often irregularly-shaped probability distributions, we propose a non-parametric chance-constrained optimization approach to operate and plan energy storage units in power distribution girds. In the proposed stochastic optimization, we consider

  15. Energy efficiency analysis of reconfigured distribution system for practical loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In deregulated rate structure, the performance evaluation of distribution system for energy efficiency includes; loss minimization, improved power quality, loadability limit, reliability and availability of supply. Energy efficiency changes with the variation in loading pattern and the load behaviour. Further, the nature of load at each node is not explicitly of any one type rather their characteristics depend upon the node voltages. In most cases, load is assumed to be constant power (real and reactive. In this paper voltage dependent practical loads are represented with composite load model and the energy efficiency performance of distribution system for practical loads is evaluated in different configurations of 33-node system.

  16. A balanced energy budget plan for hydrogen production and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williscroft, R. G.

    An integrated plan for hydrogen production and distribution within a balanced energy budget is outlined. Primary energy source is the sun, concentrated in earth orbit by satellite and beamed to selected planetside marine locations for hydrogen production from sea water. Primary distribution via already existent natural gas pipeline networks upgraded for hydrogen transmission is augmented by local network extensions and by surface marine transport using modified LNG carriers. The economic, social and environmental impact of this integrated approach is examined in its relationship to continued reliance upon fossil fuel and expanded use of nuclear fission, to increasing reliance upon so-called alternative energy sources, and to the forthcoming nuclear fusion option.

  17. Power Electronics Control of Wind Energy in Distributed Power System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Ciobotaru, Mihai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2008-01-01

    emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine......The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is an urgent demand to increase the power capacity. It is expected that the power capacity has to be doubled within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as efficient as possible and incentives to save...... energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources will be high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One...

  18. Analysis of binding energy activity of TIBO and HIV-RT based on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5,l-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2 (1 H)one (TIBO) is a noncompetitive non nucleotide antiretroviral drug with a specific allosteric binding site of HIV-1 RT. The conformational analysis shows that the effect of the drug depends on the potential energy which varied due to the beta rotatable dihedral angles (N6 ...

  19. An integrated economic and distributional analysis of energy policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labandeira, Xavier; Labeaga, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Miguel

    2009-01-01

    Most public policies, particularly those in the energy sphere, have not only efficiency but also distributional effects. However, there is a trade-off between modelling approaches suitable for calculating those impacts on the economy. For the former most of the studies have been conducted with general equilibrium models, whereas partial equilibrium models represent the main approach for distributional analysis. This paper proposes a methodology to simultaneously carry out an analysis of the distributional and efficiency consequences of changes in energy taxation. In order to do so, we have integrated a microeconomic household demand model and a computable general equilibrium model for the Spanish economy. We illustrate the advantages of this approach by simulating a revenue-neutral reform in Spanish indirect taxation, with a large increase of energy taxes that serve an environmental purpose. The results show that the reforms bring about significant efficiency and distributional effects, in some cases counterintuitive, and demonstrate the academic and social utility of this approximation.

  20. An integrated economic and distributional analysis of energy policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labandeira, Xavier [Facultade de CC. Economicas, University of Vigo, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Labeaga, Jose M. [Instituto de Estudios Fiscales, Avda. Cardenal Herrera Oria 378, 28035 Madrid (Spain); Rodriguez, Miguel [Facultade de CC. Empresariais e Turismo, University of Vigo, 32004 Ourense (Spain)

    2009-12-15

    Most public policies, particularly those in the energy sphere, have not only efficiency but also distributional effects. However, there is a trade-off between modelling approaches suitable for calculating those impacts on the economy. For the former most of the studies have been conducted with general equilibrium models, whereas partial equilibrium models represent the main approach for distributional analysis. This paper proposes a methodology to simultaneously carry out an analysis of the distributional and efficiency consequences of changes in energy taxation. In order to do so, we have integrated a microeconomic household demand model and a computable general equilibrium model for the Spanish economy. We illustrate the advantages of this approach by simulating a revenue-neutral reform in Spanish indirect taxation, with a large increase of energy taxes that serve an environmental purpose. The results show that the reforms bring about significant efficiency and distributional effects, in some cases counterintuitive, and demonstrate the academic and social utility of this approximation. (author)

  1. Free energy distribution function of a random Ising ferromagnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotsenko, Victor; Klumov, Boris

    2012-01-01

    We study the free energy distribution function of a weakly disordered Ising ferromagnet in terms of the D-dimensional random temperature Ginzburg–Landau Hamiltonian. It is shown that besides the usual Gaussian 'body' this distribution function exhibits non-Gaussian tails both in the paramagnetic and in the ferromagnetic phases. Explicit asymptotic expressions for these tails are derived. It is demonstrated that the tails are strongly asymmetric: the left tail (for large negative values of the free energy) is much slower than the right one (for large positive values of the free energy). It is argued that at the critical point the free energy of the random Ising ferromagnet in dimensions D < 4 is described by a non-trivial universal distribution function which is non-self-averaging

  2. Improving the LIE Method for Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Ligand Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Williams E; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Valiente, Pedro A

    2015-09-28

    In this work, we introduced an improved linear interaction energy (LIE) method parameterization for computations of protein–ligand binding free energies. The protocol, coined LIE-D, builds on the linear relationship between the empirical coefficient γ in the standard LIE scheme and the D parameter, introduced in our work. The D-parameter encompasses the balance (difference) between electrostatic (polar) and van der Waals (nonpolar) energies in protein–ligand complexes. Leave-one-out cross-validation showed that LIE-D reproduced accurately the absolute binding free energies for our training set of protein–ligand complexes ( = 0.92 kcal/mol, SDerror = 0.66 kcal/mol, R(2) = 0.90, QLOO(2) = 0.89, and sPRESS(LOO) = 1.28 kcal/mol). We also demonstrated LIE-D robustness by predicting accurately the binding free energies for three different protein–ligand systems outside the training data set, where the electrostatic and van der Waals interaction energies were calculated with different force fields.

  3. Fuzzy droop control loops adjustment for stored energy balance in distributed energy storage system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aldana, Nelson Leonardo Diaz; Wu, Dan; Dragicevic, Tomislav

    2015-01-01

    The study of isolated AC microgrid has been under high interest due to the integration of renewable energy resources especially for remote areas, or to improve the local energy reliability. The current trend is oriented to distributed renewable energy sources and their corresponding energy storage...... system, in order to smooth the variations at the prime energy generator. In this paper, a decentralized strategy based on fuzzy logic is proposed in order to balance the state of charge of distributed energy storage systems in lowvoltage three phase AC microgrid. The proposed method weights the action...... of conventional droop control loops for battery based distributed energy storage systems, in order to equalize their stored energy. The units are selfcontrolled by using local variables, hence, the microgrid can operate without communication systems. Frequency and voltage bus signaling are used in order...

  4. Design and Realization of Online Monitoring System of Distributed New Energy and Renewable Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yanfen; Zhou, Tao; Li, Mengwen; Zheng, Guotai; Li, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Aimed at difficult centralized monitoring and management of current distributed new energy and renewable energy generation projects due to great varieties, different communication protocols and large-scale difference, this paper designs a online monitoring system of new energy and renewable energy characterized by distributed deployment, tailorable functions, extendible applications and fault self-healing performance. This system is designed based on international general standard for grid information data model, formulates unified data acquisition and transmission standard for different types of new energy and renewable energy generation projects, and can realize unified data acquisition and real-time monitoring of new energy and renewable energy generation projects, such as solar energy, wind power, biomass energy, etc. within its jurisdiction. This system has applied in Beijing. At present, 576 projects are connected to the system. Good effect is achieved and stability and reliability of the system have been validated.

  5. Parallel Harmony Search Based Distributed Energy Resource Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a harmony search based parallel optimization algorithm to minimize voltage deviations in three phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems and to maximize active power outputs of distributed energy resources (DR). The main contribution is to reduce the adverse impacts on voltage profile during a day as photovoltaics (PVs) output or electrical vehicles (EVs) charging changes throughout a day. The IEEE 123- bus distribution test system is modified by adding DRs and EVs under different load profiles. The simulation results show that by using parallel computing techniques, heuristic methods may be used as an alternative optimization tool in electrical power distribution systems operation.

  6. Methodology for calculating the impact of distributed generation on energy losses in a distribution network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of the Master's final project 'Methodology for calculating the impact of distributed generation on energy losses in distribution network'. The question is whether, for estimation of the impact of the power plant on energy losses in the distribution network, it is necessary to analyze each hour value of small power plant engagement and its effect, or it is sufficient to analyze a small number of states, and the extent to which it is possible to reduce the number of states that will be analyzed in order to review adequately the impact of the power plant on the change of energy losses in the network. To answer this question, an algorithm consisting of two steps is performed, annual production diagrams are obtained and, on the basis of calculated specific discrete values, the impact of the small power plant on energy losses in the distribution network to which it is connected is evaluated.

  7. The effects of electron binding energy corrections on Monte Carlo models in the diagnostic x-ray energy range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, L.H.; Van Doorn, T.; Michael, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The effects of incorporating electron binding energy corrections for incoherent scatter (BEC) into Monte Carlo models of X-ray transport in the diagnostic energy range have been examined. The inclusion of BEC can significantly increase computing overhead both in terms of data storage and execution time. In a modern PC application, data storage is unlikely to be a significant problem. However, execution time is a major consideration when assessing the relative usefulness of Monte Carlo systems. If the effectiveness of including BEC is barely more than equivocal, as is the case in some of the studies reported here, then a decision to include them requires consideration of the photon energy being modelled and the data being sought. This work seeks to clarify the real significance of inclusion of BEC by examining their effects without the confounding influence of coherent scattering effects. A Monte Carlo computer code has been developed to study a variety of X-ray transport phenomena. Models of radiation dose deposition in a semi-infinite medium, a similar model in tissue using a realistic source spectrum and diverging beam geometry, a simulation of pencil beam bone densitometry measurements, models of barrier penetration by X-rays and models of the angular distribution of scattered radiation have been undertaken. Results of previous studies have been confirmed. Models of radiation dose deposition for 10 keV, 30 keV and 100 keV photons have shown that inclusion of BEC has only a small effect upon values of total depth dose. Differences are of the same order of magnitude as the standard deviation of the results. A larger effect was noted for the values of dose due to scattered photons. This effect reached a maximum of 7% at 30 keV. Similar results were obtained from a model using a realistic source spectrum and diverging beam geometry. In the simulation of bone densitometry measurements the effects are significant (i.e. of the order of 10%). The angular

  8. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Energy system analysis of fuel cells and distributed generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Brian Vad; Lund, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    must be thorough and careful when identifying any imbalances between electricity demand and production from CHP plants (Combined Heat and Power) and fluctuating renewable energy sources. This chapter introduces the energy system analysis model EnergyPLAN, which is one example of a freeware tool, which...... on the energy system in which they are used. Consequently, coherent energy systems analyses of specific and complete energy systems must be conducted in order to evaluate the benefits of FC technologies and in order to be able to compare alternative solutions. In relation to distributed generation, FC...... can be used for such analyses. Moreover, the chapter presents the results of evaluating the overall system fuel savings achieved by introducing different FC applications into different energy systems. Natural gas-based and hydrogen-based micro FC-CHP, natural gas local FC-CHP plants for district...

  10. Transition to distributed energy generation in Finland: Prospects and barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Salvatore; Varho, Vilja; Rikkonen, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    Small-scale distributed energy generation is expected to play an important role in helping Finland increase its energy self-sufficiency. However, the overall strategy to date for promoting distributed energy remains unclear. It is not yet well understood which factors promote the growth of the distributed energy sector and what barriers need to be removed. In this article we present the results of a questionnaire directed at a panel of 26 experts from the distributed energy value chain and 15 semi-structured interviews with industry and non-industry representatives. We investigated, from a sociotechnical transition perspective, the possibilities and challenges of the transition to distributed energy in Finland through 2025. The results show that a shift to a prosperous future for distributed energy is possible if permit procedures, ease of grid connection, and taxation laws are improved in the electricity sector and new business concepts are introduced in the heat sector. In contrast to other European countries, the transition in Finland is expected to take place through a market-based approach favoring investment-focused measures. We conclude that incentive-based schemes alone, whatever they may be, will be insufficient to create significant growth in Finland without institutional change, removal of barriers, and the engagement of key actors. - Highlights: • We examine the possibilities and challenges of the transition to DE in Finland. • Technological niches are emerging both in the heat and electricity sector. • Business model innovation is evident only in the electricity sector. • Removing barriers and developing new business models will accelerate the transition.

  11. Fast Reliability Assessing Method for Distribution Network with Distributed Renewable Energy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fan; Huang, Shaoxiong; Ding, Jinjin; Ding, Jinjin; Gao, Bo; Xie, Yuguang; Wang, Xiaoming

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a fast reliability assessing method for distribution grid with distributed renewable energy generation. First, the Weibull distribution and the Beta distribution are used to describe the probability distribution characteristics of wind speed and solar irradiance respectively, and the models of wind farm, solar park and local load are built for reliability assessment. Then based on power system production cost simulation probability discretization and linearization power flow, a optimal power flow objected with minimum cost of conventional power generation is to be resolved. Thus a reliability assessment for distribution grid is implemented fast and accurately. The Loss Of Load Probability (LOLP) and Expected Energy Not Supplied (EENS) are selected as the reliability index, a simulation for IEEE RBTS BUS6 system in MATLAB indicates that the fast reliability assessing method calculates the reliability index much faster with the accuracy ensured when compared with Monte Carlo method.

  12. Computation of the binding affinities of catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitors: multisubstate relative free energy calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, P Nuno; Bonifácio, Maria João; Loureiro, Ana Isabel; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2012-04-05

    Alchemical free energy simulations are amongst the most accurate techniques for the computation of the free energy changes associated with noncovalent protein-ligand interactions. A procedure is presented to estimate the relative binding free energies of several ligands to the same protein target where multiple, low-energy configurational substates might coexist, as opposed to one unique structure. The contributions of all individual substates were estimated, explicitly, with the free energy perturbation method, and combined in a rigorous fashion to compute the overall relative binding free energies and dissociation constants. It is shown that, unless the most stable bound forms are known a priori, inaccurate results may be obtained if the contributions of multiple substates are ignored. The method was applied to study the complex formed between human catechol-O-methyltransferase and BIA 9-1067, a newly developed tight-binding inhibitor that is currently under clinical evaluation for the therapy of Parkinson's disease. Our results reveal an exceptionally high-binding affinity (K(d) in subpicomolar range) and provide insightful clues on the interactions and mechanism of inhibition. The inhibitor is, itself, a slowly reacting substrate of the target enzyme and is released from the complex in the form of O-methylated product. By comparing the experimental catalytic rate (k(cat)) and the estimated dissociation rate (k(off)) constants of the enzyme-inhibitor complex, one can conclude that the observed inhibition potency (K(i)) is primarily dependent on the catalytic rate constant of the inhibitor's O-methylation, rather than the rate constant of dissociation of the complex. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Energy distribution of nanoflares in the quiet solar corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulyanov, Artyom

    2012-07-01

    We present a detailed statistical analysis of flare-like events in low layer of solar corona detected with TESIS instrument onboard CORONAS-PHOTON satellite in 171 {Å} during high-cadence (5 sec) time-series. The estimated thermal energies of these small events amount to 10^{23} - 10^{26} erg. According to modern classification flare-like events with such energies are usually referred to as nanoflares. The big number of registered events (above 2000) allowed us to obtain precise distributions of geometric and physical parameters of nanoflares, the most intriguing being energy distribution. Following Aschwanden et al. (2000) and other authors we approximated the calculated energy distribution with a single power law slope: N(E)dE ˜ N^{-α}dE. The power law index was derived to be α = 2.4 ± 0.2, which is very close to the value reported by Krucker & Benz (1998): α ≈ 2.3 - 2.4. The total energy input from registered events constitute about 10^4 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}, which is well beyond net losses in quiet corona (3 \\cdot 10^5 erg \\cdot cm^{-2} \\cdot s^{-1}). However, the value of α > 2 indicates that nanoflares with lower energies dominate over nanoflares with bigger energies and could contribute considerably to quiet corona heating.

  14. The broadband spectral energy distributions of SDSS blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huai-Zhen; Chen, Luo-En; Jiang, Yun-Guo; Yi, Ting-Feng

    2015-07-01

    We compiled the radio, optical and X-ray data of blazars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database, and presented the distribution of luminosities and broadband spectral indices. The distribution of luminosities shows that the averaged luminosity of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) is larger than that of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects. On the other hand, the broadband spectral energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and low energy peaked BL Lac objects have similar spectral properties, but high energy peaked BL Lac objects have a distinct spectral property. This may be due to the fact that different subclasses of blazars have different intrinsic environments and are at different cooling levels. Even so, a unified scheme is also revealed from the color-color diagram, which hints that there are similar physical processes operating in all objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions or beaming parameters. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  15. Asymptotic solution to the isothermal nth order distributed activation energy model using the Rayleigh Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Dhaundiyal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the influence of relevant parameters of biomass pyrolysis on the numerical solution of the isothermal nth-order distributed activation energy model (DAEM using the Rayleigh distribution as the initial distribution function F(E of the activation energies. In this study, the integral upper limit, the frequency factor, the reaction order and the scale parameters are investigated. This paper also derived the asymptotic approximation for the DAEM. The influence of these parameters is used to calculate the kinetic parameters of the isothermal nth-order DAEM with the help of thermo-analytical results of TGA/DTG analysis.

  16. Distribution of primaquine in human blood: Drug-binding to alpha 1-glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.; Frischer, H.

    1990-01-01

    To clarify the distribution of the antimalarial primaquine in human blood, we measured the drug separately in the liquid, cellular, and ultrafiltrate phases. Washed red cells resuspended at a hematocrit of 0.4 were exposed to a submaximal therapeutic level of 250 ng/ml of carbon 14-labeled primaquine. The tracer was recovered quantitatively in separated plasma and red cells. Over 75% of the total labeled drug was found in red cells suspended in saline solution, but only 10% to 30% in red cells suspended in plasma. The plasma effect was not mediated by albumin. Studies with alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AGP), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, an agent that displaces AGP-bound drugs, and cord blood known to have decreased AGP established that primaquine binds to physiologic amounts of the glycoprotein in plasma. Red cell primaquine concentration increased linearly as AGP level fell and as the free drug fraction rose. We suggest that clinical blood levels of primaquine include the red cell fraction or whole blood level because (1) erythrocytic primaquine is a sizable and highly variable component of the total drug in blood; (2) this component reflects directly the free drug in plasma, and inversely the extent of binding to AGP; (3) the amount of free primaquine may influence drug transport into specific tissues in vivo; and (4) fluctuations of AGP, an acute-phase reactant that increases greatly in patients with malaria and other infections, markedly affect the partition of primaquine in blood. Because AGP binds many basic drugs, unrecognized primaquine-drug interactions may exist

  17. Social Free Energy of a Pareto-Like Resource Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinko Zlatić

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available For an organisation with a Pareto-like distribution of the relevant resources we determine the social free energy and related social quantities using thermodynamical formalism. Macroscopic dynamics of the organisation is linked with the changes in the attributed thermodynamical quantities through changes in resource distribution function. It is argued that quantities of thermodynamical origin form the optimised set of organisation’s state indicators, which is reliable expression of micro-dynamics.

  18. Structural Vulnerability of Energy Distribution Systems; Incorporating Infrastructural Dependencies

    OpenAIRE

    Helseth, Arild; Holen, Arne T

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a method for assessing the structural vulnerability of two coupled energy distribution systems is proposed. The co-existing of an electric power distribution system and a district heating system is described and modelled, under the assumption that the operation of the district heating system is directly dependent on electric power. The structural vulnerability of the two systems subject to single failures or a set of simultaneous failures in the power system is found. Thus, the ...

  19. Distributed Electrical Energy Systems: Needs, Concepts, Approaches and Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yingchen [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Zhang, Jun [University of Denver; Gao, Wenzhong [University of Denver; Zheng, Xinhu [University of Minnesota; Yang, Liuqing [Colorado State University; Hao, Jun [University of Denver; Dai, Xiaoxiao [University of Denver

    2017-09-01

    Intelligent distributed electrical energy systems (IDEES) are featured by vast system components, diversifled component types, and difficulties in operation and management, which results in that the traditional centralized power system management approach no longer flts the operation. Thus, it is believed that the blockchain technology is one of the important feasible technical paths for building future large-scale distributed electrical energy systems. An IDEES is inherently with both social and technical characteristics, as a result, a distributed electrical energy system needs to be divided into multiple layers, and at each layer, a blockchain is utilized to model and manage its logic and physical functionalities. The blockchains at difierent layers coordinate with each other and achieve successful operation of the IDEES. Speciflcally, the multi-layer blockchains, named 'blockchain group', consist of distributed data access and service blockchain, intelligent property management blockchain, power system analysis blockchain, intelligent contract operation blockchain, and intelligent electricity trading blockchain. It is expected that the blockchain group can be self-organized into a complex, autonomous and distributed IDEES. In this complex system, frequent and in-depth interactions and computing will derive intelligence, and it is expected that such intelligence can bring stable, reliable and efficient electrical energy production, transmission and consumption.

  20. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-01-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and 3 H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of 3 H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis

  1. Binding free energy calculations to rationalize the interactions of huprines with acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Érica C M; Oliva, Mónica; Andrés, Juan

    2018-03-26

    In the present study, the binding free energy of a family of huprines with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is calculated by means of the free energy perturbation method, based on hybrid quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics potentials. Binding free energy calculations and the analysis of the geometrical parameters highlight the importance of the stereochemistry of huprines in AChE inhibition. Binding isotope effects are calculated to unravel the interactions between ligands and the gorge of AChE. New chemical insights are provided to explain and rationalize the experimental results. A good correlation with the experimental data is found for a family of inhibitors with moderate differences in the enzyme affinity. The analysis of the geometrical parameters and interaction energy per residue reveals that Asp72, Glu199, and His440 contribute significantly to the network of interactions between active site residues, which stabilize the inhibitors in the gorge. It seems that a cooperative effect of the residues of the gorge determines the affinity of the enzyme for these inhibitors, where Asp72, Glu199, and His440 make a prominent contribution.

  2. Experimental support for a desolvation energy term in governing equations for binding equilibria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Brian M; Eggers, Daryl K

    2013-07-11

    This study introduces a new thermodynamic framework for aqueous reaction equilibria that treats water as a coreactant in the development of a general binding equation. The approach features an explicit consideration for the change in hydration that occurs when two solvated surfaces come into contact. As an outcome of this framework, the standard-state free energy of binding is defined by the summation of two terms: the traditional term (-RT ln Ki) plus a desolvation free-energy term that is weighted by the number of complexes formed at equilibrium. The new formalism suggests that the equilibrium ratio, Ki, is not a constant and that the observed concentration dependence of Ki may be used to obtain the molar desolvation energy and the standard-state free energy at infinite dilution. The governing equation is supported by results from isothermal titration calorimetry using the chelation of calcium(II) by EDTA as a model binding reaction. This work may have far-reaching implications for solution thermodynamics, including an explanation for the oft-noted discrepancy between the enthalpy values obtained by calorimetry and those from the van't Hoff approach.

  3. Experimental Support for Desolvation Energy Term in Governing Equations for Binding Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Brian M.; Eggers, Daryl K.

    2013-01-01

    This study introduces a new thermodynamic framework for aqueous reaction equilibria that treats water as a co-reactant in the development of a general binding equation. The approach features an explicit consideration for the change in hydration that occurs when two solvated surfaces come into contact. As an outcome of this framework, the standard state free energy of binding is defined by the summation of two terms, the traditional term (−RTlnKi) plus a desolvation free energy term that is weighted by the number of complexes formed at equilibrium. The new formalism suggests that the equilibrium ratio, Ki, is not a constant and that the observed concentration dependence of Ki may be used to obtain the molar desolvation energy and the standard state free energy at infinite dilution. The governing equation is supported by results from isothermal titration calorimetry using the chelation of calcium(II) by EDTA as a model binding reaction. This work may have far-reaching implications for solution thermodynamics, including an explanation for the oft-noted discrepancy between enthalpy values obtained by calorimetry and the van’t Hoff approach. PMID:23773139

  4. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  5. Taxonomy for Evaluation of Distributed Control Strategies for Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xue; Heussen, Kai; Gehrke, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Distributed control strategies applied to power distribution control problems are meant to offer robust and scalable integration of distributed energy resources (DER). However, the term “distributed control” is often loosely applied to a variety of very different control strategies. In particular...... there is a lack of discrimination between aspects related to communication topology, physical distribution of components and associated control objectives. This has lead to a lack of objective criteria for performance comparison and general quality assessment of state of the art distributed control solutions....... For such comparison, a classification is required that is consistent across the different aspects mentioned above. This paper develops systematic categories of control strategies that accounts for communication, control and physical distribution aspects of the problem, and provides a set of criteria that can...

  6. Free energy profiles of cocaine esterase-cocaine binding process by molecular dynamics and potential of mean force simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Huang, Xiaoqin; Han, Keli; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-11-25

    The combined molecular dynamics (MD) and potential of mean force (PMF) simulations have been performed to determine the free energy profile of the CocE)-(+)-cocaine binding process in comparison with that of the corresponding CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process. According to the MD simulations, the equilibrium CocE-(+)-cocaine binding mode is similar to the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding mode. However, based on the simulated free energy profiles, a significant free energy barrier (∼5 kcal/mol) exists in the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process whereas no obvious free energy barrier exists in the CocE-(-)-cocaine binding process, although the free energy barrier of ∼5 kcal/mol is not high enough to really slow down the CocE-(+)-cocaine binding process. In addition, the obtained free energy profiles also demonstrate that (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine have very close binding free energies with CocE, with a negligible difference (∼0.2 kcal/mol), which is qualitatively consistent with the nearly same experimental K M values of the CocE enzyme for (+)-cocaine and (-)-cocaine. The consistency between the computational results and available experimental data suggests that the mechanistic insights obtained from this study are reasonable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Novel methodology for optimal reconfiguration of distribution networks with distributed energy resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chittur Ramaswamy, Parvathy; Tant, Jeroen; Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna

    2015-01-01

    This paper develops three novel methodologies for optimal reconfiguration of distribution networks in the presence of distributed energy resources (DERs). The novelty is in achieving a non-conservative and robust solution to grid reconfiguration. The optimal solution is the minimum-loss-configura......This paper develops three novel methodologies for optimal reconfiguration of distribution networks in the presence of distributed energy resources (DERs). The novelty is in achieving a non-conservative and robust solution to grid reconfiguration. The optimal solution is the minimum......-loss-configuration of the distribution network taking into account the cost of switching and the grid operational constraints. The methods are based on the concepts of receding horizon control (RHC) and scenario analysis (SA) which inherently optimize switching costs and losses. The salient feature of incorporating RHC and SA...

  8. Effects of distributing wind energy generation over Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebel, G. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    Using data from 60 meteorological stations distributed all over Europe in conjunction with the National Grid Model (NGM) from the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, the effects of the large-scale distribution of wind energy generation are studied. In some regions of Europe, wind energy already covers a significant proportion of the electricity demand. But the intermittence of the wind resource is always a limiting factor when penetration levels are high. Studies for single countries have shown that distributing the generation over a large area reduces the variability of the output and hence makes wind energy more appealing to utilities, since the stability requirement of the network are easier to fulfil. The data are analysed in terms of absolute highs and lows, temporal and spatial correlations. To assess the financial benefits, the NGM is used to evaluate the match of electricity demand and generation as well as the possibel savings of fossil fuel in an electricity grid incorporating various capacities of wind energy generation. To assess the value of wind energy on a trans-national scale, the European plant mix is modelled, and the NGM is used to simulate the scheduling of these plants in the presence of different penetrations of wind energy. (au) EU-JOULE-3. 11 refs.

  9. Accurate Estimation of the Standard Binding Free Energy of Netropsin with DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is the target of chemical compounds (drugs, pollutants, photosensitizers, etc., which bind through non-covalent interactions. Depending on their structure and their chemical properties, DNA binders can associate to the minor or to the major groove of double-stranded DNA. They can also intercalate between two adjacent base pairs, or even replace one or two base pairs within the DNA double helix. The subsequent biological effects are strongly dependent on the architecture of the binding motif. Discriminating between the different binding patterns is of paramount importance to predict and rationalize the effect of a given compound on DNA. The structural characterization of DNA complexes remains, however, cumbersome at the experimental level. In this contribution, we employed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to determine the standard binding free energy of DNA with netropsin, a well-characterized antiviral and antimicrobial drug, which associates to the minor groove of double-stranded DNA. To overcome the sampling limitations of classical molecular dynamics simulations, which cannot capture the large change in configurational entropy that accompanies binding, we resort to a series of potentials of mean force calculations involving a set of geometrical restraints acting on collective variables.

  10. Distributed Energy Resources Interconnection Systems: Technology Review and Research Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, N. R.

    2002-09-01

    Interconnecting distributed energy resources (DER) to the electric utility grid (or Area Electric Power System, Area EPS) involves system engineering, safety, and reliability considerations. This report documents US DOE Distribution and Interconnection R&D (formerly Distributed Power Program) activities, furthering the development and safe and reliable integration of DER interconnected with our nation's electric power systems. The key to that is system integration and technology development of the interconnection devices that perform the functions necessary to maintain the safety, power quality, and reliability of the EPS when DER are connected to it.

  11. Precision measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines and determination of neutron binding energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braumandl, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper first discusses the energy accuracy of the BILL conversion electron spectrometer at the Grenoble high flux reactor. With an improved temperature stabilisation of the magnets, an energy accuracy of ΔE/E -5 can be reached. After this, highly exact measurements of high-energy conversion electron lines of the 200 Hg, 114 Cd, 165 Dy, 168 Er, 239 U nuclei and the 13 C, 28 Al 3 H and 92 Zr photoelectron lines were carried out. Energy calibration of the spectrometer was carried out in the 1.5 MeV to 6.5 MeV range with intensive high-energy transitions of the 200 Hg nucleus. Systematic calibration errors could be investigated by means of combinations between the calibration lines. A calibration for absolute energies was obtained by comparing low-energy gamma transitions of 200 Hg with the 411.8 keV gold standard. (orig.) [de

  12. World energy intensity convergence revisited: A weighted distribution dynamics approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrerias, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the process of convergence as regards energy intensity in the case of large group countries over the period 1971–2008. In doing so, we focus on the distribution dynamics approach. The first novel aspect of this study consists in the fact that it analyses whether the convergence patterns differ when the population is taken into account, while the second one consists in investigating the convergence process in the case of total energy intensity, fossil fuel and alternative and nuclear intensity for the overall sample of countries as well as differentiating between develop and developing countries. On the one hand, our results indicate that the convergence patterns do differ once we weight the transition matrix by population, since we find more evidence against divergence. Moreover, a significant persistence is also found in the intra-distribution dynamics, which in turn influences the speed at which the steady state is achieved. On the other hand, the Kernel density estimates and the stationary distribution show that the distribution becomes at least bimodal in the former and clearly multimodal in the latter, thereby implying that convergence occurs within a group of countries. This phenomenon is present in all sources of energy examined, but in the case of alternative and nuclear intensity there are more symptoms of convergence. Developing countries converge at higher energy intensity ratios, while in the case of developed countries there are at least two convergence clubs, one in the lowest levels of energy intensity and another with higher levels of energy intensity. These results show the need to promote further energy-saving measures in the sample of countries examined. - Highlights: ► Energy intensity convergence is analysed in the case of 83 countries. ► We use the dynamic of the distribution approach. ► We weight the distribution by population of each country. ► Results indicate that weighting by population

  13. Operation optimization of a distributed energy system considering energy costs and exergy efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Somma, M.; Yan, B.; Bianco, N.; Graditi, G.; Luh, P.B.; Mongibello, L.; Naso, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Operation optimization model of a Distributed Energy System (DES). • Multi-objective strategy to optimize energy cost and exergy efficiency. • Exergy analysis in building energy supply systems. - Abstract: With the growing demand of energy on a worldwide scale, improving the efficiency of energy resource use has become one of the key challenges. Application of exergy principles in the context of building energy supply systems can achieve rational use of energy resources by taking into account the different quality levels of energy resources as well as those of building demands. This paper is on the operation optimization of a Distributed Energy System (DES). The model involves multiple energy devices that convert a set of primary energy carriers with different energy quality levels to meet given time-varying user demands at different energy quality levels. By promoting the usage of low-temperature energy sources to satisfy low-quality thermal energy demands, the waste of high-quality energy resources can be reduced, thereby improving the overall exergy efficiency. To consider the economic factor as well, a multi-objective linear programming problem is formulated. The Pareto frontier, including the best possible trade-offs between the economic and exergetic objectives, is obtained by minimizing a weighted sum of the total energy cost and total primary exergy input using branch-and-cut. The operation strategies of the DES under different weights for the two objectives are discussed. The operators of DESs can choose the operation strategy from the Pareto frontier based on costs, essential in the short run, and sustainability, crucial in the long run. The contribution of each energy device in reducing energy costs and the total exergy input is also analyzed. In addition, results show that the energy cost can be much reduced and the overall exergy efficiency can be significantly improved by the optimized operation of the DES as compared with the

  14. Mass and Charge Distribution in Low-Energy Fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, A.C.

    1965-01-01

    The mass and charge distributions for thermal-neutron fission of U 235 are discussed in considerable detail and compared with the corresponding distributions in other low-energy fission processes. Points discussed in connection with the mass distributions for binary fission include the positions of the peaks, valley and fine structure in a mass yield curve with respect to filled nuclear shells and the changes in the positions that occur with changing fissioning nucleus and excitation energy. The mass distribution from ternary fission is discussed also. For both binary and ternary fission comments are made concerning the mass distributions of primary fragments (before neutron evaporation) and of fission products (after neutron evaporation). Charge distribution is discussed in terms of charge dispersion among fission products with the same mass number and the variation with mass number of Zp, the ''most probable charge'' (non-integral) for a given mass number. Although direct information about charge distribution is limited to fission products, estimates are presented of charge distribution for primary fission fragments. Knowledge and estimates of mass and charge distribution for a fission process allow estimation of primary yields of all fission products or fragments. Although many estimated primary yields are quite uncertain mainly because of lack of knowledge of charge distribution, especially for fission products formed in low yield; some estimates of primary yields are presented to illustrate the need for and possible practicality of further experimentation. Fission processes other than thermal-neutron fission of U 235 that are discussed include thermal-neutron fission of U 233 and Pu 239 , spontaneous fission of Pu 240 and Cf 252 , 14-MeV neutron fission of U 235 and U 238 , 11-MeV proton fission of Ra 226 and 22-MeV deuteron fission of Bi 209 . (author) [fr

  15. Exploring Distributed Energy Alternatives to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Souhern California Edison Service Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute

    2005-12-01

    Distributed energy (DE) technologies have received much attention for the energy savings and electric power reliability assurances that may be achieved by their widespread adoption. Fueling the attention have been the desires to globally reduce greenhouse gas emissions and concern about easing power transmission and distribution system capacity limitations and congestion. However, these benefits may come at a cost to the electric utility companies in terms of lost revenue and concerns with interconnection on the distribution system. This study assesses the costs and benefits of DE to both consumers and distribution utilities and expands upon a precursory study done with Detroit Edison (DTE)1, by evaluating the combined impact of DE, energy-efficiency, photovoltaics (a use of solar energy), and demand response that will shape the grid of the future. This study was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Gas Research Institute (GRI), American Electric Power (AEP), and Gas Technology Institute's (GTI) Distributed Energy Collaborative Program (DECP). It focuses on two real Southern California Edison (SCE) circuits, a 13 MW suburban circuit fictitiously named Justice on the Lincoln substation, and an 8 MW rural circuit fictitiously named Prosper on the Washington Substation. The primary objectives of the study were threefold: (1) Evaluate the potential for using advanced energy technologies, including DE, energy-efficiency (EE), demand response, electricity storage, and photovoltaics (PV), to reshape electric load curves by reducing peak demand, for real circuits. (2) Investigate the potential impact on guiding technology deployment and managing operation in a way that benefits both utilities and their customers by: (a) Improving grid load factor for utilities; (b) Reducing energy costs for customers; and (c) Optimizing electric demand growth. (3) Demonstrate benefits by reporting on a recently installed advanced energy system at a utility customer site

  16. Spatial distribution of China׳s renewable energy industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dong, Liang; Liang, Hanwei; Gao, Zhiqiu

    2016-01-01

    China applies no efforts to promote the development of renewable energy (REE) so as to enhance China׳s energy security and address climate change. National top-down support scheme and the local renewable energy industry (REEI) development are the two important and intervened countermeasures......, included Bohai sea region, Yangtze River Delta, middle area, and western area. Supply chains were diversely distributed based on the regional resources allocation as well as economy development level and. In summary, REE resource supply and transformation facilities construction were the main REEI...

  17. Quantum confinement effect and exciton binding energy of layered perovskite nanoplatelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the preparation of monolayer (n = 1, few-layer (n = 2–5 and 3D (n = ∞ organic lead bromide perovskite nanoplatelets (NPLs by tuning the molar ratio of methylammonium bromide (MABr and hexadecammonium bromide (HABr. The absorption spectrum of the monolayer (HA2PbBr4 perovskite NPLs shows about 138 nm blue shift from that of 3D MAPbBr3 perovskites, which is attributed to strong quantum confinement effect. We further investigate the two-photon photoluminescence (PL of the NPLs and measure the exciton binding energy of monolayer perovskite NPLs using linear absorption and two-photon PL excitation spectroscopy. The exciton binding energy of monolayer perovskite NPLs is about 218 meV, which is far larger than tens of meV in 3D lead halide perovskites.

  18. Daily pattern of energy distribution and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Hollie A; Li, Fan; Cardoso, Chelsi

    2018-02-19

    Timing of energy intake, a temporal dietary pattern, may enhance health. Eating a greater amount of energy earlier and a smaller amount of energy later in the day, a behavioral circadian rhythm, may assist with chronoenhancement. Chronoenhancement seeks to enhance entrainment (synchronization) of biological and behavioral circadian rhythms. In humans, research reports that eating a greater amount of energy early and a smaller amount of energy later in the day increases dietary induced thermogenesis, improves cardiometabolic outcomes, and enhances weight loss. However, little human research has examined if this eating pattern enhances regularity of biological circadian rhythm. In a randomized controlled 8-week pilot study, the influence of energy distribution timing on weight loss and regularity of sleep onset and wake times (marker for biological circadian rhythm) was examined. Within an hypocaloric, three-meal prescription, participants (n = 8) were assigned to either: 1) Morning: 50%, 30%, and 20% of kcal at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively; or 2) Evening: 20%, 30%, and 50% of kcal at breakfast, lunch, and dinner, respectively. Percent weight loss and regularity of sleep onset and wake times were significantly (p energy distribution timing on health, longer studies conducted in free-living participants, with dietary intake assessed using time-stamped methods, that include measures of the circadian timing system are needed. This small review is based upon a symposium presentation at the Society of the Study of Ingestive Behavior in 2017. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Valence proton-neutron interaction strengths from double binding energy differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, D.S.; Foy, B.D.; Warner, D.D.; Zamfir, N.V.; Casten, R.F.

    1996-01-01

    Empirical p-n interaction strengths have been extracted from experimental mass data using double-difference binding energy equations. The especially strong interactions for self-conjugate nuclei will be discussed as well as microstructure found for deformed and in doubly magic regions. Valence correlation Schemes provide a basis to comment on the stability of medium mass near-drip-line nuclei and superheavy elements

  20. Prediction of trypsin/molecular fragment binding affinities by free energy decomposition and empirical scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Mark L.; Faver, John C.; Ucisik, Melek N.; Dashti, Danial S.; Zheng, Zheng; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-05-01

    Two families of binding affinity estimation methodologies are described which were utilized in the SAMPL3 trypsin/fragment binding affinity challenge. The first is a free energy decomposition scheme based on a thermodynamic cycle, which included separate contributions from enthalpy and entropy of binding as well as a solvent contribution. Enthalpic contributions were estimated with PM6-DH2 semiempirical quantum mechanical interaction energies, which were modified with a statistical error correction procedure. Entropic contributions were estimated with the rigid-rotor harmonic approximation, and solvent contributions to the free energy were estimated with several different methods. The second general methodology is the empirical score LISA, which contains several physics-based terms trained with the large PDBBind database of protein/ligand complexes. Here we also introduce LISA+, an updated version of LISA which, prior to scoring, classifies systems into one of four classes based on a ligand's hydrophobicity and molecular weight. Each version of the two methodologies (a total of 11 methods) was trained against a compiled set of known trypsin binders available in the Protein Data Bank to yield scaling parameters for linear regression models. Both raw and scaled scores were submitted to SAMPL3. Variants of LISA showed relatively low absolute errors but also low correlation with experiment, while the free energy decomposition methods had modest success when scaling factors were included. Nonetheless, re-scaled LISA yielded the best predictions in the challenge in terms of RMS error, and six of these models placed in the top ten best predictions by RMS error. This work highlights some of the difficulties of predicting binding affinities of small molecular fragments to protein receptors as well as the benefit of using training data.

  1. A Decomposition Algorithm for Optimal Control of Distributed Energy System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokoler, Leo Emil; Edlund, Kristian; Standardi, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In economic model predictive control of distributed energy systems, the constrained optimal control problem can be expressed as a linear program with a block-angular structure. In this paper, we present an efficient Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition algorithm specifically tailored to problems...

  2. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buche, D. L.; Perry, S.

    2007-10-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  3. Prediction of wind energy distribution in complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chenqi; Yang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    Based on linear models, WAsP software predicts wind energy distribution, with a good accuracy for flat terrain, but with a large error under complicated topography. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out using the FLUENT software on a mesh generated by the GAMBIT and ARGIS software...

  4. The case for coordinated energy storage in future distribution grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voulis, N.; Warnier, Martijn; Brazier, F.M.

    2017-01-01

    The integration of distributed renewable energy resources in urban power systems requires locally tailored approaches. This study analyses the impact of storage penetration and its coordination in three representative urban areas in Amsterdam: a residential, a business and a mixed area. Results show

  5. Visual Method for Spectral Energy Distribution Calculation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    c Indian Academy of Sciences. Visual Method for Spectral Energy Distribution Calculation of Blazars. Y. Huang1,3 & J. H. Fan2,3,∗. 1School of Computer Science and Education Software, Guangzhou University,. Guangzhou 510006, China. 2Centre for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

  6. Asynchronous event driven distributed energy management using profile steering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteen, G.; Molderink, A.; Hurink, J. L.; Smit, G. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Distributed Energy Management methodologies with a scheduling approach based on predictions require means to avoid problems related to prediction errors. Various approaches deal with such prediction errors by applying a different online control mechanism, such as a double-sided auction. However,

  7. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  8. Technologies for Distributed Energy Resources. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Fact Sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitchford, P.; Brown, T.

    2001-01-01

    This four-page fact sheet describes distributed energy resources for Federal facilities, which are being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Distributed energy resources include both existing and emerging energy technologies: advanced industrial turbines and microturbines; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; fuel cells; geothermal systems; natural gas reciprocating engines; photovoltaics and other solar systems; wind turbines; small, modular biopower; energy storage systems; and hybrid systems. DOE FEMP is investigating ways to use these alternative energy systems in government facilities to meet greater demand, to increase the reliability of the power-generation system, and to reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels

  9. Influence of carbamazepin and diclofenac on the radio-T3/T4-distribution and the maximal binding capacity of thyroid hormone binding proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternad, H.; Albrecher, B.; Langsteger, W.; Eber, O.

    1993-01-01

    Marked changes in plasma thyroid function parameters due to medication have been described in literature. We, therefore, studied the influence of routine administration of carbamazepine and diclofenac upon the radio T3/T4 distribution to specific thyroid transport proteins as well as their maximal binding capacity (MBC) for T4. Both drugs have been found to lead to changes in T3 and T4 distribution but not to any influence upon MBC. The parameters of thyroid function mostly revealed reduced FT3 and FT4 values while bTSH was affected only by carbamazepine administration. (authors)

  10. Binding mode and free energy prediction of fisetin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodee Nutho

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, our aim is to investigate the preferential binding mode and encapsulation of the flavonoid fisetin in the nano-pore of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD at the molecular level using various theoretical approaches: molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD simulations and binding free energy calculations. The molecular docking suggested four possible fisetin orientations in the cavity through its chromone or phenyl ring with two different geometries of fisetin due to the rotatable bond between the two rings. From the multiple MD results, the phenyl ring of fisetin favours its inclusion into the β-CD cavity, whilst less binding or even unbinding preference was observed in the complexes where the larger chromone ring is located in the cavity. All MM- and QM-PBSA/GBSA free energy predictions supported the more stable fisetin/β-CD complex of the bound phenyl ring. Van der Waals interaction is the key force in forming the complexes. In addition, the quantum mechanics calculations with M06-2X/6-31G(d,p clearly showed that both solvation effect and BSSE correction cannot be neglected for the energy determination of the chosen system.

  11. Determination of energy distribution for photon and neutron microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todo, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    This work was undertaken to provide basic physical data for use in both microdosimetry and dosimetry of high energy photons and also in the neutron radiation field. It is described the formalism to determine the initial electron energy spectra in water irradiated by photons with energies up to 1 GeV. Calculations were performed with a Monte Carlo computer code, PHOEL-3, which is also described. The code treats explicitly the production of electron-positron pairs, Compton scattering, photoelectric absorption, and the emission of Auger electrons following the occurrence of K-shell vacancies in oxygen. The tables give directly the information needed to specify the absolute single-collision kerma in water, which approximates tissue, at each photon energy. Results for continuous photon energy spectra can be obtained by using linear interpolation with the tables. The conditions under which first-collision kerma approximate absorbed dose are discussed. A formula is given for estimating bremsstrahlung energy loss, one of the principal differences between kerma and absorbed dose in practical case. A study has been carried out, on the use of cylindrical, energy-proportional pulse-height detector for determining microdosimetric quantities, as neutron fractional dose spectra, D (L), in function of linear energy transfer, TLE. In the present study the Hurst detector was used and this device satisfies the requirement of the Bragg-Gray principle. It is developed a Monte Carlo Method to obtain the D(L) spectrum from a measured pulse-height spectrum H(h), and the knowledge of the distribution of recoil-particle track lenght, P(T) in the sensitive volume of the detector. These developed programs to find P(T) and D(L) are presented. The distribution of D(L) in LET were obtained using a known distribution of P(T) and the measured H(h) spectrum from sup(252)Cf neutron source. All the results are discussed and the conclusions are presented. (author)

  12. Energy loss analysis of an integrated space power distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankam, M. David; Ribeiro, P. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of studies related to conceptual topologies of an integrated utility-like space power system are described. The system topologies are comparatively analyzed by considering their transmission energy losses as functions of mainly distribution voltage level and load composition. The analysis is expedited by use of a Distribution System Analysis and Simulation (DSAS) software. This recently developed computer program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) uses improved load models to solve the power flow within the system. However, present shortcomings of the software with regard to space applications, and incompletely defined characteristics of a space power system make the results applicable to only the fundamental trends of energy losses of the topologies studied. Accountability, such as included, for the effects of the various parameters on the system performance can constitute part of a planning tool for a space power distribution system.

  13. Incentive Driven Distributed Generation Planning with Renewable Energy Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAUR, S.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Renewable DGs may not be economically viable due to the stochastic generation and huge capital investment, but are an inevitable choice for sustainable energy development and future planning. An appropriate incentive scheme for clean Distributed Generation (DG technologies is able to address this issue in an economical manner and is considered in proposed distributed generation planning model. The proposed model minimizes the annualized cost with Emission Offset Incentive (EOI and the penalty for Green-house Gas (GHG emissions. A meta-heuristic approach with dynamic tuning of control parameters is adopted to improve the success and the convergence rate of optimal solutions. The algorithm provides the optimal solution in terms of type, size, and location of DG. The proposed technique is implemented on IEEE 33-bus system. Proposed model helps the Distribution Network Operators (DNOs to decide the proper DG technology from an economic prospective for eco-friendly energy planning.

  14. Collisionless Plasma Modeling in an Arbitrary Potential Energy Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, M. W.; Khazanov, G. V.

    1997-01-01

    A new technique for calculating a collisionless plasma along a field line is presented. The primary feature of the new model is that it can handle an arbitrary (including nonmonotonic) potential energy distribution. This was one of the limiting constraints on the existing models in this class, and these constraints are generalized for an arbitrary potential energy composition. The formulation for relating current density to the field-aligned potential as well as formulas for density, temperature and energy flux calculations are presented for several distribution functions, ranging from a bi-Lorentzian with a loss cone to an isotropic Maxwellian. A comparison of these results with previous models shows that the formulation reduces.to the earlier models under similar assumptions.

  15. Strategies for Power/Energy Saving in Distribution Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GRIGORAS, G.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The power/energy losses reduction in distribution systems is an important issue during planning and operation, with important technical and economical implications. Thus, the energy losses minimization implies not only the technical improvement of the network, through its renewal with the introduction of the technological innovations in the equipment and circuit components as well as the optimal planning of the design and development of the network, but also requires the use of the methods and software tools to facilitate the operation process. The paper presents a strategy for power/energy saving which replacement of the 6 kV voltage level with 20 kV voltage level in correlation with the extent of using efficient transformers. In this line, different urban distribution networks were analyzed using fuzzy techniques.

  16. Distribution and Morphology of Calcium-Binding Proteins Immunoreactive Neurons following Chronic Tungsten Multielectrode Implants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio M Freire

    Full Text Available The development of therapeutic approaches to improve the life quality of people suffering from different types of body paralysis is a current major medical challenge. Brain-machine interface (BMI can potentially help reestablishing lost sensory and motor functions, allowing patients to use their own brain activity to restore sensorimotor control of paralyzed body parts. Chronic implants of multielectrodes, employed to record neural activity directly from the brain parenchyma, constitute the fundamental component of a BMI. However, before this technique may be effectively available to human clinical trials, it is essential to characterize its long-term impact on the nervous tissue in animal models. In the present study we evaluated how chronic implanted tungsten microelectrode arrays impact the distribution and morphology of interneurons reactive to calcium-binding proteins calbindin (CB, calretinin (CR and parvalbumin (PV across the rat's motor cortex. Our results revealed that chronic microelectrode arrays were well tolerated by the nervous tissue, with recordings remaining viable for up to 6 months after implantation. Furthermore, neither the morphology nor the distribution of inhibitory neurons were broadly impacted. Moreover, restricted microglial activation was observed on the implanted sites. On the whole, our results confirm and expand the notion that tungsten multielectrodes can be deemed as a feasible candidate to future human BMI studies.

  17. Assessment of energy supply and continuity of service in distribution network with renewable distributed generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdullah, M.A.; Agalgaonkar, A.P.; Muttaqi, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Difficulties in assessing distribution network adequacy with DG are addressed. • Indices are proposed to assess adequacy of energy supply and service continuity. • Analytical methodology is developed to assess the proposed indices. • Concept of joint probability distribution of demand and generation is applied. - Abstract: Continuity of electricity supply with renewable distributed generation (DG) is a topical issue for distribution system planning and operation, especially due to the stochastic nature of power generation and time varying load demand. The conventional adequacy and reliability analysis methods related to bulk generation systems cannot be applied directly for the evaluation of adequacy criteria such as ‘energy supply’ and ‘continuity of service’ for distribution networks embedded with renewable DG. In this paper, new indices highlighting ‘available supply capacity’ and ‘continuity of service’ are proposed for ‘energy supply’ and ‘continuation of service’ evaluation of generation-rich distribution networks, and analytical techniques are developed for their quantification. A probability based analytical method has been developed using the joint probability of the demand and generation, and probability distributions of the proposed indices have been used to evaluate the network adequacy in energy supply and service continuation. A data clustering technique has been used to evaluate the joint probability between coincidental demand and renewable generation. Time sequential Monte Carlo simulation has been used to compare the results obtained using the proposed analytical method. A standard distribution network derived from Roy Billinton test system and a practical radial distribution network have been used to test the proposed method and demonstrate the estimation of the well-being of a system for hosting renewable DG units. It is found that renewable DG systems improve the ‘energy supply’ and

  18. Developing a Novel Hydrogen Sponge with Ideal Binding Energy and High Surface Area for Practical Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, T. C. Mike

    2018-04-19

    This Phase I (5 quarters) research project was to examine the validity of a new class of boron-containing polymer (B-polymer) frameworks, serving as the adsorbents for the practical onboard H2 storage applications. Three B-polymer frameworks were synthesized and investigated, which include B-poly(butyenylstyrene) (B-PBS) framework (A), B-poly(phenyldiacetyene) (B-PPDA) framework (B), and B-poly(phenyltriacetylene) (B-PPTA) framework (C). They are 2-D polymer structures with the repeating cyclic units that spontaneously form open morphology and the B-doped (p-type) π-electrons delocalized surfaces. The ideal B-polymer framework shall exhibit open micropores (pore size in the range of 1-1.5nm) with high surface area (>3000 m2/g), and the B-dopants in the conjugated framework shall provide high surface energy for interacting with H2 molecules (an ideal H2 binding energy in the range of 15-25 kJ/mol). The pore size distribution and H2 binding energy were investigated at both Penn State and NREL laboratories. So far, the experimental results show the successful synthesis of B-polymer frameworks with the relatively well-defined planar (2-D) structures. The intrinsically formed porous morphology exhibits a broad pore size distribution (in the range of 0.5-10 nm) with specific surface area (~1000 m2/g). The miss-alignment between 2-D layers may block some micropore channels and limit gas diffusion throughout the entire matrix. In addition, the 2-D planar conjugated structure may also allow free π-electrons delocalization throughout the framework, which significantly reduces the acidity of B-moieties (electron-deficiency).The resulting 2-D B-polymer frameworks only exhibit a small increase of H2 binding energy in the range of 8-9 KJ/mole (quite constant over the whole sorption range).

  19. Electrostatics, structure prediction, and the energy landscapes for protein folding and binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Min-Yeh; Zheng, Weihua; Balamurugan, D; Schafer, Nicholas P; Kim, Bobby L; Cheung, Margaret S; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    While being long in range and therefore weakly specific, electrostatic interactions are able to modulate the stability and folding landscapes of some proteins. The relevance of electrostatic forces for steering the docking of proteins to each other is widely acknowledged, however, the role of electrostatics in establishing specifically funneled landscapes and their relevance for protein structure prediction are still not clear. By introducing Debye-Hückel potentials that mimic long-range electrostatic forces into the Associative memory, Water mediated, Structure, and Energy Model (AWSEM), a transferable protein model capable of predicting tertiary structures, we assess the effects of electrostatics on the landscapes of thirteen monomeric proteins and four dimers. For the monomers, we find that adding electrostatic interactions does not improve structure prediction. Simulations of ribosomal protein S6 show, however, that folding stability depends monotonically on electrostatic strength. The trend in predicted melting temperatures of the S6 variants agrees with experimental observations. Electrostatic effects can play a range of roles in binding. The binding of the protein complex KIX-pKID is largely assisted by electrostatic interactions, which provide direct charge-charge stabilization of the native state and contribute to the funneling of the binding landscape. In contrast, for several other proteins, including the DNA-binding protein FIS, electrostatics causes frustration in the DNA-binding region, which favors its binding with DNA but not with its protein partner. This study highlights the importance of long-range electrostatics in functional responses to problems where proteins interact with their charged partners, such as DNA, RNA, as well as membranes. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  20. Distributed energy resources at naval base ventura county building 1512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary assessment of the cost effectiveness of distributed energy resources at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC) Building 1512. This study was conducted in response to the base's request for design assistance to the Federal Energy Management Program. Given the current tariff structure there are two main decisions facing NBVC: whether to install distributed energy resources (DER), or whether to continue the direct access energy supply contract. At the current effective rate, given assumptions about the performance and structure of building energy loads and available generating technology characteristics, the results of this study indicate that if the building installed a 600 kW DER system with absorption cooling and heat capabilities chosen by cost minimization, the energy cost savings would be about 14 percent, or $55,000 per year. However, under current conditions, this study also suggests that significant savings could be obtained if Building 1 512 changed from the direct access contract to a SCE TOU-8 (Southern California Edison time of use tariff number 8) rate without installing a DER system. At current SCE TOU-8 tariffs, the potential savings from installation of a DER system would be about 4 percent, or $15,000 per year

  1. Distributed Energy Systems in the Built Environment - European Legal Framework on Distributed Energy Systems in the Built Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pront-van Bommel, S.; Bregman, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to outline the stimuli provided by European law for promoting integrated planning of distributed renewable energy installations on the one hand and its limitations thereof on the other hand, also with regard to the role of local governments.

  2. Comparison of Measured Dark Current Distributions with Calculated Damage Energy Distributions in HgCdTe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, C. J.; Marshall, P. W.; Howe, C. L.; Reed, R. A.; Weller, R. A.; Mendenhall, M.; Waczynski, A.; Ladbury, R.; Jordan, T. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a combined Monte Carlo and analytic approach to the calculation of the pixel-to-pixel distribution of proton-induced damage in a HgCdTe sensor array and compares the results to measured dark current distributions after damage by 63 MeV protons. The moments of the Coulombic, nuclear elastic and nuclear inelastic damage distributions were extracted from Monte Carlo simulations and combined to form a damage distribution using the analytic techniques first described in [1]. The calculations show that the high energy recoils from the nuclear inelastic reactions (calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX [2]) produce a pronounced skewing of the damage energy distribution. While the nuclear elastic component (also calculated using the MCNPX) contributes only a small fraction of the total nonionizing damage energy, its inclusion in the shape of the damage across the array is significant. The Coulombic contribution was calculated using MRED [3-5], a Geant4 [4,6] application. The comparison with the dark current distribution strongly suggests that mechanisms which are not linearly correlated with nonionizing damage produced according to collision kinematics are responsible for the observed dark current increases. This has important implications for the process of predicting the on-orbit dark current response of the HgCdTe sensor array.

  3. Locating Temporal Functional Dynamics of Visual Short-Term Memory Binding using Graph Modular Dirichlet Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Keith; Ricaud, Benjamin; Shahid, Nauman; Rhodes, Stephen; Starr, John M.; Ibáñez, Augustin; Parra, Mario A.; Escudero, Javier; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Visual short-term memory binding tasks are a promising early marker for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To uncover functional deficits of AD in these tasks it is meaningful to first study unimpaired brain function. Electroencephalogram recordings were obtained from encoding and maintenance periods of tasks performed by healthy young volunteers. We probe the task’s transient physiological underpinnings by contrasting shape only (Shape) and shape-colour binding (Bind) conditions, displayed in the left and right sides of the screen, separately. Particularly, we introduce and implement a novel technique named Modular Dirichlet Energy (MDE) which allows robust and flexible analysis of the functional network with unprecedented temporal precision. We find that connectivity in the Bind condition is less integrated with the global network than in the Shape condition in occipital and frontal modules during the encoding period of the right screen condition. Using MDE we are able to discern driving effects in the occipital module between 100-140 ms, coinciding with the P100 visually evoked potential, followed by a driving effect in the frontal module between 140-180 ms, suggesting that the differences found constitute an information processing difference between these modules. This provides temporally precise information over a heterogeneous population in promising tasks for the detection of AD.

  4. Steam distribution and energy delivery optimization using wireless sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Kuruganti, Teja P.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Djouadi, Seddik M.; Lake, Joe E.

    2011-05-01

    The Extreme Measurement Communications Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) explores the deployment of a wireless sensor system with a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework in the ORNL campus. With particular focus on the 12-mile long steam distribution network in our campus, we propose an integrated system-level approach to optimize the energy delivery within the steam distribution system. We address the goal of achieving significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam valves/traps. Our approach leverages an integrated wireless sensor and real-time monitoring capabilities. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by mounting acoustic sensors on the steam pipes/traps/valves and observe the state measurements of these sensors. Our assessments are based on analysis of the wireless sensor measurements. We describe Fourier-spectrum based algorithms that interpret acoustic vibration sensor data to characterize flows and classify the steam system status. We are able to present the sensor readings, steam flow, steam trap status and the assessed alerts as an interactive overlay within a web-based Google Earth geographic platform that enables decision makers to take remedial action. We believe our demonstration serves as an instantiation of a platform that extends implementation to include newer modalities to manage water flow, sewage and energy consumption.

  5. Resolving runaway electron distributions in space, time, and energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Soldan, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Aleynikov, P.; Eidietis, N. W.; Lvovskiy, A.; Pace, D. C.; Brennan, D. P.; Hollmann, E. M.; Liu, C.; Moyer, R. A.; Shiraki, D.

    2018-05-01

    Areas of agreement and disagreement with present-day models of runaway electron (RE) evolution are revealed by measuring MeV-level bremsstrahlung radiation from runaway electrons (REs) with a pinhole camera. Spatially resolved measurements localize the RE beam, reveal energy-dependent RE transport, and can be used to perform full two-dimensional (energy and pitch-angle) inversions of the RE phase-space distribution. Energy-resolved measurements find qualitative agreement with modeling on the role of collisional and synchrotron damping in modifying the RE distribution shape. Measurements are consistent with predictions of phase-space attractors that accumulate REs, with non-monotonic features observed in the distribution. Temporally resolved measurements find qualitative agreement with modeling on the impact of collisional and synchrotron damping in varying the RE growth and decay rate. Anomalous RE loss is observed and found to be largest at low energy. Possible roles for kinetic instability or spatial transport to resolve these anomalies are discussed.

  6. Forest Biomass Energy Resources in China: Quantity and Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most important renewable and sustainable energy sources, the forest biomass energy resource has always been the focus of attention of scholars and policy makers. However, its potential is still uncertain in China, especially with respect to its spatial distribution. In this paper, the quantity and distribution of Chinese forest biomass energy resources are explored based mainly on forestry statistics data rather than forest resource inventory data used by most previous studies. The results show that the forest biomass energy resource in China was 169 million tons in 2010, of which wood felling and bucking residue (WFBR,wood processing residue (WPR, bamboo processing residue, fuel wood and firewood used by farmers accounted for 38%, 37%, 6%, 4% and 15%, respectively. The highest resource was located in East China, accounting for nearly 39.0% of the national amount, followed by the Southwest and South China regions, which accounted for 17.4% and 16.3%, respectively. At the provincial scale, Shandong has the highest distribution, accounting for 11.9% of total resources, followed by Guangxi and Fujian accounting for 10.3% and 10.2%, respectively. The actual wood-processing residue (AWPR estimated from the actual production of different wood products (considering the wood transferred between regions showed apparent differences from the local wood processing residue (LWPR, which assumes that no wood has been transferredbetween regions. Due to the large contribution of WPR to total forestry bioenergy resources, the estimation of AWPR will provide a more accurate evaluation of the total amount and the spatial distribution of forest biomass energy resources in China.

  7. Study on the distribution of organic carbon in soil fractions and its reaction potential of binding the pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ashim

    2010-05-01

    STUDY ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC CARBON IN SOIL FRACTIONS AND ITS REACTION POTENTIAL OF BINDING THE PESTICIDES **SUMITRA ROY1, SANKHAJIT ROY1, *ASHIM CHOWDHURY2, SASWATI PRADHAN2 and PETER BURAUEL3 1Department of Agricultural Chemicals, Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswavidyalay, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. 2Department of Agricultural Chemistry and Soil Science, University of Calcutta, West Bengal, India. 3Institute of Chemical Dynamics & Geosphere, FZ-Juelich, Germany. *Correspondence: ashimkly@hotmail.com **Research work carried out as DAAD Sandwich research fellow at FZ- Juelich, Germany Soil is the ultimate sink of all selectively applied pesticides. In addition to the basic physicochemical data of an active ingredient, the fate of the various compounds is largely determined by the type of application. Finally, pesticide and their metabolites, as well as structural elements, remain in the native carbon reserves of the soil or are sorbed & fixed to clay minerals and clay- humus complexes. Soil organic matter (SOM) and the soil microbial community are the crucial components which regulate soil processes and contribute towards the stability of the soil ecosystem. It is an energy source for biological mineralization processes, functions as a buffer and participates in chemical reaction. Knowledge is essential to understand the extent to which the SOM influences the mobilization and immobilization processes of foreign substance in soil and the substance transport and pollutant decomposition in soil. The freshly incorporated organic matter undergoes mineralization and the non mineralized carbon fraction is of special relevance with respect to soil stability in general and decisive for the fate and particular the persistence of xenobiotics in soil. The biological and physicochemical interactions establishing equilibrium between the organic matter bound, fixed or complexed to the soil matrix and that dissolve in the soil solution must be understood in detail to realize

  8. Coastal zone wind energy. Part I. Synoptic and mesoscale controls and distributions of coastal wind energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garstang, M.; Nnaji, S.; Pielke, R.A.; Gusdorf, J.; Lindsey, C.; Snow, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    This report describes a method of determining coastal wind energy resources. Climatological data and a mesoscale numerical model are used to delineate the available wind energy along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. It is found that the spatial distribution of this energy is dependent on the locations of the observing sites in relation to the major synoptic weather features as well as the particular orientation of the coastline with respect to the large-scale wind.

  9. Coordinated Optimization of Distributed Energy Resources and Smart Loads in Distribution Systems: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui; Zhang, Yingchen

    2016-08-01

    Distributed energy resources (DERs) and smart loads have the potential to provide flexibility to the distribution system operation. A coordinated optimization approach is proposed in this paper to actively manage DERs and smart loads in distribution systems to achieve the optimal operation status. A three-phase unbalanced Optimal Power Flow (OPF) problem is developed to determine the output from DERs and smart loads with respect to the system operator's control objective. This paper focuses on coordinating PV systems and smart loads to improve the overall voltage profile in distribution systems. Simulations have been carried out in a 12-bus distribution feeder and results illustrate the superior control performance of the proposed approach.

  10. Mass and velocity distributions of low energy cluster beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnini, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche Universita di Catania and MATIS-INFM, Viale A. Doria 6 Catania 95125 (Italy)]. E-mail: gcompagnini@unict.it; D' Urso, Luisa [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche Universita di Catania and MATIS-INFM, Viale A. Doria 6 Catania 95125 (Italy); Puglisi, Orazio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche Universita di Catania and MATIS-INFM, Viale A. Doria 6 Catania 95125 (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    We have recently generated several low energy cluster beams by using a laser vaporization source and a pulsed He stream. This has been done both for covalent (silicon and carbon) and metallic (gold) materials. In this work we present a simple procedure to carefully measure the speed and speed distribution of the obtained clusters with the help of an orthogonal time of flight mass spectrometer. Results show average speed values in the range 700-1000 m/s with a mild variation by changing the gas backing pressure and the cluster mass inside each cluster train. Detailed speed distributions for each cluster's mass will be given.

  11. Initial energy and perihelion distributions of Oort-cloud comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model of stellar perturbations of the Oort cloud is used to study the distributions in energy and perihelion of comets entering the planetary region for the first time. The model is run for a variety of initial states and a range of velocity perturbations. In all cases the resulting orbits are uniformly distributed in perihelion distance in the planetary region, q less than 20 AU. Most orbits are confined to a fairly narrow range in 1/a and hyperbolic orbits are rare.

  12. REDUCING ACTIVE ENERGY LOSSES IN LOW VOLTAGE DISTRIBUTION GRIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAVRILAS. M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the implementation of a program for reducing technical active energy losses in the distribution network operated by Delgaz Grid DSO (Distribution System Operator. Measures applied to reduce technical losses addresses both transformers at the MV / LV transformer substations and the LV network power lines. The impact of these measures has been assessed using pilot networks with structures and electrical characteristics known in detail. For the phase load balancing measure two methods have been proposed, one based on a bottom-up constructive approach and the other based on identifying a (suboptimal solution using meta-heuristic techniques

  13. a Fuel-Cell Distributed Energy Resource with Integrated Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkhajoei, Hassan

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents a fuel-cell distributed energy resource with integrated energy storage. A compatible power electronic interface to couple the fuel-cell with the grid and/or a local load is introduced. Details of the energy storage module, the power electronic interface and the corresponding controls are described. A control strategy for the power electronic interface is developed to manage the flow of power between the fuel-cell, the energy storage and the grid. A dynamic model for the fuel-cell distributed resource is developed and is used for the systematic design of the distributed resource control system. Performance of the fuel-cell distributed energy resource is evaluated based on digital time-domain simulations in the (Electromagnetic Transient Program) EMTP-RV software environment. Effectiveness of the energy storage module, the compatible interface and the corresponding controls in enhancing the fuel-cell distributed resource performance is verified. The results demonstrate the developed power electronic interface and control strategy provide the fuel-cell with the load-following capability, the plug-and-play feature and high qualities of voltage and power that are required for the microgrid application.

  14. Electron energy distribution in a weakly ionized plasma; Distribution des energies electroniques dans un plasma faiblement ionise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesari, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-03-15

    The aim of this work is to determine from both the theoretical and experimental points of view the type of distribution function for the electronic energies existing in a positive-column type cold laboratory plasma having an ionization rate of between 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -7}. The theoretical analysis, based on the imperfect Lorentz model and taking into account inelastic collisions is developed from the Boltzmann equation. The experimental method which we have employed for making an electrostatic analysis of the electronic energies makes use of a Langmuir probe used in conjunction with a transistorized electronic device. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results yields information concerning the mechanisms governing electronic energy transfer on a microscopic scale. (author) [French] Le but de cette etude est de determiner d un double point de vue theorique et experimental le type de fonction de distribution des energies electroniques existant dans un plasma froid de laboratoire, du type colonne positive, dont le taux d ionisation est compris entre 10{sup -6} et 10{sup -7}. L'analyse theorique, basee sur le modele de Lorentz imparfait et tenant compte des collisions inelastiques est developpee a partir de l equation de Boltzmann. La methode experimentale d analyse electrostatique des energies electroniques que nous avons utilisee, met en jeu une sonde de Langmuir associee a un dispositif electronique a transistors. La comparaison des resultats experimentaux et theoriques nous fournit une connaissance des mechanismes qui regissent le transfert de l energie electronique a l echelle microscopique. (auteur)

  15. Distributed energy resources in grid interactive AC microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Xiongfei; Guerrero, Josep; Chen, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    Increased penetration of distributed energy resources (DER) and large-scale deployment of renewable energy sources are challenging the entire architecture of traditional power system. Microgrid, featuring higher flexibility and reliability, becomes an attractive candidate for the configuration...... of future electrical power system. This paper gives an overview of DER units in the grid interactive ac microgrid. The options in structures and control methods of power electronics interfaced DER units are described. Instantaneous load sharing strategies among DER units in the islanded microgrid operations...

  16. Online algorithms for optimal energy distribution in microgrids

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yu; Nelms, R Mark

    2015-01-01

    Presenting an optimal energy distribution strategy for microgrids in a smart grid environment, and featuring a detailed analysis of the mathematical techniques of convex optimization and online algorithms, this book provides readers with essential content on how to achieve multi-objective optimization that takes into consideration power subscribers, energy providers and grid smoothing in microgrids. Featuring detailed theoretical proofs and simulation results that demonstrate and evaluate the correctness and effectiveness of the algorithm, this text explains step-by-step how the problem can b

  17. Feature Recognition of Froth Images Based on Energy Distribution Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Yanpeng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a determining algorithm for froth image features based on the amplitude spectrum energy statistics by applying Fast Fourier Transformation to analyze the energy distribution of various-sized froth. The proposed algorithm has been used to do a froth feature analysis of the froth images from the alumina flotation processing site, and the results show that the consistency rate reaches 98.1 % and the usability rate 94.2 %; with its good robustness and high efficiency, the algorithm is quite suitable for flotation processing state recognition.

  18. Can the energy gap in the protein-ligand binding energy landscape be used as a descriptor in virtual ligand screening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsen V Grigoryan

    Full Text Available The ranking of scores of individual chemicals within a large screening library is a crucial step in virtual screening (VS for drug discovery. Previous studies showed that the quality of protein-ligand recognition can be improved using spectrum properties and the shape of the binding energy landscape. Here, we investigate whether the energy gap, defined as the difference between the lowest energy pose generated by a docking experiment and the average energy of all other generated poses and inferred to be a measure of the binding energy landscape sharpness, can improve the separation power between true binders and decoys with respect to the use of the best docking score. We performed retrospective single- and multiple-receptor conformation VS experiments in a diverse benchmark of 40 domains from 38 therapeutically relevant protein targets. Also, we tested the performance of the energy gap on 36 protein targets from the Directory of Useful Decoys (DUD. The results indicate that the energy gap outperforms the best docking score in its ability to discriminate between true binders and decoys, and true binders tend to have larger energy gaps than decoys. Furthermore, we used the energy gap as a descriptor to measure the height of the native binding phase and obtained a significant increase in the success rate of near native binding pose identification when the ligand binding conformations within the boundaries of the native binding phase were considered. The performance of the energy gap was also evaluated on an independent test case of VS-identified PKR-like ER-localized eIF2α kinase (PERK inhibitors. We found that the energy gap was superior to the best docking score in its ability to more highly rank active compounds from inactive ones. These results suggest that the energy gap of the protein-ligand binding energy landscape is a valuable descriptor for use in VS.

  19. The influence of distributed generation penetration levels on energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahl, Fabrício Peter; Rüther, Ricardo; Casarotto Filho, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    Planning of national energy policies brings new dilemmas with the introduction of distributed generators (DG). Economic theory suggests that a perfectly competitive market would lead to efficient pricing. In the absence of competition, regulators play a fundamental role in attracting reasonably priced finance in order to maintain, refurbish and increase the infrastructure and provide services at a reasonable cost. Energy market price equilibrium is mainly dependent on suppliers, generators, energy sources and demand, represented by conventional utility grid users. Its behavior is similar to that of other commodities. As generation becomes less centralized with the increasing economic viability of renewable energy sources, new suppliers are being connected to the grid. Such evolution means the transition from a monopolistic market to a broader and more open environment, with an increasing number of competitors. We make use of variational inequalities to model a hypothetical DG market in different scenarios, from monopoly, to oligopoly, to open market. Such an approach enables different equilibrium outcomes due to different DG penetration levels. Based on these findings, we argue that energy policies for such markets must be developed according to each specific stage of the grid's lifecycle. We show how energy policies and market regulations may affect such a transition, which may be catastrophic if not managed properly, and which is dependent on the energy mix. -- Highlights: •DG affects energy markets depending on technologies, penetration and infrastructure. •Energy prices vary when the market moves from centralized to several suppliers. •Variational inequalities are presented to simulate a market under such transitions. •The increase of DG penetration level may present different energy prices variation. •If technical and political issues of smart grids are not improved, markets may crash

  20. Distributed Flexibility Management Targeting Energy Cost and Total Power Limitations in Electricity Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessler, Sanford; Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Silva, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    to actively manage power demand. This paper utilizes an existing distributed demand management architecture in order to provide the following contributions: (1) It develops and evaluates a set of algorithms that combine the optimization of energy costs in scenarios of variable day-ahead prices with the goal...

  1. 10 CFR 431.193 - Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... distribution transformers. 431.193 Section 431.193 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Distribution Transformers Test Procedures § 431.193 Test procedures for measuring energy consumption of distribution transformers. The test...

  2. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map...... the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland......, the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing...

  3. Ion energy distributions and sidewall profiles in reactive ion etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, P.W.; Field, D.; Klemperer, D.F.; Song, Y.P.

    1993-01-01

    We present a brief resume of modelling of ion trajectories in radio frequency discharges of interest in reactive ion etching of semiconductors. The procedures for calculating the energies and angles at which ions strike the substrate surface are described. Examples of ion energy distributions (IEDs) and angular distributions (IADs) are given both for low pressure, collisionless-sheath plasmas, and for higher pressure conditions, where collisions significantly modify ion trajectories. Fast neutral particles formed in the sheath by collision processes are also considered. Computer modelling of the evolution of sidewall profiles during etch processes is discussed, and examples are given of profiles calculated using IED and IAD data both at low and high pressures. (orig.)

  4. Hole energy and momentum distributions in valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laan, G. van der.

    1982-01-01

    In order to understand the electrical and magnetic properties of solids, the knowledge of the density of states and the dispersion relation of the valence bands is indispensable. This thesis offers some alternative methods to obtain information about the nature of the valence band. Part A deals with the energy distribution of the photoelectrons. A simple model, which explains the core hole satellite structure in compounds with large correlation effects between the valence band holes and the created photo-hole, is outlined. CuCl, CuX 2 (X = F Cl and Br) are studied, by photoemission and Auger electron spectroscopies in determining the valence band properties. Part B deals with the simultaneous measurement of the energy and the wave vector of the emitted electrons. A practical example is given for the determination of the dispersion relation in copper. The measurements of a surface resonance band and the distribution of the secondary electrons are also reported. (Auth.)

  5. A bolometer array for the spectral energy distribution (SPEED) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverberg, R.F. E-mail: Robert.F.Silverberg@nasa.gov; Ali, S.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T.C.; Cheng, E.S.; Cottingham, D.A.; Crawford, T.M.; Downes, T.; Finkbeiner, F.M.; Fixsen, D.J.; Logan, D.; Meyer, S.S.; O' Dell, C.; Perera, T.; Sharp, E.H.; Timbie, P.T.; Wilson, G.W

    2004-03-11

    The Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies. Its initial use will be on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope and eventually on the Large Millimeter Telescope. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2x2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-375 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high-efficiency Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). The FSB design provides the multi-pixel, multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element, allowing for higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications.

  6. Energy distributions and radiation transport in uranium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miley, G.; Bathke, C.; Maceda, E.; Choi, C.

    1976-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions have been calculated in a 235 U-plasma at 1 atmosphere for various plasma temperatures (5000 to 8000 0 K) and neutron fluxes (2 x 10 12 to 2 x 10 16 neutrons/(cm 2 -sec)). Two sources of energetic electrons are included; namely fission-fragment and electron-impact ionization, resulting in a high-energy tail superimposed on the thermalized electron distribution. Consequential derivations from equilibrium collision rates are of interest relative to direct pumping of lasers and radiation emission. Results suggest that non-equilibrium excitation can best be achieved with an additive gas such as helium or in lower temperature plasmas requiring UF 6 . An approximate analytic model, based on continuous electron slowing, has been used for survey calculations. Where more accuracy is required, a Monte Carlo technique is used which combines an analytic representation of Coulombic collisions with a random-walk treatment of inelastic collisions

  7. Constraining the gravitational binding energy of PSR J0737-3039B using terrestrial nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, W. G.; Li Baoan

    2009-01-01

    We show that the gravitational binding energy of a neutron star of a given mass is correlated with the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy at 1-2 times nuclear saturation density for equations of state without significant softening (i.e., those that predict maximum masses M max >1.44M · in line with the largest accurately measured neutron star mass). Applying recent laboratory constraints on the slope of the symmetry energy to this correlation we extract a constraint on the baryon mass of the lower mass member of the double pulsar binary system, PSR J0737-3039B. We compare with independent constraints derived from modeling the progenitor star of J0737-3039B up to and through its collapse under the assumption that it formed in an electron capture supernova. The two sets of constraints are consistent only if L < or approx. 70 MeV.

  8. Distributed late-binding micro-scheduling and data caching for data-intensive workflows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado Peris, A.

    2015-01-01

    Today's world is flooded with vast amounts of digital information coming from innumerable sources. Moreover, it seems clear that this trend will only intensify in the future. Industry, society and remarkably science are not indifferent to this fact. On the contrary, they are struggling to get the most out of this data, which means that they need to capture, transfer, store and process it in a timely and efficient manner, using a wide range of computational resources. And this task is not always simple. A very representative example of the challenges posed by the management and processing of large quantities of data is that of the Large Hadron Collider experiments, which handle tens of petabytes of physics information every year. Based on the experience of one of these collaborations, we have studied the main issues involved in the management of huge volumes of data and in the completion of sizeable workflows that consume it. In this context, we have developed a general-purpose architecture for the scheduling and execution of workflows with heavy data requirements: the Task Queue. This new system builds on the late-binding overlay model, which has helped experiments to successfully overcome the problems associated to the heterogeneity and complexity of large computational grids. Our proposal introduces several enhancements to the existing systems. The execution agents of the Task Queue architecture share a Distributed Hash Table (DHT) and perform job matching and assignment cooperatively. In this way, scalability problems of centralized matching algorithms are avoided and workflow execution times are improved. Scalability makes fine-grained micro-scheduling possible and enables new functionalities, like the implementation of a distributed data cache on the execution nodes and the integration of data location information in the scheduling decisions...(Author)

  9. Visual Method for Spectral Energy Distribution Calculation of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, we propose to use 'The Geometer's Sketchpad' to the fitting of a spectral energy distribution of blazar based on three effective spectral indices, αRO, αOX, and αRX and the flux density in the radio band. It can make us to see the fitting in detail with both the peak frequency and peak luminosity given ...

  10. A Distributed Algorithm for Energy Optimization in Hydraulic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallesøe, Carsten; Wisniewski, Rafal; Jensen, Tom Nørgaard

    2014-01-01

    An industrial case study in the form of a large-scale hydraulic network underlying a district heating system is considered. A distributed control is developed that minimizes the aggregated electrical energy consumption of the pumps in the network without violating the control demands. The algorithm...... a Plug & Play control system as most commissioning can be done during the manufacture of the pumps. Only information on the graph-structure of the hydraulic network is needed during installation....

  11. Kinetic energy and momentum distribution of isotopic liquid helium mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boninsegni, Massimo

    2018-03-14

    The momentum distribution and atomic kinetic energy of the two isotopes of helium in a liquid mixture at temperature T = 2 K are computed by quantum Monte Carlo simulations. Quantum statistics is fully included for 4 He, whereas 3 He atoms are treated as distinguishable. Comparison of theoretical estimates with a collection of the most recent experimental measurements shows reasonable agreement for the energetics of 4 He and pure 3 He. On the other hand, a significant discrepancy (already observed in previous studies) is reported between computed and measured values of the 3 He kinetic energy in the mixture, especially in the limit of low 3 He concentration. We assess quantitatively the importance of Fermi statistics and find it to be negligible for a 3 He concentration ≲20%. Our results for the momentum distribution lend support to what was already hypothesized by other authors, namely, that the discrepancy is likely due to underestimation of the 3 He kinetic energy contribution associated with the tail of the experimentally measured momentum distribution.

  12. Distribution of lateral acoustic energy in Mudejar Gothic churches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girón, S.; Galindo, M.; Zamarreño, T.

    2008-09-01

    In this work, the physical measures of spatial impression are considered in 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. This study describes the spatial distribution of the early and late lateral acoustic energy, through monaural parameters derived from impulse response analysis using a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. In the first time analysis, the two early lateral energy measures, early lateral fraction (LF) and early lateral fraction cosine (LFC) are taken in order to assess apparent source width (ASW), and the late lateral level (GLL) in the second to assess listener envelopment (LEV) are conducted. Parameters have been studied spectrally in each temple and were averaged at low- and mid-frequency values in their different naves in order to study how these two attributes of sound perception vary with source-receiver distance. Experimental results have been compared with the theoretical early lateral energy fractions and late lateral level, both of which are derived by assuming that reflected energy in these places of worship is solely dependent on source-receiver distance. This comparison is carried out in accordance with the μ-model proposed by the authors in an earlier paper in order to describe the dependence of acoustic monaural omnidirectional energy parameters on source-receiver distance. Thus, it is supposed that the directional distribution of reflections is similar to a diffuse distribution. To conclude, these spatially averaged monoaural parameters have been correlated with geometric variables by using linear regression and only weak correlations with the mean width of the churches and with the height/width ratio have been found.

  13. The energy distribution of electrons in radio jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouros, Alexandros; Kylafis, Nikolaos D.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries exhibit compact radio jets, when they are in the so called quiescent, hard, or hard intermediate states. The radio spectrum in these states is flat to slightly inverted, I.e., the spectral index of the observed flux density is in the range 0 ≲ α ≲ 0.5. It is widely accepted that the energy distribution of the electrons, in the rest frame of the jet, is a power law with index in the range 3 ≲ p ≲ 5. Aims: Contrary to what our thinking was decades ago, now we know that the jets originate in the hot, inner flow around black holes and neutron stars. So it is worth investigating the radio spectrum that is emitted by a thermal jet as a function of direction. Methods: As an example, we consider a parabolic jet and, with the assumption of flux freezing, we compute the emitted spectrum in all directions, from radio to near infrared, using either a thermal distribution of electrons or a power-law one. Results: We have found that parabolic jets with a thermal distribution of electrons give also flat to slightly inverted spectra. In particular, for directions along the jet (θ = 0), both distributions of electron energies give α = 0 ± 0.01. The index α increases as the viewing angle θ increases and for directions perpendicular to the jet (θ = π/ 2), the thermal distribution gives α = 0.40 ± 0.05, while the power-law distribution gives α = 0.20 ± 0.05. The break frequency νb, which marks the transition from partially optically thick to optically thin synchrotron emission, is comparable for the power-law and the thermal distributions. Conclusions: Contrary to common belief, it is not necessary to invoke a power-law energy distribution of the electrons in a jet to explain its flat to slightly inverted radio spectrum. A relativistic Maxwellian produces similar radio spectra. Thus, the jet may be the widely invoked "corona" around black holes in X-ray binaries.

  14. iSEDfit: Bayesian spectral energy distribution modeling of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, John

    2017-08-01

    iSEDfit uses Bayesian inference to extract the physical properties of galaxies from their observed broadband photometric spectral energy distribution (SED). In its default mode, the inputs to iSEDfit are the measured photometry (fluxes and corresponding inverse variances) and a measurement of the galaxy redshift. Alternatively, iSEDfit can be used to estimate photometric redshifts from the input photometry alone. After the priors have been specified, iSEDfit calculates the marginalized posterior probability distributions for the physical parameters of interest, including the stellar mass, star-formation rate, dust content, star formation history, and stellar metallicity. iSEDfit also optionally computes K-corrections and produces multiple "quality assurance" (QA) plots at each stage of the modeling procedure to aid in the interpretation of the prior parameter choices and subsequent fitting results. The software is distributed as part of the impro IDL suite.

  15. Alternative energy and distributed generation: thinking generations ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.D.

    2001-01-01

    Alternative Energy will be discussed in the context of Distributed Generation, which is defined as a delivery platform for micro-power generation, close to the end-users, that can also supplement regional electricity grids. Many references in the paper pertain to Alberta. This is for two reasons: First, familiarity by the author, and more importantly, Alberta is the first region in Canada that has de-regulated it's electricity sector. De-regulation allows independent and smaller power generators to enter the market. Focussing on Alberta, with some references to other Canadian provinces and USA, electricity consumption trends will be reviewed and the pressures to decentralize electricity generation discussed. Re-structuring of the electricity sector, convergence of power generation and natural gas industries, advances in technologies, and environmental concerns are collectively contributing to the creation of a new business called 'Distributed Generation'. Efficiency benefits of combined heat and power associated with the more prominent emerging distributed generation technologies like micro-turbines and fuel cells, will be highlighted. Areas of research, development and demonstration that will enable the successful deployment of Distributed Generation will be suggested with respect to Generation Technologies, Systems Controls, Supporting Infrastructure, and Socio-Political Barriers. Estimates of investments in the various alternative energy technologies will be presented. Using current trends and emerging technologies the Paper will conclude with some predictions of future scenarios. (author)

  16. Remote Sensing of Energy Distribution Characteristics over the Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, J.; Husi, L.; Wang, T.

    2017-12-01

    The overall objective of our study is to quantify the spatiotemporal characteristics and changes of typical factors dominating water and energy cycles in the Tibet region. Especially, we focus on variables of clouds optical & microphysical parameters, surface shortwave and longwave radiation. Clouds play a key role in the Tibetan region's water and energy cycles. They seriously impact the precipitation, temperature and surface energy distribution. Considering that proper cloud products with relatively higher spatial and temporal sampling and with satisfactory accuracy are serious lacking in the Tibet region, except cloud optical thickness, cloud effective radius and liquid/ice water content, the cloud coverage dynamics at hourly scales also analyzed jointly based on measurements of Himawari-8, and MODIS. Surface radiation, as an important energy source in perturbating the Tibet's evapotranspiration, snow and glacier melting, is a controlling factor in energy balance in the Tibet region. All currently available radiation products in this area are not suitable for regional scale study of water and energy exchange and snow/glacier melting due to their coarse resolution and low accuracies because of cloud and topography. A strategy for deriving land surface upward and downward radiation by fusing optical and microwave remote sensing data is proposed. At the same time, the big topographic effect on the surface radiation are also modelled and analyzed over the Tibet region.

  17. Anisotropic Lithium Insertion Behavior in Silicon Nanowires: Binding Energy, Diffusion Barrier, and Strain Effect

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Qianfan

    2011-05-19

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) have recently been shown to be promising as high capacity lithium battery anodes. SiNWs can be grown with their long axis along several different crystallographic directions. Due to distinct atomic configuration and electronic structure of SiNWs with different axial orientations, their lithium insertion behavior could be different. This paper focuses on the characteristics of single Li defects, including binding energy, diffusion barriers, and dependence on uniaxial strain in [110], [100], [111], and [112] SiNWs. Our systematic ab initio study suggests that the Si-Li interaction is weaker when the Si-Li bond direction is aligned close to the SiNW long axis. This results in the [110] and [111] SiNWs having the highest and lowest Li binding energy, respectively, and it makes the diffusion barrier along the SiNW axis lower than other pathways. Under external strain, it was found that [110] and [001] SiNWs are the most and least sensitive, respectively. For diffusion along the axial direction, the barrier increases (decreases) under tension (compression). This feature results in a considerable difference in the magnitude of the energy barrier along different diffusion pathways. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Energy management techniques: SRP cooling water distribution system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenfield, A.B.

    1979-10-01

    Cooling water for the nuclear reactors at the Savannah River Plant is supplied by a pumping and distribution system that includes about 50 miles of underground pipeline. The energy management program at SRP has thus far achieved a savings of about 5% (186 x 10 9 Btu) of the energy consumed by the electrically powered cooling water pumps; additional savings of about 14% (535 x 10 9 Btu) can be achieved by capital expenditures totaling about $3.7 million. The present cost of electricity for operation of this system is about $25 million per year. A computer model of the system was adapted and field test data were used to normalize the program to accurately represent pipeline physical characteristics. Alternate pumping schemes are analyzed to determine projected energy costs and impact on system safety and reliability

  19. Electron energy distribution in a weakly ionized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesari, C.

    1967-03-01

    The aim of this work is to determine from both the theoretical and experimental points of view the type of distribution function for the electronic energies existing in a positive-column type cold laboratory plasma having an ionization rate of between 10 -6 and 10 -7 . The theoretical analysis, based on the imperfect Lorentz model and taking into account inelastic collisions is developed from the Boltzmann equation. The experimental method which we have employed for making an electrostatic analysis of the electronic energies makes use of a Langmuir probe used in conjunction with a transistorized electronic device. A comparison between the experimental and theoretical results yields information concerning the mechanisms governing electronic energy transfer on a microscopic scale. (author) [fr

  20. Taxing energy to improve the environment. Efficiency and distributional effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijdra, B.J.; Van der Horst, A.

    1998-02-01

    The effects of environmental tax policy in a dynamic overlapping-generations model of a small open economy with environmental quality incorporated as a durable consumption good have been studied. Raising the energy tax may deliver an efficiency gain if agents care enough about the environment. The benefits are unevenly distributed across generations since capital ownership, and the capital loss induced by a tax increase, rises with age. A suitable egalitarian bond policy can be employed in order to ensure everybody gains to the same extent. With this additional instrument the optimal energy tax can be computed. The authors further considered a tax reform that simultaneously lowers labour taxation and raises the energy tax. This policy delivers qualitatively similar consequences as the first scenario, though all changes are less pronounced. A double dividend may appear soon after the reform but vanishes in the course of the transition. 22 refs

  1. Prediction of Carbohydrate Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces with 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Keng-Chang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Peng, Hung-Pin; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chen, Jun-Bo; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Non-covalent protein-carbohydrate interactions mediate molecular targeting in many biological processes. Prediction of non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces not only provides insights into the functions of the query proteins; information on key carbohydrate-binding residues could suggest site-directed mutagenesis experiments, design therapeutics targeting carbohydrate-binding proteins, and provide guidance in engineering protein-carbohydrate interactions. In this work, we show that non-covalent carbohydrate binding sites on protein surfaces can be predicted with relatively high accuracy when the query protein structures are known. The prediction capabilities were based on a novel encoding scheme of the three-dimensional probability density maps describing the distributions of 36 non-covalent interacting atom types around protein surfaces. One machine learning model was trained for each of the 30 protein atom types. The machine learning algorithms predicted tentative carbohydrate binding sites on query proteins by recognizing the characteristic interacting atom distribution patterns specific for carbohydrate binding sites from known protein structures. The prediction results for all protein atom types were integrated into surface patches as tentative carbohydrate binding sites based on normalized prediction confidence level. The prediction capabilities of the predictors were benchmarked by a 10-fold cross validation on 497 non-redundant proteins with known carbohydrate binding sites. The predictors were further tested on an independent test set with 108 proteins. The residue-based Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) for the independent test was 0.45, with prediction precision and sensitivity (or recall) of 0.45 and 0.49 respectively. In addition, 111 unbound carbohydrate-binding protein structures for which the structures were determined in the absence of the carbohydrate ligands were predicted with the trained predictors. The overall

  2. Fabrication of CuCl quantum dots and the size dependence of the biexciton binding energy

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S T; Kim, H Y; Kim, I G

    2000-01-01

    We fabricated CuCl quantum dots (QDs) in an aluminoborosilicate glass matrix. The photoluminescence of the CuCl QDs was surveyed by using the band-to-band excitation and the site selective luminescence methods. The excitation density dependence of the exciton and the biexciton luminescence was measured, and the saturation effects of the luminescence intensities were observed. The biexciton binding energies measured using the site selective luminescence method increased with decreasing QD size. The data were well fitted by a function resulting from the numerical matrix-diagonalization method.

  3. Agent-based reactive power management of power distribution networks with distributed energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.; Mahmud, M.A.; Oo, A.M.T.; Pota, H.R.; Hossain, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A coordinated multi-agent system is proposed for reactive power management. • A linear quadratic regulator with a proportional integral controller is designed. • Proposed multi-agent scheme provides accurate estimation and control of the system. • Voltage stability is improved with proper power management for different scenarios. • Results obtained from the proposed scheme is compared to the traditional approach. - Abstract: In this paper, a new agent-based distributed reactive power management scheme is proposed to improve the voltage stability of energy distribution systems with distributed generation units. Three types of agents – distribution system agent, estimator agent, and control agent are developed within the multi-agent framework. The agents simultaneously coordinated their activities through the online information and energy flow. The overall achievement of the proposed scheme depends on the coordination between two tasks – (i) estimation of reactive power using voltage variation formula and (ii) necessary control actions to provide the estimated reactive power to the distribution networks through the distributed static synchronous compensators. A linear quadratic regulator with a proportional integrator is designed for the control agent in order to control the reactive component of the current and the DC voltage of the compensators. The performance of the proposed scheme is tested on a 10-bus power distribution network under various scenarios. The effectiveness is validated by comparing the proposed approach to the conventional proportional integral control approach. It is found that, the agent-based scheme provides excellent robust performance under various operating conditions of the power distribution network.

  4. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  5. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2015-01-01

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  6. Computation of binding energies including their enthalpy and entropy components for protein-ligand complexes using support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppisetty, Chaitanya A K; Frank, Martin; Kemp, Graham J L; Nyholm, Per-Georg

    2013-10-28

    Computing binding energies of protein-ligand complexes including their enthalpy and entropy terms by means of computational methods is an appealing approach for selecting initial hits and for further optimization in early stages of drug discovery. Despite the importance, computational predictions of thermodynamic components have evaded attention and reasonable solutions. In this study, support vector machines are used for developing scoring functions to compute binding energies and their enthalpy and entropy components of protein-ligand complexes. The binding energies computed from our newly derived scoring functions have better Pearson's correlation coefficients with experimental data than previously reported scoring functions in benchmarks for protein-ligand complexes from the PDBBind database. The protein-ligand complexes with binding energies dominated by enthalpy or entropy term could be qualitatively classified by the newly derived scoring functions with high accuracy. Furthermore, it is found that the inclusion of comprehensive descriptors based on ligand properties in the scoring functions improved the accuracy of classification as well as the prediction of binding energies including their thermodynamic components. The prediction of binding energies including the enthalpy and entropy components using the support vector machine based scoring functions should be of value in the drug discovery process.

  7. Optimizing Power–Frequency Droop Characteristics of Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guggilam, Swaroop S.; Zhao, Changhong; Dall Anese, Emiliano; Chen, Yu Christine; Dhople, Sairaj V.

    2018-05-01

    This paper outlines a procedure to design power-frequency droop slopes for distributed energy resources (DERs) installed in distribution networks to optimally participate in primary frequency response. In particular, the droop slopes are engineered such that DERs respond in proportion to their power ratings and they are not unfairly penalized in power provisioning based on their location in the distribution network. The main contribution of our approach is that a guaranteed level of frequency regulation can be guaranteed at the feeder head, while ensuring that the outputs of individual DERs conform to some well-defined notion of fairness. The approach we adopt leverages an optimization-based perspective and suitable linearizations of the power-flow equations to embed notions of fairness and information regarding the physics of the power flows within the distribution network into the droop slopes. Time-domain simulations from a differential algebraic equation model of the 39-bus New England test-case system augmented with three instances of the IEEE 37-node distribution-network with frequency-sensitive DERs are provided to validate our approach.

  8. Sturmian theory of electron energy distributions in low energy ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, S.Yu. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, 401 Nielsen Physics Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: serge@charcoal.phys.utk.edu; Macek, J.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, 401 Nielsen Physics Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-1200 (United States); Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    The energy and angular distributions of electrons ejected from targets and projectiles in the collisions of slow H and H{sup -} with He targets has been calculated exactly in a model that treats electron interactions with neutral targets via zero-range interactions. These calculations employ two-center Sturmian functions for collisions at non-zero impact parameters. The computed distributions are compared with recent measurements for He targets. Total ionization cross sections are also computed and compared with experiment over a broad energy range for proton, alpha particle and neutral hydrogen impact on helium atoms. The calculations are in generally good agreement with experiment.

  9. Distributed DC-UPS for energy smart buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Munoz, A.; Pallares-Lopez, V.; Real-Calvo, R.J.; Gil-de-Castro, A. [Universidad de Cordoba, Area de Electronica, Dpto. Arquitectura de Computadores, Electronica y Tecnologia Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior, Campus de Rabanales, E-14071 Cordoba (Spain); De la Rosa, Juan Jose Gonzalez [Universidad de Cadiz, Area de Electronica, Dpto. ISA, TE y Electronica, Escuela Politecnica Superior Avda, Ramon Puyol, S/N, E-11202 Algeciras-Cadiz (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Energy efficiency (EE) improvement is one of the most important targets to be achieved on every society as a whole and in buildings in particular. Energy Smart Building aims to accelerate the uptake of EE, healthy buildings that by integrating smart technology and solutions consume radically little resources while enhancing the quality of life. This paper addresses how uninterruptible power supply (UPS), particularly when configured in distributed DC mode, can become an Energy Efficient (EE) solution in high tech buildings, especially when integrated with complimentary Power Quality (PQ) measures. The paper is based upon PQ audits conducted at different IT-intensive modern building. Some of the mayor objectives of the PQ studies were: detecting the main involved disturbances by PQ monitoring, identifying the power disturbances root causes, characterizing the electromagnetic compatibility level of equipments and installation and providing guidelines for implementing energy-efficiency solutions. It was found that the main problems for the equipment installed were harmonics and voltage sag (dip). Finally, this paper demonstrates the impacts of generalized electronic devices on the PQ of the buildings and the implications on energy uses. (author)

  10. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland...... presumptive cortex cells, excluding the medulla, lying around and above the upper dermal papilla of anagen hair follicles, epithelial cells around the lower dermal papilla region, and in some tissue samples the cell margins of the viable differentiating layers of the epidermis. In a control study, to clarify...

  11. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marnay, Chris; Chard, Joseph S.; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Lipman, Timothy; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes work completed for the California Energy Commission (CEC) on the continued development and application of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This work was performed at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) between July 2000 and June 2001 under the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. Our research on distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid ((mu)Grid), a semiautonomous grouping of electricity-generating sources and end-use sinks that are placed and operated for the benefit of its members. Although a(mu)Grid can operate independent of the macrogrid (the utility power network), the(mu)Grid is usually interconnected, purchasing energy and ancillary services from the macrogrid. Groups of customers can be aggregated into(mu)Grids by pooling their electrical and other loads, and the most cost-effective combination of generation resources for a particular(mu)Grid can be found. In this study, DER-CAM, an economic model of customer DER adoption implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software is used, to find the cost-minimizing combination of on-site generation customers (individual businesses and a(mu)Grid) in a specified test year. DER-CAM's objective is to minimize the cost of supplying electricity to a specific customer by optimizing the installation of distributed generation and the self-generation of part or all of its electricity. Currently, the model only considers electrical loads, but combined heat and power (CHP) analysis capability is being developed under the second year of CEC funding. The key accomplishments of this year's work were the acquisition of increasingly accurate data on DER technologies, including the development of methods for forecasting cost reductions for these technologies, and the creation of a credible example

  12. Modeling of customer adoption of distributed energy resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marnay, Chris; Chard, Joseph S.; Hamachi, Kristina S.; Lipman, Timothy; Moezzi, Mithra M.; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2001-08-01

    This report describes work completed for the California Energy Commission (CEC) on the continued development and application of the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). This work was performed at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) between July 2000 and June 2001 under the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) Distributed Energy Resources Integration (DERI) project. Our research on distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid ({mu}Grid), a semiautonomous grouping of electricity-generating sources and end-use sinks that are placed and operated for the benefit of its members. Although a {mu}Grid can operate independent of the macrogrid (the utility power network), the {mu}Grid is usually interconnected, purchasing energy and ancillary services from the macrogrid. Groups of customers can be aggregated into {mu}Grids by pooling their electrical and other loads, and the most cost-effective combination of generation resources for a particular {mu}Grid can be found. In this study, DER-CAM, an economic model of customer DER adoption implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS) optimization software is used, to find the cost-minimizing combination of on-site generation customers (individual businesses and a {mu}Grid) in a specified test year. DER-CAM's objective is to minimize the cost of supplying electricity to a specific customer by optimizing the installation of distributed generation and the self-generation of part or all of its electricity. Currently, the model only considers electrical loads, but combined heat and power (CHP) analysis capability is being developed under the second year of CEC funding. The key accomplishments of this year's work were the acquisition of increasingly accurate data on DER technologies, including the development of methods for forecasting cost reductions for these technologies, and the creation of a

  13. Probe method of measuring the electron energy distribution in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Hiroshi

    1984-01-01

    The function for the velocity distribution of electrons in plasma in a basic function associated with various phenomena. The probe method gives the distribution by a simple technique to insert a micro-electrode into plasma, and has good spatial resolution. It is specifically useful for weakly ionized, low temperature plasma. The purpose of this paper is to assist experimenters so that they can easily use this method for various phenomena by starting at its basic principle and explaining the scope of application and actual measuring techniques. The scope of application is considered by dividing it into the problems of sheath thickness, collision effect, the energy distribution of beam, the influence of probe end, probe surface phenomenon, magnetized plasma, the measurement of high energy tail, etc. For sheath thickness, it is accepted if the difference between sheath radius and probe radius is shorter than mean free path, and this is a measure for the application limit. The probe method is applicable as far as the beam density is far smaller than plasma density, and the symmetry of positive ion sheath is not disturbed. The surface area of a counter electrode should be 10 4 .Rc/lambda times or more of the probe surface area, where Rc is the radius of a counter electrode. The differentiation method of the probe characteristics includes A.C. method, high speed sweep measurement or digital method, and some applications are described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Modelling the Spatial Distribution of Wind Energy Resources in Latvia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniskevich, S.; Bezrukovs, V.; Zandovskis, U.; Bezrukovs, D.

    2017-12-01

    The paper studies spatial wind energy flow distribution in Latvia based on wind speed measurements carried out at an altitude of 10 m over a period of two years, from 2015 to 2016. The measurements, with 1 min increments, were carried out using certified measuring instruments installed at 22 observation stations of the Latvian National Hydrometeorological and Climatological Service of the Latvian Environment, Geology and Meteorology Centre (LEGMC). The models of the spatial distribution of averaged wind speed and wind energy density were developed using the method of spatial interpolation based on the historical measurement results and presented in the form of colour contour maps with a 1×1 km resolution. The paper also provides the results of wind speed spatial distribution modelling using a climatological reanalysis ERA5 at the altitudes of 10, 54, 100 and 136 m with a 31×31 km resolution. The analysis includes the comparison of actual wind speed measurement results with the outcomes of ERA5 modelling for meteorological observation stations in Ainazi, Daugavpils, Priekuli, Saldus and Ventspils.

  15. Perspectives and opportunities: distributed energy; Perspectives et opportunites: l'energie repartie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    Distributed energy is a cogeneration-related concept which includes a large range of energy generation means, from renewable sources to natural gas technologies (gas turbines, micro-turbines), including fuel-cells. This document presents the gas cogeneration module, which is the small-scale equivalent to traditional cogeneration plants, and the natural gas fuel cell for individual houses or small buildings. (J.S.)

  16. An accurate redetermination of the sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 Sn binding energy

    CERN Document Server

    Borzakov, S B; Faikow-Stanczyk, H; Grigoriev, Y V; Panteleev, T; Pospísil, S; Smotritsky, L M; Telezhnikov, S A

    2002-01-01

    The energy of well-known strong gamma line from sup 1 sup 9 sup 8 Au, the 'gold standard', has been modified in the light of new adjustments in the fundamental constants and the value of 411.80176(12) keV was determined, which is 0.29 eV lower than the latest 1999 value. An energy calibration procedure for determining the neutron binding energy, B sub n , from complicated (n, gamma) spectra has been developed. A mathematically simple minimization function consisting only of terms having as parameters the coefficients of the energy calibration curve (polynomial) is used. A priori information about the relationships among the energies of different peaks on the spectrum is taken into account by a Monte-Carlo simulation. The procedure was used in obtaining B sub n for sup 1 sup 1 sup 8 Sn. The gamma-ray spectrum from thermal neutron radiative capture by sup 1 sup 1 sup 7 Sn has been measured on the IBR-2 pulsed reactor. gamma-rays were detected by a 72 cm sup 3 HPGe detector. For a better determination of B sub n...

  17. First principle prediction of shallow defect level binding energies and deep level nonradiative recombination rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linwang

    2014-03-01

    Accurate calculation of defect level energies in semiconductors and their carrier capturing rate is an important issue in ab initio prediction of semiconductor properties. In this talk, I will present our result work in ab initio shallow level calculation and deep level caused nonradiative recombination rate calculation. In the shallow acceptor level calculation, a large system up to 64,000 atoms needs to be used to properly describe the weakly bounded hole wave functions. The single particle Hamiltonian of that system is patched from bulk potential and central potential. Furthermore, GW calculation is used to correct the one site potential of the impurity atom. The resulting binding energy agrees excellently with the experiments within 10 meV. To calculate the nonradiative decay rate, the electron-phonon coupling constants in the defect system are calculated all at once using a new variational algorithm. Multiphonon process formalism is used to calculate the nonradiative decay rate. It is found that the transition is induced by the electron and the optical phonon coupling, but the energy conservation is mostly satisfied by the acoustic phonons. The new algorithm allows fast calculation of such nonradiative decay rate for any defect levels, as well as other multiphonon processes in nanostructures. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Science (BES)/Materials Science and Engineering Division (MSED) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  18. Exploring the potential uptake of distributed energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, John; Ashworth, Peta; Carr-Cornish, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Global warming has been identified as an energy problem (Klare 2007). With a predicted increase in fossil fuel use for many years to come (IEA 2004) there is a need to find a future energy path that will meet our basic requirements for energy but also help to mitigate climate change (CSIRO 2006). Currently there are a range of technological solutions available, with each representing a different value proposition. Distributed Energy (DE) is one such technological solution, which involves the widespread use of small local power generators, located close to the end user. Such generators can be powered by a range of low emission and/or renewable sources. Until now, cheap electricity, existing infrastructure and reluctance for change both at a political and individual level has meant there has been little prospect for DE to be considered in Australia, except in some remote communities. However, with the majority of Australians now rating climate change as an issue of strategic importance to Australia (Ashworth, Pisarski and Littleboy 2006), it can be inferred that Australia's tolerance for generating greenhouse gas emissions has reduced, and that potential support for DE is increasing. It is therefore important to understand what factors might influence the potential adoption of DE. As part of a research project called the Intelligent Grid, CSIRO's Energy Transformed Flagship is aiming to identify the conditions under which Distributed Energy might be effectively implemented in Australia. One component of this project involves social research, which aims to understand the drivers and barriers to the uptake of DE technology by the community. This paper presents findings from two large-scale surveys (one of householders and one of businesses), designed to assess beliefs and knowledge about environmental issues, and about traditional and renewable energy sources. The surveys also assess current energy use, and identify preferences regarding DE technology. The

  19. Estimation of the Binding Free Energy of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 Protease Wild Type and Mutations Using Free Energy Perturbation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Son Tung; Mai, Binh Khanh; Hiep, Dinh Minh; Li, Mai Suan

    2015-10-01

    The binding mechanism of AC1NX476 to HIV-1 protease wild type and mutations was studied by the docking and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding free energy was calculated using the double-annihilation binding free energy method. It is shown that the binding affinity of AC1NX476 to wild type is higher than not only ritonavir but also darunavir, making AC1NX476 become attractive candidate for HIV treatment. Our theoretical results are in excellent agreement with the experimental data as the correlation coefficient between calculated and experimentally measured binding free energies R = 0.993. Residues Asp25-A, Asp29-A, Asp30-A, Ile47-A, Gly48-A, and Val50-A from chain A, and Asp25-B from chain B play a crucial role in the ligand binding. The mutations were found to reduce the receptor-ligand interaction by widening the binding cavity, and the binding propensity is mainly driven by the van der Waals interaction. Our finding may be useful for designing potential drugs to combat with HIV. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Energy spectrum of two-dimensional tight-binding electrons in a spatially varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, G.Y.; Lee, M.H.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic energy spectrum of a two-dimensional lattice in a spatially varying magnetic field is studied within the framework of the tight-binding model by using the scheme of the transfer matrix. It is found that, in comparison with the case of a uniform magnetic field, the energy spectrum exhibits more complicated behavior; band broadening (or gap closing) and band splitting (or gap opening) occur depending on characteristic parameters of the lattice. The origin of these phenomena lies in the existence of direct touching and indirect overlapping between neighboring subbands. Dependence of direct touching and indirect overlapping, and thus the electronic band structure together with the density of states, on characteristic parameters of the lattice is elucidated in detail. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  1. Dependence of single-walled carbon nanotube adsorption kinetics on temperature and binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawat, D S; Krungleviciute, V; Heroux, L; Bulut, M; Calbi, M M; Migone, A D

    2008-12-02

    We present results for the isothermal adsorption kinetics of methane, hydrogen, and tetrafluoromethane on closed-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes. In these experiments, we monitor the pressure decrease as a function of time as equilibrium is approached, after a dose of gas is added to the cell containing the nanotubes. The measurements were performed at different fractional coverages limited to the first layer. The results indicate that, for a given coverage and temperature, the equilibration time is an increasing function of E/(k(B)T), where E is the binding energy of the adsorbate and k(B)T is the thermal energy. These findings are consistent with recent theoretical predictions and computer simulations results that we use to interpret the experimental measurements.

  2. Distributed EMPC of multiple microgrids for coordinated stochastic energy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Peng; Liang, Deliang; Gao, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Reducing the system wide operating cost compared to the no-cooperation energy management strategy. • Maintaining the supply and demand balance within each microgrid. • Handling the uncertainties in both supply and demand. • Converting the stochastic optimization problems to standard quadratic and linear programming problems. • Achieving a good balance between control performance and computationally feasibility. - Abstract: The concept of multi-microgrids has the potential to improve the reliability and economic performance of a distribution system. To realize this potential, a coordination among multiple microgrids is needed. In this context, this paper presents a new distributed economic model predictive control scheme for the coordinated stochastic energy management of multi-microgrids. By optimally coordinating the operation of individual microgrids, this scheme maintains the system-wide supply and demand balance in an economical manner. Based on the probabilistic forecasts of renewable power generation and microgrid load, this scheme effectively handles the uncertainties in both supply and demand. Using the Chebyshev inequality and the Delta method, the corresponding stochastic optimization problems have been converted to quadratic and linear programs. The proposed scheme is evaluated on a large-scale case that includes ten interconnected microgrids. The results indicated that the proposed scheme successfully reduces the system wide operating cost, achieves the supply-demand balance in each microgrid, and brings the energy exchange between DNO and main grid to a predefined trajectory.

  3. Photoelectron binding energy shifts observed during oxidation of group IIA, IIIA and IVA elemental surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, P.A.W. van der

    2006-01-01

    An extensive re-evaluation of XPS binding energies (BE's) and binding energy shifts (ΔBE's) from metals, oxides and the carbonates of the group II, III and IVA elements (exceptions are Be, Mg and Hf) has been carried out using a substrate specific BE referencing approach. From this, O-1s BE's are found to fall into surface oxide, bulk oxide and carbonate groupings, with bulk oxides showing the lowest BE's followed by surface oxides (+∼1.5 eV) and then carbonates (+∼3.0 eV). The O-1s BE's from the bulk oxides also appear to scale with 1/d, where d is inter-atomic distance. The same is noted in the ΔBE's observed from the metallic counterparts during oxidation of the elemental surfaces. This, and the decreasing BE exhibited by Ca, Sr and Ba on oxidation is explained within the charge potential model as resulting from competing inter- and intra-atomic effects, and is shown to be consistent with partial covalency arguments utilizing Madulung potentials. The ΔBE's also fall into groups according to the elements location in the periodic table, i.e. s, p or d block. These trends open up the possibility of approximating ΔBE's arising from initial and final state effects, and bond distances

  4. Network Capacity Assessment of CHP-based Distributed Generation on Urban Energy Distribution Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianjun

    The combined heat and power (CHP)-based distributed generation (DG) or dis-tributed energy resources (DERs) are mature options available in the present energy market, considered to be an effective solution to promote energy efficiency. In the urban environment, the electricity, water and natural gas distribution networks are becoming increasingly interconnected with the growing penetration of the CHP-based DG. Subsequently, this emerging interdependence leads to new topics meriting serious consideration: how much of the CHP-based DG can be accommodated and where to locate these DERs, and given preexisting constraints, how to quantify the mutual impacts on operation performances between these urban energy distribution networks and the CHP-based DG. The early research work was conducted to investigate the feasibility and design methods for one residential microgrid system based on existing electricity, water and gas infrastructures of a residential community, mainly focusing on the economic planning. However, this proposed design method cannot determine the optimal DG sizing and siting for a larger test bed with the given information of energy infrastructures. In this context, a more systematic as well as generalized approach should be developed to solve these problems. In the later study, the model architecture that integrates urban electricity, water and gas distribution networks, and the CHP-based DG system was developed. The proposed approach addressed the challenge of identifying the optimal sizing and siting of the CHP-based DG on these urban energy networks and the mutual impacts on operation performances were also quantified. For this study, the overall objective is to maximize the electrical output and recovered thermal output of the CHP-based DG units. The electricity, gas, and water system models were developed individually and coupled by the developed CHP-based DG system model. The resultant integrated system model is used to constrain the DG's electrical

  5. Nuclear momentum distribution and potential energy surface in hexagonal ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Morrone, Joseph; Car, Roberto; Parrinello, Michele

    2011-03-01

    The proton momentum distribution in ice Ih has been recently measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering and calculated from open path integral Car-Parrinello simulation. Here we report a detailed investigation of the relation between momentum distribution and potential energy surface based on both experiment and simulation results. The potential experienced by the proton is largely harmonic and characterized by 3 principal frequencies, which can be associated to weighted averages of phonon frequencies via lattice dynamics calculations. This approach also allows us to examine the importance of quantum effects on the dynamics of the oxygen nuclei close to the melting temperature. Finally we quantify the anharmonicity that is present in the potential acting on the protons. This work is supported by NSF and by DOE.

  6. Adoption and supply of a distributed energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Neil Douglas

    2000-12-01

    Technical and economic developments in distributed generation (DG) represent an opportunity for a radically different energy market paradigm, and potentially significant cuts in global carbon emissions. This thesis investigates DG along two interrelated themes: (1) Early adoption and supply of the DG technology of internal combustion (IC) engine cogeneration. (2) Private and social cost implications of DG for private investors and within an energy system. IC engine cogeneration of both power and heat has been a remarkable success in the Netherlands with over 5,000 installations and 1,500MWe of installed capacity by 1997. However, the technology has struggled in the UK with an installed capacity of 110Mwe, fulfilling only 10% of its large estimated potential. An investment simulation model of DG investments in the UK and Netherlands was used, together with analysis of site level data on all DG adoptions from 1985 through 1997. In the UK over 60% of the early installations were sized too small (engine cogen suppliers and users, offering improved electricity buy-back tariffs and lower connection costs. This has allowed flexible operation of distributed generation, especially in electricity sales to the grid. Larger units can be sized for on-site heat requirements with electricity export providing revenue and aiding in management of energy networks. A comparison of internal and external costs of three distributed and three centralized generation technologies over a range of heat to power ratios (HPR) was made. Micro-turbines were found to be the lowest cost technology, especially at higher heat loads. Engines are also very competitive providing their NOx and CO emissions are controlled. A cost optimization program was used to develop an optimal green-field supply mix for Florida and New York. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  7. Autoradiographic distribution of /sup 125/I-galanin binding sites in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skofitsch, G.; Sills, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.

    1986-11-01

    Galanin (GAL) binding sites in coronal sections of the rat brain were demonstrated using autoradiographic methods. Scatchard analysis of /sup 125/I-GAL binding to slide-mounted tissue sections revealed saturable binding to a single class of receptors with a Kd of approximately 0.2 nM. /sup 125/I-GAL binding sites were demonstrated throughout the rat central nervous system. Dense binding was observed in the following areas: prefrontal cortex, the anterior nuclei of the olfactory bulb, several nuclei of the amygdaloid complex, the dorsal septal area, dorsal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, the ventral pallidum, the internal medullary laminae of the thalamus, medial pretectal nucleus, nucleus of the medial optic tract, borderline area of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus adjacent to the spinal trigeminal tract, the substantia gelatinosa and the superficial layers of the dorsal spinal cord. Moderate binding was observed in the piriform, periamygdaloid, entorhinal, insular cortex and the subiculum, the nucleus accumbens, medial forebrain bundle, anterior hypothalamic, ventromedial, dorsal premamillary, lateral and periventricular thalamic nuclei, the subzona incerta, Forel's field H1 and H2, periventricular gray matter, medial and superficial gray strata of the superior colliculus, dorsal parts of the central gray, peripeduncular area, the interpeduncular nucleus, substantia nigra zona compacta, ventral tegmental area, the dorsal and ventral parabrachial and parvocellular reticular nuclei. The preponderance of GAL-binding in somatosensory as well as in limbic areas suggests a possible involvement of GAL in a variety of brain functions.

  8. Risoe energy report 4: The future energy system - distributed production and use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L.

    2005-10-01

    The world is facing major challenges in providing energy services to meet the future needs of the developed world and the growing needs of developing countries. These challenges are exacerbated by the need to provide energy services with due respect to economic growth, sustainability and security of supply. Today, the world's energy system is based mainly on oil, gas and coal, which together supply around 80% of our primary energy. Only around 0.5% of primary energy comes from renewable sources such as wind, solar and geothermal. Despite the rapid development of new energy technologies, the world will continue to depend on fossil fuels for several decades to come - and global primary energy demand is forecasted to grow by 60% between 2002 and 2030. The expected post Kyoto targets call for significant CO{sub 2} reductions, increasing the demand to decouple the energy and transport systems from fossil fuels. There is a strong need for closer links between electricity, heat and other energy carriers, including links to the transport sector. On a national scale Denmark has three main characteristics. Firstly, it has a diverse and distributed energy system based on the power grid, the district heating grid and the natural gas grid. Secondly, renewable energy, especially wind power, plays an increasingly important role in the Danish energy system. Thirdly, Denmark's geographical location allows it to act as a buffer between the energy systems of the European continent and the Nordic countries. Energy systems can be made more robust by decentralising both power generation and control. Distributed generation (DG) is characterised by a variety of energy production technologies integrated into the electricity supply system, and the ability of different segments of the grid to operate autonomously. The use of a more distributed power generation system would be an important element in the protection of the consumers against power interruptions and blackouts, whether

  9. Distributed Flexibility Management Targeting Energy Cost and Total Power Limitations in Electricity Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessler, Sanford; Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Silva, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    Demand Management uses the interaction and information exchange between multiple control functions in order to achieve goals that can vary in different application contexts. Since there are several stakeholders involved, these may have diverse objectives and even use different architectures...... to actively manage power demand. This paper utilizes an existing distributed demand management architecture in order to provide the following contributions: (1) It develops and evaluates a set of algorithms that combine the optimization of energy costs in scenarios of variable day-ahead prices with the goal...... to improve distribution grid operation reliability, here implemented by a total Power limit. (2) It evaluates the proposed scheme as a distributed system where flexibility information is exchanged with the existing industry standard OpenADR. A Hardware-in-the-Loop testbed realization demonstrates...

  10. Distributed Optimal Dispatch of Distributed Energy Resources Over Lossy Communication Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Junfeng; Yang, Tao; Wu, Di; Kalsi, Karanjit; Johansson, Karl Henrik

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the economic dispatch problem (EDP), where a cost function that is assumed to be strictly convex is assigned to each of distributed energy resources (DERs), over packet dropping networks. The goal of a standard EDP is to minimize the total generation cost while meeting total demand and satisfying individual generator output limit. We propose a distributed algorithm for solving the EDP over networks. The proposed algorithm is resilient against packet drops over communication links. Under the assumption that the underlying communication network is strongly connected with a positive probability and the packet drops are independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.), we show that the proposed algorithm is able to solve the EDP. Numerical simulation results are used to validate and illustrate the main results of the paper.

  11. Resonance energy transfer study on the proximity relationship between the GTP binding site and the rifampicin binding site of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, K.P.; Chatterji, D.

    1990-01-01

    Terbium(III) upon complexation with guanosine 5'-triphosphate showed remarkable enhancement of fluorescence emission at 488 and 545 nm when excited at 295 nm. Analysis of the binding data yielded a value for the mean K d between Tb(III) and GTP of 0.2 μM, with three binding sites for TB(III) on GTP. 31 P and 1 H NMR measurements revealed that Tb(III) mainly binds the phosphate moiety of GTP. Fluorescence titration of the emission signals of the TbGTP complex with varying concentrations of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase resulted in a K d values of 4 μM between the TbGTP and the enzyme. It was observed that TbGTP can be incorporated in the place of GTP during E. coli RNA polymerase catalyzed abortive synthesis of dinucleotide tetraphosphate at T7A2 promoter. Both the substrate TbGTP and the inhibitor of the initiation of transcription rifampicin bind to the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase. This allows the measurement of the fluorescence excited-state energy transfer from the donor TbGTP-RNA polymerase to the acceptor rifampicin. Both emission bands of Tb(III) overlap with the rifampicin absorption, and the distances at 50% efficiency of energy transfer were calculated to be 28 and 24 angstrom for the 488- and 545-nm emission bands, respectively. The distance between the substrate binding site and the rifampicin binding site on the β-subunit of E. coli RNA polymerase was measured to be around 30 angstrom. This suggest that the nature of inhibition of transcription by rifampicin is essentially noncompetitive with the substrate

  12. Multiplicity distributions in high-energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.W.; Coffin, C.T.; Diamond, R.N.; French, H.; Louis, W.; Roe, B.P.; Seidl, A.A.; Vander Velde, J.C.; Berge, J.P.; Bogert, D.V.; DiBianca, F.A.; Cundy, D.C.; Dunaitsev, A.; Efremenko, V.; Ermolov, P.; Fowler, W.; Hanft, R.; Harigel, G.; Huson, F.R.; Kolganov, V.; Mukhin, A.; Nezrick, F.A.; Rjabov, Y.; Scott, W.G.; Smart, W.

    1976-01-01

    Results from the Fermilab 15-ft bubble chamber on the charged-particle multiplicity distributions produced in high-energy charged-current neutrino-proton interactions are presented. Comparisons are made to γp, ep, μp, and inclusive pp scattering. The mean hadronic multiplicity appears to depend only on the mass of the excited hadronic state, independent of the mode of excitation. A fit to the neutrino data gives = (1.09+-0.38) +(1.09+-0.03)lnW 2

  13. Renewable energy resources for distributed generation systems in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szewczuk, Stefan

    2010-09-15

    The South African Government has objective to provide universal access of electricity for its citizens and its electrification programme has been successful but focus has moved from numbers of connections to one of achieving sustainable socio-economic benefits. First-hand understanding was obtained of the complexity of socio-economic development where CSIR undertook a project in the rural areas of South Africa to identify electrification opportunities using renewable energy linked to economic activities. Lessons formed basis of a government funding implementation of pilot hybrid mini-grids to inform a future rollout. Results informed the development of distributed generation concepts and an integrated methodology.

  14. Distributional consequences of environmental taxes; Fordelingsvirkninger af energi- og miljoeafgifter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinge Jacobsen, H.; Birr-Pedersen, K.; Wier, M.

    2001-11-01

    Environmental taxes imposed on households have been introduced in many countries. However, few countries have reached the level of environmental taxation that is seen in Denmark today, although many are considering shifting the tax burden towards the consumption that is harming the environment. The total tax burden imposed on households in Denmark in the form of taxes on energy use of all kinds, water consumption and waste production, etc., is considerable. This paper analyses the individual taxes as well as the combination of all these taxes and duties related to environmental concerns, including taxes on heating, transport fuels, electricity, water, waste, plastic bags, registration of cars, annual car use, pesticides, etc. The distributional effect of taxes is examined in relation to household income, socio-economic class, residential location and family status. The shifting of the tax structure from high marginal income tax to consumption-based taxes, especially environmental taxes, might have distributional impacts amongst income groups which have not been considered part of the tax policy. The taxes are compared with respect to distributional impact. Do the effects of the different taxes vary to such an extent that this should be considered when designing tax policies? The hypothesis is that some environmental taxes associated with luxury income are less regressive than the average environmental tax. The results suggest that in Denmark taxes on petrol and registration duties for cars are progressive, whereas most other environmental taxes are regressive, especially the green taxes on water, retail containers and CO{sup 2}. The distributional impacts are illustrated using household consumption survey data and data covering household expenditures on energy. The energy taxes and the more recently introduced green taxes are compared. The project is combining the direct and the indirect effect of taxes. The direct effect considers the taxes imposed directly on

  15. Tunneling and reflection in unimolecular reaction kinetic energy release distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, K.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetic energy release distributions in unimolecular reactions is calculated with detailed balance theory, taking into account the tunneling and the reflection coefficient in three different types of transition states; (i) a saddle point corresponding to a standard RRKM-type theory, (ii) an attachment Langevin cross section, and (iii) an absorbing sphere potential at short range, without long range interactions. Corrections are significant in the one dimensional saddle point states. Very light and lightly bound absorbing systems will show measurable effects in decays from the absorbing sphere, whereas the Langevin cross section is essentially unchanged.

  16. Energy distribution of proton microbeam transmitted through two flat plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, G.U.L.; Rajta, I.; Bereczky, R.J.; Tőkési, K.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of 1 MeV proton microbeam passing between two parallel flat plates was investigated. Three different materials were used in our experiments. As insulators we used Polytetrafluoroethylene and borosilicate glass plates and glass with gold layer on the surface as conductor. The surface of the plates was parallel to the beam axis and one of the plates was moved towards the beam. The energy distribution and the deflection of the transmitted beam were measured as the function of the sample distance relative to the beam. We found systematic differences between the behaviour of the metallic and insulator samples. The proton microbeam suffered significant deflection towards the sample surface due to the image acceleration when using conductor material. In case of the glass and Polytetrafluoroethylene plates the beam was deflected into the opposite direction, and the incident protons did not suffer significant energy loss, which is the consequence of the guiding effect.

  17. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  18. Temporal and spatial distribution of high energy electrons at Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, I.; Garrett, H. B.; Ratliff, J. M.

    2003-04-01

    Measurements of the high energy, omni-directional electron environment by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD) were used to study the high energy electron environment in the Jovian magnetosphere, especially in the region between 8 to 18 Rj (1 Rj = 1 Jovian radius = 71,400 km). 10-minute averages of the EPD data collected between Jupiter orbit insertion (JOI) in 1995 and the orbit number 33 (I33) in 2002 form an extensive dataset, which has been extremely useful to observe temporal and spatial variability of the Jovian high energy electron environment. The count rates of the EPD electron channels (0.174, 0.304, 0.527, 1.5, 2.0, and 11 MeV) were grouped into 0.5 Rj or 0.5 L bins and analyzed statistically. The results indicate that: (1) a log-normal Gaussian distribution well describes the statistics of the high energy electron environment (for example, electron differential fluxes) in the Jovian magnetosphere, in the region studied here; (2) the high energy electron environments inferred by the Galileo EPD measurements are in a close agreement with the data obtained using the Divine model, which was developed more than 30 years ago from Pioneer 10, 11 and Voyager 1, 2 data; (3) the data are better organized when plotted against magnetic radial parameter L than Rj; (4) the standard deviations of the 0.174, 0.304, 0.527 MeV channel count rates are larger than those of the 1.5, 2.0, 11 MeV count rates in 12 Rj. These observations are very helpful to understand short- and long-term, and local variability of the Jovian high energy electron environment, and are discussed in detail.

  19. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility

  20. Role for Distributed Energy Resources (DER) in the Digital Economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, Thomas S [Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)

    2007-11-01

    A large, and growing, part of the Nation's economy either serves or depends upon the information technology industry. These high-tech or "digital" enterprises are characterized by a dependence on electronic devices, need for completely reliable power supply, and intolerance to any power quality problems. In some cases these enterprises are densely populated with electronic loads and have very high energy usage per square foot. Serving these enterprises presents both electric power and equipment cooling challenges. Traditional electric utilities are often hard-pressed to deliver power that meets the stringent requirements of digital customers, and the economic and social consequences of a service quality or reliability problem can be large. New energy delivery and control options must be developed to effectively serve a digital economy. This report explores how distributed energy resources, partnerships between utility and customer to share the responsibility for service quality, innovative facility designs, higher energy efficiencies and waste-heat utilization can be coupled to meet the needs of a growing digital economy.

  1. Global distribution of grid connected electrical energy storage systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Buss

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an overview of grid connected electrical energy storage systems worldwide, based on public available data. Technologies considered in this study are pumped hydroelectric energy storage (PHES, compressed air energy storage (CAES, sodium-sulfur batteries (NaS, lead-acid batteries, redox-flow batteries, nickel-cadmium batteries (NiCd and lithium-ion batteries. As the research indicates, the worldwide installed capacity of grid connected electrical energy storage systems is approximately 154 GW. This corresponds to a share of 5.5 % of the worldwide installed generation capacity. Furthermore, the article gives an overview of the historical development of installed and used storage systems worldwide. Subsequently, the focus is on each considered technology concerning the current storage size, number of plants and location. In summary it can be stated, PHES is the most commonly used technology worldwide, whereas electrochemical technologies are increasingly gaining in importance. Regarding the distribution of grid connected storage systems reveals the share of installed storage capacity is in Europe and Eastern Asia twice as high as in North America.

  2. Pharmacologic characterization and autoradiographic distribution of binding sites for iodinated tachykinins in the rat central nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, S.H.; Helke, C.J.; Burcher, E.; Shults, C.W.; O' Donohue, T.L.

    1986-11-01

    P-type, E-type, and K-type tachykinin binding sites have been identified in the mammalian CNS. These sites may be tachykinin receptors for which the mammalian neuropeptides substance P, neuromedin K, and substance K are the preferred natural agonists, respectively. In the present investigation, we have compared the pharmacology and the autoradiographic distribution of CNS binding sites for the iodinated (/sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter reagent) tachykinins substance P, eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K. Iodinated eledoisin and neuromedin K exhibited an E-type binding pattern in cortical membranes. Iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K each labeled sites that had a similar distribution but one that was considerably different from that of sites labeled by iodinated substance P. CNS regions where there were detectable densities of binding sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K and few or no sites for iodinated substance P included cortical layers IV-VI, mediolateral septum, supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei, interpeduncular nucleus, ventral tegmental area, and substantia nigra pars compacta. Binding sites for SP were generally more widespread in the CNS. CNS regions where there was a substantial density of binding sites for iodinated substance P and few or no sites for iodinated eledoisin, neuromedin K, and substance K included cortical layers I and II, olfactory tubercle, nucleus accumbens, caudate-putamen, globus pallidus, medial and lateral septum, endopiriform nucleus, rostral thalamus, medial and lateral preoptic nuclei, arcuate nucleus, dorsal raphe nucleus, dorsal parabrachial nucleus, parabigeminal nucleus, cerebellum, inferior olive, nucleus ambiguus, retrofacial and reticular nuclei, and spinal cord autonomic and somatic motor nuclei.

  3. Optimization based on benefit of regional energy suppliers of distributed generation in active distribution network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Xianxu; Li, Guodong; Jiang, Ling; Wang, Xudong

    2017-08-01

    With the development of electricity market, distributed generation (DG) technology and related policies, regional energy suppliers are encouraged to build DG. Under this background, the concept of active distribution network (ADN) is put forward. In this paper, a bi-level model of intermittent DG considering benefit of regional energy suppliers is proposed. The objective of the upper level is the maximization of benefit of regional energy suppliers. On this basis, the lower level is optimized for each scene. The uncertainties of DG output and load of users, as well as four active management measures, which include demand-side management, curtailing the output power of DG, regulating reactive power compensation capacity and regulating the on-load tap changer, are considered. Harmony search algorithm and particle swarm optimization are combined as a hybrid strategy to solve the model. This model and strategy are tested with IEEE-33 node system, and results of case study indicate that the model and strategy successfully increase the capacity of DG and benefit of regional energy suppliers.

  4. Creating hourly distributions at national level for various energy demands and renewable energy supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connolly, David; Drysdale, Dave; Hansen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    being recorded over longer time horizons, for example over one day. In this paper, a methodology is presented for creating hourly distributions for energy systems analysis tools. On the demand side, hourly distributions are developed for electricity, heating, cooling, and transport while the supply side...... includes wind, solar (photovoltaic and thermal), and wave power. Distributions are not created for dispatchable plants, such as coal, gas, and nuclear thermal plants, since their output is usually determined by the energy modelling tool rather than by a dependent resource. The methodologies are purposely...... based on generic data sources so it can be utilised for any country. Where possible, the results are compared against existing data. If available, local bottom-up data should be prioritised, but if not, then this methodology offers an estimation of the short-term variations expected....

  5. Characterization of plasma triiodophenol binding proteins in vertebrates and tissue distribution of triiodophenol in Rana catesbeiana tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Kiyoshi; Sai, Gobun

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the interaction of 2,4,6-triiodophenol (TIP), a potent thyroid hormone disrupting chemical, with serum proteins from rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss), bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), chicken (Gallus gallus), pig (Sus scrofa domesticus), and rat (Rattus norvegicus) using a [(125)I]TIP binding assay, gel filtration chromatography, and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. [(125)I]TIP bound non-specifically to proteins in trout serum, specifically but weakly to proteins in bullfrog serum, and specifically and strongly to proteins in chicken, pig, and rat serum samples. Candidate TIP-binding proteins included lipoproteins (220-320kDa) in trout, albumin in bullfrog, albumin and transthyretin (TTR) in chicken and pig, and TTR in rat. TTR in the chicken, pig, and rat serum samples was responsible for the high-affinity, low-capacity binding sites for TIP (dissociation constant 2.2-3.5×10(-10)M). In contrast, a weak interaction of [(125)I]TIP with tadpole serum proteins accelerated [(125)I]TIP cellular uptake in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of [(125)I]TIP in tadpoles revealed that the radioactivity was predominantly accumulated in the gallbladder and the kidney. The differences in the molecular and binding properties of TIP binding proteins among vertebrates would affect in part the cellular availability, tissue distribution and clearance of TIP. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis on Binding Energy and Auger Parameter for Estimating Size and Stoichiometry of ZnO Nanorods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santanu Bera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanorods prepared through chemical vapor deposition technique are characterized by microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS techniques to correlate the effects of size on the binding energy of Zn 2p3/2 photoelectrons. A positive shift in Zn 2p3/2-binding energy as compared to that in bulk ZnO is assumed to be the effect of size of ZnO tips. The shift in binding energy has been explained in terms of relaxation energy in the photoemission process. Simultaneously, Auger parameter of the nanorods is evaluated for stoichiometric composition. The extra peak in O1s spectrum of nanorods is explained as adsorbed O-bearing species or surface contaminants.

  7. Relation between heat of vaporization, ion transport, molar volume, and cation-anion binding energy for ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodin, Oleg

    2009-09-10

    A number of correlations between heat of vaporization (H(vap)), cation-anion binding energy (E(+/-)), molar volume (V(m)), self-diffusion coefficient (D), and ionic conductivity for 29 ionic liquids have been investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that employed accurate and validated many-body polarizable force fields. A significant correlation between D and H(vap) has been found, while the best correlation was found for -log(DV(m)) vs H(vap) + 0.28E(+/-). A combination of enthalpy of vaporization and a fraction of the cation-anion binding energy was suggested as a measure of the effective cohesive energy for ionic liquids. A deviation of some ILs from the reported master curve is explained based upon ion packing and proposed diffusion pathways. No general correlations were found between the ion diffusion coefficient and molecular volume or the diffusion coefficient and cation/anion binding energy.

  8. Earthquake Energy Distribution along the Earth Surface and Radius

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, P.; Krumm, F.; Riguzzi, F.; Doglioni, C.; Suele, B.; Wang, K.; Panza, G.F.

    2010-07-01

    The global earthquake catalog of seismic events with M W ≥ 7.0, for the time interval from 1950 to 2007, shows that the depth distribution of earthquake energy release is not uniform. The 90% of the total earthquake energy budget is dissipated in the first ∼30km, whereas most of the residual budget is radiated at the lower boundary of the transition zone (410 km - 660 km), above the upper-lower mantle boundary. The upper border of the transition zone at around 410 km of depth is not marked by significant seismic energy release. This points for a non-dominant role of the slabs in the energy budged of plate tectonics. Earthquake number and energy release, although not well correlated, when analysed with respect to the latitude, show a decrease toward the polar areas. Moreover, the radiated energy has the highest peak close to (±5 o ) the so-called tectonic equator defined by Crespi et al. (2007), which is inclined about 30 o with respect to the geographic equator. At the same time the presence of a clear axial co- ordination of the radiated seismic energy is demonstrated with maxima at latitudes close to critical (±45 o ). This speaks about the presence of external forces that influence seismicity and it is consistent with the fact that Gutenberg-Richter law is linear, for events with M>5, only when the whole Earth's seismicity is considered. These data are consistent with an astronomical control on plate tectonics, i.e., the despinning (slowing of the Earth's angular rotation) of the Earth's rotation caused primarily by the tidal friction due to the Moon. The mutual position of the shallow and ∼660 km deep earthquake energy sources along subduction zones allows us to conclude that they are connected with the same slab along the W-directed subduction zones, but they may rather be disconnected along the opposed E-NE-directed slabs, being the deep seismicity controlled by other mechanisms. (author)

  9. Energy determines broad pattern of plant distribution in Western Himalaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Rajendra M; Behera, Mukunda Dev; Roy, Partha S; Biradar, Chandrashekhar

    2017-12-01

    Several factors describe the broad pattern of diversity in plant species distribution. We explore these determinants of species richness in Western Himalayas using high-resolution species data available for the area to energy, water, physiography and anthropogenic disturbance. The floral data involves 1279 species from 1178 spatial locations and 738 sample plots of a national database. We evaluated their correlation with 8-environmental variables, selected on the basis of correlation coefficients and principal component loadings, using both linear (structural equation model) and nonlinear (generalised additive model) techniques. There were 645 genera and 176 families including 815 herbs, 213 shrubs, 190 trees, and 61 lianas. The nonlinear model explained the maximum deviance of 67.4% and showed the dominant contribution of climate on species richness with a 59% share. Energy variables (potential evapotranspiration and temperature seasonality) explained the deviance better than did water variables (aridity index and precipitation of the driest quarter). Temperature seasonality had the maximum impact on the species richness. The structural equation model confirmed the results of the nonlinear model but less efficiently. The mutual influences of the climatic variables were found to affect the predictions of the model significantly. To our knowledge, the 67.4% deviance found in the species richness pattern is one of the highest values reported in mountain studies. Broadly, climate described by water-energy dynamics provides the best explanation for the species richness pattern. Both modeling approaches supported the same conclusion that energy is the best predictor of species richness. The dry and cold conditions of the region account for the dominant contribution of energy on species richness.

  10. Optimal Energy Management of an Academic Building with Distributed Generation and Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán-Blay, C.; Roldán-Porta, C.; Peñalvo-López, E.; Escrivá-Escrivá, G.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, an optimisation algorithm is used to simulate the management of distributed energy resources in an academic building. This optimisation algorithm, called DEROP, consists of an iterative procedure reach a supply schedule with the minimum energy cost. The inputs to the algorithm are the demand forecast, the availability of each resource, the level of storage in energy storage systems and prices and efficiencies of each resource. With these data, the algorithm proposes the optimal schedule to minimise costs of energy supply. The main advantages of this algorithm are that it is fast, easy to be implemented in real buildings and flexible. The algorithm is simulated with real data to optimise management of distributed energy resources and energy storage systems in an academic building. The management of these resources is optimised for a tariff with hourly discrimination and for a tariff with no time restrictions. One of the main conclusions drawn from these simulations are that significant savings are obtained with this algorithm. Also, DEROP allows taking advantage of tariffs with hourly discrimination, even in an academic building with low night-time consumption in which, a priori, these tariffs are not profitable.

  11. Distributed Energy Storage Control for Dynamic Load Impact Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian J. Zangs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The future uptake of electric vehicles (EV in low-voltage distribution networks can cause increased voltage violations and thermal overloading of network assets, especially in networks with limited headroom at times of high or peak demand. To address this problem, this paper proposes a distributed battery energy storage solution, controlled using an additive increase multiplicative decrease (AIMD algorithm. The improved algorithm (AIMD+ uses local bus voltage measurements and a reference voltage threshold to determine the additive increase parameter and to control the charging, as well as discharging rate of the battery. The used voltage threshold is dependent on the network topology and is calculated using power flow analysis tools, with peak demand equally allocated amongst all loads. Simulations were performed on the IEEE LV European Test feeder and a number of real U.K. suburban power distribution network models, together with European demand data and a realistic electric vehicle charging model. The performance of the standard AIMD algorithm with a fixed voltage threshold and the proposed AIMD+ algorithm with the reference voltage profile are compared. Results show that, compared to the standard AIMD case, the proposed AIMD+ algorithm further improves the network’s voltage profiles, reduces thermal overload occurrences and ensures a more equal battery utilisation.

  12. Experimental Testing for Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihet-Popa, Lucian; Groza, Voicu; Isleifsson, Fridrik Rafn

    2012-01-01

    Experimental Testing for Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads......Experimental Testing for Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads...

  13. Exergy efficient production, storage and distribution of solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandnes, Bjoernar

    2003-07-01

    There are two main themes in this thesis. 1) Exergy efficient utilization of solar energy, where the introduction of alternative technologies such as photovoltaic/thermal collectors and phase change energy storage in a low temperature solar system is investigated. 2) The possibility of storing thermal energy in supercooled liquids is investigated. The introductory chapters introduce the concept of exergy, and focus on the use of solar heat as an inherently low quality source for covering low quality demands associated with space heating and hot water. The different stages of solar energy production, storage, and distribution of heat is discussed, with emphasis on exergy relevant issues. With the low temperature solar heating system as background, the introduction of some additional technologies that are investigated. A section of this thesis presents a study of a small scale PV/T collector as a possible component in a low temperature system. In another section the instrumentation that has been built for studies of full-size PV and thermal systems is described, and the possibility of using the PV unit outputs as parameters for controlling the thermal system operation is briefly discussed. It is suggested that the design of the PV/T unit in terms of whether priority should be given to electricity or heat production should be based on how consumption of high quality auxiliary energy is minimized, and not on adding up the combined exergy which is being produced. Solar combisystems require larger heat storage capacities compared to the more common solar hot water systems. Increased volumetric heat storage capacity can be achieved by latent heat storage systems where thermal energy is stored as heat of fusion in phase change materials (PCMs). A section presents a study where spherically encapsulated PCM is incorporated in a solar heat store. Solar combisystems are often complex, and have a relatively large number of interacting components. Another section describes a

  14. Power flow control strategy in distribution network for dc type distributed energy resource at load bus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanif, A.; Choudhry, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    This research work presents a feed forward power flow control strategy in the secondary distribution network working in parallel with a DC type distributed energy resource (DER) unit with SPWM-IGBT Voltage Source Converter (VSC). The developed control strategy enables the VSC to be used as power flow controller at the load bus in the presence of utility supply. Due to the investigated control strategy, power flow control from distributed energy resource (DER) to common load bus is such that power flows to the load without facing any power quality problem. The technique has an added advantage of controlling power flow without having a dedicated power flow controller. The SPWM-IGBT VSC is serving the purpose of dc-ac converter as well as power flow controller. Simulations for a test system using proposed power flow control strategy are carried out using SimPower Systems toolbox of MATLAB at the rate and Simulink at the rate. The results show that a reliable, effective and efficient operation of DC type DER unit in coordination with main utility network can be achieved. (author)

  15. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Panel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or “PB/LIE” free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo. The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  16. A Simple PB/LIE Free Energy Function Accurately Predicts the Peptide Binding Specificity of the Tiam1 PDZ Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panel, Nicolas; Sun, Young Joo; Fuentes, Ernesto J; Simonson, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    PDZ domains generally bind short amino acid sequences at the C-terminus of target proteins, and short peptides can be used as inhibitors or model ligands. Here, we used experimental binding assays and molecular dynamics simulations to characterize 51 complexes involving the Tiam1 PDZ domain and to test the performance of a semi-empirical free energy function. The free energy function combined a Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) continuum electrostatic term, a van der Waals interaction energy, and a surface area term. Each term was empirically weighted, giving a Linear Interaction Energy or "PB/LIE" free energy. The model yielded a mean unsigned deviation of 0.43 kcal/mol and a Pearson correlation of 0.64 between experimental and computed free energies, which was superior to a Null model that assumes all complexes have the same affinity. Analyses of the models support several experimental observations that indicate the orientation of the α 2 helix is a critical determinant for peptide specificity. The models were also used to predict binding free energies for nine new variants, corresponding to point mutants of the Syndecan1 and Caspr4 peptides. The predictions did not reveal improved binding; however, they suggest that an unnatural amino acid could be used to increase protease resistance and peptide lifetimes in vivo . The overall performance of the model should allow its use in the design of new PDZ ligands in the future.

  17. Glucose Sensors Based on Microcapsules Containing an Orange/Red Competitive Binding Resonance Energy Transfer Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHINNAYELKA, SWETHA; McSHANE, and MICHAEL J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent sensing systems offer the potential for noninvasive monitoring with implantable devices, but they require carrier technologies that provide suitable immobilization, accessibility, and biocompatibility while maintaining adequate response characteristics. A recent development towards this goal is a highly specific and sensitive competitive binding assay for glucose using apo-glucose oxidase (apo-GOx) as the recognition element and dextran as the competing ligand; this has been demonstrated as a glucose sensor system by encapsulating the competitive binding assay in semipermeable microcapsule carriers. This paper describes the extension of this sensor design to longer wavelengths in an attempt to increase the applicability to in vivo monitoring. The glucose sensitivity of the tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-dextran (TD) and cyanine Cy5-apo-GOx (CAG) complexes showed five to 10 times greater specificity for β-D-glucose over other sugars. Microcapsules loaded with TD/CAG complexes exhibited a linear, totally reversible response in the range of 0–720 mg/dL, with a sensitivity (percent change in intensity ratio) of 0.06%/(mg/dL). The decrease in sensitivity observed with the use of longer-wavelength dyes is most likely to be compensated with the deeper penetration of light and reduced tissue scattering. These findings imply that the encapsulation of sensing assay elements in microcapsules is a simple and translatable method for the fabrication of stable biosensors, and optimization of resonance energy transfer pairs and assay component preparation will further improve the response to approach clinically relevant performance. PMID:16800748

  18. Interband absorption and exciton binding energy in an inverse parabolic quantum well under the magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasapoglu, E.; Soekmen, I.

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of the magnetic field which is applied perpendicular to the growth direction of the well on the interband absorption and on the binding energy of the excitons in an GaAs/Ga 1-x Al x As inverse parabolic quantum well (IPQW) with different widths as well as different Al concentrations at the well center. The calculations were performed within the effective mass approximation, using a variational method. We observe that IPQW structure turns into parabolic quantum well with the inversion effect of the magnetic field and the effective band gap of the system can be modified by changing Al concentration at the well center, the strength of the magnetic field and well dimensions. This case directly influences the nature of electronic and optical properties in this structure

  19. Estimating Parameter Uncertainty in Binding-Energy Models by the Frequency-Domain Bootstrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, G. F.; Bingham, Derek

    2017-12-01

    We propose using the frequency-domain bootstrap (FDB) to estimate errors of modeling parameters when the modeling error is itself a major source of uncertainty. Unlike the usual bootstrap or the simple χ2 analysis, the FDB can take into account correlations between errors. It is also very fast compared to the Gaussian process Bayesian estimate as often implemented for computer model calibration. The method is illustrated with a simple example, the liquid drop model of nuclear binding energies. We find that the FDB gives a more conservative estimate of the uncertainty in liquid drop parameters than the χ2 method, and is in fair accord with more empirical estimates. For the nuclear physics application, there are no apparent obstacles to apply the method to the more accurate and detailed models based on density-functional theory.

  20. Mechanical Control of ATP Synthase Function: Activation Energy Difference between Tight and Loose Binding Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Beke-Somfai, Tamás

    2010-01-26

    Despite exhaustive chemical and crystal structure studies, the mechanistic details of how FoF1-ATP synthase can convert mechanical energy to chemical, producing ATP, are still not fully understood. On the basis of quantum mechanical calculations using a recent highresolution X-ray structure, we conclude that formation of the P-O bond may be achieved through a transition state (TS) with a planar PO3 - ion. Surprisingly, there is a more than 40 kJ/mol difference between barrier heights of the loose and tight binding sites of the enzyme. This indicates that even a relatively small change in active site conformation, induced by the γ-subunit rotation, may effectively block the back reaction in βTP and, thus, promote ATP. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  1. Scaling Universality between Band Gap and Exciton Binding Energy of Two-Dimensional Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zeyu; Liu, Zhirong; Li, Yuanchang; Duan, Wenhui

    2017-06-01

    Using first-principles G W Bethe-Salpeter equation calculations and the k .p theory, we unambiguously show that for two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors, there exists a robust linear scaling law between the quasiparticle band gap (Eg) and the exciton binding energy (Eb), namely, Eb≈Eg/4 , regardless of their lattice configuration, bonding characteristic, as well as the topological property. Such a parameter-free universality is never observed in their three-dimensional counterparts. By deriving a simple expression for the 2D polarizability merely with respect to Eg, and adopting the screened hydrogen model for Eb, the linear scaling law can be deduced analytically. This work provides an opportunity to better understand the fantastic consequence of the 2D nature for materials, and thus offers valuable guidance for their property modulation and performance control.

  2. Binding energy of one [sup 4]He impurity in liquid [sup 3]He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boronat, J. (Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain)); Saavedra, F.A. de; Buendia, E. (Universidad de Granola (Spain)); Polls, A. (Universitat de Barcelona (Spain))

    1994-02-01

    A variational microscopic calculation of the binding energy of a [sup 4]He impurity ([mu][sub I]) in homogeneous liquid [sup 3]He at zero temperature is presented. Starting on an extended Jastrow-Slater wave function including three-body correlations, the expression for [mu][sub I] is derived and the appropriated FHNC formalism for this problem is reviewed. In the framework of the Average Correlation Approximation (ACA), it is proved that it is possible to obtain the chemical potential of the impurity only from liquid [sup 3]He magnitudes with a good accuracy. The results are consistent with both a recent experimental determination of [mu][sub I] at zero pressure and the non-solubility of [sup 4]He in [sup 3]He. However, numerical uncertainties preclude a firm conclusion about the latter property.

  3. A Multiagent-based Consensus Algorithm for Distributed Coordinated Control of Distributed Generators in the Energy Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Qiuye; Han, Renke; Zhang, Huaguang

    2015-01-01

    With the bidirectional power flow provided by the Energy Internet, various methods are promoted to improve and increase the energy utilization between Energy Internet and Main-Grid. This paper proposes a novel distributed coordinated controller combined with a multi-agent-based consensus algorithm...... which is applied to distributed generators in the Energy Internet. Then, the decomposed tasks, models, and information flow of the proposed method are analyzed. The proposed coordinated controller installed between the Energy Internet and the Main-Grid keeps voltage angles and amplitudes consensus while...... controller in an Energy Internet....

  4. Patterns of inequality: Dynamics of income distribution in USA and global energy consumption distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anand; Yakovenko, Victor

    2010-03-01

    Applying the principle of entropy maximization, we argued that the distribution of money in a closed economic system should be exponential [1], see also recent review [2]. In this talk, we show that income distribution in USA is exponential for the majority of population (about 97%). However, the high-income tail follows a power law and is highly dynamical, i.e., out of equilibrium. The fraction of income going to the tail swelled to 20% of all income in 2000 and 2006 at the peaks of speculative bubbles followed by spectacular crashes. Next, we analyze the global distribution of energy consumption per capita among different countries. In the first approximation, it is reasonably well captured by the exponential function. Comparing the data for 1990 and 2005, we observe that the distribution is getting closer to the exponential, presumably as a result of globalization of the world economy.[4pt] [1] A. A. Dragulescu and V. M. Yakovenko, Eur. Phys. J. B 17, 723 (2000). [2] V. M. Yakovenko and J. B. Rosser, to appear in Rev. Mod. Phys. (2009), arXiv:0905.1518.

  5. Power electronics for renewable and distributed energy systems a sourcebook of topologies, control and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Kramer, William E

    2013-01-01

    While most books approach power electronics and renewable energy as two separate subjects, Power Electronics for Renewable and Distributed Energy Systems takes an integrative approach; discussing power electronic converters topologies, controls and integration that are specific to the renewable and distributed energy system applications. An overview of power electronic technologies is followed by the introduction of various renewable and distributed energy resources that includes photovoltaics, wind, small hydroelectric, fuel cells, microturbines and variable speed generation. Energy storage s

  6. Integration of 100% Micro-Distributed Energy Resources in the Low Voltage Distribution Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    You, Shi; Segerberg, Helena

    2014-01-01

    The existing electricity infrastructure may to a great extent limit a high penetration of the micro-sized Distributed Energy Resources (DERs), due to the physical bottlenecks, e.g. thermal capacitates of cables, transformers and the voltage limitations. In this study, the integration impacts...... strategies, namely dumb operation, half-direct controlled operation (i.e. controlling HPs only) and full-direct controlled operation (i.e. controlling both EVs and HPs), are modelled and simulated. The quantitative comparison proves that, by implementing a simple merit of order based congestion management...

  7. Decipher the mechanisms of protein conformational changes induced by nucleotide binding through free-energy landscape analysis: ATP binding to Hsp70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Nicolaï

    Full Text Available ATP regulates the function of many proteins in the cell by transducing its binding and hydrolysis energies into protein conformational changes by mechanisms which are challenging to identify at the atomic scale. Based on molecular dynamics (MD simulations, a method is proposed to analyze the structural changes induced by ATP binding to a protein by computing the effective free-energy landscape (FEL of a subset of its coordinates along its amino-acid sequence. The method is applied to characterize the mechanism by which the binding of ATP to the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD of Hsp70 propagates a signal to its substrate-binding domain (SBD. Unbiased MD simulations were performed for Hsp70-DnaK chaperone in nucleotide-free, ADP-bound and ATP-bound states. The simulations revealed that the SBD does not interact with the NBD for DnaK in its nucleotide-free and ADP-bound states whereas the docking of the SBD was found in the ATP-bound state. The docked state induced by ATP binding found in MD is an intermediate state between the initial nucleotide-free and final ATP-bound states of Hsp70. The analysis of the FEL projected along the amino-acid sequence permitted to identify a subset of 27 protein internal coordinates corresponding to a network of 91 key residues involved in the conformational change induced by ATP binding. Among the 91 residues, 26 are identified for the first time, whereas the others were shown relevant for the allosteric communication of Hsp70 s in several experiments and bioinformatics analysis. The FEL analysis revealed also the origin of the ATP-induced structural modifications of the SBD recently measured by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance. The pathway between the nucleotide-free and the intermediate state of DnaK was extracted by applying principal component analysis to the subset of internal coordinates describing the transition. The methodology proposed is general and could be applied to analyze allosteric communication in

  8. Multi-port isolated LLC resonant converter for distributed energy generation with energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas Manez, Kevin; Zhang, Zhe; Ouyang, Ziwei

    2017-01-01

    Distributed energy generation systems with energy storage and microgrids have attracted increasing research interest in recent years. Therefore, multi-ports dc-dc converters have gained more interest. However, when integrating into multiple port converters, the power flow control and ports...... regulation increase in complexity. In this paper, an isolated multi-port bidirectional converter based on an LLC converter is presented. The converter operates as a dc transformer at a fixed switching frequency and duty cycle without any control loop. The resonant tanks are designed to ensure soft...

  9. Potential energy surface and binding energy in the presence of an external electric field: modulation of anion-π interactions for graphene-based receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2014-02-14

    Measuring the binding energy or scanning the potential energy surface (PES) of the charged molecular systems in the presence of an external electric field (EEF) requires a careful evaluation of the origin-dependency of the energy of the system and references. Scanning the PES for charged or purely ionic systems for obtaining the intrinsic energy barriers needs careful analysis of the electric work applied on ions by the EEF. The binding energy in the presence of an EEF is different from that in the absence of an electric field as the binding energy is an anisotropic characteristic which depends on the orientation of molecules with respect to the EEF. In this contribution we discuss various aspects of the PES and the concept of binding energy in the presence of an EEF. In addition, we demonstrate that the anion-π bonding properties can be modulated by applying a uniform EEF, which has a more pronounced effect on the larger, more polarizable π-systems. An analogous behavior is presumed for cation-π systems. We predict that understanding the phenomenon introduced in the present account has enormous potential, for example, for separating charged species on the surface of polarizable two-dimensional materials such as graphene or the surface of carbon nanotubes, in desalination of water.

  10. Evaluation Framework and Tools for Distributed Energy Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gumerman, Etan Z.; Bharvirkar, Ranjit R.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Marnay , Chris

    2003-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2002 Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) forecast anticipates the need for 375 MW of new generating capacity (or about one new power plant) per week for the next 20 years, most of which is forecast to be fueled by natural gas. The Distributed Energy and Electric Reliability Program (DEER) of the Department of Energy (DOE), has set a national goal for DER to capture 20 percent of new electric generation capacity additions by 2020 (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2000). Cumulatively, this amounts to about 40 GW of DER capacity additions from 2000-2020. Figure ES-1 below compares the EIA forecast and DEER's assumed goal for new DER by 2020 while applying the same definition of DER to both. This figure illustrates that the EIA forecast is consistent with the overall DEER DER goal. For the purposes of this study, Berkeley Lab needed a target level of small-scale DER penetration upon which to hinge consideration of benefits and costs. Because the AEO2002 forecasted only 3.1 GW of cumulative additions from small-scale DER in the residential and commercial sectors, another approach was needed to estimate the small-scale DER target. The focus here is on small-scale DER technologies under 500 kW. The technology size limit is somewhat arbitrary, but the key results of interest are marginal additional costs and benefits around an assumed level of penetration that existing programs might achieve. Berkeley Lab assumes that small-scale DER has the same growth potential as large scale DER in AEO2002, about 38 GW. This assumption makes the small-scale goal equivalent to 380,000 DER units of average size 100 kW. This report lays out a framework whereby the consequences of meeting this goal might be estimated and tallied up. The framework is built around a list of major benefits and a set of tools that might be applied to estimate them. This study lists some of the major effects of an emerging paradigm shift away from

  11. Computational prediction of binding affinity for CYP1A2-ligand complexes using empirical free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poongavanam, Vasanthanathan; Olsen, Lars; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2010-01-01

    , and methods based on statistical mechanics. In the present investigation, we started from an LIE model to predict the binding free energy of structurally diverse compounds of cytochrome P450 1A2 ligands, one of the important human metabolizing isoforms of the cytochrome P450 family. The data set includes both...... substrates and inhibitors. It appears that the electrostatic contribution to the binding free energy becomes negligible in this particular protein and a simple empirical model was derived, based on a training set of eight compounds. The root mean square error for the training set was 3.7 kJ/mol. Subsequent......Predicting binding affinities for receptor-ligand complexes is still one of the challenging processes in computational structure-based ligand design. Many computational methods have been developed to achieve this goal, such as docking and scoring methods, the linear interaction energy (LIE) method...

  12. Theoretical characterization of electron energy distribution function in RF plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capitelli, M.; Capriati, G.; Dilonardo, M.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.

    1993-01-01

    Different methods for the modeling of low-temperature plasmas of both technological and fundamental interest are discussed. The main concept of all these models is the electron energy distribution function (eedf) which is necessary to calculate the rate coefficients for any chemical reaction involving electrons. Results of eedf calculations in homogeneous SF 6 and SiH 4 plasmas are discussed based on solution of the time-dependent Boltzmann equation. The space-dependent eedf in an RF discharge in He is calculated taking into account the sheath oscillations by a Monte Carlo model assuming the plasma heating mechanism and the electric field determined by using a fluid model. The need to take into account the ambipolar diffusion of electrons in RF discharge modeling is stressed. A self-consistent model based on coupling the equations of the fluid model and the chemical kinetics ones is presented. (orig.)

  13. Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jie Liu

    2011-02-01

    The DOE Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) was formed in 2005 to develop materials for hydrogen storage systems to be used in light-duty vehicles. The HSCoE and two related centers of excellence were created as follow-on activities to the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE’s) Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge Solicitation issued in FY 2003. The Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE) focuses on developing high-capacity sorbents with the goal to operate at temperatures and pressures approaching ambient and be efficiently and quickly charged in the tank with minimal energy requirements and penalties to the hydrogen fuel infrastructure. The work was directed at overcoming barriers to achieving DOE system goals and identifying pathways to meet the hydrogen storage system targets. To ensure that the development activities were performed as efficiently as possible, the HSCoE formed complementary, focused development clusters based on the following four sorption-based hydrogen storage mechanisms: 1. Physisorption on high specific surface area and nominally single element materials 2. Enhanced H2 binding in Substituted/heterogeneous materials 3. Strong and/or multiple H2 binding from coordinated but electronically unsatruated metal centers 4. Weak Chemisorption/Spillover. As a member of the team, our group at Duke studied the synthesis of various carbon-based materials, including carbon nanotubes and microporous carbon materials with controlled porosity. We worked closely with other team members to study the effect of pore size on the binding energy of hydrogen to the carbon –based materials. Our initial project focus was on the synthesis and purification of small diameter, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with well-controlled diameters for the study of their hydrogen storage properties as a function of diameters. We developed a chemical vapor deposition method that synthesized gram quantities of carbon nanotubes with

  14. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  15. Altered [125I]epidermal growth factor binding and receptor distribution in psoriasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanney, L.B.; Stoscheck, C.M.; Magid, M.; King, L.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Stimulation of growth and differentiation of human epidermis by epidermal growth factor (EGF) is mediated by its binding to specific receptors. Whether EGF receptors primarily mediate cell division or differentiation in hyperproliferative disease such as psoriasis vulgaris is unclear. To study the pathogenesis of psoriasis, 4-mm2 punch biopsy specimens of normal, uninvolved, and involved psoriatic skin were assayed for EGF receptors by autoradiographic, immunohistochemical, and biochemical methods. Using autoradiographic and immunohistochemical methods, basal keratinocytes were found to contain the greatest number of EGF binding sites and immunoreactive receptors as compared to the upper layers of the epidermis in both normal epidermis and psoriatic skin. No EGF receptor differences between normal and psoriatic epidermis were observed in this layer. In the upper layers of the epidermis, a 2-fold increase in EGF binding capacity was observed in psoriatic skin as compared with normal thin or thick skin. Biochemical methods indicated that [ 125 I]EGF binding was increased in psoriatic epidermis as compared with similar thickness normal epidermis when measured on a protein basis. Epidermal growth factor was shown to increase phosphorylation of the EGF receptor in skin. EGF receptors retained in the nonmitotic stratum spinosum and parakeratotic stratum corneum may reflect the incomplete, abnormal differentiation that occurs in active psoriatic lesions. Alternatively, retained EGF receptors may play a direct role in inhibiting cellular differentiation in the suprabasal layers

  16. Data intensive high energy physics analysis in a distributed cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charbonneau, A; Impey, R; Podaima, W; Agarwal, A; Anderson, M; Armstrong, P; Fransham, K; Gable, I; Harris, D; Leavett-Brown, C; Paterson, M; Sobie, R J; Vliet, M

    2012-01-01

    We show that distributed Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) compute clouds can be effectively used for the analysis of high energy physics data. We have designed a distributed cloud system that works with any application using large input data sets requiring a high throughput computing environment. The system uses IaaS-enabled science and commercial clusters in Canada and the United States. We describe the process in which a user prepares an analysis virtual machine (VM) and submits batch jobs to a central scheduler. The system boots the user-specific VM on one of the IaaS clouds, runs the jobs and returns the output to the user. The user application accesses a central database for calibration data during the execution of the application. Similarly, the data is located in a central location and streamed by the running application. The system can easily run one hundred simultaneous jobs in an efficient manner and should scale to many hundreds and possibly thousands of user jobs.

  17. Data intensive high energy physics analysis in a distributed cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonneau, A.; Agarwal, A.; Anderson, M.; Armstrong, P.; Fransham, K.; Gable, I.; Harris, D.; Impey, R.; Leavett-Brown, C.; Paterson, M.; Podaima, W.; Sobie, R. J.; Vliet, M.

    2012-02-01

    We show that distributed Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) compute clouds can be effectively used for the analysis of high energy physics data. We have designed a distributed cloud system that works with any application using large input data sets requiring a high throughput computing environment. The system uses IaaS-enabled science and commercial clusters in Canada and the United States. We describe the process in which a user prepares an analysis virtual machine (VM) and submits batch jobs to a central scheduler. The system boots the user-specific VM on one of the IaaS clouds, runs the jobs and returns the output to the user. The user application accesses a central database for calibration data during the execution of the application. Similarly, the data is located in a central location and streamed by the running application. The system can easily run one hundred simultaneous jobs in an efficient manner and should scale to many hundreds and possibly thousands of user jobs.

  18. Spectrophotometry of Wolf-Rayet stars. I - Continuum energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Patrick W.; Brownsberger, Kenneth R.; Conti, Peter S.; Massey, Philip; Vacca, William D.

    1993-01-01

    All available low-resolution IUE spectra are assembled for Galactic, LMC, and SMC W-R stars and are merged with ground-based optical and NIR spectra in order to collate in a systematic fashion the shapes of these energy distributions over the wavelength range 0.1-1 micron. They can be consistently fitted by a power law of the form F(lambda) is approximately equal to lambda exp -alpha over the range 1500-9000 A to derive color excesses E(B-V) and spectral indices by removing the 2175-A interstellar absorption feature. The WN star color excesses derived are found to be in good agreement with those of Schmutz and Vacca (1991) and Koesterke et al. (1991). Significant heterogeneity in spectral index values was generally seen with any given subtype, but the groups consisting of the combined set of Galactic and LMC W-R stars, the separate WN and WC sequences, and the Galactic and LMC W-R stars all showed a striking and consistent Gaussian-like frequency distribution of values.

  19. A modal approach to modeling spatially distributed vibration energy dissipation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segalman, Daniel Joseph

    2010-08-01

    The nonlinear behavior of mechanical joints is a confounding element in modeling the dynamic response of structures. Though there has been some progress in recent years in modeling individual joints, modeling the full structure with myriad frictional interfaces has remained an obstinate challenge. A strategy is suggested for structural dynamics modeling that can account for the combined effect of interface friction distributed spatially about the structure. This approach accommodates the following observations: (1) At small to modest amplitudes, the nonlinearity of jointed structures is manifest primarily in the energy dissipation - visible as vibration damping; (2) Correspondingly, measured vibration modes do not change significantly with amplitude; and (3) Significant coupling among the modes does not appear to result at modest amplitudes. The mathematical approach presented here postulates the preservation of linear modes and invests all the nonlinearity in the evolution of the modal coordinates. The constitutive form selected is one that works well in modeling spatially discrete joints. When compared against a mathematical truth model, the distributed dissipation approximation performs well.

  20. Distributional and regional economic impact of energy taxes in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandyck, Toon; Van Regemorter, Denise

    2014-01-01

    We analyse the macroeconomic and distributional effects of increased oil excises in Belgium by combining a regional Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model with a microsimulation framework that exploits the rich detail of household-level data. The link between the CGE model and the microlevel is top–down, feeding changes in commodity prices, factor returns and employment by sector into a microsimulation model. The results suggest that policymakers face an equity-efficiency trade-off driven by the choice of revenue recycling options. When the additional revenue is used to raise welfare transfers to households, the reform is beneficial for lower income groups, but output levels decrease in all regions. However, when the energy tax revenue is used to lower distortionary labour taxes, the tax shift is slightly regressive. In this case, national GDP is hardly affected but regional production levels diverge. The impact of the environmental tax reform on income distribution depends strongly on changes in factor prices and welfare payments, whereas sector composition is an important determinant for regional impact variation. - Highlights: • We study the impact of oil excises across regions and households in Belgium. • Lower income groups gain if the revenue is used to raise welfare payments. • If labour taxes are reduced, the reform is only slightly regressive. • The differential impact across households is driven by factor price changes. • Sector composition is a crucial determinant for impact variation across regions

  1. Coordinated Control Scheme of Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) and Distributed Generations (DGs) for Electric Distribution Grid Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, Seung-Tae; Zhao, Haoran; Wu, Qiuwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a coordinated control scheme of battery energy storage system (BESS) and distributed generations (DGs) for electric distribution grid operation. The BESS is designed to stabilize frequency and voltages as a primary control after the electric distribution system enters...

  2. A smart monitoring infrastructure design for distributed renewable energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalci, Ersan

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A smart grid model for renewable energy sources is proposed in this study. • The renewable energy conversion system is constituted with solar plants and full bridge inverter. • The power line communication is performed with QPSK modulation. • The transmission line that has 25 km length is modelled with real-time parameters. • The efficiency of system is analysed by comparing transmitted and received data. - Abstract: The automatic meter reading is essentially required in renewable grids as in conventional grids. It is intended to propose a reliable measurement system that is validated in a photovoltaic power system to meet the requirement of a renewable grid. In the presented study, the photovoltaic plants are controlled by using a widely known maximum power point tracking algorithm that is named as “Perturb and Observe”. The distribution line at the output of inverter is modelled according to realistic parameters of 25 km line. Besides carrying the generated line voltage, the grid is used as a transmission medium for the generated power measurements of photovoltaic plants and power consumptions of load plants separately. The modem constituting the power line communication manages the dual-channel transfer and transmits the consumed energy ratios of the load plants. One of the modems is located at the output of voltage source inverter and the other one of the load plants. The power consumption values of each load plants are individually measured and successfully transmitted to monitoring section in the modelled system. The obtained data that is only used for monitoring in this application can also be evaluated for automatic meter reading applications

  3. Electricity purchase agreements and distributed energy policies for anaerobic digesters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkley, David; Harsh, Stephen; Wolf, Christopher A.; Safferman, Steven; Kirk, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion is increasingly recognized for its ability to produce renewable energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions from livestock operations. In 2010, there were 2645 U.S. dairy farms with herd sizes large enough to support anaerobic digesters, yet only 156 systems were in operation (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), 2010a. Market Opportunities for Biogas Recovery Systems at U.S. Livestock Facilities. AgSTAR Program; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), 2011. Operational Anaerobic Digesters, Sorted by State (Dairy). AgSTAR Program.). This study analyzes the net present value of digester systems under alternative electricity purchase agreements and how returns are affected by standby charges, net metering policies and the use of feed-in-tariffs. In order for digester potential to be fully realized on a state or national level, changes to distributed energy policy are required. Results indicated that standby charges can reduce revenues from offsetting electricity by an average of nearly 20%. Net metering rules limit participation among larger farms and negatively affect profitability by restricting engine–generator size. Lastly, the effectiveness of a fixed price feed-in-tariff policy for digesters is significantly affected by project size differentiation. Digester energy policies are similar nationwide, making this study useful for government regulatory agencies and digester owners throughout the U.S. - Highlights: ► Anaerobic digester net present value was examined over a range of herd sizes. ► Standby charges reduce electricity sales revenues by an average of nearly 20%. ► Net metering rules reduce profitability by restricting engine–generator size. ► Feed-in-tariffs for digesters are significantly affected by project size.

  4. Energy flow models for the estimation of technical losses in distribution network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Au, Mau Teng; Tan, Chin Hooi

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents energy flow models developed to estimate technical losses in distribution network. Energy flow models applied in this paper is based on input energy and peak demand of distribution network, feeder length and peak demand, transformer loading capacity, and load factor. Two case studies, an urban distribution network and a rural distribution network are used to illustrate application of the energy flow models. Results on technical losses obtained for the two distribution networks are consistent and comparable to network of similar types and characteristics. Hence, the energy flow models are suitable for practical application.

  5. Guest Editorial Advanced Distributed Control of Energy Conversion Devices and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoudi, Ali; Guerrero, Josep M.; Lewis, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this special issue on advanced distributed control of energy conversion devices and systems are loosely grouped into three categories: 1) ac energy conversion systems; 2) dc energy conversion systems; and 3) optimization and standards.......The papers in this special issue on advanced distributed control of energy conversion devices and systems are loosely grouped into three categories: 1) ac energy conversion systems; 2) dc energy conversion systems; and 3) optimization and standards....

  6. Extracellular distribution of radiolabel obscures specific binding of diethylstilbestrol in mouse skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruber, B.; Blix, P.M.; Cohen, L.

    1985-01-01

    The extracellular distribution of 3 H-diethylstilbestrol ( 3 H-DES) in mouse skeletal muscle was assessed following intraperitoneal injection. Total muscle extracellular space was measured with 14 C-inulin, and the vascular space with 125 I-albumin. A significant difference in the distribution of native 3 H-DES and its metabolites in muscle and blood was found. This could only be explained if these compounds distributed with the albumin space and not the inulin space

  7. Specific interactions and binding energies between thermolysin and potent inhibitors: molecular simulations based on ab initio molecular orbital method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Tatsuya; Fujita, Seiya; Ohyama, Tatsuya; Dedachi, Kenichi; Khan, Mahmud Tareq Hassan; Sylte, Ingebrigt; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-03-01

    Biochemical functions of the metalloprotease thermolysin (TLN) are controlled by various inhibitors. In a recent study we identified 12 compounds as TLN inhibitors by virtual screening and in vitro competitive binding assays. However, the specific interactions between TLN and these inhibitors have not been clarified. We here investigate stable structures of the solvated TLN-inhibitor complexes by classical molecular mechanics simulations and elucidate the specific interactions between TLN and these inhibitors at an electronic level by using ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations. The calculated binding energies between TLN and the inhibitors are qualitatively consistent with the experimental results, and the FMO results elucidate important amino acid residues of TLN for inhibitor binding. Based on the calculated results, we propose a novel potent inhibitor having a large binding affinity to TLN. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting Binding Free Energy Change Caused by Point Mutations with Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marharyta Petukh

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new methodology termed Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE was developed to predict the changes of the binding free energy caused by mutations. The method utilizes 3D structures of the corresponding protein-protein complexes and takes advantage of both approaches: sequence- and structure-based methods. The method has two components: a MM/PBSA-based component, and an additional set of statistical terms delivered from statistical investigation of physico-chemical properties of protein complexes. While the approach is rigid body approach and does not explicitly consider plausible conformational changes caused by the binding, the effect of conformational changes, including changes away from binding interface, on electrostatics are mimicked with amino acid specific dielectric constants. This provides significant improvement of SAAMBE predictions as indicated by better match against experimentally determined binding free energy changes over 1300 mutations in 43 proteins. The final benchmarking resulted in a very good agreement with experimental data (correlation coefficient 0.624 while the algorithm being fast enough to allow for large-scale calculations (the average time is less than a minute per mutation.

  9. Distribution of Glycan Motifs at the Surface of Midgut Cells in the Cotton Leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis Demonstrated by Lectin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Walski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycans are involved in many biological phenomena, including signal transduction, cell adhesion, immune response or differentiation. Although a few papers have reported on the role of glycans in the development and proper functioning of the insect midgut, no data are available regarding the localization of the glycan structures on the surface of the cells in the gut of insects. In this paper, we analyzed the spatial distribution of glycans present on the surface of the midgut cells in larvae of the cotton leafworm Spodoptera littoralis, an important agricultural pest insect worldwide. For this purpose, we established primary midgut cell cultures, probed these individual cells that are freely suspended in liquid medium with a selection of seven fluorescently labeled lectins covering a range of different carbohydrate binding specificities [mannose oligomers (GNA and HHA, GalNAc/Gal (RSA and SSA, GlcNAc (WGA and Nictaba and Neu5Ac(α-2,6Gal/GalNAc (SNA-I], and visualized the interaction of these lectins with the different zones of the midgut cells using confocal microscopy. Our analysis focused on the typical differentiated columnar cells with a microvillar brush border at their apical side, which are dominantly present in the Lepidopteran midgut and function in food digestion and absorption, and as well as on the undifferentiated stem cells that are important for midgut development and repair. Confocal microscopy analyses showed that the GalNAc/Gal-binding lectins SSA and RSA and the terminal GlcNAc-recognizing WGA bound preferentially to the apical microvillar zone of the differentiated columnar cells as compared to the basolateral pole. The reverse result was observed for the mannose-binding lectins GNA and HHA, as well as Nictaba that binds preferentially to GlcNAc oligomers. Furthermore, differences in lectin binding to the basal and lateral zones of the cell membranes of the columnar cells were apparent. In the midgut stem cells, GNA and

  10. Predicting Ligand Binding Sites on Protein Surfaces by 3-Dimensional Probability Density Distributions of Interacting Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jhih-Wei; Elumalai, Pavadai; Pitti, Thejkiran; Wu, Chih Yuan; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Peng, Hung-Pin; Yang, An-Suei

    2016-01-01

    Predicting ligand binding sites (LBSs) on protein structures, which are obtained either from experimental or computational methods, is a useful first step in functional annotation or structure-based drug design for the protein structures. In this work, the structure-based machine learning algorithm ISMBLab-LIG was developed to predict LBSs on protein surfaces with input attributes derived from the three-dimensional probability density maps of interacting atoms, which were reconstructed on the query protein surfaces and were relatively insensitive to local conformational variations of the tentative ligand binding sites. The prediction accuracy of the ISMBLab-LIG predictors is comparable to that of the best LBS predictors benchmarked on several well-established testing datasets. More importantly, the ISMBLab-LIG algorithm has substantial tolerance to the prediction uncertainties of computationally derived protein structure models. As such, the method is particularly useful for predicting LBSs not only on experimental protein structures without known LBS templates in the database but also on computationally predicted model protein structures with structural uncertainties in the tentative ligand binding sites. PMID:27513851

  11. Foundational Report Series: Advanced Distribution Management Systems for Grid Modernization, DMS Integration of Distributed Energy Resources and Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ravindra [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Reilly, James T. [Reilly Associates, Pittston, PA (United States); Wang, Jianhui [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lu, Xiaonan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kang, Ning [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Deregulation of the electric utility industry, environmental concerns associated with traditional fossil fuel-based power plants, volatility of electric energy costs, Federal and State regulatory support of “green” energy, and rapid technological developments all support the growth of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) in electric utility systems and ensure an important role for DERs in the smart grid and other aspects of modern utilities. DERs include distributed generation (DG) systems, such as renewables; controllable loads (also known as demand response); and energy storage systems. This report describes the role of aggregators of DERs in providing optimal services to distribution networks, through DER monitoring and control systems—collectively referred to as a Distributed Energy Resource Management System (DERMS)—and microgrids in various configurations.

  12. Conformational Dynamics and Binding Free Energies of Inhibitors of BACE-1: From the Perspective of Protonation Equilibria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Olivia Kim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACE-1 is the β-secretase responsible for the initial amyloidogenesis in Alzheimer's disease, catalyzing hydrolytic cleavage of substrate in a pH-sensitive manner. The catalytic mechanism of BACE-1 requires water-mediated proton transfer from aspartyl dyad to the substrate, as well as structural flexibility in the flap region. Thus, the coupling of protonation and conformational equilibria is essential to a full in silico characterization of BACE-1. In this work, we perform constant pH replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations on both apo BACE-1 and five BACE-1-inhibitor complexes to examine the effect of pH on dynamics and inhibitor binding properties of BACE-1. In our simulations, we find that solution pH controls the conformational flexibility of apo BACE-1, whereas bound inhibitors largely limit the motions of the holo enzyme at all levels of pH. The microscopic pKa values of titratable residues in BACE-1 including its aspartyl dyad are computed and compared between apo and inhibitor-bound states. Changes in protonation between the apo and holo forms suggest a thermodynamic linkage between binding of inhibitors and protons localized at the dyad. Utilizing our recently developed computational protocol applying the binding polynomial formalism to the constant pH molecular dynamics (CpHMD framework, we are able to obtain the pH-dependent binding free energy profiles for various BACE-1-inhibitor complexes. Our results highlight the importance of correctly addressing the binding-induced protonation changes in protein-ligand systems where binding accompanies a net proton transfer. This work comprises the first application of our CpHMD-based free energy computational method to protein-ligand complexes and illustrates the value of CpHMD as an all-purpose tool for obtaining pH-dependent dynamics and binding free energies of biological systems.

  13. A Critical Review of Validation, Blind Testing, and Real- World Use of Alchemical Protein-Ligand Binding Free Energy Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Robert; Wang, Lingle; Mobley, David L; Friesner, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is among the most fundamental phenomena underlying all molecular biology, and a greater ability to more accurately and robustly predict the binding free energy of a small molecule ligand for its cognate protein is expected to have vast consequences for improving the efficiency of pharmaceutical drug discovery. We briefly reviewed a number of scientific and technical advances that have enabled alchemical free energy calculations to recently emerge as a preferred approach, and critically considered proper validation and effective use of these techniques. In particular, we characterized a selection bias effect which may be important in prospective free energy calculations, and introduced a strategy to improve the accuracy of the free energy predictions. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of a distributed energy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultura, Ambrosio B., II

    This dissertation presents the design, modeling, simulation and evaluation of distributed energy resources (DER) consisting of photovoltaics (PV), wind turbines, batteries, a PEM fuel cell and supercapacitors. The distributed energy resources installed at UMass Lowell consist of the following: 2.5kW PV, 44kWhr lead acid batteries and 1500W, 500W & 300W wind turbines, which were installed before year 2000. Recently added to that are the following: 10.56 kW PV array, 2.4 kW wind turbine, 29 kWhr Lead acid batteries, a 1.2 kW PEM fuel cell and 4-140F supercapacitors. Each newly added energy resource has been designed, modeled, simulated and evaluated before its integration into the existing PV/Wind grid-connected system. The Mathematical and Simulink model of each system was derived and validated by comparing the simulated and experimental results. The Simulated results of energy generated from a 10.56kW PV system are in good agreement with the experimental results. A detailed electrical model of a 2.4kW wind turbine system equipped with a permanent magnet generator, diode rectifier, boost converter and inverter is presented. The analysis of the results demonstrates the effectiveness of the constructed simulink model, and can be used to predict the performance of the wind turbine. It was observed that a PEM fuel cell has a very fast response to load changes. Moreover, the model has validated the actual operation of the PEM fuel cell, showing that the simulated results in Matlab Simulink are consistent with the experimental results. The equivalent mathematical equation, derived from an electrical model of the supercapacitor, is used to simulate its voltage response. The model is completely capable of simulating its voltage behavior, and can predict the charge time and discharge time of voltages on the supercapacitor. The bi-directional dc-dc converter was designed in order to connect the 48V battery bank storage to the 24V battery bank storage. This connection was

  15. Distributed Energy Alternative to Electrical Distribution Grid Expansion in Consolidated Edison Service Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kingston, Tim [Gas Technology Institute; Kelly, John [Endurant Energy LLC

    2008-08-01

    The nation's power grid, specifically the New York region, faces burgeoning energy demand and suffers from congested corridors and aging equipment that cost New York consumers millions of dollars. Compounding the problem is high-density buildup in urban areas that limits available space to expand grid capacity. Coincidently, these urban areas are precisely where additional power is required. DER in this study refers to combined heat and power (CHP) technology, which simultaneously generates heat and electricity at or near the point where the energy will be consumed. There are multiple CHP options available that, combined with a portfolio of other building energy efficiency (EE) strategies, can help achieve a more efficient supply-demand balance than what the grid can currently provide. As an alternative to expanding grid capacity, CHP and EE strategies can be deployed in a flexible manner at virtually any point on the grid to relieve load. What's more, utilities and customers can install them in a variety of potentially profitable applications that are more environmentally friendly. Under the auspices of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory representing the Office of Electricity of the U.S. Department of Energy, Gas Technology Institute (GTI) conducted this study in cooperation with Consolidated Edison to help broaden the market penetration of EE and DER. This study provides realistic load models and identifies the impacts that EE and DER can have on the electrical distribution grid; specifically within the current economic and regulatory environment of a high load growth area of New York City called Hudson Yards in Midtown Manhattan. These models can be used to guide new policies that improve market penetration of appropriate CHP and EE technologies in new buildings. The following load modeling scenarios were investigated: (1) Baseline: All buildings are built per the Energy

  16. Africa's technology options for renewable energy production and distribution

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Amigun, B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This chapter presents a critical appraisal of Africa's modern energy technologies for renewable energy. It highlights issues of scale and location-specific attributes. A critical review of different renewable energies is presented, the state...

  17. Binding energy and dynamics of Be acceptor levels in AlAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halsall, M. P.; Zheng, W. M.; Harrison, P.; Wells, J. P. R.; Steer, M. J.; Orlova, E. E.

    2004-01-01

    We report an infrared study of the effect of quantum well confinement on the binding energy and dynamics of shallow Be acceptors in both bulk GaAs and a series of delta-doped AlAs/GaAs multiquantum well samples with well thicknesses of 20,15 and 10 nm. Low temperature far-infrared absorption

  18. Effects due to temperature-dependent nuclear binding energies on the equation of state for hot nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benvenuto, O.G.; Civitarese, O.; Reboiro, M.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of finite temperature nuclear effects upon the adiabatic index, for a system of nuclei, nucleons, and leptons, is discussed. It is found that the inclusion of temperature-dependent nuclear binding energies affects the behavior of the adiabats and of the adiabatic index, particularly, at low entropies

  19. Correlation between the binding energy of neutrons in nuclei and anomalous fractionation of isotopes in medico-biological objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykovskij, Yu.A.; Timoshin, V.T.; Laptev, I.D.; Manykin, Eh.A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser mass-spectrometry is used to investigate isotope ratio in medico-biological objects (MBO). Anomalous fractionation of carbon, oxygen, silicon, sulphur, potassium and calcium isotopes in MBO is detected. Correlation between neutron binding energy in isotopic nuclei and isotope anomalous fractionation of some elements in MBO is determined

  20. Development of homogeneous binding assays based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer between quantum dots and Alexa Fluor fluorophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Beechem, Joseph M

    2006-10-01

    We studied the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between quantum dots emitting at 565, 605, and 655 nm as energy donors and Alexa Fluor fluorophores with absorbance maxima at 594, 633, 647, and 680 nm as energy acceptors. As a first step, we prepared covalent conjugates between all three types of quantum dots and each of the Alexa Fluor fluorophores that could act as an energy acceptor. All of these conjugates displayed efficient resonance energy transfer. Then we prepared covalent conjugates of these quantum dots with biotin, fluorescein, and cortisol and established that the binding of these conjugates to suitable Alexa Fluor-labeled antibodies and streptavidin (in the case of biotin) can be efficiently detected by measuring the resonance energy transfer in homogeneous solutions. Finally, based on these observations, competitive binding assays for these three small analytes were developed. The performance of these assays as a function of the degree of labeling of the quantum dots was evaluated. It was found that decreasing the degree of loading of the quantum dots leads to decreases of the limits of detection. The results show the great potential of this FRET system for the development of new homogeneous binding assays.

  1. Measurements of distributions of energy loss and additivity of energy loss for 50 to 150 keV protons in hydrogen and nine hydrogen gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorngate, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Detailed measurements of energy-loss distributions were made for 51, 102 and 153 keV protons traversing hydrogen, methane, ethyne, ethene, ethane, propyne, propadiene, propene, cyclopropane and propane. Less detailed measurements were made at 76.5 and 127.5 keV. To simplify comparison with theory, all of the measurements were made at a gas density that gave a 4% energy loss. The mean energy, second central moment (a measure of the width of the distribution) and the third central moment (a measure of the skew) were calculated from the measured distributions. Stopping power values, calculated using the mean energy, agreed with the predictions of the theory by Bethe. For the second and third central moments, the best agreement between measurement and theory was obtained when the classical scattering probability was used for the calculations; but the agreement was not good. In all cases, variations were found in the data that could be correlated to the type of carbon binding in the molecule

  2. Electron energy distributions in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Sang-Heon; Yang, Yang; Chabert, Pascal; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Optimizing and controlling electron energy distributions (EEDs) is a continuing goal in plasma materials processing as EEDs determine the rate coefficients for electron impact processes. There are many strategies to customize EEDs in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), for example, pulsing and choice of frequency, to produce the desired plasma properties. Recent experiments have shown that EEDs in low pressure ICPs can be manipulated through the use of static magnetic fields of sufficient magnitudes to magnetize the electrons and confine them to the electromagnetic skin depth. The EED is then a function of the local magnetic field as opposed to having non-local properties in the absence of the magnetic field. In this paper, EEDs in a magnetized inductively coupled plasma (mICP) sustained in Ar are discussed with results from a two-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model. Results are compared with experimental measurements. We found that the character of the EED transitions from non-local to local with application of the static magnetic field. The reduction in cross-field mobility increases local electron heating in the skin depth and decreases the transport of these hot electrons to larger radii. The tail of the EED is therefore enhanced in the skin depth and depressed at large radii. Plasmas densities are non-monotonic with increasing pressure with the external magnetic field due to transitions between local and non-local kinetics

  3. Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis of Luminous Infrared Galaxies from GOALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    U, Vivian; Sanders, D.; Evans, A.; Mazzarella, J.; Armus, L.; Iwasawa, K.; Vavilkin, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; GOALS Team

    2009-05-01

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) were thought to be well understood and exemplified by that of Arp 220, the "poster child" of these objects; but in fact, Arp 220 has been shown to be special in more than one way. Here we present comprehensive SEDs (from radio through x-ray) for the 88 most luminous (U)LIRGs in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which combines multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space telescopes (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) in an effort to fully understand galaxy evolution processes and the enhanced infrared emission in the local universe. Spanning the luminosity range 11.4 < log(L_ir/L_sun) < 12.5, our objects are a complete subset of the flux-limited IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. To complement spacecraft data, we also took optical imaging data from Mauna Kea as well as searched through literature in order to compile accurate and consistent photometry and fully characterize the spectral shapes of the SEDs. We then analyzed the ratios of the radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray emission as a function of infrared luminosity and discussed the trends observed.

  4. Phonon Surface Scattering and Thermal Energy Distribution in Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Kartik; Maldovan, Martin

    2017-07-17

    Thermal transport at small length scales has attracted significant attention in recent years and various experimental and theoretical methods have been developed to establish the reduced thermal conductivity. The fundamental understanding of how phonons move and the physical mechanisms behind nanoscale thermal transport, however, remains poorly understood. Here we move beyond thermal conductivity calculations and provide a rigorous and comprehensive physical description of thermal phonon transport in superlattices by solving the Boltzmann transport equation and using the Beckman-Kirchhoff surface scattering theory with shadowing to precisely describe phonon-surface interactions. We show that thermal transport in superlattices can be divided in two different heat transport modes having different physical properties at small length scales: layer-restricted and extended heat modes. We study how interface conditions, periodicity, and composition can be used to manipulate the distribution of thermal energy flow among such layer-restricted and extended heat modes. From predicted frequency and mean free path spectra of superlattices, we also investigate the existence of wave effects. The results and insights in this paper advance the fundamental understanding of heat transport in superlattices and the prospects of rationally designing thermal systems with tailored phonon transport properties.

  5. 76 FR 45471 - Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers; Notice of Intent To Negotiate Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-29

    ... EERE-2010-BT-STD-0048] RIN 1904-AC04 Energy Efficiency Standards for Distribution Transformers; Notice...-type distribution transformers. The purpose of the subcommittee will be to discuss and, if possible, reach consensus on a proposed rule for the energy efficiency of distribution transformers, as authorized...

  6. The effect of binding energy and resolution in simulations of the common envelope binary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaconi, Roberto; De Marco, Orsola; Passy, Jean-Claude; Staff, Jan

    2018-03-01

    The common envelope binary interaction remains one of the least understood phases in the evolution of compact binaries, including those that result in Type Ia supernovae and in mergers that emit detectable gravitational waves. In this work we continue the detailed and systematic analysis of 3D hydrodynamic simulations of the common envelope interaction aimed at understanding the reliability of the results. Our first set of simulations replicate the 5 simulations of Passy et al. (a 0.88 M⊙, 90 R⊙ RGB primary with companions in the range 0.1 to 0.9 M⊙) using a new AMR gravity solver implemented on our modified version of the hydrodynamic code ENZO. Despite smaller final separations obtained, these more resolved simulations do not alter the nature of the conclusions that are drawn. We also carry out 5 identical simulations but with a 2.0 M⊙ primary RGB star with the same core mass as the Passy et al. simulations, isolating the effect of the envelope binding energy. With a more bound envelope all the companions in-spiral faster and deeper though relatively less gas is unbound. Even at the highest resolution, the final separation attained by simulations with a heavier primary is similar to the size of the smoothed potential even if we account for the loss of some angular momentum by the simulation. As a result we suggest that a ˜2.0 M⊙ RGB primary may possibly end in a merger with companions as massive as 0.6 M⊙, something that would not be deduced using analytical arguments based on energy conservation.

  7. High level theoretical study of binding and of the potential energy surface in benzene-hydride system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coletti, Cecilia, E-mail: ccoletti@unich.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy); Re, Nazzareno [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Universita ' G. d' Annunzio' Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti (Italy)

    2012-04-04

    Graphical abstract: In-plane minimum geometries for benzene-H{sup -} non-covalent adducts: linear adduct (left) with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to one aromatic hydrogen; bifurcated adduct (right), with the hydride ion hydrogen bonded to two adjacent aromatic hydrogens. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical study on covalent and non-covalent binding in benzene-hydride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two non-covalent stable adducts were characterized in the in-plane geometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant sections of the potential energy surface were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of a very stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion upon covalent binding to carbon. - Abstract: High level ab initio calculations were performed on the interaction of the hydride anion with benzene, a system of potential interest for modelling the interactions occurring in hydrogen rich planetary atmospheres. We investigated both non-covalent and covalent binding, exploring the complete basis set limit using highly correlated MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory. Two non-covalent minima on the potential energy surface have been characterized, and found to correspond to moderately strong hydrogen bonding interactions. To gain further insight on the nature of binding, the total interaction energy was decomposed into its physically meaningful components and selected sections of the potential energy surface were calculated. Moreover, we found that H{sup -} can easily covalently bind to one of the carbon atoms of benzene to form a stable C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} anion, a global minimum on the potential energy surface, characterized by a puckered geometry, with a carbon atom bending out of the benzene plane. A slightly less stable planar C{sub 6}H{sub 7}{sup -} structure was also identified, corresponding to the transition state for the flipping motion of the puckered species.

  8. Are automated molecular dynamics simulations and binding free energy calculations realistic tools in lead optimization? An evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stjernschantz, E.M.; Marelius, J.; Medina, C.; Jacobsson, M.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.; Oostenbrink, C.

    2006-01-01

    An extensive evaluation of the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for the prediction of binding affinity of docked compounds has been performed, with an emphasis on its applicability in lead optimization. An automated setup is presented, which allows for the use of the method in an industrial

  9. Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop Summary: August 24, 2006, Sacramento, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treanton, B.; Palomo, J.; Kroposki, B.; Thomas, H.

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Power Electronics Interfaces for Distributed Energy Workshop, sponsored by the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research program and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, was held Aug. 24, 2006, in Sacramento, Calif. The workshop provided a forum for industry stakeholders to share their knowledge and experience about technologies, manufacturing approaches, markets, and issues in power electronics for a range of distributed energy resources. It focused on the development of advanced power electronic interfaces for distributed energy applications and included discussions of modular power electronics, component manufacturing, and power electronic applications.

  10. Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, David P.; Donnelly, Matthew K.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2006-12-12

    Electrical power distribution control methods, electrical energy demand monitoring methods, and power management devices are described. In one aspect, an electrical power distribution control method includes providing electrical energy from an electrical power distribution system, applying the electrical energy to a load, providing a plurality of different values for a threshold at a plurality of moments in time and corresponding to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy, and adjusting an amount of the electrical energy applied to the load responsive to an electrical characteristic of the electrical energy triggering one of the values of the threshold at the respective moment in time.

  11. The planning and construction of Distributed Energy System in Qingdao Sino-German Eco-park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cun; Zhang, Gaijing; Song, Peipei

    2018-04-01

    This paper introduce the development and characteristics of new energy, Eco-city and Distributed Energy System in China, a case study of Qingdao Sino-German Eco-park, research on practical application about planning and construction of Distributed Energy System in Eco-city. Results show that: we must first do a good job in energy planning, giving full play to their own advantages, and Distributed Energy System based renewable energy resources is a promising option for reducing emissions from electricity generation in Eco-city.

  12. Distribution and binding of [14C]acrylamide to macromolecules in SENCAR and BALB/c mice following oral and topical administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.P.; Weaver, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    To determine if differences in acrylamide distribution or its binding to DNA could be responsible for the reported higher incidence of skin papillomas observed after oral administration compared to topical application, [ 14 C]acrylamide was administered by topical application and oral intubation to male SENCAR and BALB/mice. Portions of lung, liver, stomach, testes, and skin were removed, and 14 C was measured at 15 min, 30 min, 1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hr. Binding to DNA, RNA, and protein was measured at 6 and 48 hr. Following oral administration, few strain differences in distribution or binding were noted. After topical application, SENCAR mice generally showed higher tissue concentrations than did the BALB/c mice at the early time periods but not at the later ones. Comparing the two routes, comparable concentrations were observed in all tissues except the skin where the amount of [ 14 C]acrylamide after topical application was approximately 100 times that observed after oral administration. At 48 hr, binding to DNA was sevenfold higher after topical than after oral administration. The effect of route on papilloma formation cannot be explained, therefore, on the basis of either a difference in distribution or binding to DNA in the target organ. The binding of acrylamide to DNA in skin was similar in both SENCAR and BALB/c mice indicating that the much greater susceptibility of the SENCAR mice to tumorigenesis cannot be explained simply on the basis of distribution or macromolecular binding

  13. Binding free-energy calculation is a powerful tool for drug optimization: calculation and measurement of binding free energy for 7-azaindole derivatives to glycogen synthase kinase-3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Kunihiro; Tamura, Yunoshin; Ueki, Tomokazu; Ogata, Koji; Noda, Shigeho; Himeno, Ryutaro; Chuman, Hiroshi

    2014-06-23

    Present computational lead (drug)-optimization is lacking in thermodynamic tactics. To examine whether calculation of binding free-energy change (ΔG) is effective for the lead-optimization process, binding ΔGs of 7-azaindole derivatives to the ATP binding site of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) were calculated. The result was a significant correlation coefficient of r = 0.895 between calculated and observed ΔGs. This indicates that calculated ΔG reflects the inhibitory activities of 7-azaindole derivatives. In addition to quantitative estimation of activity, ΔG calculation characterizes the thermodynamic behavior of 7-azaindole derivatives, providing also useful information for inhibitor optimization on affinity to water molecules.

  14. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) in Xanthomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Elisa E; Tavares, Milene B; Suzuki, Celso F; Pimenta, Daniel C; Angeli, Claudia B; de Oliveira, Julio C F; Ferro, Maria I T; Ferreira, Luis C S; Ferreira, Rita C C

    2010-04-01

    In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA) of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp), in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia). Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis.

  15. Distribution and biological role of the oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA in Xanthomonas species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa E. Oshiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the prevalence of the oppA gene, encoding the oligopeptide binding protein (OppA of the major bacterial oligopeptide uptake system (Opp, in different species of the genus Xanthomonas. The oppA gene was detected in two Xanthomonas axonopodis strains among eight tested Xanthomonas species. The generation of an isogenic oppA-knockout derivative of the Xac 306 strain, showed that the OppA protein neither plays a relevant role in oligopeptide uptake nor contributes to the infectivity and multiplication of the bacterial strain in leaves of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis and Rangpur lime (Citrus limonia. Taken together these results suggest that the oppA gene has a recent evolutionary history in the genus and does not contribute in the physiology or pathogenesis of X. axonopodis.

  16. Multiagent-Based Distributed State of Charge Balancing Control for Distributed Energy Storage Units in AC Microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Chendan; Coelho, Ernane Antônio Alves; Dragicevic, Tomislav

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a multiagent-based distributed control algorithm has been proposed to achieve state of charge (SoC) balance of distributed energy storage (DES) units in an ac microgrid. The proposal uses frequency scheduling instead of adaptive droop gain to regulate the active power. Each DES unit...

  17. Constructing and Analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions with the Virtual Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Omar; Busko, I.; Cresitello-Dittmar, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Doe, S.; Evans, J.; Pevunova, O.; Norris, P.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are a common and useful means of assessing the relative contributions of different emission processes occurring within an object. Iris, the Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) SED tool, seamlessly combines key features of several existing astronomical software applications to streamline and enhance the SED analysis process. With Iris, users may build and display SEDs, browse data and metadata and apply filters to them, fit models to SEDs, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be built from a number of sources using the SED Builder. Iris supports the Simple Application Messaging Protocol for interoperability with other Virtual Observatory applications, like the VAO Data Discovery tool, and can directly fetch SEDs from the NASA Extragalactic Database SED service. Particular attention has been paid to the integration of user spectrophotometric data from files in several different formats. File readers for custom formats can be provided at runtime, as well as custom models to fit the data, as template libraries for template fitting or arbitrary python functions. New functionalities can be added by installing plugins, i.e. third party components that are developed using the Iris Software Development Kit. The VAO was established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. Iris Individual components have also been supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the NASA contract NAS8-03060, and by the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  18. Fitting the integrated spectral energy distributions of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcher, Jakob; Groves, Brent; Budavári, Tamás; Dale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Fitting the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies is an almost universally used technique that has matured significantly in the last decade. Model predictions and fitting procedures have improved significantly over this time, attempting to keep up with the vastly increased volume and quality of available data. We review here the field of SED fitting, describing the modelling of ultraviolet to infrared galaxy SEDs, the creation of multiwavelength data sets, and the methods used to fit model SEDs to observed galaxy data sets. We touch upon the achievements and challenges in the major ingredients of SED fitting, with a special emphasis on describing the interplay between the quality of the available data, the quality of the available models, and the best fitting technique to use in order to obtain a realistic measurement as well as realistic uncertainties. We conclude that SED fitting can be used effectively to derive a range of physical properties of galaxies, such as redshift, stellar masses, star formation rates, dust masses, and metallicities, with care taken not to over-interpret the available data. Yet there still exist many issues such as estimating the age of the oldest stars in a galaxy, finer details of dust properties and dust-star geometry, and the influences of poorly understood, luminous stellar types and phases. The challenge for the coming years will be to improve both the models and the observational data sets to resolve these uncertainties. The present review will be made available on an interactive, moderated web page (http://sedfitting.org), where the community can access and change the text. The intention is to expand the text and keep it up to date over the coming years.

  19. THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE COLDEST KNOWN BROWN DWARF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhman, K. L.; Esplin, T. L., E-mail: kluhman@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    WISE J085510.83–071442.5 (hereafter WISE 0855–0714) is the coldest known brown dwarf (∼250 K) and the fourth-closest known system to the Sun (2.2 pc). It has been previously detected only in the J band and two mid-IR bands. To better measure its spectral energy distribution (SED), we have performed deep imaging of WISE 0855–0714 in six optical and near-IR bands with Gemini Observatory, the Very Large Telescope, and the Hubble Space Telescope . Five of the bands show detections, although one detection is marginal (S/N ∼ 3). We also have obtained two epochs of images with the Spitzer Space Telescope for use in refining the parallax of the brown dwarf. By combining astrometry from this work and previous studies, we have derived a parallax of 0.449 ± 0.008″ (2.23 ± 0.04 pc). We have compared our photometry for WISE 0855–0714 to data for known Y dwarfs and to the predictions of three suites of models by Saumon et al. and Morley et al. that are defined by the presence or absence of clouds and nonequilibrium chemistry. Our estimates of Y − J and J − H for WISE 0855–0714 are redder than colors of other Y dwarfs, confirming a predicted reversal of near-IR colors to redder values at temperatures below 300–400 K. In color–magnitude diagrams, no single suite of models provides a clearly superior match to the sequence formed by WISE 0855–0714 and other Y dwarfs. Instead, the best-fitting model changes from one diagram to the next. Similarly, all of the models have substantial differences from the SED of WISE 0855–0714. As a result, we are currently unable to constrain the presence of clouds or nonequilibrium chemistry in its atmosphere.

  20. Subsite binding energies of an exo-polygalacturonase using isothermal titration calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermodynamic parameters for binding of a series of galacturonic acid oligomers to an exo-polygalacturonase, RPG16 from Rhizopus oryzae, were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. Binding of oligomers varying in chain length from two to five galacturonic acid residues is an exothermic proc...

  1. Effect of energy distribution of laser facula on shafting aligning detection of large assembling set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Guohua; Su, Chengzhi; Xu, Hongji

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the principle of Shafting correction In heavy mechanical manufacturing industry, shipping industry and Nuclear industry, analyzes the effect of distribution of laser light beam spot energy to PSD measure precision. With experiment, we analyze the relation between the different distribution of laser light beam spot energy and PSD measure precision, discuss the method to compensate of shafting correction error caused by the distribution of laser light beam spot energy.

  2. Dark energy as consequence of release of cosmological nuclear binding-energy, and its further extension towards a new theory of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.C.; Pradhan, Anirudh; Gupta, Sushant

    2012-01-01

    Comparatively recent observations on Type-Ia supernovae and low density (Um = 0.3) measurement of matter including dark matter suggest that the present day universe consists mainly of repulsive-gravity type 'exotic matter' with negative-pressure often said 'dark energy' (Ux = O7). But the nature of dark energy is mysterious and its puzzling questions, such as why, how, where and when about the dark energy, are intriguing. In the present paper the authors attempt to answer these questions while making an effort to reveal the genesis of dark energy, and suggest that the cosmological nuclear binding energy liberated during primordial nucleo-synthesis remains trapped dormant for a long time and then is released free which manifests itself as dark energy in the universe. It is also explained why for dark energy the parameter w = -2/3. Noting that w = 1 for stiff matter and w = 1/3 for radiation; w = -2/3 is for dark energy because '- 1' is due to 'deficiency of stiff- nuclear-matter' and that this binding energy is ultimately released as 'radiation' contributing '+ 1/3', making w = -1+ 1/3 = -2/3. When dark energy is released free at Z = 80, w = -2/3. But as on present day at Z = 0 when radiation strength has diminished to ä ? 0, the parameter w = -1 + ä 1/3 = -1. This, thus almost solves the dark- energy mystery of negative pressure and repulsive-gravity. The proposed theory makes several estimates/predictions which agree reasonably well with the astrophysical constraints and observations. Though there are many candidate-theories, the proposed model of this paper presents an entirely new approach (cosmological nuclear energy) as a possible candidate for dark energy. The secret of acceleration of big-universe is hidden in the small-nucleus. (author)

  3. Energy Systems Integration: Demonstrating Distributed Grid-Edge Control Hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2017-01-01

    Overview fact sheet about the OMNETRIC Group Integrated Network Testbed for Energy Grid Research and Technology Experimentation (INTEGRATE) project at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. INTEGRATE is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Grid Modernization Initiative.

  4. Variations of Low-energy Ion Distributions Measured in the Heliosheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, R. B.; Roelof, E. C.; Hill, M. E.; Krimigis, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    This report is an update of low-energy ion intensities and angular distributions measured recently by the Low Energy Charged Particle instruments on the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft in the inner heliosheath.

  5. Determination of the cationic amphiphilic drug-DNA binding mode and DNA-assisted fluorescence resonance energy transfer amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Zahid; Banday, Abdul Rouf; Hussain, Mohammed Aamir; Tabish, Mohammad; Kabir-ud-Din

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the mechanism of drug-DNA binding is crucial for predicting the potential genotoxicity of drugs. Agarose gel electrophoresis, absorption, steady state fluorescence, and circular dichroism have been used in exploring the interaction of cationic amphiphilic drugs (CADs) such as amitriptyline hydrochloride (AMT), imipramine hydrochloride (IMP), and promethazine hydrochloride (PMT) with calf thymus or pUC19 DNA. Agarose gel electrophoresis assay, along with absorption and steady state fluorescence studies, reveal interaction between the CADs and DNA. A comparative study of the drugs with respect to the effect of urea, iodide induced quenching, and ethidium bromide (EB) exclusion assay reflects binding of CADs to the DNA primarily in an intercalative fashion. Circular dichroism data also support the intercalative mode of binding. Besides quenching, there is fluorescence exchange energy transfer (FRET) in between CADs and EB using DNA as a template.

  6. Comparison of [3H]nicotine and [3H]acetylcholine binding in mouse brain: regional distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sershen, H.; Reith, M.E.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.

    1985-01-01

    In a continuing study of nicotine binding sites, the authors determined the relative amount of nicotine binding and acetylcholine binding in various brain regions of C57/BL and of DBA mice. Although midbrain showed the highest and cerebellum the lowest binding for both [ 3 H]nicotine and [ 3 H]acetylcholine, the ratio of nicotine to acetylcholine binding showed a three-fold regional variation. Acetylcholine inhibition of [ 3 H]nicotine binding indicated that a portion of nicotine binding was not inhibited by acetylcholine. These results indicate important differences between the binding of (+/-)-[ 3 H]nicotine and that of [ 3 H]acetylcholine

  7. Sustainable or Distributed Energy—or both? Clarifying the Basic Concepts of Reforming the Energy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Pekka Peura; Patrik Sjöholm

    2015-01-01

    This paper clarifies the concepts of Sustainable Energy (SE) and Distributed Energy (DE) including their related synonyms, by discussing, analyzing and presenting recommendations. This is important because these concepts are crucial in the on-going transformation from the fossil carbon based to renewable energy based societies, but still the use of the concepts has been confusing. SE consists of the integration of rational use of energy (energy saving, energy efficiency, use of renewable ener...

  8. Spatial Distribution of Energy Consumption and Carbon Emission of Regional Logistics

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Fan; Hu, Zhi-Hua; Wang, Ke-Xin; Fu, Pei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Facing serious energy-related constraints and environmental stress, the development of the green logistics industry is restricted by degrees of logistics energy utilization and carbon emissions. Considering different logistics spatial distributions, this paper uses the degree of regional logistics energy utilization and the spatial distribution of carbon emissions as two indicators of green logistics to investigate the regional differences and changes in spatiotemporal logistics energy effici...

  9. Binding and Normalization of Binary Sparse Distributed Representations by Context-Dependent Thinning

    OpenAIRE

    Rachkovskij, Dmitri A.; Kussul, Ernst M.

    2001-01-01

    Distributed representations were often criticized as inappropriate for encoding of data with a complex structure. However Plate's Holographic Reduced Representations and Kanerva's Binary Spatter Codes are recent schemes that allow on-the-fly encoding of nested compositional structures by real-valued or dense binary vectors of fixed dimensionality. In this paper we consider procedures of the Context-Dependent Thinning which were developed for representation of complex hierarchical items in the...

  10. A distributed computing system for magnetic resonance imaging: Java-based processing and binding of XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, R; Graveron-Demilly, D; Nastase, S; van Ormondt, D

    2004-03-01

    Recently we have developed a Java-based heterogeneous distributed computing system for the field of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It is a software system for embedding the various image reconstruction algorithms that we have created for handling MRI data sets with sparse sampling distributions. Since these data sets may result from multi-dimensional MRI measurements our system has to control the storage and manipulation of large amounts of data. In this paper we describe how we have employed the extensible markup language (XML) to realize this data handling in a highly structured way. To that end we have used Java packages, recently released by Sun Microsystems, to process XML documents and to compile pieces of XML code into Java classes. We have effectuated a flexible storage and manipulation approach for all kinds of data within the MRI system, such as data describing and containing multi-dimensional MRI measurements, data configuring image reconstruction methods and data representing and visualizing the various services of the system. We have found that the object-oriented approach, possible with the Java programming environment, combined with the XML technology is a convenient way of describing and handling various data streams in heterogeneous distributed computing systems.

  11. Reshaping the Energy Landscape Transforms the Mechanism and Binding Kinetics of DNA Threading Intercalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew G; Naufer, M Nabuan; Westerlund, Fredrik; Lincoln, Per; Rouzina, Ioulia; Paramanathan, Thayaparan; Williams, Mark C

    2018-02-06

    Molecules that bind DNA via threading intercalation show high binding affinity as well as slow dissociation kinetics, properties ideal for the development of anticancer drugs. To this end, it is critical to identify the specific molecular characteristics of threading intercalators that result in optimal DNA interactions. Using single-molecule techniques, we quantify the binding of a small metal-organic ruthenium threading intercalator (Δ,Δ-B) and compare its binding characteristics to a similar molecule with significantly larger threading moieties (Δ,Δ-P). The binding affinities of the two molecules are the same, while comparison of the binding kinetics reveals significantly faster kinetics for Δ,Δ-B. However, the kinetics is still much slower than that observed for conventional intercalators. Comparison of the two threading intercalators shows that the binding affinity is modulated independently by the intercalating section and the binding kinetics is modulated by the threading moiety. In order to thread DNA, Δ,Δ-P requires a "lock mechanism", in which a large length increase of the DNA duplex is required for both association and dissociation. In contrast, measurements of the force-dependent binding kinetics show that Δ,Δ-B requires a large DNA length increase for association but no length increase for dissociation from DNA. This contrasts strongly with conventional intercalators, for which almost no DNA length change is required for association but a large DNA length change must occur for dissociation. This result illustrates the fundamentally different mechanism of threading intercalation compared with conventional intercalation and will pave the way for the rational design of therapeutic drugs based on DNA threading intercalation.

  12. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L

    1988-01-01

    , with a granular perinuclear distribution and in linear arrays throughout the cell. During migration a redistribution from diffuse to predominanately linear arrays that co-distributed with actin microfilaments was noted in double-label experiments. The 69-kD laminin-binding protein colocalized with actin filaments...... actively synthesizing matrix. Endothelial cells express a 69-kD laminin-binding protein that is membrane associated and appears to colocalize with actin microfilaments. The topological distribution of 69 kD and its cytoskeletal associations can be modulated by the cell during cell migration and growth...

  13. Binding of Hydrophobic Guests in a Coordination Cage Cavity is Driven by Liberation of "High-Energy" Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metherell, Alexander J; Cullen, William; Williams, Nicholas H; Ward, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    The cavity of an M 8 L 12 cubic coordination cage can accommodate a cluster of ten water molecules in which the average number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule is 0.5 H-bonds less than it would be in the bulk solution. The presence of these "hydrogen-bond frustrated" or "high-energy" water molecules in the cavity results in the hydrophobic effect associated with guest binding being predominantly enthalpy-based, as these water molecules can improve their hydrogen-bonding environment on release. This contrasts with the classical form of the hydrophobic effect in which the favourable entropy change associated with release of ordered molecules from hydrophobic surfaces dominates. For several guests Van't Hoff plots showed that the free energy of binding in water is primarily enthalpy driven. For five homologous pairs of guests related by the presence or absence of a CH 2 group, the incremental changes to ΔH and TΔS for guest binding-that is, ΔΔH and TΔΔS, the difference in contributions arising from the CH 2 group-are consistently 5(±1) kJ mol -1 for ΔΔH and 0(±1) kJ mol -1 for TΔΔS. This systematic dominance of ΔH in the binding of hydrophobic guests is consistent with the view that guest binding is dominated by release of "high energy" water molecules into a more favourable solvation environment, as has been demonstrated recently for some members of the cucurbituril family. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  14. Distributed technologies in California's energy future: A preliminary report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.; Craig, P.; McGuire, C.B.; Simmons, M. (eds.)

    1977-09-01

    The chapters in Volume 2 of Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future are: Environmental Impacts of Alternative Energy Technologies for California; Land Use Configurations and the Utilization of Distributive Energy Technology; Land Use Implications of a Dispersed Energy Path; Belief, Behavior, and Technologies as Driving Forces in Transitional Stages--The People Problem in Dispersed Energy Futures; Development of an Energy Attitude Survey; Interventions to Influence Firms Toward the Adoption of ''Soft'' Energy Technology; The Entry of Small Firms into Distributed Technology Energy Industries; Short-Term Matching of Supply and Demand in Electrical Systems with Renewable Sources; Vulnerability of Renewable Energy Systems; and District Heating for California.

  15. Shedding Light on the EOS-Gravity Degeneracy and Constraining the Nuclear Symmetry Energy from the Gravitational Binding Energy of Neutron Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xiao-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of properties of neutron stars requires both a reliable knowledge of the equation of state (EOS of super-dense nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity theories simultaneously. To provide information that may help break this EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of nuclear symmetry energy on the gravitational binding energy of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor subset of alternative gravity models. We focus on effects of the slope L of nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density and the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope L or the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy leads to large changes in the binding energy of neutron stars. The difference in predictions using the GR and the scalar-tensor theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and even then is significantly smaller than the difference resulting from variations in the symmetry energy.

  16. Ion energy distributions and densities in the plume of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Shotaro; Cravens, Thomas E.; Omidi, Nojan; Perry, Mark E.; Waite, J. Hunter

    2016-10-01

    Enceladus has a dynamic plume that is emitting gas, including water vapor, and dust. The gas is ionized by solar EUV radiation, charge exchange, and electron impact and extends throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn. The charge exchange collisions alter the plasma composition. Ice grains (dust) escape from the vicinity of Enceladus and form the E ring, including a portion that is negatively charged by the local plasma. The inner magnetosphere within 10 RS (Saturn radii) contains a complex mixture of plasma, neutral gas, and dust that links back to Enceladus. In this paper we investigate the energy distributions, ion species and densities of water group ions in the plume of Enceladus using test particle and Monte Carlo methods that include collisional processes such as charge exchange and ion-neutral chemical reactions. Ion observations from the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) for E07 are presented for the first time. We use the modeling results to interpret observations made by the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) and the INMS. The low energy ions, as observed by CAPS, appear to be affected by a vertical electric field (EZ=-10 μV/m) in the plume. The EZ field may be associated with the charged dust and/or the pressure gradient of plasma. The model results, along with the results of earlier models, show that H3O+ ions created by chemistry are predominant in the plume, which agrees with INMS and CAPS data, but the INMS count rate in the plume for the model is several times greater than the data, which we do not fully understand. This composition and the total ion count found in the plume agree with INMS and CAPS data. On the other hand, the Cassini Langmuir Probe measured a maximum plume ion density more than 30,000 cm-3, which is far larger than the maximum ion density from our model, 900 cm-3. The model results also demonstrate that most of the ions in the plume are from the external magnetospheric flow and are not generated by local

  17. Distributed-dispersed renewable energy systems and novel control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljankawey, Abdualah S.

    Renewable green-energy systems are re-emerging as viable economic alternative sources of environmentally safe power generation in place of conventional fossil fuels. In terms of power quality and safety, this research investigates a number of renewable green-energy (wind, photovoltaic and fuel cells) interface schemes and control strategies that ensure maximum energy utilization, voltage and frequency stabilization and minimum impact on the host electric grid systems. The research key objectives are to study efficient and robust renewable energy converter schemes with associated control strategies and validate their operations for both stand-alone and electric utility grid interfacing. The research work investigates both stand-alone and grid connected renewable green-energy utilization schemes with a number of power electronic converter topologies and robust control schemes for both dispersed and hybrid renewable energy systems. Different sample study systems and control strategies are digitally simulated and fully validated using the MATLAB-Simulink-SimPower environment.

  18. Energy storage management system with distributed wireless sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Bandhauer, Todd M.

    2015-12-08

    An energy storage system having a multiple different types of energy storage and conversion devices. Each device is equipped with one or more sensors and RFID tags to communicate sensor information wirelessly to a central electronic management system, which is used to control the operation of each device. Each device can have multiple RFID tags and sensor types. Several energy storage and conversion devices can be combined.

  19. Small Distributed Energy Russia: Combined Heat and Power Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Astafyev, Aleksandr Vladimirovich; Kazakov, Aleksandr Vladimirovich; Zavorin, Aleksandr Sergeevich

    2016-01-01

    The issues and current trends of research in the field of decentralized energy supply for the period up to 2030 were considered. The analysis of the cogeneration market in Russia was done. The questions of gasification and hydrogen technologies as applied to the market of cogeneration plants were elucidated. Promising technologies for autonomous decentralized energy supply and the evaluation of their applicability to small energy were presented.

  20. Approximations to the Non-Isothermal Distributed Activation Energy Model for Biomass Pyrolysis Using the Rayleigh Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaundiyal Alok

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the influence of some parameters relevant to biomass pyrolysis on the numerical solutions of the nonisothermal nth order distributed activation energy model using the Rayleigh distribution. Investigated parameters are the integral upper limit, the frequency factor, the heating rate, the reaction order and the scale parameters of the Rayleigh distribution. The influence of these parameters has been considered for the determination of the kinetic parameters of the non-isothermal nth order Rayleigh distribution from the experimentally derived thermoanalytical data of biomass pyrolysis.

  1. Independent Origin and Global Distribution of Distinct Plasmodium vivax Duffy Binding Protein Gene Duplications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Hostetler

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax causes the majority of malaria episodes outside Africa, but remains a relatively understudied pathogen. The pathology of P. vivax infection depends critically on the parasite's ability to recognize and invade human erythrocytes. This invasion process involves an interaction between P. vivax Duffy Binding Protein (PvDBP in merozoites and the Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC on the erythrocyte surface. Whole-genome sequencing of clinical isolates recently established that some P. vivax genomes contain two copies of the PvDBP gene. The frequency of this duplication is particularly high in Madagascar, where there is also evidence for P. vivax infection in DARC-negative individuals. The functional significance and global prevalence of this duplication, and whether there are other copy number variations at the PvDBP locus, is unknown.Using whole-genome sequencing and PCR to study the PvDBP locus in P. vivax clinical isolates, we found that PvDBP duplication is widespread in Cambodia. The boundaries of the Cambodian PvDBP duplication differ from those previously identified in Madagascar, meaning that current molecular assays were unable to detect it. The Cambodian PvDBP duplication did not associate with parasite density or DARC genotype, and ranged in prevalence from 20% to 38% over four annual transmission seasons in Cambodia. This duplication was also present in P. vivax isolates from Brazil and Ethiopia, but not India.PvDBP duplications are much more widespread and complex than previously thought, and at least two distinct duplications are circulating globally. The same duplication boundaries were identified in parasites from three continents, and were found at high prevalence in human populations where DARC-negativity is essentially absent. It is therefore unlikely that PvDBP duplication is associated with infection of DARC-negative individuals, but functional tests will be required to confirm this hypothesis.

  2. Application of the step-wise regression procedure to the semi-empirical formulae of the nuclear binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eissa, E.A.; Ayad, M.; Gashier, F.A.B.

    1984-01-01

    Most of the binding energy semi-empirical terms without the deformation corrections used by P.A. Seeger are arranged in a multiple linear regression form. The stepwise regression procedure with 95% confidence levels for acceptance and rejection of variables is applied for seeking a model for calculating binding energies of even-even (E-E) nuclei through a significance testing of each basic term. Partial F-values are taken as estimates for the significance of each term. The residual standard deviation and the overall F-value are used for selecting the best linear regression model. (E-E) nuclei are taken into sets lying between two successive proton and neutron magic numbers. The present work is in favour of the magic number 126 followed by 164 for the neutrons and indecisive in supporting the recently predicted proton magic number 114 rather than the previous one, 126. (author)

  3. Lowest excited-state impurity binding energy in InGaN/GaN parabolic QWW: magnetic field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddou El Ghazi; Anouar Jorio; Izeddine Zorkani

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the magnetic field effect on the lowest excited-state binding energy of hydrogenic shallow-donor impurity in wurtzite (In,Ga)N/GaN parabolic transversal-section quantum-well wire (PQWW) using the finite-difference method within the quasi-one-dimensional effective potential model. The calculations are performed within the framework of the effective mass approximation. A cylindrical QWW effective radius is taken into account to describe the lateral confinement strength. The numerical results show that: (i) the probability density is the largest on a circularity whose radius is the effective radius and (ii) the lowest excited-state binding energy is the largest when an impurity is located on this circularity while it starts to decrease as the impurity is away from the circularity. (author)

  4. Magnetic field-dependent of binding energy in GaN/InGaN/GaN spherical QDQW nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazi, Haddou; Jorio, Anouar; Zorkani, Izeddine

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous study of magnetic field and impurity's position effects on the ground-state shallow-donor binding energy in GaN|InGaN|GaN (core|well|shell) spherical quantum dot–quantum well (SQDQW) as a function of the ratio of the inner and the outer radius is reported. The calculations are investigated within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and an infinite deep potential describing the quantum confinement effect. A Ritz variational approach is used taking into account of the electron-impurity correlation and the magnetic field effect in the trial wave-function. It appears that the binding energy depends strongly on the external magnetic field, the impurity's position and the structure radius. It has been found that: (i) the magnetic field effect is more marked in large layer than in thin layer and (ii) it is more pronounced in the spherical layer center than in its extremities

  5. Absence of a Scott correction for the total binding energy of noninteracting fermions in a smooth potential well

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huxtable, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown, for V in a particular class of smooth functions, that the total binding energy, E(Z), of Z noninteracting Fermions in the potential well Z 4/3 V(Z 1/3 X) obeys E(Z) = c TF (V)Z 7/3 + O(Z 5/3 ) as Z → ∞. Here c TF (V) is the coefficient predicted by Thomas-Fermi theory. This result is consistent with the conjectured Scott correction, which occurs at order Z 2 , to the total binding energy of an atomic number Z. This correction is thought to arise only because V(x)∼ - |x| -1 near x = 0 in the atomic problem, and so V is not a smooth function

  6. Metrology for the persevering production, distribution, and usage of energy; Metrologie fuer die nachhaltige Erzeugung, Verteilung und Nutzung von Energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, Klaus-Dieter [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Abt. ' Chemische Physik und Explosionsschutz'

    2012-12-15

    The author describes the metrological challenges given by the necessarily effective production, transport, distribution, consumption, conservation, and storage of energy, the latter is considered in connection with mobility. Finally the activities of the PTB in this connection are listed. (HSI)

  7. Renewable energy systems for distributed generation in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available by the CSIR and its international partners, Garrad Hassan of the UK and the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation into the development of an analytical tool that could be used to assist in identifying viable renewable energy opportunities in areas...

  8. Energy distribution of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmic rays cause significant damage to the electronic equipments of the aircrafts. In this paper, we have investigated the accumulation of the deposited energy of cosmic rays on the Earth's atmosphere, especially in the aircraft area. In fact, if a high-energy neutron or proton interacts with a nanodevice having only a few ...

  9. Energy distribution of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-31

    May 31, 2016 ... Abstract. Cosmic rays cause significant damage to the electronic equipments of the aircrafts. In this paper, we have investigated the accumulation of the deposited energy of cosmic rays on the Earth's atmosphere, especially in the aircraft area. In fact, if a high-energy neutron or proton interacts with a ...

  10. Measurement of energy distribution in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, R.; Morin, T.; Finzel, M.; Hawley, M. C.

    1985-01-01

    An electrothermal propulsion concept utilizing a microwave plasma system as the mechanism to convert electromagnetic energy into kinetic energy of a flowing gas is investigated. A calorimetry system enclosing a microwave plasma system has been developed to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs of the microwave plasma system. The rate of energy transferred to the gas can be determined to within + or - 1.8 W from an energy balance around the microwave plasma system. The percentage of the power absorbed by the microwave plasma system transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the system is found to increase with the increasing flow rate, to decrease with the increasing pressure, and to be independent of the absorbed power. An upper bound for the hydrogen gas temperature is estimated from the energy content, heat capacity, and flow rate of the gas stream. A lower bound for an overall heat-transfer coefficient is then calculated, characterizing the energy loss from the hydrogen gas stream to the air cooling of the plasma discharge tube wall. The heat-transfer coefficient is found to increase with the increasing flow rate and pressure and to be independent of the absorbed power. This result indicates that a convective-type mechanism is responsible for the energy transfer.

  11. Agent-based Integration of Complex and Heterogeneous Distributed Energy Resources in Virtual Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Anders; Umair, Aisha; Demazeau, Yves

    2017-01-01

    A Virtual Power Plant aggregates several Distributed Energy Resources in order to expose them as a single, controllable entity. This enables smaller Distributed Energy Resources to take part in Demand Response programs which traditionally only targeted larger consumers. To date, models for Virtual...

  12. Distributed hippocampal patterns that discriminate reward context are associated with enhanced associative binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolosin, Sasha M; Zeithamova, Dagmar; Preston, Alison R

    2013-11-01

    Recent research indicates that reward-based motivation impacts medial temporal lobe (MTL) encoding processes, leading to enhanced memory for rewarded events. In particular, previous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies of motivated learning have shown that MTL activation is greater for highly rewarded events, with the degree of reward-related activation enhancement tracking the corresponding behavioral memory advantage. These studies, however, do not directly address leading theoretical perspectives that propose such reward-based enhancements in MTL encoding activation reflect enhanced discrimination of the motivational context of specific events. In this study, a high-value or low-value monetary cue preceded a pair of objects, indicating the future reward for successfully remembering the pair. Using representational similarity analysis and high-resolution fMRI, we show that MTL activation patterns are more similar for encoding trials preceded by the same versus different reward cues, indicating a distributed code in this region that distinguishes between motivational contexts. Moreover, we show that activation patterns in hippocampus and parahippocampal cortex (PHc) that differentiate reward conditions during anticipatory cues and object pairs relate to successful associative memory. Additionally, the degree to which patterns differentiate reward contexts in dentate gyrus/CA2,3 and PHc is related to individual differences in reward modulation of memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that distributed activation patterns in the human hippocampus and PHc reflect the rewards associated with individual events. Furthermore, we show that these activation patterns-which discriminate between reward conditions--may influence memory through the incorporation of information about motivational contexts into stored memory representations. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Electron binding energies of organic azides: Green’s function and density functional theory versus Hartree Fock calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Margarida P. S.; Cabral, Benedito J. C.

    2007-11-01

    Theoretical calculations for the electron binding energies (EBEs) of several organic azides including hydrazoic acid, methyl azide, ethyl azide, 2-chloroethyl azide, 2-azidoethanol, azidoacetone, 2-azidoacetic acid, 3-azido-2-butanone, and 2-azidoethyl acetate are reported. EBEs were calculated with ab initio Green's function (GF) and density functional theory (DFT). Complete basis-set extrapolated coupled cluster calculations with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)] for the first ionization energy of azides are also reported. It is shown that EBEs from GF and DFT calculations are in better agreement with experiment than Hartree-Fock predictions.

  14. Analysis of the transverse energy distribution of hopping electrons through a glass funnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaobing; Lei Wei; Liu Min; Zhang Laibin; Engelsen, Daniel den; Zhou Xuedong; Wang Qilong

    2005-01-01

    The transverse energy distribution of electrons leaving the exit hole of a glass funnel in a hopping field emission display (HopFED) has been analyzed. These electrons are accelerated in a uniform field onto the anode screen. The luminance distribution of the spot on the screen is largely determined by the transverse energy distribution of the electron beam. The analysis of the luminance distribution shows that the transverse energy is rather low and that a HopFED will have good beam directionality

  15. Power Dispatch Optimization of a Distributed Energy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tianyi; Shi, Kun; Liu, Huanan; Yu, Dongmin

    2017-12-01

    With the rapid development of the world economy, energy crisis has become a serious problem. In addition, considering the fact that non-renewable energy reservation decreases day by day, it is important to save energy. This paper develops an innovative optimization model, which is based on the linear programming method, to optimize power flow between each individual user. The proposed method considers power transmission losses and carbon emissions at the same time, therefore, the proposed method can effectively reduce carbon emissions and transmission losses. Through MATLAB simulation, the proposed linear programming optimization model can reduce 28.7% of transmission losses compared to the previous literature.

  16. Transverse energy distribution and hard constituent scattering in hadronic collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Åkesson

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available We estimate the contributions to the total transverse energy spectrum from hard constituent scattering and the soft hadronic spectrum in hadron collisions. The transverse energy at which jet production starts to dominate is found to be essentially independent of the cms-energy (for large enough s and roughly a linear function of rapidity and azimuthal angle interval included. Calculations are presented for pp collisions at s= 25and60GeV, andp¯p interactions at s= 540GeV.

  17. Kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral aluminum clusters: Al--Al6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coon, S.R.; Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Curlee, G.A.; White, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    Neutral aluminum clusters sputtered from polycrystalline aluminum were analyzed by laser postionization time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The kinetic energy distributions of Al through Al 6 were measured by a neutrals time-of-flight technique. The interpretation of laser postionization TOF data to extract velocity and energy distributions is presented. The aluminum cluster distributions are qualitatively similar to previous copper cluster distribution measurements from our laboratory. In contrast to the steep high energy tails predicted by the single- or multiple- collision models, the measured cluster distributions have high energy power law dependences in the range of E -3 to E -4.5 . Correlated collision models may explain the substantial abundance of energetic clusters that are observed in these experiments. Possible influences of cluster fragmentation on the distributions are discussed

  18. Economic Assessment of Network-Constrained Transactive Energy for Managing Flexible Demand in Distribution Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Junjie; Yang, Guangya; Xue, Yusheng

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number of distributed energy resources such as electric vehicles and heat pumps connected to power systems raises operational challenges to the network operator, for example, introducing grid congestion and voltage deviations in the distribution network level if their operations...... method in the system, given the high penetration of distributed energy resources. This paper firstly describes the NCTE-based distribution system that introduces a new interacting scheme for actors at the distribution system level. Then, technical modeling and economic interpretation of the NCTE...... are not properly coordinated. Coordination and control of a large number of distributed energy resources requires innovative approaches. In this paper, we follow up on a recently proposed network-constrained transactive energy (NCTE) method for scheduling of electric vehicles and heat pumps within a retailer...

  19. Radial Flux Distribution of Low-Energy Neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higinbotham, J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to illustrate the basic principle involved in the process of moderation of fast neutrons by water, and the monitoring of the low-energy neutron flux using indium as a probe. (GA)

  20. Blockchain for Smart Grid Resilience: Exchanging Distributed Energy at Speed, Scale and Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mylrea, Michael E.; Gourisetti, Sri Nikhil Gup

    2017-09-18

    Blockchain may help solve several complex problems related to integrity and trustworthiness of rapid, distributed, complex energy transactions and data exchanges. In a move towards resilience, blockchain commoditizes trust and enables automated smart contracts to support auditable multiparty transactions based on predefined rules between distributed energy providers and customers. Blockchain based smart contracts also help remove the need to interact with third-parties, facilitating the adoption and monetization of distributed energy transactions and exchanges, both energy flows as well as financial transactions. This may help reduce transactive energy costs and increase the security and sustainability of distributed energy resource (DER) integration, helping to remove barriers to a more decentralized and resilient power grid.

  1. Energy and angular distributions of electrons ejected from CH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relative cross sections, differential in energy and angle, for electrons ejected from CH4 and C3H8 molecules under 16.0 keV electron impact have been measured. Electrons were analyzed by a 45° parallel plate electrostatic analyzer at emission angles varying from 60° to 135° with energies from 50 eV to 1000 eV.

  2. Calculation of neutron radiation energy deposition distribution in subcellular parts of tissue using recombination chamber microdosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Zielczynski, M.

    1999-01-01

    Recombination chamber microdosimetry was used as an instrument for determination of local neutron radiation energy deposition distribution. The method allows to simulate of subcellular regions of tissue of the order of 70 nm in size. The results obtained qualitatively correspond to relationship between biological efficiency and neutron energy, and show regular differences of distributions achieved by the recombination method and distributions measured using tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPC), which simulates greater tissue regions of 1 μm in size

  3. 77 FR 32916 - Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers: Public Meeting and Availability of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ...-2010-BT-STD-0048] RIN 1904-AC04 Energy Conservation Standards for Distribution Transformers: Public... information that it is making available about the liquid-immersed distribution transformer equipment classes... equipment classes for several different types of liquid-immersed distribution transformers. In addition to...

  4. Temperature distribution of the energy consumed as heat in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puttagunta, V.R.

    1974-10-01

    The amount of energy consumed as heat (excluding thermal generation of electricity) in Canada is estimated from statistical data available on the total consumption of energy for the years 1958 to 2000. Based on some actual plant data and other statistical information this energy consumption is sub-divided into four temperature categories: high (>260 degrees C), intermediate (140-260 degrees C), low (100-140 degrees C), and space heating (<100 degrees C). The results of this analysis show that approximately half of all the energy consumed in Canada has an end use as heat. Less than 10 percent of the energy consumed as heat is in the high temperature category, 12 to 14 percent is in the intermediate temperature range, 21 to 27 percent is in the low temperature range, and 50 to 58 percent is used for space heating. Over 90 percent of the energy consumed as heat in Canada is within the temperature capability of the CANDU-PHW reactor. (author)

  5. Distributed multi-agent algorithm for residential energy management in smart grids

    OpenAIRE

    Mets, Kevin; Strobbe, Matthias; Verschueren, Tom; Roelens, Thomas; De Turck, Filip; Develder, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Distributed renewable power generators, such as solar cells and wind turbines are difficult to predict, making the demand-supply problem more complex than in the traditional energy production scenario. They also introduce bidirectional energy flows in the low-voltage power grid, possibly causing voltage violations and grid instabilities. In this article we describe a distributed algorithm for residential energy management in smart power grids. This algorithm consists of a market-oriented mult...

  6. Empirical analysis for Distributed Energy Resources' impact on future distribution network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xue; Sandels, Claes; Zhu, Kun

    2012-01-01

    operation will be alternated. In this paper, quantitative results in terms of how the future distribution grid will be changed by the deployment of distributed generation, active demand and electric vehicles, are presented. The analysis is based on the conditions for both a radial and a meshed distribution...... network. The input parameters are based on the current and envisioned DER deployment scenarios proposed for Sweden....

  7. Multi-agent based distributed control architecture for microgrid energy management and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basir Khan, M. Reyasudin; Jidin, Razali; Pasupuleti, Jagadeesh

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new multi-agent based distributed control architecture for energy management. • Multi-agent coordination based on non-cooperative game theory. • A microgrid model comprised of renewable energy generation systems. • Performance comparison of distributed with conventional centralized control. - Abstract: Most energy management systems are based on a centralized controller that is difficult to satisfy criteria such as fault tolerance and adaptability. Therefore, a new multi-agent based distributed energy management system architecture is proposed in this paper. The distributed generation system is composed of several distributed energy resources and a group of loads. A multi-agent system based decentralized control architecture was developed in order to provide control for the complex energy management of the distributed generation system. Then, non-cooperative game theory was used for the multi-agent coordination in the system. The distributed generation system was assessed by simulation under renewable resource fluctuations, seasonal load demand and grid disturbances. The simulation results show that the implementation of the new energy management system proved to provide more robust and high performance controls than conventional centralized energy management systems.

  8. Lectin interactions on surface-grafted glycostructures: influence of the spatial distribution of carbohydrates on the binding kinetics and rupture forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Creagh, A Louise; Haynes, Charles A; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2013-08-20

    We performed quantitative analysis of the binding kinetics and affinity of carbohydrate-lectin binding and correlated them directly with the molecular and structural features of ligands presented at the nanoscale within the glycocalyx mimicking layers on surfaces. The surface plasmon resonance analysis identified that the mode of binding changed from multivalent to monovalent, which resulted in a near 1000-fold change in the equilibrium association constant, by varying the spatial distribution of carbohydrate ligands within the surface-grafted polymer layer. We identified, for the first time, that the manner in which the ligands presented on the surface has great influence on the binding at the first stage of bivalent chelating, not on the binding at the second stage. The rupture forces measured by atomic force microscope force spectroscopy also indicated that the mode of binding between lectin and ligands changed from multiple to single with variation in the ligand presentation. The dependence of lectin binding on the glycopolymer composition and grafting density is directly correlated with the nanoscale presentation of ligands on a surface, which is a determining factor in controlling the clustering and statistical effects contributing to the enhanced binding.

  9. Binding Energy and Dissociation Barrier: Experimental Determination of the Key Parameters of the Potential Energy Curve of Diethyl Ether on Si(001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutzel, Marcel; Lipponer, Marcus; Dürr, Michael; Höfer, Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    The key parameters of the potential energy curve of organic molecules on semiconductor surfaces, binding energy of the intermediate state and dissociation barrier, were experimentally investigated for the model system of diethyl ether (Et2O) on Si(001). Et2O adsorbs via a datively bonded intermediate from which it converts via ether cleavage into a covalently attached final state. This thermally activated conversion into the final state was followed in real-time by means of optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) at different temperatures and the associated energy barrier ϵa = 0.38 ± 0.05 eV and pre-exponential factor νa = 10(4±1) s(-1) were determined. From molecular beam experiments on the initial sticking probability, the difference between the desorption energy ϵd and ϵa was extracted and thus the binding energy of the intermediate state was determined (0.62 ± 0.08 eV). The results are discussed in terms of general chemical trends as well as with respect to a wider applicability on adsorbate reactions on semiconductor surfaces.

  10. Business Pattern of Distributed Energy in Electric Power System Reformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, YUE; Zhuochu, LIU; Jun, LI; Siwei, LI

    2017-05-01

    Under the trend of the electric power system revolution, the operation mode of micro power grid that including distributed power will be more diversified. User’s demand response and different strategies on electricity all have great influence on the operation of distributed power grid. This paper will not only research sensitive factors of micro power grid operation, but also analyze and calculate the cost and benefit of micro power grid operation upon different types. Then it will build a tech-economic calculation model, which applies to different types of micro power grid under the reformation of electric power system.

  11. On the atomic-number similarity of the binding energies of electrons in filled shells of elements of the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, V. Ya.; Shpatakovskaya, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    An expression for the binding energies of electrons in the ground state of an atom is derived on the basis of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization rule within the Thomas-Fermi model. The validity of this relation for all elements from neon to uranium is tested within a more perfect quantum-mechanical model with and without the inclusion of relativistic effects, as well as with experimental binding energies. As a result, the ordering of electronic levels in filled atomic shells is established, manifested in an approximate atomic-number similarity. It is proposed to use this scaling property to analytically estimate the binding energies of electrons in an arbitrary atom.

  12. Bayes Node Energy Polynomial Distribution to Improve Routing in Wireless Sensor Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanisamy, Thirumoorthy; Krishnasamy, Karthikeyan N

    2015-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Network monitor and control the physical world via large number of small, low-priced sensor nodes. Existing method on Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) presented sensed data communication through continuous data collection resulting in higher delay and energy consumption. To conquer the routing issue and reduce energy drain rate, Bayes Node Energy and Polynomial Distribution (BNEPD) technique is introduced with energy aware routing in the wireless sensor network. The Bayes Node Energy Distribution initially distributes the sensor nodes that detect an object of similar event (i.e., temperature, pressure, flow) into specific regions with the application of Bayes rule. The object detection of similar events is accomplished based on the bayes probabilities and is sent to the sink node resulting in minimizing the energy consumption. Next, the Polynomial Regression Function is applied to the target object of similar events considered for different sensors are combined. They are based on the minimum and maximum value of object events and are transferred to the sink node. Finally, the Poly Distribute algorithm effectively distributes the sensor nodes. The energy efficient routing path for each sensor nodes are created by data aggregation at the sink based on polynomial regression function which reduces the energy drain rate with minimum communication overhead. Experimental performance is evaluated using Dodgers Loop Sensor Data Set from UCI repository. Simulation results show that the proposed distribution algorithm significantly reduce the node energy drain rate and ensure fairness among different users reducing the communication overhead.

  13. Market performance and distributional effects on renewable energy markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutstaal, P.; Bijlsma, M.; Zwart, G.; Van Tilburg, X.; Ozdemir, O.

    2009-08-01

    A renewable obligation (RO) combined with tradable renewable energy certificates is a market-based instrument used to promote the production of electricity from renewable energy sources. A renewable obligation is an alternative for subsidies. A renewable obligation will only be an efficient instrument if certificate markets are efficient. This requires that there is no market power and no anti-competitive behaviour on the certificate market. If the current developments in Dutch renewable energy production continue, market power on a future renewable certificate market in the Netherlands will probably not be an issue, even if the RO should only rest on the retail market instead of on the whole electricity market. A renewable obligation will raise the retail price for consumers, thereby reducing consumer surplus. Simulations show that the retail electricity price increases with 30 euro per MWh to a level of 104 euro per MWh in case of a 30% renewable target. Consumer surplus is reduced with 19% compared to the baseline scenario. In contrast, a subsidy such as the Dutch SDE (Promoting Renewable Energy scheme or 'Stimulering Duurzame Energie') which is financed from the state budget has the effect to (slightly) lower the retail electricity price, thereby increasing consumer surplus. It should however be realised that the costs of the subsidy will indirectly affect electricity consumers through their tax payments.

  14. Optimal Scheduling of a Battery Energy Storage System with Electric Vehicles’ Auxiliary for a Distribution Network with Renewable Energy Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Yang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With global conventional energy depletion, as well as environmental pollution, utilizing renewable energy for power supply is the only way for human beings to survive. Currently, distributed generation incorporated into a distribution network has become the new trend, with the advantages of controllability, flexibility and tremendous potential. However, the fluctuation of distributed energy resources (DERs is still the main concern for accurate deployment. Thus, a battery energy storage system (BESS has to be involved to mitigate the bad effects of DERs’ integration. In this paper, optimal scheduling strategies for BESS operation have been proposed, to assist with consuming the renewable energy, reduce the active power loss, alleviate the voltage fluctuation and minimize the electricity cost. Besides, the electric vehicles (EVs considered as the auxiliary technique are also introduced to attenuate the DERs’ influence. Moreover, both day-ahead and real-time operation scheduling strategies were presented under the consideration with the constraints of BESS and the EVs’ operation, and the optimization was tackled by a fuzzy mathematical method and an improved particle swarm optimization (IPSO algorithm. Furthermore, the test system for the proposed strategies is a real distribution network with renewable energy integration. After simulation, the proposed scheduling strategies have been verified to be extremely effective for the enhancement of the distribution network characteristics.

  15. An optimal stochastic control theory for distributed energy harvesting networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, J. T.

    2009-03-01

    A new approach, based on H2 optimal control theory, is presented for the design of feedback controllers for energy harvesting systems for maximal power generation. The theory applies to stochastically excited vibratory systems in broadband stationary response, and allows for harvested power to be explicitly optimized. It is applicable to both single-transducer systems as well as coupled networks of many transducers. The theory accounts for the influence of energy harvesting on the dynamics of the structure to which the transducers are attached. It also accounts for resistive and semiconductor dissipation in the power-electronic network interfacing the transducers with energy storage. Due to its predominance in the literature, a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam is used as the context for the theory, and simulation examples are used to illustrate various aspects of the optimal controllers.

  16. Alexandria electricity distribution company (AEDC) experience in energy conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, K.; Soliman, O.; Nabil, A.

    2005-01-01

    Alexandria is the second capital of Egypt and represents forty percent of Egypt's industrial activities. There are about 350 big industrial firms and more than 2 thousands small and medium enterprises. This industries produces significant greenhouse gas emission. Good efforts are exerted in the field of energy saving and environment conservation by AEDC in order to reduce and limit greenhouse gas emission. AEDC participated in many projects sponsored by different foreign counterparts. These projects are: 1 - Energy and urban environment in Mediterranean countries: Phases 1, 2(1995-1996). 2 - Demand side management (DSM) 1996 - 1997. 3 - Energy and urban environment in Mediterranean countries: Phases 3 (2002-2003). 4 - Global environment facility ( GEF ) 1999 - 2003. The results of these pilot projects are presented in details in this paper

  17. Distributed Model Predictive Control for Smart Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvgaard, Rasmus Fogtmann; Vandenberghe, Lieven; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2016-01-01

    . The total power consumption is controlled through a negotiation procedure between all cooperating units and an aggregator that coordinates the overall objective. For large-scale systems, this method is faster than solving the original problem and can be distributed to include an arbitrary number of units...

  18. Distributed coordination of energy-storage capacities in virtual microgrids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brehm, Robert; Ramezani, Hossein; Jouffroy, Jerome

    An approach for distributed coordinated scheduling of storage capacities is presented. When storage capacities are connected in the same grid, behind a common transformer substation, mutual charging and discharging can occur, which can be prevented by the herein introduced coordination method. Wh...

  19. Smart Control of Energy Distribution Grids over Heterogeneous Communication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwefel, Hans-Peter; Silva, Nuno; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein

    2018-01-01

    behavior needs to be analyzed within the full system context. This paper considers two prominent families of wireless communication technologies: cellular 2G to 4G systems and IEEE 802.11 WiFi. Selected results on network performance and its impact on two distribution system control use-cases are presented...

  20. Molecular dynamics study of binding energies, mechanical properties, and detonation performances of bicyclo-HMX-based PBXs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling; Xiao, Heming

    2009-05-15

    To investigate the effect of polymer binders on the monoexplosive, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the binding energies, mechanical properties, and detonation performances of the bicyclo-HMX-based polymer-bonded explosives (PBXs). The results show that the binding energies on different crystalline surfaces of bicyclo-HMX decrease in the order of (010)>(100)>(001). On each crystalline surface, binding properties of different polymers with the same chain segment are different from each other, while those of the polymers in the same content decrease in the sequence of PVDF>F(2311)>F(2314) approximately PCTFE. The mechanical properties of a dozen of model systems (elastic coefficients, various moduli, Cauchy pressure, and Poisson's ratio) have been obtained. It is found that mechanical properties are effectively improved by adding small amounts of fluorine polymers, and the overall effect of fluorine polymers on three crystalline surfaces of bicyclo-HMX changes in the order of (010)>(001) approximately (100). In comparison with the base explosive, detonation performances of the PBXs decrease slightly, but they are still superior to TNT. These suggestions may be useful for the formulation design of bicyclo-HMX-based PBXs.

  1. Identification of potential inhibitors of Fasciola gigantica thioredoxin1: computational screening, molecular dynamics simulation, and binding free energy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rohit; Shukla, Harish; Kalita, Parismita; Sonkar, Amit; Pandey, Tripti; Singh, Dev Bukhsh; Kumar, Awanish; Tripathi, Timir

    2017-07-04

    Fasciola gigantica is the causative organism of fascioliasis and is responsible for major economic losses in livestock production globally. F. gigantica thioredoxin1 (FgTrx1) is an important redox-active enzyme involved in maintaining the redox homeostasis in the cell. To identify a potential anti-fasciolid compound, we conducted a structure-based virtual screening of natural compounds from the ZINC database (n = 1,67,740) against the FgTrx1 structure. The ligands were docked against FgTrx1 and 309 ligands were found to have better docking score. These compounds were evaluated for Lipinski and ADMET prediction, and 30 compounds were found to fit well for re-docking studies. After refinement by molecular docking and drug-likeness analysis, three potential inhibitors (ZINC15970091, ZINC9312362, and ZINC9312661) were identified. These three ligands were further subjected to molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) to compare the dynamics and stability of the protein structure after binding of the ligands. The binding free energy analyses were calculated to determine the intermolecular interactions. The results suggested that the two compounds had a binding free energy of -82.237, and -109.52 kJ.mol -1 for compounds with IDs ZINC9312362 and ZINC9312661, respectively. These predicted compounds displayed considerable pharmacological and structural properties to be drug candidates. We concluded that these two compounds could be potential drug candidates to fight against F. gigantica parasites.

  2. Absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip host–guest systems in the SAMPL5 blind challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofoleanu, Florentina; Pickard, Frank C.; König, Gerhard; Huang, Jing; Damjanović, Ana; Baek, Minkyung; Seok, Chaok; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip complexes in the SAMPL5 blind challenge. Initial conformations of CBClip complexes were obtained using docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Free energy calculations were performed using thermodynamic integration (TI) with soft-core potentials and Bennett’s acceptance ratio (BAR) method based on a serial insertion scheme. We compared the results obtained with TI simulations with soft-core potentials and Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations with the serial insertion method combined with the BAR method. The results show that the difference between the two methods can be mainly attributed to the van der Waals free energies, suggesting that either the simulations used for TI or the simulations used for BAR, or both are not fully converged and the two sets of simulations may have sampled difference phase space regions. The penalty scores of force field parameters of the 10 guest molecules provided by CHARMM Generalized Force Field can be an indicator of the accuracy of binding free energy calculations. Among our submissions, the combination of docking and TI performed best, which yielded the root mean square deviation of 2.94 kcal/mol and an average unsigned error of 3.41 kcal/mol for the ten guest molecules. These values were best overall among all participants. However, our submissions had little correlation with experiments. PMID:27677749

  3. Smart Inverter Control and Operation for Distributed Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazay, Ahmad F.

    The motivation of this research is to carry out the control and operation of smart inverters and voltage source converters (VSC) for distributed energy resources (DERs) such as photovoltaic (PV), battery, and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). The main contribution of the research includes solving a couple of issues for smart grids by controlling and implementing multifunctions of VSC and smart inverter as well as improving the operational scheme of the microgrid. The work is mainly focused on controlling and operating of smart inverter since it promises a new technology for the future microgrid. Two major applications of the smart inverter will be investigated in this work based on the connection modes: microgrid at grid-tied mode and autonomous mode. In grid-tied connection, the smart inverter and VSC are used to integrate DER such as Photovoltaic (PV) and battery to provide suitable power to the system by controlling the supplied real and reactive power. The role of a smart inverter at autonomous mode includes supplying a sufficient voltage and frequency, mitigate abnormal condition of the load as well as equally sharing the total load's power. However, the operational control of the microgrid still has a major issue on the operation of the microgrid. The dissertation is divided into two main sections which are: 1. Low-level control of a single smart Inverter. 2. High-level control of the microgrid. The first part investigates a comprehensive research for a smart inverter and VSC technology at the two major connections of the microgrid. This involves controlling and modeling single smart inverter and VSC to solve specific issues of microgrid as well as improve the operation of the system. The research provides developed features for smart inverter comparing with a conventional voltage sourced converter (VSC). The two main connections for a microgrid have been deeply investigated to analyze a better way to develop and improve the operational procedure of

  4. Collaborative Technologies for Distributed Science - Fusion Energy and High-Energy Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.; Abla, G.; Burruss, J.R.; Gottschalk, E.

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale experiments, needed for fusion energy sciences (FES) and high-energy physics (HEP) research, are staffed by correspondingly large, geographically dispersed teams. At the same time, theoretical work has come to rely increasingly on complex numerical simulations developed by distributed teams of scientists and applied mathematicians and run on massively parallel computers. These trends will only accelerate. Operation of the most powerful accelerator ever built, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, will begin next year and will dominate experimental high-energy physics. The fusion program will be increasingly oriented toward the ITER where even now, a decade before operation begins, a large portion of national programs efforts are organized around coordinated efforts to develop promising operational scenarios. While both FES and HEP have a significant track record for developing and exploiting remote collaborations, with such large investments at stake, there is a clear need to improve the integration and reach of the tools available. These challenges are being addressed by the creation and deployment of advanced collaborative software and hardware tools. Grid computing, to provide secure on-demand access to data analysis capabilities and related functions, is being deployed as an alternative to traditional resource sharing among institutions. Utilizing public-key based security that is recognized worldwide, numerous analysis and simulation codes are securely available worldwide in a service-oriented approach. Traditional audio teleconferencing is being augmented by more advanced capabilities including videoconferencing, instant messaging, presentation sharing, applications sharing, large display walls, and the virtual-presence capabilities of Access Grid and VRVS. With these advances, remote real-time experimental participation has begun as well as remote seminars, working meetings, and design review meetings. Work continues to focus on reducing the

  5. Ions in size-selected aqueous nanodrops: sequential water molecule binding energies and effects of water on ion fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, William A; Leib, Ryan D; Demireva, Maria; Williams, Evan R

    2011-11-23

    The effects of water on ion fluorescence were investigated, and average sequential water molecule binding energies to hydrated ions, M(z)(H(2)O)(n), at large cluster size were measured using ion nanocalorimetry. Upon 248-nm excitation, nanodrops with ~25 or more water molecules that contain either rhodamine 590(+), rhodamine 640(+), or Ce(3+) emit a photon with average energies of approximately 548, 590, and 348 nm, respectively. These values are very close to the emission maxima of the corresponding ions in solution, indicating that the photophysical properties of these ions in the nanodrops approach those of the fully hydrated ions at relatively small cluster size. As occurs in solution, these ions in nanodrops with 8 or more water molecules fluoresce with a quantum yield of ~1. Ce(3+) containing nanodrops that also contain OH(-) fluoresce, whereas those with NO(3)(-) do not. This indirect fluorescence detection method has the advantages of high sensitivity, and both the size of the nanodrops as well as their constituents can be carefully controlled. For ions that do not fluoresce in solution, such as protonated tryptophan, full internal conversion of the absorbed 248-nm photon occurs, and the average sequential water molecule binding energies to the hydrated ions can be accurately obtained at large cluster sizes. The average sequential water molecule binding energies for TrpH(+)(H(2)O)(n) and a doubly protonated tripeptide, [KYK + 2H](2+)(H(2)O)(n), approach asymptotic values of ~9.3 (n ≥ 11) and ~10.0 kcal/mol (n ≥ 25), respectively, consistent with a liquidlike structure of water in these nanodrops.

  6. Distributed Energy Resources in the Liberalized Electricity Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biegel, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Det danske elsystem er under stor forandring, idet andelen af ikke-styrbar vedvarende energi øges kraftigt, mens de konventionelle kulkraftværker fases ud. Det sker som en del af den danske 2020 målsætning om 50% vind i elsektoren. I 2050 er det målet, at samtlige energisektorer skal forsynes ude...

  7. Distributed generation for South Africa based on renewable energy resources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Szewczuk, S

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available -grid energy systems. These two mini-grids made use of local solar and wind resources to generate electricity. This paper describes the technical lessons that the CSIR learnt in its experiences with the design and implementation of these hybrid mini...

  8. Halide Binding and Inhibition of Laccase Copper Clusters: The Role of Reorganization Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    complicate characterization. Understanding these processes at the molecular level is thus desirable but theoretically unexplored. This paper reports systematic calculations of geometries, reorganization energies, and ionization energies for all partly oxidized states of the trinuclear copper clusters...

  9. Energy Efficient Distributed Fault Identification Algorithm in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenakshi Panda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A distributed fault identification algorithm is proposed here to find both hard and soft faulty sensor nodes present in wireless sensor networks. The algorithm is distributed, self-detectable, and can detect the most common byzantine faults such as stuck at zero, stuck at one, and random data. In the proposed approach, each sensor node gathered the observed data from the neighbors and computed the mean to check whether faulty sensor node is present or not. If a node found the presence of faulty sensor node, then compares observed data with the data of the neighbors and predict probable fault status. The final fault status is determined by diffusing the fault information from the neighbors. The accuracy and completeness of the algorithm are verified with the help of statistical model of the sensors data. The performance is evaluated in terms of detection accuracy, false alarm rate, detection latency and message complexity.

  10. Distributed Energy Neural Network Integration System: Year One Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regan, T.; Sinnock, H.; Davis, A.

    2003-06-01

    This report describes the work of Orion Engineering Corp. to develop a DER household controller module and demonstrate the ability of a group of these controllers to operate through an intelligent, neighborhood controller. The controllers will provide a smart, technologically advanced, simple, efficient, and economic solution for aggregating a community of small distributed generators into a larger single, virtual generator capable of selling power or other services to a utility, independent system operator (ISO), or other entity in a coordinated manner.

  11. Facilitating a generic communication interface to distributed energy resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Bro; Hauksson, Einar Bragi; Andersen, Peter Bach

    2010-01-01

    As the power system evolves into a smarter and more flexible state, so must the communication technologies that support it. A key requirement for facilitating the distributed production of future grids is that communication and information are standardized to ensure interoperability. The IEC 61850...... a server using these technologies can be used to interface with DERs as diverse as Electric Vehicles (EVs) and micro Combined Heat and Power (μCHP) units....

  12. Review of Congestion Management Methods for Distribution Networks with High Penetration of Distributed Energy Resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Shaojun; Wu, Qiuwei; Liu, Zhaoxi

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the existing congestion management methods for distribution networks with high penetration of DERs documented in the recent research literatures. The congestion management methods for distribution networks reviewed can be grouped into two categories – market methods and direct...... control methods. The market methods consist of dynamic tariff, distribution capacity market, shadow price and flexible service market. The direct control methods are comprised of network reconfiguration, reactive power control and active power control. Based on the review of the existing methods......, the authors suggest a priority list of the existing methods....

  13. Software Comparison for Renewable Energy Deployment in a Distribution Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, David Wenzhong [Alternative Power Innovations, LLC, Sharonville, OH (United States); Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tian, Tian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Miller, Mackay [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The main objective of this report is to evaluate different software options for performing robust distributed generation (DG) power system modeling. The features and capabilities of four simulation tools, OpenDSS, GridLAB-D, CYMDIST, and PowerWorld Simulator, are compared to analyze their effectiveness in analyzing distribution networks with DG. OpenDSS and GridLAB-D, two open source software, have the capability to simulate networks with fluctuating data values. These packages allow the running of a simulation each time instant by iterating only the main script file. CYMDIST, a commercial software, allows for time-series simulation to study variations on network controls. PowerWorld Simulator, another commercial tool, has a batch mode simulation function through the 'Time Step Simulation' tool, which obtains solutions for a list of specified time points. PowerWorld Simulator is intended for analysis of transmission-level systems, while the other three are designed for distribution systems. CYMDIST and PowerWorld Simulator feature easy-to-use graphical user interfaces (GUIs). OpenDSS and GridLAB-D, on the other hand, are based on command-line programs, which increase the time necessary to become familiar with the software packages.

  14. Towards Integrating Distributed Energy Resources and Storage Devices in Smart Grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guobin; Yu, Wei; Griffith, David; Golmie, Nada; Moulema, Paul

    2017-02-01

    Internet of Things (IoT) provides a generic infrastructure for different applications to integrate information communication techniques with physical components to achieve automatic data collection, transmission, exchange, and computation. The smart grid, as one of typical applications supported by IoT, denoted as a re-engineering and a modernization of the traditional power grid, aims to provide reliable, secure, and efficient energy transmission and distribution to consumers. How to effectively integrate distributed (renewable) energy resources and storage devices to satisfy the energy service requirements of users, while minimizing the power generation and transmission cost, remains a highly pressing challenge in the smart grid. To address this challenge and assess the effectiveness of integrating distributed energy resources and storage devices, in this paper we develop a theoretical framework to model and analyze three types of power grid systems: the power grid with only bulk energy generators, the power grid with distributed energy resources, and the power grid with both distributed energy resources and storage devices. Based on the metrics of the power cumulative cost and the service reliability to users, we formally model and analyze the impact of integrating distributed energy resources and storage devices in the power grid. We also use the concept of network calculus, which has been traditionally used for carrying out traffic engineering in computer networks, to derive the bounds of both power supply and user demand to achieve a high service reliability to users. Through an extensive performance evaluation, our data shows that integrating distributed energy resources conjointly with energy storage devices can reduce generation costs, smooth the curve of bulk power generation over time, reduce bulk power generation and power distribution losses, and provide a sustainable service reliability to users in the power grid.

  15. A two-stage stochastic programming model for the optimal design of distributed energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Zhe; Zhang, Jianyun; Liu, Pei; Li, Zheng; Georgiadis, Michael C.; Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The optimal design of distributed energy systems under uncertainty is studied. ► A stochastic model is developed using genetic algorithm and Monte Carlo method. ► The proposed system possesses inherent robustness under uncertainty. ► The inherent robustness is due to energy storage facilities and grid connection. -- Abstract: A distributed energy system is a multi-input and multi-output energy system with substantial energy, economic and environmental benefits. The optimal design of such a complex system under energy demand and supply uncertainty poses significant challenges in terms of both modelling and corresponding solution strategies. This paper proposes a two-stage stochastic programming model for the optimal design of distributed energy systems. A two-stage decomposition based solution strategy is used to solve the optimization problem with genetic algorithm performing the search on the first stage variables and a Monte Carlo method dealing with uncertainty in the second stage. The model is applied to the planning of a distributed energy system in a hotel. Detailed computational results are presented and compared with those generated by a deterministic model. The impacts of demand and supply uncertainty on the optimal design of distributed energy systems are systematically investigated using proposed modelling framework and solution approach.

  16. Big Pylons: Mixed signals for transmission. Spatial planning for energy distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, Heather; Hardy, Maelíosa; Lloyd, M. Greg; McGreal, Stanley

    2013-01-01

    The effective delivery of a sustainable energy future raises many challenges in relation to energy distribution where a new understanding of spatial planning is needed in relation to energy production, consumption and storage. Understanding the emergent low carbon energy economy in terms of its production, distribution and consumption characteristics has prompted a deliberate spatial planning interest. This paper examines issues relating to spatial planning, regulation, political legitimacy and accountability in the current and future systems for energy distribution. In particular it examines the Beauly Denny public inquiry in Scotland as a case study in terms of demonstrating the changing state–market–civil relations in an energy transition context with differentiated values and interests. The case study highlights implications for the regulation in the public interest of highly contested spaces, places and development schemes, together with a synopsis of government structure and change that is influencing the future of spatial planning and energy distribution in particular. - Highlights: • We examine links between spatial planning and regulation of energy distribution. • We examine the Beauly Denny public inquiry in Scotland. • We highlight challenges surrounding the development of a resilient energy system. • We highlight links between spatial planning and infrastructural development

  17. Heat savings in energy systems with substantial distributed generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2004-01-01

    The integration of flutuating wind power is an important issue for the future development of sustainable energy systems. In Denmark, the integration is affected by a large amount of cogeneration of heat and power. This gives possibilities as well as sets restraints. The paper shows...... that with ancillary services supplied by large-scale condensation and CHP-plants, a certain degree of large-scale generation is required regardless of momentary wind input....

  18. Energy distribution of cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-31

    May 31, 2016 ... PACS Nos 29.40.−n; 95.30.Cq; 92.60.H−. 1. Introduction. Earth's atmosphere is frequently bombarded by cos- mic rays, most of them are solar energetic particles and come from other sources in our galaxy and beyond [1]. We notice here, that Fs, the solar energy flux reach- ing the Earth's orbit is 1.36 × 103 ...

  19. Energy and angular distributions of electrons ejected from CH and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Relative cross sections, differential in energy and angle, for electrons ejected from CH4 and C3H8 molecules under 16.0 keV electron impact have been measured. Electrons were analyzed by a 45Ж parallel plate electrostatic analyzer at emission angles varying from 60Ж to 135Ж with en- ergies from 50 eV to ...

  20. Using docking and alchemical free energy approach to determine the binding mechanism of eEF2K inhibitors and prioritizing the compound synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiantao; Edupuganti, Ramakrishna; Tavares, Clint D J; Dalby, Kevin N; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    A-484954 is a known eEF2K inhibitor with submicromolar IC50 potency. However, the binding mechanism and the crystal structure of the kinase remains unknown. Here, we employ a homology eEF2K model, docking and alchemical free energy simulations to probe the binding mechanism of eEF2K, and in turn, guide the optimization of potential lead compounds. The inhibitor was docked into the ATP-binding site of a homology model first. Three different binding poses, hypothesis 1, 2, and 3, were obtained and subsequently applied to molecular dynamics (MD) based alchemical free energy simulations. The calculated relative binding free energy of the analogs of A-484954 using the binding pose of hypothesis 1 show a good correlation with the experimental IC50 values, yielding an r (2) coefficient of 0.96 after removing an outlier (compound 5). Calculations using another two poses show little correlation with experimental data, (r (2) of less than 0.5 with or without removing any outliers). Based on hypothesis 1, the calculated relative free energy suggests that bigger cyclic groups, at R1 e.g., cyclobutyl and cyclopentyl promote more favorable binding than smaller groups, such as cyclopropyl and hydrogen. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the ability of the alchemical free energy approach in combination with docking and homology modeling to prioritize compound synthesis. This can be an effective means of facilitating structure-based drug design when crystal structures are not available.